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Sample records for cell division plane

  1. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson–Dumais rule generalizes Errera’s rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson–Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson–Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  2. Involvement of YODA and mitogen activated protein kinase 6 in Arabidopsis post-embryogenic root development through auxin up-regulation and cell division plane orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smékalová, V.; Luptovčiak, I.; Komis, G.; Šamajová, O.; Ovečka, M.; Doskočilová, A.; Takáč, T.; Vadovič, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Pechan, T.; Ziemann, A.; Košútová, P.; Šamaj, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 4 (2014), s. 1175-1193. ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * cell division plane * MAP65-1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  3. Use of abnormal preprophase bands to decipher division plane determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, C.; Cyr, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many premitotic plant cells possess a cortical preprophase band of microtubules and actin filaments that encircles the nucleus. In vacuolated cells, the preprophase band is visibly connected to the nucleus by a cytoplasmic raft of actin filaments and microtubules termed the phragmosome. Typically, the location of the preprophase band and phragmosome corresponds to, and thus is thought to influence, the location of the cell division plane. To better understand the function of the preprophase band and phragmosome in orienting division, we used a green fluorescent protein-based microtubule reporter protein to observe mitosis in living tobacco bright yellow 2 cells possessing unusual preprophase bands. Observations of mitosis in these unusual cells support the involvement of the preprophase band/phragmosome in properly positioning the preprophase nucleus, influencing spindle orientation such that the cytokinetic phragmoplast initially grows in an appropriate direction, and delineating a region in the cell cortex that attracts microtubules and directs later stages of phragmoplast growth. Thus, the preprophase band/phragmosome appears to perform several interrelated functions to orient the division plane. However, functional information associated with the preprophase band is not always used or needed and there appears to be an age or distance-dependent character to the information. Cells treated with the anti-actin drug, latrunculin B, are still able to position the preprophase nucleus suggesting that microtubules may play a dominant role in premitotic positioning. Furthermore, in treated cells, spindle location and phragmoplast insertion are frequently abnormal suggesting that actin plays a significant role in nuclear anchoring and phragmoplast guidance. Thus, the microtubule and actin components of the preprophase band/phragmosome execute complementary activities to ensure proper orientation of the division plane.

  4. Putative RopGAPs impact division plane selection and interact with kinesin-12 POK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle, Dorothee; Herrmann, Arvid; Lipka, Elisabeth; Lauster, Theresa; Gavidia, Richard; Zimmermann, Steffi; Müller, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape is defined by the surrounding cell walls in plants. Thus, spatial control over cell division planes and cell expansion polarity are essential to maintain cell morphology. In eukaryotes, cell polarity and expansion are controlled by Rho GTPase signalling, regulating cytoskeletal reorganization and vesicle trafficking(1). However, until now, Rho signalling was not implicated in mitotic events in plants. Here, we report a pair of putative Rho GTPase activating proteins (RhoGAPs) that interact with the mitosis-specific kinesin-12 POK1, a core component of the cortical division zone/site (CDZ/CDS) that is required for division plane maintenance in Arabidopsis(2-4). The designated pleckstrin homology GAPs (PHGAPs) are cytoplasmic and plasma membrane associated in interphase, but during mitosis they additionally localize to the CDZ/CDS in a POK-dependent manner. In contrast to pok1 pok2 mutants, phgap1 phgap2 double mutants show moderate cell wall positioning defects as a consequence of inaccurate positioning of the cortical division zone marker POK1. We conclude that loss of PHGAP function interferes with division plane selection in proliferative cell divisions. PMID:27501519

  5. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  6. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  7. Asymmetric cell division: a persistent issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Aakre, Christopher D.; Laub, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity within a clonal population of cells can increase survival in the face of environmental stress. In a recent issue of Science, Aldridge et al. (2012) demonstrate that cell division in mycobacteria is asymmetric, producing daughter cells that differ in size, growth rate, and susceptibility to antibiotics.

  8. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  9. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  10. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Blaauwen; J.M. Andreu; O. Monasterio

    2014-01-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of protein

  11. An electrostatic model for biological cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Faraggi, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    Probably the most fundamental processes for biological systems is their ability to create themselves through the use of cell division and cell differentiation. In this work a simple physical model is proposed for biological cell division. The model consists of a positive ionic gradient across the cell membrane, and concentration of charge at the nodes of the spindle and on the chromosomes. A simple calculation, based on Coulomb's Law, shows that under such circumstances a chromosome will tend to break up to its constituent chromatids and that the chromatids will be separated by a distance that is an order of thirty percent of the distance between the spindle nodes. Further repulsion between the nodes will tend to stretch the cell and eventually break the cell membrane between the separated chromatids, leading to cell division. The importance of this work is in continuing the understanding of the electromagnetic basis of cell division and providing it with an analytical model. A central implication of this and...

  12. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  13. Calibration method for division of focal plane polarimeters in the optical and near-infrared regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Timothy; Gruev, Viktor

    2011-06-01

    Advances in nanofabrication allow for the creation of metallic nanowires acting as linear polarizers in the visible and near infrared regime. The monolithic integration of silicon detectors and pixelated nanowire metallic polarization filters allows for an efficient realization of high resolution polarization imaging sensors. These silicon sensors, known as division of focal plane polarimeters, capture polarization information of the imaged environment from ~400nm to 1050nm wavelength. The performance of the polarization sensor can be degraded by both irregularities in the fabrication of the nanowires and possible misalignment errors during the final deposition of the optical nanowire filters on the surface of the imaging sensor. In addition, electronic offsets due to the readout circuitry, electronic crosstalk, and optical crosstalk will also negatively affect the quality of the polarization information. Partial compensation for many of these post-fabrication errors can be accomplished through the use of a camera calibration routine. This paper will describe one such routine, and show how its application can increase the quality of measurements in both the degree of linear polarization and angle of polarization in the visible spectrum. The imaging array of the division of focal plane polarimeter is segmented into two by two blocks of superpixels. The calibration method chooses one of the four pixels as a reference, and then a gain and offset for each of the remaining three is computed based on this reference. The output is a calibration matrix for each pixel in the image array.

  14. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Trevors J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.

  15. Polarity in Stem Cell Division: Asymmetric Stem Cell Division in Tissue Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M; Yuan, Hebao; Cheng, Jun; Hunt, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Many adult stem cells divide asymmetrically to balance self-renewal and differentiation, thereby maintaining tissue homeostasis. Asymmetric stem cell divisions depend on asymmetric cell architecture (i.e., cell polarity) within the cell and/or the cellular environment. In particular, as residents of the tissues they sustain, stem cells are inevitably placed in the context of the tissue architecture. Indeed, many stem cells are polarized within their microenvironment, or the stem cell niche, a...

  16. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CatrionaDonovan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae.

  17. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations. (paper)

  18. Regulation of cell division in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant's essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  19. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  20. Kinetics of cell division in epidermal maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    The rules governing cell division and differentiation are central to understanding the mechanisms of development, aging and cancer. By utilising inducible genetic labelling, recent studies have shown that the clonal population in transgenic mouse epidermis can be tracked in vivo. Drawing on these results, we explain how clonal fate data may be used to infer the rules of cell division and differentiation underlying the maintenance of adult murine tail-skin. We show that the rates of cell division and differentiation may be evaluated by considering the long-time and short-time clone fate data, and that the data is consistent with cells dividing independently rather than synchronously. Motivated by these findings, we consider a mechanism for cancer onset based closely on the model for normal adult skin. By analysing the expected changes to clonal fate in cancer emerging from a simple two-stage mutation, we propose that clonal fate data may provide a novel method for studying the earliest stages of the disease.

  1. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the...

  2. Cell Division, Differentiation and Dynamic Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1993-01-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled chaotic system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, in consistency with the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of ``open chaos" is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.A

  3. The effect of anterior inclined plane treatment on the dentoskeletal of Class II division 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emami Meibodi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of Class II malocclusions are due to underdeveloped mandible with increased overjet and overbite. Lack of incisal contact results in the extrusion of the upper and lower anterior dentoalveolar complex, which helps to lock the mandible and prevent its normal growth and development, and this abnormality is exaggerated by soft tissue imbalance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dental changes in patients treated with anterior inclined plane appliance in growing patients with moderate Class II Division 1 having deep overbite. In this study, 25 patients, including 15 girls and 10 boys, with a mean age of 9 ±1.2 years were selected; all of them presented with moderate Class II deep bite with increased overjet and normal or horizontal growth pattern. Pre- and post-treatment X-rays and photos for an average of 8 months were taken. The statistical assessment of the data suggested that there were no significant changes in the vertical skeletal parameters. The mandibular incisors were protruded, whereas the maxillary incisors were retruded. Overbite and overjet were also reduced. There was significant increase in the mandibular length. The results revealed that in mixed dentition patients, the inclined plane corrected Class II discrepancies mostly through dentoskeletal changes.

  4. Onset of cell division in maize germination: action of auxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed germination implies metabolic reactivation, synthesis of macromolecules and onset of cell division. During maize germination, meristematic tissues of embryos re-initiate cell division asynchronically. Since auxins are known to stimulate cell division, they asked how auxins might regulate cell cycle re-initiation. Embryonic tissues were incubated with and without auxins. A pulse of either 3H-thymidine or 32P-ortophosphate was given to the tissues. Mitotic indexes were determined and % of labeled mitotic cells recorded. Results indicated that meristematic cells re-initiate cell division either from G1 or G2 phases. Auxin stimulated differentially the cell division process of these cells. 32P incorporation into cytoplasmic or nucleic histones was measured. Auxins stimulated this incorporation. Active turnover of histone phosphorylation occurred simultaneously to the cell division process. It is suggested that auxins might regulate the cell cycle by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of histones

  5. Cell Shape and Cell Division in Fission Yeast Minireview

    OpenAIRE

    Piel, Matthieu; Tran, Phong T.

    2009-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has served as an important model organism for investigating cellular morphogenesis. This unicellular rod-shaped fission yeast grows by tip extension and divides by medial fission. In particular, microtubules appear to define sites of polarized cell growth by delivering cell polarity factors to the cell tips. Microtubules also position the cell nucleus at the cell middle, marking sites of cell division. Here, we review the microtubule-dependent mecha...

  6. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    organogenesis. Coordination of these two interdependent processes results in formation of nodules - bacterial accommodating structures where fixation of atmospheric nitrogen takes place. Plant hormones such as auxin and cytokinin play important roles in nodulation. In some legumes the infection process...... was shown to require auxin signalling. Cytokinin, in contrast, exert a negative regulation of bacterial entry into the root. During organogenesis, auxin and cytokinin maxima are known to accompany nodule primordia development and together regulate progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, application...... of auxin transport inhibitors or cytokinin alone was shown to induce cortical cell divisions in the absence of rhizobia in certain legume species. While the roles of auxin and cytokinin in nodulation have been studied extensively, the precise timing, location and means of molecular crosstalk between...

  7. Concise Review: Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Murke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells are rare cells with unique properties residing in many organs and tissues. They are undifferentiated cells responsible for tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and contain both the capacity to self-renew in order to maintain their stem cell potential and to differentiate towards tissue-specific, specialized cells. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms controlling somatic stem cell fate decisions remains sparse. One mechanism which has been described to control daughter cell fates in selected somatic stem cell systems is the process of asymmetric cell division (ACD. ACD is a tightly regulated and evolutionary conserved process allowing a single stem or progenitor cell to produce two differently specified daughter cells. In this concise review, we will summarize and discuss current concepts about the process of ACD as well as different ACD modes. Finally, we will recapitulate the current knowledge and our recent findings about ACD in human hematopoiesis.

  8. Mechanisms of daughter cell-size control during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi

    2015-05-01

    Daughter cell size is tightly regulated during cell division. In animal cells, the position of the anaphase spindle specifies the cell cleavage site to dictate the relative size of the daughter cells. Although spindle orientation is regulated by dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces exerted on astral microtubules in many cell types, it was unclear how these forces are precisely regulated to center or displace the spindle. Recently, intrinsic signals derived from chromosomes or spindle poles have been demonstrated to regulate dynein-dependent pulling forces in symmetrically dividing cells. Unexpectedly, myosin-dependent contractile forces have also been shown to control spindle position by altering the cellular boundaries during anaphase. In this review, I discuss how dynein- and myosin-dependent forces are coordinately regulated to control daughter cell size. PMID:25548067

  9. Smurfs have "fused" into the asymmetric division of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven Y. Cheng; Ying E. Zhang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The asymmetric cell division is the way in which a stem cell divides into one daughter stem cell and one differentiated daughter cell.This process is one of the key principles of developmental biology that ensures the perpetual supply of stem cells while allowing a particular cell lineage to be populated.During Drosophila oogenesis, the fate of the daughter stem cell produced from the asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by Decapentaplegic (Dpp), but the other daughter cell has almost equal access to the Dpp signal.

  10. Streptomyces: A Screening Tool for Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Charul; Tocheva, Elitza I.; McAuley, Scott; Craney, Arryn; Jensen, Grant J.; Nodwell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Cell division is essential for spore formation but not for viability in the filamentous streptomycetes bacteria. Failure to complete cell division instead blocks spore formation, a phenotype that can be visualized by the absence of gray (in Streptomyces coelicolor) and green (in Streptomyces venezuelae) spore-associated pigmentation. Despite the lack of essentiality, the streptomycetes divisome is similar to that of other prokaryotes. Therefore, the chemical inhibitors of sporulation in model streptomycetes may interfere with the cell division in rod-shaped bacteria as well. To test this, we investigated 196 compounds that inhibit sporulation in S. coelicolor. We show that 19 of these compounds cause filamentous growth in Bacillus subtilis, consistent with impaired cell division. One of the compounds is a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits cell division by activating the SOS response. The remaining 18 act independently of known stress responses and may therefore act on the divisome or on divisome positioning and stability. Three of the compounds (Fil-1, Fil-2, and Fil-3) confer distinct cell division defects on B. subtilis. They also block B. subtilis sporulation, which is mechanistically unrelated to the sporulation pathway of streptomycetes but is also dependent on the divisome. We discuss ways in which these differing phenotypes can be used in screens for cell division inhibitors. PMID:25256667

  11. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  12. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  13. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  14. Biased DNA Segregation during Stem Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells are a heterogeneous cell population characterized by a small subset of undifferentiated cells that express at high level the paired/homeodomain gene Pax7. This category of satellite cells divides predominantly by asymmetric chromatid segregation generating a daughter cell that carries the mother DNA and retains stem cell property, and a daughter cell that inherits the newly-synthesized DNA and acquires the myocyte lineage.1

  15. Microtubule networks for plant cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, de Jeroen; Mulder, B.M.; Janson, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called

  16. Size-independent symmetric division in extraordinarily long cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Pende; N. Leisch; H.R. Gruber-Vodicka; N.R. Heindl; J. Ott; T. den Blaauwen; S. Bulgheresi

    2014-01-01

    Two long-standing paradigms in biology are that cells belonging to the same population exhibit little deviation from their average size and that symmetric cell division is size limited. Here, ultrastructural, morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses reveal that two Gammaproteobacteria attached t

  17. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Jacopo; Kennard, Andrew S; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell growth-division data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different modeling frameworks were used to infer specific mechanisms from such data, but the links between frameworks are poorly explored, with relevant consequences for how well any particular mechanism can be supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with a simple physical analogue. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or inter-division time), we show explicitly how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well a...

  18. Primitive human hematopoietic cells give rise to differentially specified daughter cells upon their initial cell division.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebel, B.; Zhang, T.; Beckmann, J.; Spanholtz, J.; Wernet, P.; Ho, A.; Punzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is often predicted that stem cells divide asymmetrically, creating a daughter cell that maintains the stem-cell capacity, and 1 daughter cell committed to differentiation. While asymmetric stem-cell divisions have been proven to occur in model organisms (eg, in Drosophila), it remains illusive wh

  19. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  20. Polyalkoxyflavonoids as inhibitors of cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V. V.; Semenova, M. N.

    2015-02-01

    Being structural analogues of natural microtubule-destabilizing cytostatics, polyalkoxyflavonoids represent a promising class of compounds for anticancer drug design. The review covers synthetic routes to various polyalkoxyflavonoids and the results of biological assays in vitro on human cancer cells and in vivo using sea urchin embryos as a model. Mechanisms of action and structure-relationship activity for polyalkoxyflavonoids are discussed. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  1. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast

  2. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  3. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, T.W.

    1992-07-01

    Cell division is arguably the most fundamental of all developmental processes. In higher plants, mitotic activity is largely confined to foci of patterned cell divisions called meristems. From these perpetually embryonic tissues arise the plant`s essential organs of light capture, support, protection and reproduction. Once an adequate understanding of plant cell mitotic regulation is attained, unprecedented opportunities will ensue for analyzing and genetically controlling diverse aspects of development, including plant architecture, leaf shape, plant height, and root depth. The mitotic cycle in a variety of model eukaryotic systems in under the control of a regulatory network of striking evolutionary conservation. Homologues of the yeast cdc2 gene, its catalytic product, p34, and the cyclin regulatory subunits of the MPF complex have emerged as ubiquitous mitotic regulators. We have cloned cdc2-like and cyclin genes from pea. As in other eukaryotic model systems, p34 of Pisum sativum is a subunit of a high molecular weight complex which binds the fission yeast p13 protein and displays histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Our primary objective in this study is to gain baseline information about the regulation of this higher plant cell division control complex in non-dividing, differentiated cells as well as in synchronous and asynchronous mitotic cells. We are investigating cdc2 and cyclin expression at the levels of protein abundance, protein phosphorylation and quaternary associations.

  4. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  5. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AhmedH. K.El-Hashash

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric versus symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms.

  6. Demonstration of a 280  Gbit/s free-space space-division-multiplexing communications link utilizing plane-wave spatial multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Martin P J; Huang, Hao; Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Willner, Alan E

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a 280 Gbit/s free-space space-division-multiplexing communications link incorporating a set of independent tilted truncated plane-waves, each generated by a single mode fiber placed at the back-focal plane of a spherical lens. Each of the seven tilted plane-wave channels are encoded with a 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM signal. Our approach comprises two identical linear fiber-arrays placed approximately 5 m apart. As each fiber array is placed at the back-focal-plane of a spherical lens, each fiber array is effectively placed in a conjugate image plane of the other. A channel crosstalk of less than 26 dB is shown, with a bit-error-rate below the FEC threshold of 3.8×10(-3). PMID:26974062

  7. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-01

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells. PMID:25997796

  8. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  9. Abnormal number cell division of human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell line, SW 1736

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell division, during which a mother cell usually divides into two daughter cells during one cell cycle, is the most important physiological event of cell biology. We observed one-to-four cell division during imaging of live SW1736 human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cells transfected with a plasmid expressing the hybrid protein of green fluorescent protein and histone 2B (plasmid eGFP-H2B. Analysis of the images revealed a mother cell divided into four daughter cells. And one of the abnormally divided daughter cells subsequently formed a dinucleate cell.

  10. Rab24 is required for normal cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Rodrigo D; Munafó, Daniela B; Berón, Walter; López, Luis A; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Colombo, María I

    2013-05-01

    Rab24 is an atypical member of the Rab GTPase family whose distribution in interphase cells has been characterized; however, its function remains largely unknown. In this study, we have analyzed the distribution of Rab24 throughout cell division. We have observed that Rab24 was located at the mitotic spindle in metaphase, at the midbody during telophase and in the furrow during cytokinesis. We have also observed partial co-localization of Rab24 and tubulin and demonstrated its association to microtubules. Interestingly, more than 90% of transiently transfected HeLa cells with Rab24 presented abnormal nuclear connections (i.e., chromatin bridges). Furthermore, in CHO cells stably transfected with GFP-Rab24wt, we observed a large percentage of binucleated and multinucleated cells. In addition, these cells presented an extremely large size and multiple failures in mitosis, as aberrant spindle formation (metaphase), delayed chromosomes (telophase) and multiple cytokinesis. A marked increase in binucleated, multinucleated and multilobulated nucleus formation was observed in HeLa cells depleted of Rab24. We also present evidence that a fraction of Rab24 associates with microtubules. In addition, Rab24 knock down resulted in misalignment of chromosomes and abnormal spindle formation in metaphase leading to the appearance of delayed chromosomes during late telophase and failures in cytokinesis. Our findings suggest that an adequate level of Rab24 is necessary for normal cell division. In summary, Rab24 modulates several mitotic events, including chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, perhaps through the interaction with microtubules. PMID:23387408

  11. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A., E-mail: s.m.a.lens@umcutrecht.nl

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  12. Cell Division Behaviour in a Heterogeneous Swarm Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Erskine, Adam; Herrmann, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present a system of virtual particles that interact using simple kinetic rules. It is known that heterogeneous mixtures of particles are producing particularly interesting behaviours. Here we present a two-species swarm in which a behaviour emerges that resembles cell division. We show that the dividing behaviour exists across a narrow but finite band of parameters and for a wide range of population sizes. In a two dimensional environment the swarm's characteristics and dynamism manifests ...

  13. Patterns of Stem Cell Divisions Contribute to Plant Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Agata; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of plants ranges from a few weeks in annuals to thousands of years in trees. It is hard to explain such extreme longevity considering that DNA replication errors inevitably cause mutations. Without purging through meiotic recombination, the accumulation of somatic mutations will eventually result in mutational meltdown, a phenomenon known as Muller's ratchet. Nevertheless, the lifespan of trees is limited more often by incidental disease or structural damage than by genetic aging. The key determinants of tree architecture are the axillary meristems, which form in the axils of leaves and grow out to form branches. The number of branches is low in annual plants, but in perennial plants iterative branching can result in thousands of terminal branches. Here, we use stem cell ablation and quantitative cell-lineage analysis to show that axillary meristems are set aside early, analogous to the metazoan germline. While neighboring cells divide vigorously, axillary meristem precursors maintain a quiescent state, with only 7-9 cell divisions occurring between the apical and axillary meristem. During iterative branching, the number of branches increases exponentially, while the number of cell divisions increases linearly. Moreover, computational modeling shows that stem cell arrangement and positioning of axillary meristems distribute somatic mutations around the main shoot, preventing their fixation and maximizing genetic heterogeneity. These features slow down Muller's ratchet and thereby extend lifespan. PMID:27161504

  14. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels.

  15. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels. PMID:26505631

  16. Differential Management of the Replication Terminus Regions of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes during Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Gaëlle Demarre; Elisa Galli; Leila Muresan; Evelyne Paly; Ariane David; Christophe Possoz; François-Xavier Barre

    2014-01-01

    The replication terminus region (Ter) of the unique chromosome of most bacteria locates at mid-cell at the time of cell division. In several species, this localization participates in the necessary coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division, notably for the selection of the division site, the licensing of the division machinery assembly and the correct alignment of chromosome dimer resolution sites. The genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of the deadly human disease choler...

  17. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  18. Lessons from development: A role for asymmetric stem cell division in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Anne E.; Shung, Chia-Yi; Saylor, Katherine W.; Müllendorf, Karin A.; Weiss, Joseph B.; Wong, Melissa H.

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for physiologic control of stem cell numbers. Reinvigoration of the cancer stem cell theory suggests that tumorigenesis may be regulated by maintaining the balance between asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Therefore, mutations affecting this balance could result in aberrant expansion of stem cells. Although a number of molecules have been implicated in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division, here, we highligh...

  19. Asymmetric Cell Division in T Lymphocyte Fate Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, Janilyn; Metz, Patrick J; Chang, John T

    2015-11-01

    Immunological protection against microbial pathogens is dependent on robust generation of functionally diverse T lymphocyte subsets. Upon microbial infection, naïve CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes can give rise to effector- and memory-fated progeny that together mediate a potent immune response. Recent advances in single-cell immunological and genomic profiling technologies have helped elucidate early and late diversification mechanisms that enable the generation of heterogeneity from single T lymphocytes. We discuss these findings here and argue that one such mechanism, asymmetric cell division, creates an early divergence in T lymphocyte fates by giving rise to daughter cells with a propensity towards the terminally differentiated effector or self-renewing memory lineages, with cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic cues from the microenvironment driving the final maturation steps. PMID:26474675

  20. Omics and modeling approaches approaches for understanding regulation of asymmetric cell divisions in Arabidopsis and other angiosperm plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajala, K.; Ramakrishna, A.; Fisher, A.; Bergmann, D.C.; Smet, De I.; Sozzani, R.; Weijers, D.; Brady, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asymmetric cell divisions are formative divisions that generate daughter cells of distinct identity. These divisions are coordinated by either extrinsic (‘niche-controlled’) or intrinsic regulatory mechanisms and are fundamentally important in plant development. Scope This review describe

  1. Role of SCHIZORIZA in asymmetric cell division, cell fate segregation and specification in Arabidopsis root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansweijer, V.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms develop their large variety of cell types from just one single cell, the zygote. Both plants and animals use asymmetric cell division to establish a multicellular body plan How different cell and tissue types are determined, how patterns are created and maintained, and which

  2. Chromokinesin: Kinesin superfamily regulating cell division through chromosome and spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ai; Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-09-01

    Material transportation is essential for appropriate cellular morphology and functions, especially during cell division. As a motor protein moving along microtubules, kinesin has several intracellular functions. Many kinesins play important roles in chromosome condensation and separation and spindle organization during the cell cycle. Some of them even can directly bind to chromosomes, as a result, these proteins are called chromokinesins. Kinesin-4 and kinesin-10 family are two major families of chromokinesin and many members can regulate some processes, both in mitosis and meiosis. Their functions have been widely studied. Here, we summarize current knowledge about known chromokinesins and introduce their intracellular features in accordance with different families. Furthermore, we have also introduced some new-found but unconfirmed kinesins which may have a relationship with chromosomes or the cell cycle. PMID:27196062

  3. Huntingtin Regulates Mammary Stem Cell Division and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Elias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington’s disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties.

  4. Huntingtin regulates mammary stem cell division and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Salah; Thion, Morgane S; Yu, Hua; Sousa, Cristovao Marques; Lasgi, Charlène; Morin, Xavier; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties. PMID:24749073

  5. Cell cycle related /sup 125/IUDR-induced-division delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments were run to determine if /sup 125/I-decays, in /sup 125/IUdR labeled DNA, specifically accumulated at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 hours after plating labeled mitotic cells caused a change in the rate or time of cell entry into mitosis. To accomplish this, a pool of labeled mitotic cells was selected in mitosis and plated in replicate flasks. /sup 125/I decays were accumulated in groups of cells by cooling (40C) for 2 hours starting at the designated times. After rewarding, colcemid was added to arrest cells in mitosis. The rate of cell progression into mitosis for each cell cycle time of accumulation was determined by scoring the mitotic index of cells sampled as a function of time after addition of the colcemid. The results are summarized: (1) Decays from /sup 125/I in /sup 125/I(UdR) labeled DNA reduced the rate of cell progression into mitosis and delayed the time of initiation of mitosis. (2) The reduced rate of progression and the delayed time of initiation of mitosis were independent of the cell cycle time that /sup 125/I-decays were accumulated. (3) The reduced rate of progression after cell cycle accumulation of /sup 125/I decay was statistically indistinguishable from the corresponding controls. (4) The delayed initiation of mitosis after specific cell cycle accumulation of /sup 125/I- decays was greater than the corresponding control. The relationship of these data to DNA and non-DNA division delay target(s) is emphasized

  6. Patterns of cell division revealed by transcriptional regulation of genes during the cell cycle in plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Fobert, P R; Coen, E S; Murphy, G. J.; Doonan, J H

    1994-01-01

    Transcripts from five cell cycle related genes accumulate in isolated cells dispersed throughout the actively dividing regions of plant meristems. We propose that this pattern reflects gene expression during particular phases of the cell division cycle. The high proportion of isolated cells suggests that synchrony between daughter cells is rapidly lost following mitosis. This is the first time that such a cell specific expression pattern has been described in a higher organism. Counterstainin...

  7. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  8. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  9. Dynamics of Tetrahymena macronuclear lamina during cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBIN; ZHONGHEZHAI

    1994-01-01

    During mitosis,the nuclear lamina in higher eukaryotic cells undergoes a distinctly morphological change.It breaks down into lamin polymers or monomers at prophase.At telophase,the lamins reassemble around the condensed chromatin to form the layer of lamina.Using antiserum to mammalian lamins,we studied the dynamics of lamina during cell division in the macronuleus of Tetrahymena shanghaiensis,which divided in the way of amitosis.In contrast to those in higher animal cells,the typical perinuclear lamin distribution in the macronucleus persisted throughout the whole cell cycle.It was further found that in some synchronized cells,the lamin distribution bisplayed an unusual pattern consisting of a series of spots within the macronucleus.Using South-western hybridization,we found that the purified 66 KD lamin in Tetrahymena showed specific affinity with the telomere DNA sequence in the same species.Therefore,we propose that pattern of immunofluorescence may be due to the interaction of lamin protein with the nucleoli and the condensed chromatins in the macronucleus.

  10. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    OpenAIRE

    Antje Müller; Jana Winkler; Franziska Fiedler; Tania Sastradihardja; Claudia Binder; Ralf Schnabel; Jana Kungel; Sven Rothemund; Christian Hennig; Torsten Schöneberg; Simone Prömel

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of a...

  11. Cell division pattern influences gene expression in the shoot apical meristem

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrzykowska, Joanna; Fleming, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem of angiosperms shows a highly conserved cellular architecture in which a change of cell division orientation correlates with early events of leaf initiation. However, the causal role of this altered cellular parameter in leaf formation is debatable. We have used the dynamin-like protein phragmoplastin as a tool to modify the pattern of cell division within the apical meristem. Taking a microinduction approach, we show that local alteration in cell division orientatio...

  12. The effectiveness and problems of utilizing diagrams for secondary school students' learning of cell divisions

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Man-lai; 張敏麗

    2014-01-01

    Cell division is a topic widely recognized by biology teachers for its importance in the curriculum. However, it is also regarded by teachers and students as a very difficult topic. Students at different school levels often hold many misconceptions in cell divisions. While diagrams have been so commonly employed in biology textbooks to enhance the textual representation of cell divisions, the researcher of this study questioned about the cognitive role of the diagrams in helping students cons...

  13. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. (Univ. of Birmingham (England))

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  14. Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin [DDP, cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II)], a strong cytostatic and antineoplastic agent, was tested on seedlings of cucumber Cucumis sativus L. for its general effect on root development and its particular effects on root cell division and cell growth. DDP was characterized as a radiomimetic compound since both DDP (1·3 × 10-5 M) and γ-irradiation (2·5-10 kGy) drastically and irreversibly stopped development of embryonic lateral root primordia (LRPs) in the radicle by inhibiting both mitotic activity and cell growth. In 20% of the LRPs of DDP-treated roots, cells did not divide at all. Dividing cells completed no more than two cell cycles. These effects were specific because when DDP was available to the roots only at the onset of cell division, cell proliferation and cell growth were similar to that produced by constant incubation. Neither DDP nor γ-irradiation affected non-meristematic cell elongation. It was concluded that cell growth of meristematic cells is closely related to cell division. However, non-meristematic cell growth is independent of DNA damage. This suggests DDP as a tool to reveal these autonomous processes in plants development and to detect tissue compartments in mature plant embryos which contain potentially non-meristematic cells. (author)

  15. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Modell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  16. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  17. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies. PMID:27575162

  18. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  19. Asymmetric Inheritance of Mother Versus Daughter Centrosome in Stem Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Anthony P Mahowald; Perlin, Julie R.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2007-01-01

    Adult stem cells often divide asymmetrically to produce one self-renewed stem cell and one differentiating cell, thus maintaining both populations. The asymmetric outcome of stem cell divisions can be specified by an oriented spindle and local self-renewal signals from the stem cell niche. Here we show that developmentally programmed asymmetric behavior and inheritance of mother and daughter centrosomes underlies the stereotyped spindle orientation and asymmetric outcome of stem cell division...

  20. The Protective Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Division on the Accumulation of Heritable Damage

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, PT; Lander, AD

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric-in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not-or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces ...

  1. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium

  2. Uncovering the link between malfunctions in Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric cell division and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsom Corey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asymmetric cell division is a developmental process utilized by several organisms. On the most basic level, an asymmetric division produces two daughter cells, each possessing a different identity or fate. Drosophila melanogaster progenitor cells, referred to as neuroblasts, undergo asymmetric division to produce a daughter neuroblast and another cell known as a ganglion mother cell (GMC. There are several features of asymmetric division in Drosophila that make it a very complex process, and these aspects will be discussed at length. The cell fate determinants that play a role in specifying daughter cell fate, as well as the mechanisms behind setting up cortical polarity within neuroblasts, have proved to be essential to ensuring that neurogenesis occurs properly. The role that mitotic spindle orientation plays in coordinating asymmetric division, as well as how cell cycle regulators influence asymmetric division machinery, will also be addressed. Most significantly, malfunctions during asymmetric cell division have shown to be causally linked with neoplastic growth and tumor formation. Therefore, it is imperative that the developmental repercussions as a result of asymmetric cell division gone awry be understood.

  3. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  4. Is the cell division cycle gated by a circadian clock? The case of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Circadian oscillators are known to regulate the timing of cell division in many organisms. In the case of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, however, this conclusion has been challenged by several investigators. We have reexamined this issue and find that the division behavior of Chlamydomonas meets all the criteria for circadian rhythmicity: persistence of a cell division rhythm (a) with a period of approximately 24 h under free-running conditions, (b) that is temperature compensated, and (c) which ...

  5. Light can rescue auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division in a tobacco cell line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qiao, F.; Petrášek, Jan; Nick, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2010), s. 503-510. ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Auxin transport * cell division * NPA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.818, year: 2010 http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/61/2/503.abstract

  6. The equatorial position of the metaphase plate ensures symmetric cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chia Huei; Gasic, Ivana; Huber-Reggi, Sabina P; Dudka, Damian; Barisic, Marin; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome alignment in the middle of the bipolar spindle is a hallmark of metazoan cell divisions. When we offset the metaphase plate position by creating an asymmetric centriole distribution on each pole, we find that metaphase plates relocate to the middle of the spindle before anaphase. The spindle assembly checkpoint enables this centering mechanism by providing cells enough time to correct metaphase plate position. The checkpoint responds to unstable kinetochore-microtubule attachments resulting from an imbalance in microtubule stability between the two half-spindles in cells with an asymmetric centriole distribution. Inactivation of the checkpoint prior to metaphase plate centering leads to asymmetric cell divisions and daughter cells of unequal size; in contrast, if the checkpoint is inactivated after the metaphase plate has centered its position, symmetric cell divisions ensue. This indicates that the equatorial position of the metaphase plate is essential for symmetric cell divisions. PMID:26188083

  7. Functional Genomic Analysis of Systemic Cell Division Regulation in Legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legumes develop root nodules from pluripotent stem cells in the root pericycle in response to mitogenic activation by a decorated chitin-like nodulation factor synthesized in Rhizobium bacteria. The soybean genes encoding the receptor for such signals were cloned using map-based cloning approaches. Pluripotent cells in the root pericycle and the outer or inner cortex undergo repeated cell divisions to initiate a composite nodule primordium that develops to a functional nitrogen-fixing nodule. The process itself is autoregulated, leading to the characteristic nodulation of the upper root system. Autoregulation of nodulation (AON) in all legumes is controlled in part by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase gene (GmNARK). Mutations of GmNARK, and its other legume orthologues, result in abundant nodulation caused by the loss of a yet-undefined negative nodulation repressor system. AON receptor kinases are involved in perception of a long distance, root-derived signal, to negatively control nodule proliferation. GmNARK and LjHAR1 are expressed in phloem parenchyma. GmNARK kinase domain interacts with Kinase Associated Protein Phosphatase (KAPP). NARK gene expression did not mirror biological NARK activity in nodulation control, as q-RT-PCR in soybean revealed high NARK expression in roots, root tips, leaves, petioles, stems and hypocotyls, while shoot and root apical meristems were devoid of NARK RNA. High through-put transcript analysis in soybean leaf and root indicated that major genes involved in JA synthesis or response are preferentially down-regulated in leaf but not root of wild type, but not NARK mutants, suggesting that AON signaling may in part be controlled by events relating to hormone metabolism. Ethylene and abscisic acid insensitive mutants of L. japonicus are described. Nodulation in legumes has significance to global economies and ecologies, as the nitrogen input into the biosphere allows food, feed and biofuel production without the inherent costs

  8. Division of focal plane polarimeter-based 3 × 4 Mueller matrix microscope: a potential tool for quick diagnosis of human carcinoma tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jintao; He, Honghui; Wang, Ye; Huang, Yi; Li, Xianpeng; He, Chao; Liao, Ran; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Ma, Hui

    2016-05-01

    A polarization microscope is a useful tool to reveal the optical anisotropic nature of a specimen and can provide abundant microstructural information about samples. We present a division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeter-based polarization microscope capable of simultaneously measuring both the Stokes vector and the 3×4 Mueller matrix with an optimal polarization illumination scheme. The Mueller matrix images of unstained human carcinoma tissue slices show that the m24 and m34 elements can provide important information for pathological observations. The characteristic features of the m24 and m34 elements can be enhanced by polarization staining under illumination by a circularly polarized light. Hence, combined with a graphics processing unit acceleration algorithm, the DoFP polarization microscope is capable of real-time polarization imaging for potential quick clinical diagnoses of both standard and frozen slices of human carcinoma tissues.

  9. CyDiv, a conserved and novel filamentous Cyanobacteria cell division protein involved in septum localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka eMandakovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division, encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  10. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  11. Noise and Epigenetic Inheritance of Single-Cell Division Times Influence Population Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerulus, Bram; New, Aaron M; Pougach, Ksenia; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    The fitness effect of biological noise remains unclear. For example, even within clonal microbial populations, individual cells grow at different speeds. Although it is known that the individuals' mean growth speed can affect population-level fitness, it is unclear how or whether growth speed heterogeneity itself is subject to natural selection. Here, we show that noisy single-cell division times can significantly affect population-level growth rate. Using time-lapse microscopy to measure the division times of thousands of individual S. cerevisiae cells across different genetic and environmental backgrounds, we find that the length of individual cells' division times can vary substantially between clonal individuals and that sublineages often show epigenetic inheritance of division times. By combining these experimental measurements with mathematical modeling, we find that, for a given mean division time, increasing heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of division times increases the population growth rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the heterogeneity and epigenetic inheritance of single-cell division times can be linked with variation in the expression of catabolic genes. Taken together, our results reveal how a change in noisy single-cell behaviors can directly influence fitness through dynamics that operate independently of effects caused by changes to the mean. These results not only allow a better understanding of microbial fitness but also help to more accurately predict fitness in other clonal populations, such as tumors. PMID:27068419

  12. The protective role of symmetric stem cell division on the accumulation of heritable damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T McHale

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric-in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not-or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division.

  13. The Protective Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Division on the Accumulation of Heritable Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Peter T.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric—in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not—or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division. PMID:25121484

  14. Cell division of cycle of Bacillus subtilis: evidence of variability in period D.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, M.; Rickert, M; Pierucci, O

    1980-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis the deoxyribonucleic acid content and the extent of cell division during inhibition of chromosome replication increased as a function of the average cell mass, independent of the growth rate. At each growth rate, mass, deoxyribonucleic acid, and residual division varied in different cultures. The variation is consistent with a large variability in the D period. At growth rates higher than 1.5 doublings per h at 37 degrees C, the change in D accounts for the growth rate de...

  15. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  16. Fission yeast Nod1 is a component of cortical nodes involved in cell size control and division site placement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jourdain

    Full Text Available Most cells enter mitosis once they have reached a defined size. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, mitotic entry is orchestrated by a geometry-sensing mechanism that involves the Cdk1/Cdc2-inhibiting Wee1 kinase. The factors upstream of Wee1 gather together in interphase to form a characteristic medial and cortical belt of nodes. Nodes are also considered to be precursors of the cytokinesis contractile actomyosin ring (CAR. Here we describe a new component of the interphase nodes and cytokinesis rings, which we named Nod1. Consistent with its role in cell size control at division, nod1Δ cells were elongated and epistatic with regulators of Wee1. Through biochemical and localisation studies, we placed Nod1 in a complex with the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef2. Nod1 and Gef2 mutually recruited each other in nodes and Nod1 also assembles Gef2 in rings. Like gef2Δ, nod1Δ cells showed a mild displacement of their division plane and this phenotype was severely exacerbated when the parallel Polo kinase pathway was also compromised. We conclude that Nod1 specifies the division site by localising Gef2 to the mitotic cell middle. Previous work showed that Gef2 in turn anchors factors that control the spatio-temporal recruitment of the actin nucleation machinery. It is believed that the actin filaments originated from the nodes pull nodes together into a single contractile ring. Surprisingly however, we found that node proteins could form pre-ring helical filaments in a cdc12-112 mutant in which nucleation of the actin ring is impaired. Furthermore, the deletion of either nod1 or gef2 created an un-expected situation where different ring components were recruited sequentially rather than simultaneously. At later stages of cytokinesis, these various rings appeared inter-fitted rather than merged. This study brings a new slant to the understanding of CAR assembly and function.

  17. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  18. Study of the mechanism of diatom cell division by means of 29Si isotope tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diatoms are delicate unicellular organisms enclosed in a silica frustule, that is made up of two valves. Multiplication of the diatoms occurs by ordinary mitotic cell division. During cell division each cell produces two daughter cells, each of them keeping one of the two valves of the mother cell and producing a new valve by absorbing the silicon present in the environment. The NanoSIMS 50 allows ion imaging to be performed on diatoms in order to determine the site of fixation of silicon. The aim of this study was to observe and compare the mechanism of the construction of the new valve after cell division. To this end, different types of diatoms have been transferred in a culture medium enriched with 29Si and after several days, the distribution of the different isotopes of silicon has been determined by NanoSIMS50 imaging. The construction of new valves has been observed and the isotopic ratio has been determined

  19. System X supercomputer provides super tool for simulation of cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech researchers in computer science and biology have used the university's supercomputer, System X, to create models and algorithms that make it possible to simulate the cell cycle -- the processes leading to cell division. They have demonstrated that the new mathematical models and numerical algorithms provide powerful tools for studying the complex processes going on inside living cells.

  20. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles" of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  1. Real-Time Lineage Analysis to Study Cell Division Orientation in the Arabidopsis Shoot Meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Cory J; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem are small and divide frequently throughout the life-time of the organism making them good candidates for studying the mechanisms of cell division in plants. But tracking these cell divisions requires multiple images to be taken of the same specimen over time which means the specimen must stay alive throughout the process. This chapter provides details on how to prepare plants for live imaging, keep them alive and growing through multiple time points, and how to process the data to extract cell boundary coordinates from three-dimensional images. PMID:26659961

  2. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation on the induction of division delay in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was used in the investigation of the interaction of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation on the induction and duration of division delay in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Hyperthermia (immersion in a 45 degrees C water bath) produced a blockade of cell cycle progression with a transition point in late G2-early M, approximately at the X-ray transition point (35 min prior to selection). The duration of division delay for heated cells depended on the time of immersion: 24 minutes/minute at 45 degrees C. Radiation-induced division delay occurred at a rate of 45 minutes/gray of X-irradiation. When hyperthermic exposure and X-irradiation were combined with less than 1 minute between treatments, a division delay resulted that was approximately the sum of the delays produced by the individual treatments. As the interval between treatments was increased, the overall division delay also increased beyond that which could be accounted for solely by the postponement of the second treatment. These results indicate that hyperthermia and radiation induce division delay by different mechanisms

  3. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  4. Temperature gradient stimulation for cell division in C. Elegans Embryos on chip

    OpenAIRE

    Baranek, Sophie; Bezler, Alexandra; Adamczyk, Christian; Gönczy, Pierre; Renaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a new microfluidic device for temperature stimulation of cell in in-vitro culture. Micro-electrodes in a meander shape are embedded into the microfluidic channels to generate either a temperature gradient through the culture chamber or a local heat spot under specific cells. One promising application is the control of cell di- vision rate. Here we present first results of the synchronization of cell division in a two-cell stage embryos of C. Elegans.

  5. Expression of the wild-type p53 antioncogene induces guanine nucleotide-dependent stem cell division kinetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherley, J L; Stadler, P B; Johnson, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    The predominant type of cell division in adult mammals is renewal growth. Renewing stem cells in somatic tissues undergo continuous asymmetric divisions. One new daughter cell retains the division potential of the original stem cell, while the other differentiates into a functional constituent of the tissue. Disruptions of this process lead to the development of human cancers. We show that through a guanine nucleotide-dependent mechanism, the p53 antioncogene can induce exponentially dividing...

  6. Phosphorus deficiency inhibits cell division but not growth in the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen eLi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is an essential nutrient element for the growth of phytoplankton. How P deficiency affects population growth and the cell division cycle in dinoflagellates has only been studied in some species, and how it affects photosynthesis and cell growth remains poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the impact of P deficiency on the cell division cycle, the abundance of the carbon-fixing enzyme Rubisco, and other cellular characteristics in the Gymnodiniales peridinin-plastid species Amphidinium carterae. We found that under P-replete condition, the cell cycle actively progressed in the culture in a 24-hour diel cycle with daily growth rates markedly higher than the P-deficient cultures, in which cells were arrested in the G1 phase and cell size significantly enlarged. The results suggest that, as in previously studied dinoflagellates, P deficiency likely disenables A. carterae to complete DNA duplication or check-point protein phosphorylation. We further found that under P-deficient condition, overall photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm ratio and Rubisco abundance decreased but not significantly, while cellular contents of carbon, nitrogen, and proteins increased significantly. These observations indicated that under P-deficiency, this dinoflagellate was able to continue photosynthesis and carbon fixation, such that proteins and photosynthetically fixed carbon could accumulate resulting in continued cell growth in the absence of division. This is likely an adaptive strategy thereby P-limited cells can be ready to resume the cell division cycle upon resupply of phosphorus.

  7. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Kron, S J; Styles, C. A.; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and d...

  8. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  9. Cell division licensing in the multi-chromosomal Vibrio cholerae bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elisa; Poidevin, Mickaël; Le Bars, Romain; Desfontaines, Jean-Michel; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Barre, François-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Cell division must be coordinated with chromosome replication and segregation to ensure the faithful transmission of genetic information during proliferation. In most bacteria, assembly of the division apparatus, the divisome, starts with the polymerization of a tubulin homologue, FtsZ, into a ring-like structure at mid-cell, the Z-ring(1). It typically occurs at half of the cell cycle when most of the replication and segregation cycle of the unique chromosome they generally harbour is achieved(2). The chromosome itself participates in the regulation of cell division, at least in part because it serves as a scaffold to position FtsZ polymerization antagonists(3). However, about 10% of bacteria have more than one chromosome(4), which raises questions about the way they license cell division(3). For instance, the genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is divided between a 3 Mbp replicon that originates from the chromosome of its mono-chromosomal ancestor, Chr1, and a 1 Mbp plasmid-derived replicon, Chr2 (ref. 5). Here, we show that Chr2 harbours binding motifs for an inhibitor of Z-ring formation, which helps accurately position the V. cholerae divisome at mid-cell and postpones its assembly to the very end of the cell cycle. PMID:27562255

  10. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mani Arora; Arga Chandrashekar Anil; Karl Burgess; Jane Delany; Ehsan Mesbahi

    2015-12-01

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first green alga, the `ancestral green flagellate'. Relatively large-celled unicellular eukaryotic phytoflagellates (such as Tetraselmis and Scherffelia), traditionally placed in Prasinophyceae but now considered as members of Chlorodendrophyceae (core Chlorophyta), have retained some primitive characteristics of prasinophytes. These organisms share several ultrastructural features with the other core chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae). However, the role of Chlorodendrophycean algae as the evolutionary link between cellular individuality and cellular cooperation has been largely unstudied. Here, we show that clonal populations of a unicellular chlorophyte, Tetraselmis indica, consist of morphologically and ultrastructurally variant cells which arise through asymmetric cell division. These cells also differ in their physiological properties. The structural and physiological differences in the clonal cell population correlate to a certain extent with the longevity and function of cells.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment.

  12. Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsZ is a guanine nucleotide binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, A; Dai, K; Lutkenhaus, J

    1993-01-01

    FtsZ is an essential cell division protein in Escherichia coli that forms a ring structure at the division site under cell cycle control. The dynamic nature of the FtsZ ring suggests possible similarities to eukaryotic filament forming proteins such as tubulin. In this study we have determined that FtsZ is a GTP/GDP binding protein with GTPase activity. A short segment of FtsZ is homologous to a segment in tubulin believed to be involved in the interaction between tubulin and guanine nucleoti...

  13. Vegetative Cell Division and Nuclear Translocation in Three Algae Species of Netrium (Zygnematales, Chlorophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIAN HENDRAYANTI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Netrium oblongum, N. digitus v. latum, and N. interruptum were studied for their mode in the vegetative cell division and nuclear translocation during mitosis using light and fluorescence microscopy. The process of cell division in the three species began with the prominent constriction at the chloroplast in both semicells about half way from the apex. The constriction of chloroplast was mostly visible in N. digitus v. latum. Soon after nucleus divided, septum was formed across the cell and cytokinesis occurred. Observation with fluorescence microscope showed that the movement of nucleus moved back into the center of daughter cells was not always synchronous. Division of chloroplast in N. oblongum and N. digitus v. latum were different with that of N. interruptum. Chloroplast division in two former species occured following the movement of the nucleus down semicell. However, in N. interruptum, chloroplast divided later after nucleus occupied the position at the center of the daughter cells. Cell restoration started after the completion of mitosis and cytokinesis.

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis peptidoglycan hydrolase SleB171 involved in daughter cell separation during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Hu, Penggao; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Whole-genome analyses have revealed a putative cell wall hydrolase gene (sleB171) that constitutes an operon with two other genes (ypeBandyhcN) of unknown function inBacillus thuringiensisBMB171. The putative SleB171 protein consists of 259 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 28.3 kDa. Gene disruption ofsleB171in the BMB171 genome causes the formation of long cell chains during the vegetative growth phase and delays spore formation and spore release, although it has no significant effect on cell growth and the ultimate release of the spores. The inseparable vegetative cells were nearly restored through the complementation ofsleB171expression. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed thatsleB171is mainly active in the vegetative growth phase, with a maximum activity at the early stationary growth phase. Western blot analysis also confirmed thatsleB171is preferentially expressed during the vegetative growth phase. These results demonstrated that SleB171 plays an essential role in the daughter cell separation during cell division. PMID:26922318

  15. Electromagnetic field influences on cell surface potential and cell division in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electromagnetic field on cell surface potential and cell division were studied in s.cerevisiae. The strains used were, GM3 (a/gal 10,trp1, ura4, met 8, ade 5,7,les1, ilvl,arol D, suc-mal, cupr.)and ural (a/urap+w-c 321, R E 221, R) an electromagnetic field (h) .O.I.T, cell resistance (R) increased from 0.158 MΩ to 0.200 M Ω through 5 min. The magnetic field (MF) were switching off. The resistance spontaneously increased reaching 1.000 M Ω at the 9 Th min. However, slowly decrease occurred and reaching 0.560 M Omega at the 15 Th min. By using the MF after 15 min., the resistance value reaching 0.180 M OMEGA, through 15-25 min and cell potential (V) ranged between 130-240 mV. Cell culture, of two strains (same mating type) was used, the resistance, R., was 4000 M Ω and V; 600 mV with two cycles min, R; reached 3200 M Ω. On further cycle of (H) led to a huge sudden decrease of R; 0.176 M Ω the cell numbers were depended, upon the cell potential, due to the application of (H). For the first strain used, cell number decreased from 2x106 cells/ml to 1.5x106 cells/ml and from 2.1x108 cells/ml to 1.7x108 cells/ml after 5 min exposure to (H) for culture incubated at 30 degree on log and stationary phases respectively. While, the cell number in ural was decreased from 3.5x106 cells/ml and from 1.78x108 cells/ ml. to 1.71x108 cells/ml through 5 min exposure to (H) for culture incubated at 30 degree on log and stationary phases respectively

  16. Do Online Labs Work? An Assessment of an Online Lab on Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies show students successfully learning science through online courses. This study compared students doing an online and in-class lab exercise on cell division. Online students performed slightly but significantly better on a follow-up content quiz, however, about half those expressed a strong preference for in-class lab work.

  17. Building the perfect parasite: cell division in apicomplexa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Striepen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexans are pathogens responsible for malaria, toxoplasmosis, and crytposporidiosis in humans, and a wide range of livestock diseases. These unicellular eukaryotes are stealthy invaders, sheltering from the immune response in the cells of their hosts, while at the same time tapping into these cells as source of nutrients. The complexity and beauty of the structures formed during their intracellular development have made apicomplexans the darling of electron microscopists. Dramatic technological progress over the last decade has transformed apicomplexans into respectable genetic model organisms. Extensive genomic resources are now available for many apicomplexan species. At the same time, parasite transfection has enabled researchers to test the function of specific genes through reverse and forward genetic approaches with increasing sophistication. Transfection also introduced the use of fluorescent reporters, opening the field to dynamic real time microscopic observation. Parasite cell biologists have used these tools to take a fresh look at a classic problem: how do apicomplexans build the perfect invasion machine, the zoite, and how is this process fine-tuned to fit the specific niche of each pathogen in this ancient and very diverse group? This work has unearthed a treasure trove of novel structures and mechanisms that are the focus of this review.

  18. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  19. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Wright, Charles S; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-11-11

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple (≈ 1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a simple physical principle governing these complex biological processes: a single temperature-dependent scale of cellular time governs the stochastic dynamics of growth and division in balanced growth conditions. PMID:25349411

  20. Cell division in Escherichia coli BS-12 is hypersensitive to deoxyribonucleic acid damage by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escherichia coli BS-12 uvrA lon is hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. On minimal agar plates at densities in excess of about 10(7) bacteria per plate, as few as one or two photoreversible pyrimidine dimers in the entire genome are sufficient to cause inhibition of cell division. Most of the resulting filaments are unable to divide or form a viable colony. Inhibition of cell division appears to be a rapid consequence of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid containing a pyrimidine dimer. Photoreversibility of the inhibition of cell division persists indefinitely, indicating that the continued presence of the pyrimidine dimers (or the continued generation of daughter strand gaps) is necessary to maintain the division-inhibited state. In view of the kinetics for the production of filamentation by ultraviolet light and the extremely low average inducing fluence (0.03 J/m2), it is concluded that the initiating signal is not the same as that causing other inducible phenomena such as prophage induction or Weigle reactivation

  1. An archaebacterial homologue of the essential eubacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, P; Jackson, S P

    1996-01-01

    Life falls into three fundamental domains--Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya (formerly archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes,. respectively). Though Archaea lack nuclei and share many morphological features with Bacteria, molecular analyses, principally of the transcription and translation machineries, have suggested that Archaea are more related to Eucarya than to Bacteria. Currently, little is known about the archaeal cell division apparatus. In Bacteria, a crucial component of the cell d...

  2. Tension-oriented cell divisions limit anisotropic tissue tension in epithelial spreading during zebrafish epiboly

    OpenAIRE

    Campinho, Pedro; Behrndt, Martin; Ranft, Jonas; Risler, Thomas; Minc, Nicolas; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial spreading is a common and fundamental aspect of various developmental and disease-related processes such as epithelial closure and wound healing. A key challenge for epithelial tissues undergoing spreading is to increase their surface area without disrupting epithelial integrity. Here we show that orienting cell divisions by tension constitutes an efficient mechanism by which the enveloping cell layer (EVL) releases anisotropic tension while undergoing spreading during zebrafish ep...

  3. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  4. DNA synthesis and cell division in the adult primate brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that the adult human brain is incapable of producing new neuron. Even cursory examination of neurologic, neuropathologic, or neurobiological textbooks published during the past 50 years will testify that this belief is deeply entrenched. In his classification of cell populations on the basis of their proliferative behavior, Leblond regarded neurons of the central nervous system as belonging to a category of static, nonrenewing epithelial tissue incapable of expanding or replenishing itself. This belief, however needs to re reexamined for two major reasons: First, as reviewed below, a number of reports have provided evidence of neurogenesis in adult brain of several vertebrate species. Second, the capacity for neurogenesis in the adult primate central nervous system has never been examined by modern methods. In this article the author described recent results from an extensive autoradiographic analysis performed on twelve rhesus monkeys injected with the specific DNA precursor [3H] thymidine at ages ranging from 6 postnatal months to 17 years

  5. Cell segmentation for division rate estimation in computerized video time-lapse microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weijun; Wang, Xiaoxu; Metaxas, Dimitris; Mathew, Robin; White, Eileen

    2007-02-01

    The automated estimation of cell division rate plays an important role in the evaluation of a gene function in high throughput biomedical research. Using Computerized Video Time-Lapse (CVTL) microcopy , it is possible to follow a large number of cells in their physiological conditions for several generations. However analysis of this large volume data is complicated due to cell to cell contacts in a high density population. We approach this problem by segmenting out cells or cell clusters through a learning method. The feature of a pixel is represented by the intensity and gradient information in a small surrounding sub-window. Curve evolution techniques are used to accurately find the cell or cell cluster boundary. With the assumption that the average cell size is the same in each frame, we can use the cell area to estimate the cell division rate. Our segmentation results are compared to manually-defined ground truth. Both recall and precision measures for segmentation accuracy are above 95%.

  6. Asymmetric division triggers cell-specific gene expression through coupled capture and stabilization of a phosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Niels; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a division septum near a randomly chosen pole during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis creates unequal sized daughter cells with dissimilar programs of gene expression. An unanswered question is how polar septation activates a transcription factor (σF) selectively in the small cell. We present evidence that the upstream regulator of σF, the phosphatase SpoIIE, is compartmentalized in the small cell by transfer from the polar septum to the adjacent cell pole where SpoIIE is protect...

  7. A polymerization–depolymerization model for generation of contractile force during bacterial cell division

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Ghosh; Anirban Sain

    2008-08-01

    During the last phase of cell division in bacteria, a polymeric ring forms at the division site. The ring, made of intracellular proteins, anchors to the cell wall and starts to contract. That initiates a dividing septum to close in, like the shutter of a camera, eventually guillotining the cell into two daughters. All through, the ring remains at the leading edge of the septum and seems to power its closure. It is not understood why does the ring contract. We propose a theoretical model to explain this. It is worth mentioning that a similar contraction phenomenon occurs for the actin ring in eukaryotes, but there it is due to motor proteins, which however, are absent in bacteria.

  8. Physical association between a novel plasma-membrane structure and centrosome orients cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Takefumi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    In the last mitotic division of the epidermal lineage in the ascidian embryo, the cells divide stereotypically along the anterior-posterior axis. During interphase, we found that a unique membrane structure invaginates from the posterior to the centre of the cell, in a microtubule-dependent manner. The invagination projects toward centrioles on the apical side of the nucleus and associates with one of them. Further, a cilium forms on the posterior side of the cell and its basal body remains associated with the invagination. A laser ablation experiment suggests that the invagination is under tensile force and promotes the posterior positioning of the centrosome. Finally, we showed that the orientation of the invaginations is coupled with the polarized dynamics of centrosome movements and the orientation of cell division. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby this novel membrane structure orchestrates centrosome positioning and thus the orientation of cell division axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16550.001 PMID:27502556

  9. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB-FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved,coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces. PMID:27053678

  10. Mechanism of murine epidermal maintenance: Cell division and the Voter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interesting experimental example of voter-model statistics in biology. In recent work on mouse tail-skin, where proliferating cells are confined to a two-dimensional layer, we showed that cells proliferate and differentiate according to a simple stochastic model of cell division involving just one type of proliferating cell that may divide both symmetrically and asymmetrically. Curiously, these simple rules provide excellent predictions of the cell population dynamics without having to address their spatial distribution. Yet, if the spatial behaviour of cells is addressed by allowing cells to diffuse at random, one deduces that density fluctuations destroy tissue confluence, implying some hidden degree of spatial regulation in the physical system. To infer the mechanism of spatial regulation, we consider a two-dimensional model of cell fate that preserves the overall population dynamics. By identifying the resulting behaviour with a three-species variation of the "Voter" model, we predi...

  11. Localization of Cell Division Protein FtsQ by Immunofluorescence Microscopy in Dividing and Nondividing Cells of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Aarsman, Mirjam E. G.; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Vicente, Miguel; Nanninga, Nanne

    1998-01-01

    The localization of cell division protein FtsQ in Escherichia coli wild-type cells was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy with specific monoclonal antibodies. FtsQ could be localized to the division site in constricting cells. FtsQ could also localize to the division site in ftsQ1(Ts) cells grown at the permissive temperature. A hybrid protein in which the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain were derived from the γ form of penicillin-binding protein 1B and the periplasmic domain was derived from FtsQ was also able to localize to the division site. This result indicates that the periplasmic domain of FtsQ determines the localization of FtsQ, as has also been concluded by others for the periplasmic domain of FtsN. Noncentral FtsQ foci were found in the area of the cell where the nucleoid resides and were therefore assumed to represent sites where the FtsQ protein is synthesized and simultaneously inserted into the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:9829918

  12. Individuality and universality in the growth-division laws of single E. coli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Andrew S.; Osella, Matteo; Javer, Avelino; Grilli, Jacopo; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J.; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The mean size of exponentially dividing Escherichia coli cells in different nutrient conditions is known to depend on the mean growth rate only. However, the joint fluctuations relating cell size, doubling time, and individual growth rate are only starting to be characterized. Recent studies in bacteria reported a universal trend where the spread in both size and doubling times is a linear function of the population means of these variables. Here we combine experiments and theory and use scaling concepts to elucidate the constraints posed by the second observation on the division control mechanism and on the joint fluctuations of sizes and doubling times. We found that scaling relations based on the means collapse both size and doubling-time distributions across different conditions and explain how the shape of their joint fluctuations deviates from the means. Our data on these joint fluctuations highlight the importance of cell individuality: Single cells do not follow the dependence observed for the means between size and either growth rate or inverse doubling time. Our calculations show that these results emerge from a broad class of division control mechanisms requiring a certain scaling form of the "division hazard rate function," which defines the probability rate of dividing as a function of measurable parameters. This "model free" approach gives a rationale for the universal body-size distributions observed in microbial ecosystems across many microbial species, presumably dividing with multiple mechanisms. Additionally, our experiments show a crossover between fast and slow growth in the relation between individual-cell growth rate and division time, which can be understood in terms of different regimes of genome replication control.

  13. Flat leaf formation realized by cell-division control and mutual recessive gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Most of the land plants generally have dorsoventrally flat leaves, maximizing the surface area of both upper (adaxial) side and lower (abaxial) side. The former is specialized for light capturing for photosynthesis and the latter is specialized for gas exchange. From findings of molecular genetics, it has been considered that the coupled dynamics between tissue morphogenesis and gene regulation for cell identity is responsible for making flat leaves. The hypothesis claims that a flat leaf is generated under two assumptions, (i) two mutually recessive groups of genes specify adaxial and abaxial sides of a leaf, (ii) cell divisions are induced at the limited region in the leaf margin where both of two groups are expressed. We examined the plausibility and possibility of this hypothesis from the dynamical point of view. We studied a mathematical model where two processes are coupled, tissue morphogenesis induced by cell division and deformation, and dynamics of gene regulations. From the analysis of the model we found that the classically believed hypothesis is not sufficient to generate flat leaves with high probability. We examined several different modifications and revision of the model. Then we found that a simple additional rule of polarized cell division facilitates flat leaf formation. The result of our analysis gives prediction of possible mechanism, which can be easily verified in experiments. PMID:27287339

  14. Cell division interference in newly fertilized ovules induces stenospermocarpy in cross-pollinated citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesejo, Carlos; Muñoz-Fambuena, Natalia; Reig, Carmina; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Agustí, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Seedlessness is a highly desirable characteristic in fresh fruits. However, post-fertilization seed abortion of cross-pollinated citrus fruit is uncommon. The factors regulating stenospermocarpy in citrus are unknown. In this research, we induced stenospermocarpy interfering in newly fertilized ovule cell division. The research also elucidates the most sensitive stage for ovule/seed abortion in citrus. Experiments were conducted with 'Afourer' mandarin that cross-pollinates with several cultivars and species. Cross-pollinated fruitlets were treated with maleic hydrazide (MH), a systemic growth regulator that specifically interferes in cell division. MH reduced ovule growth rate, the number of cell layers in nucella and inhibited embryo sac expansion; moreover, the treatment increased callose accumulation in nucella and surrounding the embryo sac. Fruits developed an early-aborted seed type with an immature, soft and edible seed coat. Seed number (-80%) and seed weight (-46%) were reduced in mature fruits. MH also hampered cell division in ovary walls, mesocarp and endocarp, thus reducing daily fruitlet growth and increasing fruit abscission. Stenospermocarpy could only be induced for a short period of time in the progamic phase of fertilization, specifically, when ovules are ready to be fertilized (7 days after anthesis) to early stages of embryo sac development (14 days after anthesis). PMID:25017163

  15. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  16. Automatic detection of cell divisions (mitosis) in live-imaging microscopy images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Anat; Gefen, Amit; Benayahu, Dafna; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semi-automated pipeline for the detection of possible cell divisions in live-imaging microscopy and the classification of these mitosis candidates using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). We use time-lapse images of NIH3T3 scratch assay cultures, extract patches around bright candidate regions that then undergo segmentation and binarization, followed by a classification of the binary patches into either containing or not containing cell division. The classification is performed by training a Convolutional Neural Network on a specially constructed database. We show strong results of AUC = 0.91 and F-score = 0.89, competitive with state-of-the-art methods in this field. PMID:26736369

  17. Interplay of migratory and division forces as a generic mechanism for stem cell patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Coucke, Alice; Joanny, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    In many adult tissues, stem cells and differentiated cells are not homogeneously distributed: stem cells are arranged in periodic "niches," and differentiated cells are constantly produced and migrate out of these niches. In this article, we provide a general theoretical framework to study mixtures of dividing and actively migrating particles, which we apply to biological tissues. We show in particular that the interplay between the stresses arising from active cell migration and stem cell division give rise to robust stem cell patterns. The instability of the tissue leads to spatial patterns which are either steady or oscillating in time. The wavelength of the instability has an order of magnitude consistent with the biological observations. We also discuss the implications of these results for future in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  18. An interplay of migratory and division forces as a generic mechanism for stem cell patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Hannezo, Edouard; Joanny, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    In many adult tissues, stem cells and differentiated cells are not homogeneously distributed : stem cells are arranged in periodic "niches", and differentiated cells are constantly produced and migrate out of these niches. In this article, we provide a general theoretical framework to study mixtures of dividing and actively migrating particles, which we apply to biological tissues. We show in particular that the interplay between the stresses arising from active cell migration and stem cell division give rise to robust stem cell patterns. The instability of the tissue leads to spatial patterns which are either steady or oscillating in time. The wavelength of the instability has an order of magnitude consistent with the biological observations. We also discuss the implications of these results for future in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  19. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development. PMID:27056332

  20. Characterization of substances that restore impaired cell division of UV-irradiated E. coli B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substances which restore impaired cell division in UV-irradiated E. coli B were surveyed among various bacteria. The active substance was found only in several genera of Gram-negative bacteria, i.e., Escherichia, Enterobacter, Salmonella and some species of Pseudomonas. The activity in the dialyzed cell extract of E. coli B/r was observed in the presence of β-NAD and was enhanced by Mg2+ and Mn2+. The active substance was very labile, but the activity was protected by 1 mM dithiothreitol in the process of purification. The activity of a fraction recovered through DEAE-cellulose column chromatography was stimulated by the presence of membrane fraction. Upon treatment with lipid-degrading enzymes and proteases, the division-stimulating activity was lost or reduced. It appears that the inactivation by lipase and phospholipase A2 was due to the formation of lysophospholipids and that a proteinous substance participated in the recovery of impaired cell division of UV-irradiated E. coli B

  1. Structural and functional studies of MinD ATPase: implications for the molecular recognition of the bacterial cell division apparatus

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Ikuko; Oyama, Takuji; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2001-01-01

    Proper placement of the bacterial cell division site requires the site-specific inactivation of other potential division sites. In Escherichia coli, selection of the correct mid-cell site is mediated by the MinC, MinD and MinE proteins. To clarify the functional role of the bacterial cell division inhibitor MinD, which is a membrane-associated ATPase that works as an activator of MinC, we determined the crystal structure of a Pyrococcus furiosus MinD homologue complexed with a substrate analo...

  2. Arv1 promotes cell division by recruiting IQGAP1 and myosin to the cleavage furrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvold, Hilde; Sundvold-Gjerstad, Vibeke; Malerød-Fjeld, Helle; Haglund, Kaisa; Stenmark, Harald; Malerød, Lene

    2016-03-01

    Cell division is strictly regulated by a diversity of proteins and lipids to ensure proper duplication and segregation of genetic material and organelles. Here we report a novel role of the putative lipid transporter ACAT-related protein required for viability 1 (Arv1) during telophase. We observed that the subcellular localization of Arv1 changes according to cell cycle progression and that Arv1 is recruited to the cleavage furrow in early telophase by epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN). At the cleavage furrow Arv1 recruits myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) and myosin light chain 9 (MYL9) by interacting with IQ-motif-containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP1). Consequently the lack of Arv1 delayed telophase-progression, and a strongly increased incidence of furrow regression and formation of multinuclear cells was observed both in human cells in culture and in follicle epithelial cells of egg chambers of Drosophila melanogaster in vivo. Interestingly, the cholesterol-status at the cleavage furrow did not affect the recruitment of either IQGAP1, MYH9 or MYL. These results identify a novel function for Arv1 in regulation of cell division through promotion of the contractile actomyosin ring, which is independent of its lipid transporter activity. PMID:27104745

  3. Polar flagellar biosynthesis and a regulator of flagellar number influence spatial parameters of cell division in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Balaban

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and numerical regulation of flagellar biosynthesis results in different flagellation patterns specific for each bacterial species. Campylobacter jejuni produces amphitrichous (bipolar flagella to result in a single flagellum at both poles. These flagella confer swimming motility and a distinctive darting motility necessary for infection of humans to cause diarrheal disease and animals to promote commensalism. In addition to flagellation, symmetrical cell division is spatially regulated so that the divisome forms near the cellular midpoint. We have identified an unprecedented system for spatially regulating cell division in C. jejuni composed by FlhG, a regulator of flagellar number in polar flagellates, and components of amphitrichous flagella. Similar to its role in other polarly-flagellated bacteria, we found that FlhG regulates flagellar biosynthesis to limit poles of C. jejuni to one flagellum. Furthermore, we discovered that FlhG negatively influences the ability of FtsZ to initiate cell division. Through analysis of specific flagellar mutants, we discovered that components of the motor and switch complex of amphitrichous flagella are required with FlhG to specifically inhibit division at poles. Without FlhG or specific motor and switch complex proteins, cell division occurs more often at polar regions to form minicells. Our findings suggest a new understanding for the biological requirement of the amphitrichous flagellation pattern in bacteria that extend beyond motility, virulence, and colonization. We propose that amphitrichous bacteria such as Campylobacter species advantageously exploit placement of flagella at both poles to spatially regulate an FlhG-dependent mechanism to inhibit polar cell division, thereby encouraging symmetrical cell division to generate the greatest number of viable offspring. Furthermore, we found that other polarly-flagellated bacteria produce FlhG proteins that influence cell division, suggesting that

  4. Regulation of cell division and expansion by sugar and auxin signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth and development are modulated by concerted actions of a variety of signaling molecules. In recent years, evidence has emerged on the roles of sugar and auxin signals in diverse aspects of plant growth and development. Here, based on recent progress of genetic analyses and gene expression profiling studies, we summarize the functional similarities, diversities and their interactions of sugar and auxin signals in regulating two major processes of plant development: cell division and cell expansion. We focus on roles of sugar and auxin signaling in both vegetative and reproductive tissues including developing seed.

  5. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  6. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  7. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  8. Markov numbers and Lagrangian cell complexes in the complex projective plane

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Jonathan David; Smith, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We study Lagrangian embeddings of a class of two-dimensional cell complexes $L_{p,q}$ into the complex projective plane. These cell complexes, which we call pinwheels, arise naturally in algebraic geometry as vanishing cycles for quotient singularities of type $\\frac{1}{p^2}(pq-1,1)$ (Wahl singularities). We show that if a pinwheel admits a Lagrangian embedding into $\\mathbf{CP}^2$ then $p$ is a Markov number and we completely characterise $q$. We also show that a collection of Lagrangian pin...

  9. Elucidating through-plane liquid water profile in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun (University of California, Irvine, CA); Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, a numerical model incorporating micro-porous layers (MPLs) is presented for simulating water transport within the gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and MPLs as well as across their interfaces in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. One-dimensional analysis is conducted to investigate the impacts of MPL and GDL properties on the liquid-water profile across the anode GDL-MPL and cathode MPL-GDL regions. Furthermore, two-dimensional numerical simulations that take MPLs into account are also carried out to elucidate liquid water transport, particularly through-plane liquid-water profile in a PEM fuel cell. Results from case studies are presented.

  10. EzrA: a spectrin-like scaffold in the bacterial cell division machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Cleverley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in identifying the components of the divisome, the assembly of proteins that undertakes the vital process of cell division in bacteria. However, how the highly interdependent processes on either side of the membrane are coordinated during division is a major unresolved question. How is the degradation and synthesis of the cell wall on the outside of the cell coordinated with cytokinesis and membrane fission, which are driven from the inside of the cell by the tubulin homologue FtsZ? A possible key mediator of such coordination is the membrane protein EzrA, as it interacts both with FtsZ and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs that synthesize peptidoglycan. Cleverley et al. [Nature Communications (2014 5, 5421] have recently solved the crystal structure of the cytoplasmic domain of B. subtilis EzrA, which points to an important scaffolding role for EzrA in the divisome. The structure resembles the eukaryotic, cytoskeletal spectrin proteins, which link actin filaments in the cytoskeleton and also connect the actin cytoskeleton to membrane-bound integrin proteins.

  11. Positioning of polarity formation by extracellular signaling during asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-07-01

    Anterior-posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which ultimately generates cell diversity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a single fertilized egg cell (P0), its daughter cell (P1), and the germline precursors (P2 and P3 cells) form two exclusive domains of different PAR proteins on the membrane along the anterior-posterior axis. However, the phenomenon of polarity reversal has been observed in which the axis of asymmetric cell division of the P2 and P3 cells is formed in an opposite manner to that of the P0 and P1 cells. The extracellular signal MES-1/SRC-1 has been shown to induce polarity reversal, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, using a mathematical model, I explore the mechanism by which MES-1/SRC-1 signaling can induce polarity reversal and ultimately affect the process of polarity formation. I show that a positive correlation between SRC-1 and the on-rate of PAR-2 is the essential mechanism underlying polarity reversal, providing a mathematical basis for the orientation of cell polarity patterns. PMID:27086039

  12. Effect of microgravity environment on cell wall regeneration, cell divisions, growth, and differentiation of plants from protoplasts (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to investigate if microgravity has any influence on growth and differentiation of protoplasts. Formation of new cell walls on rapeseed protoplasts takes place within the first 24 hours after isolation. Cell division can be observed after 2-4 days and formation of cell aggregates after 5-7 days. Therefore, it is possible during the 7 day IML-1 Mission to investigate if cell wall formation, cell division, and cell differentiation are influenced by microgravity. Protoplasts of rapeseeds and carrot will be prepared shortly before launch and injected into 0.6 ml polyethylene bags. Eight bags are placed in an aluminum block inside the ESA Type 1 container. The containers are placed at 4 C in PTCU's and transferred to orbiter mid-deck. At 4 C all cell processes are slowed down, including cell wall formation. Latest access to the shuttle will be 12 hours before launch. In orbit the containers will be transferred from the PTC box to the 22 C Biorack incubator. The installation of a 1 g centrifuge in Biorack will make it possible to distinguish between effects of near weightlessness and effects caused by cosmic radiation and other space flight factors including vibrations. Parallel control experiments will be carried out on the ground. Other aspects of the experiment are discussed.

  13. Mini-F plasmid genes that couple host cell division to plasmid proliferation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, T; Hiraga, S

    1983-01-01

    A mechanism for stable maintenance of plasmids, besides the replication and partition mechanisms, has been found to be specified by genes of a mini-F plasmid. An oriC plasmid carrying both a mini-F segment necessary for partition [coordinates 46.4-49.4 kilobase pairs (kb) on the F map] and another segment (42.9-43.6 kb), designated ccd (coupled cell division), is more stably maintained than are oriC plasmids carrying only the partition segment; the stability is comparable to that of the paren...

  14. Cdc42 and Rab8a are critical for intestinal stem cell division, survival, and differentiation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan; Feng, Shanshan; Stypulkowski, Ewa; Guan, Yinzheng; Douard, Veronique; Tang, Waixing; Ferraris, Ronaldo P; Harada, Akihiro; Brakebusch, Cord; Guo, Wei; Gao, Nan

    2012-01-01

    reminiscent of human microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), a devastating congenital intestinal disorder that results in severe nutrient deprivation. Further analysis revealed that Cdc42-deficient stem cells had cell division defects, reduced capacity for clonal expansion and differentiation into Paneth cells...

  15. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 → S transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. → TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 → S transition. → Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 → S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 → S arrest is discussed.

  16. Nek11 regulates asymmetric cell division during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Hong-Hui; Zhang, Teng; Qi, Shu-Tao; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-06-10

    Nek11, a member of the never in mitosis gene A (NIMA) family, is activated in somatic cells associated with G1/S or G2/M arrest. However, its function in meiosis is unknown. In this research, the expression, localization and functions of NEK11 in the mouse oocyte meiotic maturation were examined. Western blotting indicated that NEK11S was the major NEK11 protein in mouse oocyte. MYC-tagged Nek11 mRNA microinjection and immunofluorescent staining showed that NEK11 was localized to the meiotic spindles at MI and MII stage. Knockdown of Nek11 by microinjection of siRNA did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and the first polar body extrusion, but caused formation of 2-cell-like eggs. These results demonstrate that Nek11 regulates asymmetric cell division during oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27150633

  17. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates mode of cell division of early cerebral cortex progenitors and increases astrogliogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geissy LL Araújo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH plays a critical role in the development of different tissues. In the central nervous system, SHH is well known to contribute to the patterning of the spinal cord and separation of the brain hemispheres. In addition, it has recently been shown that SHH signaling also contributes to the patterning of the telencephalon and establishment of adult neurogenic niches. In this work, we investigated whether SHH signaling influences the behavior of neural progenitors isolated from the dorsal telencephalon, which generate excitatory neurons and macroglial cells in vitro. We observed that SHH increases proliferation of cortical progenitors and generation of astrocytes, whereas blocking SHH signaling with cyclopamine has opposite effects. In both cases, generation of neurons did not seem to be affected. However, cell survival was broadly affected by blockade of SHH signaling. SHH effects were related to three different cell phenomena: mode of cell division, cell cycle length and cell growth. Together, our data in vitro demonstrate that SHH signaling controls cell behaviors that are important for proliferation of cerebral cortex progenitors, as well as differentiation and survival of neurons and astroglial cells.

  18. The Relationship between Cell Number, Division Behavior and Developmental Potential of Cleavage Stage Human Embryos: A Time-Lapse Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fei; Lu, Changfu; Zhang, Shuoping; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Day 3 cleavage embryo transfer is routine in many assisted reproductive technology centers today. Embryos are usually selected according to cell number, cell symmetry and fragmentation for transfer. Many studies have showed the relationship between cell number and embryo developmental potential. However, there is limited understanding of embryo division behavior and their association with embryo cell number and developmental potential. A retrospective and observational study was conducted to investigate how different division behaviors affect cell number and developmental potential of day 3 embryos by time-lapse imaging. Based on cell number at day 3, the embryos (from 104 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment cycles, n = 799) were classified as follows: less than 5 cells (10C; n = 42). Division behavior, morphokinetic parameters and blastocyst formation rate were analyzed in 5 groups of day 3 embryos with different cell numbers. In 10C embryos increased compared to 7–8C embryos (45.8%, 33.3% vs. 11.1%, respectively). In ≥5C embryos, FR and DC significantly reduced developmental potential, whereas 10C). In NB embryos, the cell cycle elongation or shortening was the main cause for abnormally low or high cell number, respectively. After excluding embryos with abnormal division behaviors, the developmental potential, implantation rate and live birth rate of day 3 embryos increased with cell number. PMID:27077739

  19. Entropyomics as the Blueprint of the Logic of Normal Cell Division and Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Afrasiabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this article I propose a blueprint based on one of the most fundamental laws governing the known universe, namely the second law of thermodynamics and I present support for its central role in initiation of mitosis and relationship of the other sub cellular compartments and their organization. Approach: Life is considered to be the most sophisticated antientropy machinery ever born on the face of the universe as far as its power to minimize the speed of rise in entropy is concerned, however we all get old, sick and die because it is not possible to stop the rise in entropy based on the nature of the known universe. Results: Lack of understanding of the scientific foundation of logic of the normal cell division has surrounded us by darkness and has made analysis of an ever increasing and explosive amount of information originating from whole genome sequencing, genomics, exonomics, proteomics and metabolomics more problematic. Clearly this understanding is the prerequisite for understanding of pathological states of cell division including malignancy. Conclusion/Recommendations: The main approach to this problem is calculation of the free energy of the master regulator proteins of the intracellular communication network of the cancer stem cell and its normal counterpart which in turn could get identified by the available mathematical models that could identify master regulator proteins of the intracellular communication network and deciphering the difference by spectrophotometry at a given wavelength of light and identification of higher absorbance in the malignant counterpart and designing epigenetic or homologous recombination mediated methodology using nanotechology as a delivery mechanism targeting transcription of mRNAs which would lead to protein products with a normal free energy for that cell lineage / higher free energy compared with its malignant counterpart and by doing so we could convert the

  20. Enzymatically Inactive Procaspase 1 stabilizes the ASC Pyroptosome and Supports Pyroptosome Spreading during Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Robert; Kapplusch, Franz; Heymann, Michael Christian; Russ, Susanne; Staroske, Wolfgang; Hedrich, Christian Michael; Rösen-Wolff, Angela; Hofmann, Sigrun Ruth

    2016-08-26

    Caspase-1 is a key player during the initiation of pro-inflammatory innate immune responses, activating pro-IL-1β in so-called inflammasomes. A subset of patients with recurrent febrile episodes and systemic inflammation of unknown origin harbor mutations in CASP1 encoding caspase-1. CASP1 variants result in reduced enzymatic activity of caspase-1 and impaired IL-1β secretion. The apparent paradox of reduced IL-1β secretion but systemic inflammation led to the hypothesis that CASP1 mutations may result in variable protein interaction clusters, thus activating alternative signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we established and characterized an in vitro system of transduced immortalized murine macrophages expressing either WT or enzymatically inactive (p.C284A) procaspase-1 fusion reporter proteins. Macrophages with variant p.C284A caspase-1 did not secrete IL-1β and exhibited reduced inflammatory cell death, referred to as pyroptosis. Caspase-1 and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) formed cytosolic macromolecular complexes (so-called pyroptosomes) that were significantly increased in number and size in cells carrying the p.C284A caspase-1 variant compared with WT caspase-1. Furthermore, enzymatically inactive caspase-1 interacted with ASC longer and with increased intensity compared with WT caspase-1. Applying live cell imaging, we documented for the first time that pyroptosomes containing enzymatically inactive variant p.C284A caspase-1 spread during cell division. In conclusion, variant p.C284A caspase-1 stabilizes pyroptosome formation, potentially enhancing inflammation by two IL-1β-independent mechanisms: pyroptosomes convey an enhanced inflammatory stimulus through the recruitment of additional proteins (such as RIP2, receptor interacting protein kinase 2), which is further amplified through pyroptosome and cell division. PMID:27402835

  1. Targeting the Wolbachia cell division protein FtsZ as a new approach for antifilarial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiru Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics targeting the obligate bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia of filarial parasites has been validated as an approach for controlling filarial infection in animals and humans. Availability of genomic sequences for the Wolbachia (wBm present in the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi has enabled genome-wide searching for new potential drug targets. In the present study, we investigated the cell division machinery of wBm and determined that it possesses the essential cell division gene ftsZ which was expressed in all developmental stages of B. malayi examined. FtsZ is a GTPase thereby making the protein an attractive Wolbachia drug target. We described the molecular characterization and catalytic properties of Wolbachia FtsZ. We also demonstrated that the GTPase activity was inhibited by the natural product, berberine, and small molecule inhibitors identified from a high-throughput screen. Furthermore, berberine was also effective in reducing motility and reproduction in B. malayi parasites in vitro. Our results should facilitate the discovery of selective inhibitors of FtsZ as a novel anti-symbiotic approach for controlling filarial infection. NOTE: The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper are available in GenBank™ Data Bank under the accession number wAlB-FtsZ (JN616286.

  2. A pulse-chase strategy for EdU labelling assay is able to rapidly quantify cell division orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaofeng; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-09-01

    Measurement of the direction of cell division is an important, yet difficult, task to analyse how a plant organ acquires its final shape from an initially small group of cells. We introduce a method that rapidly and easily quantifies cell division direction and is applicable to all plant species. A pulse-chase strategy for 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labelling assay was established and was shown to be successful for leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and Juncus prismatocarpus. By optimization of the pulse and chase periods, most of the signals obtained were sets of daughter nuclei. For Arabidopsis, the optimal time was a 45-min pulse and a 7-h chase. For J. prismatocarpus, the optimal time was a 2-h pulse and a 13.5-h chase. The positions of the daughter nuclei were used to quantify cell division direction in the Arabidopsis leaf primordia. Overall, cell division along the proximal-distal axis was more frequent than along the medial-lateral axis. In petiole, major vein, minor vein and margin areas, the major cell division direction seemed to be coincident with the direction of auxin flow. The advantages of our method over the few methods used previously are discussed. We anticipate that it will provide opportunities to study plant development in the near future. PMID:27121010

  3. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya Kumar Charaka; Kruti P Mehta; H S Misra

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the `Min’ proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  4. Influence of hydroxyurea on cell divisions and microtubular cytoskeleton in Allium cepa root meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Q. Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In onion roots, hydroxyurea (HU causes a gradual depression of mitotic activity which ceases after 24-36 hrs. The effect is reversible; divisions begin after several hours of recovery and after 12-14 hrs about 90% cells undergo mitosis. Mitotic activity commences in the distal region of the apical meristem, and as a wave it spreads towards the apex. In the roots treated with HU for a short time, the tubulin immunofluorescence method reveals normal arrays of microtubules (MTs. After 36 hrs of HU treatment there are only cortical and endocytoplasmatic MTs. In the recovering roots, preprophase bands (PB mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts appear. Some PBs are split into two parallel rings. These abnormal PBs mostly occur in elongated cells. Apart from this, HU does not appear to have any significant influence on microtubular organization.

  5. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: aberrant cellular division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Thomas K; Derby, Melissa; Martin, Dean F; Wright, Scott D; Dao, My Lien

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells. PMID:12745987

  6. Downregulation of cell division cycle 25 homolog C reduces the radiosensitivity and proliferation activity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yachao; Dou, Xiaoyan; Duan, Shimiao; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Quanjing; Li, Hongwei; Li, Duojie

    2016-09-30

    Radiation therapy is one of the most important methods of contemporary cancer treatment. Cells in the G2 and M phases are more sensitive to radiation therapy, and cell division cycle 25 homolog C (CDC25C) is essential in shifting the cell cycle between these two phases. In this study, the knockdown of CDC25C in human esophageal squamous carcinoma EC9706 cells was mediated by transfecting shRNA against human CDC25C-subcloning into pGV248. The levels of CDC25C mRNA and protein expression were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, cell proliferation and radiosensitivity were measured. Stable CDC25C-knockdown EC9706 cell lines were successfully established. Furthermore, the proliferation of both control and CDC25C-shRNA-EC9706 cells was inhibited after the cells were treated with increasing X-ray doses, and the proliferation of the control cells was affected more significantly (p<0.05). Moreover, cell colony formation assays allowed us to reach the same conclusion. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that the knockdown of CDC25C can reduce both the radiotherapy sensitivity and the proliferation activity of EC9706 cells. Thus, CDC25C might be a potential biomarker for radiotherapy treatment. PMID:27188256

  7. Par1b links lumen polarity with LGN-NuMA positioning for distinct epithelial cell division phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazaro-Dieguez, Francisco; Cohen, David; Fernandez, Dawn; Hodgson, Louis; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Muesch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Columnar epithelia establish their luminal domains and their mitotic spindles parallel to the basal surface and undergo symmetric cell divisions in which the cleavage furrow bisects the apical domain. Hepatocyte lumina interrupt the lateral domain of neighboring cells perpendicular to two basal doma

  8. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  9. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1 in cell division: its role in bovine granulosa cells mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Terzaghi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present studies were aimed to assess Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1 role in regulating bovine granulosa cells (bGC mitosis. First, we performed immunofluorescence studies on in vitro cultured bGC collected from antral follicles, which showed that PGRMC1 localizes to the spindle apparatus in mitotic cells. Then, to evaluate PGRMC1 effect on cell proliferation we silenced its expression with RNA interference technique (RNAi. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting confirmed down-regulation of PGRMC1 expression, when compared to CTRL-RNAi treated bGC (p<0.05. After 72h of culture, PGRMC1 silencing determined a lower growth rate (p<0.05 and a higher percentage of cells arrested at G2/M phase as assessed by flowcytometry (p<0.05. Accordingly, live imaging studies revealed more aberrant mitosis and a delayed M-phase in PGRMC1-RNAi treated cells compared to CTRL-RNAi group (p<0.05. These data confirmed that PGRMC1 is directly involved in bGC mitosis and ongoing preliminary studies are aimed to elucidate its putative mechanisms of action. Since PGRMC1 is a membrane protein, we hypothesize its possible involvement in vesicular trafficking and endocytosis, which is in turn an important process to assure proper cell division. To assess this hypothesis, we have preliminarily conducted immunofluorescence and in situ proximity ligation assay experiments that showed PGRMC1 co-localization and direct interaction with clathrin. This is important since clathrin is an essential protein for both endosomes formation, and cell division acting directly on the spindle apparatus. Thus our studies set the stage for analysis aimed to further characterize PGRMC1’s mechanism of action in mitotic cell.

  10. The cell birth marker BrdU does not affect recruitment of subsequent cell divisions in the adult avian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattan, Anat; Ayali, Amir; Barnea, Anat

    2015-01-01

    BrdU is commonly used to quantify neurogenesis but also causes mutation and has mitogenic, transcriptional, and translational effects. In mammalian studies, attention had been given to its dosage, but in birds such examination was not conducted. Our previous study suggested that BrdU might affect subsequent cell divisions and neuronal recruitment in the brain. Furthermore, this effect seemed to increase with time from treatment. Accordingly, we examined whether BrdU might alter neurogenesis in the adult avian brain. We compared recruitment of [(3)H]-thymidine(+) neurons in brains of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) when no BrdU was involved and when BrdU was given 1 or 3 months prior to [(3)H]-thymidine. In nidopallium caudale, HVC, and hippocampus, no differences were found between groups in densities and percentages of [(3)H]-thymidine(+) neurons. The number of silver grains per [(3)H]-thymidine(+) neuronal nucleus and their distribution were similar across groups. Additionally, time did not affect the results. The results indicate that the commonly used dosage of BrdU in birds has no long-term effects on subsequent cell divisions and neuronal recruitment. This conclusion is also important in neuronal replacement experiments, where BrdU and another cell birth marker are given, with relatively long intervals between them. PMID:25759813

  11. ALIX and ESCRT-III Coordinately Control Cytokinetic Abscission during Germline Stem Cell Division In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenes, Åsmund H.; Malerød, Lene; Christensen, Anette Lie; Steen, Chloé B.; Mathieu, Juliette; Nezis, Ioannis P.; Liestøl, Knut; Huynh, Jean-René; Stenmark, Harald; Haglund, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Abscission is the final step of cytokinesis that involves the cleavage of the intercellular bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Recent studies have given novel insight into the spatiotemporal regulation and molecular mechanisms controlling abscission in cultured yeast and human cells. The mechanisms of abscission in living metazoan tissues are however not well understood. Here we show that ALIX and the ESCRT-III component Shrub are required for completion of abscission during Drosophila female germline stem cell (fGSC) division. Loss of ALIX or Shrub function in fGSCs leads to delayed abscission and the consequent formation of stem cysts in which chains of daughter cells remain interconnected to the fGSC via midbody rings and fusome. We demonstrate that ALIX and Shrub interact and that they co-localize at midbody rings and midbodies during cytokinetic abscission in fGSCs. Mechanistically, we show that the direct interaction between ALIX and Shrub is required to ensure cytokinesis completion with normal kinetics in fGSCs. We conclude that ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control abscission in Drosophila fGSCs and that their complex formation is required for accurate abscission timing in GSCs in vivo. PMID:25635693

  12. Single-cell analysis reveals a novel uncultivated magnetotactic bacterium within the candidate division OP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; Katzmann, Emanuel; Wanner, Gerhard; Peplies, Jörg; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of prokaryotes that orient along magnetic fields using membrane-coated magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) or greigite (Fe(3) S(4) ), the magnetosomes. Previous phylogenetic analysis of MTB has been limited to few cultivated species and most abundant members of natural populations, which were assigned to Proteobacteria and the Nitrospirae phyla. Here, we describe a single cell-based approach that allowed the targeted phylogenetic and ultrastructural analysis of the magnetotactic bacterium SKK-01, which was low abundant in sediments of Lake Chiemsee. Morphologically conspicuous single cells of SKK-01 were micromanipulated from magnetically collected multi-species MTB populations, which was followed by whole genome amplification and ultrastructural analysis of sorted cells. Besides intracellular sulphur inclusions, the large ovoid cells of SKK-01 harbour ∼175 bullet-shaped magnetosomes arranged in multiple chains that consist of magnetite as revealed by TEM and EDX analysis. Sequence analysis of 16 and 23S rRNA genes from amplified genomic DNA as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned SKK-01 to the candidate division OP3, which so far lacks any cultivated representatives. SKK-01 represents the first morphotype that can be assigned to the OP3 group as well as the first magnetotactic member of the PVC superphylum. PMID:22003954

  13. Interaction of Mouse Pem Protein and Cell Division Cycle 37 Homolog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen GUO; Yue-Qin LI; Shi-Qian LI; Zhi-Wen LUO; Xin ZHANG; Dong-Sheng TANG; Tian-Hong ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Mouse Pem, a homeobox gene, encodes a protein consisting of 210 amino acid residues. To study the function of mouse Pem protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen the library of 7-day mouse embryo with full-length mouse Pem eDNA. Fifty-two colonies were obtained after 1.57×108 colonies were screened by nutrition limitation and β-galactosidase assay. Seven individual insert fragments were obtained from the library, and three of them were identified, one of which was confirmed to be the cell division cycle 37 (Cdc37) homolog gene by sequencing. The interaction between mouse Pem and Cdc37homolog was then confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and the possible interaction model was suggested.

  14. Adaptive drug resistance mediated by root-nodulation-cell division efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C; Ramos, J L

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major therapeutic problem. Bacteria use the same mechanisms for developing resistance to antibiotics as they do for developing resistance to biocide compounds present in some cleaning and personal care products. Root-nodulation-cell division (RND) family efflux pumps are a common means of multidrug resistance, and induction of their expression can explain the observed cross-resistance found between antibiotics and biocides in laboratory strains. Hence, there is a relationship between the active chemicals used in household products, organic solvents and antibiotics. The widespread use of biocide-containing modern-day household products may promote the development of microbial resistance and, in particular, cross-resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19220351

  15. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  16. From cell differentiation to cell collectives : Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In thi

  17. Aspects of plant cell growth and the actin cytoskeleton: lessons from root hairs

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijter, de, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main topic the thesis addresses is the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the growth process of plant cells. Plant growth implies a combination of cell division and cell expansion. The cytoskeleton, which exists of microtubules and actin filaments, plays a major role in both processes. Before cell growth takes place, a new cell is formed by cell division. The orientation of the division plane most often predicts the orientation of cell expansion, and a correct positioning of the division p...

  18. Characterization of a null allelic mutant of the rice NAL1 gene reveals its role in regulating cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    Full Text Available Leaf morphology is closely associated with cell division. In rice, mutations in Narrow leaf 1 (NAL1 show narrow leaf phenotypes. Previous studies have shown that NAL1 plays a role in regulating vein patterning and increasing grain yield in indica cultivars, but its role in leaf growth and development remains unknown. In this report, we characterized two allelic mutants of NARROW LEAF1 (NAL1, nal1-2 and nal1-3, both of which showed a 50% reduction in leaf width and length, as well as a dwarf culm. Longitudinal and transverse histological analyses of leaves and internodes revealed that cell division was suppressed in the anticlinal orientation but enhanced in the periclinal orientation in the mutants, while cell size remained unaltered. In addition to defects in cell proliferation, the mutants showed abnormal midrib in leaves. Map-based cloning revealed that nal1-2 is a null allelic mutant of NAL1 since both the whole promoter and a 404-bp fragment in the first exon of NAL1 were deleted, and that a 6-bp fragment was deleted in the mutant nal1-3. We demonstrated that NAL1 functions in the regulation of cell division as early as during leaf primordia initiation. The altered transcript level of G1- and S-phase-specific genes suggested that NAL1 affects cell cycle regulation. Heterogeneous expression of NAL1 in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe further supported that NAL1 affects cell division. These results suggest that NAL1 controls leaf width and plant height through its effects on cell division.

  19. Effect of gamma-irradiation and colchicine on cell division and differentiation of xylem elements in citrus limon juice vesicle cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying doses of gamma irradiation on cell division and cytodifferentiation of tracheary elements in cultured juice vesicles of Citrus limon (L) Burmann var. Assam lemon were investigated. Low radiation doses stimulated cell division and differentiation of xylem fibres, sclereids and tracheids in explants given up to 10 Gy of gamma rays. Although cell division and cytodifferentiation of fibers and sclereids occurred in explants exposed to 150 dose of Gy radiation, the intensity of differentiation was much less than that induced by 10 Gy radiation dose. Amongst the differential elements, tracheids were more sensitive to radiation than fibres and sclereids. The requirement of cell division for differentiation of xylem cells was also studied by using different concentrations of colchicine in Citrus limon juice vesicle cultures. It was found that the low concentrations of colchicine permitted normal cell division and also resulted in normal differentiation of xylem cells; higher colchicine concentration, however, inhibited cell division as well as differentiation and resulted in an abnormal differentiation of tracheary element. A positive correlation between intensity of nucleic acid staining and cell division in both the above-mentioned experiments was qualitatively confirmed by Azur B staining test of nucleic acid. Thus, it was concluded that juice vesicle parenchyma cells go through nucleic acid synthesis, followed by cell division before differentiation. (author)

  20. Intracellular photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in protonemata of the fern Adiantum [Pteridophyta]: Further analyses by polarized light irradiation and cell centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular localization of the photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in single-celled protonemata of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. was investigated using polarized light irradiation and protonemal cell centrifugation. The response to irradiation with polarized blue light showed no dependence on the direction of light polarization. However, centrifugation of the protonemata followed by microbeam irradiation showed that the site of blue light perception could be displaced together with the nucleus. Centrifugal treatment changed the distribution of intracellular organelles at the time of light exposure and basipetally displaced the nucleus about 90μm. This treatment had no effect on the induction of cell division with blue light if the protonemata were centrifuged again acropetally after the light treatment. Microbeam (30×30 μm2) irradiation with blue light of the apical 45–75 βm region, the receptive site of blue light in non-centrifuged cell, did not induce cell division. However, cell division was induced by irradiation of the nucleus-containing region, indicating that the photoreceptive site was displaced together with the nucleus by the centrifugation. These results suggest that the blue light receptor regulating cell division in Adiantum protonemata is not likely to be located on the plasma membrane. (author)

  1. The Snail protein family regulates neuroblast expression of inscuteable and string, genes involved in asymmetry and cell division in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S I; Ip, Y T

    2001-12-01

    Delaminated neuroblasts in Drosophila function as stem cells during embryonic central nervous system development. They go through repeated asymmetric divisions to generate multiple ganglion mother cells, which divide only once more to produce postmitotic neurons. Snail, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, is a pan-neural protein, based on its extensive expression in neuroblasts. Previous results have demonstrated that Snail and related proteins, Worniu and Escargot, have redundant and essential functions in the nervous system. We show that the Snail family of proteins control central nervous system development by regulating genes involved in asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts. In mutant embryos that have the three genes deleted, the expression of inscuteable is significantly lowered, while the expression of other genes that participate in asymmetric division, including miranda, staufen and prospero, appears normal. The deletion mutants also have much reduced expression of string, suggesting that a key component that drives neuroblast cell division is abnormal. Consistent with the gene expression defects, the mutant embryos lose the asymmetric localization of prospero RNA in neuroblasts and lose the staining of Prospero protein that is normally present in ganglion mother cells. Simultaneous expression of inscuteable and string in the snail family deletion mutant efficiently restores Prospero expression in ganglion mother cells, demonstrating that the two genes are key targets of Snail in neuroblasts. Mutation of the dCtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the Snail protein leads to reduction of the Snail function in central nervous system. These results suggest that the Snail family of proteins control both asymmetry and cell division of neuroblasts by activating, probably indirectly, the expression of inscuteable and string. PMID:11731456

  2. The role of GlsA in the evolution of asymmetric cell division in the green alga Volvox carteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Fowler, Rachel; Tam, Lai-wa; Edwards, Lisseth; Miller, Stephen M

    2003-07-01

    Volvox carteri, a green alga in the order Volvocales, contains two completely differentiated cell types, small motile somatic cells and large reproductive cells called gonidia, that are set apart from each other during embryogenesis by a series of visibly asymmetric cell divisions. Mutational analysis has revealed a class of genes (gonidialess, gls) that are required specifically for asymmetric divisions in V. carteri, but that are dispensable for symmetric divisions. Previously we cloned one of these genes, glsA, and showed that it encodes a chaperone-like protein (GlsA) that has close orthologs in a diverse set of eukaryotes, ranging from fungi to vertebrates and higher plants. In the present study we set out to explore the role of glsA in the evolution of asymmetric division in the volvocine algae by cloning and characterizing a glsA ortholog from one of the simplest members of the group, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which does not undergo asymmetric divisions. This ortholog (which we have named gar1, for glsA related) is predicted to encode a protein that is 70% identical to GlsA overall, and that is most closely related to GlsA in the same domains that are most highly conserved between GlsA and its other known orthologs. We report that a gar1 transgene fully complements the glsA mutation in V. carteri, a result that suggests that asymmetric division probably arose through the modification of a gene whose product interacts with GlsA, but not through a modification of glsA itself. PMID:12743823

  3. The Effect of Olive Oil Mill Effluent on the Mitotic Cell Division and Total Protein Amount of the Root Tips of Triticum aestivumL.

    OpenAIRE

    Aybeke, Mehmet; OLGUN, Göksel

    2000-01-01

    In this work sitotoxic and mutagenic effects Olive Oil Mill Effluent (OOME) on the root tips of Triticum aestivumL. were investigated. In this purpose, germination rate of seeds, mitotic division abnormalities and total protein amounts were evaluated. The seeds kept in various OOME concentrastions, it was determinated that germination rate decreased, whilst mitotic abnormalities and mitotic cell division frequency increased. Especially, the increased cell division frequency was of signif...

  4. A systematic analysis of cell cycle regulators in yeast reveals that most factors act independently of cell size to control initiation of division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Hoose

    Full Text Available Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene deletions that altered cell cycle progression did not change cell size. Our results highlight a strong requirement for ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis for initiation of cell division. We also identified numerous factors that have not been previously implicated in cell cycle control mechanisms. We found that CBS, which catalyzes the synthesis of cystathionine from serine and homocysteine, advances START in two ways: by promoting cell growth, which requires CBS's catalytic activity, and by a separate function, which does not require CBS's catalytic activity. CBS defects cause disease in humans, and in animals CBS has vital, non-catalytic, unknown roles. Hence, our results may be relevant for human biology. Taken together, these findings significantly expand the range of factors required for the timely initiation of cell division. The systematic identification of non-essential regulators of cell division we describe will be a valuable resource for analysis of cell cycle progression in yeast and other organisms.

  5. The deletion of bacterial dynamin and flotillin genes results in pleiotrophic effects on cell division, cell growth and in cell shape maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dempwolff Felix

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, dynamin and flotillin are involved in processes such as endocytosis and lipid raft formation, respectively. Dynamin is a GTPase that exerts motor-like activity during the pinching off of vesicles, while flotillins are coiled coil rich membrane proteins with no known enzymatic activity. Bacteria also possess orthologs of both classes of proteins, but their function has been unclear. Results We show that deletion of the single dynA or floT genes lead to no phenotype or a mild defect in septum formation in the case of the dynA gene, while dynA floT double mutant cells were highly elongated and irregularly shaped, although the MreB cytoskeleton appeared to be normal. DynA colocalizes with FtsZ, and the dynA deletion strain shows aberrant FtsZ rings in a subpopulation of cells. The mild division defect of the dynA deletion is exacerbated by an additional deletion in ezrA, which affects FtsZ ring formation, and also by the deletion of a late division gene (divIB, indicating that DynA affects several steps in cell division. DynA and mreB deletions generated a synthetic defect in cell shape maintenance, showing that MreB and DynA play non-epistatic functions in cell shape maintenance. TIRF microscopy revealed that FloT forms many dynamic membrane assemblies that frequently colocalize with the division septum. The deletion of dynA did not change the pattern of localization of FloT, and vice versa, showing that the two proteins play non redundant roles in a variety of cellular processes. Expression of dynamin or flotillin T in eukaryotic S2 cells revealed that both proteins assemble at the cell membrane. While FloT formed patch structures, DynA built up tubulated structures extending away from the cells. Conclusions Bacillus subtilis dynamin ortholog DynA plays a role during cell division and in cell shape maintenance. It shows a genetic link with flotillin T, with both proteins playing non-redundant functions at

  6. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  7. LocZ is a new cell division protein involved in proper septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holečková, Nela; Doubravová, Linda; Massidda, Orietta; Molle, Virginie; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-13. ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/12/1568; GA ČR GAP302/12/0256 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cell division * septum placement * Streptococcus pneumoniae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.786, year: 2014

  8. LIN-39/Hox triggers cell division and represses EFF-1/fusogen-dependent vulval cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shemer, Gidi; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    General mechanisms by which Hox genes establish cell fates are known. However, a few Hox effectors mediating cell behaviors have been identified. Here we found the first effector of LIN-39/HoxD4/Dfd in Caenorhabditis elegans. In specific vulval precursor cells (VPCs), LIN-39 represses early and late expression of EFF-1, a membrane protein essential for cell fusion. Repression of eff-1 is also achieved by the activity of CEH-20/Exd/Pbx, a known cofactor of Hox proteins. Unfused VPCs in lin-39(...

  9. Temperature stress promotes cell division arrest in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumares, Júlia A P; Morão, Luana Galvão; Martins, Paula M M; Martins, Daniela A B; Gomes, Eleni; Belasque, José; Ferreira, Henrique

    2016-04-01

    Citrus canker is an economically important disease that affects orange production in some of the most important producing areas around the world. It represents a great threat to the Brazilian and North American citriculture, particularly to the states of São Paulo and Florida, which together correspond to the biggest orange juice producers in the world. The etiological agent of this disease is the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), which grows optimally in laboratory cultures at ~30°C. To investigate how temperatures differing from 30°C influence the development of Xcc, we subjected the bacterium to thermal stresses, and afterward scored its recovery capability. In addition, we analyzed cell morphology and some markers of essential cellular processes that could indicate the extent of the heat-induced damage. We found that the exposure of Xcc to 37°C for a period of 6 h led to a cell cycle arrest at the division stage. Thermal stress might have also interfered with the DNA replication and/or the chromosome segregation apparatuses, since cells displayed an increased number of sister origins side-by-side within rods. Additionally, Xcc treated at 37°C was still able to induce citrus canker symptoms, showing that thermal stress did not affect the ability of Xcc to colonize the host citrus. At 40-42°C, Xcc lost viability and became unable to induce disease symptoms in citrus. Our results provide evidence about essential cellular mechanisms perturbed by temperature, and can be potentially explored as a new method for Xanthomonas citri synchronization in cell cycle studies, as well as for the sanitation of plant material. PMID:26663580

  10. Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Affect Parasite Cell Division and Increase the Survival of Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S Martins-Duarte

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, is a worldwide disease whose clinical manifestations include encephalitis and congenital malformations in newborns. Previously, we described the synthesis of new ethyl-ester derivatives of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin with ~40-fold increased activity against T. gondii in vitro, compared with the original compound. Cipro derivatives are expected to target the parasite's DNA gyrase complex in the apicoplast. The activity of these compounds in vivo, as well as their mode of action, remained thus far uncharacterized. Here, we examined the activity of the Cipro derivatives in vivo, in a model of acute murine toxoplasmosis. In addition, we investigated the cellular effects T. gondii tachyzoites in vitro, by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. When compared with Cipro treatment, 7-day treatments with Cipro derivatives increased mouse survival significantly, with 13-25% of mice surviving for up to 60 days post-infection (vs. complete lethality 10 days post-infection, with Cipro treatment. Light microscopy examination early (6 and 24h post-infection revealed that 6-h treatments with Cipro derivatives inhibited the initial event of parasite cell division inside host cells, in an irreversible manner. By TEM and immunofluorescence, the main cellular effects observed after treatment with Cipro derivatives and Cipro were cell scission inhibition--with the appearance of 'tethered' parasites--malformation of the inner membrane complex, and apicoplast enlargement and missegregation. Interestingly, tethered daughter cells resulting from Cipro derivatives, and also Cipro, treatment did not show MORN1 cap or centrocone localization. The biological activity of Cipro derivatives against C. parvum, an apicomplexan species that lacks the apicoplast, is, approximately, 50 fold lower than that in T. gondii tachyzoites, supporting that these compounds targets the apicoplast. Our results

  11. Radmis, a novel mitotic spindle protein that functions in cell division of neural progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Yumoto

    Full Text Available Developmental dynamics of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs are crucial for embryonic and adult neurogenesis, but its regulatory factors are not fully understood. By differential subtractive screening with NSPCs versus their differentiated progenies, we identified the radmis (radial fiber and mitotic spindle/ckap2l gene, a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP enriched in NSPCs. Radmis is a putative substrate for the E3-ubiquitin ligase, anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C, and is degraded via the KEN box. Radmis was highly expressed in regions of active neurogenesis throughout life, and its distribution was dynamically regulated during NSPC division. In embryonic and perinatal brains, radmis localized to bipolar mitotic spindles and radial fibers (basal processes of dividing NSPCs. As central nervous system development proceeded, radmis expression was lost in most brain regions, except for several neurogenic regions. In adult brain, radmis expression persisted in the mitotic spindles of both slowly-dividing stem cells and rapid amplifying progenitors. Overexpression of radmis in vitro induced hyper-stabilization of microtubules, severe defects in mitotic spindle formation, and mitotic arrest. In vivo gain-of-function using in utero electroporation revealed that radmis directed a reduction in NSPC proliferation and a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, causing a reduction in the Tbr2-positive basal progenitor population and shrinkage of the embryonic subventricular zone. Besides, radmis loss-of-function by shRNAs induced the multipolar mitotic spindle structure, accompanied with the catastrophe of chromosome segregation including the long chromosome bridge between two separating daughter nuclei. These findings uncover the indispensable role of radmis in mitotic spindle formation and cell-cycle progression of NSPCs.

  12. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  13. Structure of the bacterial cell division determinant GpsB and its interaction with penicillin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismondo, Jeanine; Cleverley, Robert M; Lane, Harriet V; Großhennig, Stephanie; Steglich, Anne; Möller, Lars; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Hain, Torsten; Lewis, Richard J; Halbedel, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Each bacterium has to co-ordinate its growth with division to ensure genetic stability of the population. Consequently, cell division and growth are tightly regulated phenomena, albeit different bacteria utilise one of several alternative regulatory mechanisms to maintain control. Here we consider GpsB, which is linked to cell growth and division in Gram-positive bacteria. ΔgpsB mutants of the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes show severe lysis, division and growth defects due to distortions of cell wall biosynthesis. Consistent with this premise, GpsB interacts both in vitro and in vivo with the major bi-functional penicillin-binding protein. We solved the crystal structure of GpsB and the interaction interfaces in both proteins are identified and validated. The inactivation of gpsB results in strongly attenuated virulence in animal experiments, comparable in degree to classical listerial virulence factor mutants. Therefore, GpsB is essential for in vitro and in vivo growth of a highly virulent food-borne pathogen, suggesting that GpsB could be a target for the future design of novel antibacterials. PMID:26575090

  14. Different Degree in Proteasome Malfunction Has Various Effects on Root Growth Possibly through Preventing Cell Division and Promoting Autophagic Vacuolization

    OpenAIRE

    Xianyong Sheng; Qian Wei; Liping Jiang; Xue Li; Yuan Gao; Li Wang

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a vital role in plant development. But the effects of proteasome malfunction on root growth, and the mechanism underlying this involvement remains unclear. In the present study, the effects of proteasome inhibitors on Arabidopsis root growth were studied through the analysis of the root length, and meristem size and cell length in maturation zone using FM4-64, and cell-division potential using GFP fusion cyclin B, and accumulation of ubiquitinated protei...

  15. Brassinazole resistant 1 (BZR1)-dependent brassinosteroid signalling pathway leads to ectopic activation of quiescent cell division and suppresses columella stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hak-Soo; Kim, Yoon; Pham, Giang; Kim, Ju Won; Song, Ji-Hye; Lee, Yew; Hwang, Yong-Sic; Roux, Stanley J; Kim, Soo-Hwan

    2015-08-01

    Previous publications have shown that BRI1 EMS suppressor 1 (BES1), a positive regulator of the brassinosteroid (BR) signalling pathway, enhances cell divisions in the quiescent centre (QC) and stimulates columella stem cell differentiation. Here, it is demonstrated that BZR1, a BES1 homologue, also promotes cell divisions in the QC, but it suppresses columella stem cell differentiation, opposite to the action of BES1. In addition, BR and its BZR1-mediated signalling pathway are shown to alter the expression/subcellular distribution of pin-formed (PINs), which may result in changes in auxin movement. BR promotes intense nuclear accumulation of BZR1 in the root tip area, and the binding of BZR1 to the promoters of several root development-regulating genes, modulating their expression in the root stem cell niche area. These BZR1-mediated signalling cascades may account for both the ectopic activation of QC cell divisions as well as the suppression of the columella stem cell differentiation. They could also inhibit auxin-dependent distal stem cell differentiation by antagonizing the auxin/WOX5-dependent pathway. In conclusion, BZR1-/BES1-mediated BR signalling pathways show differential effects on the maintenance of root apical meristem activities: they stimulate ectopic QC division while they show opposite effects on the differentiation of distal columella stem cells in a BR concentration- and BZR1-/BES1-dependent manner. PMID:26136267

  16. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Arora, M.; Anil, A.C.; Burgess, K.; Delany, J.E.; Mesbahi, E.

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first...

  17. Different degree in proteasome malfunction has various effects on root growth possibly through preventing cell division and promoting autophagic vacuolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianyong Sheng

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a vital role in plant development. But the effects of proteasome malfunction on root growth, and the mechanism underlying this involvement remains unclear. In the present study, the effects of proteasome inhibitors on Arabidopsis root growth were studied through the analysis of the root length, and meristem size and cell length in maturation zone using FM4-64, and cell-division potential using GFP fusion cyclin B, and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins using immunofluorescence labeling, and autophagy activity using LysoTracker and MDC. The results indicated that lower concentration of proteasome inhibitors promoted root growth, whereas higher concentration of inhibitors had the opposite effects. The accumulation of cyclin B was linked to MG132-induced decline in meristem size, indicating that proteasome malfunction prevented cell division. Besides, MG132-induced accumulation of the ubiquitinated proteins was associated with the increasing fluorescence signal of LysoTracker and MDC in the elongation zone, revealing a link between the activation of autophagy and proteasome malfunction. These results suggest that weak proteasome malfunction activates moderate autophagy and promotes cell elongation, which compensates the inhibitor-induced reduction of cell division, resulting in long roots. Whereas strong proteasome malfunction induces severe autophagy and disturbs cell elongation, resulting in short roots.

  18. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division

  19. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  20. Cell division factors from crown gall tumors: a strategy for structural elucidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitogenic compounds present in extracts of Vinca rosea crown gall tumor tissue were investigated. An isolation procedure, consisting of solvent partitions and reverse phase chromatography, has yielded a group of isomeric compounds which show activity in the tobacco pith bioassay. Initial characterizations revealed an unsaturated base, a sugar residue, a β-linked glucose, an allylic alcohol, and two methyl groups. A two part strategy of mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) was envisioned. The aglycone structure would be determined by MS and the regiochemical relationships among the structural units would be defined by 1H NMR data. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by the structure assignment of a specific inhibitor of β-D-glucuronidase, 2(S)-carboxy-3(R),4(R),5(S)-trihydroxypiperidine. The relative stereochemistry of the hydroxyls was revealed by 1H NMR and the absolute configuration was deduced by a comparison of Cotton effects with a model compound. The use of 1H NMR to establish regiochemical relationships was investigated. Terpenes containing quaternary carbons and methyl groups were excellent models for the regiochemical problems presented by the mitogenic factors. This 1H NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the cell division factor structure problem. These data, with information from two dimensional nOe experiments, have defined some of the regio-relationships among the structural units present in the isolated factors

  1. The simulation model of growth and cell divisions for the root apex with an apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska-Stachowiak, Anna; Nakielski, Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to seed plants, the roots of most ferns have a single apical cell which is the ultimate source of all cells in the root. The apical cell has a tetrahedral shape and divides asymmetrically. The root cap derives from the distal division face, while merophytes derived from three proximal division faces contribute to the root proper. The merophytes are produced sequentially forming three sectors along a helix around the root axis. During development, they divide and differentiate in a predictable pattern. Such growth causes cell pattern of the root apex to be remarkably regular and self-perpetuating. The nature of this regularity remains unknown. This paper shows the 2D simulation model for growth of the root apex with the apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata. The field of growth rates of the organ, prescribed by the model, is of a tensor type (symplastic growth) and cells divide taking principal growth directions into account. The simulations show how the cell pattern in a longitudinal section of the apex develops in time. The virtual root apex grows realistically and its cell pattern is similar to that observed in anatomical sections. The simulations indicate that the cell pattern regularity results from cell divisions which are oriented with respect to principal growth directions. Such divisions are essential for maintenance of peri-anticlinal arrangement of cell walls and coordinated growth of merophytes during the development. The highly specific division program that takes place in merophytes prior to differentiation seems to be regulated at the cellular level. PMID:23989670

  2. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  3. Deliberate ROS production and auxin synergistically trigger the asymmetrical division generating the subsidiary cells in Zea mays stomatal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanos, Pantelis; Galatis, Basil; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Subsidiary cell generation in Poaceae is an outstanding example of local intercellular stimulation. An inductive stimulus emanates from the guard cell mother cells (GMCs) towards their laterally adjacent subsidiary cell mother cells (SMCs) and triggers the asymmetrical division of the latter. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) immunolocalization in Zea mays protoderm confirmed that the GMCs function as local sources of auxin and revealed that auxin is polarly accumulated between GMCs and SMCs in a timely-dependent manner. Besides, staining techniques showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) exhibit a closely similar, also time-dependent, pattern of appearance suggesting ROS implication in subsidiary cell formation. This phenomenon was further investigated by using the specific NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, menadione which leads to ROS overproduction, and H2O2. Treatments with diphenylene iodonium, N-acetyl-cysteine, and menadione specifically blocked SMC polarization and asymmetrical division. In contrast, H2O2 promoted the establishment of SMC polarity and subsequently subsidiary cell formation in "younger" protodermal areas. Surprisingly, H2O2 favored the asymmetrical division of the intervening cells of the stomatal rows leading to the creation of extra apical subsidiary cells. Moreover, H2O2 altered IAA localization, whereas synthetic auxin analogue 1-napthaleneacetic acid enhanced ROS accumulation. Combined treatments with ROS modulators along with 1-napthaleneacetic acid or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, an auxin efflux inhibitor, confirmed the crosstalk between ROS and auxin functioning during subsidiary cell generation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ROS are critical partners of auxin during development of Z. mays stomatal complexes. The interplay between auxin and ROS seems to be spatially and temporarily regulated. PMID:26250135

  4. Asymmetric Wnt Pathway Signaling Facilitates Stem Cell-Like Divisions via the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase FRK-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila, Danielle; Calderon, Adriana; Baldwin, Austin T; Moore, Kelsey M; Watson, McLane; Phillips, Bryan T; Putzke, Aaron P

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division is critical during development, as it influences processes such as cell fate specification and cell migration. We have characterized FRK-1, a homolog of the mammalian Fer nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, and found it to be required for differentiation and maintenance of epithelial cell types, including the stem cell-like seam cells of the hypodermis. A genomic knockout of frk-1, allele ok760, results in severely uncoordinated larvae that arrest at the L1 stage and have an excess number of lateral hypodermal cells that appear to have lost asymmetry in the stem cell-like divisions of the seam cell lineage. frk-1(ok760) mutants show that there are excess lateral hypodermal cells that are abnormally shaped and smaller in size compared to wild type, a defect that could be rescued only in a manner dependent on the kinase activity of FRK-1. Additionally, we observed a significant change in the expression of heterochronic regulators in frk-1(ok760) mutants. However, frk-1(ok760) mutants do not express late, nonseam hypodermal GFP markers, suggesting the seam cells do not precociously differentiate as adult-hyp7 cells. Finally, our data also demonstrate a clear role for FRK-1 in seam cell proliferation, as eliminating FRK-1 during the L3-L4 transition results in supernumerary seam cell nuclei that are dependent on asymmetric Wnt signaling. Specifically, we observe aberrant POP-1 and WRM-1 localization that is dependent on the presence of FRK-1 and APR-1. Overall, our data suggest a requirement for FRK-1 in maintaining the identity and proliferation of seam cells primarily through an interaction with the asymmetric Wnt pathway. PMID:26358719

  5. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis. PMID:27113856

  6. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

    OpenAIRE

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs in...

  7. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase: effects on nucleic acid synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather, N F; Orr, E; Holland, I B

    1980-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to the antibiotic clorobiocin are also coumermycin resistant, and the mutation to resistance in at least one mutant was mapped near gyrB. We conclude, therefore, that clorobiocin inhibits deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase, and the drug was used to probe the role of this enzyme in vivo. Deozyribonucleic acid synthesis was preferentially inhibited but not completely blocked by the antibiotic. Transcription and cell division were also markedly affected. However, ...

  8. Spatial and Temporal Quantitative Analysis of Cell Division and Elongation Rate in Growing Wheat Leaves under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Leaf growth in grasses is determined by the cell division and elongation rates, with the duration of cell elongation being one of the processes that is the most sensitive to salinity. Our objective was to investigate the distribution profiles of cell production, cell length and the duration of cell elongation in the growing zone of the wheat leaf during the steady growth phase. Plants were grown in loamy soil with or without 120 mmol/L NaCl in a growth chamber, and harvested at day 3 after leaf 4 emerged. Results show that the elongation rate of leaf 4 was reduced by 120 mmol/L NaCl during the steady growth phase. The distribution profile of the lengths of abaxial epidermal cells of leaf 4 during the steady growth stage shows a sigmoidal pattern along the leaf axis for both treatments. Although salinity did not affect or even increased the length of the epidermal cells in some locations in the growth zone compared to the control treatment, the final length of the epidermal cells was reduced by 14% at 120 mmol/L NaCl. Thus, we concluded that the observed reduction in the leaf elongation rate derived in part from the reduced cell division rate and either the shortened cell elongation zone or shortened duration of cell elongation. This suggests that more attention should be paid to the effects of salinity on those properties of cell production and the period of cell maturation that are related to the properties of cell wall.

  9. A Systematic Analysis of Cell Cycle Regulators in Yeast Reveals That Most Factors Act Independently of Cell Size to Control Initiation of Division

    OpenAIRE

    Scott A Hoose; Jeremy A Rawlings; Kelly, Michelle M.; M Camille Leitch; Ababneh, Qotaiba O; Robles, Juan P.; David Taylor; Hoover, Evelyn M.; Bethel Hailu; McEnery, Kayla A.; S Sabina Downing; Deepika Kaushal; Yi Chen; Alex Rife; Kirtan A Brahmbhatt

    2012-01-01

    Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene dele...

  10. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2016-04-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  11. A new loss-of-function allele 28y reveals a role of ARGONAUTE1 in limiting asymmetric division of stomatal lineage ground cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kezhen Yangy; Min Jiangy; Jie Le

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana L., stomata are produced through a series of divisions including asymmetric and symmetric divisions. Asymmetric entry division of meristemoid mother cellproduces two daughter cells, the smal er meristemoid and the larger sister cell, a stomatal lineage ground cell(SLGC). Stomatal lineage ground cells can differentiate into epidermal pavement cells but have the potential to divide asymmetrical y, spacing divisions, to create satel ite meristemoids. Peptide ligands and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) and ERECTA family receptors regulate the initiation of stomatal lineages, activity, and orientation of spacing divisions. Here, we reported that a natural mutant 28y displayed an increased stomatal density and index. Using map-based cloning, we identified mutation in ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) as the cause of 28y phenotypes. Time-lapse tracing of stomatal lineage cells reveals that stomatal overproduction in 28y is caused by the excessive asymmetric spacing division of SLGCs.Further genetic results demonstrated that AGO1 acts down-stream of TMM and negatively regulates the SPCH transcripts, but in a brassinosteroid-independent manner. Upregulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE16 (AGL16) in 28y mutants suggests that AGO1 is required to restrict AGL16-mediated stomatal spacing divisions, an miRNA pathway in addition to ligand-receptor signaling modules.

  12. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson, Anthony J.

    2013-03-25

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  13. Universal Protein Distributions in a Model of Cell Growth and Division

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Osmanovic, Dino; Rabin, Yitzhak; Salman, Hanna; Stein, D L

    2015-01-01

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast exhibit a universal skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties are reproduced by protein accumulation and division dynamics across generations. We present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured universal distribution shape with high accuracy, and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  14. ftsZ gene and plastid division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Plastid is one of the most important cellular organelles, the normal division process of plastid is essential for the differentiation and development of plant cells. For a long time, morphological observations and genetic analyses to special mutants are the major research fields of plastid division, but the molecular mechanisms underlying plastid division are largely unknown. Because of the endosymbiotic origin, plastid division might have mechanisms in common with those involved in bacterial cell division. It has been proved that several prokaryotic cell division genes also participate in the plastid division. Recently, the mechanisms of prokaryotic cell division have been well documented, which provides a valuable paradigm for understanding the plastid division mechanisms. In plants, the functional analyses of ftsZ, a key gene involved both in bacteria and plastid division, have established the solid foundation for people to understand the plastid division in molecular level. In this paper we will make a review for the research history and progress of plastid division.

  15. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adnalizawati, A. Siti Noor; Nazlina, I. [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaacob, W. A. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The in vitro activity of methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark was studied against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and MRSA BM1 (clinical strain) using time-kill curves in conjunction with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extract showed more markedly bactericidal activity in MRSA BM1 clinical strain within less than 4 h by 6.25-12.5 mg/mL and within 6 h by 1.56 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of MRSA BM1 revealed distortion of cell whilst transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption in cell wall division.

  16. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnalizawati, A. Siti Noor; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    The in vitro activity of methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark was studied against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and MRSA BM1 (clinical strain) using time-kill curves in conjunction with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extract showed more markedly bactericidal activity in MRSA BM1 clinical strain within less than 4 h by 6.25-12.5 mg/mL and within 6 h by 1.56 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of MRSA BM1 revealed distortion of cell whilst transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption in cell wall division.

  17. Cell death in the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus of male and female lamb fetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Radhika C.; Scheldrup, Melissa; Meaker, Mary; Stormshak, Fred; Estill, Charles T.; Roselli, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    The medial preoptic area of the adult sheep contains an ovine sexually dimorphic nucleus (oSDN) that is larger and has more neurons in males than in females. In the lamb fetus, the nascent oSDN occupies the central division of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPNc) and consists of a cluster of cells that is organized by the action of testosterone during gestational days 60 to 90 of a 147 day term pregnancy. The current study sought to determine whether programmed cell death cont...

  18. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro activity of methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark was studied against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and MRSA BM1 (clinical strain) using time-kill curves in conjunction with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extract showed more markedly bactericidal activity in MRSA BM1 clinical strain within less than 4 h by 6.25-12.5 mg/mL and within 6 h by 1.56 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of MRSA BM1 revealed distortion of cell whilst transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption in cell wall division

  19. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Lisa M; Hyde, Andrew S; MacGregor, Barbara J; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis - previously developed based on (14)C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  20. RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) is essential for male germline stem cell maintenance and division in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexei A; Olenkina, Oxana M; Kibanov, Mikhail V; Olenina, Ludmila V

    2016-06-01

    The present study showed that RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) was required intrinsically for mitotic progression and survival of germline stem cells (GSCs) and spermatogonial cells in the Drosophila melanogaster testes. We found that deficiency of Belle in the male germline resulted in a strong germ cell loss phenotype. Early germ cells are lost through cell death, whereas somatic hub and cyst cell populations are maintained. The observed phenotype is related to that of the human Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome caused by the loss of DBY (DDX3) expression in the human testes and results in a complete lack of germ cells with preservation of somatic Sertoli cells. We found the hallmarks of mitotic G2 delay in early germ cells of the larval testes of bel mutants. Both mitotic cyclins, A and B, are markedly reduced in the gonads of bel mutants. Transcription levels of cycB and cycA decrease significantly in the testes of hypomorph bel mutants. Overexpression of Cyclin B in the germline partially rescues germ cell survival, mitotic progression and fertility in the bel-RNAi knockdown testes. Taken together, these results suggest that a role of Belle in GSC maintenance and regulation of early germ cell divisions is associated with the expression control of mitotic cyclins. PMID:26876306

  1. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Yue, Kun; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  2. Systemic Control of Cell Division and Endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by Modulating CDKs in Root Tip Cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigna G. Tank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  3. SecA is required for membrane targeting of the cell division protein DivIVA in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SvenHalbedel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The conserved protein DivIVA is involved in different morphogenetic processes in Gram-positive bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, the protein localises to the cell division site and cell poles, and functions as a scaffold for proteins that regulate division site selection, and for proteins that are required for sporulation. To identify other proteins that bind to DivIVA, we performed an in vivo cross-linking experiment. A possible candidate that emerged was the secretion motor ATPase SecA. SecA mutants have been described that inhibit sporulation, and since DivIVA is necessary for sporulation, we examined the localisation of DivIVA in these mutants. Surprisingly, DivIVA was delocalised, suggesting that SecA is required for DivIVA targeting. To further corroborate this, we performed SecA depletion and inhibition experiments, which provided further indications that DivIVA localisation depends on SecA. Cell fractionation experiments showed that SecA is important for binding of DivIVA to the cell membrane. This was unexpected since DivIVA does not contain a signal sequence, and is able to bind to artificial lipid membranes in vitro without support of other proteins. SecA is required for protein secretion and membrane insertion, and therefore its role in DivIVA localisation is likely indirect. Possible alternative roles of SecA in DivIVA folding and/or targeting are discussed.

  4. The ClpP protease homologue is required for the transmission traits and cell division of the pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qin-fen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila, the intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease, exhibit characteristic transmission traits such as elevated stress tolerance, shortened length and virulence during the transition from the replication phase to the transmission phase. ClpP, the catalytic core of the Clp proteolytic complex, is widely involved in many cellular processes via the regulation of intracellular protein quality. Results In this study, we showed that ClpP was required for optimal growth of L. pneumophila at high temperatures and under several other stress conditions. We also observed that cells devoid of clpP exhibited cell elongation, incomplete cell division and compromised colony formation. Furthermore, we found that the clpP-deleted mutant was more resistant to sodium stress and failed to proliferate in the amoebae host Acanthamoeba castellanii. Conclusions The data present in this study illustrate that the ClpP protease homologue plays an important role in the expression of transmission traits and cell division of L. pneumophila, and further suggest a putative role of ClpP in virulence regulation.

  5. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kamimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of overcrowding of molecules as a natural outcome of the replication. The protocell exhibits synchrony between its division process and replication of the minority molecule. We discuss the effects of the crowding molecule on the formation of primitive structures. The generality of this result is demonstrated through the extension of our model to a hypercycle with three molecular species, where a localized layered structure of molecules continues to divide, triggered by the replication of a minority molecule at the center.

  6. The cytological changes of tobacco zygote and proembryo cells induced by beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent suggest the involvement of arabinogalactan proteins in cell division and cell plate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Miao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In dicotyledonous plant, the first asymmetric zygotic division and subsequent several cell divisions are crucial for proembryo pattern formation and later embryo development. Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a family of extensively glycosylated cell surface proteins that are thought to have important roles in various aspects of plant growth and development, including embryogenesis. Previous results from our laboratory show that AGPs are concerned with tobacco egg cell fertilization and zygotic division. However, how AGPs interact with other factors involved in zygotic division and proembryo development remains unknown. Results In this study, we used the tobacco in vitro zygote culture system and series of meticulous cell biology techniques to investigate the roles of AGPs in zygote and proembryo cell division. For the first time, we examined tobacco proembryo division patterns detailed to every cell division. The bright-field images and statistical results both revealed that with the addition of an exogenous AGPs inhibitor, beta-glucosyl Yariv (beta-GlcY reagent, the frequency of aberrant division increased remarkably in cultured tobacco zygotes and proembryos, and the cell plate specific locations of AGPs were greatly reduced after beta-GlcY treatment. In addition, the accumulations of new cell wall materials were also significantly affected by treating with beta-GlcY. Detection of cellulose components by Calcofluor white stain showed that strong fluorescence was located in the newly formed wall of daughter cells after the zygotic division of in vivo samples and the control samples from in vitro culture without beta-GlcY treatment; while there was only weak fluorescence in the newly formed cell walls with beta-GlcY treatment. Immunocytochemistry examination with JIM5 and JIM7 respectively against the low- and high-esterified pectins displayed that these two pectins located in opposite positions of zygotes and proembryos in

  7. Compartmentalization and Cell Division through Molecular Discreteness and Crowding in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Kamimura; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the emergence of primitive cellular structures from a set of chemical reactions is necessary to unveil the origin of life and to experimentally synthesize protocells. By simulating a cellular automaton model with a two-species hypercycle, we demonstrate the reproduction of a localized cluster; that is, a protocell with a growth-division process emerges when the replication and degradation speeds of one species are respectively slower than those of the other species, because of ...

  8. AHP6 inhibits cytokinin signaling to regulate the orientation of pericycle cell division during lateral root initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Moreira

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots (LRs initiate from anticlinal cell divisions of pericycle founder cells. The formation of LR primordia is regulated antagonistically by the phytohormones cytokinin and auxin. It has previously been shown that cytokinin has an inhibitory effect on the patterning events occurring during LR formation. However, the molecular players involved in cytokinin repression are still unknown. In a similar manner to protoxylem formation in Arabidopsis roots, in which AHP6 (ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 6 acts as a cytokinin inhibitor, we reveal that AHP6 also functions as a cytokinin repressor during early stages of LR development. We show that AHP6 is expressed at different developmental stages during LR formation and is required for the correct orientation of cell divisions at the onset of LR development. Moreover, we demonstrate that AHP6 influences the localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1, which is necessary for patterning the LR primordia. In summary, we show that the inhibition of cytokinin signaling through AHP6 is required to establish the correct pattern during LR initiation.

  9. Effect of chronic fractionated low-dose gamma irradiation on division potential of human embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Kimiko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Nakano, Kazushiro

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the in vitro phenotypic transformation of human embryo (HE) cells that were repeatedly irradiated (7.5 cGy once a week) throughout their life-span. Irradiation was repeated until the cells had accumulated 195 cGy (equivalent to the 26th passage). Samples of cells were assayed for survival by colony formation, as well as for mutation at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus and for transformation by focus formation. The life-span (mean number of population doublings) of multiply irradiated cells with a total dose of 97.5 cGy was slightly but significantly prolonged over that of controls. After HE cells had accumulated 195 cGy, the maximum number of divisions increased to 130-160% of the number in non-irradiated control cells. Transformed foci were not observed until cells had accumulated 97.5 cGy, and then increased with the increasing accumulation of radiation. However, no cells showed immortality or expressed a malignant phenotype in vitro. (author).

  10. SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shan; Xiao, Han; Cabrera, Antonio; Meulia, Tea; van der Knaap, Esther

    2011-01-01

    One of the major genes controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ at the sun locus, and SUN overexpressors in both the wild species LA1589 (Solanum pimpinellifolium) and the cultivar Sun1642 background. Our results demonstrate that SUN controls tomato shape through redistribution of mass that is mediated by increased cell division in the longitudinal and decreased cell division in the transverse direction of the fruit. The expression of SUN is positively correlated with slender phenotypes in cotyledon, leaflet, and floral organs, an elongated ovary, and negatively correlated with seed weight. Overexpression of SUN leads to more extreme phenotypes than those shown in the NILs and include thinner leaf rachises and stems, twisted leaf rachises, increased serrations of the leaflets, and dramatically increased elongation at the proximal end of the ovary and fruit. In situ hybridizations of the NILs showed that SUN is expressed throughout the ovary and young fruit, particularly in the vascular tissues and placenta surface, and in the ovules and developing seed. The phenotypic effects resulting from high expression of SUN suggest that the gene is involved in several plant developmental processes. PMID:21921117

  11. Structural and Functional Characterizations of SsgB, a Conserved Activator of Developmental Cell Division in Morphologically Complex Actinomycetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A.; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A. Mieke; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; van Wezel, Gilles P.; (Leiden-MC); (SLAC); (Scripps); (UV); (UCSD); (Burnham)

    2010-01-20

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic 'whirly' single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners.

  12. The ABC's of Cell Division: Regulation of Peptidoglycan Amidase Activity during Cytokinesis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Desiree Choy

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, composed of peptidoglycan (PG), is an essential component of the cell envelope. This macromolecular structure fortifies the cell membrane, determines cell shape, and helps prevent osmotic lysis. The synthesis and remodeling/recycling of this polymer is mediated by PG synthases and hydrolases, respectively. Proper control of the PG hydrolases is particularly important since misregulation of these enzymes can lead to lethal breaches in the cell wall. Surprisingly, howev...

  13. Lyme disease and relapsing fever Borrelia elongate through zones of peptidoglycan synthesis that mark division sites of daughter cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, Brandon Lyon; Scott, Molly; Parry, Bradley; Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2016-08-16

    Agents that cause Lyme disease, relapsing fever, leptospirosis, and syphilis belong to the phylum Spirochaetae-a unique lineage of bacteria most known for their long, spiral morphology. Despite the relevance to human health, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of spirochete growth. Here, using quantitative microscopy to track peptidoglycan cell-wall synthesis, we found that the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi displays a complex pattern of growth. B. burgdorferi elongates from discrete zones that are both spatially and temporally regulated. In addition, some peptidoglycan incorporation occurs along the cell body, with the notable exception of a large region at the poles. Newborn cells inherit a highly active zone of peptidoglycan synthesis at midcell that contributes to elongation for most of the cell cycle. Concomitant with the initiation of nucleoid separation and cell constriction, second and third zones of elongation are established at the 1/4 and 3/4 cellular positions, marking future sites of division for the subsequent generation. Positioning of elongation zones along the cell is robust to cell length variations and is relatively precise over long distances (>30 µm), suggesting that cells ‟sense" relative, as opposed to absolute, cell length to establish zones of peptidoglycan synthesis. The transition from one to three zones of peptidoglycan growth during the cell cycle is also observed in relapsing fever Borrelia. However, this mode of growth does not extend to representative species from other spirochetal genera, suggesting that this distinctive growth mode represents an evolutionary divide in the spirochete phylum. PMID:27506799

  14. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  15. A mechanism for ParB-dependent waves of ParA, a protein related to DNA segregation during cell division in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunding, Axel; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2003-01-01

    Prokaryotic plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci involved in segregation of DNA to daughter cells at cell division. A functional fusion protein consisting of Walker-type ParA ATPase and green fluorescent protein (Gfp) oscillates back and forth within nucleoid regions with a wave period of about...

  16. Enteral peptide formulas inhibit radiation induced enteritis and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and suppress the expression and function of Alzheimer's and cell division control gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have shown that patients receiving enteral peptide formulas prior to irradiation have a significantly reduced incidence of enteritis and express a profound increase in intestinal cellularity. Two conceptual approaches were taken to describe this response. First was the evaluation in changes in programmed intestinal cell death and secondly the evaluation of a gene product controlling cell division cycling. This study provided a relationship between the ratio of cell death to cell formulations. The results indicate that in the canine and murine models, irradiation induces expression of the Alzheimer's gene in intestinal crypt cells, while the incidence of apoptosis in apical cells is significantly increased. The use of peptide enteral formulations suppresses the expression of the Alzheimer's gene in crypt cells, while apoptosis is eliminated in the apical cells of the intestine. Concomitantly, enteral peptide formulations suppress the function of the CK-II gene product in the basal and baso-lateral cells of the intestine. These data indicate that although the mitotic index is significantly reduced in enterocytes, this phenomenon alone is not sufficient to account for the peptide-induced radio-resistance of the intestine. The data also indicate a significant reduction of normal apoptosis in the upper lateral and apical cells of the intestinal villi. Thus, the ratio of cell death to cell replacement is significantly decreased resulting in an increase in villus height and hypertrophy of the apical villus cells. Thus, peptide solutions should be considered as an adjunct treatment both in radio- and chemotherapy

  17. Effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene distribution in gas diffusion layers on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Iwamura, Takuya; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; Nakano, Akihiro; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Hironori; Kitahara, Tatsumi

    2016-02-01

    This experimental study identifies the effect of through-plane polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distribution in gas diffusion backing (GDB) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). PTFE-drying under vacuum pressure created a relatively uniform PTFE distribution in GDB compared to drying under atmospheric pressure. Carbon paper samples with different PTFE distributions due to the difference in drying conditions were prepared and used for the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) of PEMFCs. Also investigated is the effect of MPL application on the performance for those samples. The current density (i) - voltage (V) characteristics of these PEMFCs measured under high relative humidity conditions clearly showed that, with or without MPL, the cell using the GDL with PTFE dried under vacuum condition showed better performance than that dried under atmospheric condition. It is suggested that this improved performance is caused by the efficient transport of liquid water through the GDB due to the uniform distribution of PTFE.

  18. Asymmetric division of cyst stem cells in Drosophila testis is ensured by anaphase spindle repositioning

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jun; Tiyaboonchai, Amita; Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Hunt, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Many stem cells divide asymmetrically to balance self-renewal and differentiation. In Drosophila testes, two stem cell populations, germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs), cohere and regulate one another. Here, we report that CySCs divide asymmetrically through repositioning the mitotic spindle around anaphase. CySC spindle repositioning requires functional centrosomes, Dynein and the actin-membrane linker Moesin. Anaphase spindle repositioning is required to achieve h...

  19. Cell division in the unicellular microalga Dunaliella viridis depends on phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Carlos; Cossío, Belén R; Rivard, Christopher J; Berl, Tomás; Capasso, Juan M

    2007-01-01

    In mammalian cells, MAPKs are involved in both stress response (JNK and p38 pathways) and cell proliferation and differentiation [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)] through protein kinase cascades. Exposure of Dunaliella viridis cell cultures to PD98059, a very specific inhibitor of the ERK signalling pathway, resulted in a total arrest of cell proliferation and a complete dephosphorylation of ERK. As shown by flow cytometry analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells, PD98059 stopped mitosis at the G(2) phase after the S phase has been completed. Multiple physiological parameters such as cell motility and reducing power generation (NADPH) clearly indicate that the treated cells are wholly viable. Exposure of D. viridis to environmental stresses that impair cell division, such as hyperosmotic shock, nitrogen starvation, or sublethal UV irradiation, caused a marked decrease in the phospho-ERK levels as detected by western blot. Two 400 bp polynucleotides from D. viridis with high homologies to published sequences of ERK1 and ERK2 were cloned, sequenced, and submitted to GenBank. Northern blot analysis revealed two mRNA bands of approximately 1.9 kb, consistent with the expected size of ERK proteins ( approximately 40 kDa). Sequence analysis showed that they contained several mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) conserved domains, including II, III, VIb, VII, and the double phosphorylation motif. Interestingly, in D. viridis, this motif was T*DY* instead of the canonic T*EY*. Based on this finding, ERK plant sequences can be divided into two groups, one termed the T*DY* branch and the other termed the T*EY* branch. The molecular and functional data presented here suggest that ERK is a very ancient signalling pathway and that it was already present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotic cells. PMID:17220513

  20. AUREOCHROME1a-mediated induction of the diatom-specific cyclin dsCYC2 controls the onset of cell division in diatoms (Phaeodactylum tricornutum)

    OpenAIRE

    Huysman, Marie; Fortunato, Antonio E; Matthijs, Michiel; Costa, Benjamin Schellenberger; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Van Den Daele, Hilde; Sachse, Matthias; Inzé, Dirk; Bowler, Chris; Kroth, Peter G.; Wilhelm, Christian; Falciatore, Angela; Vyverman, Wim; De Veylder, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in photosynthetic organisms is tightly regulated by light. Although the light dependency of the onset of the cell cycle has been well characterized in various phototrophs, little is known about the cellular signaling cascades connecting light perception to cell cycle activation and progression. Here, we demonstrate that diatom-specific cyclin 2 (dsCYC2) in Phaeodactylum tricornutum displays a transcriptional peak within 15 min after light exposure, long before the onset of cell ...

  1. Dynamic FtsA and FtsZ localization and outer membrane alterations during polar growth and cell division in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Zupan, John R.; Cameron, Todd A.; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2013-01-01

    Growth and cell division in rod-shaped bacteria have been primarily studied in species that grow predominantly by peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis along the length of the cell. Rhizobiales species, however, predominantly grow by PG synthesis at a single pole. Here we characterize the dynamic localization of several Agrobacterium tumefaciens components during the cell cycle. First, the lipophilic dye FM 4-64 predominantly stains the outer membranes of old poles versus growing poles. In cells about...

  2. Algorithm development and simulation outcomes for hypoxic head and neck cancer radiotherapy using a Monte Carlo cell division model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A temporal Monte Carlo tumour model, 'Hyp-RT'. sim ulating hypoxic head and neck cancer has been updated and extended to model radiothcrapy. The aim is to providc a convenient radiobio logical tool for clinicians to evaluate radiotherapy treatment schedules based on many individual tumour properties including oxygenation. FORTRAN95 and JA YA havc been utilised to develop the efficient algorithm, which can propagate 108 cells. Epithelial cell kill is affected by dose, oxygenation and proliferativc status. Accelerated repopulation (AR) has been modelled by increasing the symmetrical stem cell division probability, and reoxygenation (ROx) has been modelled using random incremental boosts of oxygen to the cell po ulation throughout therapy. Results The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia dominate tumour growth rate. For conventional radiotherapy. 15-25% more dose was required for a hypox ic versus oxic tumours, depending on the time of AR onset (0-3 weeks after thc start of treatment). ROx of hypoxic tumours resulted in tumoUJ: sensitisation and therefore a dose reduction, of up to 35%, varying with the time of onset. Fig. I shows results for all combinations of AR and ROx onset times for the moderate hypoxia case. Conclusions In hypoxic tumours, accelerated repopulation and reoxy genation affect ccll kill in the same manner as when the effects are modelled individually. however the degree of the effect is altered and therefore the combined result is difficult to predict. providing evidence for the usefulness of computer models. Simulations have quantitatively

  3. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  4. The cyanobacterial cell division factor Ftn6 contains an N-terminal DnaD-like domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saguez Cyril

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA replication and cell cycle as well as their relationship have been extensively studied in the two model organisms E. coli and B. subtilis. By contrast, little is known about these processes in cyanobacteria, even though they are crucial to the biosphere, in utilizing solar energy to renew the oxygenic atmosphere and in producing the biomass for the food chain. Recent studies have allowed the identification of several cell division factors that are specifics to cyanobacteria. Among them, Ftn6 has been proposed to function in the recruitment of the crucial FtsZ proteins to the septum or the subsequent Z-ring assembly and possibly in chromosome segregation. Results In this study, we identified an as yet undescribed domain located in the conserved N-terminal region of Ftn6. This 77 amino-acids-long domain, designated here as FND (Ftn6 N-Terminal Domain, exhibits striking sequence and structural similarities with the DNA-interacting module, listed in the PFAM database as the DnaD-like domain (pfam04271. We took advantage of the sequence similarities between FND and the DnaD-like domains to construct a homology 3D-model of the Ftn6 FND domain from the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. Mapping of the conserved residues exposed onto the FND surface allowed us to identify a highly conserved area that could be engaged in Ftn6-specific interactions. Conclusion Overall, similarities between FND and DnaD-like domains as well as previously reported observations on Ftn6 suggest that FND may function as a DNA-interacting module thereby providing an as yet missing link between DNA replication and cell division in cyanobacteria. Consistently, we also showed that Ftn6 is involved in tolerance to DNA damages generated by UV rays.

  5. Spindle formation and microtubule organization during first division in reconstructed rat embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Ikuo; Mizutani, Eiji; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Atsushi; Inai, Kentaro; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2007-08-01

    The present study was conducted to demonstrate the spindle formation and behavior of chromosomes and microtubules during first division in reconstructed rat embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with cumulus cell nuclei. To demonstrate the effect of oocyte aging after ovulation on the cleavage of SCNT embryos, micromanipulation was carried out 11, 15 and 18 h after injection of hCG. SCNT oocytes were activated by incubation in culture medium supplemented with 5 microM ionomycin for 5 min followed by treatment with 2 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) in mR1ECM for 2-3 h. For immunocytochemical observation, the SCNT embryos were incubated with monoclonal anti-alpha-tubulin antibody and then fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. Cleavage rates were significantly higher for oocytes collected after 15 and 18 h rather than for those collected 11 h after injection of hCG (56 and 53%, respectively vs. 28%; P<0.05). Premature chromosome condensation occurred before activation of the SCNT oocytes, but adequate spindle formation was only rarely observed. The distribution of microtubules in SCNT embryos after activation was different from those of fertilized and parthenogenic oocytes, i.e., a dense microtubule organization shaped like a ring was observed. Eighteen to 20 h post-activation, most SCNT embryos were in the 2-cell stage, but no nucleoli were clearly visible, which was quite different from the fertilized oocytes. In addition, first division with and without small cellular bodies containing DNA was observed in the rat SCNT embryos in some cases. The present study suggests that reorganization of transferred nuclei in rat SCNT embryos may be inadequate in terms of formation of the mitotic assembly and nucleolar reorganization. PMID:17446658

  6. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  7. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  8. Role of SufI (FtsP) in Cell Division of Escherichia coli: Evidence for Its Involvement in Stabilizing the Assembly of the Divisome▿

    OpenAIRE

    Samaluru, Harish; SaiSree, L.; Reddy, Manjula

    2007-01-01

    The function of SufI, a well-studied substrate of the TatABC translocase in Escherichia coli, is not known. It was earlier implicated in cell division, based on the finding that multiple copies of sufI suppressed the phenotypes of cells with mutations in ftsI (ftsI23), which encodes a divisomal transpeptidase. Recently, sufI was identified as both a multicopy suppressor gene and a synthetic lethal mutant of ftsEX, which codes for a division-specific putative ABC transporter. In this study, we...

  9. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S.; De La Torre, Carola M.; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction. PMID:26417108

  10. Disruption of an M. tuberculosis Membrane Protein Causes a Magnesium-dependent Cell Division Defect and Failure to Persist in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsmith, Nichole; Guo, Xinzheng V.; Vandal, Omar H.; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Wang, Ruojun; Botella, Hélène; Song, Shuang; Bhatt, Kamlesh; Liba, Amir; Salgame, Padmini; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes necessary for persistence in vivo provides insight into bacterial biology as well as host defense strategies. We show that disruption of M. tuberculosis membrane protein PerM (Rv0955) resulted in an IFN-γ-dependent persistence defect in chronic mouse infection despite the mutant’s near normal growth during acute infection. The perM mutant required increased magnesium for replication and survival; incubation in low magnesium media resulted in cell elongation and lysis. Transcriptome analysis of the perM mutant grown in reduced magnesium revealed upregulation of cell division and cell wall biosynthesis genes, and live cell imaging showed PerM accumulation at the division septa in M. smegmatis. The mutant was acutely sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, including specific inhibitors of cell division-associated peptidoglycan transpeptidase FtsI. Together, these data implicate PerM as a novel player in mycobacterial cell division and pathogenesis, and are consistent with the hypothesis that immune activation deprives M. tuberculosis of magnesium. PMID:25658098

  11. 3′ UTR-Dependent, miR-92-Mediated Restriction of Tis21 Expression Maintains Asymmetric Neural Stem Cell Division to Ensure Proper Neocortex Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Feng Fei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neocortex size primarily reflects the number and mode of divisions of neural stem and progenitor cells. Cortical stem cells (apical progenitors switching from symmetric divisions, which expand their population, to asymmetric divisions, which generate downstream neuronal progenitors (basal progenitors, start expressing Tis21, a so-called antiproliferative/prodifferentiative gene. Tis21 encodes a small (17.5 kDa, functionally poorly characterized protein and a relatively large (2 kb, highly conserved 3′ UTR. Here, we show that mice lacking the Tis21 3′ UTR develop a microcephalic neocortex with fewer neurons, notably in the upper layers. This reflects a progressive decrease in basal progenitors, which in turn is due to a fraction of apical progenitors prematurely switching from asymmetric self-renewing to symmetric self-consuming divisions. This switch is caused by the markedly increased Tis21 protein level resulting from lack of microRNA-, notably miR-92-, dependent restriction of Tis21 expression. Our data show that a premature onset of consumptive neural stem cell divisions can lead to microcephaly.

  12. Hsp70 protects mitotic cells against heat-induced centrosome damage and division abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat shock on centrosomes has been mainly studied in interphase cells. Centrosomes play a key role in proper segregation of DNA during mitosis. However, the direct effect and consequences of heat shock on mitotic cells and a possible cellular defense system against proteotoxic stress d

  13. ASPM regulates symmetric stem cell division by tuning Cyclin E ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecchi, Mario R.; Pozner, Amir

    2016-01-01

    We generate a mouse model for the human microcephaly syndrome by mutating the ASPM locus, and demonstrate a premature exhaustion of the neuronal progenitor pool due to dysfunctional self-renewal processes. Earlier studies have linked ASPM mutant progenitor excessive cell cycle exit to a mitotic orientation defect. Here, we demonstrate a mitotic orientation-independent effect of ASPM on cell cycle duration. We pinpoint the cell fate-determining factor to the length of time spent in early G1 before traversing the restriction point. Characterization of the molecular mechanism reveals an interaction between ASPM and the Cdk2/Cyclin E complex, regulating the Cyclin activity by modulating its ubiquitination, phosphorylation and localization into the nucleus, before the cell is fated to transverse the restriction point. Thus, we reveal a novel function of ASPM in mediating the tightly coordinated Ubiquitin- Cyclin E- Retinoblastoma- E2F bistable-signalling pathway controlling restriction point progression and stem cell maintenance. PMID:26581405

  14. PN solutions for the slowing-down and the cell calculation problems in plane geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work PN solutions for the slowing-down and cell problems in slab geometry are developed. To highlight the main contributions of this development, one can mention: the new particular solution developed for the PN method applied to the slowing-down problem in the multigroup model, originating a new class of polynomials denominated Chandrasekhar generalized polynomials; the treatment of a specific situation, known as a degeneracy, arising from a particularity in the group constants and the first application of the PN method, for arbitrary N, in criticality calculations at the cell level reported in literature. (author)

  15. Sensory mother cell division is specifically affected in a Cyclin-A mutant of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, R; Togashi, S; Takahisa, M; Tsurumura, S; Mikuni, M; Kondo, K.(Yamagata University, Yamagata, 992-8510, Japan); Miyake, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclin proteins are one of the important components of the mechanism regulating mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We isolated a Drosophila Cyclin-A mutant in which the progenitor cells of the peripheral nervous system (the sensory mother cells) do not divide properly, causing the loss and other abnormalities of mechanosensory organs in the adult fly. Sequence analysis of the mutant genome reveals that a P element is inserted into the first intron of the Cyclin-A gene. A 13 kb wild-type genomic DNA...

  16. Function and regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p kinase family in cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    During mitosis, the parent cell distributes its genetic materials equally into two daughter cells through chromosome segregation, a complex movements orchestrated by mitotic kinases and its effector proteins.Faithful chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensure that each daughter cell receives a full copy of genetic materials of parent cell. Defects in these processes can lead to aneuploidy or polyploidy. Aurora/Ipl1p fanily,a class of conserved serine/threonine kinases, plays key roles in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis.This article highlights the function and regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p family in mitosis and provides potential links between aberrant regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p kinases and pathogenesis of human cancer.

  17. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  18. Dynamics of pre-replication complex proteins during the cell division cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanth, Supriya G.; Méndez, Juan; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.; Stillman, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Replication of the human genome every time a cell divides is a highly coordinated process that ensures accurate and efficient inheritance of the genetic information. The molecular mechanism that guarantees that many origins of replication fire only once per cell-cycle has been the area of intense research. The origin recognition complex (ORC) marks the position of replication origins in the genome and serves as the landing pad for the assembly of a multiprotein, pre-replicative complex (pre-R...

  19. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    CERN Document Server

    Doss, C E; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al., J.~Geophys.~Res., 120, 7748 (2015). Applications to planetary...

  20. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  1. The stochastic dance of circling sperm cells: sperm chemotaxis in the plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, B M; Juelicher, F [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: ben@pks.mpg.de, E-mail: julicher@pks.mpg.de

    2008-12-15

    Biological systems such as single cells must function in the presence of fluctuations. It has been shown in a two-dimensional experimental setup that sea urchin sperm cells move toward a source of chemoattractant along planar trochoidal swimming paths, i.e. drifting circles. In these experiments, a pronounced variability of the swimming paths is observed. We present a theoretical description of sperm chemotaxis in two dimensions which takes fluctuations into account. We derive a coarse-grained theory of stochastic sperm swimming paths in a concentration field of chemoattractant. Fluctuations enter as multiplicative noise in the equations for the sperm swimming path. We discuss the stochastic properties of sperm swimming and predict a concentration-dependence of the effective diffusion constant of sperm swimming which could be tested in experiments.

  2. LGH00031, a novel ortho-quinonoid inhibitor of cell division cycle 25B, inhibits human cancer cells via ROS generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-bo ZHOU; Xu FENG; Li-na WANG; Jun-qing DU; Yue-yang ZHOU; Hai-ping YU; Yi ZANG; Jing-ya LI; Jia LI

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To discover novel cell division cycle 25 (CDC25) B inhibitors and elucidate the mechanisms of inhibition in cancer cells. Methods: Cell growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay, the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression and phosphorylation was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: LGH00031 inhibited CDC25B irreversibly in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and impaired the proliferation of tumor cell lines. In synchronized HeLa cells, LGH00031 delayed the cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase. LGH00031 increased cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) tyrosine 15 phosphorylation and cyclin B1 protein level. The activity of LGH00031 against CDC25B in vitro relied on the existence of 1, 4-dithiothreitol (DTT) or dihydrolipoic acid and oxygen. The oxygen free radical scavenger catalase and superoxide dismutase reduced the inactivation of CDC25 by LGH00031, confirming that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the inactivation process in vitro. LGH00031 accelerated cellular ROS production in a dose-dependent manner, and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) markedly decreased the ROS production induced by LGH00031.Correspondingly, the LGH00031-induced decrease in cell viability and cell cycle arrest, cyclin B1 protein level, and phosphorylation of CDK1 tyrosine 15 were also rescued by NAC that decreased ROS pro-duction. Conclusion: The activity of LGH00031 at the molecular and cellular level is mediated by ROS.

  3. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulagna Banerjee; Suchismita Das; Anuradha Lohia

    2002-11-01

    Fidelity in transmission of genetic characters is ensured by the faithful duplication of the genome, followed by equal segregation of the genetic material in the progeny. Thus, alternation of DNA duplication (S-phase) and chromosome segregation during the M-phase are hallmarks of most well studied eukaryotes. Several rounds of genome reduplication before chromosome segregation upsets this cycle and leads to polyploidy. Polyploidy is often witnessed in cells prior to differentiation, in embryonic cells or in diseases such as cancer. Studies on the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica suggest that in its proliferative phase, this organism may accumulate polyploid cells. It has also been shown that although this organism contains sequence homologs of genes which are known to control the cell cycle of most eukaryotes, these genes may be structurally altered and their equivalent function yet to be demonstrated in amoeba. The available information suggests that surveillance mechanisms or ‘checkpoints’ which are known to regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle may be absent or altered in E. histolytica.

  4. In vivo robustness analysis of cell division cycle genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Moriya

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular biochemical parameters, such as the expression level of gene products, are considered to be optimized so that a biological system, including the parameters, works effectively. Those parameters should have some permissible range so that the systems have robustness against perturbations, such as noise in gene expression. However, little is known about the permissible range in real cells because there has been no experimental technique to test it. In this study, we developed a genetic screening method, named "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW that evaluates upper limit copy numbers of genes in a model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and we applied it for 30 cell-cycle related genes (CDC genes. The experiment provided unique quantitative data that could be used to argue the system-level properties of the cell cycle such as robustness and fragility. The data were used to evaluate the current computational model, and refinements to the model were suggested.

  5. AUREOCHROME1a-Mediated Induction of the Diatom-Specific Cyclin dsCYC2 Controls the Onset of Cell Division in Diatoms (Phaeodactylum tricornutum)[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysman, Marie J.J.; Fortunato, Antonio E.; Matthijs, Michiel; Costa, Benjamin Schellenberger; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Van den Daele, Hilde; Sachse, Matthias; Inzé, Dirk; Bowler, Chris; Kroth, Peter G.; Wilhelm, Christian; Falciatore, Angela; Vyverman, Wim; De Veylder, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in photosynthetic organisms is tightly regulated by light. Although the light dependency of the onset of the cell cycle has been well characterized in various phototrophs, little is known about the cellular signaling cascades connecting light perception to cell cycle activation and progression. Here, we demonstrate that diatom-specific cyclin 2 (dsCYC2) in Phaeodactylum tricornutum displays a transcriptional peak within 15 min after light exposure, long before the onset of cell division. The product of dsCYC2 binds to the cyclin-dependent kinase CDKA1 and can complement G1 cyclin-deficient yeast. Consistent with the role of dsCYC2 in controlling a G1-to-S light-dependent cell cycle checkpoint, dsCYC2 silencing decreases the rate of cell division in diatoms exposed to light-dark cycles but not to constant light. Transcriptional induction of dsCYC2 is triggered by blue light in a fluence rate-dependent manner. Consistent with this, dsCYC2 is a transcriptional target of the blue light sensor AUREOCHROME1a, which functions synergistically with the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor bZIP10 to induce dsCYC2 transcription. The functional characterization of a cyclin whose transcription is controlled by light and whose activity connects light signaling to cell cycle progression contributes significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying light-dependent cell cycle onset in diatoms. PMID:23292736

  6. Treatment with IL-2 and IL-12 inhibits tumour cell division in SL2 lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masztalerz, A; Van Luyn, M; Werner, N; Molema, G; Everse, LA; Den Otter, W

    2004-01-01

    We examined which mechanism plays a dominant role in the rejection of solid SL2 lymphoma treated with locally applied IL-2 and /or IL-12. This treatment resulted in about 80% cures. There was a moderate influx of leukocytes in the tissue surrounding tumours; yet these cells failed to invade the soli

  7. The special case of hepatocytes : unique tissue architecture calls for a distinct mode of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Christiaan L; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Müsch, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Columnar epithelia (e.g., kidney, intestine) and hepatocytes embody the two major organizational phenotypes of non-stratified epithelial cells. Columnar epithelia establish their apical and basal domains at opposing poles and organize in monolayered cysts and tubules, in which their apical surfaces

  8. Factors Influencing Academic Performance of Students Enrolled in a Lower Division Cell Biology Core Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Julio G.; Anand, Sulekha

    2009-01-01

    Students' performance in two semesters of our Cell Biology course was examined for this study. Teaching strategies, behaviors, and pre-course variables were analyzed with respect to students' performance. Pre-semester and post-semester surveys were administered to ascertain students' perceptions about class difficulty, amount of study and effort…

  9. CYCP2;1 integrates genetic and nutritional information to promote meristem cell division in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peng, L.; Skylar, A.; Chang, P.L.; Bišová, Kateřina; Wu, X.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 2 (2014), s. 160-170. ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR M200201205 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) MCB-1122213 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cell cycle * arabidopsis * meristem Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.547, year: 2014

  10. Effects of the Scientific Argumentation Based Learning Process on Teaching the Unit of Cell Division and Inheritance to Eighth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Ceyda; Yenice, Nilgun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of scientific argumentation based learning process on the eighth grade students' achievement in the unit of "cell division and inheritance". It also deals with the effects of this process on their comprehension about the nature of scientific knowledge, their willingness to take part in…

  11. Development and Application of a Two-Tier Multiple-Choice Diagnostic Test for High School Students' Understanding of Cell Division and Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesli, Ertugrul; Kara, Yilmaz

    2012-01-01

    This study involved the development and application of a two-tier diagnostic test for measuring students' understanding of cell division and reproduction. The instrument development procedure had three general steps: defining the content boundaries of the test, collecting information on students' misconceptions, and instrument development.…

  12. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer. PMID:27136938

  13. Effect of polytetrafluoroethylene-treatment and microporous layer-coating on the in-plane permeability of gas diffusion layers used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.S.; Ingham, D.B.; Ma, L.; Pourkashanian, M. [Centre for Computational Fluid Dynamics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Damjanovic, T. [SGL Technologies GmbH, Meitingen 86405 (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    The in-plane permeability has been experimentally estimated for a number of carbon substrates and microporous layer (MPL)-coated gas diffusion layers (GDLs) as used in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The results show that the in-plane permeability of the tested carbon substrates decreases with increasing polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loading and, in contrast, the greater is the PTFE loading in the MPL, the greater is the permeability. It has been shown that the in-plane permeability of the carbon substrates is reduced by an order of magnitude if they are coated with MPLs. Further, the permeability is different from one in-plane principal direction to another by a factor of about two. Finally, ignoring the inertial terms (for the reported flow rates) and the compressibility of the flowing air results in significant errors in the obtained values of the permeability. (author)

  14. DNA replication initiation, doubling of rate of phospholipid synthesis, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseleau-Petit, D; Képès, F; Peutat, L; D'Ari, R; Képès, A

    1987-01-01

    In synchronized culture of Escherichia coli, the specific arrest of phospholipid synthesis (brought about by glycerol starvation in an appropriate mutant) did not affect the rate of ongoing DNA synthesis but prevented the initiation of new rounds. The initiation block did not depend on cell age at the time of glycerol removal, which could be before, during, or after the doubling in the rate of phospholipid synthesis (DROPS) and as little as 10 min before the expected initiation. We conclude t...

  15. Osteogenic differentiation of hypertrophic chondrocytes involves asymmetric cell divisions and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the early cellular events that take place during the change in lineage commitment from hypertrophic chondrocytes to osteoblast-like cells. We have induced this osteogenic differentiation by cutting through the hypertrophic cartilage of embryonic chick femurs and culturing the explants. Immunocytochemical characterization, [3H]thymidine pulse-chase labeling, in situ nick translation or end labeling of DNA breaks were combined with ultrastructural studies to characterize th...

  16. Lymph Node Metastases and Prognosis in Left Upper Division Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers: The Impact of Interlobar Lymph Node Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kuroda

    Full Text Available Left upper division segmentectomy is one of the major pulmonary procedures; however, it is sometimes difficult to completely dissect interlobar lymph nodes. We attempted to clarify the prognostic importance of hilar and mediastinal nodes, especially of interlobar lymph nodes, in patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC located in the left upper division.We retrospectively studied patients with primary left upper lobe NSCLC undergoing surgical pulmonary resection (at least lobectomy with radical lymphadenectomy. The representative evaluation of therapeutic value from the lymph node dissection was determined using Sasako's method. This analysis was calculated by multiplying the frequency of metastasis to the station and the 5-year survival rate of the patients with metastasis to the station.We enrolled 417 patients (237 men, 180 women. Tumors were located in the lingular lobe and at the upper division of left upper lobe in 69 and 348 patients, respectively. The pathological nodal statuses were pN0 in 263 patients, pN1 in 70 patients, and pN2 in 84 patients. Lymph nodes #11 and #7 were significantly correlated with differences in node involvement in patients with left upper lobe NSCLC. Among those with left upper division NSCLC, the 5-year overall survival in pN1 was 31.5% for #10, 39.3% for #11, and 50.4% for #12U. The involvement of node #11 was 1.89-fold higher in the anterior segment than that in the apicoposterior segment. The therapeutic index of estimated benefit from lymph node dissection for #11 was 3.38, #4L was 1.93, and the aortopulmonary window was 4.86 in primary left upper division NSCLC.Interlobar node involvement is not rare in left upper division NSCLC, occurring in >20% cases. Furthermore, dissection of interlobar nodes was found to be beneficial in patients with left upper division NSCLC.

  17. Modeling of the dynamic pole-to-pole oscillations of the min proteins in bacterial cell division: The effect of an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Modchang, C; Triampo, W; Ngamsaad, W; Nuttawut, N; Tang, I M; Lenbury, Y; Modchang, Charin; Kanthang, Paisan; Triampo, Wannapong; Ngamsaad, Waipot; Nuttawut, Narin; Lenbury, Yongwimol

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps in the developmental process of the bacteria cell at the cellular level is the determination of the middle of the cell and the proper placement of the septum, these being essential to the division of the cell. In E. coli, this step depends on the proteins MinC, MinD, and MinE. Exposure to a constant electric field may cause the bacteria cell division mechanism to change, resulting in an abnormal cytokinesis. To see the effects of an external field e.g., an electric or magnetic field on this process, we have solved a set of deterministic reaction diffusion equations, which incorporate the influence of an electric field. We have found some changes in the dynamics of the oscillations of the min proteins from pole to pole. The numerical results show some interesting effects, which are qualitatively in good agreement with some experimental results.

  18. A trisubstituted benzimidazole cell division inhibitor with efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Knudson

    Full Text Available Trisubstituted benzimidazoles have demonstrated potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Previously, a library of novel trisubstituted benzimidazoles was constructed for high throughput screening, and compounds were identified that exhibited potency against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and clinical isolates, and were not toxic to Vero cells. A new series of 2-cyclohexyl-5-acylamino-6-N, N-dimethylaminobenzimidazoles derivatives has been developed based on SAR studies. Screening identified compounds with potency against M. tuberculosis. A lead compound from this series, SB-P17G-A20, was discovered to have an MIC of 0.16 µg/mL and demonstrated efficacy in the TB murine acute model of infection based on the reduction of bacterial load in the lungs and spleen by 1.73 ± 0.24 Log10 CFU and 2.68 ± Log10 CFU, respectively, when delivered at 50 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection (IP twice daily (bid. The activity of SB-P17G-A20 was determined to be concentration dependent and to have excellent stability in mouse and human plasma, and liver microsomes. Together, these studies demonstrate that SB-P17G-A20 has potency against M. tuberculosis clinical strains with varying susceptibility and efficacy in animal models of infection, and that trisubstituted benzimidazoles continue to be a platform for the development of novel inhibitors with efficacy.

  19. Resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump involved in aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii strain BM4454.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    2001-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  20. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  1. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-11-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, and imbalance of plant hormone (ethylene and auxin) homeostasis. Moreover, the phytotoxic effect of CA was also manifested by modifications in expansin gene expression, especially in expansins responsible for cell wall remodeling after the cytokinesis (LeEXPA9, LeEXPA18). Based on these results the phytotoxic activity of CA on growth of roots of tomato seedlings is likely due to alterations associated with cell division. PMID:22847024

  2. CEH-20/Pbx and UNC-62/Meis function upstream of rnt-1/Runx to regulate asymmetric divisions of the C. elegans stem-like seam cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Hughes

    2013-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans seam cells divide in the stem-like mode throughout larval development, with the ability to both self-renew and produce daughters that differentiate. Seam cells typically divide asymmetrically, giving rise to an anterior daughter that fuses with the hypodermis and a posterior daughter that proliferates further. Previously we have identified rnt-1 (a homologue of the mammalian cancer-associated stem cell regulator Runx as being an important regulator of seam development, acting to promote proliferation; rnt-1 mutants have fewer seam cells whereas overexpressing rnt-1 causes seam cell hyperplasia. We isolated the interacting CEH-20/Pbx and UNC-62/Meis TALE-class transcription factors during a genome-wide RNAi screen for novel regulators of seam cell number. Animals lacking wild type CEH-20 or UNC-62 display seam cell hyperplasia, largely restricted to the anterior of the worm, whereas double mutants have many additional seam cells along the length of the animal. The cellular basis of the hyperplasia involves the symmetrisation of normally asymmetric seam cell divisions towards the proliferative stem-like fate. The hyperplasia is completely suppressed in rnt-1 mutants, and rnt-1 is upregulated in ceh-20 and unc-62 mutants, suggesting that CEH-20 and UNC-62 function upstream of rnt-1 to limit proliferative potential to the appropriate daughter cell. In further support of this we find that CEH-20 is asymmetrically localised in seam daughters following an asymmetric division, being predominantly restricted to anterior nuclei whose fate is to differentiate. Thus, ceh-20 and unc-62 encode crucial regulators of seam cell division asymmetry, acting via rnt-1 to regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Transfer of a eubacteria-type cell division site-determining factor CrMinD gene to the nucleus from the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiZhong; HU Yong; ZHANG RunJie; ZHOU WeiWei; ZHU JiaYing; LIU XiangLin; HE YiKun

    2007-01-01

    MinD is a ubiquitous ATPase that plays a crucial role in selection of the division site in eubacteria, chloroplasts, and probably Archaea. In four green algae, Mesostigma viride, Nephroselmis olivacea, Chlorella vulgaris and Prototheca wickerhamii, MinD homologues are encoded in the plastid genome. However, in Arabidopsis, MinD is a nucleus-encoded, chloroplast-targeted protein involved in chloroplast division, which suggests that MinD has been transferred to the nucleus in higher land plants. Yet the lateral gene transfer (LGT) of MinD from plastid to nucleus during plastid evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a nucleus-encoded MinD homologue from unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a basal species in the green plant lineage. Overexpression of CrMinD in wild type E. coli inhibited cell division and resulted in the filamentous cell formation, clearly demonstrated the conservation of the MinD protein during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The transient expression of CrMinD-egfp confirmed the role of CrMinD protein in the regulation of plastid division. Searching all the published plastid genomic sequences of land plants, no MinD homologues were found, which suggests that the transfer of MinD from plastid to nucleus might have occurred before the evolution of land plants.

  4. A Negative Feedback Loop Controlling bHLH Complexes Is Involved in Vascular Cell Division and Differentiation in the Root Apical Meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Kuninori; Kariya, Yuka; Asakawa, Tomohiro; Kan, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hiroo; Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Controlling cell division and differentiation in meristems is essential for proper plant growth. Two bHLH heterodimers consisting of LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW) and TARGET OF MONOPTEROS 5 (TMO5)/TMO5-LIKE1 (T5L1) regulate periclinal cell division in vascular cells in the root apical meristem (RAM). In this study, we further investigated the functions of LHW-T5L1, finding that in addition to controlling cell division, this complex regulates xylem differentiation in the RAM via a novel negative regulatory system. LHW-T5L1 upregulated the thermospermine synthase gene ACAULIS5 (ACL5), as well as SUPPRESSOR OF ACAULIS5 LIKE3 (SACL3), which encodes a bHLH protein, in the RAM. The SACL3 promoter sequence contains a conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF), which blocked translation of the main SACL3 ORF in the absence of thermospermine. Thermospermine eliminated the negative effect of uORF and enhanced SACL3 production. Further genetic and molecular biological analyses indicated that ACL5 and SACL3 suppress the function of LHW-T5L1 through a protein-protein interaction between LHW and SACL3. Finally, we showed that a negative feedback loop consisting of LHW-T5L1, ACL5, SACL3, and LHW-SACL3 contributes to maintain RAM size and proper root growth. These findings suggest that a negative feedback loop regulates the LHW-T5L1 output level to coordinate cell division and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:26616019

  5. Contribution of the Ade Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pumps to Fitness and Pathogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Balloy, Viviane; Fiette, Laurence; Chignard, Michel; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overexpression of chromosomal resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems with broad substrate specificity contributes to multidrug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii. We have shown that modulation of expression of the structural genes for the efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK confers MDR and results in numerous alterations of membrane-associated cellular functions, in particular biofilm formation. However, the contribution of these RND pumps to cell fitness and virulence has not yet been studied. The biological cost of an antibiotic resistance mechanism is a key parameter in determining its stability and dissemination. From an entirely sequenced susceptible clinical isolate, we have generated a set of isogenic derivatives having single point mutations resulting in overexpression of each efflux system or with every pump deleted by allelic replacement. We found that overproduction of the pumps results in a significant decrease in fitness of the bacterial host when measured by competition experiments in vitro. Fitness and virulence were also evaluated in vivo both in systemic and pulmonary infection models in immunocompetent mice. A diminished competitiveness of the AdeABC-overexpressing mutant was observed only after intraperitoneal inoculation, but not after intranasal inoculation, the latter mimicking the most frequent type of human A. baumannii infection. However, in mice infected intranasally, this mutant was more virulent and stimulated an enhanced neutrophil activation in the lungs. Altogether, these data account for the observation that adeABC overexpression is common in MDR A. baumannii frequently found in ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:27247231

  6. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, C. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7748 (2015)]. Applications to planetary magnetospheres, tokamaks, and the solar wind are discussed.

  7. Role of SufI (FtsP) in cell division of Escherichia coli: evidence for its involvement in stabilizing the assembly of the divisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaluru, Harish; SaiSree, L; Reddy, Manjula

    2007-11-01

    The function of SufI, a well-studied substrate of the TatABC translocase in Escherichia coli, is not known. It was earlier implicated in cell division, based on the finding that multiple copies of sufI suppressed the phenotypes of cells with mutations in ftsI (ftsI23), which encodes a divisomal transpeptidase. Recently, sufI was identified as both a multicopy suppressor gene and a synthetic lethal mutant of ftsEX, which codes for a division-specific putative ABC transporter. In this study, we show that sufI is essential for the viability of E. coli cells subjected to various forms of stress, including oxidative stress and DNA damage. The sufI mutant also exhibits sulA-independent filamentation, indicating a role in cell division. The phenotypes of the sufI mutant are suppressed by factors that stabilize FtsZ ring assembly, such as increased expression of cell division proteins FtsQAZ or FtsN or the presence of the gain-of-function ftsA* (FtsA R286W) mutation, suggesting that SufI is a divisomal protein required during stress conditions. In support of this, multicopy sufI suppressed the divisional defects of mutants carrying the ftsA12, ftsQ1, or ftsK44 allele but not those of mutants carrying ftsZ84. Most of the division-defective mutants, in particular those carrying a DeltaftsEX or ftsI23 allele, exhibited sensitivity to oxidative stress or DNA damage, and this sensitivity was also abolished by multiple copies of SufI. All of these data suggest that SufI is a division component involved in protecting or stabilizing the divisomal assembly under conditions of stress. Since sufI fulfils the requirements to be designated an fts gene, we propose that it be renamed ftsP. PMID:17766410

  8. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  9. Direct interaction between the cell division protein FtsZ and the cell differentiation protein SpoIIE

    OpenAIRE

    Lucet, Isabelle; Feucht, Andrea; Yudkin, Michael D.; Errington, Jeffery

    2000-01-01

    SpoIIE is a bifunctional protein with two critical roles in the establishment of cell fate in Bacillus subtilis. First, SpoIIE is needed for the normal formation of the asymmetrically positioned septum that forms early in sporulation and separates the mother cell from the prespore compartment. Secondly, SpoIIE is essential for the activation of the first compartment-specific transcription factor σF in the prespore. After initiation of sporulation, SpoIIE localizes to the potential asymmetric ...

  10. The Monofunctional Glycosyltransferase of Escherichia coli Localizes to the Cell Division Site and Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 3, FtsW, and FtsN▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Derouaux, Adeline; Wolf, Benoît; Fraipont, Claudine; Breukink, Eefjan; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Terrak, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    The monofunctional peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase (MtgA) catalyzes glycan chain elongation of the bacterial cell wall. Here we show that MtgA localizes at the division site of Escherichia coli cells that are deficient in PBP1b and produce a thermosensitive PBP1a and is able to interact with three constituents of the divisome, PBP3, FtsW, and FtsN, suggesting that MtgA may play a role in peptidoglycan assembly during the cell cycle in collaboration with other proteins.

  11. Cell division cycle 25 homolog c effects on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance at elevated dosage in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The underlying mechanisms behind both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and induced radioresistance (IRR), generally occurring at elevated radiation levels, remain unclear; however, elucidation of the relationship between cell cycle division 25 homolog c (Cdc25c) phosphatase and HRS/IRR may provide important insights into this process. Two cell lines with disparate HRS status, A549 and SiHa cells, were selected as cell models for comparison of dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase expression subsequent to low-dose irradiation. Knockdown of Cdc25c in A549 cells was mediated by transfection with a pGCsi-RAN-U6neo vector containing hairpin siRNA sequences. S216-phosphorylated Cdc25c protein [p-Cdc25c (Ser216)], cell survival and mitotic ratio were measured by western blot, colony-forming assay and histone H3 phosphorylation analysis. Variant p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression was observed in the two cell lines after irradiation. The p-Cdc25c (Ser216) expression noted in SiHa cells after administration of 0-1 Gy radiation was similar to the radioresistance model; however, in A549 cells, the dose response for the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue overlapped the level required to overcome the HRS response. Furthermore, Cdc25c repression prior to low-dose radiation induced more distinct HRS and prevented the development of IRR. The dose required to overcome the HRS response coincided with the effect of early G2-phase checkpoint arrest in A549 cells (approximately 0.3 Gy), and Cdc25c knockdown in A549 cells (approximately 0.5 Gy) corresponded to the phosphorylation of the Cdc25c Ser216 residue. Resultant data confirmed that dose-dependent Cdc25c phosphatase does effectively act as an early G2-phase checkpoint, thus indicating mechanistic importance in the HRS to IRR transition in A549 cells. (author)

  12. Structural determinants underlying the temperature-sensitive nature of a Galpha mutant in asymmetric cell division of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher A; Afshar, Katayoun; Snyder, Jason T; Tall, Gregory G; Gönczy, Pierre; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2008-08-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are integral to a conserved regulatory module that influences metazoan asymmetric cell division (ACD). In the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, GOA-1 (Galpha(o)) and GPA-16 (Galpha(i)) are involved in generating forces that pull on astral microtubules and position the spindle asymmetrically. GPA-16 function has been analyzed in vivo owing notably to a temperature-sensitive allele gpa-16(it143), which, at the restrictive temperature, results in spindle orientation defects in early embryos. Here we identify the structural basis of gpa-16(it143), which encodes a point mutation (G202D) in the switch II region of GPA-16. Using Galpha(i1)(G202D) as a model in biochemical analyses, we demonstrate that high temperature induces instability of the mutant Galpha. At the permissive temperature, the mutant Galpha was stable upon GTP binding, but switch II rearrangement was compromised, as were activation state-selective interactions with regulators involved in ACD, including GoLoco motifs, RGS proteins, and RIC-8. We solved the crystal structure of the mutant Galpha bound to GDP, which indicates a unique switch II conformation as well as steric constraints that suggest activated GPA-16(it143) is destabilized relative to wild type. Spindle severing in gpa-16(it143) embryos revealed that pulling forces are symmetric and markedly diminished at the restrictive temperature. Interestingly, pulling forces are asymmetric and generally similar in magnitude to wild type at the permissive temperature despite defects in the structure of GPA-16(it143). These normal pulling forces in gpa-16(it143) embryos at the permissive temperature were attributable to GOA-1 function, underscoring a complex interplay of Galpha subunit function in ACD. PMID:18519563

  13. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  14. Effects of the Scientific Argumentation Based Learning Process on Teaching the Unit of Cell Division and Inheritance to Eighth Grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    Balci, Ceyda; Yenice, Nilgun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of scientific argumentation based learning process on the eighth grade students’ achievement in the unit of “cell division and inheritance”. It also deals with the effects of this process on their comprehension about the nature of scientific knowledge, their willingness to take part in discussions and their attitude towards the course of science and technology. The study employed the design of pretest-post test matched control group design which...

  15. Formation of multinuclear cells induced by dimethyl sulfoxide: inhibition of cytokinesis and occurrence of novel nuclear division in dictyostelium cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that 10 percent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induces the formation of actin microfilament bundles in the cell nucleus together with the dislocation of cortical microfilaments from the plasma membrane. The present study investigated the effects of DMSO on diverse activities mediated by cellular microfilaments as the second step toward assessing potential differences between nuclear and cytoplasmic actins of dictyostelium mucoroides. DMSO was found to reversibly inhibit...

  16. Cell division arrest by gamma-irradiation in photoautotrophic suspension culture of Euphorbia characias: maintenance of photosynthetic capacity and overaccumulation of sucrose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiation (250 Gy) applied to photoautotrophic cell suspensions of Euphorbia characias L. in the exponential growth phase led to the arrest of cell division and to a subsequent overaccumulation of sucrose and dry matter. From the fourth day of culture, the chlorophyll content and gross photosynthesis were not depressed by gamma-treatment nor by sugar accumulation. In both cultures, no difference was observed between oxygen uptake in the light at CO2 saturating concentration and in the dark, suggesting that no change in energy-dissipative reactions took place after irradiation. A slight increase in oxygen uptake in both light and dark was observed in irradiated cells during the first four days. However, in the absence of limiting factors, the photosynthetic capacities of the dividing and irradiated non-dividing photoautotrophic cells were identical but higher than that of the non-dividing cells in the stationary growth phase. This suggests that gamma-irradiation arrests cell division by a mechanism different to that occurring in stationary-phase cultures. This may be of value in investigating the metabolism of secondary products. (author)

  17. Quaternion hermitian planes

    OpenAIRE

    Stroppel, Markus

    1993-01-01

    The quaternion hermitian planes are defined, and are characterized by certain groups of automorphisms. For this purpose, characterizations of locally compact connected translation planes (in the context of stable planes) and compact connected projective desarguesian planes are given.

  18. The Role of Embryologic Fusion Planes in the Invasiveness and Recurrence of Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Classic Mix-Up of Causation and Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Linus T. D.; Guppy, Michelle P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The facial embryologic fusion planes as regions of mesenchymal and ectodermal fusion of the primordial facial processes during embryological development have been suggested to influence the spread, invasiveness, pathogenesis, and recurrence of cutaneous carcinoma. This study sought to establish whether basal cell carcinoma (BCC) originating in embryologic fusion planes has a greater propensity for earlier depth of invasion, leading to an increased rate of lesion recurrence. Methods: Facial BCCs excised in a single surgeon practice over 2 years were allocated into 2 anatomic domains according to their correlation with embryologic fusion planes. Lesion depth of invasion, surface area, and margins of excision were analyzed in conjunction with recurrence data over the following 70–80 months. Results: Of the 331 lesions examined, 70 were located in embryologic fusion planes. No difference was found in the mean surface area and depth of invasion for lesions located in the 2 domains (P > 0.05). Ten lesion recurrences were identified, none of which were located in embryologic fusion planes. Recurrent lesions were excised with a significantly greater percentage of close and incomplete excision margins (P < 0.05). Conclusions: BCC arising in embryologic fusion planes are not more invasive or at greater risk of recurrence. Excision margins seem to have the greatest influence on lesion recurrence. Because of the paucity of superfluous tissue and the cosmetic and functionally sensitive nature of these areas of embryologic fusion, specialist treatment of these lesions is recommended to ensure that adequacy of excision is not neglected at the cost of ease of closure and cosmesis. PMID:26894007

  19. Cyanamide mode of action during inhibition of onion (Allium cepa L.) root growth involves disturbances in cell division and cytoskeleton formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata

    2011-09-01

    Cyanamide is an allelochemical produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.). Its phyotoxic effect on plant growth was examined on roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Water solution of cyanamide (2-10 mM) restricted growth of onion roots in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of onion roots with cyanamide resulted in a decrease in root growth rate accompanied by a decrease in accumulation of fresh and dry weight. The inhibitory effect of cyanamide was reversed by its removal from the environment, but full recovery was observed only for tissue treated with this chemical at low concentration (2-6 mM). Cytological observations of root tip cells suggest that disturbances in cell division may explain the strong cyanamide allelopathic activity. Moreover, in cyanamide-treated onion the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells and cell cycle, and modifications of cytoskeleton arrangement. PMID:21573814

  20. Evaluation of in-plane local stress distribution in stacked IC chip using dynamic random access memory cell array for highly reliable three-dimensional IC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Seiya; Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    As three-dimensional (3D) ICs have many advantages, IC performances can be enhanced without scaling down of transistor size. However, 3D IC has mechanical stresses inside Si substrates owing to its 3D stacking structure, which induces negative effects on transistor performances such as carrier mobility changes. One of the mechanical stresses is local bending stress due to organic adhesive shrinkage among stacked IC chips. In this paper, we have proposed an evaluation method for in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips using retention time modulation of a dynamic random access memory (DRAM) cell array. We fabricated a test structure composed of a DRAM chip bonded on a Si interposer with dummy Cu/Sn microbumps. As a result, we clarified that the DRAM cell array can precisely evaluate the in-plane local stress distribution in the stacked IC chips.

  1. PERSONNEL DIVISION BECOMES HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    In the years to come, CERN faces big challenges in the planning and use of human resources. At this moment, Personnel (PE) Division is being reorganised to prepare for new tasks and priorities. In order to accentuate the purposes of the operation, the name of the division has been changed into Human Resources (HR) Division, with effect from 1st January 2000. Human Resources DivisionTel.73222

  2. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division Evolução molecular em bactérias: divisão celular

    OpenAIRE

    Trevors, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.A evolução molecular em bactérias é examinada com ênfase na auto-organização de uma célula capaz de divisão primitiva e ...

  3. The fate of Müller’s glia following experimental retinal detachment: nuclear migration, cell division, and subretinal glial scar formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Geoffrey P.; Chapin, Ethan A.; Luna, Gabriel; Linberg, Kenneth A.; Fisher, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the fate of Müller’s glia following experimental retinal detachment, using a “pulse/chase” paradigm of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling for the purpose of understanding the role of Müller cell division in subretinal scar formation. Methods Experimental retinal detachments were created in pigmented rabbit eyes, and 3 days later 10 µg of BrdU was injected intravitreally. The retinas were harvested 4 h after the BrdU was administered (i.e., day 3) or on days 4, 7, and 21 post d...

  4. Inhibition of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) root growth by cyanamide is due to altered cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Anita; Bogatek, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Cyanamide (CA) has been reported as a natural compound produced by hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) and it was shown also to be an allelochemical, responsible for strong allelopathic potential in this species. CA phytotoxicity has been demonstrated on various plant species, but to date little is known about its mode of action at cellular level. Treatment of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) roots with CA (1.2 mM) resulted in inhibition of growth accompanied by alterations in cell division, an...

  5. Altered mRNA cap recognition activity of initiation factor 4E in the yeast cell cycle division mutant cdc33.

    OpenAIRE

    Altmann, M; Trachsel, H

    1989-01-01

    The mutation in the S. cerevisiae cell cycle division mutant cdc33 consists of a single G to A transition in the open reading frame encoding translation initiation factor 4E (eIF-4E). This leads to the substitution of glycine 113 by aspartic acid close to tryptophane 115 in the protein. This mutation reduces cap binding activity of eIF-4E as measured by binding of eIF-4E to m7GDP agarose columns and slows down overall protein synthesis at the non-permissive temperature. Comparison of the cdc3...

  6. The tumor suppressor APC differentially regulates multiple β-catenins through the function of axin and CKIα during C. elegans asymmetric stem cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin T; Phillips, Bryan T

    2014-06-15

    The APC tumor suppressor regulates diverse stem cell processes including gene regulation through Wnt-β-catenin signaling and chromosome stability through microtubule interactions, but how the disparate functions of APC are controlled is not well understood. Acting as part of a Wnt-β-catenin pathway that controls asymmetric cell division, Caenorhabditis elegans APC, APR-1, promotes asymmetric nuclear export of the β-catenin WRM-1 by asymmetrically stabilizing microtubules. Wnt function also depends on a second β-catenin, SYS-1, which binds to the C. elegans TCF POP-1 to activate gene expression. Here, we show that APR-1 regulates SYS-1 levels in asymmetric stem cell division, in addition to its known role in lowering nuclear levels of WRM-1. We demonstrate that SYS-1 is also negatively regulated by the C. elegans homolog of casein kinase 1α (CKIα), KIN-19. We show that KIN-19 restricts APR-1 localization, thereby regulating nuclear WRM-1. Finally, the polarity of APR-1 cortical localization is controlled by PRY-1 (C. elegans Axin), such that PRY-1 controls the polarity of both SYS-1 and WRM-1 asymmetries. We propose a model whereby Wnt signaling, through CKIα, regulates the function of two distinct pools of APC - one APC pool negatively regulates SYS-1, whereas the second pool stabilizes microtubules and promotes WRM-1 nuclear export. PMID:24762815

  7. Clinical observation of the plane plate in the treatment of Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion patients with temporomandibular disorders%安氏Ⅱ类2分类错牙合伴颞下颌关节紊乱病患者的平面导板矫治器临床治疗效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦金炜; 张静露; 秦妍; 陈文静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical therapeutic effects of plane plate on Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion patients with tem-poromandibular disorders (TMD). Methods 20 outpatients who had Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion with temporomandibular joint disorders from January 2013 to December 2014 at Jiangsu Provincial Stomatological Hospital of Orthodontics and TMJ Branch were se-lected in this study. All were treated by the plane plates and used United States Myotronics K7 (Neuromuscular Dentistry analysis sys-tem)was used to record their changes of condylar trajectory and vibration frequency before and after using the flat-screen guide appli-ance. Results ①After being treated by plane plate,maximum mouth opening,protrusion and lateral movement all had little changes compared with the previous treatment (P > 0. 05). ②The style of mouth opening was changed after treatment (P < 0. 05). ③Joint vi-brations were statistically changed compared with those before treatment (P < 0. 05). Conclusions The plane plant can lead to open bite on deep overbite patients,improve jaw movement patterns,and relieve related symptoms of temporomandibular diseases,thus provi-ding guidance for clinical treatment.%目的:对患有颞下颌关节紊乱病的安氏Ⅱ类2分类患者给予平面导板矫治器进行治疗,分析其临床效果,为正畸临床提供指导意义。方法选择2013年1月到2014年12月在南京医科大学附属口腔医院就诊的安氏Ⅱ类2分类错牙合伴颞下颌关节紊乱病患者20例,用美国Myotronics K7神经肌肉牙医学分析系统记录每位患者带用平面导板矫治器治疗前、后的下颌运动轨迹及髁突震动频率的变化。结果①平面导板矫治器治疗后下颌的最大张口度、前伸、侧方运动与治疗前相比变化不大,无统计学意义( P >0.05)。②平面导板矫治器治疗后开口型牙合位偏移与治疗前相比结果有统计学意义(P <0.05)。③平面导板

  8. Role of FtsEX in cell division of Escherichia coli: viability of ftsEX mutants is dependent on functional SufI or high osmotic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Manjula

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, at least 12 proteins, FtsZ, ZipA, FtsA, FtsE/X, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsL, FtsB, FtsW, FtsI, FtsN, and AmiC, are known to localize to the septal ring in an interdependent and sequential pathway to coordinate the septum formation at the midcell. The FtsEX complex is the latest recruit of this pathway, and unlike other division proteins, it is shown to be essential only on low-salt media. In this study, it is shown that ftsEX null mutations are not only salt remedial but also osmoremedial, which suggests that FtsEX may not be involved in salt transport as previously thought. Increased coexpression of cell division proteins FtsQ-FtsA-FtsZ or FtsN alone restored the growth defects of ftsEX mutants. ftsEX deletion exacerbated the defects of most of the mutants affected in Z ring localization and septal assembly; however, the ftsZ84 allele was a weak suppressor of ftsEX. The viability of ftsEX mutants in high-osmolarity conditions was shown to be dependent on the presence of a periplasmic protein, SufI, a substrate of twin-arginine translocase. In addition, SufI in multiple copies could substitute for the functions of FtsEX. Taken together, these results suggest that FtsE and FtsX are absolutely required for the process of cell division in conditions of low osmotic strength for the stability of the septal ring assembly and that, during high-osmolarity conditions, the FtsEX and SufI functions are redundant for this essential process. PMID:17071757

  9. The progression of the intra-erythrocytic cell cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and the role of the centriolar plaques in asynchronous mitotic division during schizogony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C

    2011-01-01

    The cell division cycle and mitosis of intra-erythrocytic (IE) Plasmodium falciparum are poorly understood aspects of parasite development which affect malaria molecular pathogenesis. Specifically, the timing of the multiple gap (G), DNA synthesis (S) and chromosome separation (M) phases of...... parasite mitosis are not well defined, nor whether genome divisions are immediately followed by cleavage of the nuclear envelope. Curiously, daughter merozoite numbers do not follow the geometric expansion expected from equal numbers of binary divisions, an outcome difficult to explain using the standard...

  10. Pattern classification of time plane features of ECG wave from cell-phone photography for machine aided cardiac disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Rupendra Nath; Pramanik, Sayak; Mitra, Sucharita; Chaudhuri, Bidyut B

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a robust technique for extracting time plane features of Electrocardiogram (ECG) from digital images of ECG paper strips. We concluded this article reporting performance evaluation of the system developed for machine aided cardiac disease detection. Mostly paper based ECG recordings are used in developing countries and digital photographs of different leads could easily be taken and sent with a mediocre cellular phone set. Apart from extracting the features, the proposed system detects cardiac axis deviation and diagnose if Left or Right Bundle Branch Blockage (LBBB or RBBB) is present while fed with the digital photographs of different leads of ECG strips. Preprocessing of the low-resolution images involves background grid line noise removal, adaptive image binarization by Sauvola's method and Bresenham's line joining algorithm to link the ECG signature, if broken. Pattern extraction mainly delineate the time plane features like P wave, QRS complex and T wave using water reservoir based pattern recognition techniques and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Cardiac axis deviation detection is done by checking the overall voltage levels of QRS complexes of lead I, II and III. Having the knowledge of cardiac axis completes the requirements to comment on the cardiac blockage like Left or Right Bundle Branch Blockage (LBBB or RBBB). Thus, the proposed algorithm is primarily developed for machine aided diagnosis of LBBB or RBBB from the digital photographs of ECG paper strips. PMID:25571067

  11. Euclid Squares on Infinite Planes

    OpenAIRE

    W.B.Vasantha Kandasamy; Ilanthenral, K.; Florentin Smarandache

    2015-01-01

    In this book for the first time the authors study the new type of Euclid squares in various planes like real plane, complex plane, dual number plane, special dual like number plane and special quasi dual number plane.

  12. Synthesis of the cell surface during the division cycle of rod-shaped, gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, S

    1991-01-01

    When the growth of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall is considered in relation to the synthesis of the other components of the cell, a new understanding of the pattern of wall synthesis emerges. Rather than a switch in synthesis between the side wall and pole, there is a partitioning of synthesis such that the volume of the cell increases exponentially and thus perfectly encloses the exponentially increasing cytoplasm. This allows the density of the cell to remain constant during the divi...

  13. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division Evolução molecular em bactérias: divisão celular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Trevors

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.A evolução molecular em bactérias é examinada com ênfase na auto-organização de uma célula capaz de divisão primitiva e multiplicação durante o princípio da evolução molecular. Também se discute a possibilidade de que algum tipo de estrutura de encapsulação tenha antecedido as vias bioquímicas e o agrupamento de material genético. Esses aspectos são considerados sob uma perspectiva evolutiva.

  14. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermacore Inc. proposes an innovative titanium heat pipe thermal plane for passive thermal control of individual cells within a fuel cell stack. The proposed...

  15. Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Growth of Leptospire, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: Immunoreactivity and Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Triampo, W; Triampo, D; Wong-Ekkabut, J; Tang, I M; Triampo, Wannapong; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Triampo, Darapond; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the exposure of the bacterium, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola to a constant magnetic field with magnetic flux density from a permanent ferrite magnet = 140 mT were studied. Changes in Leptospira cells after their exposure to the field were determined on the basis of changes in their growth behavior and agglutination immunoreactivity with a homologous antiserum using darkfield microscopy together with visual imaging. The data showed that the exposed Leptospira cells have lower densities and lower agglutination immunoreactivity than the unexposed control group. Interestingly, some of the exposed Leptospira cells showed abnormal morphologies such as large lengths. We discussed some of the possible reasons for these observations.

  16. Germ cells may survive clipping and division of the spermatic vessels in surgery for intra-abdominal testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, J M; Cortes, Dina; Visfeldt, J

    1999-01-01

    Laparoscopy is a well described modality that provides an accurate visual diagnosis upon which further management of intra-abdominal testes may be based. Laparoscopic ligation of spermatic vessels as stage 1 of the procedure is a natural extension of laparoscopy. A staged approach provides adequate...... viability of the intra-abdominal testis. However, it is uncertain whether the more sensitive germ cells survive this procedure in addition to the Sertoli and interstitial cells of the human testis. Survival of germ cells is a prerequisite of later fertility potential....

  17. Lighter and stronger planes

    OpenAIRE

    Attard, Bonnie; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The price of fuel is a large cost burden on the aerospace industry. A lighter plane means cheaper flights, increased aircraft range, and less environmental pollution. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/lighter-and-stronger-planes/

  18. Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Growth of Leptospire, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: Immunoreactivity and Cell Division

    OpenAIRE

    Triampo, Wannapong; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Triampo, Darapond; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak; Tang, I-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the exposure of the bacterium, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola to a constant magnetic field with magnetic flux density from a permanent ferrite magnet = 140 mT were studied. Changes in Leptospira cells after their exposure to the field were determined on the basis of changes in their growth behavior and agglutination immunoreactivity with a homologous antiserum using darkfield microscopy together with visual imaging. The data showed that the exposed Leptospira cells hav...

  19. 31P NMR studies of intracellular pH and phosphate metabolism during cell division cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Gillies, R.J.; Ugurbil, K; den Hollander, J A; Shulman, R G

    1981-01-01

    We have analyzed changes in intracellular pH and phosphate metabolism during the cell cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NCYC 239) by using high-resolution 31P NMR spectroscopy. High-density yeast cultures (2 x 10(8) cells per ml) were arrested prior to "start" by sequential glucose deprivation, after which they synchronously replicated DNA and divided after a final glucose feeding. Oxygenation of arrested cultures in the absence of glucose led to increased levels of sugar phosphates and ATP ...

  20. Rice OsRAD21-2 is Expressed in Actively Dividing Tissues and its Ectopic Expression in Yeast Results in Aberrant Cell Division and Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Gong; Tang Li; Qi Li; Longfeng Yan; Tai Wang

    2011-01-01

    Rad21 and its meiotic counterpart Rec8,the key components of the cohesin complex,are essential for sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis,respectively.In contrast to yeast and vertebrates,which have only two RAD21/REC8 genes,the rice genome encodes four Rad21/Rec8 proteins.Here,we report on the cloning and characterization of OsRAD21-2 from rice (Oryza sativa L.).Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length amino acids showed that OsRad21-2 was grouped into the plant-specific Rad21 subfamily.Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed OsRAD21-2 preferentially expressed in premeiotic flowers.Further RNA in situ hybridization analysis and promoter::β-glucuronidase staining indicated that OsRAD21-2 was mainly expressed in actively dividing tissues including premeiotic stamen,stem intercalary meristem,leaf meristem,and root pericycle.Ectopic expression of OsRAD21-2 in fission yeast resulted in cell growth delay and morphological abnormality.Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the OsRAD21-2-expressed cells were arrested in G2 phase.Our results suggest that OsRad21-2 functions in regulation of cell division and growth.

  1. On the stability of homogenous orientation in a plane-parallel cell of a liquid crystal doped with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of molecules homogenous orientations stability of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) doped with small amount of cholesteric LC are considered. The LC cell with homeotropic orientation on the wall and the cell with a twist-oriented molecules on the boundaries are studied. The problems are solved using the Noether theorem for LC. The invariance of the form of free energy to translation according to the Noether theorem leads to conservation of the momentum flux, and invariance with respect to the rotation group leads to conservation of the angular momentum flux. These conservation laws are used to get thresholds of molecules homogenous orientation stability of mentioned mixture and the influence of nanoparticles on this thresholds

  2. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts...... study alternative and richer models, such as externalities in cake cutting, simultaneous cake cutting, and envy-free cake cutting. The second part of the thesis tackles the fair allocation of multiple goods, divisible and indivisible. In the realm of divisible goods, we investigate the well known...

  3. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siddique, S.; Radakovic, Z.S.; De La Torre, C.M.; Chronis, D.; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, E.; Holbein, J.; Matera, C.; Hutten, M.; Gutbrod, P.; Anjam, M.S.; Rozanska, E.; Habash, S.; Elashry, A.; Sobczak, M.; Kakimoto, T.; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, T.; Mitchum, M.G.; Grundler, F.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 41 (2015), s. 12669-12674. ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cell cycle * cytokinin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.674, year: 2014

  4. LocZ Is a New Cell Division Protein Involved in Proper Septum Placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holečková, Nela; Doubravová, Linda; Massida, O.; Molle, V.; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2015). ISSN 2150-7511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0256; GA ČR GAP207/12/1568 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Z-RING FORMATION * ESCHERICHIA-COLI-CELLS * CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.786, year: 2014

  5. Ultrastructure of cells after reversible dark-induced blocking of mitotic divisions in antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available As compared with the control plants cultured under photoperiodic L : D = =14 : 10 conditions (K w i a t k o w s k a, M a s z e w s k i, 1978, the ultrastructure of nuclei -in cells blocked by a 5 day exposure to continuous darkness is characterized by homogenous arrangement. This homogeneity is maintained in all generations of antheridial filaments irrespective of cell length, which in the controls, being directly correlated with particular type of nuclear structure, may serve as a precise indicator of a given stage of interphase. From similarities in both the spatial distribution and content of condensed chromatin in is concluded that the block of the cell cycle is imposed at the beginning of the G2 phase. On comparing these cells with the early G2 period (stage VII in the control plants, marked changes in the structure of nucleoli were found. They decrease in size by half owing to the complete decline of granular component. The area occupied by endoplasmic reticulum undergoes a 50% reduction. The decrease in the activity of Golgi apparatus expressed by a drop in number of smooth vesicles surrounding a single dictyosome is found to parallel the limited rate of cell growth. The number of coated vesicles and cisterns of dictyosome slightly increases. Mitochondria show typical condensed configuration with dense matrices and swollen cristae, while in the control orthodox forms are prevailing. The mean size of mitochondria is smaller, but their number exceeds that of the control plants. The surface area of mitochondrial profiles is found to remain constant proportion of the cytoplasm section, e.g., about 3%. Dark-cultured antheridial filaments show absolute decline of lipid droplets. No differences were found in structure of plastids and vacuols, as well as in number of ribosomes in cytoplasm surface unit.

  6. Information Model for Resource of ASON Control Plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bin; SONG Hong-sheng; GUI Xuan; ZHANG Jie; GU Wan-yi

    2004-01-01

    Automatic Switched Optical network (ASON) is the key technology for the next generation optical networks, and the recommendations for ASON were also developed by ITU-T. However, the recommendations for the management plane have not been made yet. In this paper, the management information model for the resources of control plane is proposed based on the management requirements of ASON for the first time. The managed objects for control plane could be used for the management of control Network Elements(NEs) and control channels, they can also be used for route areas division in control plane, parameter configuration and performance inspection for the control modules in a control NEs.

  7. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  8. Evolution and tinkering: what do a protein kinase, a transcriptional regulator and chromosome segregation/cell division proteins have in common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Kalantari, Aida; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we focus on functional interactions among multi-domain proteins which share a common evolutionary origin. The examples we develop are four Bacillus subtilis proteins, which all possess an ATP-binding Walker motif: the bacterial tyrosine kinase (BY-kinase) PtkA, the chromosome segregation protein Soj (ParA), the cell division protein MinD and a transcription regulator SalA. These proteins have arisen via duplication of the ancestral ATP-binding domain, which has undergone fusions with other functional domains in the process of divergent evolution. We point out that these four proteins, despite having very different physiological roles, engage in an unusually high number of binary functional interactions. Namely, MinD attracts Soj and PtkA to the cell pole, and in addition, activates the kinase function of PtkA. SalA also activates the kinase function of PtkA, and it gets phosphorylated by PtkA as well. The consequence of this phosphorylation is the activation of SalA as a transcriptional repressor. We hypothesize that these functional interactions remain preserved during divergent evolution and represent a constraint on the process of evolutionary "tinkering", brought about by fusions of different functional domains. PMID:26286503

  9. A long non-coding RNA targets microRNA miR-34a to regulate colon cancer stem cell asymmetric division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Ai, Yiwei; Srinivasan, Tara; Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Xiang, Kun; Lipkin, Steven M; Shen, Xiling

    2016-01-01

    The roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in regulating cancer and stem cells are being increasingly appreciated. Its diverse mechanisms provide the regulatory network with a bigger repertoire to increase complexity. Here we report a novel LncRNA, Lnc34a, that is enriched in colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) and initiates asymmetric division by directly targeting the microRNA miR-34a to cause its spatial imbalance. Lnc34a recruits Dnmt3a via PHB2 and HDAC1 to methylate and deacetylate the miR-34a promoter simultaneously, hence epigenetically silencing miR-34a expression independent of its upstream regulator, p53. Lnc34a levels affect CCSC self-renewal and colorectal cancer (CRC) growth in xenograft models. Lnc34a is upregulated in late-stage CRCs, contributing to epigenetic miR-34a silencing and CRC proliferation. The fact that lncRNA targets microRNA highlights the regulatory complexity of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which occupy the bulk of the genome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14620.001 PMID:27077950

  10. Relation of cell division to the acquisition of responsiveness to cortisol in the neural retina of the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Or, S.; Eshel, M. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Hadassah Medical School)

    1982-01-01

    Responsiveness of the neural retina to cortisol, as measured by cortisol-induced glutamine synthetase activity, is acquired in the chick embryo during the second week of embryogenesis. The magnitude of the response is inversely related to the growth rate of the neural retina. This developmental event is also acquired by the 8-d-old neural retina under organ culture conditions. The acquisition of competence to respond to the hormonal stimulation can be reversibly abolished by inhibition of DNA synthesis with 0.01 mM cytosine arabinoside; the magnitude of response that resumes after withdrawal of the drug, is characterized by the stage of growth of the neural retina. Responsiveness to cortisol in the embryonic neural retina is apparently coupled to the number of Muller cells (the targets for cortisol action) that have withdrawn from the cell cycle.

  11. Relation of cell division to the acquisition of responsiveness to cortisol in the neural retina of the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responsiveness of the neural retina to cortisol, as measured by cortisol-induced glutamine synthetase activity, is acquired in the chick embryo during the second week of embryogenesis. The magnitude of the response is inversely related to the growth rate of the neural retina. This developmental event is also acquired by the 8-d-old neural retina under organ culture conditions. The acquisition of competence to respond to the hormonal stimulation can be reversibly abolished by inhibition of DNA synthesis with 0.01 mM cytosine arabinoside; the magnitude of response that resumes after withdrawal of the drug, is characterized by the stage of growth of the neural retina. Responsiveness to cortisol in the embryonic neural retina is apparently coupled to the number of Muller cells (the targets for cortisol action) that have withdrawn from the cell cycle. (author)

  12. Modification of Experimental Protocols for a Space Shuttle Flight and Applications for the Analysis of Cytoskeletal Structures During Fertilization, Cell Division , and Development in Sea Urchin Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Stoecker, Andrew; Schatten, Heide

    1995-01-01

    To explore the role of microgravity on cytoskeletal organization and skeletal calcium deposition during fertilization, cell division, and early development, the sea urchin was chosen as a model developmental system. Methods were developed to employ light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy on cultures being prepared for flight on the Space Shuttle. For analysis of microfilaments, microtubules, centrosomes, and calcium-requiring events, our standard laboratory protocols had to be modified substantially for experimentation on the Space Shuttle. All manipulations were carried out in a closed culture chamber containing 35 ml artificial sea water as a culture fluid. Unfertilized eggs stored for 24 hours in these chambers were fertilized with sperm diluted in sea water and fixed with concentrated fixatives for final fixation in formaldehyde, taxol, EGTA, and MgCl2(exp -6)H2O for 1 cell to 16 cell stages to preserve cytoskeletal structures for simultaneous analysis with light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, and 1.5 percent glutaraldehyde and 0.4 percent formaldehyde for blastula and plueus stages. The fixed samples wre maintained in chambers without degradation for up to two weeks after which the specimens were processed and analyzed with routine methods. Since complex manipulations are not possible in the closed chambers, the fertilization coat was removed from fixation using 0.5 percent freshly prepared sodium thioglycolate solution at pH 10.0 which provided reliable immunofluorescence staining for microtubules. Sperm/egg fusion, mitosis, cytokinesis, and calcium deposition during spicule formatin in early embryogenesis were found to be without artificial alterations when compared to cells fixed fresh and processed with conventional methods.

  13. PBP1a-deficiency causes major defects in cell division, growth and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zezhang T Wen

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of human dental caries, lives almost exclusively on the tooth surface in plaque biofilms and is known for its ability to survive and respond to various environmental insults, including low pH, and antimicrobial agents from other microbes and oral care products. In this study, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP1a-deficient mutant, strain JB467, was generated by allelic replacement mutagenesis and analyzed for the effects of such a deficiency on S. mutans' stress tolerance response and biofilm formation. Our results so far have shown that PBP1a-deficiency in S. mutans affects growth of the deficient mutant, especially at acidic and alkaline pHs. As compared to the wild-type, UA159, the PBP1a-deficient mutant, JB467, had a reduced growth rate at pH 6.2 and did not grow at all at pH 8.2. Unlike the wild-type, the inclusion of paraquat in growth medium, especially at 2 mM or above, significantly reduced the growth rate of the mutant. Acid killing assays showed that the mutant was 15-fold more sensitive to pH 2.8 than the wild-type after 30 minutes. In a hydrogen peroxide killing assay, the mutant was 16-fold more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide (0.2%, w/v after 90 minutes than the wild-type. Relative to the wild-type, the mutant also had an aberrant autolysis rate, indicative of compromises in cell envelope integrity. As analyzed using on 96-well plate model and spectrophotometry, biofilm formation by the mutant was decreased significantly, as compared to the wild-type. Consistently, Field Emission-SEM analysis also showed that the PBP1a-deficient mutant had limited capacity to form biofilms. TEM analysis showed that PBP1a mutant existed primarily in long rod-like cells and cells with multiple septa, as compared to the coccal wild-type. The results presented here highlight the importance of pbp1a in cell morphology, stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in S. mutans.

  14. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  15. Effect of estrone on somatic and female gametophyte cell division and differentiation in Arabidospis thaliana cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Żabicki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the mammalian female sex hormone estrone on differentiation of somatic tissues and on induction of autonomous endosperm in culture of female gametophyte cells of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0. In culture, estrone-stimulated development of autonomous endosperm (AE occurred in 14.7% of unpollinated pistils. The AE represented development stages similar to those of young endosperm after fertilization and AE of fis mutants in vivo. In the majority of ovules the AE was in a few-nucleate young stage. Some ovules showed more advanced stages of AE development, with nuclei and cytoplasm forming characteristic nuclear cytoplasmic domains (NCDs. Sporadically, AE was divided into regions characteristic for Arabidopsis endosperm formed after fertilization. Direct organogenesis (caulogenesis, rhizogenesis, callus proliferation and formation of trichome-like structures were observed during in vitro culture of hypocotyls and cotyledons of 3-day-old seedlings cultured on medium supplemented with estrone for 28 days. Histological analysis showed adventitious root formation and changes in explant anatomy caused by estrone.

  16. Effective formation of the segregation-competent complex determines successful partitioning of the bovine papillomavirus genome during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silla, Toomas; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2010-11-01

    Effective segregation of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus type 8 (KSHV) genomes into daughter cells is mediated by a single viral protein that tethers viral genomes to host mitotic chromosomes. The linker proteins that mediate BPV1, EBV, and KSHV segregation are E2, LANA1, and EBNA1, respectively. The N-terminal transactivation domain of BPV1 E2 is responsible for chromatin attachment and subsequent viral genome segregation. Because E2 transcriptional activation and chromatin attachment functions are not mutually exclusive, we aimed to determine the requirement of these activities during segregation by analyzing chimeric E2 proteins. This approach allowed us to separate the two activities. Our data showed that attachment of the segregation protein to chromatin is not sufficient for proper segregation. Rather, formation of a segregation-competent complex which carries multiple copies of the segregation protein is required. Complementation studies of E2 functional domains indicated that chromatin attachment and transactivation functions must act in concert to ensure proper plasmid segregation. These data indicate that there are specific interactions between linker molecules and transcription factors/complexes that greatly increase segregation-competent complex formation. We also showed, using hybrid E2 molecules, that restored segregation function does not involve interactions with Brd4. PMID:20810736

  17. Influence of elevated CO2 concentrations on cell division and nitrogen fixation rates in the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface ocean currently absorbs about one-fourth of the CO2 emitted to the atmosphere from human activities. As this CO2 dissolves in seawater, it reacts with seawater to form carbonic acid, increasing ocean acidity and shifting the partitioning of inorganic carbon species towards increased CO2 at the expense of CO32− concentrations. While the decrease in [CO32−] and/or increase in [H+] has been found to adversely affect many calcifying organisms, some photosynthetic organisms appear to benefit from increasing [CO2]. Among these is the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium, a predominant diazotroph (nitrogen-fixing in large parts of the oligotrophic oceans, which responded with increased carbon and nitrogen fixation at elevated pCO2. With the mechanism underlying this CO2 stimulation still unknown, the question arises whether this is a common response of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. In this study we therefore investigate the physiological response of Nodularia spumigena, a heterocystous bloom-forming diazotroph of the Baltic Sea, to CO2-induced changes in seawater carbonate chemistry. N. spumigena reacted to seawater acidification/carbonation with reduced cell division rates and nitrogen fixation rates, accompanied by significant changes in carbon and phosphorus quota and elemental composition of the formed biomass. Possible explanations for the contrasting physiological responses of Nodularia compared to Trichodesmium may be found in the different ecological strategies of non-heterocystous (Trichodesmium and heterocystous (Nodularia cyanobacteria.

  18. Analysis of the Tomato Fruit Growth Response to Temperature and Plant Fruit Load in Relation to Cell Division, Cell Expansion and DNA Endoreduplication

    OpenAIRE

    Bertin, N.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims To better understand the regulation of fruit growth in response to environmental factors, the effects of temperature and plant fruit load on cell number, cell size and DNA endoreduplication were analysed.

  19. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  20. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles

  1. Des divisions aux alternances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Clemens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available - From the divisions to the alternations - Society, action and common good give sense to democracy. Society is in fact a set of unmitigated divisions (horizontal and vertical, material and symbolic. Democratic action, since the discourse’s conflicts, doesn’t change the human beings, but things between they, in the alternation of power’s institutions for our only good in common: the body. With this aim, the Basic Income Earth Network is necessary.

  2. MicroRNA319a-targeted Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis TCP genes modulate head shape in chinese cabbage by differential cell division arrest in leaf regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanfei; Wu, Feijie; Yu, Xiang; Bai, Jinjuan; Zhong, Weili; He, Yuke

    2014-02-01

    Leafy heads of cabbage (Brassica oleracea), Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are composed of extremely incurved leaves. The shape of these heads often dictates the quality, and thus the commercial value, of these crops. Using quantitative trait locus mapping of head traits within a population of 150 recombinant inbred lines of Chinese cabbage, we investigated the relationship between expression levels of microRNA-targeted Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, cycloidea, and PCF transcription factor4 (BrpTCP4) genes and head shape. Here, we demonstrate that a cylindrical head shape is associated with relatively low BrpTCP4-1 expression, whereas a round head shape is associated with high BrpTCP4-1 expression. In the round-type Chinese cabbage, microRNA319 (miR319) accumulation and BrpTCP4-1 expression decrease from the apical to central regions of leaves. Overexpression of BrpMIR319a2 reduced the expression levels of BrpTCP4 and resulted in an even distribution of BrpTCP4 transcripts within all leaf regions. Changes in temporal and spatial patterns of BrpTCP4 expression appear to be associated with excess growth of both apical and interveinal regions, straightened leaf tips, and a transition from the round to the cylindrical head shape. These results suggest that the miR319a-targeted BrpTCP gene regulates the round shape of leafy heads via differential cell division arrest in leaf regions. Therefore, the manipulation of miR319a and BrpTCP4 genes is a potentially important tool for use in the genetic improvement of head shape in these crops. PMID:24351684

  3. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  4. On rank 4 projective planes

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, O.

    1981-01-01

    Let a finite projective plane be called rank m plane if it admits a collineation group G of rank m, let it be called strong rank m plane if moreover GP=G1 for some point-line pair (P,1). It is well known that every rank 2 plane is desarguesian (Theorem of Ostrom and Wagner). It is conjectured that the only rank 3 plane is the plane of order 2. By [1] and [7] the only strong rank 3 plane is the plane of order 2. In this paper it is proved that no strong rank 4 plane exists.

  5. Avaliação das alterações do plano oclusal em telerradiografias em norma lateral no tratamento de más oclusões de Classe II, 1ª divisão, com Bionator de Balters, em pacientes retrovertidos, neutrovertidos e provertidos Evaluation of occlusal plane changes in retroverted, neutroverted and proverted patients, with Class II, division 1, malocclusion treated with Balters' Bionator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Madeira de Barros Nunes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este trabalho objetiva verificar as alterações do plano oclusal funcional de Ricketts, utilizando as variáveis que orientam este plano nas análises cefalométricas de Ricketts e Schawrz-Faltin, em pacientes portadores de má oclusão de Classe II de Angle, 1ª divisão, associada ao retrognatismo mandibular, cuja terapêutica indicada tenha sido a Bionatorterapia. METODOLOGIA: a amostra coletada neste estudo retrospectivo consta de 128 telerradiografias em norma lateral de 64 indivíduos retrovertidos, neutrovertidos e provertidos, de ambos os gêneros, no estágio de desenvolvimento da oclusão em fase mista ou permanente jovem. A faixa etária dos indivíduos selecionados para o estudo variou entre 7 anos e 1 mês a 13 anos e 2 meses no momento T1, sendo a média inicial de 10 anos de idade. A média de duração do tratamento foi de 19,7 meses. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: os resultados mostraram comportamentos distintos do plano oclusal, conforme o tipo facial retrovertido, neutrovertido ou provertido. O controle do plano oclusal na Bionatorterapia, pelo manejo do Bionator conforme o tipo facial de cada paciente, por meio de desgastes seletivos no acrílico e conseqüente erupção diferenciada dos dentes, pode influenciar favoravelmente o crescimento geral da face em cada tipo facial.AIM: This work aims to verify the changes of Ricketts functional occlusal plane making use of variables which guide this same plane in the cephalometric analysis of Ricketts and Schwarz-Faltin among patients with Class II, division 1 malocclusion, associated to mandible retrognathism, whose therapy indicated has been Bionatortherapy. METHODS: The sample collected in this retrospective survey has 128 lateral cephalograms of 64 retroverted, neutroverted and proverted individuals, of both genders, at the stage of developing occlusion, either in mixed phase or permanent young. The age scale of individuals selected by the survey goes from 7 years and 1

  6. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  7. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  8. The Escherichia coli Cell Division Protein and Model Tat Substrate SufI (FtsP) Localizes to the Septal Ring and Has a Multicopper Oxidase-Like Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Tarry, Michael; Arends, S. J. Ryan; Roversi, Pietro; Piette, Evan; Sargent, Frank; Berks, Ben C.; Weiss, David S.; Lea, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein SufI (FtsP) has recently been proposed to be a component of the cell division apparatus. The SufI protein is also in widespread experimental use as a model substrate in studies of the Tat (twin arginine translocation) protein transport system. We have used SufI-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusions to show that SufI localizes to the septal ring in the dividing cell. We have also determined the structure of SufI by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 Å. ...

  9. On infinitely divisible semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2015-01-01

    by a random measure admits a unique decomposition into an independent increment process and an infinitely divisible process of finite variation. Consequently, the natural analog of Stricker's theorem holds for all strictly representable processes (as defined in this paper). Since Gaussian processes...... are strictly representable due to Hida's multiplicity theorem, the classical Stricker's theorem follows from our result. Another consequence is that the question when an infinitely divisible process is a semimartingale can often be reduced to a path property, when a certain associated infinitely...

  10. Advanced code-division multiplexers for superconducting detector arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, K D; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Hilton, G C; Niemack, M D; Reintsema, C D; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N; Vale, L R

    2011-01-01

    Multiplexers based on the modulation of superconducting quantum interference devices are now regularly used in multi-kilopixel arrays of superconducting detectors for astrophysics, cosmology, and materials analysis. Over the next decade, much larger arrays will be needed. These larger arrays require new modulation techniques and compact multiplexer elements that fit within each pixel. We present a new in-focal-plane code-division multiplexer that provides multiplexing elements with the required scalability. This code-division multiplexer uses compact lithographic modulation elements that simultaneously multiplex both signal outputs and superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) detector bias voltages. It eliminates the shunt resistor used to voltage bias TES detectors, greatly reduces power dissipation, allows different dc bias voltages for each TES, and makes all elements sufficiently compact to fit inside the detector pixel area. These in-focal-plane code-division multiplexers can be combined with multi-g...

  11. Anticrossproducts and cross divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leva, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    This paper defines, in the context of conventional vector algebra, the concept of anticrossproduct and a family of simple operations called cross or vector divisions. It is impossible to solve for a or b the equation axb=c, where a and b are three-dimensional space vectors, and axb is their cross product. However, the problem becomes solvable if some "knowledge about the unknown" (a or b) is available, consisting of one of its components, or the angle it forms with the other operand of the cross product. Independently of the selected reference frame orientation, the known component of a may be parallel to b, or vice versa. The cross divisions provide a compact and insightful symbolic representation of a family of algorithms specifically designed to solve problems of such kind. A generalized algorithm was also defined, incorporating the rules for selecting the appropriate kind of cross division, based on the type of input data. Four examples of practical application were provided, including the computation of the point of application of a force and the angular velocity of a rigid body. The definition and geometrical interpretation of the cross divisions stemmed from the concept of anticrossproduct. The "anticrossproducts of axb" were defined as the infinitely many vectors x(i) such that x(i)xb=axb. PMID:18423647

  12. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  13. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  14. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Photochemically driven redox chemistry induces protocell membrane pearling and division

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ting F.; Adamala, Katarzyna; Zhang, Na; SZOSTAK, JACK W.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the evolution of complex biochemical machinery, the growth and division of simple primitive cells (protocells) must have been driven by environmental factors. We have previously demonstrated two pathways for fatty acid vesicle growth in which initially spherical vesicles grow into long filamentous vesicles; division is then mediated by fluid shear forces. Here we describe a different pathway for division that is independent of external mechanical forces. We show that the illumination...

  16. Integrated ablation and division device for liver resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Stephen Kin Yong; Hlaing, Wah Wah; Huang, Wei Hsuan; Chui, Chee Kong

    2011-01-01

    Background Intraoperative blood loss during liver resection may be minimized by ablating the liver parenchyma using radiofrequency (RF) energy. However, it is difficult to estimate the depth of the avascular plane and more RF energy than necessary may be inadvertently used as a result of lack of feedback. Methods Laparoscopic liver resection was performed on a live porcine model to determine the feasibility and applicability of a model which integrates ablation and division in a single device. Results Liver resection was uncomplicated with minimal bleeding. The integration of the ablation and division mechanism resolved the difficulty of estimating the depth of the avascular plane after coagulation. The real-time feedback mechanism minimized liver damage by eliminating the application of unnecessary RF. Conclusions The proposed model is functionally acceptable and represents a possible method of determining the depth of the avascular plane and the amount of RF energy required during liver resection. PMID:21309931

  17. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  18. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  19. Divisibility of characteristic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    We use homotopy theory to define certain rational coefficients characteristic numbers with integral values, depending on a given prime number q and positive integer t. We prove the first nontrivial degree formula and use it to show that existence of morphisms between algebraic varieties for which these numbers are not divisible by q give information on the degree of such morphisms or on zero cycles of the target variety.

  20. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included

  1. BKP plane partitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another.

  2. BKP plane partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Foda, O.; Wheeler, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another.

  3. BKP plane partitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another

  4. Homogeneous Plane Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the search for potentially exactly solvable time-dependent string backgrounds, we determine all homogeneous plane wave (HPW) metrics in any dimension and find one family of HPWs with geodesically complete metrics and another with metrics containing null singularities. The former generalises both the Cahen-Wallach (constant $A_{ij}$) metrics to time-dependent HPWs, $A_{ij}(t)$, and the Ozsvath-Sch\\"ucking anti-Mach metric to arbitrary dimensions. The latter is a generalisation of ...

  5. Boundaries in digital planes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efim Khalimsky

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of topological connectedness properties in processing digital pictures is well known. A natural way to begin a theory for this is to give a definition of connectedness for subsets of a digital plane which allows one to prove a Jordan curve theorem. The generally accepted approach to this has been a non-topological Jordan curve theorem which requires two different definitions, 4-connectedness, and 8-connectedness, one for the curve and the other for its complement.

  6. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  7. Biorepositories | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  8. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  9. Evolution of the chloroplast division machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo GAO; Fuli GAO

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic organelles derived from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria during evolution.Dramatic changes occurred during the process of the formation and evolution of chloroplasts,including the large-scale gene transfer from chloroplast to nucleus.However,there are still many essential characters remaining.For the chloroplast division machinery,FtsZ proteins,Ftn2,SulA and part of the division site positioning system- MinD and MinE are still conserved.New or at least partially new proteins,such as FtsZ family proteins FtsZl and ARC3,ARC6H,ARC5,PDV1,PDV2 and MCD1,were introduced for the division of chloroplasts during evolution.Some bacterial cell division proteins,such as FtsA,MreB,Ftn6,FtsW and Ftsl,probably lost their function or were gradually lost.Thus,the chloroplast division machinery is a dynamically evolving structure with both conservation and innovation.

  10. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2004-01-01

    Plane and Geodetic Surveying blends theory and practice, conventional techniques and GPS, to provide the ideal book for students of surveying.Detailed guidance is given on how and when the principle surveying instruments (theodolites, Total Stations, levels and GPS) should be used. Concepts and formulae needed to convert instrument readings into useful results are explained. Rigorous explanations of the theoretical aspects of surveying are given, while at the same time a wealth of useful advice about conducting a survey in practice is provided. An accompanying least squares adjustment program

  11. THE SPRINGBOK SIXTH DIVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertzog Biermann

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Springbok Sixth Division was a mighty armoured force Of men whose ancestors made war in ships, on foot and horse They wrote a stirring chapter in Springbok Martial lore When they went to sunny Italy in Nineteen-Forty-Four.   They were in the Springbok First Team and their modest claim to fame Was their response to the clarion call: "Pay up and play the game!" Their duty they did nobly as their fathers did of old They proudly wore the Sixth Div flash of Springbok green and gold.

  12. An APC:WNT counter-current-like mechanism regulates cell division along the colonic crypt axis: a mechanism that explains how APC mutations induce proliferative abnormalities that drive colon cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M Boman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside. WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g. survivin are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric. APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly-proliferating cells during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes.

  13. Homogeneous plane waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Matthias E-mail: mblau@ictp.trieste.it; O' Loughlin, Martin E-mail: loughlin@sissa.it

    2003-03-24

    Motivated by the search for potentially exactly solvable time-dependent string backgrounds, we determine all homogeneous plane wave (HPW) metrics in any dimension and find one family of HPWs with geodesically complete metrics and another with metrics containing null singularities. The former generalises both the Cahen-Wallach (constant A{sub ij}) metrics to time-dependent HPWs, A{sub ij}(x{sup +}), and the Ozsvath-Schuecking anti-Mach metric to arbitrary dimensions. The latter is a generalisation of the known homogeneous metrics with A{sub ij}{approx}1/(x{sup +}){sup 2} to a more complicated time-dependence. We display these metrics in various coordinate systems, show how to embed them into string theory, and determine the isometry algebra of a general HPW and the associated conserved charges. We review the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory of invariants of time-dependent harmonic oscillators and show how it can be deduced from the geometry of plane waves. We advocate the use of the invariant associated with the extra (timelike) isometry of HPWs for lightcone quantisation, and illustrate the procedure in some examples.

  14. The MOND Fundamental Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Diaferio, A; Tortora, C; Molinaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) has been shown to be able to fit spiral galaxy rotation curves as well as giving a theoretical foundation for empirically determined scaling relations, such as the Tully - Fisher law, without the need for a dark matter halo. As a complementary analysis, one should investigate whether MOND can also reproduce the dynamics of early - type galaxies (ETGs) without dark matter. As a first step, we here show that MOND can indeed fit the observed central velocity dispersion $\\sigma_0$ of a large sample of ETGs assuming a simple MOND interpolating functions and constant anisotropy. We also show that, under some assumptions on the luminosity dependence of the Sersic n parameter and the stellar M/L ratio, MOND predicts a fundamental plane for ETGs : a log - linear relation among the effective radius $R_{eff}$, $\\sigma_0$ and the mean effective intensity $\\langle I_e \\rangle$. However, we predict a tilt between the observed and the MOND fundamental planes.

  15. Homogeneous plane waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the search for potentially exactly solvable time-dependent string backgrounds, we determine all homogeneous plane wave (HPW) metrics in any dimension and find one family of HPWs with geodesically complete metrics and another with metrics containing null singularities. The former generalises both the Cahen-Wallach (constant Aij) metrics to time-dependent HPWs, Aij(x+), and the Ozsvath-Schuecking anti-Mach metric to arbitrary dimensions. The latter is a generalisation of the known homogeneous metrics with Aij∼1/(x+)2 to a more complicated time-dependence. We display these metrics in various coordinate systems, show how to embed them into string theory, and determine the isometry algebra of a general HPW and the associated conserved charges. We review the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory of invariants of time-dependent harmonic oscillators and show how it can be deduced from the geometry of plane waves. We advocate the use of the invariant associated with the extra (timelike) isometry of HPWs for lightcone quantisation, and illustrate the procedure in some examples

  16. Homogeneous Plane Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Blau, Matthias; Blau, Matthias; Loughlin, Martin O'

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the search for potentially exactly solvable time-dependent string backgrounds, we determine all homogeneous plane wave (HPW) metrics in any dimension and find one family of HPWs with geodesically complete metrics and another with metrics with null singularities. The former generalises both the Cahen-Wallach (constant $A_{ij}$) metrics to time-dependent HPWs, $A_{ij}(t)$, and the Ozsvath-Sch\\"ucking anti-Mach metric to arbitrary dimensions. The latter is a generalisation of the known homogeneous metrics with $A_{ij}\\sim 1/t^2$ to a more complicated time-dependence. We display these metrics in various coordinate systems, show how to embed them into string theory, and determine the isometry algebra of a general HPW and the associated conserved charges. We review the Lewis-Riesenfeld theory of invariants of time-dependent harmonic oscillators and show how it can be deduced from the geometry of plane waves. We advocate the use of the invariant associated with the extra (timelike) isometry of HPWs for ...

  17. The Escherichia coli cell division protein and model Tat substrate SufI (FtsP) localizes to the septal ring and has a multicopper oxidase-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Michael; Arends, S J Ryan; Roversi, Pietro; Piette, Evan; Sargent, Frank; Berks, Ben C; Weiss, David S; Lea, Susan M

    2009-02-20

    The Escherichia coli protein SufI (FtsP) has recently been proposed to be a component of the cell division apparatus. The SufI protein is also in widespread experimental use as a model substrate in studies of the Tat (twin arginine translocation) protein transport system. We have used SufI-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusions to show that SufI localizes to the septal ring in the dividing cell. We have also determined the structure of SufI by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A. SufI is structurally related to the multicopper oxidase superfamily but lacks metal cofactors. The structure of SufI suggests it serves a scaffolding rather than an enzymatic role in the septal ring and reveals regions of the protein likely to be involved in the protein-protein interactions required to assemble SufI at the septal ring. PMID:19135451

  18. Role of FtsEX in Cell Division of Escherichia coli: Viability of ftsEX Mutants Is Dependent on Functional SufI or High Osmotic Strength▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Manjula

    2006-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, at least 12 proteins, FtsZ, ZipA, FtsA, FtsE/X, FtsK, FtsQ, FtsL, FtsB, FtsW, FtsI, FtsN, and AmiC, are known to localize to the septal ring in an interdependent and sequential pathway to coordinate the septum formation at the midcell. The FtsEX complex is the latest recruit of this pathway, and unlike other division proteins, it is shown to be essential only on low-salt media. In this study, it is shown that ftsEX null mutations are not only salt remedial but also osmore...

  19. Duality and noncommutative planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøndrup, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We study extensions of simple modules over an associative ring A   and we prove that for twosided ideals mm and nn with artinian factors the condition ExtA1(A/m,A/n)≠0 holds for the left A  -modules A/mA/m and A/nA/n if and only if it holds for the right modules A/nA/n and A/mA/m. The methods pro...... proving this are applied to show that noncommutative models of the plane, i.e. algebras of the form k〈x,y〉/(f)k〈x,y〉/(f), where f∈([x,y])f∈([x,y]) are noetherian only in case (f)=([x,y])...

  20. Therapeutic Targeting the Cell Division Cycle 25 (CDC25 Phosphatases in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia — The Possibility to Target Several Kinases through Inhibition of the Various CDC25 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Brenner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle 25 (CDC25 phosphatases include CDC25A, CDC25B and CDC25C. These three molecules are important regulators of several steps in the cell cycle, including the activation of various cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. CDC25s seem to have a role in the development of several human malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML; and CDC25 inhibition is therefore considered as a possible anticancer strategy. Firstly, upregulation of CDC25A can enhance cell proliferation and the expression seems to be controlled through PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling, a pathway possibly mediating chemoresistance in human AML. Loss of CDC25A is also important for the cell cycle arrest caused by differentiation induction of malignant hematopoietic cells. Secondly, high CDC25B expression is associated with resistance against the antiproliferative effect of PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibitors in primary human AML cells, and inhibition of this isoform seems to reduce AML cell line proliferation through effects on NFκB and p300. Finally, CDC25C seems important for the phenotype of AML cells at least for a subset of patients. Many of the identified CDC25 inhibitors show cross-reactivity among the three CDC25 isoforms. Thus, by using such cross-reactive inhibitors it may become possible to inhibit several molecular events in the regulation of cell cycle progression and even cytoplasmic signaling, including activation of several CDKs, through the use of a single drug. Such combined strategies will probably be an advantage in human cancer treatment.

  1. Vacuole Partitioning during Meiotic Division in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Roeder, A D; Shaw, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the partitioning of the yeast vacuole during meiotic division. In pulse-chase experiments, vacuoles labeled with the lumenal ade2 fluorophore or the membrane-specific dye FM 4-64 were not inherited by haploid spores. Instead, these fluorescent markers were excluded from spores and trapped between the spore cell walls and the ascus. Serial optical sections using a confocal microscope confirmed that spores did not inherit detectable amounts of fluorescently labeled vacuoles. Mo...

  2. X-ray induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in division arrested, G0/G1 phase Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of X-irradiation was determined with Chinese hamster ovary cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle through 9 days incubation in serum-free medium. In comparison with exponential phase cultures, the arrested cells showed increased cytotoxicity and mutation induction over the dose range of 50-800 rad. Exponential cultures showed a linear mutant frequency-survival relationship while the arrested cells showed a biphasic linear relationship. A post irradiation holding period 24 h does not result in any change in the mutant frequency. The increased sensitivity of the arrested cells to the mutagenic effects of X-rays appears to be a cell-cycle phase phenomenon. Upon readdition of serum, the arrested cells re-enter the cell cycle in a synchronous manner, reaching S phase at 10-12 h. Cells irradiated at 5 h after serum addition, i.e. in G1, show a similar dose response for mutant frequency, while those irradiated at 10 h or later, i.e. in late G1, S or G2, show lower mutation induction. These observations are consistent with a chromosome interchange mechanism of mutation induction by X-rays, possibly through interactions between repairing regions of the DNA. Irradiation of cells in the G0/G1 phase allow more time for such interactions in the absence of semiconservative DNA replication. (orig.)

  3. Performance of an in-plane detection cell with integrated waveguides for UV/Vis absorbance measurements on microfluidic separation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2002-01-01

    A microfluidic device with integrated waveguides and a long path length detection cell for UV/Vis absorbance detection is presented. The 750 mum U-cell detection geometry was evaluated in terms of its optical performance as well as its influence on efficiency for electrophoretic separations in the...... microdevice. Stray light was found to have a strong effect on both, the sensitivity of the detection and the available linear range. The long path length U-cell showed a 9 times higher sensitivity when compared to a conventional capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with a 75 mum inner diameter (ID) capillary...

  4. Important projects of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter important projects of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. are presented. Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management has successfully carried out variety of significant projects. The most significant projects that were realised, are implemented and possible future projects are introduced in the following part of presentation.

  5. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  6. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  7. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics. In addition, this report describes work on accelerators, radiation damage, microwaves, and plasma diagnostics

  8. β-catenin: A multi-functional protein’s role at the centrosome and implications for a broader role in cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Mbom, Bertrade C.; Nelson, W. James; Barth, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein with critical roles in cell-cell adhesion, Wnt-signaling and the centrosome cycle. Whereas the roles of β-catenin in cell-cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling have been studied extensively, the mechanism(s) involving β-catenin in centrosome functions are poorly understood. β-Catenin localizes to centrosomes and promotes mitotic progression. NIMA-related protein kinase 2 (Nek2), which stimulates centrosome separation, binds to and phosphorylates β-catenin. ...

  9. Plane Mercury librations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    theory of Mercury librations in longitude by using three characteristics of Mercury rotation determined in the paper [3]. Two from these parameters are values of angle of librations in longitude and angular velocity in moment of passage of perihelion of Mercury orbit on 17 April 2002: (^g)0 = 0007 ± 0001, (^?•? )0 = (2.10± 0.06)•? ars/d. Third parameter determined in [3] is a dynamical coefficient: K = (B -A)•(4Cm ) = (5.08± 0.30) × 10-5. B > A are principal moment of inertia, corresponding to equatorial axes of inertia; Cm is a polar moment of inertia of the mantle of Mercury. 1 Analytical theory of plane Mercury librations. This theory describes forced and free librations of Mercury in longitude in the frame of plane problem about resonant librations of Mercury considered or as non-spherical rigid body, or as system of rigid non-spherical mantle and liquid ellipsoidal core. Saving the main terms for the perturbations of angle of librations ^g and angular velocity ^? in both mentioned cases we will have formulae [6]: ^g = K(E sin M + E sin2M + E sin 3M + E sin4M + E sin5M ) 1 2 3 4 5+K0 sin(E šKM- - φ) (A)

  10. 1-MCP treatment enhanced expression of genes controlling endosperm cell division and starch biosynthesis for improvement of grain filling in a dense-panicle rice cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, B B; Badoghar, A K; Sekhar, S; Shaw, B P; Mohapatra, P K

    2016-05-01

    High ethylene production in dense-panicle rice cultivars impacts grain filling. 1-MCP (ethylene action inhibitor) treatment increased assimilates partitioning, cell number and size and expression of starch synthesizing enzyme genes of developing caryopses mostly in the basal spikelets of panicle at early post-anthesis stage. The gain in cell number was less compared to the increase of size. High ethylene production in spikelets matched with greater expression of ethylene receptor and signal transducer genes. Genes encoding cell cycle regulators CDK, CYC and CKI expressed poorly on 9 DAA. 1-MCP treatment enhanced their expression; the increase of expression was higher for CDKs and lower for CKIs in basal compared to apical spikelets. Greater expression of CDKB2:1 might have lifted cytokinesis of nascent peripheral cells of endosperm, while promotion of CDKAs, CYCD2:2 and inhibition of CYCB2:2 expression contributed to endoreduplication of central cells increasing cell size and DNA ploidy level. It is concluded that the process of endoreduplication, which begins at mid-grain filling stage, is crucially linked with the final caryopsis size of rice grain. The enhanced endosperm growth brought about by repressed ethylene action during the first few days after anthesis seems to be associated with the overall increased cell cycle activity and sink strength. PMID:26993232

  11. Seroprevalence of hepatitis C in pregnant females of Hazara division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), the causative agent of Hepatitis C is prevalent in different countries including Pakistan. Studies have been conducted on various aspects of HCV in Pakistan. The present study was planed to see the prevalence of hepatitis C in pregnant females of Hazara Division. Five hundred pregnant females of reproductive age group from Hazara Division selected by non probability convenient sampling technique were studied from 1, March 2006 to 28, February 2007 at Ayub Teaching Hospital, and District Head quarter Hospitals Abbottabad, Haripur and Mansehra. After initial serving by immunology technique positive cases were confirmed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Essay (ELISA). Seroprevalence of HCV in pregnant females of Hazara division was 8.9%. Females aged from 25-35 constituted the largest group among positive cases. HCV was more prevalent in District Abbottabad as compared to the other districts of Hazara division. Seroprevalence of HCV in pregnant females of Hazara Division is different from the figures already reported form the other parts of Pakistan. (author)

  12. Scientific Equipment Division - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: - designing of devices and equipment for experiments in physics, their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, there are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV; - maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; - participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and a AO plotter, what allows us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop can offer a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. It offers the following possibilities: - turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc-type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm; - milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm; - grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm; - drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm; - welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding; - soft and hard soldering; - mechanical works including precision engineering; - plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides; - painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fred drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop posses CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work-pieces up to 500 kg

  13. Gravitational Couplings for Gop-Planes and y-Op-Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Ospina-Giraldo, J F

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino actions for generalized orientifold planes (GOp-planes) and y-deformed orientifold planes (yOp-planes) are presented and two series power expantions are realized from whiches processes that involves GOp-planes,yOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard GOp-planes and y-Op-planes are showed.

  14. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  15. Conceptual Design of Wave Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Trewers, Andrew; Kofoed, Jens Peter;

    The Wave Plane is a patented Wave Energy device of the overtopping type, designed to capture potential as well as kinetic energy. This is as such different to other overtopping devices, who usually only focus on potential energy. If Wave Plane A/S can deliver the turbine technology to utilize both...

  16. Physics division annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission

  17. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  18. Treatment with antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibits chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Charophytes is a green algal group closely related to land plants. We investigated the effects of antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis on chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex. To detect cells just after division, we used colchicine, which inhibits Closterium cell elongation after division. Although normal Closterium cells had two chloroplasts before and after cell division, cells treated with ampicillin, D-cycloserine, or fosfomycin had only one chloroplast after cell division, suggesting that the cells divided without chloroplast division. The antibiotics bacitracin and vancomycin showed no obvious effect. Electron microscopic observation showed that irregular-shaped chloroplasts existed in ampicillin-treated Closterium cells. Because antibiotic treatments resulted in the appearance of long cells with irregular chloroplasts and cell death, we counted cell types in the culture. The results suggested that cells with one chloroplast appeared first and then a huge chloroplast was generated that inhibited cell division, causing elongation followed by cell death.

  19. E-Division activities report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barschall, H.H. (comp.)

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included.

  20. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included

  1. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in material science. In addition this report describes work on accelerators, microwaves, plasma diagnostics, determination of atmospheric oxygen and of nitrogen in tissue

  2. RNase III mediated cleavage of the coding region of mraZ mRNA is required for efficient cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tomoya; Tanaka, Yuya; Takemoto, Norihiko; Hamamoto, Nagisa; Inui, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum R cgR_1959 gene encodes an endoribonuclease of the RNase III family. Deletion mutant of cgR_1959 (Δrnc mutant) showed an elongated cell shape, and presence of several lines on the cell surface, indicating a required of RNase III for maintaining normal cell morphology in C. glutamicum. The level of mraZ mRNA was increased, whereas cgR_1596 mRNA encoding a putative cell wall hydrolase and ftsEX mRNA were decreased in the Δrnc mutant. The half-life of mraZ mRNA was significantly prolonged in the Δrnc and the Δpnp mutant strains. This indicated that the degradation of mraZ mRNA was performed by RNase III and the 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, PNPase. Northern hybridization and primer extension analysis revealed that the cleavage site for mraZ mRNA by RNase III is in the coding region. Overproduction of MraZ resulted in an elongated cell shape. The expression of ftsEX decreased while that of cgR_1596 unchanged in an MraZ-overexpressing strain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a transcriptional reporter assay indicate that MraZ is a transcriptional repressor of ftsEX in C. glutamicum. These results indicate that RNase III is required for efficient expression of MraZ-dependent ftsEX and MraZ-independent cgR_1596. PMID:26713407

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Technology Division (CMT) is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. CMT is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature super-conductors. The Division's wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial

  4. 2003 Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    national importance. Included among them are: Advanced lithium-ion and lithium-polymer batteries for transportation and other applications, Fuel cells, including the use of an oxidative reformer with gasoline as the fuel supply, Production and storage technologies critical to the hydrogen economy, Stable nuclear waste forms suitable for storage in a geological repository, Threat attribution and training relative to radioactive dispersal devices (''dirty bombs''), and Aqueous and pyrochemical processes for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel. Other important programs are focused in superconductivity, catalysis, nanotechnology, and nuclear materials. During fiscal year 2003, CMT had an annual operating budget of approximately $36 million. Of that, more than 90% was from DOE and the remainder from other government agencies and private industry. Displayed below is an overview organization chart of the Division. A complete organization chart appears at the end of this report. In this annual report we present an overview of the technical programs together with representative highlights. The report is not intended to be comprehensive or encyclopedic, but to serve as an indication of the condition and status of the Division

  5. Determination and Removal of 8th Grade Students’ Misconceptions About The Unit of “Cell Division and Inheritance” by Using Analogy with Conceptual Change Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan AKYÜREK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine 8th grade students’ misconceptions about the unit of “Cell Division” by using roundhouse diagramming, detected misconceptions eliminate by an analogy and conceptional change texts. The research single group pre-test and post test were used. The sample of study was 26 eighth grade students (Boy – 12/Girl –14 from “A Primary School” in Kırsehir/Turkey. Three roundhouse diagrams were drawn about unit of cell division’s seven basic concepts to determine their misconceptions. The results of this research show that the vast majority of students had misconceptions about “DNA, chromosome, gene”, “mutation, modification” and “mitosis, meiosis”. Given to remove misconceptions identified by analogy to investigate the effect of conceptual change texts. As a result, by analogy, the conceptual change texts were found to be effective in remedying students' misconceptions were identified.

  6. Euphane and tirucallane triterpenes from the roots of Euphorbia kansui and their in vitro effects on the cell division of Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Nai-Li; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Miyata, Syohei; Kitanaka, Susumu

    2003-05-01

    Four new euphane-type triterpenes, kansenone (1), kansenonol (3), 11-oxo-kansenonol (4), kansenol (5), and a new tirucallane-type triterpene, epi-kansenone (2), were isolated from a 60% EtOH extract of Euphorbia kansui, together with alpha-euphol. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive analysis of their 1D and 2D NMR spectral data. This appears to be the first report of the natural occurrence of euphane/tirucallane-type triterpenes with a ketone at C-7. In vitro treatment of cultured individual Xenopus laevis cells at the blastular stage with 1-4 significantly arrested cleavage of the cells (10 microg/mL of each compound resulted in >50% cleavage arrest). PMID:12762796

  7. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  9. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  10. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  11. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  12. Frequency up-conversion in nonpolar a-plane GaN/AlGaN based multiple quantum wells optimized for applications with silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have described a method for structural parameters optimization of GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum well based up-converter for silicon solar cells. It involves a systematic tuning of individual step quantum wells by use of the genetic algorithm for global optimization. In quantum well structures, the up-conversion process can be achieved by utilizing nonlinear optical effects based on intersubband transitions. Both single and double step quantum wells have been tested in order to maximize the second order susceptibility derived from the density matrix formalism. The results obtained for single step wells proved slightly better and have been further pursued to obtain a more complex design, optimized for conversion of an entire range of incident photon energies.

  13. Frequency up-conversion in nonpolar a-plane GaN/AlGaN based multiple quantum wells optimized for applications with silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosavljević, S.; Radovanović, J.; Milanović, V.; Tomić, S.

    2014-07-01

    We have described a method for structural parameters optimization of GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum well based up-converter for silicon solar cells. It involves a systematic tuning of individual step quantum wells by use of the genetic algorithm for global optimization. In quantum well structures, the up-conversion process can be achieved by utilizing nonlinear optical effects based on intersubband transitions. Both single and double step quantum wells have been tested in order to maximize the second order susceptibility derived from the density matrix formalism. The results obtained for single step wells proved slightly better and have been further pursued to obtain a more complex design, optimized for conversion of an entire range of incident photon energies.

  14. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors†

    OpenAIRE

    Diann Jordan; Timetria Bonds

    2015-01-01

    Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content.  We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell ...

  15. Effect of 5-Aminouracil on mitotic cell division in Allium cepa Efeito de 5-Aminouracil na divisão mitótica de células de Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Elisa Pimenta Vicentini

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A exposição de células meristemáticas de Allium cepa por dois ciclos de divisões (48 horas, em soluções contendo concentrações mais baixas de 5-aminouracil (50, 100 e 150μM do que as usualmente empregadas para proceder à sincronização da proliferação celular, mostrou que as concentrações usadas causam anormalidades cromossômicas e formação de micronúcleos, mas não bloqueiam a entrada destas células em mitose. As células em mitose e com micronúcleos podem prosseguir em divisão e assim contribuir para o crescimento das raízes de A. cepa expostas às concentrações de 5-aminouracil estudadas. As células meristemáticas da raiz de A. cepa parecem suportar um certo nível de danos não reparados no DNA, os quais não impedem a divisão celular e o conseqüente crescimento dos tecidos. Esta flexibilidade genética do genoma de vegetais deve se constituir numa resposta metabólica adaptativa para sustentar condições ambientais adversas.Cytological preparations of Allium cepa meristematic cells were examined under a light microscope to evaluate the effect of prolonged exposure (at least two-cell cycle to 5-aminouracil (5-AU on mitotic cell division in the roots. The results are a cytological demonstration that a lower concentration of 5-AU than usually employed for synchronizing proliferating cells in A. cepa root meristems induces chromosomal abnormalities and formation of micronucleus but does not fully block the cell flow into mitosis, and that micronucleated cells can proceed in mitosis and contribute to the enhancement of root length values reported by other authors. A. cepa root tip cells seems to support a certain damage level in DNA (around 10% of micronucleated cells in mitosis without having any negative effect on cellular proliferation and growth of the roots. This genetic flexibility of vegetable genomes may permit an attenuation of the adaptative metabolic-response to sustained adverse environmental conditions.

  16. Placental expression of estrogen receptor beta and its hormone binding variant – comparison with estrogen receptor alpha and a role for estrogen receptors in asymmetric division and differentiation of estrogen-dependent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henley Donald C

    2003-04-01

    differentiation, the ER-alpha is associated with a less, and ER-beta with the more differentiated state. Enhanced expression of ~64 kDa ER-beta variant in trophoblast cultures suggests a unique role of ER-beta hormone binding domain in the regulation of trophoblast differentiation. Our data also indicate that asymmetric segregation of ER-alpha may play a role in asymmetric division of estrogen-dependent cells.

  17. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  18. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    of the ground-breaking research with Garnmasphere was the first study of the limits of stability with angular momentum in the shell stabilized nobelium isotopes. It was found that these heaviest nuclei could be formed at surprisingly high angular momentum, providing important new insight into the production mechanisms for super-heavy elements. Another focus continues to be experiments with short-lived beams for critical nuclear astrophysics applications. Measurements revealed that {sup 44}Ti is more readily destroyed in supernovae than was expected. Major progress was made in collecting and storing unstable ions in the Canadian Penning Trap. The technique of stopping and rapidly extracting ions from a helium gas cell led directly to the new paradigm in the production of rare isotope beams that became RIA. ATLAS provided a record 6046 hours of beam use for experiments in FY99. The facility pressed hard to support the heavy demands of the GammaSphere Research program but maintained an operational reliability of 93%. Of the 29 different isotopes provided as beams in FY99, radioactive beams of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 17}F comprised 6% of the beam time. The theoretical efforts in the Division made dramatic new strides in such topics as quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei to understand microscopic many-body forces in nuclei; QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach which were extended to baryon systems and finite temperatures and densities; the structure of heavy nuclei; and proton decay modes of nuclei far from stability. The medium-energy program continues to focus on new techniques to understand how the quark-gluon structure of matter impacts the structure of nuclei. The HERMES experiment began making measurements of the fraction of the spin of the nucleon carried by the glue. Drell-Yan experiments study the flavor composition of the sea of the proton. Experiments at Jefferson lab search for clues of QCD dynamics at the hadronic level. A major

  19. Geography of irreducible plane sextics

    OpenAIRE

    Akyol, Ayşegül; Degtyarev, Alex

    2014-01-01

    We complete the equisingular deformation classification of irreducible singular plane sextic curves. As a by-product, we also compute the fundamental groups of the complement of all but a few maximizing sextics.

  20. Vegfc Regulates Bipotential Precursor Division and Prox1 Expression to Promote Lymphatic Identity in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Fischer, Johanna C; Francois, Mathias; Ober, Elke A; Yap, Alpha S; Hogan, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels arise chiefly from preexisting embryonic veins. Genetic regulators of lymphatic fate are known, but how dynamic cellular changes contribute during the acquisition of lymphatic identity is not understood. We report the visualization of zebrafish lymphatic precursor cell dynamics...... cell becomes lymphatic and progressively upregulates Prox1, and the other downregulates Prox1 and remains in the vein. Vegfc drives cell division and Prox1 expression in lymphatic daughter cells, coupling signaling dynamics with daughter cell fate restriction and precursor division....

  1. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a component of tea (Camellia sinensis): a study by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-Miller, J M; Shah, S

    1999-07-15

    A component of aqueous extracts of green tea (Camellia sinensis), known to reverse methicillin-resistance in staphylococci, causes extensive morphological changes in methicillin-resistant but not in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Clumps of partly divided cocci, consisting of up to 14 individuals, with thickened internal but normal external cell walls were seen by electron microscopy in cultures of methicillin-resistant S. aureus grown in the presence of the active principle. The morphological changes observed were consistent with selective inhibition of penicillin-binding proteins. PMID:10427729

  2. Effective Formation of the Segregation-Competent Complex Determines Successful Partitioning of the Bovine Papillomavirus Genome during Cell Division ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Silla, Toomas; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2010-01-01

    Effective segregation of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus type 8 (KSHV) genomes into daughter cells is mediated by a single viral protein that tethers viral genomes to host mitotic chromosomes. The linker proteins that mediate BPV1, EBV, and KSHV segregation are E2, LANA1, and EBNA1, respectively. The N-terminal transactivation domain of BPV1 E2 is responsible for chromatin attachment and subsequent viral geno...

  3. Robustness of the division symmetry in Escherichia coli and functional consequences of symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological symmetry of the division process of Escherichia coli is well-known. Recent studies verified that, in optimal growth conditions, most divisions are symmetric, although there are exceptions. We investigate whether such morphological asymmetries in division introduce functional asymmetries between sister cells, and assess the robustness of the symmetry in division to mild chemical stresses and sub-optimal temperatures. First, we show that the difference in size between daughter cells at birth is positively correlated to the difference between the numbers of fluorescent protein complexes inherited from the parent cell. Next, we show that the degree of symmetry in division observed in optimal conditions is robust to mild acidic shift and to mild oxidative stress, but not to sub-optimal temperatures, in that the variance of the difference between the sizes of sister cells at birth is minimized at 37 °C. This increased variance affects the functionality of the cells in that, at sub-optimal temperatures, larger/smaller cells arising from asymmetric divisions exhibit faster/slower division times than the mean population division time, respectively. On the other hand, cells dividing faster do not do so at the cost of morphological symmetry in division. Finally we show that at suboptimal temperatures the mean distance between the nucleoids increases, explaining the increased variance in division. We conclude that the functionality of E. coli cells is not immune to morphological asymmetries at birth, and that the effectiveness of the mechanism responsible for ensuring the symmetry in division weakens at sub-optimal temperatures. (paper)

  4. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diann Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content.  We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell cycle and ethics in scientific studies.  Over 90% of our students preferred this additional teaching method compared to a traditional lecture only.  Furthermore, the exercise enhanced the students' writing, research, and critical thinking skills through the ethical implications of the film.

  5. Translational control in Drosophila female germline stem cell asymmetric division%mRNA翻译水平调控参与果蝇生殖干细胞不对称分裂的机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏来新; 陈大华

    2013-01-01

    Germline stem cells have the sole character of transmitting their genetic information to the next generation. Drosophila female germline stem cells are a very powerful and sophisticated system to study stem cell asymmetric division behavior, which is controlled by the niche signal. These stem cells are regulated at many different levels including transcriptional level, post-transcriptional level, translational level and protein level. The study from the last two decades shows that many RNA binding proteins mutants in Drosophila have either germline stem cell loss or over-proliferation phenotypes. Here, this review tried to summarize the relationship between translational control and germline stem cell fate determination, especially focused on recent progresses in the field. And we also discuss the probable molecular detailed mechanisms involved in the process.%生殖干细胞是唯一能够将遗传物质传给下一代的成体干细胞.果蝇的雌性生殖干细胞是一个非常成熟的用来研究干细胞自身不对称分裂的系统,来自微环境的信号控制其增殖和分化.果蝇的生殖干细胞受到转录水平、转录后水平、mRNA翻译水平和蛋白质水平的精确调控,多年来的研究表明很多翻译相关的RNA结合蛋白的突变都会导致果蝇的生殖干细胞提前分化或者不分化.综述了mRNA翻译水平调控与果蝇生殖干细胞命运决定的关系,特别是该领域近年来的一些重大进展,并讨论了翻译水平调控参与果蝇生殖干细胞命运决定的可能具体分子机制.

  6. Health and Safety Research Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The programs of the Health and Safety Research Division encompass a broad range of basic and applied research defining how energy-related technologies affect man. Approximately one-third of the effort is in basic studies at atomic and molecular levels and is supported almost entirely by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research. The remainder of the Division's programs is of a more applied nature and receives more diverse funding from within DOE and other agencies. Some of the Division's special skills including negative ion physics, electron- and ion-molecule interactions, electron attachment and detachment processes, laser spectroscopy, wake theory, gaseous dielectrics, nuclear medicine, modeling radionuclide transport to man, radiation dosimetry, decontamination and decommissioning surveys, developing and testing instrumentation to measure exposures of humans to chemicals, and uncertainty analysis of assessment models are discussed. A selection of some recent accomplishments is listed

  7. Building an academic colorectal division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltun, Walter A

    2014-06-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  8. Obstacle to e-government: Digital division

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Çapar; Ömer Faruk Vural

    2013-01-01

    The issue of digital division; is defined as different sectors of society’s difference in rates of access to information and communication technologies. Digital division is the one of the greatest obstacles to the transition to an information society and the provision of e-government services. In this study, the subject of digital division, importance of reducing digital division and its effect of the transition to e-government were described, the issue of digital division in Turkey and the ...

  9. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  10. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  11. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  12. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  13. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1979 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committees on Reactor Physics and on Decomissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  14. Study of genes induced by ionizing radiations at Arabidopsis thaliana: identification and molecular characterization of the ATGR1 gene, a new gene encoding a protein involved in plant cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage, that can be experimentally introduced by ionizing radiation (IR), induces complex signal transduction pathways leading to cell recovery or, alternatively to programmed cell death if damages are too severe. To identify the inducible components of the response to genotoxic stress in plants, we have screened by Differential Display for mRNAs that rapidly and strongly accumulate after IR treatment in A. thaliana cells. We have characterized ATGR1, a new single copy Arabidopsis gene encoding a PEST-box protein of unknown function. In unstressed plant organs the ATGR1 mRNA is hardly detectable, whereas the protein is present in extracts prepared from roots, shoot meristems and inflorescences, that all contain large amounts of actively dividing cells. This pattern is confirmed by immuno localisation on tissue sections that shows constitutive ATGR1 protein expression covering the root elongation zone, the shoot meristem, leaf primordial and the ovules of developing flowers. Histochemical analysis of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ATGR1 promoter, demonstrate that the developmental and tissue-specific profile of ATGR1 protein expression is conferred by the gene promoter. The massive, transient and dose-dependent accumulation of ATGR1 transcripts after IR treatment observed in all plant organs does not lead to significant changes in ATGR1 protein pattern. Stable ATGR1 protein overexpression, as exemplified by transgenic A. thaliana plants that contain a 35S promoter-ATGR1 gene fusion, does not induce notable changes of the overall ATGR1 protein level, but leads to male and female sterility. The cause of sterility is a lack of correct chromosome assembly and distribution at the stage metaphase II of meiosis. Taken together our results show that i) ATGR1 gene expression is associated to cell division during plant development ii) the ATGR1 protein level is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level iii

  15. CDP1, a novel component of chloroplast division site positioning system in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Yong Hu; Jingjing Jia; Dapeng Li; Runjie Zhang; Hongbo Gao; Yikun He

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts are plant-specific organelles that evolved from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria. They divide through binary fission. Selection of the chloroplast division site is pivotal for the symmetric chloroplast division. In E. coli, positioning of the division site at the midpoint of the cell is regulated by dynamic oscillation of the Min system, which includes MinC, MinD and MinE. Homologs of Mind and MinE in plants are involved in chloroplast division. The homolog of MinC still has not been identified in higher plants. However, an FtsZ-like protein, ARC3, was found to be involved in chloroplast division site positioning. Here, we report that chloroplast division site positioning 1 (AtCDP1) is a novel chloroplast division protein involved in chloroplast division site placement in Arabidopsis. AtCDP1 was dis-covered by screening an Arabidopsis cDNA expression library in bacteria for colonies with a cell division phenotype. AtCDP1 is exclusively expressed in young green tissues in Arabidopsis. Elongated chloroplasts with multiple division sites were observed in the loss-of-function cdpl mutant. Overexpression of AtCDPI caused a chloroplast division phe-notype too. Protein interaction assays suggested that AtCDP1 may mediate the chloroplast division site positioning through the interaction with ARC3. Overall, our results indicate that AtCDP1 is a novel component of the chloroplast division site positioning system, and the working mechanism of this system is different from that of the traditional MinCDE system in prokaryotic cells.

  16. Division by Flat Ultradifferentiable Functions and Sectorial Extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Thilliez, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    We consider classes $ \\mathcal{A}_M(S) $ of functions holomorphic in an open plane sector $ S $ and belonging to a strongly non-quasianalytic class on the closure of $ S $. In $ \\mathcal{A}_M(S) $, we construct functions which are flat at the vertex of $ S $ with a sharp rate of vanishing. This allows us to obtain a Borel-Ritt type theorem for $ \\mathcal{A}_M(S) $ extending previous results by Schmets and Valdivia. We also derive a division property for ideals of flat ultradifferentiable func...

  17. A Novel Multiobject Tracking Approach in the Presence of Collision and Division

    OpenAIRE

    Mingli Lu; Benlian Xu; Andong Sheng; Zhengqiang Jiang; Liping Wang; Peiyi Zhu; Jian Shi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a general framework for accurately tracking and quantitatively characterizing multiple cells (objects) when collision and division between cells arise. Through introducing three types of interaction events among cells, namely, independence, collision, and division, the corresponding dynamic models are defined and an augmented interacting multiple model particle filter tracking algorithm is first proposed for spatially adjacent cells with varying size. In addition, t...

  18. BASL and EPF2 act independently to regulate asymmetric divisions during stomatal development

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Lee; Gray, Julie E

    2010-01-01

    The initiation of stomatal development in the developing Arabidopsis epidermis is characterized by an asymmetric ‘entry’ division in which a small cell, known as a meristemoid, and a larger daughter cell is formed. The meristemoid may undergo further asymmetric divisions, regenerating a meristemoid each time, before differentiating into a guard mother cell which divides symmetrically to form a pair of guard cells surrounding a stomatal pore. Recently EPF2 and BASL have emerged as regulators o...

  19. Explosive plane-wave lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  20. Plane waves as tractor beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems, plane waves act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode carrying more momentum, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. This tractor beam or negative radiation pressure (NRP) effect, is found to be generic in systems with multiple scattering channels. In a birefringent medium, electromagnetic plane waves incident on a thin plate exert NRP of the same order of magnitude as optical radiation pressure, while in artificial dielectrics (metamaterials), the magnitude of NRP can even be macroscopic. In two dimensions, we study various scattering situations on vortices, and NRP is shown to occur by the scattering of heavy baryons into light leptons off cosmic strings, and by neutron scattering off vortices in the XY model.

  1. Premature centromere division and other centromeric misbehavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, P.H. [Christchurch School of Medicine (New Zealand)

    1993-12-31

    Premature centromere division was initially described for the X chromosome. In an otherwise typical metaphase cell, one chromosome showed no primary constriction and appeared to have no centromere. G-banding analysis indicated that this apparent acentric fragment was an entire X chromosome. Because its centromere was divided when the centromeres of all other chromosomes of the metaphase cell were entire, the condition was described as premature centromere division (PCD). The importance of PCD lies in its being a mechanism on non-disjunction, as was indicated by the strong association of X chromosome aneuploidy with PCD,X. We can infer that the affected chromosome failed to take part in the normal distribution of chromosomes at mitoses. The centromere, it its widest sense, is generally believed to have a role in the correct orientation of chromosomes at the metaphase plate and the distribution of chromatids to the spindle poles. The failure of these functions implies a major centromeric dysfunction. What do we know of this complex region of the chromosome that might help us understand its dysfunction?

  2. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy–momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  3. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, M. C. B.; Holender, L.; Santos, M. A.; Vancea, I. V.

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy-momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  4. Plane waves in noncommutative fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B., E-mail: mabdalla@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco 2, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, 01156-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Holender, L., E-mail: holender@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil); Santos, M.A., E-mail: masantos@cce.ufes.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Avenida Fernando Ferarri S/N, Goiabeiras, 29060-900 Vitória, ES (Brazil); Vancea, I.V., E-mail: ionvancea@ufrrj.br [Grupo de Física Teórica e Matemática Física, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Cx. Postal 23851, BR 465 Km 7, 23890-000 Seropédica, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the noncommutative fluid in the Snyder space perturbatively at the first order in powers of the noncommutative parameter. The linearized noncommutative fluid dynamics is described by a system of coupled linear partial differential equations in which the variables are the fluid density and the fluid potentials. We show that these equations admit a set of solutions that are monochromatic plane waves for the fluid density and two of the potentials and a linear function for the third potential. The energy–momentum tensor of the plane waves is calculated.

  5. Nuclear Physics division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work undertaken by the Nuclear Physics Division of AERE, Harwell during 1980 is presented under the headings: (1) Nuclear Data and Technology for Nuclear Power. (2) Nuclear Studies. (3) Applications of Nuclear and Associated Techniques. (4) Accelerator Operation, Maintenance and Development. Reports, publications and conference papers presented during the period are given and members of staff listed. (U.K.)

  6. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Schubert, J.F.; Bowman, W.W.; Adams, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report.

  7. Nuclear Physics Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1983 progress report of the Nuclear Physics Division, UKAEA Harwell, is divided into four main topics. These are a) nuclear data and technology for nuclear power; b) nuclear studies; c) applications of nuclear and associated techniques, including ion beam techniques and moessbauer spectroscopy; and d) accelerator operation, maintenance and development. (U.K.)

  8. Manpower Division Looks at CETA

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Vocational Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Manpower Division at the American Vocational Association (AVA) convention in Houston was concerned about youth unemployment and about the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA)--its problems and possibilities. The panel discussion reported here reveals some differing perspectives and a general consensus--that to improve their role in…

  9. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report

  10. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  11. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Open Axis... branding program based upon distinctive trademarks to create high customer awareness of, demand for,...

  12. Physics division annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R and D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A and M BaF2 array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of

  13. Toward Spatially Regulated Division of Protocells: Insights into the E. coli Min System from in Vitro Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Kretschmer; Petra Schwille

    2014-01-01

    For reconstruction of controlled cell division in a minimal cell model, or protocell , a positioning mechanism that spatially regulates division is indispensable. In Escherichia coli , the Min protein s oscillate from pole to pole to determine the division site by inhibition of the primary divisome protein FtsZ anywhere but in the cell middle. Remarkably, when reconstituted under defined conditions in vitro , the Min proteins self - organize into spatiotem poral patterns in the presence of a ...

  14. Vegfc Regulates Bipotential Precursor Division and Prox1 Expression to Promote Lymphatic Identity in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Koltowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic vessels arise chiefly from preexisting embryonic veins. Genetic regulators of lymphatic fate are known, but how dynamic cellular changes contribute during the acquisition of lymphatic identity is not understood. We report the visualization of zebrafish lymphatic precursor cell dynamics during fate restriction. In the cardinal vein, cellular commitment is linked with the division of bipotential Prox1-positive precursor cells, which occurs immediately prior to sprouting angiogenesis. Following precursor division, identities are established asymmetrically in daughter cells; one daughter cell becomes lymphatic and progressively upregulates Prox1, and the other downregulates Prox1 and remains in the vein. Vegfc drives cell division and Prox1 expression in lymphatic daughter cells, coupling signaling dynamics with daughter cell fate restriction and precursor division.

  15. Force Lines in Plane Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    A state of plane stress is illustrated by means of two families of curves, each family representing constant values of a derivative of Airy's stress function. The two families of curves form a map giving in the first place an overall picture of regions of high and low stress, and in the second...

  16. Plane and parabolic solar panels

    OpenAIRE

    Sales, J. H. O.; Suzuki, A.T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

  17. 线粒体分裂蛋白抑制剂对小胶质细胞氧化损伤的保护作用%Mitochondrial Division Inhibition Attenuates Aβ-induced Oxidative Stress Injury in Primary Microglial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢南昌; 陈晨; 王翠; 张倩; 夏建华; 张宏伟; 连亚军

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1) attenuates β-amyloid protein (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress injury in primary microglial cells. Methods:Primary microglial cells were randomly divided into control group, Aβgroup, mdivi-1 group and Aβ+mdivi-1 group. The viability and apoptosis of cells, mitochondrial membrane potential, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) content and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were examined. Results:Compared with control group, the cell viability of Aβ group was significantly reduced, the apoptotic cells was increased, the mitochondrial membrane potential and SOD activity were decreased, while the levels of MDA and 8-OHdG were increased( <0.05). Compared with the Aβgroup, in the Aβ+mdivi-1 group, the cell viability was increased, the apoptotic cells was decreased, the mitochondrial membrane potential and SOD activity were increased, while the levels of MDA and 8-OhdG were decreased ( <0.05). Conclusion:Mdivi-1 exerts neuroprotective effects against Aβ-induced oxida-tive stress injury in primary microglial cells.%目的:研究线粒体分裂蛋白抑制剂(mdivi-1)能否减轻β淀粉样蛋白(Aβ)诱导的体外原代培养小鼠小胶质细胞的氧化应激损伤。方法:随机将体外原代培养BALB/C小鼠小胶质细胞分为con组、Aβ组、mdi组和 Aβ+mdi 组,con 组不予处理,Aβ组中加入 Aβ,mdi 组中加入 mdivi-1,Aβ+mdi 组分别加入2、5、10、20μmol/L mdivi-1后1 h加入Aβ。分别检测小胶质细胞存活率及凋亡、线粒体膜电位、丙二醛(MDA)含量、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)活性、8-羟基脱氧鸟苷(8-OHdG)含量。结果:与con组相比,Aβ组小胶质细胞存活率下降,凋亡增加,线粒体膜电位下降,MDA和8-OHdG含量升高,SOD活性下降,差异有统计学意义(<0.05);与Aβ组相比,Aβ+mdi组小胶质细胞存活率上升,凋亡减少,线粒体

  18. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Divisions's activities during 1988 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries (mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide, sodium/metal chloride, and sodium/sulfur); (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous chemical water; (6) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing /sup 99/Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 53 figs., 16 tabs

  2. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Linear Instability of the Plane Couette and Plane Poiseuille Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    We show possibility of the Plane Couette (PC) flow instability for Reynolds number Re>Reth=140. This new result of the linear hydrodynamic stability theory is obtained on the base of refusal from the traditionally used assumption on longitudinal periodicity of the disturbances along the direction of the fluid flow. We found that earlier existing understanding on the linear stability of this flow for any arbitrary large Reynolds number is directly related with an assumption on the separation of the variables of the spatial variability for the disturbance field and their periodicity in linear theory of stability. By the refusal from the pointed assumptions also for the Plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, we get a new threshold Reynolds value Reth=1040 that with 4% accuracy agrees with the experiment contrary to more than 500% discrepancy for the earlier known estimate Reth=5772 obtained in the frame of the linear theory but when using the "normal" disturbance form (S. A. Orszag, 1971).

  5. Gravitational Couplings for y-Gop-Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Ospina-Giraldo, J F

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino action for y deformed and generalized orientifold planes (yGOp-planes) is presented and one power expantion is realized from which processes that involves yGOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard yGOp-planes are showed.

  6. Gravitational Couplings for Generalized Orientifold Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Ospina-Giraldo, J F

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino action for generalized orientifold planes (GOp-planes) is presented and a series power expantion is realized from which processes that involves GOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard GOp-planes are showed.

  7. Optimization of starshades: focal plane versus pupil plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamary, R.; Aime, C.

    2014-09-01

    We search for the best possible transmission for an external occulter coronagraph that is dedicated to the direct observation of terrestrial exoplanets. We show that better observation conditions are obtained when the flux in the focal plane is minimized in the zone in which the exoplanet is observed, instead of for the total flux received by the telescope. We describe the transmission of the occulter as a sum of basis functions. For each element of the basis, we numerically computed the Fresnel diffraction at the aperture of the telescope and the complex amplitude at its focus. The basis functions are circular disks that are linearly apodized over a few centimeters (truncated cones). We complemented the numerical calculation of the Fresnel diffraction for these functions by a comparison with pure circular disks (cylinder) for which an analytical expression, based on a decomposition in Lommel series, is available. The technique of deriving the optimal transmission for a given spectral bandwidth is a classical regularized quadratic minimization of intensities, but linear optimizations can be used as well. Minimizing the integrated intensity on the aperture of the telescope or for selected regions of the focal plane leads to slightly different transmissions for the occulter. For the focal plane optimization, the resulting residual intensity is concentrated behind the geometrical image of the occulter, in a blind region for the observation of an exoplanet, and the level of background residual starlight becomes very low outside this image. Finally, we provide a tolerance analysis for the alignment of the occulter to the telescope, which also favors the focal plane optimization. This means that telescope offsets of a few decimeters do not strongly reduce the efficiency of the occulter.

  8. Physiographic divisions of the conterminous U. S.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon coverage of Physiographic Divisions in the conterminous United States. It was automated from Fenneman's 1:7,000,000-scale map, "Physical Divisions...

  9. Targeted cell elimination reveals an auxin-guided biphasic mode of lateral root initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhavý, Peter; Montesinos, Juan Carlos; Abuzeineh, Anas; Van Damme, Daniel; Vermeer, Joop E.M.; Duclercq, Jerôme; Rakusová, Hana; Nováková, Petra; Friml, Jiři; Geldner, Niko; Benková, Eva

    2016-01-01

    To sustain a lifelong ability to initiate organs, plants retain pools of undifferentiated cells with a preserved proliferation capacity. The root pericycle represents a unique tissue with conditional meristematic activity, and its tight control determines initiation of lateral organs. Here we show that the meristematic activity of the pericycle is constrained by the interaction with the adjacent endodermis. Release of these restraints by elimination of endodermal cells by single-cell ablation triggers the pericycle to re-enter the cell cycle. We found that endodermis removal substitutes for the phytohormone auxin-dependent initiation of the pericycle meristematic activity. However, auxin is indispensable to steer the cell division plane orientation of new organ-defining divisions. We propose a dual, spatiotemporally distinct role for auxin during lateral root initiation. In the endodermis, auxin releases constraints arising from cell-to-cell interactions that compromise the pericycle meristematic activity, whereas, in the pericycle, auxin defines the orientation of the cell division plane to initiate lateral roots. PMID:26883363

  10. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C [comp.

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  11. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes main research achievements in the 48th fiscal year which were made by Reactor Engineering Division consisted of eight laboratories and Computing Center. The major research and development projects, with which the research programmes in the Division are associated, are development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor for multi-purpose use, development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor conducted by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and Engineering Research Programme for Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor. Many achievements are reported in various research items such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of Computing Center. (auth.)

  12. The Grushin plane and quasiconformal Jacobians

    OpenAIRE

    Meyerson, William

    2011-01-01

    We construct a quasiconformal map from the Grushin plane to the Euclidean plane. Then, we generalize the Grushin plane slightly and explain how the Grushin plane can serve as an intermediary in dealing with quasiconformal maps on Euclidean spaces. In particular, we construct a family of quasiconformal embeddings of the Euclidean plane into larger Euclidean spaces whose Jacobians fail to be locally integrable on a line.

  13. Division of solid state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a survey of the present research projects at the division of solid state physics, Inst. of Technology, Uppsala University. The projects fall within the fields of magnetism, i.e. spin glasses, ordered magnetic structures and itinerant electron magnetism, and optics, i.e. properties of crystalline and amorphous materials for selective transmission and absorption in connection with energy-related research. (author)

  14. Ontario Hydro Research Division, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Research Division of Ontario Hydro provides technical and scientific support for the engineering and operation of a power system that includes hydraulic, fossil-fired, and nuclear generation. It also relates to the transmission and distribution of electricity and to the need to help customers use electricity with safety and economy. Among the examples of projects given are qualification of CANDU heat transport system components, pressure tube replacement, steam generator integrity, testing for earthquake resistance, and radioactive waste disposal

  15. Building an Academic Colorectal Division

    OpenAIRE

    Koltun, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for...

  16. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  17. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  18. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support

  20. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  1. Optical code division multiple access fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Prucnal, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    Code-division multiple access (CDMA) technology has been widely adopted in cell phones. Its astonishing success has led many to evaluate the promise of this technology for optical networks. This field has come to be known as Optical CDMA (OCDMA). Surveying the field from its infancy to the current state, Optical Code Division Multiple Access: Fundamentals and Applications offers the first comprehensive treatment of OCDMA from technology to systems.The book opens with a historical perspective, demonstrating the growth and development of the technologies that would eventually evolve into today's

  2. INFLUENCE OF SODIUM METABISULPHITE (E 223) ON MITOTIC DIVISION IN CALENDULA OFFICINALIS L.s

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo-Cristian Marc; Gabriela Capraru

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the cytogenetic effects induced by sodium metabisulphite (E 223) (a food additive used as preservative) in meristematic cells of Calendula officinalis L. root tips. The treatment has determined the lessening of the mitotic index (comparative with the control variant), until mitotic division total inhibition, as well as a growth frequency of division aberration in anaphase and telophase.

  3. Materials division facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Division at the Petten Establishment have the aims of characterising the properties of high temperature materials in industrial process environments and of understanding the structures involved in order to gain an insight into behavioural mechanisms. Metallic materials fall within the scope of the programme; the activities are, at present, almost entirely concerned with austenitic steels and nickel based alloys. Starting in 1984, advanced ceramic materials will be studied as well. The equipment available permits the study of mechanical properties in controlled gaseous environments, of the rates and mechanisms of corrosive reactions between materials and those environments, and of the surface and bulk structures by advanced physical techniques. Special preparation and treatment techniques are available. The Division has developed a Data Bank on high temperature alloys. It also operates an information Centre, the activities of which include the organisation of scientific meetings, the commissioning of ''state of the art'' studies on topics in the field of high temperature materials and their applications and the development of a inventory of current research activities in the field in Europe. This booklet is intended to present the facilities and services of the Division to the organizations which are interested in its programmes of work

  4. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing

  5. Division of household tasks and financial management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonides, G.

    2011-01-01

    Both the standard economic model and bargaining theory make predictions about financial management and the division of household labor between household partners. Using a large Internet survey, we have tested several predictions about task divisions reported by Dutch household partners. The division

  6. The general relativistic infinite plane

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Preston; Ragsdale, Michael; Singleton, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Uniform fields are one of the simplest and most pedagogically useful examples in introductory courses on electrostatics or Newtonian gravity. In general relativity there have been several proposals as to what constitutes a uniform field. In this article we examine two metrics that can be considered the general relativistic version of the infinite plane with finite mass per unit area. The first metric is the 4D version of the 5D "brane" world models which are the starting point for many current research papers. The second case is the cosmological domain wall metric. We examine to what extent these different metrics match or deviate from our Newtonian intuition about the gravitational field of an infinite plane. These solutions provide the beginning student in general relativity both computational practice and conceptual insight into Einstein's field equations. In addition they do this by introducing the student to material that is at the forefront of current research.

  7. Plane waves as tractor beams

    CERN Document Server

    Forgács, Péter; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that in a large class of systems plane waves can act as tractor beams: i.e., an incident plane wave can exert a pulling force on the scatterer. The underlying physical mechanism for the pulling force is due to the sufficiently strong scattering of the incoming wave into another mode having a larger wave number, in which case excess momentum is created behind the scatterer. Such a tractor beam or negative radiation pressure effect arises naturally in systems where the coupling between the scattering channels is due to Aharonov-Bohm (AB) gauge potentials. It is demonstrated that this effect is also present if the AB potential is an induced, ("artificial") gauge potential such as the one found in J. March-Russell, J. Preskill, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58 2567 (1992).

  8. Twisted sectors from plane partitions

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Shouvik; Li, Wei; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Twisted sectors arise naturally in the bosonic higher spin CFTs at their free points, as well as in the associated symmetric orbifolds. We identify the coset representations of the twisted sector states using the description of W_\\infty representations in terms of plane partitions. We confirm these proposals by a microscopic null-vector analysis, and by matching the excitation spectrum of these representations with the orbifold prediction.

  9. Plane SPDC-Quantum Mirror

    OpenAIRE

    Ion, M. L. D.; Ion, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the kinematical correlations from the phase conjugated optics (equivalently with crossing symmetric spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) phenomena) in the nonlinear crystals are used for the description of a new kind of optical device called SPDC-quantum mirrors. Then, some important laws of the plane SPDC-quantum mirrors combined with usual mirrors or lens are proved only by using geometric optics concepts. In particular, these results allow us to obtain a new interpre...

  10. Force Lines in Plane Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Rathkjen, Arne

    1994-01-01

    A state of plane stress is illustrated by means of two families of curves, each family representing constant values of a derivative of Airy's stress function. The two families of curves form a map giving in the first place an overall picture of regions of high and low stress, and in the second place, the map comprises a complete graphic representation of the stress at any point.

  11. Air ionization wire plane chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Measurement for protection level instrumentation requires large number of detectors. Since the number is large, the detector should be cost effective and yet should have good sensitivity. Gas detectors with presently available microelectronics and signal processing capabilities opened a new era in radiation monitoring. Present paper describes the use of air filled multi anode grid planes as detector for alpha detection. Due to multiple anode wire planes, the charge collection efficiency of the air ionization chamber is higher as compared to conventional ionization chamber. The signal from this Wire Plane Chamber (WPC) has a faster and narrower pulse shape as compared to conventional two-electrode chamber of similar dimensions. The reduction in capacitance also improves the signal to noise ratio so that air can be used as the ionization medium without any special cleaning procedure etc and it may be possible to use even engineering plastic as the structural material for the chamber. The paper gives the results obtained so far with this air ionization chamber. (author)

  12. Advances in nickel hydrogen technology at Yardney Battery Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    The current major activites in nickel hydrogen technology being addressed at Yardney Battery Division are outlined. Five basic topics are covered: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 AH NiH2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/industry briefing; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 inch cell development; and bipolar NiH2 battery development.

  13. Generalized plane gravitational waves of non-symmetric unified field theories in plane symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Bhoyar, Sanjiv R.; Ajit Deshmukh

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the plane wave solutions of both the weak and strong non-symmetric unified field equations of Einstein and Bonner in a generalized plane symmetric space-time in the sense of Taub [Ann. Math. 53, 472 (1951)] for plane gravitational waves. We show that the plane wave solutions of Einstein and Bonner field equations exist in plane symmetry.

  14. Changes in the number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris L. antheridial filament cells during the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of cell divisions following a mitodepressive effect of darkness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes in number and size of nucleoli of Chara vulgaris antheridial filament cells were monitored with the use of Howell and Black's silver staining method. After a 3-day mitodepressive treatment with darkness the cells were exposed to light which reactivated mitotic activity after 18-20 hours. Eight-celled antheridial filaments were observed. In the period preceding light-induced re-initiation of mitoses a gradual reconstruction of the number and size of nucleoli characteristic of control, as well as their total area per nucleus appeared. The obtained results indicate that one of the important conditions for a cell to be able to divide is accumulation of nucleolus components characteristic of a given developmental stage and this controls nucleologenesis of the subsequent cell cycle.

  15. Plane wave diffraction by a perfectly transparent half-plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhov, Sergey P

    2007-09-01

    The exact solution is found for plane wave diffraction by an arbitrary phase step. The analysis is performed by using the Huygens-Fresnel principle and the superposition integral, where every secondary wave was identified with the surface element field of the actual electromagnetic wave. The dependence of the total field structure on the height of the phase step is analyzed. The formation algorithm is demonstrated for the primary wave component of the edge diffraction, which has a singular nature and determines nearly all physical properties of this phenomenon. PMID:17767219

  16. A Novel Multiobject Tracking Approach in the Presence of Collision and Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingli Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop a general framework for accurately tracking and quantitatively characterizing multiple cells (objects when collision and division between cells arise. Through introducing three types of interaction events among cells, namely, independence, collision, and division, the corresponding dynamic models are defined and an augmented interacting multiple model particle filter tracking algorithm is first proposed for spatially adjacent cells with varying size. In addition, to reduce the ambiguity of correspondence between frames, both the estimated cell dynamic parameters and cell size are further utilized to identify cells of interest. The experiments have been conducted on two real cell image sequences characterized with cells collision, division, or number variation, and the resulting dynamic parameters such as instant velocity, turn rate were obtained and analyzed.

  17. A Novel Multiobject Tracking Approach in the Presence of Collision and Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingli; Xu, Benlian; Sheng, Andong; Jiang, Zhengqiang; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Peiyi; Shi, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a general framework for accurately tracking and quantitatively characterizing multiple cells (objects) when collision and division between cells arise. Through introducing three types of interaction events among cells, namely, independence, collision, and division, the corresponding dynamic models are defined and an augmented interacting multiple model particle filter tracking algorithm is first proposed for spatially adjacent cells with varying size. In addition, to reduce the ambiguity of correspondence between frames, both the estimated cell dynamic parameters and cell size are further utilized to identify cells of interest. The experiments have been conducted on two real cell image sequences characterized with cells collision, division, or number variation, and the resulting dynamic parameters such as instant velocity, turn rate were obtained and analyzed. PMID:26075015

  18. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report

  19. Biology and Medicine Division annual report, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-04-01

    This book briefly describes the activities of the Biology and Medicine Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. During the past year the Donner Pavilion program on the treatment of arteriovenous malformations in the brain has chalked up very significant successes. The disease control rate has been high and objective measures of success using cerebral angiography have been established. The new high resolution positron emitting tomographic imager has been demonstrated to operate successfully. In the Radiation Biophysics program, the availability of higher mass ions up to uranium has allowed us cell and tissue studies in a radiation domain that is entirely new. Using uranium beams, investigators have already made new and exciting findings that are described in the body of the report.

  20. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems