WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell division plane

  1. Illuminating traffic control for cell-division planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatzek, Silke

    2014-01-01

    When a plant cell divides, four related proteins control the trafficking of vesicles and ensure that cargo that is normally recycled to the plasma membrane is instead re-routed to the plane of cell division.

  2. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-07-26

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson-Dumais rule generalizes Errera's rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson-Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson-Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants.

  3. Arabidopsis  SABRE and CLASP interact to stabilize cell division plane orientation and planar polarity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The orientation of cell division and the coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) contribute to shape diverse multicellular organisms. The root of Arabidopsis thaliana displays regularly oriented cell divisions, cell elongation and planar polarity providing a plant model system to study these processes. Here we report that the SABRE protein, which shares similarity with proteins of unknown function throughout eukaryotes, has important roles in orien...

  4. Endocytosis restricts Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin to the cell division plane during late cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Yohann; Frescatada-Rosa, Márcia; Men, Shuzhen; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Ebine, Kazuo; Gustavsson, Anna; Johansson, Lenore; Ueda, Takashi; Moore, Ian; Jürgens, Gerd; Grebe, Markus

    2010-02-03

    Cytokinesis represents the final stage of eukaryotic cell division during which the cytoplasm becomes partitioned between daughter cells. The process differs to some extent between animal and plant cells, but proteins of the syntaxin family mediate membrane fusion in the plane of cell division in diverse organisms. How syntaxin localization is kept in check remains elusive. Here, we report that localization of the Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin in the plane of cell division is maintained by sterol-dependent endocytosis involving a clathrin- and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A-dependent mechanism. On genetic or pharmacological interference with endocytosis, KNOLLE mis-localizes to lateral plasma membranes after cell-plate fusion. Fluorescence-loss-in-photo-bleaching and fluorescence-recovery-after-photo-bleaching experiments reveal lateral diffusion of GFP-KNOLLE from the plane of division to lateral membranes. In an endocytosis-defective sterol biosynthesis mutant displaying lateral KNOLLE diffusion, KNOLLE secretory trafficking remains unaffected. Thus, restriction of lateral diffusion by endocytosis may serve to maintain specificity of syntaxin localization during late cytokinesis.

  5. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Li

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  6. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  7. Planar cell polarity planes the inconveniences of cell division into a smooth morphogenetic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechiporuk, Tamilla; Vasioukhin, Valeri

    2006-02-01

    Cell divisions are necessary, but also very disruptive for morphogenesis. Dividing cells lose many intercellular contacts and polarized features. This breaks the magnificent topology of the developing embryo and, if left unrepaired, can lead to severe tissue disorganization. A recent study demonstrated that cells use the planar cell polarity pathway to reestablish polarity and reintegrate daughter cells into developing tissue.

  8. Predicting division plane position and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minc, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-04-01

    Predicting cellular behavior is a major challenge in cell and developmental biology. Since the late nineteenth century, empirical rules have been formulated to predict the position and orientation of mitotic cleavage planes in plant and animal cells. Here, we review the history of division plane orientation rules and discuss recent experimental and theoretical studies that refine these rules and provide mechanistic insights into how division can be predicted. We describe why some of these rules may better apply to certain cell types and developmental contexts and discuss how they could be integrated in the future to allow the prediction of division positioning in tissues.

  9. An automated image analysis framework for segmentation and division plane detection of single live Staphylococcus aureus cells which can operate at millisecond sampling time scales using bespoke Slimfield microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M; Foster, Simon; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, giving rise to antimicrobial resistance in cell strains such as Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Here we report an image analysis framework for automated detection and image segmentation of cells in S. aureus cell clusters, and explicit identification of their cell division planes. We use a new combination of several existing analytical tools of image analysis to detect cellular and subcellular morphological features relevant to cell division from millisecond time scale sampled images of live pathogens at a detection precision of single molecules. We demonstrate this approach using a fluorescent reporter GFP fused to the protein EzrA that localises to a mid-cell plane during division and is involved in regulation of cell size and division. This image analysis framework presents a valuable platform from which to study candidate new antimicrobials which target the cell division machinery, but may also have more general application in detecting morphological...

  10. An automated image analysis framework for segmentation and division plane detection of single live Staphylococcus aureus cells which can operate at millisecond sampling time scales using bespoke Slimfield microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J. M.; Miller, Helen; Foster, Simon; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, giving rise to antimicrobial resistance in cell strains such as Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Here we report an image analysis framework for automated detection and image segmentation of cells in S. aureus cell clusters, and explicit identification of their cell division planes. We use a new combination of several existing analytical tools of image analysis to detect cellular and subcellular morphological features relevant to cell division from millisecond time scale sampled images of live pathogens at a detection precision of single molecules. We demonstrate this approach using a fluorescent reporter GFP fused to the protein EzrA that localises to a mid-cell plane during division and is involved in regulation of cell size and division. This image analysis framework presents a valuable platform from which to study candidate new antimicrobials which target the cell division machinery, but may also have more general application in detecting morphologically complex structures of fluorescently labelled proteins present in clusters of other types of cells.

  11. Putative RopGAPs impact division plane selection and interact with kinesin-12 POK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle, Dorothee; Herrmann, Arvid; Lipka, Elisabeth; Lauster, Theresa; Gavidia, Richard; Zimmermann, Steffi; Müller, Sabine

    2016-08-08

    Cell shape is defined by the surrounding cell walls in plants. Thus, spatial control over cell division planes and cell expansion polarity are essential to maintain cell morphology. In eukaryotes, cell polarity and expansion are controlled by Rho GTPase signalling, regulating cytoskeletal reorganization and vesicle trafficking(1). However, until now, Rho signalling was not implicated in mitotic events in plants. Here, we report a pair of putative Rho GTPase activating proteins (RhoGAPs) that interact with the mitosis-specific kinesin-12 POK1, a core component of the cortical division zone/site (CDZ/CDS) that is required for division plane maintenance in Arabidopsis(2-4). The designated pleckstrin homology GAPs (PHGAPs) are cytoplasmic and plasma membrane associated in interphase, but during mitosis they additionally localize to the CDZ/CDS in a POK-dependent manner. In contrast to pok1 pok2 mutants, phgap1 phgap2 double mutants show moderate cell wall positioning defects as a consequence of inaccurate positioning of the cortical division zone marker POK1. We conclude that loss of PHGAP function interferes with division plane selection in proliferative cell divisions.

  12. Proper division plane orientation and mitotic progression together allow normal growth of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Anding; Sylvester, Anne

    2017-01-01

    How growth, microtubule dynamics, and cell-cycle progression are coordinated is one of the unsolved mysteries of cell biology. A maize mutant, tangled1, with known defects in growth and proper division plane orientation, and a recently characterized cell-cycle delay identified by time-lapse imaging, was used to clarify the relationship between growth, cell cycle, and proper division plane orientation. The tangled1 mutant was fully rescued by introduction of cortical division site localized TANGLED1-YFP. A CYCLIN1B destruction box was fused to TANGLED1-YFP to generate a line that mostly rescued the division plane defect but still showed cell-cycle delays when expressed in the tangled1 mutant. Although an intermediate growth phenotype between wild-type and the tangled1 mutant was expected, these partially rescued plants grew as well as wild-type siblings, indicating that mitotic progression delays alone do not alter overall growth. These data indicate that division plane orientation, together with proper cell-cycle progression, is critical for plant growth. PMID:28202734

  13. Formative cell divisions: principal determinants of plant morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Michalina; Dhonukshe, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Formative cell divisions utilizing precise rotations of cell division planes generate and spatially place asymmetric daughters to produce different cell layers. Therefore, by shaping tissues and organs, formative cell divisions dictate multicellular morphogenesis. In animal formative cell divisions, the orientation of the mitotic spindle and cell division planes relies on intrinsic and extrinsic cortical polarity cues. Plants lack known key players from animals, and cell division planes are determined prior to the mitotic spindle stage. Therefore, it appears that plants have evolved specialized mechanisms to execute formative cell divisions. Despite their profound influence on plant architecture, molecular players and cellular mechanisms regulating formative divisions in plants are not well understood. This is because formative cell divisions in plants have been difficult to track owing to their submerged positions and imprecise timings of occurrence. However, by identifying a spatiotemporally inducible cell division plane switch system applicable for advanced microscopy techniques, recent studies have begun to uncover molecular modules and mechanisms for formative cell divisions. The identified molecular modules comprise developmentally triggered transcriptional cascades feeding onto microtubule regulators that now allow dissection of the hierarchy of the events at better spatiotemporal resolutions. Here, we survey the current advances in understanding of formative cell divisions in plants in the context of embryogenesis, stem cell functionality and post-embryonic organ formation.

  14. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  15. Cell division in apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Striepen, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum are important human pathogens. These parasites and many of their apicomplexan relatives undergo a complex developmental process in the cells of their hosts, which includes genome replication, cell division and the assembly of new invasive stages. Apicomplexan cell cycle progression is both globally and locally regulated. Global regulation is carried out throughout the cytoplasm by diffusible factors that include cell cycle-specific kinases, cyclins and transcription factors. Local regulation acts on individual nuclei and daughter cells that are developing inside the mother cell. We propose that the centrosome is a master regulator that physically tethers cellular components and that provides spatial and temporal control of apicomplexan cell division.

  16. In-plane wavelength division de-multiplexing using photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Harpøth, Anders; Hede, K. K.;

    We demonstrate a novel concept for in-plane coarse wavelength division de-multiplexing in integrated photonic circuits utilizing planar photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material. The filtering of wavelength channels is realized by shifting the cut-off frequ......We demonstrate a novel concept for in-plane coarse wavelength division de-multiplexing in integrated photonic circuits utilizing planar photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material. The filtering of wavelength channels is realized by shifting the cut...

  17. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Sivaprakasam, Iswariya; Periasamy, Vinod; Govindan, Subashika; Mani, Shyamala

    2015-05-15

    The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signalling had an effect on plane of cell division. Asymmetric distribution of β-Catenin was shown to occur towards the source of a localized extracellular cue.

  18. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  19. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues.

  20. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  1. The fencing problem and Coleochaete cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuandi; Dou, Mingya; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    The findings in this study suggest that the solution of a boundary value problem for differential equation system can be used to discuss the fencing problem in mathematics and Coleochaete, a green algae, cell division. This differential equation model in parametric expression is used to simulate the two kinds of cell division process, one is for the usual case and the case with a "dead" daughter cell.

  2. Cell Division and Evolution of Biological Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, Nicolas; Arcenegui-Siemens, Xavier; Schliecker, Gudrun

    A tissue is a geometrical, space-filling, random cellular network; it remains in this steady state while individual cells divide. Cell division (fragmentation) is a local, elementary topological transformation which establishes statistical equilibrium of the structure. Statistical equilibrium is characterized by observable relations (Lewis, Aboav) between cell shapes, sizes and those of their neighbours, obtained through maximum entropy and topological correlation extending to nearest neighbours only, i.e. maximal randomness. For a two-dimensional tissue (epithelium), the distribution of cell shapes and that of mother and daughter cells can be obtained from elementary geometrical and physical arguments, except for an exponential factor favouring division of larger cells, and exponential and combinatorial factors encouraging a most symmetric division. The resulting distributions are very narrow, and stationarity severely restricts the range of an adjustable structural parameter

  3. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells gro

  4. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hatzold

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well.

  5. Cell Division in the Light of Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-09-26

    Theoretical modeling is central to elucidating underlying principles of emergent properties of complex systems. In cell and developmental biology, the last 15 years have witnessed a convergence of empirical and modeling approaches for fresh perspectives. The role of cell division in coordinating size, shape, and fate in particular illustrates the ever-growing impact of modeling.

  6. An electrostatic model for biological cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Faraggi, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    Probably the most fundamental processes for biological systems is their ability to create themselves through the use of cell division and cell differentiation. In this work a simple physical model is proposed for biological cell division. The model consists of a positive ionic gradient across the cell membrane, and concentration of charge at the nodes of the spindle and on the chromosomes. A simple calculation, based on Coulomb's Law, shows that under such circumstances a chromosome will tend to break up to its constituent chromatids and that the chromatids will be separated by a distance that is an order of thirty percent of the distance between the spindle nodes. Further repulsion between the nodes will tend to stretch the cell and eventually break the cell membrane between the separated chromatids, leading to cell division. The importance of this work is in continuing the understanding of the electromagnetic basis of cell division and providing it with an analytical model. A central implication of this and...

  7. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-12-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic "rule breakers," control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals.

  8. Genes involved in cell division in mycoplasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Alarcón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell division has been studied mainly in model systems such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, where it is described as a complex process with the participation of a group of proteins which assemble into a multiprotein complex called the septal ring. Mycoplasmas are cell wall-less bacteria presenting a reduced genome. Thus, it was important to compare their genomes to analyze putative genes involved in cell division processes. The division and cell wall (dcw cluster, which in E. coli and B. subtilis is composed of 16 and 17 genes, respectively, is represented by only three to four genes in mycoplasmas. Even the most conserved protein, FtsZ, is not present in all mycoplasma genomes analyzed so far. A model for the FtsZ protein from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae has been constructed. The conserved residues, essential for GTP/GDP binding, are present in FtsZ from both species. A strong conservation of hydrophobic amino acid patterns is observed, and is probably necessary for the structural stability of the protein when active. M. synoviae FtsZ presents an extended amino acid sequence at the C-terminal portion of the protein, which may participate in interactions with other still unknown proteins crucial for the cell division process.

  9. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona eDonovan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae.

  10. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiv Haldipur

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh signalling had an effect on plane of cell division. Asymmetric distribution of β-Catenin was shown to occur towards the source of a localized extracellular cue.

  11. The effect of anterior inclined plane treatment on the dentoskeletal of Class II division 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emami Meibodi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of Class II malocclusions are due to underdeveloped mandible with increased overjet and overbite. Lack of incisal contact results in the extrusion of the upper and lower anterior dentoalveolar complex, which helps to lock the mandible and prevent its normal growth and development, and this abnormality is exaggerated by soft tissue imbalance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dental changes in patients treated with anterior inclined plane appliance in growing patients with moderate Class II Division 1 having deep overbite. In this study, 25 patients, including 15 girls and 10 boys, with a mean age of 9 ±1.2 years were selected; all of them presented with moderate Class II deep bite with increased overjet and normal or horizontal growth pattern. Pre- and post-treatment X-rays and photos for an average of 8 months were taken. The statistical assessment of the data suggested that there were no significant changes in the vertical skeletal parameters. The mandibular incisors were protruded, whereas the maxillary incisors were retruded. Overbite and overjet were also reduced. There was significant increase in the mandibular length. The results revealed that in mixed dentition patients, the inclined plane corrected Class II discrepancies mostly through dentoskeletal changes.

  12. Kinetics of cell division in epidermal maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    The rules governing cell division and differentiation are central to understanding the mechanisms of development, aging and cancer. By utilising inducible genetic labelling, recent studies have shown that the clonal population in transgenic mouse epidermis can be tracked in vivo. Drawing on these results, we explain how clonal fate data may be used to infer the rules of cell division and differentiation underlying the maintenance of adult murine tail-skin. We show that the rates of cell division and differentiation may be evaluated by considering the long-time and short-time clone fate data, and that the data is consistent with cells dividing independently rather than synchronously. Motivated by these findings, we consider a mechanism for cancer onset based closely on the model for normal adult skin. By analysing the expected changes to clonal fate in cancer emerging from a simple two-stage mutation, we propose that clonal fate data may provide a novel method for studying the earliest stages of the disease.

  13. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Parthiv Haldipur; Iswariya Sivaprakasam; Vinod Periasamy; Subashika Govindan; Shyamala Mani

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of S...

  14. Cell Division, Differentiation and Dynamic Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1993-01-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled chaotic system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, in consistency with the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of ``open chaos" is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.A

  15. Effects of Polyhydroxybutyrate Production on Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathleen; Rahman, Asif; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biological engineering can be utilized to aide the advancement of improved long-term space flight. The potential to use synthetic biology as a platform to biomanufacture desired equipment on demand using the three dimensional (3D) printer on the International Space Station (ISS) gives long-term NASA missions the flexibility to produce materials as needed on site. Polyhydroxybutyrates (PHBs) are biodegradable, have properties similar to plastics, and can be produced in Escherichia coli using genetic engineering. Using PHBs during space flight could assist mission success by providing a valuable source of biomaterials that can have many potential applications, particularly through 3D printing. It is well documented that during PHB production E. coli cells can become significantly elongated. The elongation of cells reduces the ability of the cells to divide and thus to produce PHB. I aim to better understand cell division during PHB production, through the design, building, and testing of synthetic biological circuits, and identify how to potentially increase yields of PHB with FtsZ overexpression, the gene responsible for cell division. Ultimately, an increase in the yield will allow more products to be created using the 3D printer on the ISS and beyond, thus aiding astronauts in their missions.

  16. Spindle Positioning and Cell Division in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    During cell division a cell duplicates its genetic material and segregates one intact copy into each daughter cell. However, cell division has many aspects in addition to the propagation of the genome. For instance, some cells divide asymmetrically, which contributes to the generation of cell divers

  17. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    organogenesis. Coordination of these two interdependent processes results in formation of nodules - bacterial accommodating structures where fixation of atmospheric nitrogen takes place. Plant hormones such as auxin and cytokinin play important roles in nodulation. In some legumes the infection process...... of auxin transport inhibitors or cytokinin alone was shown to induce cortical cell divisions in the absence of rhizobia in certain legume species. While the roles of auxin and cytokinin in nodulation have been studied extensively, the precise timing, location and means of molecular crosstalk between...

  18. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  19. Mechanisms of asymmetric cell divisions in Drosophila melanogaster neuroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess the properties of self-renewal and differentiation, and mainly rely on two strategies for division, including symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. In this review, we summarize the latest progress on asymmetric cell divisions in Drosophila melanogaster neuroblasts (NBs, which focus on the establishment of cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation, the asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants as well as cell-cycle control. Here we also introduce five major cell fate determinants, including Numb, Prospero, Brat, Miranda, and Pon, which are thought to be unequally segregated to the ganglion mother cells (GMCs and play an important role in the formation of stem cell-derived tumors

  20. Polarity and cell division orientation in the cleavage embryo: from worm to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajduk, Anna; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Cleavage is a period after fertilization, when a 1-cell embryo starts developing into a multicellular organism. Due to a series of mitotic divisions, the large volume of a fertilized egg is divided into numerous smaller, nucleated cells—blastomeres. Embryos of different phyla divide according to different patterns, but molecular mechanism of these early divisions remains surprisingly conserved. In the present paper, we describe how polarity cues, cytoskeleton and cell-to-cell communication interact with each other to regulate orientation of the early embryonic division planes in model animals such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mouse. We focus particularly on the Par pathway and the actin-driven cytoplasmic flows that accompany it. We also describe a unique interplay between Par proteins and the Hippo pathway in cleavage mammalian embryos. Moreover, we discuss the potential meaning of polarity, cytoplasmic dynamics and cell-to-cell communication as quality biomarkers of human embryos. PMID:26660321

  1. Novel coiled-coil cell division factor ZapB stimulates Z ring assembly and cell division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Galli, Elisa; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    Formation of the Z ring is the first known event in bacterial cell division. However, it is not yet known how the assembly and contraction of the Z ring are regulated. Here, we identify a novel cell division factor ZapB in Escherichia coli that simultaneously stimulates Z ring assembly and cell...

  2. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  3. Concise Review: Asymmetric Cell Divisions in Stem Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Murke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic stem cells are rare cells with unique properties residing in many organs and tissues. They are undifferentiated cells responsible for tissue regeneration and homeostasis, and contain both the capacity to self-renew in order to maintain their stem cell potential and to differentiate towards tissue-specific, specialized cells. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms controlling somatic stem cell fate decisions remains sparse. One mechanism which has been described to control daughter cell fates in selected somatic stem cell systems is the process of asymmetric cell division (ACD. ACD is a tightly regulated and evolutionary conserved process allowing a single stem or progenitor cell to produce two differently specified daughter cells. In this concise review, we will summarize and discuss current concepts about the process of ACD as well as different ACD modes. Finally, we will recapitulate the current knowledge and our recent findings about ACD in human hematopoiesis.

  4. Absence of nucleoid occlusion effector Noc impairs formation of orthogonal FtsZ rings during Staphylococcus aureus cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Helena; Jorge, Ana M; Pinho, Mariana G

    2011-06-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides by synthesizing the septum in three orthogonal planes over three consecutive division cycles. This process has to be tightly coordinated with chromosome segregation to avoid bisection of the nucleoid by the septum. Here we show that deletion of the nucleoid occlusion effector Noc in S. aureus results in the formation of Z-rings over the nucleoid, as well as in DNA breaks, indicating that Noc has an important role as an antiguillotine checkpoint that prevents septa from forming over the DNA. Furthermore, Noc deleted cells show multiple Z-rings which are no longer placed in perpendicular planes. We propose that the axis of chromosome segregation has a role in determining the placement of the division septum. This is achieved via the action of Noc which restricts the placement of the division septum to one of an infinite number of potential division planes that exist in S. aureus.

  5. Are There Really Animals Like That? No Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwelder, R. E.; Garoian, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    Provides examples of animals in which growth occurs without cell division. Indicates that this phenomenon (called cell constancy or eutely) is an oddity of development that has arisen independently in several animal groups. (JN)

  6. Smurfs have "fused" into the asymmetric division of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven Y. Cheng; Ying E. Zhang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The asymmetric cell division is the way in which a stem cell divides into one daughter stem cell and one differentiated daughter cell.This process is one of the key principles of developmental biology that ensures the perpetual supply of stem cells while allowing a particular cell lineage to be populated.During Drosophila oogenesis, the fate of the daughter stem cell produced from the asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by Decapentaplegic (Dpp), but the other daughter cell has almost equal access to the Dpp signal.

  7. Segrosome complex formation during DNA trafficking in bacterial cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Oliva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialised partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  8. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  9. Entrainment of cell division in phytoplankton with dynamic energy budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Erik B.; Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; Klanjšček, Tin; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2011-11-01

    We explore the entrainment behavior of cell division in phytoplankton in the context of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. In particular, we explore the range of DEB and environmental parameter values within which a cell divides at regular intervals in a periodic light environment with abundant nutrients and investigate the impact of parameter values on the phase of cell division. We consider three types of cells that differ in the evolution of surface area to volume ratio during the cell cycle: cells with a constant shape (isomorphs), cells with a constant surface area (V0-morphs) and cells with a constant surface area to volume ratio (V1-morphs), the latter being the default choice in studies on the population dynamics of unicellular organisms because of its desirable mathematical implications. Only in isomorphs and V0-morphs, however, cell division can be entrained to a periodic light. Regular cell division in V1 is purely coincidental, as it depends on exact choices for parameter values. We attribute this to the fact that V1-morphs lack the negative feedback of size on the dynamics of reserves in V0-morphs and isomorphs. Because entrained isomorphs and V0-morphs divide during the dark hours in our simulations, these two shapes can represent the division behavior of phytoplankton species that complete the cell cycle during the night, such as dinoflagellates and coccolithophores. A description of the division behavior of species completing the cell cycle during the day, such as silicon dependent diatoms and cyanobacteria, requires a more complex model than used in this paper. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of our findings by randomizing model parameters and introducing unevenness in biomass separation between daughter cells during cell division. We conclude that especially the entrainment in V0-morphs is relatively insensitive to perturbations.

  10. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  11. Cellular Clocks : Coupled Circadian Dispatch and Cell Division Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2004-01-01

    Gating of cell division by the circadian clock is well known, yet its mechanism is little understood. Genetically tractable model systems have led to new hypotheses and questions concerning the coupling of these two cellular cycles.

  12. Cell division and death inhibit glassy behaviour of confluent tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Matoz-Fernandez, D A; Sknepnek, Rastko; Barrat, J L; Henkes, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of cell division and apopotosis on collective dynamics in two-dimensional epithelial tissues. Our model includes three key ingredients observed across many epithelia, namely cell-cell adhesion, cell death and a cell division process that depends on the surrounding environment. We show a rich non-equilibrium phase diagram depending on the ratio of cell death to cell division and on the adhesion strength. For large apopotosis rates, cells die out and the tissue disintegrates. As the death rate decreases, however, we show, consecutively, the existence of a gas-like phase, a gel-like phase, and a dense confluent (tissue) phase. Most striking is the observation that the tissue is self-melting through its own internal activity, ruling out the existence of any glassy phase.

  13. Fluidization of tissues by cell division and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranft, Jonas; Basan, Markus; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Jülicher, Frank

    2010-12-07

    During the formation of tissues, cells organize collectively by cell division and apoptosis. The multicellular dynamics of such systems is influenced by mechanical conditions and can give rise to cell rearrangements and movements. We develop a continuum description of tissue dynamics, which describes the stress distribution and the cell flow field on large scales. In the absence of division and apoptosis, we consider the tissue to behave as an elastic solid. Cell division and apoptosis introduce stress sources that, in general, are anisotropic. By combining cell number balance with dynamic equations for the stress source, we show that the tissue effectively behaves as a viscoelastic fluid with a relaxation time set by the rates of division and apoptosis. If the system is confined in a fixed volume, it reaches a homeostatic state in which division and apoptosis balance. In this state, cells undergo a diffusive random motion driven by the stochasticity of division and apoptosis. We calculate the expression for the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the tissue parameters and compare our results concerning both diffusion and viscosity to simulations of multicellular systems using dissipative particle dynamics.

  14. Control of patterns of symmetric cell division in the epidermal and cortical tissues of the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Iakovidis, Michail; Costa, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Controlled cell division is central to the growth and development of all multicellular organisms. Within the proliferating zone of the Arabidopsis root, regular symmetric divisions give rise to patterns of parallel files of cells, the genetic basis of which remains unclear. We found that genotypes impaired in the TONNEAU1a (TON1a) gene display misoriented symmetric divisions in the epidermis and have no division defects in the underlying cortical tissue. The TON1a gene encodes a microtubule-associated protein. We show that in the ton1a mutant, epidermal and cortical cells do not form narrow, ring-like preprophase bands (PPBs), which are plant-specific, cytoskeletal structures that predict the position of the division plane before mitosis. The results indicate that in the cortex but not in the epidermis, division plane positioning and patterning can proceed correctly in the absence of both a functional TON1a and PPB formation. Differences between tissues in how they respond to the signals that guide symmetric division orientation during patterning might provide the basis for organised organ growth in the absence of cell movements.

  15. Anillin localization suggests distinct mechanisms of division plane specification in mouse oogenic meiosis I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Bedra; Fadero, Tanner; Maddox, Amy Shaub

    2015-03-01

    Anillin is a conserved cytokinetic ring protein implicated in actomyosin cytoskeletal organization and cytoskeletal-membrane linkage. Here we explored anillin localization in the highly asymmetric divisions of the mouse oocyte that lead to the extrusion of two polar bodies. The purposes of polar body extrusion are to reduce the chromosome complement within the egg to haploid, and to retain the majority of the egg cytoplasm for embryonic development. Anillin's proposed roles in cytokinetic ring organization suggest that it plays important roles in achieving this asymmetric division. We report that during meiotic maturation, anillin mRNA is expressed and protein levels steadily rise. In meiosis I, anillin localizes to a cortical cap overlying metaphase I spindles, and a broad ring over anaphase spindles that are perpendicular to the cortex. Anillin is excluded from the cortex of the prospective first polar body, and highly enriched in the cytokinetic ring that severs the polar body from the oocyte. In meiosis II, anillin is enriched in a cortical stripe precisely coincident with and overlying the meiotic spindle midzone. These results suggest a model in which this cortical structure contributes to spindle re-alignment in meiosis II. Thus, localization of anillin as a conserved cytokinetic ring marker illustrates that the geometry of the cytokinetic ring is distinct between the two oogenic meiotic cytokineses in mammals.

  16. Oriented cell divisions in the extending germband of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sara Morais; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2007-09-01

    Tissue elongation is a general feature of morphogenesis. One example is the extension of the germband, which occurs during early embryogenesis in Drosophila. In the anterior part of the embryo, elongation follows from a process of cell intercalation. In this study, we follow cell behaviour at the posterior of the extending germband. We find that, in this region, cell divisions are mostly oriented longitudinally during the fast phase of elongation. Inhibiting cell divisions prevents longitudinal deformation of the posterior region and leads to an overall reduction in the rate and extent of elongation. Thus, as in zebrafish embryos, cell intercalation and oriented cell division together contribute to tissue elongation. We also show that the proportion of longitudinal divisions is reduced when segmental patterning is compromised, as, for example, in even skipped (eve) mutants. Because polarised cell intercalation at the anterior germband also requires segmental patterning, a common polarising cue might be used for both processes. Even though, in fish embryos, both mechanisms require the classical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, germband extension and oriented cell divisions proceed normally in embryos lacking dishevelled (dsh), a key component of the PCP pathway. An alternative means of planar polarisation must therefore be at work in the embryonic epidermis.

  17. Defect driven shapes in nematic droplets: analogies with cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Leoni, Marco; Bowick, Mark J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Building on the striking similarity between the structure of the spindle during mitosis in living cells and nematic textures in confined liquid crystals, we use a continuum model of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal droplets, to examine the physical aspects of cell division. The model investigates the interplay between bulk elasticity of the microtubule assembly, described as a nematic liquid crystal, and surface elasticity of the cell cortex, modelled as a bounding flexible membrane, in controlling cell shape and division. The centrosomes at the spindle poles correspond to the cores of the topological defects required to accommodate nematic order in a closed geometry. We map out the progression of both healthy bipolar and faulty multi-polar division as a function of an effective parameter that incorporates active processes and controls centrosome separation. A robust prediction, independent of energetic considerations, is that the transition from a single cell to daughters cells occurs at critical value...

  18. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  19. Novel Coiled-Coil Cell Division Factor ZapB Stimulates Z Ring Assembly and Cell Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Galli, Elizabeth; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    exhibited a synthetic sick phenotype and aberrant cell divisions. The crystal structure showed that ZapB exists as a dimer that is 100% coiled-coil. In vitro, ZapB self-assembled into long filaments and bundles. These results raise the possibility that ZapB stimulates Z ring formation directly via its......Formation of the Z ring is the first known event in bacterial cell division. However, it is not yet known how the assembly and contraction of the Z ring is regulated. Here, we identify a novel cell division factor ZapB in Escherichia coli that simultaneously stimulates Z ring assembly and cell...... division. Deletion of zapB resulted in delayed cell division and the formation of ectopic Z rings and spirals whereas overexpression of ZapB resulted in nucleoid condensation and aberrant cell divisions. Localization of ZapB to the divisome depended on FtsZ but not FtsA, ZipA or FtsI and ZapB interacted...

  20. On the chronology and topography of bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, M; Palacios, P; Dopazo, A; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Aldea, M

    1991-01-01

    Gene products that play a role in the formation of cell septum should be expected to be endowed with a set of specific properties. In principle, septal proteins should be located at the cell envelope. The expression of division genes should ensure the synthesis of septal proteins at levels commensurate with the needs of cell division at different rates of cell duplication. We have results indicating that some fts genes located within the 2.5-min cluster in the Escherichia coli chromosome conform to these predictions.

  1. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M.; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Summers, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3–5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological proces...

  2. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  3. Cell-Division Behavior in a Heterogeneous Swarm Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Adam; Herrmann, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a system of virtual particles that interact using simple kinetic rules. It is known that heterogeneous mixtures of particles can produce particularly interesting behaviors. Here we present a two-species three-dimensional swarm in which a behavior emerges that resembles cell division. We show that the dividing behavior exists across a narrow but finite band of parameters and for a wide range of population sizes. When executed in a two-dimensional environment the swarm's characteristics and dynamism manifest differently. In further experiments we show that repeated divisions can occur if the system is extended by a biased equilibrium process to control the split of populations. We propose that this repeated division behavior provides a simple model for cell-division mechanisms and is of interest for the formation of morphological structure and to swarm robotics.

  4. Stationary Size Distributions of Growing Cells with Binary and Multiple Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rading, M. M.; Engel, T. A.; Lipowsky, R.; Valleriani, A.

    2011-10-01

    Populations of unicellular organisms that grow under constant environmental conditions are considered theoretically. The size distribution of these cells is calculated analytically, both for the usual process of binary division, in which one mother cell produces always two daughter cells, and for the more complex process of multiple division, in which one mother cell can produce 2 n daughter cells with n=1,2,3,… . The latter mode of division is inspired by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uniform response of the whole population to different environmental conditions is encoded in the individual rates of growth and division of the cells. The analytical treatment of the problem is based on size-dependent rules for cell growth and stochastic transition processes for cell division. The comparison between binary and multiple division shows that these different division processes lead to qualitatively different results for the size distribution and the population growth rates.

  5. A mirror-symmetric cell division that orchestrates neuroepithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawk, Marcel; Araya, Claudio; Lyons, Dave A; Reugels, Alexander M; Girdler, Gemma C; Bayley, Philippa R; Hyde, David R; Tada, Masazumi; Clarke, Jonathan D W

    2007-04-12

    The development of cell polarity is an essential prerequisite for tissue morphogenesis during embryogenesis, particularly in the development of epithelia. In addition, oriented cell division can have a powerful influence on tissue morphogenesis. Here we identify a novel mode of polarized cell division that generates pairs of neural progenitors with mirror-symmetric polarity in the developing zebrafish neural tube and has dramatic consequences for the organization of embryonic tissue. We show that during neural rod formation the polarity protein Pard3 is localized to the cleavage furrow of dividing progenitors, and then mirror-symmetrically inherited by the two daughter cells. This allows the daughter cells to integrate into opposite sides of the developing neural tube. Furthermore, these mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence: when forced to occur in ectopic locations during neurulation, they orchestrate the development of mirror-image pattern formation and the consequent generation of ectopic neural tubes.

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Barta, Michael L.; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis, and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient E. coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia. PMID:25382739

  7. Microtubule networks for plant cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, de Jeroen; Mulder, B.M.; Janson, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called

  8. Constriction and septation during cell division in caulobacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1981-07-01

    Morphogenesis of the division site in caulobacters had been described as constrictive in Caulobacter spp. and septate in Asticcacaulis excentricus. However, subsequent studies of other gram-negative genera had implied that constrictive division was an artefact resulting from inadequate preservation of septa; exploration of alternatives to osmium fixation, particularly with aldehydes, was recommended. In this study, the appearance of sectioned division sites was reinvestigated in caulobacter cells prepared by 20 different procedures varying with respect to fixation agents, media, schedules, and temperatures, to dehydrating agents, and to embedding resins. Three types of division site morphogenesis were observed: constriction in C. bacteroides and C. crescentus, partial septation in C. leidyi, and complete, undivided septation in A. excentricus and A. biprosthecum. The anatomy of the division site depended on the bacterial strain, not on the method of preparation of the cells for sectioning. These studies confirm the earlier observations on osmium-fixed caulobacter cells and lead to the general conclusion that gram-negative bacteria with tapered poles probably divide by constriction, whereas septation results in blunt cell poles. A pattern of spiral, rather than circular, insertion of new envelope subunits at the cell equator is proposed as a basic developmental difference between constrictive and septate fission in gram-negative bacteria. Since caulobacter prosthecae can develop as extensions of tapered poles formed by constriction, whereas subpolar or lateral prosthecae occur in species with blunt poles resulting from septation, the site of formation of a thick septum appears unsuitable as a site of subsequent envelope outgrowth.

  9. Genetic control of plant development by overriding a geometric division rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, S.; Barbier de Reuille, P.; Lane, B.; Bassel, G.W.; Prusinkiewicz, P.; Smith, R.S.; Weijers, D.

    2014-01-01

    Formative cell divisions are critical for multicellular patterning. In the early plant embryo, such divisions follow from orienting the division plane. A major unanswered question is how division plane orientation is genetically controlled, and in particular whether this relates to cell geometry. We

  10. Relevant parameters in models of cell division control

    CERN Document Server

    Grilli, Jacopo; Kennard, Andrew S; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2016-01-01

    A recent burst of dynamic single-cell growth-division data makes it possible to characterize the stochastic dynamics of cell division control in bacteria. Different modeling frameworks were used to infer specific mechanisms from such data, but the links between frameworks are poorly explored, with relevant consequences for how well any particular mechanism can be supported by the data. Here, we describe a simple and generic framework in which two common formalisms can be used interchangeably: (i) a continuous-time division process described by a hazard function and (ii) a discrete-time equation describing cell size across generations (where the unit of time is a cell cycle). In our framework, this second process is a discrete-time Langevin equation with a simple physical analogue. By perturbative expansion around the mean initial size (or inter-division time), we show explicitly how this framework describes a wide range of division control mechanisms, including combinations of time and size control, as well a...

  11. On robustness of phase resetting to cell division under entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hafiz; Ushirobira, Rosane; Efimov, Denis

    2015-12-21

    The problem of phase synchronization for a population of genetic oscillators (circadian clocks, synthetic oscillators, etc.) is considered in this paper, taking into account a cell division process and a common entrainment input in the population. The proposed analysis approach is based on the Phase Response Curve (PRC) model of an oscillator (the first order reduced model obtained for the linearized system and inputs with infinitesimal amplitude). The occurrence of cell division introduces state resetting in the model, placing it in the class of hybrid systems. It is shown that without common entraining input in all oscillators, the cell division acts as a disturbance causing phase drift, while the presence of entrainment guarantees boundedness of synchronization phase errors in the population. The performance of the obtained solutions is demonstrated via computer experiments for two different models of circadian/genetic oscillators (Neurospora׳s circadian oscillation model and the repressilator).

  12. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F; Summers, David K

    2012-07-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3-5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological process. Our findings have implications for our understanding of membrane biology, bacterial cell cycle control and potentially for the design of antibiotics that target the cell membrane.

  13. AN ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY OF VEGETATIVE CELL DIVISION IN OEDOGONIUM BORISIANUM(1) (2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, G J; Machlis, L

    1968-12-01

    Vegetative cell division in Oedogonium borisianum is initiated by the formation of a 3-layered ring adjacent to the wall in the upper portion of the cell. This structure enlarges by the coalescence of vesicles. When the ring is fully developed, the parent wall splits adjacent to the ring, and the ring expands into a cylinder, which becomes the cuticle of the upper daughter cell. The lateral wall then forms between this cuticle and the plasmalemma of the cell. Concurrent with ring development and expansion, the nucleus migrates to a position in the center of the cell and karyokinesis occurs. Commencing with late telophase, evidence of transverse wall formation becomes apparent. The zone between the daughter nuclei contains a layer of microtubules in a plane parallel to the plane in which the transverse wall will develop. Subsequently a random coalescence of vesicles occurs along this plane. During the latter stages of this process, the ring expands and the plane of the transverse wall moves upward to the base of the ring cylinder. The completed transverse wall then fuses at is periphery with the newly formed lateral wall.

  14. Primitive human hematopoietic cells give rise to differentially specified daughter cells upon their initial cell division.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebel, B.; Zhang, T.; Beckmann, J.; Spanholtz, J.; Wernet, P.; Ho, A.; Punzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    It is often predicted that stem cells divide asymmetrically, creating a daughter cell that maintains the stem-cell capacity, and 1 daughter cell committed to differentiation. While asymmetric stem-cell divisions have been proven to occur in model organisms (eg, in Drosophila), it remains illusive wh

  15. Ultrastructure and Membrane Traffic During Cell Division in the Marine Pennate Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsuko; De Martino, Alessandra; Amato, Alberto; Montsant, Anton; Mathieu, Benjamin; Rostaing, Philippe; Tirichine, Leila; Bowler, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The marine pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has become a model for diatom biology, due to its ease of culture and accessibility to reverse genetics approaches. While several features underlying the molecular mechanisms of cell division have been described, morphological analyses are less advanced than they are in other diatoms. We therefore examined cell ultrastructure changes prior to and during cytokinesis. Following chloroplast division, cleavage furrows are formed at both longitudinal ends of the cell and are accompanied by significant vesicle transport. Although neither spindle nor microtubules were observed, the nucleus appeared to be split by the furrow after duplication of the Golgi apparatus. Finally, centripetal cytokinesis was completed by fusion of the furrows. Additionally, F-actin formed a ring structure and its diameter became smaller, accompanying the ingrowing furrows. To further analyse vesicular transport during cytokinesis, we generated transgenic cells expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions with putative diatom orthologs of small GTPase Sec4 and t-SNARE protein SyntaxinA. Time-lapse observations revealed that SyntaxinA-YFP localization expands from both cell tips toward the center, whereas Sec4-YFP was found in the Golgi and subsequently relocalizes to the future division plane. This work provides fundamental new information about cell replication processes in P. tricornutum.

  16. Circadian clocks and cell division: What's the pacemaker?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to...

  17. Planar cell polarity signalling controls cell division orientation during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Mo, Chunhui; Fraser, Scott E

    2004-08-05

    Oriented cell division is an integral part of pattern development in processes ranging from asymmetric segregation of cell-fate determinants to the shaping of tissues. Despite proposals that it has an important function in tissue elongation, the mechanisms regulating division orientation have been little studied outside of the invertebrates Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we have analysed mitotic divisions during zebrafish gastrulation using in vivo confocal imaging and found that cells in dorsal tissues preferentially divide along the animal-vegetal axis of the embryo. Establishment of this animal-vegetal polarity requires the Wnt pathway components Silberblick/Wnt11, Dishevelled and Strabismus. Our findings demonstrate an important role for non-canonical Wnt signalling in oriented cell division during zebrafish gastrulation, and indicate that oriented cell division is a driving force for axis elongation. Furthermore, we propose that non-canonical Wnt signalling has a conserved role in vertebrate axis elongation, orienting both cell intercalation and mitotic division.

  18. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Burke

    Full Text Available Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics and inheritance during cell division, development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Prashant; Chan, David C

    2014-10-01

    During cell division, it is critical to properly partition functional sets of organelles to each daughter cell. The partitioning of mitochondria shares some common features with that of other organelles, particularly in the use of interactions with cytoskeletal elements to facilitate delivery to the daughter cells. However, mitochondria have unique features - including their own genome and a maternal mode of germline transmission - that place additional demands on this process. Consequently, mechanisms have evolved to regulate mitochondrial segregation during cell division, oogenesis, fertilization and tissue development, as well as to ensure the integrity of these organelles and their DNA, including fusion-fission dynamics, organelle transport, mitophagy and genetic selection of functional genomes. Defects in these processes can lead to cell and tissue pathologies.

  20. A 250 frames-per-second 640 by 480 pixel division-of-focal-plane polarimeter for the visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Timothy; Marinov, Radoslav; Gruev, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    The most common method of polarimetery involves imaging a scene through a polarization analyzer at multiple configurations. Switching among these configurations requires capturing multiple images of the scene, limiting the ability to capture real-time polarization data due to multiple scene sampling and motion artifacts. Advances in nanofabrication technology have allowed direct integration of polarization analyzers onto the sensor, enabling the capture of multiple analyzer intensities from a single frame. Using this technique, we have fabricated a high frame rate, VGA resolution, division of focal plane polarization imager for the visible spectrum. The imaging sensor is realized by monolithic integration of aluminum nanowires with an array of CCD imaging elements. The pixelated nanowire polarization filters are at four different orientations offset by 45° This allows for recording of the first three Stokes parameters at every super pixel, and subsequently the degree of linear polarization and angle of polarization are computed at 250 frames per second at full VGA resolution and over 1000 when limited to a subsection of the array. The imaging sensor also employs a per pixel calibration scheme which mitigates the variations in the aluminum nanowire sizes. We present an optical characterization of the sensor, and then utilize the increased frame rate to capture high speed polarization images of pieces of polycarbonate plastic placed under stress. The high frame rate allows us to recover strain information that regular rate sensors cannot.

  1. Control of sporulation-specific cell division in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke

    2007-01-01

    During developmental cell division in sporulation-committed aerial hyphae of streptomycetes, up to a hundred septa are simultaneously produced, in close harmony with synchromous chromosome condensation and segregation. Several unique protein families are involved in the control of this process, incl

  2. How to Foster an Understanding of Growth and Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Dirk; Fleige, Jennifer; Riemeier, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the frequencies of students' conceptions of growth and cell division before and after one hour of instruction. The investigation supplements qualitative results by directing attention to those conceptions which might occur most frequently to students: teachers can then concentrate their preparation on practical requirements. A…

  3. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by ou

  4. Oriented cell divisions and cellular morphogenesis in the zebrafish gastrula and neurula: a time-lapse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, M L; Adams, R J

    1998-03-01

    We have taken advantage of the optical transparency of zebrafish embryos to investigate the patterns of cell division, movement and shape during early stages of development of the central nervous system. The surface-most epiblast cells of gastrula and neurula stage embryos were imaged and analysed using a computer-based, time-lapse acquisition system attached to a differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope. We find that the onset of gastrulation is accompanied by major changes in cell behaviour. Cells collect into a cohesive sheet, apparently losing independent motility and integrating their behaviour to move coherently over the yolk in a direction that is the result of two influences: towards the vegetal pole in the movements of epiboly and towards the dorsal midline in convergent movements that strengthen throughout gastrulation. Coincidentally, the plane of cell division becomes aligned to the surface plane of the embryo and oriented in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. These behaviours begin at the blastoderm margin and propagate in a gradient towards the animal pole. Later in gastrulation, cells undergo increasingly mediolateral-directed elongation and autonomous convergence movements towards the dorsal midline leading to an enormous extension of the neural axis. Around the equator and along the dorsal midline of the gastrula, persistent AP orientation of divisions suggests that a common mechanism may be involved but that neither oriented cell movements nor shape can account for this alignment. When the neural plate begins to differentiate, there is a gradual transition in the direction of cell division from AP to the mediolateral circumference (ML). ML divisions occur in both the ventral epidermis and dorsal neural plate. In the neural plate, ML becomes the predominant orientation of division during neural keel and nerve rod stages and, from late neural keel stage, divisions are concentrated at the dorsal midline and generate bilateral progeny

  5. Balanced transcription of cell division genes in Bacillus subtilis as revealed by single cell analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Erik Nico; Veening, Jan-Willem; Stewart, Eric J.; Errington, Jeff; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria is carried out by a set of conserved proteins that all have to function at the correct place and time. A cell cycle-dependent transcriptional programme drives cell division in bacteria such as Caulobacter crescentus. Whether such a programme exists in the Gram-positive mode

  6. [Induced-division of neurons derived from neural stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiu-Xia; Que, Hai-Ping; Lu, Shuang-Hong; Liu, Shao-Jun

    2004-04-25

    In order to explore if mature neurons derived from neural stem cells have the potentiality to divide, we utilized the chemical digestion method to disperse the adult rat brain tissue into single cells, and culture them in serum-free medium. After being cultured for about eight days in vitro, the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons. The neurons were further induced to divide. Utilizing the method of serial photograph and NF-160 immunocytochemistry, the processes of division of some neurons were recorded. At the same time, PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label were used to investigate if the dividing-neurons were mature ones. After the neural stem cells were induced to differentiate in vitro for eight days, they possessed the shape and character of mature neurons. The differentiated neuron had a big nucleus and one or two distinct nucleolus in the nuclear. Within the perikaryon,there were a large amount of dense and Nissl body-like structure. Several long processes emerged from various locations of the cell body. Then, EGF and bFGF were added into the medium to induce division. After two days of induced-division, neuron-like cells were observed to divide; moreover, the number of neuron-like cells in the region increased continually. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated these cells were NF-160-positive. Serial photographs of dividing-process of neuron-like cells were obtained and their daughter cells were also NF-160-positive. After PCNA+NF-160 (or Chat, GABA, GAD) double label, some cells showed brown cell plasma and black nucleus. The above-mentioned results indicate that neurons, which were previously thought to be end-differentiated, can be re-called into cell cycle under appropriate conditions. Mature neurons still have the potential to divide, proliferate and self-renew.

  7. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  8. MinD and MinE interact with anionic phospholipids and regulate division plane formation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lars D; Weibel, Douglas B

    2012-11-09

    The Min proteins (MinC, MinD, and MinE) form a pole-to-pole oscillator that controls the spatial assembly of the division machinery in Escherichia coli cells. Previous studies identified that interactions of MinD with phospholipids positioned the Min machinery at the membrane. We extend these studies by measuring the affinity, kinetics, and ATPase activity of E. coli MinD, MinE, and MinDE binding to supported lipid bilayers containing varying compositions of anionic phospholipids. Using quartz crystal microbalance measurements, we found that the binding affinity (K(d)) for the interaction of recombinant E. coli MinD and MinE with lipid bilayers increased with increasing concentration of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. The K(d) for MinD (1.8 μM) in the presence of ATP was smaller than for MinE (12.1 μM) binding to membranes consisting of 95:5 phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin. The simultaneous binding of MinD and MinE to membranes revealed that increasing the concentration of anionic phospholipid stimulates the initial rate of adsorption (k(on)). The ATPase activity of MinD decreased in the presence of anionic phospholipids. These results indicate that anionic lipids, which are concentrated at the poles, increase the retention of MinD and MinE and explain its dwell time at this region of bacterial cells. These studies provide insight into interactions between MinD and MinE and between these proteins and membranes that are relevant to understanding the process of bacterial cell division, in which the interaction of proteins and membranes is essential.

  9. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  10. DNA replication defects delay cell division and disrupt cell polarity in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, S E; Martin, P R; Phillips, J B; Lyczak, R; Hamill, D R; Swan, K A; Bowerman, B

    2000-12-15

    In early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, asymmetric cell divisions produce descendants with asynchronous cell cycle times. To investigate the relationship between cell cycle regulation and pattern formation, we have identified a collection of embryonic-lethal mutants in which cell divisions are delayed and cell fate patterns are abnormal. In div (for division delayed) mutant embryos, embryonic cell divisions are delayed but remain asynchronous. Some div mutants produce well-differentiated cell types, but they frequently lack the endodermal and mesodermal cell fates normally specified by a transcriptional activator called SKN-1. We show that mislocalization of PIE-1, a negative regulator of SKN-1, prevents the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in div-1 mutant embryos. In addition to defects in the normally asymmetric distribution of PIE-1, div mutants also exhibit other losses of asymmetry during early embryonic cleavages. The daughters of normally asymmetric divisions are nearly equal in size, and cytoplasmic P-granules are not properly localized to germline precursors in div mutant embryos. Thus the proper timing of cell division appears to be important for multiple aspects of asymmetric cell division. One div gene, div-1, encodes the B subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex. Reducing the function of other DNA replication genes also results in a delayed division phenotype and embryonic lethality. Thus the other div genes we have identified are likely to encode additional components of the DNA replication machinery in C. elegans.

  11. Bacterial cell division as a target for new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Peter; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to currently applied antibiotics complicates the treatment of infections and demands the evaluation of new strategies to counteract multidrug-resistant bacteria. In recent years, the inhibition of the bacterial divisome, mainly by targeting the central cell division mediator FtsZ, has been recognized as a promising strategy for antibiotic attack. New antibiotics were shown to either interfere with the natural dynamics and functions of FtsZ during the cell cycle or to activate a bacterial protease to degrade FtsZ and thus bring about bacterial death in a suicidal manner. Their efficacy in animal models of infection together with resistance-breaking properties prove the potential of such drugs and validate the inhibition of bacterial cell division as an attractive approach for antibiotic intervention.

  12. Role of polarized cell divisions in zebrafish neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jon

    2009-04-01

    Development of epithelial cell polarity and morphogenesis of a central lumen are essential prerequisites for the formation of the vertebrate neural tube. In teleost fish embryos this first involves the formation of a solid neural rod structure that then undergoes a process of cavitation to form a lumen. This process is initiated from a neural plate that has a distinct organization compared to other vertebrates, and involves complex cell intercalations and rearrangements. A key element is a mode of polarized cell division that generates daughters with mirror-image apico-basal polarity. These mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence because when they occur in ectopic locations they orchestrate the development of ectopic apical and basal specializations and the development of ectopic neural tubes.

  13. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  14. Polycystic kidney disease: cell division without a c(l)ue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, M; Walz, G

    2006-09-01

    Polycystic kidneys are caused by an amazingly broad array of genetic mutations and manipulations. The ciliary hypothesis has evolved as the unifying concept of cystogenesis: cilia, bend by fluid flow, initiate a calcium influx that prevents cyst formation. The integrity of ciliary functions has been linked to the polycystic kidney disease gene products localizing to the cilium or the basal body/centrosome. Until recently, the signals and cellular programs located downstream of the ciliary-mediated calcium flux have remained elusive. Now, several reports point towards a role of the cilium or the basal body/centrosome complex in planar cell polarity, a pathway that orients cell in the plane of a tissue layer. First, Inversin, a protein mutated in nephronophthisis type II was found to act as a switch between the canonical and the noncanonical Wnt cascade, suggesting that beta-catenin/TCF-dependent gene transcription has to be curtailed to allow normal tubular differentiation. Second, heterozygote deletions of Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins affect neural tube closure and disrupt the cochlear sterociliary bundles, two typical planar cell polarity defects. Third, tubular epithelial cells undergo oriented cell division during tubular elongation, along the axis of the anterior-posterior axis of the nephron. Thus, the cilium or the basal body/centrosome complex may provide the spatial cues to position the centrosome and the mitotic spindle before the next cell division. Failure to communicate this spatial information may condemn the tubular epithelial cells to proliferate and to form cysts.

  15. Using Live-Cell Markers in Maize to Analyze Cell Division Orientation and Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed live-cell markers provide an opportunity to explore the dynamics and localization of proteins in maize, an important crop and model for monocot development. A step-by-step method is outlined for observing and analyzing the process of division in maize cells. The steps include plant growth conditions, sample preparation, time-lapse setup, and calculation of division rates.

  16. A role for katanin in plant cell division: microtubule organization in dividing root cells of fra2 and lue1Arabidopsis thaliana mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Voulgari, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Galini

    2011-07-01

    Severing of microtubules by katanin has proven to be crucial for cortical microtubule organization in elongating and differentiating plant cells. On the contrary, katanin is currently not considered essential during cell division in plants as it is in animals. However, defects in cell patterning have been observed in katanin mutants, implying a role for it in dividing plant cells. Therefore, microtubule organization was studied in detail by immunofluorescence in dividing root cells of fra2 and lue1 katanin mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In both, early preprophase bands consisted of poorly aligned microtubules, prophase spindles were multipolar, and the microtubules of expanding phragmoplasts were elongated, bended toward and connected to the surface of daughter nuclei. Accordingly, severing by katanin seems to be necessary for the proper organization of these microtubule arrays. In both fra2 and lue1, metaphase/anaphase spindles and initiating phragmoplasts exhibited typical organization. However, they were obliquely oriented more frequently than in the wild type. It is proposed that this oblique orientation may be due to prophase spindle multipolarity and results in a failure of the cell plate to follow the predetermined division plane, during cytokinesis, producing oblique cell walls in the roots of both mutants. It is therefore concluded that, like in animal cells, katanin is important for plant cell division, influencing the organization of several microtubule arrays. Moreover, failure in microtubule severing indirectly affects the orientation of the division plane.

  17. Abnormal number cell division of human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell line, SW 1736

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell division, during which a mother cell usually divides into two daughter cells during one cell cycle, is the most important physiological event of cell biology. We observed one-to-four cell division during imaging of live SW1736 human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cells transfected with a plasmid expressing the hybrid protein of green fluorescent protein and histone 2B (plasmid eGFP-H2B. Analysis of the images revealed a mother cell divided into four daughter cells. And one of the abnormally divided daughter cells subsequently formed a dinucleate cell.

  18. Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Li, Lu; Vogelstein, Bert

    2017-03-24

    Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all countries, regardless of their environment. The major role of R mutations in cancer etiology was supported by an independent approach, based solely on cancer genome sequencing and epidemiological data, which suggested that R mutations are responsible for two-thirds of the mutations in human cancers. All of these results are consistent with epidemiological estimates of the fraction of cancers that can be prevented by changes in the environment. Moreover, they accentuate the importance of early detection and intervention to reduce deaths from the many cancers arising from unavoidable R mutations.

  19. Cell division control by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, Maike S. van der; Hengeveld, Rutger C.C.; Horst, Armando van der; Lens, Susanne M.A., E-mail: s.m.a.lens@umcutrecht.nl

    2012-07-15

    The Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) consisting of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin and Borealin, is essential for genomic stability by controlling multiple processes during both nuclear and cytoplasmic division. In mitosis it ensures accurate segregation of the duplicated chromosomes by regulating the mitotic checkpoint, destabilizing incorrectly attached spindle microtubules and by promoting the axial shortening of chromosomal arms in anaphase. During cytokinesis the CPC most likely prevents chromosome damage by imposing an abscission delay when a chromosome bridge connects the two daughter cells. Moreover, by controlling proper cytoplasmic division, the CPC averts tetraploidization. This review describes recent insights on how the CPC is capable of conducting its various functions in the dividing cell to ensure chromosomal stability.

  20. FTSZ AND THE DIVISION OF PROKARYOTIC CELLS AND ORGANELLES

    OpenAIRE

    Margolin, William

    2005-01-01

    Binary fission of many prokaryotes as well as some eukaryotic organelles depends on the FtsZ protein, which self-assembles into a membrane-associated ring structure early in the division process. FtsZ is homologous to tubulin, the building block of the microtubule cytoskeleton in eukaryotes. Recent advances in genomics and cell-imaging techniques have paved the way for the remarkable progress in our understanding of fission in bacteria and organelles.

  1. Sara endosomes and the asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Chrystelle; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    Tissue homeostasis is maintained by adult stem cells, which self-renew and give rise to differentiating cells. The generation of daughter cells with different fates is mediated by signalling molecules coming from an external niche or being asymmetrically dispatched between the two daughters upon stem cell mitosis. In the adult Drosophila midgut, the intestinal stem cell (ISC) divides to generate a new ISC and an enteroblast (EB) differentiating daughter. Notch signalling activity restricted to the EB regulates intestinal cell fate decision. Here, we show that ISCs divide asymmetrically, and Sara endosomes in ISCs are specifically dispatched to the presumptive EB. During ISC mitosis, Notch and Delta traffic through Sara endosomes, thereby contributing to Notch signalling bias, as revealed in Sara mutants: Sara itself contributes to the control of the ISC asymmetric division. Our data uncover an intrinsic endosomal mechanism during ISC mitosis, which participates in the maintenance of the adult intestinal lineage.

  2. Dissection of Cell Division Processes in the One Cell Stage Caenorhabditis elegans Embryo by Mutational Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gönczy, Pierre; Schnabel, Heinke; Kaletta, Titus; Amores, Ana Duran; Hyman, Tony; Schnabel, Ralf

    1999-01-01

    To identify novel components required for cell division processes in complex eukaryotes, we have undertaken an extensive mutational analysis in the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. The large size and optical properties of this cell permit observation of cell division processes with great detail in live specimens by simple differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We have screened an extensive collection of maternal-effect embryonic lethal mutations on chromosome III wi...

  3. A dynamic model of tomato fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanwoua, J.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Heuvelink, E.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a model of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication. The fruit was considered as a population of cells grouped in cell classes differing in their initial cell age and cell mass. The model describes fruit gr

  4. Replicating vesicles as models of primitive cell growth and division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Szostak, Jack W

    2004-12-01

    Primitive cells, lacking the complex bio-machinery present in modern cells, would have had to rely on the self-organizing properties of their components and on interactions with their environment to achieve basic cellular functions such as growth and division. Many bilayer-membrane vesicles, depending on their composition and environment, can exhibit complex morphological changes such as growth, fusion, fission, budding, internal vesicle assembly and vesicle-surface interactions. The rich dynamic properties of these vesicles provide interesting models of how primitive cellular replication might have occurred in response to purely physical and chemical forces.

  5. Oriented cell division: new roles in guiding skin wound repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaowei; Ma, Kui; Geng, Zhijun; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-18

    Tissue morphogenesis depends on precise regulation and timely co-ordination of cell division and also on the control of the direction of cell division. Establishment of polarity division axis, correct alignment of the mitotic spindle, segregation of fate determinants equally or unequally between daughter cells, are essential for the realization of oriented cell division. Furthermore, oriented cell division is regulated by intrinsic cues, extrinsic cues and other cues, such as cell geometry and polarity. However, dysregulation of cell division orientation could lead to abnormal tissue development and function. In the present study, we review recent studies on the molecular mechanism of cell division orientation and explain their new roles in skin repair and regeneration.

  6. Distribution of CD133 reveals glioma stem cells self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathia, J D; Hitomi, M; Gallagher, J; Gadani, S P; Adkins, J; Vasanji, A; Liu, L; Eyler, C E; Heddleston, J M; Wu, Q; Minhas, S; Soeda, A; Hoeppner, D J; Ravin, R; McKay, R D G; McLendon, R E; Corbeil, D; Chenn, A; Hjelmeland, A B; Park, D M; Rich, J N

    2011-09-01

    Malignant gliomas contain a population of self-renewing tumorigenic stem-like cells; however, it remains unclear how these glioma stem cells (GSCs) self-renew or generate cellular diversity at the single-cell level. Asymmetric cell division is a proposed mechanism to maintain cancer stem cells, yet the modes of cell division that GSCs utilize remain undetermined. Here, we used single-cell analyses to evaluate the cell division behavior of GSCs. Lineage-tracing analysis revealed that the majority of GSCs were generated through expansive symmetric cell division and not through asymmetric cell division. The majority of differentiated progeny was generated through symmetric pro-commitment divisions under expansion conditions and in the absence of growth factors, occurred mainly through asymmetric cell divisions. Mitotic pair analysis detected asymmetric CD133 segregation and not any other GSC marker in a fraction of mitoses, some of which were associated with Numb asymmetry. Under growth factor withdrawal conditions, the proportion of asymmetric CD133 divisions increased, congruent with the increase in asymmetric cell divisions observed in the lineage-tracing studies. Using single-cell-based observation, we provide definitive evidence that GSCs are capable of different modes of cell division and that the generation of cellular diversity occurs mainly through symmetric cell division, not through asymmetric cell division.

  7. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  8. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review.

  9. Connecting the dots of the bacterial cell cycle: Coordinating chromosome replication and segregation with cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Isabella V; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Proper division site selection is crucial for the survival of all organisms. What still eludes us is how bacteria position their division site with high precision, and in tight coordination with chromosome replication and segregation. Until recently, the general belief, at least in the model organisms Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was that spatial regulation of division comes about by the combined negative regulatory mechanisms of the Min system and nucleoid occlusion. However, as we review here, these two systems cannot be solely responsible for division site selection and we highlight additional regulatory mechanisms that are at play. In this review, we put forward evidence of how chromosome replication and segregation may have direct links with cell division in these bacteria and the benefit of recent advances in chromosome conformation capture techniques in providing important information about how these three processes mechanistically work together to achieve accurate generation of progenitor cells.

  10. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  11. Dido3 PHD Modulates Cell Differentiation and Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovylyn Gatchalian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Death Inducer Obliterator 3 (Dido3 is implicated in the maintenance of stem cell genomic stability and tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Dido3 regulates the expression of stemness genes in embryonic stem cells through its plant homeodomain (PHD finger. Binding of Dido3 PHD to histone H3K4me3 is disrupted by threonine phosphorylation that triggers Dido3 translocation from chromatin to the mitotic spindle. The crystal structure of Dido3 PHD in complex with H3K4me3 reveals an atypical aromatic-cage-like binding site that contains a histidine residue. Biochemical, structural, and mutational analyses of the binding mechanism identified the determinants of specificity and affinity and explained the inability of homologous PHF3 to bind H3K4me3. Together, our findings reveal a link between the transcriptional control in embryonic development and regulation of cell division.

  12. Cell divisions are not essential for the direct conversion of fibroblasts into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, V S; Shnayder, T A; Orishchenko, K E; Bader, M; Alenina, N; Serov, O L

    2015-01-01

    Direct lineage conversion is a promising approach for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Cell divisions play a key role in reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency, however their role in direct lineage conversion is not clear. Here we used transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into neuronal cells by forced expression of defined transcription factors as a model system to study the role of cellular division in the direct conversion process. We have shown that conversion occurs in the presence of the cell cycle inhibitors aphidicolin or mimosine. Moreover, overexpression of the cell cycle activator cMyc negatively influences the process of direct conversion. Overall, our results suggest that cell divisions are not essential for the direct conversion of fibroblasts into neuronal cells.

  13. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  14. Asymmetric cell division and template DNA co-segregation in cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R Pine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During tissue homeostasis, normal stem cells self-renew and repopulate the diverse cell types found within the tissue via a series of carefully controlled symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. The notion that solid tumors comprise a subset of cancer stem cells with dysregulated self-renewal and excessive symmetric cell divisions has led to numerous studies aimed to elucidate the mechanisms regulating asymmetric cell division under steady-state conditions, during stem cell expansion, and in cancer. In this perspective, we focus on a type of asymmetry that can be established during asymmetric cell division, called non-random co-segregation of template DNA, which has been identified across numerous species, cell types and cancers. We discuss the role of p53 loss in maintaining self-renewal in both normal and malignant cells. We then review our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying co-segregation of template DNA strands and the stem cell pathways associated with it in normal and cancer stem cells.

  15. Tomato fruit growth : integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication by experimentation and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanwoua, J.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: cell division, cell growth, cell endoreduplication, fruit growth, genotype, G×E interaction, model, tomato. Fruit size is a major component of fruit yield and quality of many crops. Variations in fruit size can be tremendous due to genotypic and environmental factors. The mechanisms

  16. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  17. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  18. Dynamics of Tetrahymena macronuclear lamina during cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENBIN; ZHONGHEZHAI

    1994-01-01

    During mitosis,the nuclear lamina in higher eukaryotic cells undergoes a distinctly morphological change.It breaks down into lamin polymers or monomers at prophase.At telophase,the lamins reassemble around the condensed chromatin to form the layer of lamina.Using antiserum to mammalian lamins,we studied the dynamics of lamina during cell division in the macronuleus of Tetrahymena shanghaiensis,which divided in the way of amitosis.In contrast to those in higher animal cells,the typical perinuclear lamin distribution in the macronucleus persisted throughout the whole cell cycle.It was further found that in some synchronized cells,the lamin distribution bisplayed an unusual pattern consisting of a series of spots within the macronucleus.Using South-western hybridization,we found that the purified 66 KD lamin in Tetrahymena showed specific affinity with the telomere DNA sequence in the same species.Therefore,we propose that pattern of immunofluorescence may be due to the interaction of lamin protein with the nucleoli and the condensed chromatins in the macronucleus.

  19. Synchronization of Green Algae by Light and Dark Regimes for Cell Cycle and Cell Division Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavová, Monika; Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    A synchronous population of cells is one of the prerequisites for studying cell cycle processes such as DNA replication, nuclear and cellular division. Green algae dividing by multiple fission represent a unique single cell system enabling the preparation of highly synchronous cultures by application of a light-dark regime similar to what they experience in nature. This chapter provides detailed protocols for synchronization of different algal species by alternating light-dark cycles; all critical points are discussed extensively. Moreover, detailed information on basic analysis of cell cycle progression in such cultures is presented, including analyses of nuclear, cellular, and chloroplast divisions. Modifications of basic protocols that enable changes in cell cycle progression are also suggested so that nuclear or chloroplast divisions can be followed separately.

  20. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. (Univ. of Birmingham (England))

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  1. Factors affecting daughter cells' arrangement during the early bacterial divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Tzu Su

    Full Text Available On agar plates, daughter cells of Escherichia coli mutually slide and align side-by-side in parallel during the first round of binary fission. This phenomenon has been previously attributed to an elastic material that restricts apparently separated bacteria from being in string. We hypothesize that the interaction between bacteria and the underneath substratum may affect the arrangement of the daughter bacteria. To test this hypothesis, bacterial division on hyaluronic acid (HA gel, as an alternative substratum, was examined. Consistent with our proposition, the HA gel differs from agar by suppressing the typical side-by-side alignments to a rare population. Examination of bacterial surface molecules that may contribute to the daughter cells' arrangement yielded an observation that, with disrupted lpp, the E. coli daughter cells increasingly formed non-typical patterns, i.e. neither sliding side-by-side in parallel nor forming elongated strings. Therefore, our results suggest strongly that the early cell patterning is affected by multiple interaction factors. With oscillatory optical tweezers, we further demonstrated that the interaction force decreased in bacteria without Lpp, a result substantiating our notion that the side-by-side sliding phenomenon directly reflects the strength of in-situ interaction between bacteria and substratum.

  2. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  3. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Modell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  4. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage.

  5. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  6. Arabidopsis TCP20 links regulation of growth and cell division control pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    During postembryonic plant development, cell division is coupled to cell growth. There is a stringent requirement to couple these processes in shoot and root meristems. As cells pass through meristems, they transit through zones with high rates of cell growth and proliferation during organogenesis. This transition implies a need for coordinate regulation of genes underpinning these two fundamental cell functions. Here, we report a mechanism for coregulation of cell division control genes and ...

  7. Dissection of Cell Division Processes in the One Cell Stage Caenorhabditis elegans Embryo by Mutational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönczy, Pierre; Schnabel, Heinke; Kaletta, Titus; Amores, Ana Duran; Hyman, Tony; Schnabel, Ralf

    1999-01-01

    To identify novel components required for cell division processes in complex eukaryotes, we have undertaken an extensive mutational analysis in the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. The large size and optical properties of this cell permit observation of cell division processes with great detail in live specimens by simple differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We have screened an extensive collection of maternal-effect embryonic lethal mutations on chromosome III with time-lapse DIC video microscopy. Using this assay, we have identified 48 mutations in 34 loci which are required for specific cell division processes in the one cell stage embryo. We show that mutations fall into distinct phenotypic classes which correspond, among others, to the processes of pronuclear migration, rotation of centrosomes and associated pronuclei, spindle assembly, chromosome segregation, anaphase spindle positioning, and cytokinesis. We have further analyzed pronuclear migration mutants by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies against tubulin and ZYG-9, a centrosomal marker. This analysis revealed that two pronuclear migration loci are required for generating normal microtubule arrays and four for centrosome separation. All 34 loci have been mapped by deficiencies to distinct regions of chromosome III, thus paving the way for their rapid molecular characterization. Our work contributes to establishing the one cell stage C. elegans embryo as a powerful metazoan model system for dissecting cell division processes. PMID:10085292

  8. Uncovering the link between malfunctions in Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric cell division and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsom Corey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asymmetric cell division is a developmental process utilized by several organisms. On the most basic level, an asymmetric division produces two daughter cells, each possessing a different identity or fate. Drosophila melanogaster progenitor cells, referred to as neuroblasts, undergo asymmetric division to produce a daughter neuroblast and another cell known as a ganglion mother cell (GMC. There are several features of asymmetric division in Drosophila that make it a very complex process, and these aspects will be discussed at length. The cell fate determinants that play a role in specifying daughter cell fate, as well as the mechanisms behind setting up cortical polarity within neuroblasts, have proved to be essential to ensuring that neurogenesis occurs properly. The role that mitotic spindle orientation plays in coordinating asymmetric division, as well as how cell cycle regulators influence asymmetric division machinery, will also be addressed. Most significantly, malfunctions during asymmetric cell division have shown to be causally linked with neoplastic growth and tumor formation. Therefore, it is imperative that the developmental repercussions as a result of asymmetric cell division gone awry be understood.

  9. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  10. Splitting the cell, building the organism: Mechanisms of cell division in metazoan embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Megha; Pushpa, Kumari; Mylavarapu, Sivaram V S

    2015-07-01

    The unicellular metazoan zygote undergoes a series of cell divisions that are central to its development into an embryo. Differentiation of embryonic cells leads eventually to the development of a functional adult. Fate specification of pluripotent embryonic cells occurs during the early embryonic cleavage divisions in several animals. Early development is characterized by well-known stages of embryogenesis documented across animals--morulation, blastulation, and morphogenetic processes such as gastrulation, all of which contribute to differentiation and tissue specification. Despite this broad conservation, there exist clearly discernible morphological and functional differences across early embryonic stages in metazoans. Variations in the mitotic mechanisms of early embryonic cell divisions play key roles in governing these gross differences that eventually encode developmental patterns. In this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms of both karyokinesis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic separation) during early embryonic divisions. We outline the broadly conserved molecular pathways that operate in these two stages in early embryonic mitoses. In addition, we highlight mechanistic variations in these two stages across different organisms. We finally discuss outstanding questions of interest, answers to which would illuminate the role of divergent mitotic mechanisms in shaping early animal embryogenesis.

  11. Cell division in Escherichia coli cultures monitored at single cell resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luidalepp Hannes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental characteristic of cells is the ability to divide. To date, most parameters of bacterial cultures, including cell division, have been measured as cell population averages, assuming that all bacteria divide at a uniform rate. Results We monitored the division of individual cells in Escherichia coli cultures during different growth phases. Our experiments are based on the dilution of green fluorescent protein (GFP upon cell division, monitored by flow cytometry. The results show that the vast majority of E. coli cells in exponentially growing cultures divided uniformly. In cultures that had been in stationary phase up to four days, no cell division was observed. However, upon dilution of stationary phase culture into fresh medium, two subpopulations of cells emerged: one that started dividing and another that did not. These populations were detectable by GFP dilution and displayed different side scatter parameters in flow cytometry. Further analysis showed that bacteria in the non-growing subpopulation were not dead, neither was the difference in growth capacity reducible to differences in stationary phase-specific gene expression since we observed uniform expression of several stress-related promoters. The presence of non-growing persisters, temporarily dormant bacteria that are tolerant to antibiotics, has previously been described within growing bacterial populations. Using the GFP dilution method combined with cell sorting, we showed that ampicillin lyses growing bacteria while non-growing bacteria retain viability and that some of them restart growth after the ampicillin is removed. Thus, our method enables persisters to be monitored even in liquid cultures of wild type strains in which persister formation has low frequency. Conclusion In principle, the approaches developed here could be used to detect differences in cell division in response to different environmental conditions and in cultures of unicellular

  12. Probabilistic model of microbial cell growth, division, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Joseph; Normand, Mark D; Corradini, Maria G; Peleg, Micha

    2010-01-01

    After a short time interval of length deltat during microbial growth, an individual cell can be found to be divided with probability Pd(t)deltat, dead with probability Pm(t)deltat, or alive but undivided with the probability 1-[Pd(t)+Pm(t)]deltat, where t is time, Pd(t) expresses the probability of division for an individual cell per unit of time, and Pm(t) expresses the probability of mortality per unit of time. These probabilities may change with the state of the population and the habitat's properties and are therefore functions of time. This scenario translates into a model that is presented in stochastic and deterministic versions. The first, a stochastic process model, monitors the fates of individual cells and determines cell numbers. It is particularly suitable for small populations such as those that may exist in the case of casual contamination of a food by a pathogen. The second, which can be regarded as a large-population limit of the stochastic model, is a continuous mathematical expression that describes the population's size as a function of time. It is suitable for large microbial populations such as those present in unprocessed foods. Exponential or logistic growth with or without lag, inactivation with or without a "shoulder," and transitions between growth and inactivation are all manifestations of the underlying probability structure of the model. With temperature-dependent parameters, the model can be used to simulate nonisothermal growth and inactivation patterns. The same concept applies to other factors that promote or inhibit microorganisms, such as pH and the presence of antimicrobials, etc. With Pd(t) and Pm(t) in the form of logistic functions, the model can simulate all commonly observed growth/mortality patterns. Estimates of the changing probability parameters can be obtained with both the stochastic and deterministic versions of the model, as demonstrated with simulated data.

  13. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Benjamin G; Scharer, Christopher D; Bally, Alexander P R; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-10-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody-secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell-division-dependent manner. Analysis of B cells differentiating in vivo stratified by cell division revealed a fivefold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs for the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for the transcription factors IRF and Oct-2 and was coincident with activation and differentiation gene-expression programs in a cell-division-dependent manner. These data provide mechanistic insight into cell-division-coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest that DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation.

  14. Division of focal plane polarimeter-based 3 × 4 Mueller matrix microscope: a potential tool for quick diagnosis of human carcinoma tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jintao; He, Honghui; Wang, Ye; Huang, Yi; Li, Xianpeng; He, Chao; Liao, Ran; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Ma, Hui

    2016-05-01

    A polarization microscope is a useful tool to reveal the optical anisotropic nature of a specimen and can provide abundant microstructural information about samples. We present a division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeter-based polarization microscope capable of simultaneously measuring both the Stokes vector and the 3×4 Mueller matrix with an optimal polarization illumination scheme. The Mueller matrix images of unstained human carcinoma tissue slices show that the m24 and m34 elements can provide important information for pathological observations. The characteristic features of the m24 and m34 elements can be enhanced by polarization staining under illumination by a circularly polarized light. Hence, combined with a graphics processing unit acceleration algorithm, the DoFP polarization microscope is capable of real-time polarization imaging for potential quick clinical diagnoses of both standard and frozen slices of human carcinoma tissues.

  15. Droplet size influences division of mammalian cell factories in droplet microfluidic cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periyannan Rajeswari, Prem Kumar; Joensson, Haakan N.; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using droplet microfluidics for screening mammalian cell factories has been limited by the difficulty in achieving continuous cell division during cultivation in droplets. Here, we report the influence of droplet size on mammalian cell division and viability during cultivation......, making them a more suitable droplet size for 72-h cultivation. This study shows a direct correlation of microfluidic droplet size to the division and viability of mammalian cells. This highlights the importance of selecting suitable droplet size for mammalian cell factory screening assays....... in droplets. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, the most widely used mammalian host cells for biopharmaceuticals production were encapsulated and cultivated in 33, 180 and 320 pL droplets for 3 days. Periodic monitoring of the droplets during incubation showed that the cell divisions in 33 pL droplets stopped...

  16. MioC and GidA proteins promote cell division in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eLies

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The well-conserved genes surrounding the E. coli replication origin, mioC and gidA, do not affect chromosome replication and have little known function. We report that mioC and gidA mutants exhibit a mild cell division inhibition phenotype, which is exacerbated by a fis deletion. Measurements replication initiation frequency, replication elongation, and chromosome segregation indicate that cell division inhibition does not involve any effects of these genes on oriC function. Division inhibition is independent of the major cell division control systems including the SOS response and nucleoid occlusion. Complementation analysis indicates that mioC and gidA affect cell division in trans, and transcriptome analysis by next-generation RNA sequencing showed that expression of a cell division septum component, YmgF, is strongly affected in both mioC and gidA mutants. Our results suggest that MioC and GidA proteins are involved in a cell division regulatory pathway, which may link DNA replication and division.

  17. Three Dimensional Simulation Method in Early Process of Division and Growth for Tumour Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-qiu; ZHAO Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    The process of division, growth and death for tumour cell mass in the early is simulated. An integrated GUI is provided for users to set the value of each parameters, which are cell growth rates, cell mass division rates, cell mass death rates, simulate type, maximum running time, polarity and cell colour. It can display the growth process of each cell on result GUI. Also, it can display the values of each parameters for observing and analysing in current life cycle on result GUI, which are cell mass division times, cell mass death rate, cell mass division rate and cell mass growth rate. In the process of simulation, The cell growth rate is described by the approach to combine the exponential model with the linear model. In addition, a linked list data structure to store the tumour cells is used by the cellular automata for a reference to determine the position of each cell. It sets up two linked list to store the cells, one of them save the new small division cells and the other one save the big cell. That can make the painting process of cells on result GUI clearer and more organized. At last, the polarity of tumour growth is described for determining the growth direction of cells.

  18. Positive control of cell division: FtsZ is recruited by SsgB during sporulation of Streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.; Borst, J.W.; Waal, de E.; Bisseling, T.; Wezel, van G.P.

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria that divide by binary fission, cell division starts with the polymerization of the tubulin homolog FtsZ at mid-cell to form a cell division scaffold (the Z ring), followed by recruitment of the other divisome components. The current view of bacterial cell division control starts from the

  19. Optimal architecture of differentiation cascades with asymmetric and symmetric stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel

    2016-10-21

    The role of symmetric division in stem cell biology is ambiguous. It is necessary after injuries, but if symmetric divisions occur too often, the appearance of tumours is more likely. To explore the role of symmetric and asymmetric division in cell populations, we propose a mathematical model of competition of populations, in which the stem cell expansion is controlled by fully differentiated cells. We show that there is an optimal fraction of symmetric stem cell division, which maximises the long-term survival probability of the organism. Moreover, we show the optimal number of stem cells in a tissue, and we show that number has to be small enough to reduce the probability of the appearance of advantageous malignant cells, and large enough to assure that the population will not be suppressed by stochastic fluctuations.

  20. A theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Mohr, Elodie; Pelletier, Nadége; Zhang, Yang; Victora, Gabriel D; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2012-07-26

    High-affinity antibodies are generated in germinal centers in a process involving mutation and selection of B cells. Information processing in germinal center reactions has been investigated in a number of recent experiments. These have revealed cell migration patterns, asymmetric cell divisions, and cell-cell interaction characteristics, used here to develop a theory of germinal center B cell selection, division, and exit (the LEDA model). According to this model, B cells selected by T follicular helper cells on the basis of successful antigen processing always return to the dark zone for asymmetric division, and acquired antigen is inherited by one daughter cell only. Antigen-retaining B cells differentiate to plasma cells and leave the germinal center through the dark zone. This theory has implications for the functioning of germinal centers because compared to previous models, high-affinity antibodies appear one day earlier and the amount of derived plasma cells is considerably larger.

  1. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  2. Planar cell polarity signalling couples cell division and morphogenesis during neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruna, Brian; Jenny, Andreas; Lee, Diana; Mlodzik, Marek; Schier, Alexander F

    2006-01-12

    Environmental and genetic aberrations lead to neural tube closure defects (NTDs) in 1 out of every 1,000 births. Mouse and frog models for these birth defects have indicated that Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2, also known as Strabismus) and other components of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling might control neurulation by promoting the convergence of neural progenitors to the midline. Here we show a novel role for PCP signalling during neurulation in zebrafish. We demonstrate that non-canonical Wnt/PCP signalling polarizes neural progenitors along the anteroposterior axis. This polarity is transiently lost during cell division in the neural keel but is re-established as daughter cells reintegrate into the neuroepithelium. Loss of zebrafish Vangl2 (in trilobite mutants) abolishes the polarization of neural keel cells, disrupts re-intercalation of daughter cells into the neuroepithelium, and results in ectopic neural progenitor accumulations and NTDs. Remarkably, blocking cell division leads to rescue of trilobite neural tube morphogenesis despite persistent defects in convergence and extension. These results reveal a function for PCP signalling in coupling cell division and morphogenesis at neurulation and indicate a previously unrecognized mechanism that might underlie NTDs.

  3. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity and effects of selection on cell division symmetry in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttara N Lele

    Full Text Available Aging has been demonstrated in unicellular organisms and is presumably due to asymmetric distribution of damaged proteins and other components during cell division. Whether the asymmetry-induced aging is inevitable or an adaptive and adaptable response is debated. Although asymmetric division leads to aging and death of some cells, it increases the effective growth rate of the population as shown by theoretical and empirical studies. Mathematical models predict on the other hand, that if the cells divide symmetrically, cellular aging may be delayed or absent, growth rate will be reduced but growth yield will increase at optimum repair rates. Therefore in nutritionally dilute (oligotrophic environments, where growth yield may be more critical for survival, symmetric division may get selected. These predictions have not been empirically tested so far. We report here that Escherichia coli grown in oligotrophic environments had greater morphological and functional symmetry in cell division. Both phenotypic plasticity and genetic selection appeared to shape cell division time asymmetry but plasticity was lost on prolonged selection. Lineages selected on high nutrient concentration showed greater frequency of presumably old or dead cells. Further, there was a negative correlation between cell division time asymmetry and growth yield but there was no significant correlation between asymmetry and growth rate. The results suggest that cellular aging driven by asymmetric division may not be hardwired but shows substantial plasticity as well as evolvability in response to the nutritional environment.

  5. CyDiv, a conserved and novel filamentous Cyanobacteria cell division protein involved in septum localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka eMandakovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division, encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  6. CyDiv, a Conserved and Novel Filamentous Cyanobacterial Cell Division Protein Involved in Septum Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandakovic, Dinka; Trigo, Carla; Andrade, Derly; Riquelme, Brenda; Gómez-Lillo, Gabriela; Soto-Liebe, Katia; Díez, Beatriz; Vásquez, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Cell division in bacteria has been studied mostly in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, model organisms for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. However, cell division in filamentous cyanobacteria is poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel protein, named CyDiv (Cyanobacterial Division), encoded by the all2320 gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that CyDiv plays a key role during cell division. CyDiv has been previously described only as an exclusive and conserved hypothetical protein in filamentous cyanobacteria. Using polyclonal antibodies against CyDiv, we showed that it localizes at different positions depending on cell division timing: poles, septum, in both daughter cells, but also in only one of the daughter cells. The partial deletion of CyDiv gene generates partial defects in cell division, including severe membrane instability and anomalous septum localization during late division. The inability to complete knock out CyDiv strains suggests that it is an essential gene. In silico structural protein analyses and our experimental results suggest that CyDiv is an FtsB/DivIC-like protein, and could therefore, be part of an essential late divisome complex in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:26903973

  7. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  8. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona Donovan

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  9. The essential cell division protein FtsN interacts with the murein (peptidoglycan) synthase PBP1B in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Patrick; Ewers, C.; Bertsche, U.; Anstett, M.; Kallis, T.; Breukink, E.J.; Fraipont, Claudine; Terrak, Mohammed; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Vollmer, W.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial cell division requires the coordinated action of cell division proteins and murein (peptidoglycan) synthases. Interactions involving the essential cell division protein FtsN and murein synthases were studied by affinity chromatography with membrane fraction. The murein synthases PBP1A, PBP

  10. YgbQ, a cell division protein in Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae, localizes in codependent fashion with FtsL to the division site

    OpenAIRE

    Buddelmeijer, Nienke; Judson, Nicholas; Boyd, Dana; Mekalanos, John J.; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    YgbQ is a cell division protein in Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae. In E. coli the ygbQ gene was discovered as a result of a computer search of the E. coli genome designed to find potential interacting partners for cell division protein FtsL. In V. cholerae, ygbQ was identified as an essential gene by using a transposon that fuses genes to an arabinose promoter. The role of YgbQ in cell division is supported by the following. Cells depleted of YgbQ in both organisms form long filaments, ...

  11. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  12. Planar cell polarity aligns osteoblast division in response to substrate strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Gabriel L; Meakin, Lee B; Savery, Dawn; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Delisser, Peter; Stein, Gary S; Copp, Andrew J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2015-03-01

    Exposure of bone to dynamic strain increases the rate of division of osteoblasts and also influences the directional organization of the cellular and molecular structure of the bone tissue that they produce. Here, we report that brief exposure to dynamic substrate strain (sufficient to rapidly stimulate cell division) influences the orientation of osteoblastic cell division. The initial proliferative response to strain involves canonical Wnt signaling and can be blocked by sclerostin. However, the strain-related orientation of cell division is independently influenced through the noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Blockade of Rho-associated coiled kinase (ROCK), a component of the PCP pathway, prevents strain-related orientation of division in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Heterozygous loop-tail mutation of the core PCP component van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) in mouse osteoblasts impairs the orientation of division in response to strain. Examination of bones from Vangl2 loop-tail heterozygous mice by µCT and scanning electron microscopy reveals altered bone architecture and disorganized bone-forming surfaces. Hence, in addition to the well-accepted role of PCP involvement in response to developmental cues during skeletal morphogenesis, our data reveal that this pathway also acts postnatally, in parallel with canonical Wnt signaling, to transduce biomechanical cues into skeletal adaptive responses. The simultaneous and independent actions of these two pathways appear to influence both the rate and orientation of osteoblast division, thus fine-tuning bone architecture to meet the structural demands of functional loading.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis CwsA overproduction modulates cell division and cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocinski, P; Martinez, L; Sarva, K; Plocinska, R; Madiraju, M; Rajagopalan, M

    2013-12-01

    We recently showed that two small membrane proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, CwsA and CrgA, interact with each other, and that loss of CwsA in M. smegmatis is associated with defects in the cell division and cell wall synthesis processes. Here we show that CwsA overproduction also affected growth, cell division and cell shape of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. CwsA overproduction in M. tuberculosis led to increased sensitivity to cefsulodin, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A/1B targeting beta (β) -lactam, but was unaffected by other β-lactams and vancomycin. A M. smegmatis cwsA overexpressing strain showed bulgy cells, increased fluorescent vancomycin staining and altered localization of Wag31-mCherry fusion protein. However, the levels of phosphorylated Wag31, important for optimal peptidoglycan synthesis and growth in mycobacteria, were not affected. Interestingly, CwsA overproduction in E. coli led to the formation of large rounded cells that eventually lysed whereas the overproduction of FtsZ along with CwsA reversed this phenotype. Together, our results emphasize that optimal levels of CwsA are required for regulated cell wall synthesis, hence maintenance of cell shape, and that CwsA likely interacts with and modulates the activities of other cell wall synthetic components including PBPs.

  14. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration.

  15. Zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis requires Scribble-dependent oriented cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Trinh, Le A; Fraser, Scott E; Moens, Cecilia B

    2011-01-11

    How control of subcellular events in single cells determines morphogenesis on the scale of the tissue is largely unresolved. The stereotyped cross-midline mitoses of progenitors in the zebrafish neural keel provide a unique experimental paradigm for defining the role and control of single-cell orientation for tissue-level morphogenesis in vivo. We show here that the coordinated orientation of individual progenitor cell division in the neural keel is the cellular determinant required for morphogenesis into a neural tube epithelium with a single straight lumen. We find that Scribble is required for oriented cell division and that its function in this process is independent of canonical apicobasal and planar polarity pathways. We identify a role for Scribble in controlling clustering of α-catenin foci in dividing progenitors. Loss of either Scrib or N-cadherin results in abnormally oriented mitoses, reduced cross-midline cell divisions, and similar neural tube defects. We propose that Scribble-dependent nascent cell-cell adhesion clusters between neuroepithelial progenitors contribute to define orientation of their cell division. Finally, our data demonstrate that while oriented mitoses of individual cells determine neural tube architecture, the tissue can in turn feed back on its constituent cells to define their polarization and cell division orientation to ensure robust tissue morphogenesis.

  16. ESCRT-III mediated cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius - a reconstitution perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtel, Tobias; Schwille, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of synthetic biology, it has become an intriguing question what would be the minimal representation of cell division machinery. Thus, it seems appropriate to compare how cell division is realized in different microorganisms. In particular, the cell division system of Crenarchaeota lacks certain proteins found in most bacteria and Euryarchaeota, such as FtsZ, MreB or the Min system. The Sulfolobaceae family encodes functional homologs of the eukaryotic proteins vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4) and endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III). ESCRT-III is essential for several eukaryotic pathways, e.g., budding of intraluminal vesicles, or cytokinesis, whereas Vps4 dissociates the ESCRT-III complex from the membrane. Cell Division A (CdvA) is required for the recruitment of crenarchaeal ESCRT-III proteins to the membrane at mid-cell. The proteins polymerize and form a smaller structure during constriction. Thus, ESCRT-III mediated cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius shows functional analogies to the Z ring observed in prokaryotes like Escherichia coli, which has recently begun to be reconstituted in vitro. In this short perspective, we discuss the possibility of building such an in vitro cell division system on basis of archaeal ESCRT-III.

  17. ESCRT-III mediated cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius –A reconstitution perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eHärtel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Synthetic Biology, it has become an intriguing question what would be the minimal representation of cell division machinery. Thus, it seems appropriate to compare how cell division is realized in different microorganisms. In particular, the cell division system of Crenarchaeota lacks certain proteins found in most bacteria and Euryarchaeota, such as FtsZ, MreB or the Min system. The Sulfolobaceae family encodes functional homologs of the eukaryotic proteins Vps4 and ESCRT-III. ESCRT-III is essential for several eukaryotic pathways, e.g. budding of intralumenal vesicles (ILVs, or cytokinesis, whereas Vps4 dissociates the ESCRT-III complex from the membrane. CdvA (Cell Division A is required for the recruitment of crenarchaeal ESCRT-III proteins to the membrane at mid-cell. The proteins polymerize and form a smaller structure during constriction. Thus, ESCRT-III mediated cell division in S. acidocaldarius shows functional analogies to the Z ring observed in prokaryotes like E. coli, which has recently begun to be reconstituted in vitro. In this short perspective, we discuss the possibility of building such an in vitro cell division system on basis of archaeal ESCRT-III.

  18. Fibroblasts Cultured on Nanowires Exhibit Low Motility, Impaired Cell Division, and DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H.; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    Mouse fibroblasts cultured on 7-μm-long vertical nanowires are reported on page 4006 by C. N. Prinz and co-workers. Culturing cells on this kind of substrate interferes greatly with cell function, causing the cells to develop into widely different morphologies. The cells' division is impaired...

  19. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  20. Tension-oriented cell divisions limit anisotropic tissue tension in epithelial spreading during zebrafish epiboly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campinho, Pedro; Behrndt, Martin; Ranft, Jonas; Risler, Thomas; Minc, Nicolas; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial spreading is a common and fundamental aspect of various developmental and disease-related processes such as epithelial closure and wound healing. A key challenge for epithelial tissues undergoing spreading is to increase their surface area without disrupting epithelial integrity. Here we show that orienting cell divisions by tension constitutes an efficient mechanism by which the enveloping cell layer (EVL) releases anisotropic tension while undergoing spreading during zebrafish epiboly. The control of EVL cell-division orientation by tension involves cell elongation and requires myosin II activity to align the mitotic spindle with the main tension axis. We also found that in the absence of tension-oriented cell divisions and in the presence of increased tissue tension, EVL cells undergo ectopic fusions, suggesting that the reduction of tension anisotropy by oriented cell divisions is required to prevent EVL cells from fusing. We conclude that cell-division orientation by tension constitutes a key mechanism for limiting tension anisotropy and thus promoting tissue spreading during EVL epiboly.

  1. Control of cell division and the spatial localization of assembled gene products in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments are described that examine the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the regulation of cell division in Caulobacter crescentus; and the spatial localization of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) in C. crescentus swarmer and predivisional cells. In the analysis of PBP function, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus PBPs with (/sup 3/H) penicillin G in wild type strain CB15, in a series of conditional cell division mutants and in new temperature sensitive cephalosporin C resistant mutants PC8002 and PC8003. 14 PBPs are characterized and a high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1B) that is required for cell division is identified. PBP 1B competes for ..beta..-lactams that induce filament formation and may be a high affinity binding protein. A second high molecular weight PBP (PBP 1C) is also associated with defective cell division. The examination of PBP patterns in synchronous swarmer cells reveals that the in vivo activity of PBP 1B and PBP 1C increases at the time that the cell division pathway is initiated. None of the PBPs, however, appear to be differentially localized in the C. crescentus cell. In the analysis of MCP localization, in vivo and in vitro assays are used to directly label C. crescentus MCPs with methyl-/sup 3/H. MCPs are examined in flagellated and non-flagellated vesicles prepared from cells by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  2. Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ganhui; Daniels, Brian R; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X

    2009-01-06

    Forces are important in biological systems for accomplishing key cell functions, such as motility, organelle transport, and cell division. Currently, known force generation mechanisms typically involve motor proteins. In bacterial cells, no known motor proteins are involved in cell division. Instead, a division ring (Z-ring) consists of mostly FtsZ, FtsA, and ZipA is used to exerting a contractile force. The mechanism of force generation in bacterial cell division is unknown. Using computational modeling, we show that Z-ring formation results from the colocalization of FtsZ and FtsA mediated by the favorable alignment of FtsZ polymers. The model predicts that the Z-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low-density state to a high-density state and generates a sufficient contractile force to achieve division. FtsZ GTP hydrolysis facilitates monomer turnover during the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that FtsZ density increases during division, in accord with model results. The mechanism is akin to van der Waals picture of gas-liquid condensation, and shows that organisms can exploit microphase transitions to generate mechanical forces.

  3. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle W Clark

    Full Text Available Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH, no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5 the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2-7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress.

  4. Investigation of roles for LRR-RLKs PNL1 and PNL2 in asymmetric cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Maiti Celina

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a vital component of plant development. It enables cell differentiation and cell diversity. A key component of asymmetric cell division is cell signaling. Signals are believed to control polarization and orientation of asymmetric divisions during stomatal development. The findings of this report suggest that PNL1 and PNL2, two LRR-RLKs found in Arabidopsis and closely related to maize PAN1 LRR-RLK, are possibly involved in the signaling events occurring during the ...

  5. Colocalization and interaction between elongasome and divisome during a preparative cell division phase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, René; Verheul, Jolanda; Vischer, Norbert O E; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Banzhaf, Manuel; Vollmer, Waldemar; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2013-03-01

    The rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli grows by insertion of peptidoglycan into the lateral wall during cell elongation and synthesis of new poles during cell division. The monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3 are part of specialized protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively, which catalyse peptidoglycan extension and maturation. Endogenous immunolabelled PBP2 localized in the cylindrical part of the cell as well as transiently at midcell. Using the novel image analysis tool Coli-Inspector to analyse protein localization as function of the bacterial cell age, we compared PBP2 localization with that of other E. coli cell elongation and division proteins including PBP3. Interestingly, the midcell localization of the two transpeptidases overlaps in time during the early period of divisome maturation. Försters Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) experiments revealed an interaction between PBP2 and PBP3 when both are present at midcell. A decrease in the midcell diameter is visible after 40% of the division cycle indicating that the onset of new cell pole synthesis starts much earlier than previously identified by visual inspection. The data support a new model of the division cycle in which the elongasome and divisome interact to prepare for cell division.

  6. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles" of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  7. Electrical signals polarize neuronal organelles, direct neuron migration, and orient cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; McCaig, Colin D; Zhao, Min

    2009-09-01

    During early brain development, the axis of division of neuronal precursor cells is regulated tightly and can determine whether neurons remain in the germinal layers or migrate away. Directed neuronal migration depends on the establishment of cell polarity, and cells are polarized dynamically in response to extracellular signals. Endogenous electric fields (EFs) orient cell division and direct migration of a variety of cell types. Here, we show that cell division of cultured hippocampal cells (neuron-like cells and glial-like cells) is oriented strikingly by an applied EF, which also directs neuronal migration. Directed migration involves polarization of the leading neurite, of the microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 and of the Golgi apparatus and the centrosome, all of which reposition asymmetrically to face the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinases (ROCK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase decreased, leading neurite orientation and Golgi polarization in the neurons in response to an EF and in parallel decreased the directedness of EF-guided neuronal migration. This work demonstrates that the axis of hippocampal cell division, the establishment of neuronal polarity, the polarization of intracellular structures, and the direction of neuronal migration are all regulated by an extracellular electrical cue.

  8. MIRO1 influences the morphology and intracellular distribution of mitochondria during embryonic cell division in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Shohei; Nakajima, Masaki; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Regulating the morphology and intracellular distribution of mitochondria is essential for embryo development in animals. However, the importance of such regulation is not clearly defined in plants. The evolutionarily conserved Miro proteins are known to be involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology and motility. We previously demonstrated that MIRO1, an Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of the Miro protein, is required for embryogenesis. An insertional mutation in the MIRO1 gene causes arrest of embryonic cell division, leading to abortion of the embryo at an early stage. Here we investigated the role of MIRO1 in the regulation of mitochondrial behaviour in egg cells and early-stage embryos using GFP-labeled mitochondria. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy revealed that, in miro1 mutant egg cells, mitochondria are abnormally enlarged, although egg cell formation is nearly unaffected. After fertilization and subsequent zygotic cell division, the homozygous miro1 mutant two-celled embryo contained a significantly reduced number of mitochondria in its apical cell compared with the wild type, suggesting that the miro1 mutation inhibits proper intracellular distribution of mitochondria, leading to an arrest of embryonic cell division. Our findings suggest that proper mitochondrial morphology and intracellular distribution are maintained by MIRO1 and are vital for embryonic cell division.

  9. Spire, an actin nucleation factor, regulates cell division during Drosophila heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    Full Text Available The Drosophila dorsal vessel is a beneficial model system for studying the regulation of early heart development. Spire (Spir, an actin-nucleation factor, regulates actin dynamics in many developmental processes, such as cell shape determination, intracellular transport, and locomotion. Through protein expression pattern analysis, we demonstrate that the absence of spir function affects cell division in Myocyte enhancer factor 2-, Tinman (Tin-, Even-skipped- and Seven up (Svp-positive heart cells. In addition, genetic interaction analysis shows that spir functionally interacts with Dorsocross, tin, and pannier to properly specify the cardiac fate. Furthermore, through visualization of double heterozygous embryos, we determines that spir cooperates with CycA for heart cell specification and division. Finally, when comparing the spir mutant phenotype with that of a CycA mutant, the results suggest that most Svp-positive progenitors in spir mutant embryos cannot undergo full cell division at cell cycle 15, and that Tin-positive progenitors are arrested at cell cycle 16 as double-nucleated cells. We conclude that Spir plays a crucial role in controlling dorsal vessel formation and has a function in cell division during heart tube morphogenesis.

  10. Cell wall growth during elongation and division : one ring to bind them?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cell division protein FtsZ in bacterial cell wall (CW) synthesis is believed to be restricted to localizing proteins involved in the synthesis of the septal wall. Elsewhere, compelling evidence is provided that in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsZ plays an additional role in CW synthesis

  11. Colocalization and interaction between elongasome and divisome during a preparative cell division phase in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der R.; Verheul, J.; Vischer, N.O.E.; Alexeeva, S.V.; Hoogendoorn, E.; Postma, M.; Banzhaf, M.; Vollmer, W.; Blaauwen, den T.

    2013-01-01

    The rod-shaped bacterium Escherichia coli grows by insertion of peptidoglycan into the lateral wall during cell elongation and synthesis of new poles during cell division. The monofunctional transpeptidases PBP2 and PBP3 are part of specialized protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respe

  12. Interaction Network among Escherichia coli Membrane Proteins Involved in Cell Division as Revealed by Bacterial Two-Hybrid Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karimova, Gouzel; Dautin, Nathalie; Ladant, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Formation of the Escherichia coli division septum is catalyzed by a number of essential proteins (named Fts) that assemble into a ring-like structure at the future division site. Several of these Fts proteins are intrinsic transmembrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Although these proteins appear to be recruited to the division site in a hierarchical order, the molecular interactions underlying the assembly of the cell division machinery remain mostly unspecified. In the prese...

  13. Evolutionary Cell Biology of Division Mode in the Bacterial Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia- Chlamydiae Superphylum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Canosa, Inés; Devos, Damien P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria from the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Chlamydiae (PVC) superphylum are exceptions to the otherwise dominant mode of division by binary fission, which is based on the interaction between the FtsZ protein and the peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis machinery. Some PVC bacteria are deprived of the FtsZ protein and were also thought to lack PG. How these bacteria divide is still one of the major mysteries of microbiology. The presence of PG has recently been revealed in Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, and proteins related to PG synthesis have been shown to be implicated in the division process in Chlamydiae, providing important insights into PVC mechanisms of division. Here, we review the historical lack of observation of PG in PVC bacteria, its recent detection in two phyla and its involvement in chlamydial cell division. Based on the detection of PG-related proteins in PVC proteomes, we consider the possible evolution of the diverse division mechanisms in these bacteria. We conclude by summarizing what is known and what remains to be understood about the evolutionary cell biology of PVC division modes. PMID:28018303

  14. Evolutionary cell biology of division mode in the bacterial Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae superphylum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rivas-Marín

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria from the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chlamydiae (PVC superphylum are exceptions to the otherwise dominant mode of division by binary fission, which is based on the interaction between the FtsZ protein and the peptidoglycan (PG biosynthesis machinery. Some PVC bacteria are deprived of the FtsZ protein and were also thought to lack PG. How these bacteria divide is still one of the major mysteries of microbiology. The presence of PG has recently been revealed in Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, and proteins related to PG synthesis have been shown to be implicated in the division process in Chlamydiae, providing important insights into PVC mechanisms of division. Here, we review the historical lack of observation of PG in PVC bacteria, its recent detection in two phyla and its involvement in chlamydial cell division. Based on the detection of PG-related proteins in PVC proteomes, we consider the possible evolution of the diverse division mechanisms in these bacteria. We conclude by summarizing what is known and what remains to be understood about the evolutionary cell biology of PVC division modes.

  15. Cell Divisions Are Required for L1 Retrotransposition▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xi; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons comprise a large fraction of genomic DNAs of many organisms. Many L1 elements are active and may generate potentially deleterious mutations by inserting into genes, yet little is known about the control of retrotransposition by the host. Here we examined whether retrotransposition depends on the cell cycle by using a retrotransposition assay with cultured human cells. We show that in both cancer cells and primary human fibroblasts, retrotransposition was strongly inhibited in the cells arrested in the G1, S, G2, or M stage of the cell cycle. Retrotransposition was also inhibited during cellular senescence in primary human fibroblasts. The levels of L1 transcripts were strongly reduced in arrested cells, suggesting that the reduction in L1 transcript abundance limits retrotransposition in nondividing cells. We hypothesize that inhibition of retrotransposition in nondividing cells protects somatic tissues from accumulation of deleterious mutations caused by L1 elements. PMID:17145770

  16. Stereotypical cell division orientation controls neural rod midline formation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Hernández, Elena; Caneparo, Luca; Schneider, Sylvia; Winkler, Sylke; Liebling, Michael; Fraser, Scott E; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-11-09

    The development of multicellular organisms is dependent on the tight coordination between tissue growth and morphogenesis. The stereotypical orientation of cell divisions has been proposed to be a fundamental mechanism by which proliferating and growing tissues take shape. However, the actual contribution of stereotypical division orientation (SDO) to tissue morphogenesis is unclear. In zebrafish, cell divisions with stereotypical orientation have been implicated in both body-axis elongation and neural rod formation, although there is little direct evidence for a critical function of SDO in either of these processes. Here we show that SDO is required for formation of the neural rod midline during neurulation but dispensable for elongation of the body axis during gastrulation. Our data indicate that SDO during both gastrulation and neurulation is dependent on the noncanonical Wnt receptor Frizzled 7 (Fz7) and that interfering with cell division orientation leads to severe defects in neural rod midline formation but not body-axis elongation. These findings suggest a novel function for Fz7-controlled cell division orientation in neural rod midline formation during neurulation.

  17. Cell cycle kinetics with supramitotic control, two cell types, and unequal division: a model of transformed embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, M; Arino, O

    1991-06-01

    We develop a mathematical model of cell cycle kinetics of transformed embryonic cells. The model includes supramitotic regulation, in which decisions regarding growth control are made at a point inside the cell division cycle and their impact extends to the next decision point, located in the next division cycle. Another feature is the presence of two varieties of cells, which switch from one to the other with given transition probabilities. The third factor considered is unequal division of cells, also defined in probabilistic terms. We provide a rigorous description of the model and derivation of its equations and analyze its asymptotic properties by defining and investigating an abstract semigroup of positive linear operators in appropriate state space. The spectral properties of the semigroup yield the balanced exponential growth law for the model. To compare the model to experimental data, we derive basic pedigree statistics, beta curves, and generation time correlations. We present numerical calculations based on measurements available for the embryonic cells. We conclude that to yield the experimentally obtained pedigree statistics, switches from one cell variety to the other must be quite infrequent.

  18. Division of Labor in Biofilms : the Ecology of Cell Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The dense aggregation of cells on a surface, as seen in biofilms, inevitably results in both environmental and cellular heterogeneity. For example, nutrient gradients can trigger cells to differentiate into various phenotypic states. Not only do cells adapt physiologically to the local environmental

  19. Scaling laws governing stochastic growth and division of single bacterial cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Henry, Jonathan T; Lo, Klevin; Burov, Stanislav; Lin, Yihan; Crooks, Gavin E; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering the quantitative laws that govern the growth and division of single cells remains a major challenge. Using a unique combination of technologies that yields unprecedented statistical precision, we find that the sizes of individual Caulobacter crescentus cells increase exponentially in time. We also establish that they divide upon reaching a critical multiple ($\\approx$1.8) of their initial sizes, rather than an absolute size. We show that when the temperature is varied, the growth and division timescales scale proportionally with each other over the physiological temperature range. Strikingly, the cell-size and division-time distributions can both be rescaled by their mean values such that the condition-specific distributions collapse to universal curves. We account for these observations with a minimal stochastic model that is based on an autocatalytic cycle. It predicts the scalings, as well as specific functional forms for the universal curves. Our experimental and theoretical analysis reveals a ...

  20. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  1. Three-dimensional patterns of cell division and expansion throughout the development of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalve, Shweta; Fotschki, Joanna; Beeckman, Tom; Vissenberg, Kris; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-12-01

    Variations in size and shape of multicellular organs depend on spatio-temporal regulation of cell division and expansion. Here, cell division and expansion rates were quantified relative to the three spatial axes in the first leaf pair of Arabidopsis thaliana. The results show striking differences in expansion rates: the expansion rate in the petiole is higher than in the leaf blade; expansion rates in the lateral direction are higher than longitudinal rates between 5 and 10 days after stratification, but become equal at later stages of leaf blade development; and anticlinal expansion co-occurs with, but is an order of magnitude slower than periclinal expansion. Anticlinal expansion rates also differed greatly between tissues: the highest rates occurred in the spongy mesophyll and the lowest in the epidermis. Cell division rates were higher and continued for longer in the epidermis compared with the palisade mesophyll, causing a larger increase of palisade than epidermal cell area over the course of leaf development. The cellular dynamics underlying the effect of shading on petiole length and leaf thickness were then investigated. Low light reduced leaf expansion rates, which was partly compensated by increased duration of the growth phase. Inversely, shading enhanced expansion rates in the petiole, so that the blade to petiole ratio was reduced by 50%. Low light reduced leaf thickness by inhibiting anticlinal cell expansion rates. This effect on cell expansion was preceded by an effect on cell division, leading to one less layer of palisade cells. The two effects could be uncoupled by shifting plants to contrasting light conditions immediately after germination. This extended kinematic analysis maps the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of cell division and expansion, providing a framework for further research to understand the molecular regulatory mechanisms involved.

  2. Novel roles of plant RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; de Mendoza, Alex; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-06-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein was identified as a human tumour suppressor protein that controls various stages of cell proliferation through the interaction with members of the E2F family of transcription factors. It was originally thought to be specific to animals but plants contain homologues of Rb, called RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR). In fact, the Rb-E2F module seems to be a very early acquisition of eukaryotes. The activity of RBR depends on phosphorylation of certain amino acid residues, which in most cases are well conserved between plant and animal proteins. In addition to its role in cell-cycle progression, RBR has been shown to participate in various cellular processes such as endoreplication, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodelling, cell growth, stem cell biology, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the most recent advances to define the role of RBR in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division. These and other reports clearly support the idea that RBR is used as a landing platform of a plethora of cellular proteins and complexes to control various aspects of cell physiology and plant development.

  3. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  4. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mani Arora; Arga Chandrashekar Anil; Karl Burgess; Jane Delany; Ehsan Mesbahi

    2015-12-01

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first green alga, the `ancestral green flagellate'. Relatively large-celled unicellular eukaryotic phytoflagellates (such as Tetraselmis and Scherffelia), traditionally placed in Prasinophyceae but now considered as members of Chlorodendrophyceae (core Chlorophyta), have retained some primitive characteristics of prasinophytes. These organisms share several ultrastructural features with the other core chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae). However, the role of Chlorodendrophycean algae as the evolutionary link between cellular individuality and cellular cooperation has been largely unstudied. Here, we show that clonal populations of a unicellular chlorophyte, Tetraselmis indica, consist of morphologically and ultrastructurally variant cells which arise through asymmetric cell division. These cells also differ in their physiological properties. The structural and physiological differences in the clonal cell population correlate to a certain extent with the longevity and function of cells.

  5. Vegetative Cell Division and Nuclear Translocation in Three Algae Species of Netrium (Zygnematales, Chlorophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIAN HENDRAYANTI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Three species of Netrium oblongum, N. digitus v. latum, and N. interruptum were studied for their mode in the vegetative cell division and nuclear translocation during mitosis using light and fluorescence microscopy. The process of cell division in the three species began with the prominent constriction at the chloroplast in both semicells about half way from the apex. The constriction of chloroplast was mostly visible in N. digitus v. latum. Soon after nucleus divided, septum was formed across the cell and cytokinesis occurred. Observation with fluorescence microscope showed that the movement of nucleus moved back into the center of daughter cells was not always synchronous. Division of chloroplast in N. oblongum and N. digitus v. latum were different with that of N. interruptum. Chloroplast division in two former species occured following the movement of the nucleus down semicell. However, in N. interruptum, chloroplast divided later after nucleus occupied the position at the center of the daughter cells. Cell restoration started after the completion of mitosis and cytokinesis.

  6. A plant U-box protein, PUB4, regulates asymmetric cell division and cell proliferation in the root meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinoshita, A.; Hove, ten C.A.; Tabata, R.; Yamada, M.; Shimizu, N.; Ishida, T.; Yamaguchi, K.; Shigenobu, S.; Takebayashi, Y.; Luchies, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kurata, T.; Wada, T.; Seo, M.; Hasebe, M.; Blilou, I.; Fukuda, H.; Scheres, B.; Heidstra, R.; Kamiya, Y.; Sawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    The root meristem (RM) is a fundamental structure that is responsible for postembryonic root growth. The RM contains the quiescent center (QC), stem cells and frequently dividing meristematic cells, in which the timing and the frequency of cell division are tightly regulated. In Arabidopsis thaliana

  7. A new target for the HYPOM polarimeter with plane LH{sub 2} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Borzounov, Yu.; Piskunov, N.M.; Tsvinev, A.P.; Ball, J.; Sans, J.L.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. E-mail: etomasi@cea.fr

    1999-06-01

    We present a new liquid hydrogen target working as a secondary target for an extended polarimeter. The specificity of this target is that the inner cell has a parallelepipedic shape. The dimensions along the beam and along the focal plane are maximized, for a small vertical extension, using a much smaller volume of liquid hydrogen, as compared to standard cylindrical cells.

  8. Asymmetric zygote division: A mystery starting point of embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2016-10-02

    In angiosperm, asymmetric zygote division is critical for embryogenesis. The molecular mechanism underlying this process has gained a great attention recently. Some players involve in the control of both accurate position and correct orientation of zygote division plane have been found, which provide useful clues for the extensive investigations. It is getting clear that both internal and external factors are involved in this complex regulatory mechanism and the asymmetric zygote division seems with great impact in cell fate determination and embryo pattern formation.

  9. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-07-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability.

  10. Lipid spirals in Bacillus subtilis and their role in cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barák, Imrich; Muchová, Katarína; Wilkinson, Anthony J; O'Toole, Peter J; Pavlendová, Nada

    2008-06-01

    The fluid mosaic model of membrane structure has been revised in recent years as it has become evident that domains of different lipid composition are present in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Using membrane binding fluorescent dyes, we demonstrate the presence of lipid spirals extending along the long axis of cells of the rod-shaped bacterium Bacillus subtilis. These spiral structures are absent from cells in which the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol is disrupted, suggesting an enrichment in anionic phospholipids. Green fluorescent protein fusions of the cell division protein MinD also form spiral structures and these were shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer to be coincident with the lipid spirals. These data indicate a higher level of membrane lipid organization than previously observed and a primary role for lipid spirals in determining the site of cell division in bacterial cells.

  11. Division genes in Escherichia coli are expressed coordinately to cell septum requirements by gearbox promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Pla, J; Vicente, M

    1990-11-01

    The cell division ftsQAZ cluster and the ftsZ-dependent bolA morphogene of Escherichia coli are found to be driven by gearboxes, a distinct class of promoters characterized by showing an activity that is inversely dependent on growth rate. These promoters contain specific sequences upstream from the mRNA start point, and their -10 region is essential for the inverse growth rate dependence. Gearbox promoters are essential for driving ftsQAZ and bolA gene expression so that the encoded products are synthesized at constant amounts per cell independently of cell size. This mode of regulation would be expected for the expression of proteins that either play a regulatory role in cell division or form a stoichiometric component of the septum, a structure that, independently of cell size and growth rate, is produced once per cell cycle.

  12. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    , and the completely replicated terminus regions stay associated with each other after chromosome replication is completed, disassociating very late in the cell cycle shortly before the final cell division event. Invagination of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs earlier than separation of the replicated terminus regions...... and formation of separate nucleoids, which results in trapping of a chromosome on either side of the cell division septum, indicating that there is not a nucleoid exclusion phenotype.......Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment.

  14. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis peptidoglycan hydrolase SleB171 involved in daughter cell separation during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Hu, Penggao; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Whole-genome analyses have revealed a putative cell wall hydrolase gene (sleB171) that constitutes an operon with two other genes (ypeBandyhcN) of unknown function inBacillus thuringiensisBMB171. The putative SleB171 protein consists of 259 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 28.3 kDa. Gene disruption ofsleB171in the BMB171 genome causes the formation of long cell chains during the vegetative growth phase and delays spore formation and spore release, although it has no significant effect on cell growth and the ultimate release of the spores. The inseparable vegetative cells were nearly restored through the complementation ofsleB171expression. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed thatsleB171is mainly active in the vegetative growth phase, with a maximum activity at the early stationary growth phase. Western blot analysis also confirmed thatsleB171is preferentially expressed during the vegetative growth phase. These results demonstrated that SleB171 plays an essential role in the daughter cell separation during cell division.

  16. Intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins on the cell division of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Norihito; Umeda, Akiko; Kadota, Yoshu; Kira, Mizuki; Okazaki, Ami; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori divides in the human stomach resulting in persistent infections and causing various disorders. Bacterial cell division is precisely coordinated by many molecules, including FtsZ and Min proteins. However, the role of Min proteins in H. pylori division is poorly understood. We investigated the functional characteristics of Min proteins in wild-type HPK5 and five HPK5-derivative mutants using morphological and genetic approaches. All mutants showed a filamentous shape. However, the bacterial cell growth and viability of three single-gene mutants (minC, minD, minE) were similar to that of the wild-type. The coccoid form number was lowest in the minE-disruptant, indicating that MinE contributes to the coccoid form conversion during the stationary phase. Immunofluorescence microscopic observations showed that FtsZ was dispersedly distributed throughout the bacterial cell irrespective of nucleoid position in only minD-disruptants, indicating that MinD is involved in the nucleoid occlusion system. A chase assay demonstrated that MinC loss suppressed FtsZ-degradation, indicating that FtsZ degrades in a MinC-dependent manner. Molecular interactions between FtsZ and Min proteins were confirmed by immunoprecipitation (IP)-western blotting (WB), suggesting the functional cooperation of these molecules during bacterial cell division. This study describes the intrinsic characteristics of Min proteins and provides new insights into H. pylori cell division.

  17. A new role of Klumpfuss in establishing cell fate during the GMC asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabilondo, Hugo; Losada-Pérez, María; Monedero, Ignacio; Torres-Herráez, Arturo; Molina, Isabel; Torroja, Laura; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Studies in the Drosophila embryonic NB4-2 lineage have suggested that the transcription factor Klumpfuss (Klu) functions within embryonic neuroblast lineages to differentiate between the identities of two adjacent ganglion mother cells (GMCs). However, because of the limited lineage markers available, these observations have been made only for the NB4-2 lineage. Recent findings have placed this transcription factor in the vanguard of Drosophila neural stem cell biology by demonstrating that Klu is necessary for larval neuroblast growth and self-renewal. Here, we have studied the role of klu in an incipient model in order to address basic mechanisms of neural specification: the Va system. None of the previously reported roles of Klu satisfactorily explain our observations. Unexpectedly, in this lineage, klu is necessary for differentiating between the fates of the two neurons born from a unique GMC; klu mutants produce two B-type cells, rather than one B-type (Notch-OFF) and one A-type (Notch-ON) cell. Additionally, our results demonstrate that Klu operates in the GMC and/or in the newly born neuron, but not in the neuroblast. Unlike in larval neuroblasts in which Klu is an executor of Notch signaling, we have found that Klu does not lie downstream of the Notch pathway in this cell division context.

  18. SEPT9_v1 Functions in Breast Cancer Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    from FCF- and DMSO-treated (50 M; 8 h) MDCK cells stained for CENP-E, CREST and DNA (DAPI). Arrows point to misaligned chromosomes; arrowheads point...for recombi - nant proteins, and Dr. Linda Wordeman (University of Washington) for HeLa cells expressing -tubulin-GFP.We also thank Nafisa Ghori for...needle concentration) sera were dialyzed, concentrated on Microcon 50.000 MW columns (Millipore), mixed with plasmid DNA in 10 mM Hepes, 140 mM KCl, pH

  19. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H2-O2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  20. FtsZ-less prokaryotic cell division as well as FtsZ- and dynamin-less chloroplast and non-photosynthetic plastid division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ya eMiyagishima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The chloroplast division machinery is a mixture of a stromal FtsZ-based complex descended from a cyanobacterial ancestor of chloroplasts and a cytosolic dynamin-related protein (DRP 5B-based complex derived from the eukaryotic host. Molecular genetic studies have shown that each component of the division machinery is normally essential for normal chloroplast division. However, several exceptions have been found. In the absence of the FtsZ ring, nonphotosynthetic plastids are able to proliferate, likely by elongation and budding. Depletion of DRP5B impairs, but does not stop chloroplast division. Chloroplasts in glaucophytes, which possesses a peptidoglycan (PG layer, divide without DRP5B. Certain parasitic eukaryotes possess nonphotosynthetic plastids of secondary endosymbiotic origin, but neither FtsZ nor DRP5B is encoded in their genomes. Elucidation of the FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast division mechanism will lead to a better understanding of the function and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery and the finding of the as-yet-unknown mechanism that is likely involved in chloroplast division. Recent studies have shown that FtsZ was lost from a variety of prokaryotes, many of which lost PG by regressive evolution. In addition, even some of the FtsZ-bearing bacteria are able to divide when FtsZ and PG are depleted experimentally. In some cases, alternative mechanisms for cell division, such as budding by an increase of the cell surface-to-volume ratio, are proposed. Although PG is believed to have been lost from chloroplasts other than in glaucophytes, there is some indirect evidence for the existence of PG in chloroplasts. Such information is also useful for understanding how nonphotosynthetic plastids are able to divide in FtsZ-depleted cells and the reason for the retention of FtsZ in chloroplast division. Here we summarize information to facilitate analyses of FtsZ- and/or DRP5B-less chloroplast and nonphotosynthetic plastid

  1. Deletion of cdvB paralogous genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius impairs cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of Crenarchaeota utilize the cell division system (Cdv) to divide. This system consists of three highly conserved genes, cdvA, cdvB and cdvC that are organized in an operon. CdvC is homologous to the AAA-type ATPase Vps4, involved in multivesicular body biogenesis in eukaryotes. CdvA is

  2. Coordination of peptidoglycan synthesis and outer membrane constriction during Escherichia coli cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, A.N.; Egan, A.J.F.; van 't Veer, I.L.; Verheul, J.; Colavin, A.; Koumoutsi, A.; Biboy, J.; Altelaar, A.F.M.; Damen, M.J.; Huang, K.C.; Simorre, J.P.; Breukink, E.; den Blaauwen, T.; Typas, A.; Gross, C.A.; Vollmer, W.

    2015-01-01

    To maintain cellular structure and integrity during division, Gram-negative bacteria must carefully coordinate constriction of a tripartite cell envelope of inner membrane, peptidoglycan (PG), and outer membrane (OM). It has remained enigmatic how this is accomplished. Here, we show that envelope ma

  3. Direct interactions of early and late assembling division proteins in Escherichia coli cells resolved by FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexeeva, S.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Verheul, J.; Verhoeven, G.S.; den Blaauwen, T.

    2010-01-01

    The bacterial cell division machinery is organized in the so-called divisome composed of highly dynamic but low abundant interacting (membrane-bound) proteins. In order to elucidate the molecular interactions between these proteins, we developed a robust background-insensitive quantitative spectral

  4. A pseudokinase couples signaling pathways to enable asymmetric cell division in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Seth Childers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria face complex decisions when initiating developmental events such as sporulation, nodulation, virulence, and asymmetric cell division. These developmental decisions require global changes in genomic readout, and bacteria typically employ intricate (yet poorly understood signaling networks that enable changes in cell function. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus divides asymmetrically to yield two functionally distinct cells: a motile, chemotactic swarmer cell, and a sessile stalked cell with replication and division capabilities. Work from several Caulobacter labs has revealed that differentiation requires concerted regulation by several two-component system (TCS signaling pathways that are differentially positioned at the poles of the predivisional cell (Figure 1. The strict unidirectional flow from histidine kinase (HK to the response regulator (RR, observed in most studied TCS, is difficult to reconcile with the notion that information can be transmitted between two or more TCS signaling pathways. In this study, we uncovered a mechanism by which daughter cell fate, which is specified by the DivJ-DivK-PleC system and effectively encoded in the phosphorylation state of the single-domain RR DivK, is communicated to the CckA-ChpT-CtrA signaling pathway that regulates more than 100 genes for polar differentiation, replication initiation and cell division. Using structural biology and biochemical findings we proposed a mechanistic basis for TCS pathway coupling in which the DivL pseudokinase is repurposed as a sensor rather than participant in phosphotransduction.

  5. Control of the meiotic cell division program in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Schnittger, A.

    2013-01-01

    While the question of why organisms reproduce sexually is still a matter of controversy, it is clear that the foundation of sexual reproduction is the formation of gametes with half the genomic DNA content of a somatic cell. This reduction in genomic content is accomplished through meiosis that, in

  6. Building the perfect parasite: cell division in apicomplexa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Striepen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexans are pathogens responsible for malaria, toxoplasmosis, and crytposporidiosis in humans, and a wide range of livestock diseases. These unicellular eukaryotes are stealthy invaders, sheltering from the immune response in the cells of their hosts, while at the same time tapping into these cells as source of nutrients. The complexity and beauty of the structures formed during their intracellular development have made apicomplexans the darling of electron microscopists. Dramatic technological progress over the last decade has transformed apicomplexans into respectable genetic model organisms. Extensive genomic resources are now available for many apicomplexan species. At the same time, parasite transfection has enabled researchers to test the function of specific genes through reverse and forward genetic approaches with increasing sophistication. Transfection also introduced the use of fluorescent reporters, opening the field to dynamic real time microscopic observation. Parasite cell biologists have used these tools to take a fresh look at a classic problem: how do apicomplexans build the perfect invasion machine, the zoite, and how is this process fine-tuned to fit the specific niche of each pathogen in this ancient and very diverse group? This work has unearthed a treasure trove of novel structures and mechanisms that are the focus of this review.

  7. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  8. DipM, a new factor required for peptidoglycan remodelling during cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möll, Andrea; Schlimpert, Susan; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In bacteria, cytokinesis is dependent on lytic enzymes that facilitate remodelling of the cell wall during constriction. In this work, we identify a thus far uncharacterized periplasmic protein, DipM, that is required for cell division and polarity in Caulobacter crescentus. DipM is composed of four peptidoglycan binding (LysM) domains and a C-terminal lysostaphin-like (LytM) peptidase domain. It binds to isolated murein sacculi in vitro, and is recruited to the site of constriction through interaction with the cell division protein FtsN. Mutational analyses showed that the LysM domains are necessary and sufficient for localization of DipM, while its peptidase domain is essential for function. Consistent with a role in cell wall hydrolysis, DipM was found to interact with purified murein sacculi in vitro and to induce cell lysis upon overproduction. Its inactivation causes severe defects in outer membrane invagination, resulting in a significant delay between cytoplasmic compartmentalization and final separation of the daughter cells. Overall, these findings indicate that DipM is a periplasmic component of the C. crescentus divisome that facilitates remodelling of the peptidoglycan layer and, thus, coordinated constriction of the cell envelope during the division process.

  9. miR-430 regulates oriented cell division during neural tube development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Carter M; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression. Originally shown to regulate developmental timing, microRNAs have since been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including cell identity, migration and signaling. miRNA-430, the earliest expressed microRNA during zebrafish embryogenesis, is required to undergo morphogenesis and has previously been shown to regulate maternal mRNA clearance, Nodal signaling, and germ cell migration. The functions of miR-430 in brain morphogenesis, however, remain unclear. Herein we find that miR-430 instructs oriented cell divisions in the neural rod required for neural midline formation. Loss of miR-430 function results in mitotic spindle misorientation in the neural rod, failed neuroepithelial integration after cell division, and ectopic cell accumulation in the dorsal neural tube. We propose that miR-430, independently of canonical apicobasal and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways, coordinates the stereotypical cell divisions that instruct neural tube morphogenesis.

  10. Fibroblasts Cultured on Nanowires Exhibit Low Motility, Impaired Cell Division, and DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H.; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    largely unknown. Fibroblast behaviour on vertical nanowire arrays is investigated, and it is shown that cell motility and proliferation rate are reduced on nanowires. Fibroblasts cultured on long nanowires exhibit failed cell division, DNA damage, increased ROS content and respiration. Using focused ion......Nanowires are commonly used as tools for interfacing living cells, acting as biomolecule-delivery vectors or electrodes. It is generally assumed that the small size of the nanowires ensures a minimal cellular perturbation, yet the effects of nanowires on cell migration and proliferation remain...... damage. These results are important guidelines to the design and interpretation of experiments involving nanowire-based transfection and electrical characterization of living cells....

  11. Liquid Crystal Pre-Patterning for Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas; Mottram, Nigel; Lydon, John

    2005-11-01

    We are examining the hypothesis that the overall geometry of mitosis is determined by liquid-crystal pre-patterning of the cytoplasm. The identification of mitosis with liquid crystalline (LX) phases is at least 50 years old but no attempt has been made to propose a detailed theory, presumably because of the difficulties in applying a theory of liquid crystals (LCs) in a 3D geometry. In this work, we use a mathematical model (Q-tensor theory) of a nematic LC for the cytoplasm of the cell and solve this numerically to show that the geometry of the prophase and metaphase can be explained using LX phases. The pre-patterning for the spindle is regarded as a bipolar LX assembly with the centrosomes acting as LC poles (centres of LX defects). The centrosomes and the nuclear envelope are both treated as bodies submerged in the LC medium between two spherical shells (the nuclear and cell membranes). The geometries considered are novel and 3D.

  12. Haspin has Multiple Functions in the Plant Cell Division Regulatory Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozgunova, Elena; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Masaki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kurihara, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Progression of cell division is controlled by various mitotic kinases. In animal cells, phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 by the kinase Haspin (haploid germ cell-specific nuclear protein kinase) promotes centromeric Aurora B localization to regulate chromosome segregation. However, less is known about the function of Haspin in regulatory networks in plant cells. Here, we show that inhibition of Haspin with 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu) in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells delayed chromosome alignment. Haspin inhibition also prevented the centromeric localization of Aurora3 kinase (AUR3) and disrupted its function. This suggested that Haspin plays a role in the specific positioning of AUR3 on chromosomes in plant cells, a function conserved in animals. The results also indicated that Haspin and AUR3 are involved in the same pathway, which regulates chromosome alignment during prometaphase/metaphase. Remarkably, Haspin inhibition by 5-ITu also led to a severe cytokinesis defect, resulting in binuclear cells with a partially formed cell plate. The 5-ITu treatment did not affect microtubules, AUR1/2 or the NACK-PQR pathway; however, it did alter the distribution of actin filaments on the cell plate. Together, these results suggested that Haspin has several functions in regulating cell division in plant cells: in the localization of AUR3 on centromeres and in regulating late cell plate expansion during cytokinesis.

  13. Asymmetric B Cell Division%B细胞不对称分裂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓芳; 姜云瀚; 沈关心

    2012-01-01

    It has been mostly accepted that asymmetric cell division is important for cell diversi -ty. Asymmetric B cell division is firstly found in the study of antibody class switch . Recently, five American scientists have addressed the asymmetric division of B cells in germinal centre . The result has been published in the journal of Science (20 January 2012). Asymmetric B cell division is involved in antibody class switch and antibody affinity maturation of immunity . Although the mechanism of asymmetric B cell division remains unclear , the recent study implies that the molecules that display asymmetry distribution in the cell may play as upstream factors . Moreover, asymmetric B cell division and asymmetric segregation of antigen may have independent and synergistic actions in the process of antibody affinity maturation.%细胞的不对称分裂对于细胞多样性产生的重要性已经被大部分人所认识.B细胞的不对称分裂首先是在抗体类别转换的研究中发现的.最近,美国5科学家对B细胞在免疫发生中心中不对称分裂的原因进行了探索.结果 发表在2012年1月20日出版的中.B细胞的不对称分裂参与体液免疫的抗体类别转换和抗体亲和力成熟过程.对于其机制仍不清楚,但目前研究初步提示细胞内分子的不对称分布是其发生的上游因素.并且B细胞的不对称分裂可能与不对称抗原分离可能在抗体亲和力成熟过程中具有独立协同作用.

  14. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  15. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: Three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, B.N.; Shigenaga, M.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gold, L.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10{sup 6} oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants).

  16. A polymerization–depolymerization model for generation of contractile force during bacterial cell division

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biplab Ghosh; Anirban Sain

    2008-08-01

    During the last phase of cell division in bacteria, a polymeric ring forms at the division site. The ring, made of intracellular proteins, anchors to the cell wall and starts to contract. That initiates a dividing septum to close in, like the shutter of a camera, eventually guillotining the cell into two daughters. All through, the ring remains at the leading edge of the septum and seems to power its closure. It is not understood why does the ring contract. We propose a theoretical model to explain this. It is worth mentioning that a similar contraction phenomenon occurs for the actin ring in eukaryotes, but there it is due to motor proteins, which however, are absent in bacteria.

  17. Asymptotic behavior of a nonlinear functional-integral equation of cell kinetics with unequal division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino, O; Kimmel, M

    1989-01-01

    A model of cell cycle kinetics is proposed, which includes unequal division of cells, and a nonlinear dependence of the fraction of cells re-entering proliferation on the total number of cells in the cycle. The model is described by a nonlinear functional-integral equation. It is analyzed using the operator semigroup theory combined with classical differential equations approach. A complete description of the asymptotic behavior of the model is provided for a relatively broad class of nonlinearities. The nonnegative solutions either tend to a stable steady state, or to zero. The simplicity of the model makes it an interesting step in the analysis of dynamics of nonlinear structure populations.

  18. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling.

  19. A DNA damage checkpoint in Caulobacter crescentus inhibits cell division through a direct interaction with FtsW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Joshua W; Hopkins, Alexander C; Laub, Michael T

    2011-06-15

    Following DNA damage, cells typically delay cell cycle progression and inhibit cell division until their chromosomes have been repaired. The bacterial checkpoint systems responsible for these DNA damage responses are incompletely understood. Here, we show that Caulobacter crescentus responds to DNA damage by coordinately inducing an SOS regulon and inhibiting the master regulator CtrA. Included in the SOS regulon is sidA (SOS-induced inhibitor of cell division A), a membrane protein of only 29 amino acids that helps to delay cell division following DNA damage, but is dispensable in undamaged cells. SidA is sufficient, when overproduced, to block cell division. However, unlike many other regulators of bacterial cell division, SidA does not directly disrupt the assembly or stability of the cytokinetic ring protein FtsZ, nor does it affect the recruitment of other components of the cell division machinery. Instead, we provide evidence that SidA inhibits division by binding directly to FtsW to prevent the final constriction of the cytokinetic ring.

  20. SepG coordinates sporulation-specific cell division and nucleoid organization in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Claessen, Dennis; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly complex process that requires tight coordination between septum formation and chromosome replication and segregation. In bacteria that divide by binary fission a single septum is formed at mid-cell, a process that is coordinated by the conserved cell division scaffold protein FtsZ. In contrast, during sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes, up to a hundred rings of FtsZ (Z rings) are produced almost simultaneously, dividing the multinucleoid aerial hyphae into long chains of unigenomic spores. This involves the active recruitment of FtsZ by the SsgB protein, and at the same time requires sophisticated systems to regulate chromosome dynamics. Here, we show that SepG is required for the onset of sporulation and acts by ensuring that SsgB is localized to future septum sites. Förster resonance energy transfer imaging suggests direct interaction between SepG and SsgB. The beta-lactamase reporter system showed that SepG is a transmembrane protein with its central domain oriented towards the cytoplasm. Without SepG, SsgB fails to localize properly, consistent with a crucial role for SepG in the membrane localization of the SsgB-FtsZ complex. While SsgB remains associated with FtsZ, SepG re-localizes to the (pre)spore periphery. Expanded doughnut-shaped nucleoids are formed in sepG null mutants, suggesting that SepG is required for nucleoid compaction. Taken together, our work shows that SepG, encoded by one of the last genes in the conserved dcw cluster of cell division and cell-wall-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria whose function was still largely unresolved,coordinates septum synthesis and chromosome organization in Streptomyces.

  1. Local Cell Death Changes the Orientation of Cell Division in the Developing Drosophila Wing Imaginal Disc Without Using Fat or Dachsous as Orienting Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Abhijit; Rimesso, Gerard; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila imaginal disc cells exhibit preferred cell division orientations according to location within the disc. These orientations are altered if cell death occurs within the epithelium, such as is caused by cell competition or by genotypes affecting cell survival. Both normal cell division orientations, and their orientations after cell death, depend on the Fat-Dachsous pathway of planar cell polarity (PCP). The hypothesis that cell death initiates a planar polarity signal was investigated. When clones homozygous for the pineapple eye (pie) mutation were made to initiate cell death, neither Dachsous nor Fat was required in pie cells for the re-orientation of nearby cells, indicating a distinct signal for this PCP pathway. Dpp and Wg were also not needed for pie clones to re-orient cell division. Cell shapes were evaluated in wild type and mosaic wing discs to assess mechanical consequences of cell loss. Although proximal wing disc cells and cells close to the dorso-ventral boundary were elongated in their preferred cell division axes in wild type discs, cell shapes in much of the wing pouch were symmetrical on average and did not predict their preferred division axis. Cells in pie mutant clones were slightly larger than their normal counterparts, consistent with mechanical stretching following cell loss, but no bias in cell shape was detected in the surrounding cells. These findings indicate that an unidentified signal influences PCP-dependent cell division orientation in imaginal discs. PMID:28030539

  2. Direct visualization of cell division using high-resolution imaging of M-phase of the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse, Michael; Raulf, Alexandra; Pilz, Gregor-Alexander; Haberlandt, Christian; Klein, Alexandra M; Jabs, Ronald; Zaehres, Holm; Fügemann, Christopher J.; Zimmermann, Katrin; Trebicka, Jonel; Welz, Armin; Pfeifer, Alexander; Röll, Wilhelm; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Current approaches to monitor and quantify cell division in live cells, and reliably distinguish between acytokinesis and endoreduplication, are limited and complicate determination of stem cell pool identities. Here we overcome these limitations by generating an in vivo reporter system using the scaffolding protein anillin fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein, to provide high spatiotemporal resolution of mitotic phase. This approach visualizes cytokinesis and midbody formation as hall...

  3. Mechanism of murine epidermal maintenance: Cell division and the Voter Model

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interesting experimental example of voter-model statistics in biology. In recent work on mouse tail-skin, where proliferating cells are confined to a two-dimensional layer, we showed that cells proliferate and differentiate according to a simple stochastic model of cell division involving just one type of proliferating cell that may divide both symmetrically and asymmetrically. Curiously, these simple rules provide excellent predictions of the cell population dynamics without having to address their spatial distribution. Yet, if the spatial behaviour of cells is addressed by allowing cells to diffuse at random, one deduces that density fluctuations destroy tissue confluence, implying some hidden degree of spatial regulation in the physical system. To infer the mechanism of spatial regulation, we consider a two-dimensional model of cell fate that preserves the overall population dynamics. By identifying the resulting behaviour with a three-species variation of the "Voter" model, we predi...

  4. Deletion of cdvB paralogous genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius impairs cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-03-01

    The majority of Crenarchaeota utilize the cell division system (Cdv) to divide. This system consists of three highly conserved genes, cdvA, cdvB and cdvC that are organized in an operon. CdvC is homologous to the AAA-type ATPase Vps4, involved in multivesicular body biogenesis in eukaryotes. CdvA is a unique archaeal protein that interacts with the membrane, while CdvB is homologous to the eukaryal Vps24 and forms helical filaments. Most Crenarcheota contain additional CdvB paralogs. In Sulfolobus acidocaldarius these are termed CdvB1-3. We have used a gene inactivation approach to determine the impact of these additional cdvB genes on cell division. Independent deletion mutants of these genes were analyzed for growth and protein localization. One of the deletion strains (ΔcdvB3) showed a severe growth defect on plates and delayed growth on liquid medium. It showed the formation of enlarged cells and a defect in DNA segregation. Since these defects are accompanied with an aberrant localization of CdvA and CdvB, we conclude that CdvB3 fulfills an important accessory role in cell division.

  5. Automatic detection of cell divisions (mitosis) in live-imaging microscopy images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Anat; Gefen, Amit; Benayahu, Dafna; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semi-automated pipeline for the detection of possible cell divisions in live-imaging microscopy and the classification of these mitosis candidates using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). We use time-lapse images of NIH3T3 scratch assay cultures, extract patches around bright candidate regions that then undergo segmentation and binarization, followed by a classification of the binary patches into either containing or not containing cell division. The classification is performed by training a Convolutional Neural Network on a specially constructed database. We show strong results of AUC = 0.91 and F-score = 0.89, competitive with state-of-the-art methods in this field.

  6. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  7. Direct interactions of early and late assembling division proteins in Escherichia coli cells resolved by FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Verheul, Jolanda; Verhoeven, Gertjan S; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2010-07-01

    The bacterial cell division machinery is organized in the so-called divisome composed of highly dynamic but low abundant interacting (membrane-bound) proteins. In order to elucidate the molecular interactions between these proteins, we developed a robust background-insensitive quantitative spectral unmixing method for estimating FRET efficiencies at near endogenous protein levels using fluorescent protein fusions. The assembly of the division machinery of Escherichia coli occurs in two steps that are discrete in time: first the FtsZ-ring and the so-called early localizing proteins that together seem to prepare the division assembly at midcell. Subsequently, the late localizing protein complexes that contain the peptidoglycan-synthesizing proteins PBP1B and FtsI (PBP3) are recruited to the division site, which initiates septation. Physical interactions were observed between members within each group but also between the early and late localizing proteins strongly suggesting that these proteins despite their differential localization in time are linked at the molecular and functional level. Interestingly, we find FtsN, one of the latest proteins in the divisome assembly, interacting with late assembling proteins FtsI and FtsW, but also with early (proto-ring) protein ZapA. This is in line with the recently described role of FtsN in divisome stabilization including the proto-ring elements.

  8. The influence of GAP-43 on orientation of cell division through G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Zhao, Junpeng; Ju, Lili; Wen, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that GAP-43 is highly expressed in horizontally dividing neural progenitor cells, and G protein complex are required for proper mitotic-spindle orientation of those progenitors in the mammalian developing cortex. In order to verify the hypothesis that GAP-43 may influence the orientation of cell division through interacting with G proteins during neurogenesis, the GAP-43 RNA from adult C57 mouse was cloned into the pEGFP-N1 vector, which was then transfected into Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture system. The interaction of GAP-43 with Gαi was detected by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP), while cystogenesis of 3D morphogenesis of MDCK cells and expression of GAP-43 and Gαi were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The results showed are as follows: After being transfected by pEGFP-N1-GAP-43, GAP-43 was localized on the cell membrane and co-localized with Gαi, and this dramatically induced a defective cystogenesis in 3D morphogenesis of MDCK cells. The functional interaction between GAP-43 and Gαi proteins was proven by the co-IP assay. It can be considered from the results that the GAP-43 is involved in the orientation of cell division by interacting with Gαi and this should be an important mechanism for neurogenesis in the mammalian brain.

  9. A quantitative study of the division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus stalked cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progression of a cell through the division cycle is tightly controlled at different steps to ensure the integrity of genome replication and partitioning to daughter cells. From published experimental evidence, we propose a molecular mechanism for control of the cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus. The mechanism, which is based on the synthesis and degradation of three "master regulator" proteins (CtrA, GcrA, and DnaA, is converted into a quantitative model, in order to study the temporal dynamics of these and other cell cycle proteins. The model accounts for important details of the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of cell cycle control in stalked C. crescentus cell. It reproduces protein time courses in wild-type cells, mimics correctly the phenotypes of many mutant strains, and predicts the phenotypes of currently uncharacterized mutants. Since many of the proteins involved in regulating the cell cycle of C. crescentus are conserved among many genera of alpha-proteobacteria, the proposed mechanism may be applicable to other species of importance in agriculture and medicine.

  10. Divisome and segrosome components of Deinococcus radiodurans interact through cell division regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Ganesh K; Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes many of the known components of divisome as well as four sets of genome partitioning proteins, ParA and ParB on its multipartite genome. Interdependent regulation of cell division and genome segregation is not understood. In vivo interactions of D. radiodurans' sdivisome, segrosome and other cell division regulatory proteins expressed on multicopy plasmids were studied in Escherichia coli using a bacterial two-hybrid system and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation with the proteins made in E. coli. Many of these showed interactions both with the self and with other proteins. For example, DrFtsA, DrFtsZ, DrMinD, DrMinC, DrDivIVA and all four ParB proteins individually formed at least homodimers, while DrFtsA interacted with DrFtsZ, DrFtsW, DrFtsE, DrFtsK and DrMinD. DrMinD also showed interaction with DrFtsW, DrFtsE and DrMinC. Interestingly, septum site determining protein, DrDivIVA showed interactions with secondary genome ParAs as well as ParB1, ParB3 and ParB4 while DrMinC interacted with ParB1 and ParB3. PprA, a pleiotropic protein recently implicated in cell division regulation, neither interacted with divisome proteins nor ParBs but interacted at different levels with all four ParAs. These results suggest the formation of independent multiprotein complexes of 'DrFts' proteins, segrosome proteins and cell division regulatory proteins, and these complexes could interact with each other through DrMinC and DrDivIVA, and PprA in D. radiodurans.

  11. FtsZ and the division of prokaryotic cells and organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, William

    2005-11-01

    Binary fission of many prokaryotes as well as some eukaryotic organelles depends on the FtsZ protein, which self-assembles into a membrane-associated ring structure early in the division process. FtsZ is homologous to tubulin, the building block of the microtubule cytoskeleton in eukaryotes. Recent advances in genomics and cell-imaging techniques have paved the way for the remarkable progress in our understanding of fission in bacteria and organelles.

  12. An interplay of migratory and division forces as a generic mechanism for stem cell patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Hannezo, Edouard; Joanny, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    In many adult tissues, stem cells and differentiated cells are not homogeneously distributed : stem cells are arranged in periodic "niches", and differentiated cells are constantly produced and migrate out of these niches. In this article, we provide a general theoretical framework to study mixtures of dividing and actively migrating particles, which we apply to biological tissues. We show in particular that the interplay between the stresses arising from active cell migration and stem cell division give rise to robust stem cell patterns. The instability of the tissue leads to spatial patterns which are either steady or oscillating in time. The wavelength of the instability has an order of magnitude consistent with the biological observations. We also discuss the implications of these results for future in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  13. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaad M; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2014-02-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks.

  14. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development.

  15. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Yang; Minglei Wang; Jia Wang; Xingxu Huang; Ru Yang; Wei-Qiang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patche...

  16. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  17. Cumulative number of cell divisions as a meaningful timescale for adaptive laboratory evolution of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Lee

    Full Text Available Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE under controlled conditions has become a valuable approach for the study of the genetic and biochemical basis for microbial adaptation under a given selection pressure. Conventionally, the timescale in ALE experiments has been set in terms of number of generations. As mutations are believed to occur primarily during cell division in growing cultures, the cumulative number of cell divisions (CCD would be an alternative way to set the timescale for ALE. Here we show that in short-term ALE (up to 40-50 days, Escherichia coli, under growth rate selection pressure, was found to undergo approximately 10(11.2 total cumulative cell divisions in the population to produce a new stable growth phenotype that results from 2 to 8 mutations. Continuous exposure to a low level of the mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was found to accelerate this timescale and led to a superior growth rate phenotype with a much larger number of mutations as determined with whole-genome sequencing. These results would be useful for the fundamental kinetics of the ALE process in designing ALE experiments and provide a basis for its quantitative description.

  18. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C. J.; Stultiens, Catharina L. M.; de Groot, Peter F. M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnoud G.; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H.; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development. PMID:25883382

  19. Characterization of YmgF, a 72-residue inner membrane protein that associates with the Escherichia coli cell division machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimova, Gouzel; Robichon, Carine; Ladant, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Formation of the Escherichia coli division septum is catalyzed by a number of essential proteins (named Fts) that assemble into a ring-like structure at the future division site. Many of these Fts proteins are intrinsic transmembrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. In the present study, we attempted to identify a novel putative component(s) of the E. coli cell division machinery by searching for proteins that could interact with known Fts proteins. To do that, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system based on interaction-mediated reconstitution of a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling cascade to perform a library screening in order to find putative partners of E. coli cell division protein FtsL. Here we report the characterization of YmgF, a 72-residue integral membrane protein of unknown function that was found to associate with many E. coli cell division proteins and to localize to the E. coli division septum in an FtsZ-, FtsA-, FtsQ-, and FtsN-dependent manner. Although YmgF was previously shown to be not essential for cell viability, we found that when overexpressed, YmgF was able to overcome the thermosensitive phenotype of the ftsQ1(Ts) mutation and restore its viability under low-osmolarity conditions. Our results suggest that YmgF might be a novel component of the E. coli cell division machinery.

  20. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  1. Directional Notch trafficking in Sara endosomes during asymmetric cell division in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressmann, Sabine; Campos, Claudia; Castanon, Irinka; Fürthauer, Maximilian; González-Gaitán, Marcos

    2015-03-01

    Asymmetric division of neural precursor cells contributes to the generation of a variety of neuronal types. Asymmetric division is mediated by the asymmetric inheritance of fate determinants by the two daughter cells. In vertebrates, asymmetric fate determinants, such as Par3 and Mib, are only now starting to be identified. Here we show that, during mitosis of neural precursors in zebrafish, directional trafficking of Sara endosomes to one of the daughters can function as such a determinant. In asymmetric lineages, where one daughter cell becomes a neuron (n cell) whereas the other divides again to give rise to two neurons (p cell), we found that the daughter that inherits most of the Sara endosomes acquires the p fate. Sara endosomes carry an endocytosed pool of the Notch ligand DeltaD, which is thereby itself distributed asymmetrically. Sara and Notch are both essential for cell fate assignation within asymmetric lineages. Therefore, the Sara endosome system determines the fate decision between neuronal differentiation and mitosis in asymmetric lineages and thereby contributes to controlling the number of neural precursors and differentiated neurons during neurogenesis in a vertebrate.

  2. LocZ Is a New Cell Division Protein Involved in Proper Septum Placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holečková, Nela; Molle, Virginie; Buriánková, Karolína; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Ulrych, Aleš; Branny, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How bacteria control proper septum placement at midcell, to guarantee the generation of identical daughter cells, is still largely unknown. Although different systems involved in the selection of the division site have been described in selected species, these do not appear to be widely conserved. Here, we report that LocZ (Spr0334), a newly identified cell division protein, is involved in proper septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that locZ is not essential but that its deletion results in cell division defects and shape deformation, causing cells to divide asymmetrically and generate unequally sized, occasionally anucleated, daughter cells. LocZ has a unique localization profile. It arrives early at midcell, before FtsZ and FtsA, and leaves the septum early, apparently moving along with the equatorial rings that mark the future division sites. Consistently, cells lacking LocZ also show misplacement of the Z-ring, suggesting that it could act as a positive regulator to determine septum placement. LocZ was identified as a substrate of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP, which regulates cell division in S. pneumoniae. Interestingly, homologues of LocZ are found only in streptococci, lactococci, and enterococci, indicating that this close phylogenetically related group of bacteria evolved a specific solution to spatially regulate cell division. PMID:25550321

  3. The Relationship between Cell Number, Division Behavior and Developmental Potential of Cleavage Stage Human Embryos: A Time-Lapse Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyi; Yang, Shuting; Gong, Fei; Lu, Changfu; Zhang, Shuoping; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Day 3 cleavage embryo transfer is routine in many assisted reproductive technology centers today. Embryos are usually selected according to cell number, cell symmetry and fragmentation for transfer. Many studies have showed the relationship between cell number and embryo developmental potential. However, there is limited understanding of embryo division behavior and their association with embryo cell number and developmental potential. A retrospective and observational study was conducted to investigate how different division behaviors affect cell number and developmental potential of day 3 embryos by time-lapse imaging. Based on cell number at day 3, the embryos (from 104 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment cycles, n = 799) were classified as follows: less than 5 cells (10C; n = 42). Division behavior, morphokinetic parameters and blastocyst formation rate were analyzed in 5 groups of day 3 embryos with different cell numbers. In 10C embryos increased compared to 7-8C embryos (45.8%, 33.3% vs. 11.1%, respectively). In ≥5C embryos, FR and DC significantly reduced developmental potential, whereas division behaviors. In NB embryos, the blastocyst formation rate increased with cell number from 7.4% (10C). In NB embryos, the cell cycle elongation or shortening was the main cause for abnormally low or high cell number, respectively. After excluding embryos with abnormal division behaviors, the developmental potential, implantation rate and live birth rate of day 3 embryos increased with cell number.

  4. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  5. An imaging flow cytometric method for measuring cell division history and molecular symmetry during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filby, Andrew; Perucha, Esperanza; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Chana, Prabhjoat; Heck, Susanne; Lord, Graham M; Davies, Derek

    2011-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important mechanism for generating cellular diversity, however, techniques for measuring the distribution of fate-regulating molecules during mitosis have been hampered by a lack of objectivity, quantitation, and statistical robustness. Here we describe a novel imaging flow cytometric approach that is able to report a cells proliferative history and cell cycle position using dye dilution, pH3, and PI staining to then measure the spatial distribution of fluorescent signals during mitosis using CCD-derived imagery. Using Jurkat cells, resolution of the fluorescently labeled populations was comparable to traditional PMT based cytometers thus eliminating the need to sort cells with specific division histories for microscopy. Subdividing mitotic stages by morphology allowed us to determine the time spent in each cell cycle phase using mathematical modeling approaches. Furthermore high sample throughput allowed us to collect statistically relevant numbers of cells without the need to use blocking agents that artificially enrich for mitotic events. The fluorescent imagery was used to measure PKCζ protein and EEA-1+ endosome distribution during different mitotic phases in Jurkat cells. While telophase cells represented the favorable population for measuring asymmetry, asynchronously dividing cells spent approximately 43 seconds in this stage, explaining why they were present at such low frequencies. This necessitated the acquisition of large cell numbers. Interestingly we found that PKCζ was inherited asymmetrically in 2.5% of all telophasic events whereas endosome inheritance was significantly more symmetrical. Furthermore, molecular polarity at early mitotic phases was a poor indicator of asymmetry during telophase highlighting that, though rare, telophasic events represented the best candidates for asymmetry studies. In summary, this technique combines the spatial information afforded by fluorescence microscopy with the statistical

  6. Cdc42 and Rab8a are critical for intestinal stem cell division, survival, and differentiation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Das, Soumyashree; Yu, Shiyan

    2012-01-01

    activity in the intestinal epithelium, where continued cell division takes place. Furthermore, mice haploinsufficient for both Cdc42 and Rab8a in the intestine demonstrated abnormal crypt morphogenesis and epithelial transporter physiology, further supporting their functional interaction. These data...

  7. Identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; Lee, Chrissie Y.; Vassilev, Boris; Zhu, Wenge; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Martin, Scott E.; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome duplication is normally restricted to once per cell division, but aberrant events that allow excess DNA replication (EDR) promote genomic instability and aneuploidy, both of which are characteristics of cancer development. Here we provide the first comprehensive identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division. An siRNA library of 21,584 human genes was screened for those that prevent EDR in cancer cells with undetectable chromosomal instability. Candidates were validated by testing multiple siRNAs and chemical inhibitors on both TP53+ and TP53- cells to reveal the relevance of this ubiquitous tumor suppressor to preventing EDR, and in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor to reveal the full extent of EDR. The results revealed 42 genes that prevented either DNA re-replication or unscheduled endoreplication. All of them participate in one or more of eight cell cycle events. Seventeen of them have not been identified previously in this capacity. Remarkably, 14 of the 42 genes have been shown to prevent aneuploidy in mice. Moreover, suppressing a gene that prevents EDR increased the ability of the chemotherapeutic drug Paclitaxel to induce EDR, suggesting new opportunities for synthetic lethalities in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27144335

  8. Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the formin mDia2 upon completion of cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWard, Aaron D; Alberts, Arthur S

    2009-07-24

    Formins assemble non-branched actin filaments and modulate microtubule dynamics during cell migration and cell division. At the end of mitosis formins contribute to the generation of actin filaments that form the contractile ring. Rho small GTP-binding proteins activate mammalian diaphanous-related (mDia) formins by directly binding and disrupting an intramolecular autoinhibitory mechanism. Although the Rho-regulated activation mechanism is well characterized, little is known about how formins are switched off. Here we reveal a novel mechanism of formin regulation during cytokinesis based on the following observations; 1) mDia2 is degraded at the end of mitosis, 2) mDia2 is targeted for disposal by post-translational ubiquitin modification, 3) forced expression of activated mDia2 yields binucleate cells due to failed cytokinesis, and 4) the cytokinesis block is dependent upon mDia2-mediated actin assembly as versions of mDia2 incapable of nucleating actin but that still stabilize microtubules have no effect on cytokinesis. We propose that the tight control of mDia2 expression and ubiquitin-mediated degradation is essential for the completion of cell division. Because of the many roles for formins in cell morphology, we discuss the relevance of mDia protein turnover in other processes where ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is an essential component.

  9. Translational repression determines a neuronal potential in Drosophila asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, M; Imai, T; Kurusu, M; Hiromi, Y; Okano, H

    2001-05-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental strategy for generating cellular diversity during animal development. Daughter cells manifest asymmetry in their differential gene expression. Transcriptional regulation of this process has been the focus of many studies, whereas cell-type-specific 'translational' regulation has been considered to have a more minor role. During sensory organ development in Drosophila, Notch signalling directs the asymmetry between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, and a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 (TTK69) acts downstream of Notch as a determinant of non-neuronal identity. Here we show that repression of TTK69 protein expression in the neuronal lineage occurs translationally rather than transcriptionally. This translational repression is achieved by a direct interaction between cis-acting sequences in the 3' untranslated region of ttk69 messenger RNA and its trans-acting repressor, the RNA-binding protein Musashi (MSI). Although msi can act downstream of Notch, Notch signalling does not affect MSI expression. Thus, Notch signalling is likely to regulate MSI activity rather than its expression. Our results define cell-type-specific translational control of ttk69 by MSI as a downstream event of Notch signalling in asymmetric cell division.

  10. Brassinosteroid signaling directs formative cell divisions and protophloem differentiation in Arabidopsis root meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yeon Hee; Breda, Alice; Hardtke, Christian S

    2017-01-15

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) trigger an intracellular signaling cascade through its receptors BR INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), BRI1-LIKE 1 (BRL1) and BRL3. Recent studies suggest that BR-independent inputs related to vascular differentiation, for instance root protophloem development, modulate downstream BR signaling components. Here, we report that protophloem sieve element differentiation is indeed impaired in bri1 brl1 brl3 mutants, although this effect might not be mediated by canonical downstream BR signaling components. We also found that their small meristem size is entirely explained by reduced cell elongation, which is, however, accompanied by supernumerary formative cell divisions in the radial dimension. Thus, reduced cell expansion in conjunction with growth retardation, because of the need to accommodate supernumerary formative divisions, can account for the overall short root phenotype of BR signaling mutants. Tissue-specific re-addition of BRI1 activity partially rescued subsets of these defects through partly cell-autonomous, partly non-cell-autonomous effects. However, protophloem-specific BRI1 expression essentially rescued all major bri1 brl1 brl3 root meristem phenotypes. Our data suggest that BR perception in the protophloem is sufficient to systemically convey BR action in the root meristem context.

  11. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  12. CdO nanoparticle toxicity on growth, morphology, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2012-12-04

    This Article deals with the toxicological study of synthesized CdO nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli . Characterization of the CdO NPs was done by DLS, XRD, TEM, and AFM studies, and the average size of NPs was revealed as 22 ± 3 nm. The NPs showed bactericidal activity against E. coli. When NPs were added at midlog phase of growth, complete growth inhibitory concentration was found as 40 μg/mL. Bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form with increasing CdO NPs exposure time, and thereafter resulted in filamentation-associated clumping. From AFM study, severe damage of the cell surface was found in CdO NPs-treated cells. CdO NPs were found to interfere with the expression level of two conserved cell division components, ftsZ and ftsQ, in E. coli at both transcriptional and translational levels. Interference of CdO NPs in proper septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation was also observed in confocal micrographs. The elevated intracellular oxidative stress due to CdO NPs exposure seems to be one of the reasons for the changes in cell morphology and expression of division proteins in E. coli.

  13. Late assembly of the Vibrio cholerae cell division machinery postpones septation to the last 10% of the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elisa; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, François-Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is a highly regulated process, which involves the formation of a complex apparatus, the divisome, by over a dozen proteins. In the few model bacteria in which the division process was detailed, divisome assembly occurs in two distinct steps: a few proteins, including the FtsZ tubulin-like protein, form a membrane associated contractile ring, the Z-ring, at ~30% of the cell cycle. The Z-ring serves as a scaffold for the recruitment of a second series of proteins, including integral membrane and periplasmic cell wall remodelling enzymes, at ~50% of the cell cycle. Actual septation occupies most of the remaining half of the cell cycle. In contrast, we present evidence suggesting that early pre-divisional Z-rings form between 40 and 50% of the cell cycle and mature into fully assembled divisome at about 80% of the cell cycle in Vibrio cholerae. Thus, actual septation is restricted to a very short amount of time. Our results further suggest that late assembly of the divisome probably helps maintain the asymmetric polar organisation of V. cholerae cells by limiting the accumulation of a cell pole marker, HubP, at the nascent cell poles. PMID:28300142

  14. A Prophage-Encoded Small RNA Controls Metabolism and Cell Division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Ragunathan, Preethi T; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in diverse bacterial species, and while the functions of most remain unknown, some regulate key processes, particularly stress responses. The sRNA DicF was identified over 25 years ago as an inhibitor of cell division but since then has remained uncharacterized. DicF consists of 53 nucleotides and is encoded by a gene carried on a prophage (Qin) in the genomes of many Escherichia coli strains. We demonstrated that DicF inhibits cell division via direct base pairing with ftsZ mRNA to repress translation and prevent new synthesis of the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ. Systems analysis using computational and experimental methods identified additional mRNA targets of DicF: xylR and pykA mRNAs, encoding the xylose uptake and catabolism regulator and pyruvate kinase, respectively. Genetic analyses showed that DicF directly base pairs with and represses translation of these targets. Phenotypes of cells expressing DicF variants demonstrated that DicF-associated growth inhibition is not solely due to repression of ftsZ, indicating that the physiological consequences of DicF-mediated regulation extend beyond effects on cell division caused by reduced FtsZ synthesis. IMPORTANCE sRNAs are ubiquitous and versatile regulators of bacterial gene expression. A number of well-characterized examples in E. coli are highly conserved and present in the E. coli core genome. In contrast, the sRNA DicF (identified over 20 years ago but remaining poorly characterized) is encoded by a gene carried on a defective prophage element in many E. coli genomes. Here, we characterize DicF in order to better understand how horizontally acquired sRNA regulators impact bacterial gene expression and physiology. Our data confirm the long-hypothesized DicF-mediated regulation of ftsZ, encoding the bacterial tubulin homolog required for cell division. We further uncover DicF-mediated posttranscriptional control of metabolic gene expression. Ectopic

  15. Judging diatoms by their cover: variability in local elasticity of Lithodesmium undulatum undergoing cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Karp-Boss

    Full Text Available Unique features of diatoms are their intricate cell covers (frustules made out of hydrated, amorphous silica. The frustule defines and maintains cell shape and protects cells against grazers and pathogens, yet it must allow for cell expansion during growth and division. Other siliceous structures have also evolved in some chain-forming species as means for holding neighboring cells together. Characterization and quantification of mechanical properties of these structures are crucial for the understanding of the relationship between form and function in diatoms, but thus far only a handful of studies have addressed this issue. We conducted micro-indentation experiments, using atomic force microscopy (AFM, to examine local variations in elastic (Young's moduli of cells and linking structures in the marine, chain-forming diatom Lithodesmium undulatum. Using a fluorescent tracer that is incorporated into new cell wall components we tested the hypothesis that new siliceous structures differ in elastic modulus from their older counterparts. Results show that the local elastic modulus is a highly dynamic property. Elastic modulus of stained regions was significantly lower than that of unstained regions, suggesting that newly formed cell wall components are generally softer than the ones inherited from the parent cells. This study provides the first evidence of differentiation in local elastic properties in the course of the cell cycle. Hardening of newly formed regions may involve incorporation of additional, possibly organic, material but further studies are needed to elucidate the processes that regulate mechanical properties of the frustule during the cell cycle.

  16. Accelerated cell divisions drive the outgrowth of the regenerating spinal cord in axolotls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fabian; Albors, Aida Rodrigo; Mazurov, Vladimir; Brusch, Lutz; Deutsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Axolotls are unique in their ability to regenerate the spinal cord. However, the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Previously, we showed that regenerating stem cells in the axolotl spinal cord revert to a molecular state resembling embryonic neuroepithelial cells and functionally acquire rapid proliferative divisions (Rodrigo Albors et al., 2015). Here, we refine the analysis of cell proliferation in space and time and identify a high-proliferation zone in the regenerating spinal cord that shifts posteriorly over time. By tracking sparsely-labeled cells, we also quantify cell influx into the regenerate. Taking a mathematical modeling approach, we integrate these quantitative datasets of cell proliferation, neural stem cell activation and cell influx, to predict regenerative tissue outgrowth. Our model shows that while cell influx and neural stem cell activation play a minor role, the acceleration of the cell cycle is the major driver of regenerative spinal cord outgrowth in axolotls. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20357.001 PMID:27885987

  17. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  18. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  19. Egf Signaling Directs Neoblast Repopulation by Regulating Asymmetric Cell Division in Planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kai; Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Mohan, Ryan D; McKinney, Sean A; Seidel, Chris W; Alexander, Richard; Gotting, Kirsten; Workman, Jerry L; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-08-22

    A large population of proliferative stem cells (neoblasts) is required for physiological tissue homeostasis and post-injury regeneration in planarians. Recent studies indicate that survival of a few neoblasts after sublethal irradiation results in the clonal expansion of the surviving stem cells and the eventual restoration of tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. However, the precise mechanisms regulating the population dynamics of neoblasts remain largely unknown. Here, we uncovered a central role for epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling during in vivo neoblast expansion mediated by Smed-egfr-3 (egfr-3) and its putative ligand Smed-neuregulin-7 (nrg-7). Furthermore, the EGF receptor-3 protein localizes asymmetrically on the cytoplasmic membrane of neoblasts, and the ratio of asymmetric to symmetric cell divisions decreases significantly in egfr-3(RNAi) worms. Our results not only provide the first molecular evidence of asymmetric stem cell divisions in planarians, but also demonstrate that EGF signaling likely functions as an essential regulator of neoblast clonal expansion.

  20. Temporal controls of the asymmetric cell division cycle in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Li

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric cell division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is orchestrated by an elaborate gene-protein regulatory network, centered on three major control proteins, DnaA, GcrA and CtrA. The regulatory network is cast into a quantitative computational model to investigate in a systematic fashion how these three proteins control the relevant genetic, biochemical and physiological properties of proliferating bacteria. Different controls for both swarmer and stalked cell cycles are represented in the mathematical scheme. The model is validated against observed phenotypes of wild-type cells and relevant mutants, and it predicts the phenotypes of novel mutants and of known mutants under novel experimental conditions. Because the cell cycle control proteins of Caulobacter are conserved across many species of alpha-proteobacteria, the model we are proposing here may be applicable to other genera of importance to agriculture and medicine (e.g., Rhizobium, Brucella.

  1. Regulation of cell divisions and differentiation by MALE STERILITY32 is required for anther development in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jihyun; Skibbe, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Kelliher, Timothy; Kremling, Karl; Walbot, Virginia; Cande, William Zacheus

    2013-11-01

    Male fertility in flowering plants relies on proper division and differentiation of cells in the anther, a process that gives rise to four somatic layers surrounding central germinal cells. The maize gene male sterility32 (ms32) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, which functions as an important regulator of both division and differentiation during anther development. After the four somatic cell layers are generated properly through successive periclinal divisions, in the ms32 mutant, tapetal precursor cells fail to differentiate, and, instead, undergo additional periclinal divisions to form extra layers of cells. These cells become vacuolated and expand, and lead to failure in pollen mother cell development. ms32 expression is specific to the pre-meiotic anthers and is distributed initially broadly in the four lobes, but as the anther develops, its expression becomes restricted to the innermost somatic layer, the tapetum. The ms32-ref mac1-1 double mutant is unable to form tapetal precursors and also exhibits excessive somatic proliferation leading to numerous, disorganized cell layers, suggesting a synergistic interaction between ms32 and mac1. Altogether, our results show that MS32 is a major regulator in maize anther development that promotes tapetum differentiation and inhibits periclinal division once a tapetal cell is specified.

  2. Crystal structure of the Z-ring associated cell division protein ZapC from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Cristina; Kureisaite-Ciziene, Danguole; Schmitz, Florian; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Vicente, Miguel; Löwe, Jan

    2015-12-21

    Bacterial cell division involves a contractile ring that organises downstream proteins at the division site and which contains the tubulin homologue FtsZ. ZapC has been discovered as a non-essential regulator of FtsZ. It localises to the septal ring and deletion of zapC leads to a mild phenotype, while overexpression inhibits cell division. Interference with cell division is facilitated by an interaction with FtsZ. Here, we present the 2.9 Å crystal structure of ZapC from Escherichia coli. ZapC forms a dimer and comprises two domains that belong to the Royal superfamily of which many members bind methylated arginines or lysines. ZapC contains an N-terminal chromo-like domain and a Tudor-like C-terminal domain. We show by ITC that ZapC binds the C-terminal tail of FtsZ.

  3. Positioning of polarity formation by extracellular signaling during asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-07-07

    Anterior-posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which ultimately generates cell diversity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a single fertilized egg cell (P0), its daughter cell (P1), and the germline precursors (P2 and P3 cells) form two exclusive domains of different PAR proteins on the membrane along the anterior-posterior axis. However, the phenomenon of polarity reversal has been observed in which the axis of asymmetric cell division of the P2 and P3 cells is formed in an opposite manner to that of the P0 and P1 cells. The extracellular signal MES-1/SRC-1 has been shown to induce polarity reversal, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, using a mathematical model, I explore the mechanism by which MES-1/SRC-1 signaling can induce polarity reversal and ultimately affect the process of polarity formation. I show that a positive correlation between SRC-1 and the on-rate of PAR-2 is the essential mechanism underlying polarity reversal, providing a mathematical basis for the orientation of cell polarity patterns.

  4. Mechanics of kinetochore microtubules and their interactions with chromosomes during cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Redemann, Stephanie; Baumgart, Johannes; Lindow, Norbert; Kratz, Andrea; Prohaska, Steffen; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The accurate segregation of chromosomes, and subsequent cell division, in Eukaryotic cells is achieved by the interactions of an assembly of microtubules (MTs) and motor-proteins, known as the mitotic spindle. We use a combination of our computational platform for simulating cytoskeletal assemblies and our structural data from high-resolution electron tomography of the mitotic spindle, to study the kinetics and mechanics of MTs in the spindle, and their interactions with chromosomes during chromosome segregation in the first cell division in C.elegans embryo. We focus on kinetochore MTs, or KMTs, which have one end attached to a chromosome. KMTs are thought to be a key mechanical component in chromosome segregation. Using exploratory simulations of MT growth, bending, hydrodynamic interactions, and attachment to chromosomes, we propose a mechanical model for KMT-chromosome interactions that reproduces observed KMT length and shape distributions from electron tomography. We find that including detailed hydrodynamic interactions between KMTs is essential for agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. Completion of cell division is associated with maximum telomerase activity in naturally synchronized cultures of the green alga Desmodesmus quadricauda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Bišová, Kateřina; Fojtová, Miloslava; Lukešová, Alena; Hrčková, Kristýna; Sýkorová, Eva

    2013-03-18

    Telomerase maintains the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, and its activity is an important parameter correlating with the proliferative capacity of cells. We have investigated cell cycle-specific changes in telomerase activity using cultures of Desmodesmus quadricauda, a model alga naturally synchronized by light/dark entrainment. A quantitative telomerase assay revealed high activity in algal cultures, with slight changes during the light period. Significantly increased telomerase activity was observed at the end of the dark phase, when cell division was complete. In contrast to other models, a natural separation between nuclear and cellular division typical for the cell cycle in D. quadricauda made this observation possible.

  6. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones A Maxwell P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L. was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27 in controls to 65.3% (±4.60. Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59 by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived

  7. A model for the Escherichia coli FtsB/FtsL/FtsQ cell division complex

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    Lagos Rosalba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial division is produced by the formation of a macromolecular complex in the middle of the cell, called the divisome, formed by more than 10 proteins. This process can be divided into two steps, in which the first is the polymerization of FtsZ to form the Z ring in the cytoplasm, and then the sequential addition of FtsA/ZipA to anchor the ring at the cytoplasmic membrane, a stage completed by FtsEX and FtsK. In the second step, the formation of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery in the periplasm takes place, followed by cell division. The proteins involved in connecting both steps in cell division are FtsQ, FtsB and FtsL, and their interaction is a crucial and conserved event in the division of different bacteria. These components are small bitopic membrane proteins, and their specific function seems to be mainly structural. The purpose of this study was to obtain a structural model of the periplasmic part of the FtsB/FtsL/FtsQ complex, using bioinformatics tools and experimental data reported in the literature. Results Two oligomeric models for the periplasmic region of the FtsB/FtsL/FtsQ E. coli complex were obtained from bioinformatics analysis. The FtsB/FtsL subcomplex was modelled as a coiled-coil based on sequence information and several stoichiometric possibilities. The crystallographic structure of FtsQ was added to this complex, through protein-protein docking. Two final structurally-stable models, one trimeric and one hexameric, were obtained. The nature of the protein-protein contacts was energetically favourable in both models and the overall structures were in agreement with the experimental evidence reported. Conclusions The two models obtained for the FtsB/FtsL/FtsQ complex were stable and thus compatible with the in vivo periplasmic complex structure. Although the hexameric model 2:2:2 has features that indicate that this is the most plausible structure, the ternary complex 1:1:1 cannot be discarded

  8. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates mode of cell division of early cerebral cortex progenitors and increases astrogliogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geissy LL Araújo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH plays a critical role in the development of different tissues. In the central nervous system, SHH is well known to contribute to the patterning of the spinal cord and separation of the brain hemispheres. In addition, it has recently been shown that SHH signaling also contributes to the patterning of the telencephalon and establishment of adult neurogenic niches. In this work, we investigated whether SHH signaling influences the behavior of neural progenitors isolated from the dorsal telencephalon, which generate excitatory neurons and macroglial cells in vitro. We observed that SHH increases proliferation of cortical progenitors and generation of astrocytes, whereas blocking SHH signaling with cyclopamine has opposite effects. In both cases, generation of neurons did not seem to be affected. However, cell survival was broadly affected by blockade of SHH signaling. SHH effects were related to three different cell phenomena: mode of cell division, cell cycle length and cell growth. Together, our data in vitro demonstrate that SHH signaling controls cell behaviors that are important for proliferation of cerebral cortex progenitors, as well as differentiation and survival of neurons and astroglial cells.

  9. Molecular Insights into Division of Single Human Cancer Cells in On-Chip Transparent Microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, mammalian cells proliferate within 3D environments consisting of numerous microcavities and channels, which contain a variety of chemical and physical cues. External environments often differ between normal and pathological states, such as the unique spatial constraints that metastasizing cancer cells experience as they circulate the vasculature through arterioles and narrow capillaries, where they can divide and acquire elongated cylindrical shapes. While metastatic tumors cause most cancer deaths, factors impacting early cancer cell proliferation inside the vasculature and those that can promote the formation of secondary tumors remain largely unknown. Prior studies investigating confined mitosis have mainly used 2D cell culture systems. Here, we mimic aspects of metastasizing tumor cells dividing inside blood capillaries by investigating single-cell divisions of living human cancer cells, trapped inside 3D rolled-up, transparent nanomembranes. We assess the molecular effects of tubular confinement on key mitotic features, using optical high- and super-resolution microscopy. Our experiments show that tubular confinement affects the morphology and dynamics of the mitotic spindle, chromosome arrangements, and the organization of the cell cortex. Moreover, we reveal that membrane blebbing and/or associated processes act as a potential genome-safety mechanism, limiting the extent of genomic instability caused by mitosis in confined circumstances, especially in tubular 3D microenvironments. Collectively, our study demonstrates the potential of rolled-up nanomembranes for gaining molecular insights into key cellular events occurring in tubular 3D microenvironments in vivo. PMID:27267364

  10. Heterogeneity, Cell Biology and Tissue Mechanics of Pseudostratified Epithelia: Coordination of Cell Divisions and Growth in Tightly Packed Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzyz, P J; Matejcic, M; Norden, C

    2016-01-01

    Pseudostratified epithelia (PSE) are tightly packed proliferative tissues that are important precursors of the development of diverse organs in a plethora of species, invertebrate and vertebrate. PSE consist of elongated epithelial cells that are attached to the apical and basal side of the tissue. The nuclei of these cells undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM) which leads to all mitotic events taking place at the apical surface of the epithelium. In this review, we discuss the intricacies of proliferation in PSE, considering cell biological, as well as the physical aspects. First, we summarize the principles governing the invariability of apical nuclear migration and apical cell division as well as the importance of apical mitoses for tissue proliferation. Then, we focus on the mechanical and structural features of these tissues. Here, we discuss how the overall architecture of pseudostratified tissues changes with increased cell packing. Lastly, we consider possible mechanical cues resulting from these changes and their potential influence on cell proliferation.

  11. Targeting the Wolbachia cell division protein FtsZ as a new approach for antifilarial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiru Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics targeting the obligate bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia of filarial parasites has been validated as an approach for controlling filarial infection in animals and humans. Availability of genomic sequences for the Wolbachia (wBm present in the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi has enabled genome-wide searching for new potential drug targets. In the present study, we investigated the cell division machinery of wBm and determined that it possesses the essential cell division gene ftsZ which was expressed in all developmental stages of B. malayi examined. FtsZ is a GTPase thereby making the protein an attractive Wolbachia drug target. We described the molecular characterization and catalytic properties of Wolbachia FtsZ. We also demonstrated that the GTPase activity was inhibited by the natural product, berberine, and small molecule inhibitors identified from a high-throughput screen. Furthermore, berberine was also effective in reducing motility and reproduction in B. malayi parasites in vitro. Our results should facilitate the discovery of selective inhibitors of FtsZ as a novel anti-symbiotic approach for controlling filarial infection. NOTE: The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper are available in GenBank™ Data Bank under the accession number wAlB-FtsZ (JN616286.

  12. Targeting the Wolbachia cell division protein FtsZ as a new approach for antifilarial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiru; Garner, Amanda L; Gloeckner, Christian; Janda, Kim D; Carlow, Clotilde K

    2011-11-01

    The use of antibiotics targeting the obligate bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia of filarial parasites has been validated as an approach for controlling filarial infection in animals and humans. Availability of genomic sequences for the Wolbachia (wBm) present in the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi has enabled genome-wide searching for new potential drug targets. In the present study, we investigated the cell division machinery of wBm and determined that it possesses the essential cell division gene ftsZ which was expressed in all developmental stages of B. malayi examined. FtsZ is a GTPase thereby making the protein an attractive Wolbachia drug target. We described the molecular characterization and catalytic properties of Wolbachia FtsZ. We also demonstrated that the GTPase activity was inhibited by the natural product, berberine, and small molecule inhibitors identified from a high-throughput screen. Furthermore, berberine was also effective in reducing motility and reproduction in B. malayi parasites in vitro. Our results should facilitate the discovery of selective inhibitors of FtsZ as a novel anti-symbiotic approach for controlling filarial infection. NOTE: The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper are available in GenBank™ Data Bank under the accession number wAlB-FtsZ (JN616286).

  13. The Type IVa Pilus Machinery Is Recruited to Sites of Future Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tyson; Buensuceso, Ryan N C; Tammam, Stephanie; Lamers, Ryan P; Harvey, Hanjeong; Howell, P Lynne; Burrows, Lori L

    2017-01-31

    Type IVa pili (T4aP) are ubiquitous microbial appendages used for adherence, twitching motility, DNA uptake, and electron transfer. Many of these functions depend on dynamic assembly and disassembly of the pilus by a megadalton-sized, cell envelope-spanning protein complex located at the poles of rod-shaped bacteria. How the T4aP assembly complex becomes integrated into the cell envelope in the absence of dedicated peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases is unknown. After ruling out the potential involvement of housekeeping PG hydrolases in the installation of the T4aP machinery in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we discovered that key components of inner (PilMNOP) and outer (PilQ) membrane subcomplexes are recruited to future sites of cell division. Midcell recruitment of a fluorescently tagged alignment subcomplex component, mCherry-PilO, depended on PilQ secretin monomers-specifically, their N-terminal PG-binding AMIN domains. PilP, which connects PilO to PilQ, was required for recruitment, while PilM, which is structurally similar to divisome component FtsA, was not. Recruitment preceded secretin oligomerization in the outer membrane, as loss of the PilQ pilotin PilF had no effect on localization. These results were confirmed in cells chemically blocked for cell division prior to outer membrane invagination. The hub protein FimV and a component of the polar organelle coordinator complex-PocA-were independently required for midcell recruitment of PilO and PilQ. Together, these data suggest an integrated, energy-efficient strategy for the targeting and preinstallation-rather than retrofitting-of the T4aP system into nascent poles, without the need for dedicated PG-remodeling enzymes.

  14. Entropyomics as the Blueprint of the Logic of Normal Cell Division and Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Afrasiabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this article I propose a blueprint based on one of the most fundamental laws governing the known universe, namely the second law of thermodynamics and I present support for its central role in initiation of mitosis and relationship of the other sub cellular compartments and their organization. Approach: Life is considered to be the most sophisticated antientropy machinery ever born on the face of the universe as far as its power to minimize the speed of rise in entropy is concerned, however we all get old, sick and die because it is not possible to stop the rise in entropy based on the nature of the known universe. Results: Lack of understanding of the scientific foundation of logic of the normal cell division has surrounded us by darkness and has made analysis of an ever increasing and explosive amount of information originating from whole genome sequencing, genomics, exonomics, proteomics and metabolomics more problematic. Clearly this understanding is the prerequisite for understanding of pathological states of cell division including malignancy. Conclusion/Recommendations: The main approach to this problem is calculation of the free energy of the master regulator proteins of the intracellular communication network of the cancer stem cell and its normal counterpart which in turn could get identified by the available mathematical models that could identify master regulator proteins of the intracellular communication network and deciphering the difference by spectrophotometry at a given wavelength of light and identification of higher absorbance in the malignant counterpart and designing epigenetic or homologous recombination mediated methodology using nanotechology as a delivery mechanism targeting transcription of mRNAs which would lead to protein products with a normal free energy for that cell lineage / higher free energy compared with its malignant counterpart and by doing so we could convert the

  15. The Type IVa Pilus Machinery Is Recruited to Sites of Future Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tyson; Buensuceso, Ryan N. C.; Tammam, Stephanie; Lamers, Ryan P.; Harvey, Hanjeong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type IVa pili (T4aP) are ubiquitous microbial appendages used for adherence, twitching motility, DNA uptake, and electron transfer. Many of these functions depend on dynamic assembly and disassembly of the pilus by a megadalton-sized, cell envelope-spanning protein complex located at the poles of rod-shaped bacteria. How the T4aP assembly complex becomes integrated into the cell envelope in the absence of dedicated peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases is unknown. After ruling out the potential involvement of housekeeping PG hydrolases in the installation of the T4aP machinery in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we discovered that key components of inner (PilMNOP) and outer (PilQ) membrane subcomplexes are recruited to future sites of cell division. Midcell recruitment of a fluorescently tagged alignment subcomplex component, mCherry-PilO, depended on PilQ secretin monomers—specifically, their N-terminal PG-binding AMIN domains. PilP, which connects PilO to PilQ, was required for recruitment, while PilM, which is structurally similar to divisome component FtsA, was not. Recruitment preceded secretin oligomerization in the outer membrane, as loss of the PilQ pilotin PilF had no effect on localization. These results were confirmed in cells chemically blocked for cell division prior to outer membrane invagination. The hub protein FimV and a component of the polar organelle coordinator complex—PocA—were independently required for midcell recruitment of PilO and PilQ. Together, these data suggest an integrated, energy-efficient strategy for the targeting and preinstallation—rather than retrofitting—of the T4aP system into nascent poles, without the need for dedicated PG-remodeling enzymes. PMID:28143978

  16. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya Kumar Charaka; Kruti P Mehta; H S Misra

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the `Min’ proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  17. A pulse-chase strategy for EdU labelling assay is able to rapidly quantify cell division orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaofeng; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-09-01

    Measurement of the direction of cell division is an important, yet difficult, task to analyse how a plant organ acquires its final shape from an initially small group of cells. We introduce a method that rapidly and easily quantifies cell division direction and is applicable to all plant species. A pulse-chase strategy for 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labelling assay was established and was shown to be successful for leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and Juncus prismatocarpus. By optimization of the pulse and chase periods, most of the signals obtained were sets of daughter nuclei. For Arabidopsis, the optimal time was a 45-min pulse and a 7-h chase. For J. prismatocarpus, the optimal time was a 2-h pulse and a 13.5-h chase. The positions of the daughter nuclei were used to quantify cell division direction in the Arabidopsis leaf primordia. Overall, cell division along the proximal-distal axis was more frequent than along the medial-lateral axis. In petiole, major vein, minor vein and margin areas, the major cell division direction seemed to be coincident with the direction of auxin flow. The advantages of our method over the few methods used previously are discussed. We anticipate that it will provide opportunities to study plant development in the near future.

  18. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaka, Vijaya Kumar; Mehta, Kruti P; Misra, H S

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the 'Min' proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  19. Effect of capric, lauric and alpha-linolenic acids on the division time distributions of single cells of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado Kamdem, S; Guerzoni, M E; Baranyi, J; Pin, C

    2008-11-30

    The effect of non-inhibitory concentrations of capric, lauric and alpha-linolenic acids (C10:0, C12:0 and C18:3 respectively) on the division time distribution of single cells of Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated at pH 7 and pH 5. The effect of the initial cell concentration on the lag time of growing cell populations was also assessed. The statistical properties of the division times (defined as the time interval from birth to next binary fission for a single cell) were studied using the method of Elfwing et al. [Elfwing, A., Le Marc, Y., Baranyi, J., Ballagi, A., 2004. Observing the growth and division of large number of individual bacteria using image analysis. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 70, 675-678]. The division times were significantly longer in the presence of free fatty acids than in the control. Shorter division intervals were detected at pH 7 than at pH 5 in the control experiment and in the presence of C10:0. However, both C12:0 and C18:3 slowed down the growth, regardless of the pH. The observed division time distributions were used to simulate growth curves from different inoculum sizes using the stochastic birth process described by Pin and Baranyi [Pin, C., Baranyi, J., 2006. Kinetics of single cells: observation and modelling of a stochastic process. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 72, 2163-2169]. The output of the simulation results were compared with observed data. The lag times fitted to simulated growth curves were in good agreement with those fitted to growth curves measured by plate counts. The averaged out effect of the population masked the effect of the free fatty acids and pH on the division times of single cells.

  20. [On the effect of Chinese lacquer upon the cell division of root tip of Allium cepa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, H; Liang, W

    1997-01-01

    Chinese Lacquer, as a fine coating, has been studied and applied for thousands years. The allergic reaction in Chinese Lacquer on the human skin has also been known early. The reaction of Chinese Lacquer on mitosis of cell in plant meristem have not been reported yet and was carefully studied in this paper. The result showed that Chinese Lacquer induced severe abnormality of mitotic division in Allium cepa root tips. This was more obvious in the anaphase and telophase, especially in the former phase laggard chromosomes, chromosome bridges, acentric fragments and polypolar distribution could be seen frequently. A lot of polynuclear bodies were observed in the telophase. Therefore, we think that the Chinese Lacquer can be used as a plant cell mutagen, and suggest geneticists and physiologists to do more researches on the effects of Chinese Lacquer at the genetic variation, metabolism etc.

  1. Influence of hydroxyurea on cell divisions and microtubular cytoskeleton in Allium cepa root meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Q. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In onion roots, hydroxyurea (HU causes a gradual depression of mitotic activity which ceases after 24-36 hrs. The effect is reversible; divisions begin after several hours of recovery and after 12-14 hrs about 90% cells undergo mitosis. Mitotic activity commences in the distal region of the apical meristem, and as a wave it spreads towards the apex. In the roots treated with HU for a short time, the tubulin immunofluorescence method reveals normal arrays of microtubules (MTs. After 36 hrs of HU treatment there are only cortical and endocytoplasmatic MTs. In the recovering roots, preprophase bands (PB mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts appear. Some PBs are split into two parallel rings. These abnormal PBs mostly occur in elongated cells. Apart from this, HU does not appear to have any significant influence on microtubular organization.

  2. Fruit illumination stimulates cell division but has no detectable effect on fruit size in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Robert C O; Heuvelink, Ep; de Visser, Pieter H B; Lammers, Michiel; de Maagd, Ruud A; Marcelis, Leo F M; Struik, Paul C

    2015-05-01

    Light affects plant growth through assimilate availability and signals regulating development. The effects of light on growth of tomato fruit were studied using cuvettes with light-emitting diodes providing white, red or blue light to individual tomato trusses for different periods during daytime. Hypotheses tested were as follows: (1) light-grown fruits have stronger assimilate sinks than dark-grown fruits, and (2) responses depend on light treatment provided, and fruit development stage. Seven light treatments [dark, 12-h white, 24-h white, 24-h red and 24-h blue light, dark in the first 24 days after anthesis (DAA) followed by 24-h white light until breaker stage, and its reverse] were applied. Observations were made between anthesis and breaker stage at fruit, cell and gene levels. Fruit size and carbohydrate content did not respond to light treatments while cell division was strongly stimulated at the expense of cell expansion by light. The effects of light on cell number and volume were independent of the combination of light color and intensity. Increased cell division and decreased cell volume when fruits were grown in the presence of light were not clearly corroborated by the expression pattern of promoters and inhibitors of cell division and expansion analyzed in this study, implying a strong effect of posttranscriptional regulation. Results suggest the existence of a complex homeostatic regulatory system for fruit growth in which reduced cell division is compensated by enhanced cell expansion.

  3. High Antioxidant Activity Facilitates Maintenance of Cell Division in Leaves of Drought Tolerant Maize Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Viktoriya; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Vasileva, Ivanina; Petrova, Alexandra S.; Holek, Anna; Mariën, Joachim; Asard, Han; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the impact of drought on growth regulation in leaves of 13 maize varieties with different drought sensitivity and geographic origins (Western Europe, Egypt, South Africa) and the inbred line B73. Combining kinematic analysis of the maize leaf growth zone with biochemical measurements at a high spatial resolution allowed us to examine the correlation between the regulation of the cellular processes cell division and elongation, and the molecular redox-regulation in response to drought. Moreover, we demonstrated differences in the response of the maize lines to mild and severe levels of water deficit. Kinematic analysis indicated that drought tolerant lines experienced less impact on leaf elongation rate due to a smaller reduction of cell production, which, in turn, was due to a smaller decrease of meristem size and number of cells in the leaf meristem. Clear differences in growth responses between the groups of lines with different geographic origin were observed in response to drought. The difference in drought tolerance between the Egyptian hybrids was significantly larger than between the European and South-African hybrids. Through biochemical analyses, we investigated whether antioxidant activity in the growth zone, contributes to the drought sensitivity differences. We used a hierarchical clustering to visualize the patterns of lipid peroxidation, H2O2 and antioxidant concentrations, and enzyme activities throughout the growth zone, in response to stress. The results showed that the lines with different geographic region used different molecular strategies to cope with the stress, with the Egyptian hybrids responding more at the metabolite level and African and the European hybrids at the enzyme level. However, drought tolerance correlated with both, higher antioxidant levels throughout the growth zone and higher activities of the redox-regulating enzymes CAT, POX, APX, and GR specifically in leaf meristems. These findings provide evidence for a link

  4. The adhesion GPCR latrophilin - a novel signaling cascade in oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Jana; Prömel, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Although several signaling pathways in oriented cell division have been well characterized such as delta/notch inductions or wnt/frizzled-based anterior-posterior polarity, there is strong evidence for additional signal pathways controlling early anterior-posterior polarity decisions. The homolog of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor latrophilin, LAT-1 has been identified as a receptor essential for oriented cell division in an anterior-posterior direction of specific blastomeres in the early C. elegans embryo. We recently conducted a study aiming at clarifying the signals involved in LAT-1 function. We identified a Gs protein/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway in vitro and demonstrated its physiological relevance in oriented cell division. By interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates cAMP levels. These data indicate that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. This commentary will discuss our findings in the context of the current knowledge of mechanisms controlling oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity. Further, we identify open questions which need to be addressed in the future.

  5. Arabidopsis CAP regulates the actin cytoskeleton necessary for plant cell elongation and division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2002-01-01

    An Arabidopsis cDNA (AtCAP1) that encodes a predicted protein of 476 amino acids highly homologous with the yeast cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was isolated. Expression of AtCAP1 in the budding yeast CAP mutant was able to rescue defects such as abnormal cell morphology and random budding pattern. The C-terminal domain, 158 amino acids of AtCAP1 possessing in vitro actin binding activity, was needed for the regulation of cytoskeleton-related defects of yeast. Transgenic plants overexpressing AtCAP1 under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter showed different levels of AtCAP1 accumulation related to the extent of growth abnormalities, in particular size reduction of leaves as well as petioles. Morphological alterations in leaves were attributable to decreased cell size and cell number in both epidermal and mesophyll cells. Tobacco suspension-cultured cells (Bright Yellow 2) overexpressing AtCAP1 exhibited defects in actin filaments and were unable to undergo mitosis. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation experiment suggested that AtCAP1 interacted with actin in vivo. Therefore, AtCAP1 may play a functional role in actin cytoskeleton networking that is essential for proper cell elongation and division.

  6. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  7. Mechanisms of organelle division and inheritance and their implications regarding the origin of eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria and plastids have their own DNAs and are regarded as descendants of endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Organellar DNAs are not naked in vivo but are associated with basic proteins to form DNA-protein complexes (called organelle nuclei). The concept of organelle nuclei provides a new approach to explain the origin, division, and inheritance of organelles. Organelles divide using organelle division rings (machineries) after organelle-nuclear division. Organelle division machineries are a c...

  8. Microcystin quota, cell division and microcystin net production of precultured Microcystis aeruginosa CYA 228 (Chroococcales, Cyanophyceae) under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyck, S.; Christoffersen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between the specific cell division rate (mu(c)), the specific microcystin (mcyst) production rate (mu(mcyst)) and the cellular content of mcyst (Q(mcyst)) was investigated during growth of Microcystis aeruginosa strain CYA 228 cells in the field (microcosms), and the results were...

  9. Cortical excitatory neurons become protected from cell division during neurogenesis in an Rb family-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Mio; Okada, Kei; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ajioka, Itsuki

    2013-06-01

    Cell cycle dysregulation leads to abnormal proliferation and cell death in a context-specific manner. Cell cycle progression driven via the Rb pathway forces neurons to undergo S-phase, resulting in cell death associated with the progression of neuronal degeneration. Nevertheless, some Rb- and Rb family (Rb, p107 and p130)-deficient differentiating neurons can proliferate and form tumors. Here, we found in mouse that differentiating cerebral cortical excitatory neurons underwent S-phase progression but not cell division after acute Rb family inactivation in differentiating neurons. However, the differentiating neurons underwent cell division and proliferated when Rb family members were inactivated in cortical progenitors. Differentiating neurons generated from Rb(-/-); p107(-/-); p130(-/-) (Rb-TKO) progenitors, but not acutely inactivated Rb-TKO differentiating neurons, activated the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway without increasing trimethylation at lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20), which has a role in protection against DNA damage. The activation of the DSB repair pathway was essential for the cell division of Rb-TKO differentiating neurons. These results suggest that newly born cortical neurons from progenitors become epigenetically protected from DNA damage and cell division in an Rb family-dependent manner.

  10. Flow cytometric quantification of T cell proliferation and division kinetics in woodchuck model of hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, Shashi A; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2005-01-01

    Woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the closest natural animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of liver injury caused by essentially noncytopathic, highly human specific hepatitis B virus (HBV). The importance of antiviral T cell response in induction of hepatitis and in control of HBV replication has been demonstrated. However, the understanding of how these responses contribute to the development of different immunomorphological forms of liver disease and their outcomes remain elusive. In this study, we established and standardized a flow cytometry assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) to assess WHV-specific and mitogen-driven T lymphocyte proliferative responses in woodchucks. The assay is of significantly greater sensitivity than the adenine incorporation assay currently used when applied to measure either WHV-specific T cell responses in acute (P measuring cell division rates. The study shows that woodchuck PBMC labeled with CFSE exhibit light scatter and fluorescence profiles compatible to those of human PBMC, allowing quantitation and deconvolution of the flow cytometric data by applying the existing analytical softwares. The availability of this novel assay should facilitate a more precise and comprehensive evaluation of hepadnavirus-specific and generalized T cell responses in experimental WHV hepatitis.

  11. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde derivatives as inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Sheng, Juzheng; Huang, Guihua; Ma, Ruixin; Yin, Fengxin; Song, Di; Zhao, Can; Ma, Shutao

    2015-06-05

    In an attempt to discover potential antibacterial agents against the increasing bacterial resistance, novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activity against nine significant pathogens using broth microdilution method, and their cell division inhibitory activity against four representative strains. In the in vitro antibacterial activity, the newly synthesized compounds generally displayed better efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 than the others. In particular, compounds 3, 8 and 10 exerted superior or comparable activity to all the reference drugs. In the cell division inhibitory activity, all the compounds showed the same trend as their in vitro antibacterial activity, exhibiting better activity against S. aureus ATCC25923 than the other strains. Additionally, compounds 3, 6, 7 and 8 displayed potent cell division inhibitory activity with an MIC value of below 1 μg/mL, over 256-fold better than all the reference drugs.

  12. Lipid droplets in cultured luteal cells in non-pregnant sheep fed different planes of nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanthusaeng, Vilaivan; Thammasiri, Jiratti; Bass, Casie S; Navanukraw, Chainarong; Borowicz, Pawel; Redmer, Dale A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of lipid droplets (LD) in luteal cells likely is important for energy storage and steroidogenesis in the highly metabolically active corpus luteum (CL). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of plane of nutrition on progesterone (P4) secretion, and lipid droplet number and size in cultured ovine luteal cells. Ewes were randomly assigned to one of three nutritional groups: control (C; 100% NRC requirements, n=9), overfed (O; 2×C, n=12), or underfed (U; 0.6×C, n=10). Superovulation was induced by follicle stimulating hormone injections. At the early and mid-luteal phases of the estrous cycle, CL were dissected from ovaries, and luteal cells isolated enzymatically. Luteal cells were incubated overnight in medium containing serum in chamber slides. Media were then changed to serum-free and after 24h incubation, media were collected for P4 analysis, and cells were fixed in formalin and stained with BODIPY followed by DAPI staining. Z-stacks of optical sections of large and small luteal cells (LLC and SLC, respectively) were obtained using a laser-scanning microscope. Rendered 3D images of individual LLC and SLC were analyzed for cell volume, and total and individual LD volume, number and percentage of cellular volume occupied by LD by using Imaris software. Concentrations of P4 in serum and media were greater (Pplane. LD total volume and number were greater (Pplane affect selected LD measurements and thus may affect luteal functions. Furthermore, these data confirm that LD dynamics differ among parenchymal steroidogenic luteal cell types.

  13. The planar cell polarity protein Strabismus promotes Pins anterior localization during asymmetric division of sensory organ precursor cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns; Beaudoin-Massiani, Olivia; Stuttem, Isabella; Schweisguth, François

    2004-01-01

    Cell fate diversity is generated in part by the unequal segregation of cell-fate determinants during asymmetric cell division. In the Drosophila bristle lineage, the sensory organ precursor (pI) cell is polarized along the anteroposterior (AP) axis by Frizzled (Fz) receptor signaling. We show here that Fz localizes at the posterior apical cortex of the pI cell prior to mitosis, whereas Strabismus (Stbm) and Prickle (Pk), which are also required for AP polarization of the pI cell, co-localize at the anterior apical cortex. Thus, asymmetric localization of Fz, Stbm and Pk define two opposite cortical domains prior to mitosis of the pI cell. At mitosis, Stbm forms an anterior crescent that overlaps with the distribution of Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) and Discs-large (Dlg), two components of the anterior Dlg-Pins-Galphai complex that regulates the localization of cell-fate determinants. At prophase, Stbm promotes the anterior localization of Pins. By contrast, Dishevelled (Dsh) acts antagonistically to Stbm by excluding Pins from the posterior cortex. We propose that the Stbm-dependent recruitment of Pins at the anterior cortex of the pI cell is a novel read-out of planar cell polarity.

  14. Interaction of Mouse Pem Protein and Cell Division Cycle 37 Homolog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen GUO; Yue-Qin LI; Shi-Qian LI; Zhi-Wen LUO; Xin ZHANG; Dong-Sheng TANG; Tian-Hong ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Mouse Pem, a homeobox gene, encodes a protein consisting of 210 amino acid residues. To study the function of mouse Pem protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen the library of 7-day mouse embryo with full-length mouse Pem eDNA. Fifty-two colonies were obtained after 1.57×108 colonies were screened by nutrition limitation and β-galactosidase assay. Seven individual insert fragments were obtained from the library, and three of them were identified, one of which was confirmed to be the cell division cycle 37 (Cdc37) homolog gene by sequencing. The interaction between mouse Pem and Cdc37homolog was then confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and the possible interaction model was suggested.

  15. Studies on the cortical morphogenesis during cell division in Halteria grandinella (Muller, 1773) (Ciliophora, Oligotrichida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weibo

    1993-06-01

    Morphogenesis during cell division was investigated in oligotrichous ciliate, Halteria grandinella utilizing protargol impregnated specimens. The cortical morphogenetical pattern of Halteria grandinella is generally similar to that given by Fauré-Fremiet. The proter inherits the parental adoral zone of membranelles (AZM) apparently unchanged; in the opisthe the oral primordium develops de novo from a single. AZM-anlage; somatic cirri for both the proter and opisthe are separately differentiated from 10 (seldom 9) cirral primordia that originate de novo from 10 latitudinal developmental analagen. The anlage of paroral membrane of opisthe forms just to the right of the posterior end of the oral primordium. Each streak of cirral primordia develops 4 groups of basal body pairs: both of the anterior two consist of only one pair of basal bodies, on the contrary, each of the last two groups has 2 basal body pairs.

  16. Rate maintenance of cell division in Escherichia coli B/r: analysis of a simple nutritional shift-down.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaritsky, A; Helmstetter, C E

    1992-01-01

    A competitive (nonmetabolizable) inhibitor of glucose uptake, alpha-methylglucoside, was used to limit the growth of Escherichia coli. Cell division during such a nutritional shift-down was studied in batch cultures and with the "baby-machine" technique. Following a brief delay, the rate of division was maintained for 60 to 70 min in batch cultures and for an extended period in the baby machine. Decreases in cell size were due, in part, to a possible reduction in the mass per chromosome origi...

  17. Direct interaction of FtsZ and MreB is required for septum synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Andrew K.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-01-01

    How bacteria coordinate cell growth with division is not well understood. Bacterial cell elongation is controlled by actin–MreB while cell division is governed by tubulin–FtsZ. A ring-like structure containing FtsZ (the Z ring) at mid-cell attracts other cell division proteins to form the divisome, an essential protein assembly required for septum synthesis and cell separation. The Z ring exists at mid-cell during a major part of the cell cycle without contracting. Here, we show that MreB and...

  18. ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control cytokinetic abscission during germline stem cell division in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsmund H Eikenes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abscission is the final step of cytokinesis that involves the cleavage of the intercellular bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Recent studies have given novel insight into the spatiotemporal regulation and molecular mechanisms controlling abscission in cultured yeast and human cells. The mechanisms of abscission in living metazoan tissues are however not well understood. Here we show that ALIX and the ESCRT-III component Shrub are required for completion of abscission during Drosophila female germline stem cell (fGSC division. Loss of ALIX or Shrub function in fGSCs leads to delayed abscission and the consequent formation of stem cysts in which chains of daughter cells remain interconnected to the fGSC via midbody rings and fusome. We demonstrate that ALIX and Shrub interact and that they co-localize at midbody rings and midbodies during cytokinetic abscission in fGSCs. Mechanistically, we show that the direct interaction between ALIX and Shrub is required to ensure cytokinesis completion with normal kinetics in fGSCs. We conclude that ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control abscission in Drosophila fGSCs and that their complex formation is required for accurate abscission timing in GSCs in vivo.

  19. Bradykinin promotes neuron-generating division of neural progenitor cells through ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillat, Micheli M; Lameu, Claudiana; Trujillo, Cleber A; Glaser, Talita; Cappellari, Angélica R; Negraes, Priscilla D; Battastini, Ana M O; Schwindt, Telma T; Muotri, Alysson R; Ulrich, Henning

    2016-09-15

    During brain development, cells proliferate, migrate and differentiate in highly accurate patterns. In this context, published results indicate that bradykinin functions in neural fate determination, favoring neurogenesis and migration. However, mechanisms underlying bradykinin function are yet to be explored. Our findings indicate a previously unidentified role for bradykinin action in inducing neuron-generating division in vitro and in vivo, given that bradykinin lengthened the G1-phase of the neural progenitor cells (NPC) cycle and increased TIS21 (also known as PC3 and BTG2) expression in hippocampus from newborn mice. This role, triggered by activation of the kinin-B2 receptor, was conditioned by ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis of hippocampal dentate gyrus showed that the percentage of Ki67(+) cells markedly increased in bradykinin-treated mice, and ERK1/2 inhibition affected this neurogenic response. The progress of neurogenesis depended on sustained ERK phosphorylation and resulted in ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus in NPCs and PC12 cells, changing expression of genes such as Hes1 and Ngn2 (also known as Neurog2). In agreement with the function of ERK in integrating signaling pathways, effects of bradykinin in stimulating neurogenesis were reversed following removal of protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated sustained phosphorylation.

  20. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  1. Roles of Cell Division and Gene Transcription in the Methylation of CpG Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Christina M.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.; Gonzales, Felicidad A.; Nguyen, Carvell T.; Robertson, Keith D.; Jones, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    De novo methylation of CpG islands within the promoters of eukaryotic genes is often associated with their transcriptional repression, yet the methylation of CpG islands located downstream of promoters does not block transcription. We investigated the kinetics of mRNA induction, demethylation, and remethylation of the p16 promoter and second-exon CpG islands in T24 cells after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment to explore the relationship between CpG island methylation and gene transcription. The rates of remethylation of both CpG islands were associated with time but not with the rate of cell division, and remethylation of the p16 exon 2 CpG island occurred at a higher rate than that of the p16 promoter. We also examined the relationship between the remethylation of coding sequence CpG islands and gene transcription. The kinetics of remethylation of the p16 exon 2, PAX-6 exon 5, c-ABL exon 11, and MYF-3 exon 3 loci were examined following 5-Aza-CdR treatment because these genes contain exonic CpG islands which are hypermethylated in T24 cells. Remethylation occurred most rapidly in the p16, PAX-6, and c-ABL genes, shown to be transcribed prior to drug treatment. These regions also exhibited higher levels of remethylation in single-cell clones and subclones derived from 5-Aza-CdR-treated T24 cells. Our data suggest that de novo methylation is not restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle and that transcription through CpG islands does not inhibit their remethylation. PMID:10490608

  2. Novel role of phosphorylation-dependent interaction between FtsZ and FipA in mycobacterial cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamakshi Sureka

    Full Text Available The bacterial divisome is a multiprotein complex. Specific protein-protein interactions specify whether cell division occurs optimally, or whether division is arrested. Little is known about these protein-protein interactions and their regulation in mycobacteria. We have investigated the interrelationship between the products of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene cluster Rv0014c-Rv0019c, namely PknA (encoded by Rv0014c and FtsZ-interacting protein A, FipA (encoded by Rv0019c and the products of the division cell wall (dcw cluster, namely FtsZ and FtsQ. M. smegmatis strains depleted in components of the two gene clusters have been complemented with orthologs of the respective genes of M. tuberculosis. Here we identify FipA as an interacting partner of FtsZ and FtsQ and establish that PknA-dependent phosphorylation of FipA on T77 and FtsZ on T343 is required for cell division under oxidative stress. A fipA knockout strain of M. smegmatis is less capable of withstanding oxidative stress than the wild type and showed elongation of cells due to a defect in septum formation. Localization of FtsQ, FtsZ and FipA at mid-cell was also compromised. Growth and survival defects under oxidative stress could be functionally complemented by fipA of M. tuberculosis but not its T77A mutant. Merodiploid strains of M. smegmatis expressing the FtsZ(T343A showed inhibition of FtsZ-FipA interaction and Z ring formation under oxidative stress. Knockdown of FipA led to elongation of M. tuberculosis cells grown in macrophages and reduced intramacrophage growth. These data reveal a novel role of phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions involving FipA, in the sustenance of mycobacterial cell division under oxidative stress.

  3. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  4. (1) The Relationship of Protein Expression and Cell Division, (2) 3D Imaging of Cells Using Digital Holography, and (3) General Chemistry Enrollment at University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1: The role of cell division in protein expression is important to understand in order to guide the development of better nonviral gene delivery materials that can transport DNA to the nucleus with high efficiency for a variety of cell types, particularly when nondividing cells are targets of gene therapy. We evaluated the relationship…

  5. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-27

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  6. Structure-function analysis of the extracellular domain of the pneumococcal cell division site positioning protein MapZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Jean, Nicolas L.; Guinot, Mégane; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Laguri, Cédric; Bougault, Catherine M.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Grangeasse, Christophe; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Accurate placement of the bacterial division site is a prerequisite for the generation of two viable and identical daughter cells. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the positive regulatory mechanism involving the membrane protein MapZ positions precisely the conserved cell division protein FtsZ at the cell centre. Here we characterize the structure of the extracellular domain of MapZ and show that it displays a bi-modular structure composed of two subdomains separated by a flexible serine-rich linker. We further demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminal subdomain serves as a pedestal for the C-terminal subdomain, which determines the ability of MapZ to mark the division site. The C-terminal subdomain displays a patch of conserved amino acids and we show that this patch defines a structural motif crucial for MapZ function. Altogether, this structure-function analysis of MapZ provides the first molecular characterization of a positive regulatory process of bacterial cell division.

  7. Pattern formation in Escherichia coli: A model for the pole-to-pole oscillations of Min proteins and the localization of the division site

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Proper cell division requires an accurate definition of the division plane. In bacteria, this plane is determined by a polymeric ring of the FtsZ protein. The site of Z ring assembly in turn is controlled by the Min system, which suppresses FtsZ polymerization at noncentral membrane sites. The Min proteins in Escherichia coli undergo a highly dynamic localization cycle, during which they oscillate between the membrane of both cell halves. By using computer simulati...

  8. Nuclear envelope dynamics during plant cell division suggest common mechanisms between kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graumann, Katja; Evans, David E

    2011-05-01

    Behaviour of the NE (nuclear envelope) during open mitosis has been explored extensively in metazoans, but lack of native markers has limited similar investigations in plants. In the present study, carried out using living synchronized tobacco BY-2 suspension cultures, the non-functional NE marker LBR (lamin B receptor)-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and two native, functional NE proteins, AtSUN1 [Arapidopsis thaliana SUN (Sad1/UNC84) 1] and AtSUN2, we provide evidence that the ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-retention theory for NE membranes is applicable in plants. We also observe two apparently unique plant features: location of the NE-membrane components in close proximity to chromatin throughout division, and spatially distinct reformation of the NE commencing at the chromatin surface facing the spindle poles and concluding at the surface facing the cell plate. Mobility of the proteins was investigated in the interphase NE, during NE breakdown and reformation, in the spindle membranes and the cell plate. A role for AtSUN2 in nuclear envelope breakdown is suggested.

  9. Expression of a begomoviral DNAβ gene in transgenic Nicotiana plants induced abnormal cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiao-feng; LI Yun-qin; HU Dong-wei; ZHOU Xue-ping

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of monopartite begomoviruses are being identified that a satellite molecule (DNAβ) is required to induce typical symptoms in host plants. DNAβ encodes a single gene (termed βC1) encoded in the complementary-sense. We have produced transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and N. tabacum plants expressing theβC1 gene of a DNAβ associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Transgenic plants expressing βC1 showed severe developmental abnormalities in both species. Microscopic analysis of sections of both transgenic and non-transgenic N. tabacum leaves showed abnormal outgrowths of transgenic N. tabacum to be due to disorganized cell division (hyperplasia) of spongy and palisade parenchyma. Immuno-gold labeling of sections with a polyclonal antibody against the βC1 protein showed that the βC1 protein accumulated in the nuclei of cells. The possible biological function of the βC1 protein was discussed.

  10. Strigolactones inhibit caulonema elongation and cell division in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Hoffmann

    Full Text Available In vascular plants, strigolactones (SLs are known for their hormonal role and for their role as signal molecules in the rhizosphere. SLs are also produced by the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which they act as signaling factors for controlling filament extension and possibly interaction with neighboring individuals. To gain a better understanding of SL action at the cellular level, we investigated the effect of exogenously added molecules (SLs or analogs in moss growth media. We used the previously characterized Ppccd8 mutant that is deficient in SL synthesis and showed that SLs affect moss protonema extension by reducing caulonema cell elongation and mainly cell division rate, both in light and dark conditions. Based on this effect, we set up bioassays to examine chemical structure requirements for SL activity in moss. The results suggest that compounds GR24, GR5, and 5-deoxystrigol are active in moss (as in pea, while other analogs that are highly active in the control of pea branching show little activity in moss. Interestingly, the karrikinolide KAR1, which shares molecular features with SLs, did not have any effect on filament growth, even though the moss genome contains several genes homologous to KAI2 (encoding the KAR1 receptor and no canonical homologue to D14 (encoding the SL receptor. Further studies should investigate whether SL signaling pathways have been conserved during land plant evolution.

  11. Strigolactones inhibit caulonema elongation and cell division in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Beate; Proust, Hélène; Belcram, Katia; Labrune, Cécile; Boyer, François-Didier; Rameau, Catherine; Bonhomme, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    In vascular plants, strigolactones (SLs) are known for their hormonal role and for their role as signal molecules in the rhizosphere. SLs are also produced by the moss Physcomitrella patens, in which they act as signaling factors for controlling filament extension and possibly interaction with neighboring individuals. To gain a better understanding of SL action at the cellular level, we investigated the effect of exogenously added molecules (SLs or analogs) in moss growth media. We used the previously characterized Ppccd8 mutant that is deficient in SL synthesis and showed that SLs affect moss protonema extension by reducing caulonema cell elongation and mainly cell division rate, both in light and dark conditions. Based on this effect, we set up bioassays to examine chemical structure requirements for SL activity in moss. The results suggest that compounds GR24, GR5, and 5-deoxystrigol are active in moss (as in pea), while other analogs that are highly active in the control of pea branching show little activity in moss. Interestingly, the karrikinolide KAR1, which shares molecular features with SLs, did not have any effect on filament growth, even though the moss genome contains several genes homologous to KAI2 (encoding the KAR1 receptor) and no canonical homologue to D14 (encoding the SL receptor). Further studies should investigate whether SL signaling pathways have been conserved during land plant evolution.

  12. Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Affect Parasite Cell Division and Increase the Survival of Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Duarte, Erica S.; Dubar, Faustine; Lawton, Philippe; França da Silva, Cristiane; C. Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré; de Souza, Wanderley; Biot, Christophe; Vommaro, Rossiane C.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, is a worldwide disease whose clinical manifestations include encephalitis and congenital malformations in newborns. Previously, we described the synthesis of new ethyl-ester derivatives of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin with ~40-fold increased activity against T. gondii in vitro, compared with the original compound. Cipro derivatives are expected to target the parasite’s DNA gyrase complex in the apicoplast. The activity of these compounds in vivo, as well as their mode of action, remained thus far uncharacterized. Here, we examined the activity of the Cipro derivatives in vivo, in a model of acute murine toxoplasmosis. In addition, we investigated the cellular effects T. gondii tachyzoites in vitro, by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When compared with Cipro treatment, 7-day treatments with Cipro derivatives increased mouse survival significantly, with 13–25% of mice surviving for up to 60 days post-infection (vs. complete lethality 10 days post-infection, with Cipro treatment). Light microscopy examination early (6 and 24h) post-infection revealed that 6-h treatments with Cipro derivatives inhibited the initial event of parasite cell division inside host cells, in an irreversible manner. By TEM and immunofluorescence, the main cellular effects observed after treatment with Cipro derivatives and Cipro were cell scission inhibition - with the appearance of ‘tethered’ parasites – malformation of the inner membrane complex, and apicoplast enlargement and missegregation. Interestingly, tethered daughter cells resulting from Cipro derivatives, and also Cipro, treatment did not show MORN1 cap or centrocone localization. The biological activity of Cipro derivatives against C. parvum, an apicomplexan species that lacks the apicoplast, is, approximately, 50 fold lower than that in T. gondii tachyzoites, supporting that these compounds targets the apicoplast. Our results show

  13. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  14. Auxin as an inducer of asymmetrical division generating the subsidiary cells in stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanos, Pantelis; Giannoutsou, Eleni; Apostolakos, Panagiotis; Galatis, Basil

    2015-01-01

    The data presented in this work revealed that in Zea mays the exogenously added auxins indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-napthaleneacetic acid (NAA), promoted the establishment of subsidiary cell mother cell (SMC) polarity and the subsequent subsidiary cell formation, while treatment with auxin transport inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and 1-napthoxyacetic acid (NOA) specifically blocked SMC polarization and asymmetrical division. Furthermore, in young guard cell mother cells (GMCs) the PIN1 auxin efflux carriers were mainly localized in the transverse GMC faces, while in the advanced GMCs they appeared both in the transverse and the lateral ones adjacent to SMCs. Considering that phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is an active component of auxin signal transduction and that phospholipid signaling contributes in the establishment of polarity, treatments with the specific inhibitor of the PI3K LY294002 were carried out. The presence of LY294002 suppressed polarization of SMCs and prevented their asymmetrical division, whereas combined treatment with exogenously added NAA and LY294002 restricted the promotional auxin influence on subsidiary cell formation. These findings support the view that auxin is involved in Z. mays subsidiary cell formation, probably functioning as inducer of the asymmetrical SMC division. Collectively, the results obtained from treatments with auxin transport inhibitors and the appearance of PIN1 proteins in the lateral GMC faces indicate a local transfer of auxin from GMCs to SMCs. Moreover, auxin signal transduction seems to be mediated by the catalytic function of PI3K.

  15. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  16. Exclusive multipotency and preferential asymmetric divisions in post-embryonic neural stem cells of the fish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ander, Janina-J; Hoeckendorf, Burkhard; Lust, Katharina; Kellner, Tanja; Kraemer, Isabel; Urbany, Cedric; Hasel, Eva; Harris, William A; Simons, Benjamin D; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2014-09-01

    The potency of post-embryonic stem cells can only be addressed in the living organism, by labeling single cells after embryonic development and following their descendants. Recently, transplantation experiments involving permanently labeled cells revealed multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) of embryonic origin in the medaka retina. To analyze whether NSC potency is affected by developmental progression, as reported for the mammalian brain, we developed an inducible toolkit for clonal labeling and non-invasive fate tracking. We used this toolkit to address post-embryonic stem cells in different tissues and to functionally differentiate transient progenitor cells from permanent, bona fide stem cells in the retina. Using temporally controlled clonal induction, we showed that post-embryonic retinal NSCs are exclusively multipotent and give rise to the complete spectrum of cell types in the neural retina. Intriguingly, and in contrast to any other vertebrate stem cell system described so far, long-term analysis of clones indicates a preferential mode of asymmetric cell division. Moreover, following the behavior of clones before and after external stimuli, such as injuries, shows that NSCs in the retina maintained the preference for asymmetric cell division during regenerative responses. We present a comprehensive analysis of individual post-embryonic NSCs in their physiological environment and establish the teleost retina as an ideal model for studying adult stem cell biology at single cell resolution.

  17. Well-posedness and asynchronous exponential growth of solutions of a two-phase cell division model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Bai

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study a two-phase cell division model. The cells of the two different phases have different growth rates. We mainly consider the model of equal mitosis. By using the semigroup theory, we prove that this model is well-posed in suitable function spaces and its solutions have the property of asynchronous exponential growth as time approaches infinity. The corresponding model of asymmetric mitosis is also studied and similar results are obtained.

  18. Structural reorganization of the bacterial cell-division protein FtsZ from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Yamane, Junji; Mogi, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2012-09-01

    FtsZ is a key molecule in bacterial cell division. In the presence of GTP, it polymerizes into tubulin-like protofilaments by head-to-tail association. Protofilaments of FtsZ seem to adopt a straight or a curved conformation in relation to the bound nucleotide. However, although several bacterial and archaeal FtsZ structures have been determined, all of the structures reported previously are considered to have a curved conformation. In this study, structures of FtsZ from Staphylococcus aureus (SaFtsZ) were determined in apo, GDP-bound and inhibitor-complex forms and it was found that SaFtsZ undergoes marked conformational changes. The accumulated evidence suggests that the GDP-bound structure has the features of the straight form. The structural change between the curved and straight forms shows intriguing similarity to the eukaryotic cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Furthermore, the structure of the apo form showed an unexpectedly large conformational change in the core region. FtsZ has also been recognized as a novel target for antibacterial drugs. The structure of the complex with the inhibitor PC190723, which has potent and selective antistaphylococcal activity, indicated that the inhibitor binds at the cleft between the two subdomains.

  19. Single-cell spatial reconstruction reveals global division of labour in the mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Shenhav, Rom; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Tóth, Beáta; Lemze, Doron; Golan, Matan; Massasa, Efi E; Baydatch, Shaked; Landen, Shanie; Moor, Andreas E; Brandis, Alexander; Giladi, Amir; Stokar-Avihail, Avigail; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2017-02-16

    The mammalian liver consists of hexagon-shaped lobules that are radially polarized by blood flow and morphogens. Key liver genes have been shown to be differentially expressed along the lobule axis, a phenomenon termed zonation, but a detailed genome-wide reconstruction of this spatial division of labour has not been achieved. Here we measure the entire transcriptome of thousands of mouse liver cells and infer their lobule coordinates on the basis of a panel of zonated landmark genes, characterized with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using this approach, we obtain the zonation profiles of all liver genes with high spatial resolution. We find that around 50% of liver genes are significantly zonated and uncover abundant non-monotonic profiles that peak at the mid-lobule layers. These include a spatial order of bile acid biosynthesis enzymes that matches their position in the enzymatic cascade. Our approach can facilitate the reconstruction of similar spatial genomic blueprints for other mammalian organs.

  20. Asymmetric cell division and Notch signaling specify dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tio, Murni; Toh, Joanne; Fang, Wanru; Blanco, Jorge; Udolph, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, dopaminergic (DA) neurons can be found from mid embryonic stages of development till adulthood. Despite their functional involvement in learning and memory, not much is known about the developmental as well as molecular mechanisms involved in the events of DA neuronal specification, differentiation and maturation. In this report we demonstrate that most larval DA neurons are generated during embryonic development. Furthermore, we show that loss of function (l-o-f) mutations of genes of the apical complex proteins in the asymmetric cell division (ACD) machinery, such as inscuteable and bazooka result in supernumerary DA neurons, whereas l-o-f mutations of genes of the basal complex proteins such as numb result in loss or reduction of DA neurons. In addition, when Notch signaling is reduced or abolished, additional DA neurons are formed and conversely, when Notch signaling is activated, less DA neurons are generated. Our data demonstrate that both ACD and Notch signaling are crucial mechanisms for DA neuronal specification. We propose a model in which ACD results in differential Notch activation in direct siblings and in this context Notch acts as a repressor for DA neuronal specification in the sibling that receives active Notch signaling. Our study provides the first link of ACD and Notch signaling in the specification of a neurotransmitter phenotype in Drosophila. Given the high degree of conservation between Drosophila and vertebrate systems, this study could be of significance to mechanisms of DA neuronal differentiation not limited to flies.

  1. Emp is a component of the nuclear matrix of mammalian cells and undergoes dynamic rearrangements during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Soni, Shivani; Sinha, Sudha; Hanspal, Manjit

    2006-04-21

    Emp, originally detected in erythroblastic islands, is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues suggesting a functionality not limited to hematopoiesis. To study the function of Emp in non-hematopoietic cells, an epitope-tagged recombinant human Emp was expressed in HEK cells. Preliminary studies revealed that Emp partitioned into both the nuclear and Triton X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions in approximately a 4:1 ratio. In this study, we report investigations of Emp in the nucleus. Sequential extractions of interphase nuclei showed that recombinant Emp was present predominantly in the nuclear matrix. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that Emp was present in typical nuclear speckles enriched with the spliceosome assembly factor SC35 and partially co-localized with actin staining. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down assays confirmed the apparent close association of Emp with nuclear actin. During mitosis, Emp was detected at the mitotic spindle/spindle poles, as well as in the contractile ring during cytokinesis. These results suggest that Emp undergoes dynamic rearrangements within the nuclear architecture that are correlated with cell division.

  2. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  3. Direct measurement of through-plane thermal conductivity and contact resistance in fuel cell materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Manish; Mench, M. M.

    An experimental study to determine the through-plane thermal conductivity of dry Nafion ®, various diffusion media, catalyst layer, and the thermal contact resistance between diffusion media and a metal plate as a function of temperature and pressure was performed. Dry Nafion ® thermal conductivity was determined to be 0.16 ± 0.03 W m -1 K -1 at room temperature, which decreases to 0.13 ± 0.02 W m -1 K -1 at 65 °C. Diffusion media thermal conductivity was found to be function of PTFE content and manufacturer, and was 0.48 ± 0.09 W m -1 K -1 for untreated and 0.22 ± 0.04 W m -1 K -1 for 20 wt.% PTFE treated SIGRACET ® diffusion media, respectively. Toray diffusion media thermal conductivity was measured to be 1.80 ± 0.27 W m -1 K -1 at 26 °C and decreases to 1.24 ± 0.19 W m -1 K at 73 °C. The thermal contact resistance between Toray carbon paper and aluminium bronze material was determined to vary from 6.7 × 10 -4 to 2.0 × 10 -4 m 2 K W -1 for an increase in compression pressure from 0.4 to 2.2 MPa. The equivalent thermal conductivity of a 0.5 mg cm -2 platinum loaded catalyst layer was estimated to be 0.27 ± 0.05 W m -1 K -1. A one-dimensional analytical model was also used to estimate the temperature drop in the fuel cell components. A maximum of 3-4 °C temperature drop can be expected for a 200 μm thick SIGRACET ® diffusion media at 1 A cm -2. The thermal properties characterized should be useful to help modelers accurately predict the temperature distribution in a fuel cell.

  4. Mutations Decreasing Intrinsic β-Lactam Resistance Are Linked to Cell Division in the Nosocomial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel; Dimitrova, Daniela D; Rudin, Susan D; Bonomo, Robert A; Rather, Philip N

    2016-06-01

    Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify novel determinants of intrinsic β-lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii An EZ-Tn5 transposon insertion in a gene corresponding to the A1S_0225 sequence resulted in a 4-fold decrease in resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, and ceftriaxone but did not alter resistance to other classes of antibiotics. Based on this phenotype, the gene was designated blhA (β-lactam hypersusceptibility). The blhA::EZ-Tn5 mutation conferred a similar phenotype in A. baumannii strain ATCC 17978. The wild-type blhA gene complemented the blhA::EZTn5 insertion and restored β-lactam resistance levels back to wild-type levels. The blhA mutation also increased β-lactam susceptibility in an adeB adeJ double mutant, indicating that the blhA mutation acted independently of these efflux systems to mediate susceptibility. In addition, mRNA levels for the blaOXA and blaADC β-lactamase genes were not altered by the blhA mutation. The blhA mutation resulted in a prominent cell division and morphological defect, with cells exhibiting a highly elongated phenotype, combined with large bulges in some cells. The blhA gene is unique to Acinetobacter and likely represents a novel gene involved in cell division. Three additional mutations, in zipA, zapA, and ftsK, each of which encode predicted cell division proteins, also conferred increased β-lactam susceptibility, indicating a common link between cell division and intrinsic β-lactam resistance in A. baumannii.

  5. The simulation model of growth and cell divisions for the root apex with an apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska-Stachowiak, Anna; Nakielski, Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    In contrast to seed plants, the roots of most ferns have a single apical cell which is the ultimate source of all cells in the root. The apical cell has a tetrahedral shape and divides asymmetrically. The root cap derives from the distal division face, while merophytes derived from three proximal division faces contribute to the root proper. The merophytes are produced sequentially forming three sectors along a helix around the root axis. During development, they divide and differentiate in a predictable pattern. Such growth causes cell pattern of the root apex to be remarkably regular and self-perpetuating. The nature of this regularity remains unknown. This paper shows the 2D simulation model for growth of the root apex with the apical cell in application to Azolla pinnata. The field of growth rates of the organ, prescribed by the model, is of a tensor type (symplastic growth) and cells divide taking principal growth directions into account. The simulations show how the cell pattern in a longitudinal section of the apex develops in time. The virtual root apex grows realistically and its cell pattern is similar to that observed in anatomical sections. The simulations indicate that the cell pattern regularity results from cell divisions which are oriented with respect to principal growth directions. Such divisions are essential for maintenance of peri-anticlinal arrangement of cell walls and coordinated growth of merophytes during the development. The highly specific division program that takes place in merophytes prior to differentiation seems to be regulated at the cellular level.

  6. Organization and transcription of the division cell wall (dcw) cluster in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, F; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Salimnia, H; Victor, C; Dillon, J R

    2000-06-27

    A cluster of genes involved in cell division and cell wall (dcw) biosynthesis was identified in Neisseria gonorrhoeae using genomic analysis and through verification of gene order by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. The gonococcal dcw cluster consists of 17 genes, in the order 5'-mraZ-mraW-ftsI-murE-hyp1-murF- mraY-hyp2-murD-ftsW-murG-murC-ddl -ft sQ-ftsA-ftsZ-hyp3-3'. The gene organization of the dcw cluster of N. gonorrhoeae is more similar to that observed in Gram-negative rods such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae than in Gram-positive bacteria. The cluster is characterized by several intergenic spaces. Compared with E. coli, two genes, ftsL and envA, are absent in the gonococcal dcw cluster and three hypothetical genes are novel to the cluster. The cluster is flanked by two transcriptional terminators consisting of paired neisserial uptake sequences and also includes four internal terminators, three of which are paired neisserial uptake sequences. We also found that a repeated sequence on the gonococcal genome, commonly called a Correia element, acts as the fourth transcriptional terminator. All termination sequences were shown to be fully functional by using reverse transcription PCR experiments. Transcriptional start sites upstream of ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ were determined by primer extension and six promoters were identified; three promoters were located upstream of ftsZ in the intergenic space, two were upstream of ftsA within ftsQ and one was upstream of ftsQ within ddl. Some of these promoters were preferentially used under anaerobic conditions. The location of these promoters differed from those described in E. coli indicating dissimilar transcriptional regulation.

  7. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  8. New insights into FtsZ rearrangements during the cell division of Escherichia coli from single-molecule localization microscopy of fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyaykin, Alexey D; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E; Polinovskaya, Vasilisa S; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sabantsev, Anton V

    2016-06-01

    FtsZ - a prokaryotic tubulin homolog - is one of the central components of bacterial division machinery. At the early stage of cytokinesis FtsZ forms the so-called Z-ring at mid-cell that guides septum formation. Many approaches were used to resolve the structure of the Z-ring, however, researchers are still far from consensus on this question. We utilized single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) in combination with immunofluorescence staining to visualize FtsZ in Esherichia coli fixed cells that were grown under slow and fast growth conditions. This approach allowed us to obtain images of FtsZ structures at different stages of cell division and accurately measure Z-ring dimensions. Analysis of these images demonstrated that Z-ring thickness increases during constriction, starting at about 70 nm at the beginning of division and increasing by approximately 25% half-way through constriction.

  9. Self-organization and advective transport in the cell polarity formation for asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-07

    Anterior-Posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which depends not only on the several genetic process but also biochemical and biophysical interactions. The mechanism of AP formation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is characterized into the three processes: (i) membrane association and dissociation of posterior and anterior proteins, (ii) diffusion into the membrane and cytosol, and (iii) active cortical and cytoplasmic flows induced by the contraction of the acto-myosin cortex. We explored the mechanism of symmetry breaking and AP polarity formation using self-recruitment model of posterior proteins. We found that the AP polarity pattern is established over wide range in the total mass of polarity proteins and the diffusion ratio in the cytosol to the membrane. We also showed that the advective transport in both membrane and cytosol during the establishment phase affects optimal time interval of establishment and positioning of the posterior domain, and plays a role to increase the robustness in the AP polarity formation by reducing the number of posterior domains for the sensitivity of initial conditions. We also demonstrated that a proper ratio of the total mass to cell size robustly regulate the length scale of the posterior domain.

  10. Growth and cell-division in extensive (XDR) and extremely drug resistant (XXDR) tuberculosis strains: transmission and atomic force observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Parissa; Mohammad, Reza Masjedi; Merza, Muayad Aghali; Tabarsi, Payam; Zhavnerko, Gennadii Konstantinovich; Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi; Kuan, Ho Oi; Ghanavei, Jalladein; Farnia, Poopak; Ranjbar, Reza; Poleschuyk, Nikolai Nikolaevich; Titov, Leonid Petrovich; Owlia, Parviz; Kazampour, Mehadi; Setareh, Mohammad; Sheikolslami, Muaryam; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2010-09-30

    The ultra-structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) was examined by transmission electronic (TEM)) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The study was performed to describe the morphology of susceptible, multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis isolates (XXDR-TB) during their exponential growth phase. Four types of cell division were observed and described. While three of them (symmetrical, asymmetrical and branching type) occurred in all isolates studied, the fourth one (adapted type) was seen only in XDR and XXDR-TB bacilli. In the fourth type of cell division, a rod shaped mother cell produced a small round shape bacillus (0.3-0.5 μm). These round cells were different from buds or polar division, but similar to terminal endospores without showing the typing heat resistance. Based on the present observation, we suggest that XDR-and XXDR-TB bacilli accommodate changes helping them to overcome the hostile environment. Viewed under AFM, the other frequently detected shapes in MTB isolates were oval, V, Y and multi-branching filaments. These shape variation confirmed pleomorphic phenomena in MTB populations and the specific features of pan-resistant strains.

  11. Implications of intravital imaging of murine germinal centres on the control of B cell selection and division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian C. Binder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravital imaging of antibody optimization in germinal centre (GC reactions hasset a new dimension in the understanding of the humoral immune response duringthe last decade. The inclusion of spatio-temporal cellular dynamics inthe research on GCs required analysis with agent-based mathematical models.Here, we integrate the available intravital imaging data from various researchgroups and incorporate these into a quantitative mathematical model ofGC reactions and antibody affinity maturation. Interestingly, the integrationof data concerning the spatial organisation of GCs and B cell motility allows to drawconclusions on the strength of the selection pressure and the controlof B cell division by T follicular helper cells.

  12. Plane of nutrition affects growth rate, organ size and skeletal muscle satellite cell activity in newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGhee, M E; Bradley, J S; McCoski, S R; Reeg, A M; Ealy, A D; Johnson, S E

    2016-11-18

    Plane of nutrition effects on body, tissue and cellular growth in the neonatal calf are poorly understood. The hypothesis that a low plane of nutrition (LPN) would limit skeletal muscle size by reducing fibre growth and muscle progenitor cell activity was tested. At birth, calves were randomly assigned to either a LPN (20% CP, 20% fat; GE=1.9 Mcal/days) or a high plane of nutrition (HPN; 27% CP, 10% fat, GE = 3.8 Mcal/days) in a 2 × 3 factorial design to test the impact of diet on neonatal calf growth, organ weight and skeletal muscle morphometry with time. Groups of calves (n = 4 or 5) were euthanised at 2, 4 and 8 week of age and organ and empty carcass weights were recorded. Body composition was measured by DXA. Longissimus muscle (LM) fibre cross-sectional area (CSA), fibre/mm(2) and Pax7 were measured by immunohistology. Satellite cells were isolated at each time point and proliferation rates were measured by EdU incorporation. Calves fed a HPN had greater (p satellite cells per fibre. Proliferation rates of satellite cells isolated from HPN fed calves were greater (p satellite cell activity.

  13. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis.

  14. Divergence and transcriptional analysis of the division cell wall (dcw) gene cluster in Neisseria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lori A S; Shafer, William M; Saunders, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    Three of the 18 open reading frames in the division and cell wall synthesis cluster of the pathogenic Neisseria spp. are not present in the clusters of other bacterial species. The region containing two of these, dcaB and dcaC, displays interstrain and interspecies variability uncharacteristic of such clusters. 3' of dcaB is a Correia repeat enclosed element (CREE), which is only present in some strains. It has been suggested that this CREE is a transcriptional terminator, although we demonstrate otherwise. A gearbox-like promoter within this CREE is active in Escherichia coli but not in Neisseria meningitidis. There is an active promoter 5' of dcaC, although its sequence is not conserved. The presence of similarly located promoters has not been demonstrated in other species. In Neisseria lactamica, this promoter involves another dcw-associated CREE, the first demonstration of active promoter generation at the 5' end of this common intergenic, apparently mobile, element. Upstream of this promoter is an inverted pair of neisserial uptake signal sequences, which are commonly considered to be transcriptional terminators. It has been proposed to terminate transcription in this location, although we have demonstrated transcript extending through this uptake signal sequence. dcaC contains a 108 bp tandem repeat, which is present in different copy numbers in the neisserial strains examined. This investigation reveals extensive sequence variation, disputes the presence of transcriptional terminators and identifies active internal promoters in this normally highly conserved cluster of essential genes, and addresses the transcriptional activity of two common neisserial intergenic components.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Quantitative Analysis of Cell Division and Elongation Rate in Growing Wheat Leaves under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Leaf growth in grasses is determined by the cell division and elongation rates, with the duration of cell elongation being one of the processes that is the most sensitive to salinity. Our objective was to investigate the distribution profiles of cell production, cell length and the duration of cell elongation in the growing zone of the wheat leaf during the steady growth phase. Plants were grown in loamy soil with or without 120 mmol/L NaCl in a growth chamber, and harvested at day 3 after leaf 4 emerged. Results show that the elongation rate of leaf 4 was reduced by 120 mmol/L NaCl during the steady growth phase. The distribution profile of the lengths of abaxial epidermal cells of leaf 4 during the steady growth stage shows a sigmoidal pattern along the leaf axis for both treatments. Although salinity did not affect or even increased the length of the epidermal cells in some locations in the growth zone compared to the control treatment, the final length of the epidermal cells was reduced by 14% at 120 mmol/L NaCl. Thus, we concluded that the observed reduction in the leaf elongation rate derived in part from the reduced cell division rate and either the shortened cell elongation zone or shortened duration of cell elongation. This suggests that more attention should be paid to the effects of salinity on those properties of cell production and the period of cell maturation that are related to the properties of cell wall.

  16. Generation of high-producing cell lines by overexpression of cell division cycle 25 homolog A in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Tsutsui, Tomomi; Honda, Kohsuke; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Ohtake, Hisao; Omasa, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of conventional gene amplification systems, the effect of cell cycle modification during the gene amplification process on IgG production was investigated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The full-length cDNA of CHO cell division cycle 25 homolog A (Cdc25A) was introduced into CHO DG44 cells and the effects of CDC25A overexpression on the cell cycle, transgene copy number and IgG productivity were examined. Both wild-type and mutated CDC25A-overexpressing CHO cells showed a rapid increase in transgene copy number compared with mock cells during the gene amplification process, in both cell pools and individual clones. High-producing clones were obtained with high frequency in CDC25A-overexpressing cell pools. The specific production rate of the isolated clone CHO SD-S23 was up to 2.9-fold higher than that of mock cells in the presence of 250 nM methotrexate (MTX). Cell cycle analysis revealed that the G2 to M phase transition rate was increased ∼1.5-fold in CDC25A-overexpressing CHO cells under MTX treatment. Our results show the improvement of conventional gene amplification systems via cell cycle engineering at an early stage of cell line development.

  17. ftsZ gene and plastid division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Plastid is one of the most important cellular organelles, the normal division process of plastid is essential for the differentiation and development of plant cells. For a long time, morphological observations and genetic analyses to special mutants are the major research fields of plastid division, but the molecular mechanisms underlying plastid division are largely unknown. Because of the endosymbiotic origin, plastid division might have mechanisms in common with those involved in bacterial cell division. It has been proved that several prokaryotic cell division genes also participate in the plastid division. Recently, the mechanisms of prokaryotic cell division have been well documented, which provides a valuable paradigm for understanding the plastid division mechanisms. In plants, the functional analyses of ftsZ, a key gene involved both in bacteria and plastid division, have established the solid foundation for people to understand the plastid division in molecular level. In this paper we will make a review for the research history and progress of plastid division.

  18. A new loss-of-function allele 28y reveals a role of ARGONAUTE1 in limiting asymmetric division of stomatal lineage ground cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kezhen Yangy; Min Jiangy; Jie Le

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana L., stomata are produced through a series of divisions including asymmetric and symmetric divisions. Asymmetric entry division of meristemoid mother cellproduces two daughter cells, the smal er meristemoid and the larger sister cell, a stomatal lineage ground cell(SLGC). Stomatal lineage ground cells can differentiate into epidermal pavement cells but have the potential to divide asymmetrical y, spacing divisions, to create satel ite meristemoids. Peptide ligands and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) and ERECTA family receptors regulate the initiation of stomatal lineages, activity, and orientation of spacing divisions. Here, we reported that a natural mutant 28y displayed an increased stomatal density and index. Using map-based cloning, we identified mutation in ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) as the cause of 28y phenotypes. Time-lapse tracing of stomatal lineage cells reveals that stomatal overproduction in 28y is caused by the excessive asymmetric spacing division of SLGCs.Further genetic results demonstrated that AGO1 acts down-stream of TMM and negatively regulates the SPCH transcripts, but in a brassinosteroid-independent manner. Upregulation of AGAMOUS-LIKE16 (AGL16) in 28y mutants suggests that AGO1 is required to restrict AGL16-mediated stomatal spacing divisions, an miRNA pathway in addition to ligand-receptor signaling modules.

  19. Asymmetry of chromosome Replichores renders the DNA translocase activity of FtsK essential for cell division and cell shape maintenance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesterlin, Christian; Pages, Carine; Dubarry, Nelly; Dasgupta, Santanu; Cornet, François

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organised as two replichores of opposite polarity that coincide with the replication arms from the ori to the ter region. Here, we investigated the effects of asymmetry in replichore organisation in Escherichia coli. We show that large chromosome inversions from the terminal junction of the replichores disturb the ongoing post-replicative events, resulting in inhibition of both cell division and cell elongation. This is accompanied by alterations of the segregation pattern of loci located at the inversion endpoints, particularly of the new replichore junction. None of these defects is suppressed by restoration of termination of replication opposite oriC, indicating that they are more likely due to the asymmetry of replichore polarity than to asymmetric replication. Strikingly, DNA translocation by FtsK, which processes the terminal junction of the replichores during cell division, becomes essential in inversion-carrying strains. Inactivation of the FtsK translocation activity leads to aberrant cell morphology, strongly suggesting that it controls membrane synthesis at the division septum. Our results reveal that FtsK mediates a reciprocal control between processing of the replichore polarity junction and cell division.

  20. Asymmetry of chromosome Replichores renders the DNA translocase activity of FtsK essential for cell division and cell shape maintenance in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lesterlin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial chromosomes are organised as two replichores of opposite polarity that coincide with the replication arms from the ori to the ter region. Here, we investigated the effects of asymmetry in replichore organisation in Escherichia coli. We show that large chromosome inversions from the terminal junction of the replichores disturb the ongoing post-replicative events, resulting in inhibition of both cell division and cell elongation. This is accompanied by alterations of the segregation pattern of loci located at the inversion endpoints, particularly of the new replichore junction. None of these defects is suppressed by restoration of termination of replication opposite oriC, indicating that they are more likely due to the asymmetry of replichore polarity than to asymmetric replication. Strikingly, DNA translocation by FtsK, which processes the terminal junction of the replichores during cell division, becomes essential in inversion-carrying strains. Inactivation of the FtsK translocation activity leads to aberrant cell morphology, strongly suggesting that it controls membrane synthesis at the division septum. Our results reveal that FtsK mediates a reciprocal control between processing of the replichore polarity junction and cell division.

  1. Universal Protein Distributions in a Model of Cell Growth and Division

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Naama; Osmanovic, Dino; Rabin, Yitzhak; Salman, Hanna; Stein, D L

    2015-01-01

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast exhibit a universal skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties are reproduced by protein accumulation and division dynamics across generations. We present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured universal distribution shape with high accuracy, and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  2. The Asymmetric Cell Division Regulators Par3, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 Are Not Essential for Erythroid Development or Enucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölwer, Christina B.; Gödde, Nathan; Pase, Luke B.; Elsum, Imogen A.; Lim, Krystle Y. B.; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Walkley, Carl R.; Ellis, Sarah; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid enucleation is the process by which the future red blood cell disposes of its nucleus prior to entering the blood stream. This key event during red blood cell development has been likened to an asymmetric cell division (ACD), by which the enucleating erythroblast divides into two very different daughter cells of alternate molecular composition, a nucleated cell that will be removed by associated macrophages, and the reticulocyte that will mature to the definitive erythrocyte. Here we investigated gene expression of members of the Par, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 asymmetric cell division complexes in erythroid cells, and functionally tested their role in erythroid enucleation in vivo and ex vivo. Despite their roles in regulating ACD in other contexts, we found that these polarity regulators are not essential for erythroid enucleation, nor for erythroid development in vivo. Together our results put into question a role for cell polarity and asymmetric cell division in erythroid enucleation. PMID:28095473

  3. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment causes an arrest of cell division and apoptosis in rat embryonic erythroblasts in whole embryo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posobiec, Lorraine M; Clark, Robert L; Bushdid, Paul B; Laffan, Susan B; Wang, Kai-Fen; White, Tacey E K

    2013-12-01

    Within 24 hr after oral administration of the antimalarial artesunate to rats on Day 10 or 11 postcoitum (pc), there is depletion of embryonic erythroblasts (EEbs), leading to embryo malformation and death. The proximate agent is dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the primary metabolite. We investigated the causes of EEb depletion by evaluating effects of DHA on EEbs in whole embryo culture (WEC). Rat embryos cultured starting on Day 9 pc were treated with 1 or 7 μM DHA for 24 hr starting after 19 hr of culture (∼Day 10 pc) and for 2 to 12 hr starting after 43 hr of culture (∼Day 11 pc). DHA effects indicating the depletion of EEbs were paling of the visceral yolk sac and reductions in visible blood cells, H&E-stained normal (Type II or III) EEbs, and dividing (BrdU-stained) EEbs. DHA-induced abnormal cell division was indicated by increases in symmetric and asymmetric binuclear cells. DHA-induced apoptosis was indicated by increases in TUNEL- and Caspase-3-positive cells and EEbs with fragmented nuclei. In addition, although the overall number of EEbs was decreasing, DHA caused increases in the numbers of circulating early-stage (Type I or earlier) EEbs that could not be accounted for by cell division, suggesting the release of new, less sensitive erythroblasts from the yolk sac. In summary, treatment of Day 10 or 11 pc rat embryos with DHA in WEC resulted in defective and arrested cell division in EEbs followed by apoptosis, suggesting a mechanism for their depletion after artesunate treatment in vivo.

  4. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson, Anthony J.

    2013-03-25

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  5. A novel group of pumilio mutations affects the asymmetric division of germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H; Spradling, A C

    1997-06-01

    Germline stem cells play a pivotal role in gametogenesis; yet little is known about how they are formed, how they divide to self-renew, and how these processes are genetically controlled. Here we describe the self-renewing asymmetric division of germline stem cells in the Drosophila ovarian germline, as marked by the spectrosome, a cytoplasmic structure rich in membrane skeletal proteins. The ontogeny of the spectrosome marks the lineage of germline stem cells. We identified two new groups of mutations in which the divisional asymmetry is disrupted. The first, which we refer to as ovarette (ovt) mutations, was shown to correspond to a novel class of mutations in the pumilio locus. Since pumilio is known to posttranscriptionally repress the expression of target genes at earlier stages of germ cell development, our results suggest that a similar activity is needed to maintain germ line stem cells. We have also identified a second and novel gene, piwi, whose mutations abolish germline stem cell division.

  6. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Robertson

    2013-03-01

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB, which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  7. DERIVATION OF A SINGLE-BAND MODEL FOR CUO2 PLANES BY A CELL-PERTURBATION METHOD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JEFFERSON, JH; ESKES, H; FEINER, LF

    1992-01-01

    A cell-perturbation method is developed for CuO2 planes in the cuprate superconductors described by a d-p model. It is shown that a single-band t-t'-J-J' model accurately describes the low-energy physics and how the parameters of this model vary with those of the underlying d-p model. The method is

  8. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adnalizawati, A. Siti Noor; Nazlina, I. [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yaacob, W. A. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The in vitro activity of methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark was studied against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and MRSA BM1 (clinical strain) using time-kill curves in conjunction with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extract showed more markedly bactericidal activity in MRSA BM1 clinical strain within less than 4 h by 6.25-12.5 mg/mL and within 6 h by 1.56 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of MRSA BM1 revealed distortion of cell whilst transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption in cell wall division.

  9. Disorganization of cell division of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnalizawati, A. Siti Noor; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    The in vitro activity of methanolic extract from Phyllanthus columnaris stem bark was studied against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300 and MRSA BM1 (clinical strain) using time-kill curves in conjunction with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The extract showed more markedly bactericidal activity in MRSA BM1 clinical strain within less than 4 h by 6.25-12.5 mg/mL and within 6 h by 1.56 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy of MRSA BM1 revealed distortion of cell whilst transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption in cell wall division.

  10. Genetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling Unbalances the Rate of Neural Stem Cell Renewal by Increasing Symmetric Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Ferent

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the adult brain, self-renewal is essential for the persistence of neural stem cells (NSCs throughout life, but its regulation is still poorly understood. One NSC can give birth to two NSCs or one NSC and one transient progenitor. A correct balance is necessary for the maintenance of germinal areas, and understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying NSC division mode is clearly important. Here, we report a function of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH receptor Patched in the direct control of long-term NSC self-renewal in the subependymal zone. We show that genetic conditional activation of SHH signaling in adult NSCs leads to their expansion and the depletion of their direct progeny. These phenotypes are associated in vitro with an increase in NSC symmetric division in a process involving NOTCH signaling. Together, our results demonstrate a tight control of adult neurogenesis and NSC renewal driven by Patched.

  11. Intrinsic disorder of the bacterial cell division protein ZipA: coil-to-brush conformational transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Montero, Iván; López-Navajas, Pilar; Mingorance, Jesús; Rivas, Germán; Vélez, Marisela; Vicente, Miguel; Monroy, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    The full-length ZipA protein from Escherichia coli, one of the essential elements of the cell division machinery, was studied in a surface model built as adsorbed monolayers. The interplay between lateral packing and molecular conformation was probed using a combined methodology based on the scaling analysis of the surface pressure isotherms and ellipsometry measurements of the monolayer thickness. The observed behavior is compatible with the one expected for an intrinsically disordered and highly flexible protein that is preferentially structured in a random coil conformation. At low grafting densities, ZipA coils organize in a mushroom-like regime, whereas a coil-to-brush transition occurs on increasing lateral packing. The structural results suggest a functional scenario in which ZipA acts as a flexible tether anchoring bacterial proto-ring elements to the membrane during the earlier stages of division.

  12. The fenestrin antigen in submembrane skeleton of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is proposed as a marker of cell polarity during cell division and in oral replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczanowska, Janina; Joachimiak, Ewa; Kiersnowska, Mauryla; Krzywicka, Anna; Golinska, Krystyna; Kaczanowski, Andrzej

    2003-07-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila cells have two types of polarized morphogenesis: divisional morphogenesis and oral reorganization (OR). The aim of this research is the analysis of cortical patterns of immunostaining during cell division and in OR using previously characterized antibodies against fenestrin and epiplasm B proteins. During cell division, the anarchic field of basal body proliferation of the new developing oral apparatus (AF) showed concomitant strong binding of the fenestrin antigen and withdrawal of a signal of the epiplasm B antigen. At a specific stage, the fenestrin antigen also appeared as a character of the anterior cortex pole, with a co-localized decrease in the detected epiplasm B antigen. The fenestrin antigen also showed a polarity of duplicating basal bodies in ciliary rows. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling experiments were performed in the absence and presence of an inhibitor of activity of serine/threonine kinases, 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) as an inducer of the oral replacement process. In the presence of 6-DMAP, one class of cells started OR, and some others were trapped and affected in cell division. Both types of cells showed an instability of oral structures and formed enlarged primordial oral fields. These anarchic fields (AFs) bind the fenestrin antigen, with disappearance of epiplasmic antigen staining. Only one protein (about 64 kDa) is detected in western blots by the anti-fenestrin antibody and it accumulated in 6-DMAP-treated cells that are involved in uncompleted morphogenetic activity. At a defined stage of oral development, both during cell division and in OR, the fenestrin antigen served as a marker of polarity of the cell of the anterior pole character.

  13. Cell directional migration and oriented division on three-dimensional laser-induced periodic surface structures on polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Ohlin, Christian A; Lu, Qinghua; Hu, Jun

    2008-05-01

    The extracellular matrix in animal tissues usually provides a three-dimensional structural support to cells in addition to performing various other important functions. In the present study, wavy submicrometer laser-irradiated periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were produced on a smooth polystyrene film by polarized laser irradiation with a wavelength of 266 nm. Rat C6 glioma cells exhibited directional migration and oriented division on laser-irradiated polystyrene, which was parallel to the direction of LIPSS. However, rat C6 glioma cells on smooth polystyrene moved in a three-step invasion cycle, with faster migration speed than that on laser-irradiated polystyrene. In addition, focal adhesions examined by immunostaining focal adhesion kinase in human epithelial carcinoma HeLa cells were punctuated on smooth polystyrene, whereas dash-like on laser-irradiated polystyrene. We hypothesized that LIPSS on laser-irradiated polystyrene acted as an anisotropic and persistent mechanical stimulus to guide cell anisotropic spreading, migration and division through focal adhesions.

  14. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  15. RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) is essential for male germline stem cell maintenance and division in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexei A; Olenkina, Oxana M; Kibanov, Mikhail V; Olenina, Ludmila V

    2016-06-01

    The present study showed that RNA helicase Belle (DDX3) was required intrinsically for mitotic progression and survival of germline stem cells (GSCs) and spermatogonial cells in the Drosophila melanogaster testes. We found that deficiency of Belle in the male germline resulted in a strong germ cell loss phenotype. Early germ cells are lost through cell death, whereas somatic hub and cyst cell populations are maintained. The observed phenotype is related to that of the human Sertoli Cell-Only Syndrome caused by the loss of DBY (DDX3) expression in the human testes and results in a complete lack of germ cells with preservation of somatic Sertoli cells. We found the hallmarks of mitotic G2 delay in early germ cells of the larval testes of bel mutants. Both mitotic cyclins, A and B, are markedly reduced in the gonads of bel mutants. Transcription levels of cycB and cycA decrease significantly in the testes of hypomorph bel mutants. Overexpression of Cyclin B in the germline partially rescues germ cell survival, mitotic progression and fertility in the bel-RNAi knockdown testes. Taken together, these results suggest that a role of Belle in GSC maintenance and regulation of early germ cell divisions is associated with the expression control of mitotic cyclins.

  16. Asymmetry of Chromosome Replichores Renders the DNA Translocase Activity of FtsK Essential for Cell Division and Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Lesterlin; Carine Pages; Nelly Dubarry; Santanu Dasgupta; François Cornet

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organised as two replichores of opposite polarity that coincide with the replication arms from the ori to the ter region. Here, we investigated the effects of asymmetry in replichore organisation in Escherichia coli. We show that large chromosome inversions from the terminal junction of the replichores disturb the ongoing post-replicative events, resulting in inhibition of both cell division and cell elongation. This is accompanied by alterations of the segregation p...

  17. Cell division in Apicomplexan parasites is organized by a homolog of the striated rootlet fiber of algal flagella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Jordan, Carly N; Patel, Jay D; Sheiner, Lilach; Demerly, Jessica L; Fellows, Justin D; de Leon, Jessica Cruz; Morrissette, Naomi S; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Striepen, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Apicomplexa are intracellular parasites that cause important human diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. During host cell infection new parasites are formed through a budding process that parcels out nuclei and organelles into multiple daughters. Budding is remarkably flexible in output and can produce two to thousands of progeny cells. How genomes and daughters are counted and coordinated is unknown. Apicomplexa evolved from single celled flagellated algae, but with the exception of the gametes, lack flagella. Here we demonstrate that a structure that in the algal ancestor served as the rootlet of the flagellar basal bodies is required for parasite cell division. Parasite striated fiber assemblins (SFA) polymerize into a dynamic fiber that emerges from the centrosomes immediately after their duplication. The fiber grows in a polarized fashion and daughter cells form at its distal tip. As the daughter cell is further elaborated it remains physically tethered at its apical end, the conoid and polar ring. Genetic experiments in Toxoplasma gondii demonstrate two essential components of the fiber, TgSFA2 and 3. In the absence of either of these proteins cytokinesis is blocked at its earliest point, the initiation of the daughter microtubule organizing center (MTOC). Mitosis remains unimpeded and mutant cells accumulate numerous nuclei but fail to form daughter cells. The SFA fiber provides a robust spatial and temporal organizer of parasite cell division, a process that appears hard-wired to the centrosome by multiple tethers. Our findings have broader evolutionary implications. We propose that Apicomplexa abandoned flagella for most stages yet retained the organizing principle of the flagellar MTOC. Instead of ensuring appropriate numbers of flagella, the system now positions the apical invasion complexes. This suggests that elements of the invasion apparatus may be derived from flagella or flagellum associated structures.

  18. Heat shock proteins IbpA and IbpB are required for NlpI-participated cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jing; Sang, Yu; Teng, Qihui; Ni, Jinjing; Yang, Yi; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein NlpI of Escherichia coli is involved in the cell division, virulence, and bacterial interaction with eukaryotic host cells. To elucidate the functional mechanism of NlpI, we examined how NlpI affects cell division and found that induction of NlpI inhibits nucleoid division and halts cell growth. Consistent with these results, the cell division protein FtsZ failed to localize at the septum but diffused in the cytosol. Elevation of NlpI expression enhanced the transcription and the outer membrane localization of the heat shock protein IbpA and IbpB. Deletion of either ibpA or ibpB abolished the effects of NlpI induction, which could be restored by complementation. The C-terminus of NlpI is critical for the enhancement in IbpA and IbpB production, and the N-terminus of NlpI is required for the outer membrane localization of NlpI, IbpA, and IbpB. Furthermore, NlpI physically interacts with IbpB. These results indicate that over-expression of NlpI can interrupt the nucleoids division and the assembly of FtsZ at the septum, mediated by IbpA/IbpB, suggesting a role of the NlpI/IbpA/IbpB complex in the cell division.

  19. Heat shock proteins IbpA and IbpB are required for NlpI-participated cell division in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eTao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein NlpI of Escherichia coli is involved in the cell division, virulence and bacterial interaction with eukaryotic host cells. To elucidate the functional mechanism of NlpI, we examined how NlpI affects cell division and found that induction of NlpI inhibits nucleoid division and halts cell growth. Consistent with these results, the cell division protein FtsZ failed to localize at the septum but diffused in the cytosol. Elevation of NlpI expression enhanced the transcription and the outer membrane localization of the heat shock protein IbpA and IbpB. Deletion of either ibpA or ibpB abolished the effects of NlpI induction, which could be restored by complementation. The C-terminus of NlpI is critical for the enhancement in IbpA and IbpB production, and the N-terminus of NlpI is required for the outer membrane localization of NlpI, IbpA, and IbpB. Furthermore, NlpI physically interacts with IbpB. These results indicate that over-expression of NlpI can interrupt the nucleoids division and the assembly of FtsZ at the septum, mediated by IbpA/IbpB, suggesting a role of the NlpI/IbpA/IbpB complex in the cell division.

  20. Characterization of the ftsZ cell division gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: expression in Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimnia, H; Radia, A; Bernatchez, S; Beveridge, T J; Dillon, J R

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the cell division gene ftsZ of the gram-negative coccus Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) strain CH811, characterized it genetically and phenotypically, and studied its localization in N. gonorrhoeae and Escherichia coli (Ec). The 1,179-bp ORF of ftsZ(Ng) encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 41.5 kDa. Protein sequence alignments indicate that FtsZ(Ng) is similar to other FtsZ proteins and contains the conserved GTP binding motif. FtsZ homologues were identified in several N. gonorrhoeae strains and in Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria polysaccharae and Neisseria cinerea either by Western blot or by PCR-Southern blot analysis. Attempts to inactivate the ftsZ(Ng) on the chromosome failed, indicating that it is essential for gonococcal growth. FtsZ(Ng) was synthesized in an in vitro transcription/translation system and was shown to be 43 kDa, the same size as in Western blots. Expression of the ftsZ(Ng) gene from nongonococcal promoters resulted in a filamentous phenotype in E. coli. Under controlled expression, the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein localized at the mid-cell division site in E. coli. E. coli expressing high levels of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein formed filaments and exhibited different fluorescent structures including helices, spiral tubules extending from pole to pole, and regularly spaced dots or bands that did not localize at the middle of the cell. Expression of the FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusion protein in N. gonorrhoeae resulted in abnormal cell division as shown by electron microscopy. FtsZ(Ng)-GFP fusions were also expressed in a gonococcal background using a unique shuttle vector.

  1. Systemic control of cell division and endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by modulating CDKs in root tip cells of Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jigna G; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP) treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  2. Systemic Control of Cell Division and Endoreduplication by NAA and BAP by Modulating CDKs in Root Tip Cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigna G. Tank

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanism regulated by auxin and cytokinin during endoreduplication, cell division, and elongation process is studied by using Allium cepa roots as a model system. The activity of CDK genes modulated by auxin and cytokinin during cell division, elongation, and endoreduplication process is explained in this research work. To study the significance of auxin and cytokinin in the management of cell division and endoreduplication process in plant meristematic cells at molecular level endoreduplication was developed in root tips of Allium cepa by giving colchicine treatment. There were inhibition of vegetative growth, formation of c-tumor at root tip, and development of endoreduplicated cells after colchicine treatment. This c-tumor was further treated with NAA and BAP to reinitiate vegetative growth in roots. BAP gave positive response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from center of c-tumor. However, NAA gave negative response in reinitiation of vegetative growth of roots from c-tumor. Further, CDKs gene expression analysis from normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormone (NAA or BAP treated root tip was done and remarkable changes in transcription level of CDK genes in normal, endoreduplicated, and phytohormones treated cells were observed.

  3. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  4. The ClpP protease homologue is required for the transmission traits and cell division of the pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qin-fen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila, the intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease, exhibit characteristic transmission traits such as elevated stress tolerance, shortened length and virulence during the transition from the replication phase to the transmission phase. ClpP, the catalytic core of the Clp proteolytic complex, is widely involved in many cellular processes via the regulation of intracellular protein quality. Results In this study, we showed that ClpP was required for optimal growth of L. pneumophila at high temperatures and under several other stress conditions. We also observed that cells devoid of clpP exhibited cell elongation, incomplete cell division and compromised colony formation. Furthermore, we found that the clpP-deleted mutant was more resistant to sodium stress and failed to proliferate in the amoebae host Acanthamoeba castellanii. Conclusions The data present in this study illustrate that the ClpP protease homologue plays an important role in the expression of transmission traits and cell division of L. pneumophila, and further suggest a putative role of ClpP in virulence regulation.

  5. A conserved DNA damage response pathway responsible for coupling the cell division cycle to the circadian and metabolic cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-12-01

    The circadian clock drives endogenous oscillations of cellular and physiological processes with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. Progression of the cell division cycle (CDC) has been found to be coupled to the circadian clock, and it has been postulated that gating of the CDC by the circadian cycle may have evolved to protect DNA from the mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light. When grown under nutrient-limiting conditions in a chemostat, prototrophic strains of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adopt a robust metabolic cycle of ultradian dimensions that temporally compartmentalizes essential cellular events. The CDC is gated by this yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), with DNA replication strictly segregated away from the oxidative phase when cells are actively respiring. Mutants impaired in such gating allow DNA replication to take place during the respiratory phase of the YMC and have been found to suffer significantly elevated rates of spontaneous mutation. Analogous to the circadian cycle, the YMC also employs the conserved DNA checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk2 to facilitate coupling with the CDC. These studies highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that seems to confine cell division to particular temporal windows to prevent DNA damage. We hypothesize that DNA damage itself might constitute a "zeitgeber", or time giver, for both the circadian cycle and the metabolic cycle. We discuss these findings in the context of a unifying theme underlying the circadian and metabolic cycles, and explore the relevance of cell cycle gating to human diseases including cancer.

  6. Trisomy 18: studies of the parent and cell division of origin and the effect of aberrant recombination on nondisjunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J.M.; Harvey, J.F.; Jacobs, P.A. [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom); Morton, N.E. [CRC Epidemiology Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    We have studied the mechanism of origin of 63 cases of trisomy 18. In 2 the additional chromosome was paternal in origin, and in the remaining 61 it was maternal in origin. Both paternal cases were attributable to a postzygotic mitotic (PZM) error. Among the 54 maternal cases for which the cell division of error was established, only 16 were attributable to an error at the first meiotic division (mat MI), whereas no fewer than 35 were due an error at the second meiotic division (mat MII), the remaining 3 being the result of a PZM error involving the maternal chromosome 18. A standard map of chromosome 18 was constructed and compared with the nondisjunctional map. Approximately one-third of the mat MI errors were associated with complete absence of recombination, whereas in the remaining two-thirds and in all the mat MII errors recombination in the nondisjoined chromosomes appeared to be normal. All the maternal errors were associated with an increased maternal age, although this reached significance only for the mat MII category of nondisjunction. Our observations on chromosome 18 are compared with those on other chromosomes for which there are comparable data. 37 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20 in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients.

  8. Characterization of inner membrane protein YciB in Escherichia coli: YciB interacts with cell elongation and division proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaochi; Badaluddin, Noor Afiza; Kitakawa, Madoka

    2015-11-01

    The function of inner membrane protein YciB in Escherichia coli has not been identified. In this study, the membrane topology of the protein that contains five transmembrane domains was clarified. YciB was found to interact with various proteins involved in cell elongation and cell division using a bacterial two-hybrid system. It was also found that the deletion mutant of yciB is susceptible to the low osmolarity. These observations together with previous reports indicate that YciB is involved in synthesis of the cell envelope by interacting with cell elongation and cell division complexes.

  9. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J.; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-c...

  10. Division of labor: subsets of dorsal-appendage-forming cells control the shape of the entire tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael J; French, Rachael L; Cosand, K Amber; Dorman, Jennie B; Kiehart, Daniel P; Berg, Celeste A

    2010-10-01

    The function of an organ relies on its form, which in turn depends on the individual shapes of the cells that create it and the interactions between them. Despite remarkable progress in the field of developmental biology, how cells collaborate to make a tissue remains an unsolved mystery. To investigate the mechanisms that determine organ structure, we are studying the cells that form the dorsal appendages (DAs) of the Drosophila melanogaster eggshell. These cells consist of two differentially patterned subtypes: roof cells, which form the outward-facing roof of the lumen, and floor cells, which dive underneath the roof cells to seal off the floor of the tube. In this paper, we present three lines of evidence that reveal a further stratification of the DA-forming epithelium. Laser ablation of only a few cells in the anterior of the region causes a disproportionately severe shortening of the appendage. Genetic alteration through the twin peaks allele of tramtrack69 (ttk(twk)), a female-sterile mutation that leads to severely shortened DAs, causes no such shortening when removed from a majority of the DA-forming cells, but rather, produces short appendages only when removed from cells in the very anterior of the tube-forming tissue. Additionally we show that heterotrimeric G-protein function is required for DA morphogenesis. Like TTK69, Gbeta 13F is not required in all DA-forming follicle cells but only in the floor and leading roof cells. The different phenotypes that result from removal of Gbeta 13F from each region demonstrate a striking division of function between different DA-forming cells. Gbeta mutant floor cells are unable to control the width of the appendage while Gbeta mutant leading roof cells fail to direct the elongation of the appendage and the convergent-extension of the roof-cell population.

  11. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  12. Mathematical models of tissue stem and transit target cell divisions and the risk of radiation- or smoking-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mark P; Hendry, Jolyon H

    2017-02-01

    There is compelling biological data to suggest that cancer arises from a series of mutations in single target cells, resulting in defects in cell renewal and differentiation processes which lead to malignancy. Because much mutagenic damage is expressed following cell division, more-rapidly renewing tissues could be at higher risk because of the larger number of cell replications. Cairns suggested that renewing tissues may reduce cancer risk by partitioning the dividing cell populations into lineages comprising infrequently-dividing long-lived stem cells and frequently-dividing short-lived daughter transit cells. We develop generalizations of three recent cancer-induction models that account for the joint maintenance and renewal of stem and transit cells, also competing processes of partially transformed cell proliferation and differentiation/apoptosis. We are particularly interested in using these models to separately assess the probabilities of mutation and development of cancer associated with "spontaneous" processes and with those linked to a specific environmental mutagen, specifically ionizing radiation or cigarette smoking. All three models demonstrate substantial variation in cancer risks, by at least 20 orders of magnitude, depending on the assumed number of critical mutations required for cancer, and the stem-cell and transition-cell mutation rates. However, in most cases the conditional probabilities of cancer being mutagen-induced range between 7-96%. The relative risks associated with mutagen exposure compared to background rates are also stable, ranging from 1.0-16.0. Very few cancers, generally Little difference is made to relative risks if competing processes of proliferation and differentiation in the partially transformed stem and transit cell population are allowed for, nor is any difference made if one assumes that transit cells require an extra mutation to confer malignancy from the number required by stem cells. The probability of a cancer

  13. AHP6 inhibits cytokinin signaling to regulate the orientation of pericycle cell division during lateral root initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Moreira

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots (LRs initiate from anticlinal cell divisions of pericycle founder cells. The formation of LR primordia is regulated antagonistically by the phytohormones cytokinin and auxin. It has previously been shown that cytokinin has an inhibitory effect on the patterning events occurring during LR formation. However, the molecular players involved in cytokinin repression are still unknown. In a similar manner to protoxylem formation in Arabidopsis roots, in which AHP6 (ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 6 acts as a cytokinin inhibitor, we reveal that AHP6 also functions as a cytokinin repressor during early stages of LR development. We show that AHP6 is expressed at different developmental stages during LR formation and is required for the correct orientation of cell divisions at the onset of LR development. Moreover, we demonstrate that AHP6 influences the localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1, which is necessary for patterning the LR primordia. In summary, we show that the inhibition of cytokinin signaling through AHP6 is required to establish the correct pattern during LR initiation.

  14. Van Gogh and Frizzled act redundantly in the Drosophila sensory organ precursor cell to orient its asymmetric division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Eduardo Gomes

    Full Text Available Drosophila sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs divide asymmetrically along the anterior-posterior (a-p body axis to generate two different daughter cells. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP regulates the a-p orientation of the SOP division. The localization of the PCP proteins Van Gogh (Vang and Frizzled (Fz define anterior and posterior apical membrane domains prior to SOP division. Here, we investigate the relative contributions of Vang, Fz and Dishevelled (Dsh, a membrane-associated protein acting downstream of Fz, in orienting SOP polarity. Genetic and live imaging analyses suggest that Dsh restricts the localization of a centrosome-attracting activity to the anterior cortex and that Vang is a target of Dsh in this process. Using a clone border assay, we provide evidence that the Vang and fz genes act redundantly in SOPs to orient its polarity axis in response to extrinsic local PCP cues. Additionally, we find that the activity of Vang is dispensable for the non-autonomous polarizing activity of fz. These observations indicate that both Vang and Fz act as cues for downstream effectors orienting the planar polarity axis of dividing SOPs.

  15. Direct interaction of FtsZ and MreB is required for septum synthesis and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Andrew K; Gerdes, Kenn

    2013-07-03

    How bacteria coordinate cell growth with division is not well understood. Bacterial cell elongation is controlled by actin-MreB while cell division is governed by tubulin-FtsZ. A ring-like structure containing FtsZ (the Z ring) at mid-cell attracts other cell division proteins to form the divisome, an essential protein assembly required for septum synthesis and cell separation. The Z ring exists at mid-cell during a major part of the cell cycle without contracting. Here, we show that MreB and FtsZ of Escherichia coli interact directly and that this interaction is required for Z ring contraction. We further show that the MreB-FtsZ interaction is required for transfer of cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes from the lateral to the mature divisome, allowing cells to synthesise the septum. Our observations show that bacterial cell division is coupled to cell elongation via a direct and essential interaction between FtsZ and MreB.

  16. Quantitation of (a)symmetric inheritance of functional and of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial aconitase in the cell division of old yeast mother cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Harald; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Lam, Yuen T; Laun, Peter; Heeren, Gino; Klocker, Andrea; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Dickinson, J Richard; Dawes, Ian W; Breitenbach, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Asymmetric segregation of oxidatively damaged proteins is discussed in the literature as a mechanism in cell division cycles which at the same time causes rejuvenation of the daughter cell and aging of the mother cell. This process must be viewed as cooperating with the cellular degradation processes like autophagy, proteasomal degradation and others. Together, these two mechanisms guarantee survival of the species and prevent clonal senescence of unicellular organisms, like yeast. It is widely believed that oxidative damage to proteins is primarily caused by oxygen radicals and their follow-up products produced in the mitochondria. As we have shown previously, old yeast mother cells in contrast to young cells contain reactive oxygen species and undergo programmed cell death. Here we show that aconitase of the mitochondrial matrix is readily inactivated by oxidative stress, but even in its inactive form is relatively long-lived and retains fluorescence in the Aco1p-eGFP form. The fluorescent protein is distributed between old mothers and their daughters approximately corresponding to the different sizes of mother and daughter cells. However, the remaining active enzyme is primarily inherited by the daughter cells. This indicates that asymmetric distribution of the still active enzyme takes place and a mechanism for discrimination between active and inactive enzyme must exist. As the aconitase remains mitochondrial during aging and cell division, our findings could indicate discrimination between active and no longer active mitochondria during the process.

  17. Somatic mosaicism in families with hemophilia B: 11% of germline mutations originate within a few cell divisions post-fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoell, A.; Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previous molecular estimates of mosaicism in the dystrophin and other genes generally have focused on the transmission of the mutated allele to two or more children by an individual without the mutation in leukocyte DNA. We have analyzed 414 families with hemophilia B by direct genomic sequencing and haplotype analysis, and have deduced the origin of mutation in 56 families. There was no origin individual who transmitted a mutant allele to more than one child. However, somatic mosaicism was detected by sequence analysis of four origin individuals (3{female} and 1{male}). The sensitivity of this analysis is typically one part in ten. In one additional female who had close to a 50:50 ratio of mutant to normal alleles, three of four noncarrier daughters inherited the haplotype associated with the mutant allele. This highlights a caveat in molecular analysis: a presumptive carrier in a family with sporadic disease does not necessarily have a 50% probability of transmitting the mutant allele to her offspring. After eliminating those families in which mosaicism could not be detected because of a total gene deletion or absence of DNA from a deduced origin individual, 5 of 43 origin individuals exhibited somatic mosaicism at a level that reflects a mutation within the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In one patient, analysis of cervical scrapings and buccal mucosa confirm the generalized distribution of somatic mutation. Are the first few cell divisions post-fertilization highly mutagenic, or do mutations at later divisions also give rise to somatic mosaicism? To address this question, DNA from origin individuals are being analyzed to detect somatic mosaicism at a sensitivity of 1:1000. Single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) has been utilized in eight families to date and no mosaicism has been detected. When the remaining 30 samples are analyzed, it will be possible to compare the frequency of somatic mosaicism at 0.1-10% with that of {ge}10%.

  18. Dynamic instability--a common denominator in prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA segregation and cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuesler, John A; Li, Hsin-Jung Sophia

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic instability is an essential phenomenon in eukaryotic nuclear division and prokaryotic plasmid R1 segregation. Although the molecular machines used in both systems differ greatly in composition, strong similarities and requisite nuances in dynamics and segregation mechanisms are observed. This brief examination of the current literature provides a functional comparison between prokaryotic and eukaryotic dynamically unstable filaments, specifically ParM and microtubules. Additionally, this mini-review should support the notion that any dynamically unstable filament could serve as the molecular machine driving DNA segregation, but these machines possess auxiliary features to adapt to temporal and spatial disparities in either system.

  19. Structural and Functional Characterizations of SsgB, a Conserved Activator of Developmental Cell Division in Morphologically Complex Actinomycetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A.; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A. Mieke; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; van Wezel, Gilles P.; (Leiden-MC); (SLAC); (Scripps); (UV); (UCSD); (Burnham)

    2010-01-20

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic 'whirly' single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners.

  20. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  1. The influence of the slowing of Earth's rotation: A hypothesis to explain cell division synchrony under different day duration in earlier and later evolved unicellular algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, E.; González-Gil, S.; López-Rodas, V.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-03-01

    Every year the Earth's rotation period is reduced, mainly due to the tidal drag of the moon. The length of day increases continuously by about 1 h every 200 million years. The period of rotation around the Sun remains constant; hence, the length of the year remains constant, so years acquire progressively fewer days. Many unicellular algae show rhythmicity in their cell division cycle. If primitive algae evolved under a shorter day duration, then it is possible that the early-evolved algae had to synchronize their cell division cycle to shorter lengths of day than did later-evolved algae. We tested this hypothesis by growing Cyanobacteria, Dinophyceae, Prasinophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Conjugatophyceae (evolutionary appearance probably in this order) at 8∶8 h light-dark cycles (LD), 10∶10 LD, and 12∶12 LD, at 20 or 27°C. Cyanobacteria synchronized their cell division cycles optimally at 8∶8 h LD, Dinophyceae and Prasinophyceae at 10∶10 h LD, and Conjugatophyceae and Bacillariophyceae at 12∶12 h LD. The synchrony of cell division was scarcely affected by temperature. Results suggested that the early evolved unicellular autotrophic organisms such as the Cyanobacteria synchronized their cell division cycle under a shorter day duration than later-evolved unicellular algae, and these traits may have been conserved by quiescent genes up to the present day.

  2. DNA damage in stem cells activates p21, inhibits p53, and induces symmetric self-renewing divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Faretta, Mario; Gallo, Barbara; Albano, Luisa; Ronzoni, Simona; Furia, Laura; Viale, Andrea; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    DNA damage leads to a halt in proliferation owing to apoptosis or senescence, which prevents transmission of DNA alterations. This cellular response depends on the tumor suppressor p53 and functions as a powerful barrier to tumor development. Adult stem cells are resistant to DNA damage-induced apoptosis or senescence, however, and how they execute this response and suppress tumorigenesis is unknown. We show that irradiation of hematopoietic and mammary stem cells up-regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21, a known target of p53, which prevents p53 activation and inhibits p53 basal activity, impeding apoptosis and leading to cell cycle entry and symmetric self-renewing divisions. p21 also activates DNA repair, limiting DNA damage accumulation and self-renewal exhaustion. Stem cells with moderate DNA damage and diminished self-renewal persist after irradiation, however. These findings suggest that stem cells have evolved a unique, p21-dependent response to DNA damage that leads to their immediate expansion and limits their long-term survival.

  3. Cell division in the CNS: Protective response or lethal event in post-mitotic neurons?

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yan; Herrup, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Cell cycle events have been documented to be associated with several human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on two diseases - Alzheimer’s disease and ataxia telangiectasia - as well as their mouse models. Cell cycle studies have shown that ectopic expression of cell cycle markers is spatially and regional correlated well with neuronal cell death in both disease conditions. Further evidence of ectopic cell cycling is found in both human diseases and in its mouse models. These fi...

  4. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  5. The soluble periplasmic domains of Escherichia coli cell division proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL form a trimeric complex with submicromolar affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Marjolein; Bart Van Den Berg Van Saparoea, H.; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Roseboom, Winfried; Liu, Fan; Koningstein, Gregory M.; Fish, Alexander; Den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Heck, Albert J R; De Jong, Luitzen; Bitter, Wilbert; De Esch, Iwan J P; Luirink, Joen

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a ce

  6. The Soluble Periplasmic Domains of Escherichia coli Cell Division Proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL form a Trimeric Complex with Sub-micromolar Affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, M.; van den Berg van Saparoea, H.B.; McLaughlin, S.H.; Roseboom, W.; Liu, F.; Koningstein, G.M.; Fish, A.; den Blaauwen, T.; Heck, A.J.R.; de Jong, L.; Bitter, W.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Luirink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a ce

  7. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  8. The cyanobacterial cell division factor Ftn6 contains an N-terminal DnaD-like domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saguez Cyril

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA replication and cell cycle as well as their relationship have been extensively studied in the two model organisms E. coli and B. subtilis. By contrast, little is known about these processes in cyanobacteria, even though they are crucial to the biosphere, in utilizing solar energy to renew the oxygenic atmosphere and in producing the biomass for the food chain. Recent studies have allowed the identification of several cell division factors that are specifics to cyanobacteria. Among them, Ftn6 has been proposed to function in the recruitment of the crucial FtsZ proteins to the septum or the subsequent Z-ring assembly and possibly in chromosome segregation. Results In this study, we identified an as yet undescribed domain located in the conserved N-terminal region of Ftn6. This 77 amino-acids-long domain, designated here as FND (Ftn6 N-Terminal Domain, exhibits striking sequence and structural similarities with the DNA-interacting module, listed in the PFAM database as the DnaD-like domain (pfam04271. We took advantage of the sequence similarities between FND and the DnaD-like domains to construct a homology 3D-model of the Ftn6 FND domain from the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. Mapping of the conserved residues exposed onto the FND surface allowed us to identify a highly conserved area that could be engaged in Ftn6-specific interactions. Conclusion Overall, similarities between FND and DnaD-like domains as well as previously reported observations on Ftn6 suggest that FND may function as a DNA-interacting module thereby providing an as yet missing link between DNA replication and cell division in cyanobacteria. Consistently, we also showed that Ftn6 is involved in tolerance to DNA damages generated by UV rays.

  9. Knockdown of dystrophin Dp71 impairs PC12 cells cycle: localization in the spindle and cytokinesis structures implies a role for Dp71 in cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Villarreal-Silva

    Full Text Available The function of dystrophin Dp71 in neuronal cells remains to be established. Previously, we revealed the involvement of this protein in both nerve growth factor (NGF-induced neuronal differentiation and cell adhesion by isolation and characterization of PC12 neuronal cells with depleted levels of Dp71. In this work, a novel phenotype of Dp71-knockdown cells was characterized, which is their delayed growth rate. Cell cycle analyses revealed an altered behavior of Dp71-depleted cells, which consists of a delay in G0/G1 transition and an increase in apoptosis during nocodazole-induced mitotic arrest. Dp71 associates with lamin B1 and β-dystroglycan, proteins involved in aspects of the cell division cycle; therefore, we compared the distribution of Dp71 with that of lamin B1 and β-dystroglycan in PC12 cells at mitosis and cytokinesis by means of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analysis. All of these three proteins exhibited a similar immunostaining pattern, localized at mitotic spindle, cleavage furrow, and midbody. It is noteworthy that a drastic decreased staining in mitotic spindle, cleavage furrow, and midbody was observed for both lamin B1 and β-dystroglycan in Dp71-depleted cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated the interaction of Dp71 with lamin B1 in PC12 cells by immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, and importantly, we revealed that knockdown of Dp71 expression caused a marked reduction in lamin B1 levels and altered localization of the nuclear envelope protein emerin. Our data indicate that Dp71 is a component of the mitotic spindle and cytokinesis multi-protein apparatuses that might modulate the cell division cycle by affecting lamin B1 and β-dystroglycan levels.

  10. The Garlic Allelochemical Diallyl Disulfide Affects Tomato Root Growth by Influencing Cell Division, Phytohormone Balance and Expansin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen; Tang, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.), and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seed germination, root growth, mitotic index, and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs), auxin transport genes (SlPINs), and expansin genes (EXPs) in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01–0.62 mM) of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20–20.67 mM) showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM). This result suggests that tomato root growth may be

  11. The garlic allelochemical diallyl disulfide affects tomato root growth by influencing cell division, phytohormone balance and expansin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a volatile organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L., and it is known as an allelochemical responsible for the strong allelopathic potential of garlic. The anticancer properties of DADS have been studied in experimental animals and various types of cancer cells, but to date, little is known about its mode of action as an allelochemical at the cytological level. The current research presents further studies on the effects of DADS on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. seed germination, root growth, mitotic index and cell size in root meristem, as well as the phytohormone levels and expression profile of auxin biosynthesis genes (FZYs, auxin transport genes (SlPINs and expansin genes (EXPs in tomato root. The results showed a biphasic, dose-dependent effect on tomato seed germination and root growth under different DADS concentrations. Lower concentrations (0.01-0.62 mM of DADS significantly promoted root growth, whereas higher levels (6.20-20.67 mM showed inhibitory effects. Cytological observations showed that the cell length of root meristem was increased and that the mitotic activity of meristematic cells in seedling root tips was enhanced at lower concentrations of DADS. In contrast, DADS at higher concentrations inhibited root growth by affecting both the length and division activity of meristematic cells. However, the cell width of the root meristem was not affected. Additionally, DADS increased the IAA and ZR contents of seedling roots in a dose-dependent manner. The influence on IAA content may be mediated by the up-regulation of FZYs and PINs. Further investigation into the underlying mechanism revealed that the expression levels of tomato EXPs were significantly affected by DADS. The expression levels of EXPB2 and beta-expansin precursor were increased after 3 d, and those of EXP1, EXPB3 and EXLB1 were increased after 5 d of DADS treatment (0.41 mM. This result suggests that tomato root growth

  12. TiO2 nanoparticles suppress Escherichia coli cell division in the absence of UV irradiation in acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Lyudmila V; Kiwi, John; Nikandrov, Vitaly V

    2012-09-01

    TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) activated by UV irradiation are known to have a bactericidal effect. In this study we report the details of TiO(2) NPs influence on the colony-forming capacity of E. coli in the dark at pH 4.0-4.5. At this pH the bacterial cells are negatively charged and TiO(2) NPs present a positive charge. A 60 min contact between E. coli with TiO(2) at concentrations of 0.02-0.2 mg/mL led to a reduction of E. coli cell number from 10(8) to 10(4)CFU/mL. After the reduction the system remains unchanged during the subsequent incubation. The observed reduction was a function on the initial E. coli concentration. In the presence of 0.04 mg/mL TiO(2) the colony-forming units (CFU) reduction after 60 min was of four-five orders of magnitude when the initial concentration was 10(8) cells/mL. But when starting with an E. coli concentration of 10(7) cells/mL the cell number reduction was less than one order of magnitude. Less than one order of magnitude cell number reduction was also observed for suspensions of E. coli 10(8) cells/mL and 0.002 mg/mL of TiO(2). The bacteria number reduction was always accompanied by the formation of cell aggregates. During cell incubation with TiO(2), the pH of the suspension increased, but did not reach the TiO(2) isoelectric point (IEP). E. coli cells stained with the fluorescent dye acridine orange (AO) showed that the fluorescence of single cells remained unchanged after incubation in the presence of TiO(2). The color change of fluorescence was revealed only in aggregated cells. This suggests changes in the physiologic state of E. coli incorporated into the aggregates. Aggregates of E. coli occur due to the electrostatic interaction between TiO(2) NPs and the bacterial cell surface. A hypothesis is suggested in this study to explain the CFU reduction and the retention of a certain irreducible number of cells capable of further division in the suspension in the presence of TiO(2) in the dark.

  13. [NEW INFORMATION ABOUT THE STRUCTURES FORMED BY FtsZ PROTEIN IN ESCHERICHIA COLI CELLS DURING DIVISION PROCESS OBTAINED BY SINGLE-MOLECULE LOCALIZATION MICROSCOPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyaykin, A D; Vishnyakov, I E; Polinovskaya, V S; Artamonova, I T; Khodorkovskii, M A; Sabantsev, A V

    2015-01-01

    FtsZ--a bacterial tubulin homolog--is one of the key bacterial division proteins, forming a contractile Z-ring at the midcell of dividing bacteria. In this work immunofluorescent labeling was used in conjunction with single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) to visualize native structures formed by FtsZ protein in Escherichia coli cells. This approach allowed the reorganization of FtsZ structures during cytokinesis to be visualized step-by-step. New data was obtained that support the hypothesis that the Z-ring is a spiral structure that constricts during division, assisting the formation of the septum between daughter cells.

  14. Analysis of premature centromere division (PCD) of the X chromosome in Alzheimer patients through the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana; Zivkovic, Lada; Djelic, Ninoslav; Bajic, Vladan

    2004-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the X chromosome in phytohaemagglutinin stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated in 12 sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and in 11 healthy subjects. For chromosome analysis two methods were used: (1) standard analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes and; (2) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the detection of the X chromosome centromeric region in interphase nuclei. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the X chromosome expresses premature centromere division (PCD) in AD females in 10.53% of metaphase cells and in 15.22% of interphase nuclei. In AD men the percentages were 3.98 and 6.06%, respectively. X chromosome PCD in the female control group showed a percentage of 7.46% in metaphase cells and 9.35% in interphase nuclei and in male controls the percentages were 2.84% in metaphases and 5.54% in interphase nuclei. The results of FISH analysis showed that PCD could occur much earlier than metaphase of mitosis, i.e. in interphase of the cell cycle, immediately after replication. The FISH method can be used for PCD verification in all phases of the cell cycle in various disorders including AD.

  15. 3' UTR-dependent, miR-92-mediated restriction of Tis21 expression maintains asymmetric neural stem cell division to ensure proper neocortex size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Ji-Feng; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-04-24

    Mammalian neocortex size primarily reflects the number and mode of divisions of neural stem and progenitor cells. Cortical stem cells (apical progenitors) switching from symmetric divisions, which expand their population, to asymmetric divisions, which generate downstream neuronal progenitors (basal progenitors), start expressing Tis21, a so-called antiproliferative/prodifferentiative gene. Tis21 encodes a small (17.5 kDa), functionally poorly characterized protein and a relatively large (2 kb), highly conserved 3' UTR. Here, we show that mice lacking the Tis21 3' UTR develop a microcephalic neocortex with fewer neurons, notably in the upper layers. This reflects a progressive decrease in basal progenitors, which in turn is due to a fraction of apical progenitors prematurely switching from asymmetric self-renewing to symmetric self-consuming divisions. This switch is caused by the markedly increased Tis21 protein level resulting from lack of microRNA-, notably miR-92-, dependent restriction of Tis21 expression. Our data show that a premature onset of consumptive neural stem cell divisions can lead to microcephaly.

  16. Hsp70 protects mitotic cells against heat-induced centrosome damage and division abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat shock on centrosomes has been mainly studied in interphase cells. Centrosomes play a key role in proper segregation of DNA during mitosis. However, the direct effect and consequences of heat shock on mitotic cells and a possible cellular defense system against proteotoxic stress d

  17. Contribution of soft substrates to malignancy and tumor suppression during colon cancer cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Rabineau

    Full Text Available In colon cancer, a highly aggressive disease, progression through the malignant sequence is accompanied by increasingly numerous chromosomal rearrangements. To colonize target organs, invasive cells cross several tissues of various elastic moduli. Whether soft tissue increases malignancy or in contrast limits invasive colon cell spreading remains an open question. Using polyelectrolyte multilayer films mimicking microenvironments of various elastic moduli, we revealed that human SW480 colon cancer cells displayed increasing frequency in chromosomal segregation abnormalities when cultured on substrates with decreasing stiffness. Our results show that, although decreasing stiffness correlates with increased cell lethality, a significant proportion of SW480 cancer cells did escape from the very soft substrates, even when bearing abnormal chromosome segregation, achieve mitosis and undergo a new cycle of replication in contrast to human colonic HCoEpiC cells which died on soft substrates. This observation opens the possibility that the ability of cancer cells to overcome defects in chromosome segregation on very soft substrates could contribute to increasing chromosomal rearrangements and tumor cell aggressiveness.

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the scaling of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with in-plane flow shear

    CERN Document Server

    Doss, C E; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in systems simultaneously containing asymmetric (anti-parallel) magnetic fields, asymmetric plasma densities and temperatures, and arbitrary in-plane bulk flow of plasma in the upstream regions. Such configurations are common in the high-latitudes of Earth's magnetopause and in tokamaks. We investigate the convection speed of the X-line, the scaling of the reconnection rate, and the condition for which the flow suppresses reconnection as a function of upstream flow speeds. We use two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to capture the mixing of plasma in the outflow regions better than is possible in fluid modeling. We perform simulations with asymmetric magnetic fields, simulations with asymmetric densities, and simulations with magnetopause-like parameters where both are asymmetric. For flow speeds below the predicted cutoff velocity, we find good scaling agreement with the theory presented in Doss et al., J.~Geophys.~Res., 120, 7748 (2015). Applications to planetary...

  19. C. elegans nucleostemin is required for larval growth and germline stem cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Kudron

    Full Text Available The nucleolus has shown to be integral for many processes related to cell growth and proliferation. Stem cells in particular are likely to depend upon nucleolus-based processes to remain in a proliferative state. A highly conserved nucleolar factor named nucleostemin is proposed to be a critical link between nucleolar function and stem-cell-specific processes. Currently, it is unclear whether nucleostemin modulates proliferation by affecting ribosome biogenesis or by another nucleolus-based activity that is specific to stem cells and/or highly proliferating cells. Here, we investigate nucleostemin (nst-1 in the nematode C. elegans, which enables us to examine nst-1 function during both proliferation and differentiation in vivo. Like mammalian nucleostemin, the NST-1 protein is localized to the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm; however, its expression is found in both differentiated and proliferating cells. Global loss of C. elegans nucleostemin (nst-1 leads to a larval arrest phenotype due to a growth defect in the soma, while loss of nst-1 specifically in the germ line causes germline stem cells to undergo a cell cycle arrest. nst-1 mutants exhibit reduced levels of rRNAs, suggesting defects in ribosome biogenesis. However, NST-1 is generally not present in regions of the nucleolus where rRNA transcription and processing occurs, so this reduction is likely secondary to a different defect in ribosome biogenesis. Transgenic studies indicate that NST-1 requires its N-terminal domain for stable expression and both its G1 GTPase and intermediate domains for proper germ line function. Our data support a role for C. elegans nucleostemin in cell growth and proliferation by promoting ribosome biogenesis.

  20. A three-cell liquid hydrogen target for an extended focal plane polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Borzounov, Yu.T.; Piskunov, N.M.; Tsvinev, A.P. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of High Energy; Ball, J.; Chesny, Ph.; Gheller, J.M.; Guillier, G.; Ladygin, V.P.; Theure, Ph.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E. [Laboratoire National Saturne, Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-12-31

    This article describes the design and working principle of a 3-cell liquid hydrogen target produced for the high-energy deuteron polarimeter HYPOM. This target uses liquid Helium as a cooling agent. After a general description of the apparatus, tests and operating modes are thoroughly explained. In particular the air controlled self regulation of Helium flow in the cryostat to stabilize the liquid hydrogen level is presented. (author). 12 refs.; Submitted to Nuclear Instruments and Methods, A (NL).

  1. SpoIIIE and a novel type of DNA translocase, SftA, couple chromosome segregation with cell division in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimer, Christine; González-Pastor, José Eduardo; Graumann, Peter L

    2009-11-01

    Cell division must only occur once daughter chromosomes have been fully separated. However, the initiating event of bacterial cell division, assembly of the FtsZ ring, occurs while chromosome segregation is still ongoing. We show that a two-step DNA translocase system exists in Bacillus subtilis that couples chromosome segregation and cell division. The membrane-bound DNA translocase SpoIIIE assembled very late at the division septum, and only upon entrapment of DNA, while its orthologue, SftA (YtpST), assembled at each septum in B. subtilis soon after FtsZ. Lack of SftA resulted in a moderate segregation defect at a late stage in the cell cycle. Like the loss of SpoIIIE, the absence of SftA was deleterious for the cells during conditions of defective chromosome segregation, or after induction of DNA damage. Lack of both proteins exacerbated all phenotypes. SftA forms soluble hexamers in solution, binds to DNA and has DNA-dependent ATPase activity, which is essential for its function in vivo. Our data suggest that SftA aids in moving DNA away from the closing septum, while SpoIIIE translocates septum-entrapped DNA only when septum closure precedes complete segregation of chromosomes.

  2. Function and regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p kinase family in cell division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    During mitosis, the parent cell distributes its genetic materials equally into two daughter cells through chromosome segregation, a complex movements orchestrated by mitotic kinases and its effector proteins.Faithful chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensure that each daughter cell receives a full copy of genetic materials of parent cell. Defects in these processes can lead to aneuploidy or polyploidy. Aurora/Ipl1p fanily,a class of conserved serine/threonine kinases, plays key roles in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis.This article highlights the function and regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p family in mitosis and provides potential links between aberrant regulation of Aurora/Ipl1p kinases and pathogenesis of human cancer.

  3. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  4. Survival motor neuron protein regulates stem cell division, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Grice

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy is a severe neurogenic disease that is caused by mutations in the human survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene. SMN protein is required for the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and a dramatic reduction of the protein leads to cell death. It is currently unknown how the reduction of this ubiquitously essential protein can lead to tissue-specific abnormalities. In addition, it is still not known whether the disease is caused by developmental or degenerative defects. Using the Drosophila system, we show that SMN is enriched in postembryonic neuroblasts and forms a concentration gradient in the differentiating progeny. In addition to the developing Drosophila larval CNS, Drosophila larval and adult testes have a striking SMN gradient. When SMN is reduced in postembryonic neuroblasts using MARCM clonal analysis, cell proliferation and clone formation defects occur. These SMN mutant neuroblasts fail to correctly localise Miranda and have reduced levels of snRNAs. When SMN is removed, germline stem cells are lost more frequently. We also show that changes in SMN levels can disrupt the correct timing of cell differentiation. We conclude that highly regulated SMN levels are essential to drive timely cell proliferation and cell differentiation.

  5. The β-lactam resistance protein Blr, a small membrane polypeptide, is a component of the Escherichia coli cell division machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimova, Gouzel; Davi, Marilyne; Ladant, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    In Escherichia coli, cell division is performed by a multimolecular machinery called the divisome, made of 10 essential proteins and more than 20 accessory proteins. Through a bacterial two-hybrid library screen, we identified the E. coli β-lactam resistance protein Blr, a short membrane polypeptide of 41 residues, as an interacting partner of the essential cell division protein FtsL. In addition to FtsL, Blr was found to associate with several other divisomal proteins, including FtsI, FtsK, FtsN, FtsQ, FtsW, and YmgF. Using fluorescently tagged Blr, we showed that this peptide localizes to the division septum and that its colocalization requires the presence of the late division protein FtsN. Although Blr is not essential, previous studies have shown that the inactivation of the blr gene increased the sensitivity of bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics or their resistance to cell envelope stress. Here, we found that Blr, when overproduced, restores the viability of E. coli ftsQ1(Ts) cells, carrying a thermosensitive allele of the ftsQ gene, during growth under low-osmotic-strength conditions (e.g., in synthetic media or in Luria-Bertani broth without NaCl). In contrast, the inactivation of blr increases the osmosensitivity of ftsQ1(Ts) cells, and blr ftsQ1 double mutants exhibit filamentous growth in LB broth even at a moderate salt concentration (0.5% NaCl) compared to parental ftsQ1(Ts) cells. Altogether, our results suggest that the small membrane polypeptide Blr is a novel component of the E. coli cell division apparatus involved in the stabilization of the divisome under certain stress conditions.

  6. Artificial septal targeting of Bacillus subtilis cell division proteins in Escherichia coli: an interspecies approach to the study of protein-protein interactions in multiprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichon, Carine; King, Glenn F; Goehring, Nathan W; Beckwith, Jon

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial cell division is mediated by a set of proteins that assemble to form a large multiprotein complex called the divisome. Recent studies in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli indicate that cell division proteins are involved in multiple cooperative binding interactions, thus presenting a technical challenge to the analysis of these interactions. We report here the use of an E. coli artificial septal targeting system for examining the interactions between the B. subtilis cell division proteins DivIB, FtsL, DivIC, and PBP 2B. This technique involves the fusion of one of the proteins (the "bait") to ZapA, an E. coli protein targeted to mid-cell, and the fusion of a second potentially interacting partner (the "prey") to green fluorescent protein (GFP). A positive interaction between two test proteins in E. coli leads to septal localization of the GFP fusion construct, which can be detected by fluorescence microscopy. Using this system, we present evidence for two sets of strong protein-protein interactions between B. subtilis divisomal proteins in E. coli, namely, DivIC with FtsL and DivIB with PBP 2B, that are independent of other B. subtilis cell division proteins and that do not disturb the cytokinesis process in the host cell. Our studies based on the coexpression of three or four of these B. subtilis cell division proteins suggest that interactions among these four proteins are not strong enough to allow the formation of a stable four-protein complex in E. coli in contrast to previous suggestions. Finally, our results demonstrate that E. coli artificial septal targeting is an efficient and alternative approach for detecting and characterizing stable protein-protein interactions within multiprotein complexes from other microorganisms. A salient feature of our approach is that it probably only detects the strongest interactions, thus giving an indication of whether some interactions suggested by other techniques may either be considerably weaker or due to

  7. Forward genetic analysis of the apicomplexan cell division cycle in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Jan Gubbels

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa are obligate intracellular pathogens that have fine-tuned their proliferative strategies to match a large variety of host cells. A critical aspect of this adaptation is a flexible cell cycle that remains poorly understood at the mechanistic level. Here we describe a forward genetic dissection of the apicomplexan cell cycle using the Toxoplasma model. By high-throughput screening, we have isolated 165 temperature sensitive parasite growth mutants. Phenotypic analysis of these mutants suggests regulated progression through the parasite cell cycle with defined phases and checkpoints. These analyses also highlight the critical importance of the peculiar intranuclear spindle as the physical hub of cell cycle regulation. To link these phenotypes to parasite genes, we have developed a robust complementation system based on a genomic cosmid library. Using this approach, we have so far complemented 22 temperature sensitive mutants and identified 18 candidate loci, eight of which were independently confirmed using a set of sequenced and arrayed cosmids. For three of these loci we have identified the mutant allele. The genes identified include regulators of spindle formation, nuclear trafficking, and protein degradation. The genetic approach described here should be widely applicable to numerous essential aspects of parasite biology.

  8. Xnrs and activin regulate distinct genes during Xenopus development: activin regulates cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Ramis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mesoderm of the amphibian embryo is formed through an inductive interaction in which vegetal cells of the blastula-staged embryo act on overlying equatorial cells. Candidate mesoderm-inducing factors include members of the transforming growth factor type beta family such as Vg1, activin B, the nodal-related proteins and derrière. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Microarray analysis reveals different functions for activin B and the nodal-related proteins during early Xenopus development. Inhibition of nodal-related protein function causes the down-regulation of regionally expressed genes such as chordin, dickkopf and XSox17alpha/beta, while genes that are mis-regulated in the absence of activin B tend to be more widely expressed and, interestingly, include several that are involved in cell cycle regulation. Consistent with the latter observation, cells of the involuting dorsal axial mesoderm, which normally undergo cell cycle arrest, continue to proliferate when the function of activin B is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations reveal distinct functions for these two classes of the TGF-beta family during early Xenopus development, and in doing so identify a new role for activin B during gastrulation.

  9. Eukaryotic checkpoints are absent in the cell division cycle of Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulagna Banerjee; Suchismita Das; Anuradha Lohia

    2002-11-01

    Fidelity in transmission of genetic characters is ensured by the faithful duplication of the genome, followed by equal segregation of the genetic material in the progeny. Thus, alternation of DNA duplication (S-phase) and chromosome segregation during the M-phase are hallmarks of most well studied eukaryotes. Several rounds of genome reduplication before chromosome segregation upsets this cycle and leads to polyploidy. Polyploidy is often witnessed in cells prior to differentiation, in embryonic cells or in diseases such as cancer. Studies on the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica suggest that in its proliferative phase, this organism may accumulate polyploid cells. It has also been shown that although this organism contains sequence homologs of genes which are known to control the cell cycle of most eukaryotes, these genes may be structurally altered and their equivalent function yet to be demonstrated in amoeba. The available information suggests that surveillance mechanisms or ‘checkpoints’ which are known to regulate the eukaryotic cell cycle may be absent or altered in E. histolytica.

  10. LGH00031, a novel ortho-quinonoid inhibitor of cell division cycle 25B, inhibits human cancer cells via ROS generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-bo ZHOU; Xu FENG; Li-na WANG; Jun-qing DU; Yue-yang ZHOU; Hai-ping YU; Yi ZANG; Jing-ya LI; Jia LI

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To discover novel cell division cycle 25 (CDC25) B inhibitors and elucidate the mechanisms of inhibition in cancer cells. Methods: Cell growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay, the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression and phosphorylation was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: LGH00031 inhibited CDC25B irreversibly in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and impaired the proliferation of tumor cell lines. In synchronized HeLa cells, LGH00031 delayed the cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase. LGH00031 increased cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) tyrosine 15 phosphorylation and cyclin B1 protein level. The activity of LGH00031 against CDC25B in vitro relied on the existence of 1, 4-dithiothreitol (DTT) or dihydrolipoic acid and oxygen. The oxygen free radical scavenger catalase and superoxide dismutase reduced the inactivation of CDC25 by LGH00031, confirming that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the inactivation process in vitro. LGH00031 accelerated cellular ROS production in a dose-dependent manner, and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) markedly decreased the ROS production induced by LGH00031.Correspondingly, the LGH00031-induced decrease in cell viability and cell cycle arrest, cyclin B1 protein level, and phosphorylation of CDK1 tyrosine 15 were also rescued by NAC that decreased ROS pro-duction. Conclusion: The activity of LGH00031 at the molecular and cellular level is mediated by ROS.

  11. Identification of Wnt Pathway Target Genes Regulating the Division and Differentiation of Larval Seam Cells and Vulval Precursor Cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrepati, Lakshmi; Krause, Michael W; Chen, Weiping; Brodigan, Thomas M; Correa-Mendez, Margarita; Eisenmann, David M

    2015-06-05

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, regulating numerous processes including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Wnt ligand binding leads to stabilization of the transcriptional effector β-catenin and upregulation of target gene expression to mediate a cellular response. During larval development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Wnt/β-catenin pathways act in fate specification of two hypodermal cell types, the ventral vulval precursor cells (VPCs) and the lateral seam cells. Because little is known about targets of the Wnt signaling pathways acting during larval VPC and seam cell differentiation, we sought to identify genes regulated by Wnt signaling in these two hypodermal cell types. We conditionally activated Wnt signaling in larval animals and performed cell type-specific "mRNA tagging" to enrich for VPC and seam cell-specific mRNAs, and then used microarray analysis to examine gene expression compared to control animals. Two hundred thirty-nine genes activated in response to Wnt signaling were identified, and we characterized 50 genes further. The majority of these genes are expressed in seam and/or vulval lineages during normal development, and reduction of function for nine genes caused defects in the proper division, fate specification, fate execution, or differentiation of seam cells and vulval cells. Therefore, the combination of these techniques was successful at identifying potential cell type-specific Wnt pathway target genes from a small number of cells and at increasing our knowledge of the specification and behavior of these C. elegans larval hypodermal cells.

  12. Deficiency of BrpB causes major defects in cell division, stress responses and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitoun, Jacob P; Liao, Sumei; Xie, Gary G; Beatty, Wandy L; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary aetiological agent of dental caries, possesses an YjeE-like protein that is encoded by locus SMU.409, herein designated brpB. In this study, a BrpB-deficient mutant, JB409, and a double mutant deficient of BrpB and BrpA (a paralogue of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell wall-associated proteins), JB819, were constructed and characterized using function assays and microscopy analysis. Both JB409 and JB819 displayed extended lag phases and drastically slowed growth rates during growth in brain heart infusion medium as compared to the wild-type, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB409 and JB819 were more than 60- and 10-fold more susceptible to acid killing at pH 2.8, and more than 1 and 2 logs more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Complementation of the deficient mutants with a wild-type copy of the respective gene(s) partly restored the acid and oxidative stress responses to a level similar to the wild-type. As compared to UA159, biofilm formation by JB409 and JB819 was drastically reduced (P<0.001), especially during growth in medium containing sucrose. Under a scanning electron microscope, JB409 had significantly more giant cells with an elongated, rod-like morphology, and JB819 formed marble-like super cells with apparent defects in cell division. As revealed by transmission electron microscopy analysis, BrpB deficiency in both JB409 and JB819 resulted in the development of low electron density patches and formation of a loose nucleoid structure. Taken together, these results suggest that BrpB likely functions together with BrpA in regulating cell envelope biogenesis/homeostasis in Strep. mutans. Further studies are under way to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the BrpA- and BrpB-mediated regulation.

  13. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer.

  14. Insights into nucleotide recognition by cell division protein FtsZ from a mant-GTP competition assay and molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schaffner-Barbero; R. Gil-Redondo; L.B. Ruiz-Avila; S. Huecas; T. Läppchen; T. den Blaauwen; J.F. Diaz; A. Morreale; J.M. Andreu

    2010-01-01

    Essential cell division protein FtsZ forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring and is a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ monomers bind GTP and assemble into filaments. Hydrolysis to GDP at the association interface between monomers leads to filament disassembly. We have developed a homogeneous competitio

  15. Fine-mapping the contact sites of the Escherichia coli cell division proteins FtsB and Fts on the FtsQ protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg van Saparoea, H.B.; Glas, M.; Vernooij, I.G.W.H.; Bitter, W.; den Blaauwen, T.; Luirink, J.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cell division is effected by a large assembly of proteins called the divisome, of which a subcomplex consisting of three bitopic inner membrane proteins, FtsQ, FtsB, and FtsL, is an essential part. These three proteins, hypothesized to link cytoplasmic to periplasmic events during c

  16. Functional analysis of CedA based on its structure: residues important in binding of DNA and RNA polymerase and in the cell division regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshito; Fujisaki, Naoki; Miyoshi, Takanori; Watanabe, Noriko; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    DnaAcos, a mutant of the initiator DnaA, causes overinitiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli, resulting in inhibition of cell division. CedA was found to be a multi-copy suppressor which represses the dnaAcos inhibition of cell division. However, functional mechanism of CedA remains elusive except for previously indicated possibilities in binding to DNA and RNA polymerase. In this study, we searched for the specific sites of CedA in binding of DNA and RNA polymerase and in repression of cell division inhibition. First, DNA sequence to which CedA preferentially binds was determined. Next, the several residues and β4 region in CedA C-terminal domain was suggested to specifically interact with the DNA. Moreover, we found that the flexible N-terminal region was required for tight binding to longer DNA as well as interaction with RNA polymerase. Based on these results, several cedA mutants were examined in ability for repressing dnaAcos cell division inhibition. We found that the N-terminal region was dispensable and that Glu32 in the C-terminal domain was required for the repression. These results suggest that CedA has multiple roles and residues with different functions are positioned in the two regions.

  17. Development and Application of a Two-Tier Multiple-Choice Diagnostic Test for High School Students' Understanding of Cell Division and Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesli, Ertugrul; Kara, Yilmaz

    2012-01-01

    This study involved the development and application of a two-tier diagnostic test for measuring students' understanding of cell division and reproduction. The instrument development procedure had three general steps: defining the content boundaries of the test, collecting information on students' misconceptions, and instrument development.…

  18. Factors Influencing Academic Performance of Students Enrolled in a Lower Division Cell Biology Core Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Julio G.; Anand, Sulekha

    2009-01-01

    Students' performance in two semesters of our Cell Biology course was examined for this study. Teaching strategies, behaviors, and pre-course variables were analyzed with respect to students' performance. Pre-semester and post-semester surveys were administered to ascertain students' perceptions about class difficulty, amount of study and effort…

  19. Cell division and differentiation in protoplasts from cell cultures of Glycine species and leaf tissue of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamborg, O L; Davis, B P; Stahlhut, R W

    1983-08-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from cell cultures of G. soja and G. tabacina, respectively. The isolation procedure employed Percoll for the separation and concentration of protoplasts. The cultured protoplasts formed cells which developed into embryo-like structures. Protoplasts also were isolated from leaf tissue of soybean cv. Williams 82. Upon culture, the protoplasts regenerated cell walls and divided to form cell cultures.

  20. Culturally relevant inquiry-based laboratory module implementations in upper-division genetics and cell biology teaching laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Montero-Rojas, María; Carrero, Katherine; Toro, Gladys; Vélez, Ana; Carrero-Martínez, Franklin A

    2011-01-01

    Today, more minority students are entering undergraduate programs than ever before, but they earn only 6% of all science or engineering PhDs awarded in the United States. Many studies suggest that hands-on research activities enhance students' interest in pursuing a research career. In this paper, we present a model for the implementation of laboratory research in the undergraduate teaching laboratory using a culturally relevant approach to engage students. Laboratory modules were implemented in upper-division genetics and cell biology courses using cassava as the central theme. Students were asked to bring cassava samples from their respective towns, which allowed them to compare their field-collected samples against known lineages from agricultural stations at the end of the implementation. Assessment of content and learning perceptions revealed that our novel approach allowed students to learn while engaged in characterizing Puerto Rican cassava. In two semesters, based on the percentage of students who answered correctly in the premodule assessment for content knowledge, there was an overall improvement of 66% and 55% at the end in the genetics course and 24% and 15% in the cell biology course. Our proposed pedagogical model enhances students' professional competitiveness by providing students with valuable research skills as they work on a problem to which they can relate.

  1. The effects of isopropyl N-phenyl carbamate on the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum. I. Cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, R A; Pickett-Heaps, J D

    1974-10-01

    Cell division in vegetative filaments of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum is presented as an experimental system. We report on how we have used this system to study the effects of isopropyl N-phenylcarbamate (IPC) on the mitotic apparatus and on the phycoplast, a planar array of cytokinetic microtubules. Polymerization of microtubules was prevented when filaments, synchronized by a light/dark regime and chilled (2 degrees C) while in metaphase or just before phycoplast formation, were exposed to 5.5 x 10(-4) M IPC and then returned to room temperature. Spindles reformed or phycoplasts formed when these filaments were transferred to growth medium free of IPC. However, the orientation of both microtubular systems was disturbed: the mitotic apparatus often contained three poles, frequently forming three daughter nuclei upon karyokinesis; the phycoplast was often stellate rather than planar, and it sometimes was displaced to the side of both daughter nuclei, resulting in a binucleate and an anucleate cell upon cytokinesis. Our results suggest that IPC (a) prevents the assembly of microtubules, (b) increases the number of functional polar bodies, and (c) affects the orientation of microtubules in O. cardiacum. High voltage (1,000 kV) electron microscopy of 0.5-microm thick sections allowed us to visualize the polar structures, which were not discernible in thin sections.

  2. IFT88 Plays a Cilia- and PCP-Independent Role in Controlling Oriented Cell Divisions during Vertebrate Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Borovina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88 mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  3. DNA replication initiation, doubling of rate of phospholipid synthesis, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseleau-Petit, D; Képès, F; Peutat, L; D'Ari, R; Képès, A

    1987-01-01

    In synchronized culture of Escherichia coli, the specific arrest of phospholipid synthesis (brought about by glycerol starvation in an appropriate mutant) did not affect the rate of ongoing DNA synthesis but prevented the initiation of new rounds. The initiation block did not depend on cell age at the time of glycerol removal, which could be before, during, or after the doubling in the rate of phospholipid synthesis (DROPS) and as little as 10 min before the expected initiation. We conclude t...

  4. Survival Motor Neuron Protein Regulates Stem Cell Division, Proliferation, and Differentiation in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart J Grice; Ji-Long Liu

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a severe neurogenic disease that is caused by mutations in the human survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN protein is required for the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and a dramatic reduction of the protein leads to cell death. It is currently unknown how the reduction of this ubiquitously essential protein can lead to tissue-specific abnormalities. In addition, it is still not known whether the disease is caused by developmental or degenerative defe...

  5. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division.

  6. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Zweytick

    Full Text Available Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill

  7. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Japelj, Bostjan; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Zorko, Mateja; Dowhan, William; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Riedl, Sabrina; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill bacteria by

  8. Fighting Divisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1945-12-01

    when it hit the beaches of Morotai to open the drive that later led to the liberation of the Philippines, its Doughboys were alternately whistling...the Dixie Division sailed from Maffin Bay for the reconquest of Morotai , and on the 15th of the month hit the beaches of this Dutch island, less than...quickly secured a beachhead and by noon of D-day had seized Pitoe Airdrome. Morotai gave our forces control of the Halma- hera Sea and cut off 20,000

  9. Overproduction of individual gas vesicle proteins perturbs flotation, antibiotic production and cell division in the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Rita E; Tashiro, Yosuke; Salmond, George P C

    2016-09-01

    Gas vesicles are intracellular proteinaceous organelles that facilitate bacterial colonization of static water columns. In the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, gas vesicle formation requires the proteins GvpA1, GvpF1, GvpG, GvpA2, GvpK, GvpA3, GvpF2 and GvpF3 and the three gas vesicle regulatory proteins GvrA, GvrB and GvrC. Deletion of gvpC alters gas vesicle robustness and deletion of gvpN or gvpV results in small bicone vesicles. In this work, we assessed the impacts on gas vesicle formation when each of these 14 essential proteins was overexpressed. Overproduction of GvpF1, GvpF2, GvrA, GvrB or GvrC all resulted in significantly reduced gas vesicle synthesis. Perturbations in gas vesicle formation were also observed when GvpV and GvpA3 were in excess. In addition to impacts on gas vesicle formation, overproduction of GvrA or GvrB led to elevated biosynthesis of the tripyrrole pigment, prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite of increasing medical interest due to its antimalarial and anticancer properties. Finally, when GvpG was overexpressed, gas vesicles were still produced, but the cells exhibited a growth defect. Further analysis showed that induction of GvpG arrested cell growth and caused a drop in viable count, suggesting a possible physiological role for this protein linking gas vesicle biogenesis and binary fission. These combined results demonstrate that the stoichiometry of individual gas vesicle proteins is crucially important for controlled organelle morphogenesis and flotation and provides evidence for the first link between gas vesicle assembly and cell division, to our knowledge.

  10. Site-directed fluorescence labeling reveals a revised N-terminal membrane topology and functional periplasmic residues in the Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezuk, Alison M; Goodyear, Mara; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-08-22

    In Escherichia coli, FtsK is a large integral membrane protein that coordinates chromosome segregation and cell division. The N-terminal domain of FtsK (FtsKN) is essential for division, and the C terminus (FtsKC) is a well characterized DNA translocase. Although the function of FtsKN is unknown, it is suggested that FtsK acts as a checkpoint to ensure DNA is properly segregated before septation. This may occur through modulation of protein interactions between FtsKN and other division proteins in both the periplasm and cytoplasm; thus, a clear understanding of how FtsKN is positioned in the membrane is required to characterize these interactions. The membrane topology of FtsKN was initially determined using site-directed reporter fusions; however, questions regarding this topology persist. Here, we report a revised membrane topology generated by site-directed fluorescence labeling. The revised topology confirms the presence of four transmembrane segments and reveals a newly identified periplasmic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains. Within this loop, four residues were identified that, when mutated, resulted in the appearance of cellular voids. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of these voids showed asymmetric division of the cytoplasm in the absence of outer membrane invagination or visible cell wall ingrowth. This uncoupling reveals a novel role for FtsK in linking cell envelope septation events and yields further evidence for FtsK as a critical checkpoint of cell division. The revised topology of FtsKN also provides an important platform for future studies on essential interactions required for this process.

  11. Notch signaling induces retinal stem-like properties in perinatal neural retina progenitors and promotes symmetric divisions in adult retinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balenci, Laurent; van der Kooy, Derek

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating retinal stem cell (RSC) activity is fundamental for future stem cell-based therapeutic purposes. By combining gain and loss of function approaches, we addressed whether Notch signaling may play a selective role in retinal stem versus retinal progenitor cells in both developing and adult eyes. Inhibition of either Notch or fibroblast growth factor signaling reduced proliferation of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells, and inhibited RSC self-renewal. Conversely, exogenous Delta-like 3 and direct intrinsic Notch activation stimulated expansionary symmetric divisions in adult RSCs with the concomitant upregulation of Hes5. Knocking down Hes5 expression specifically decreased the numbers, but not the diameters, of adult RSC primary spheres, indicating that HES5 is the downstream effector of Notch receptor in controlling adult RSC proliferation. In addition, constitutive Notch activation induced retinal stem-like asymmetric self-renewal properties, with no expansion (no symmetrical division) in perinatal neural retina progenitor cells. These findings highlight central roles of Notch signaling activity in regulating the modes of division of retinal stem and retinal progenitor cells.

  12. Mapping Flexibility and the Assembly Switch of Cell Division Protein FtsZ by Computational and Mutational Approaches*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; Buey, Rubén M.; Cabezas, Marta; Andreu, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular switch for nucleotide-regulated assembly and disassembly of the main prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ is unknown despite the numerous crystal structures that are available. We have characterized the functional motions in FtsZ with a computational consensus of essential dynamics, structural comparisons, sequence conservation, and networks of co-evolving residues. Employing this information, we have constructed 17 mutants, which alter the FtsZ functional cycle at different stages, to modify FtsZ flexibility. The mutant phenotypes ranged from benign to total inactivation and included increased GTPase, reduced assembly, and stabilized assembly. Six mutations clustering at the long cleft between the C-terminal β-sheet and core helix H7 deviated FtsZ assembly into curved filaments with inhibited GTPase, which still polymerize cooperatively. These mutations may perturb the predicted closure of the C-terminal domain onto H7 required for switching between curved and straight association modes and for GTPase activation. By mapping the FtsZ assembly switch, this work also gives insight into FtsZ druggability because the curved mutations delineate the putative binding site of the promising antibacterial FtsZ inhibitor PC190723. PMID:20472561

  13. A trisubstituted benzimidazole cell division inhibitor with efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Knudson

    Full Text Available Trisubstituted benzimidazoles have demonstrated potency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Previously, a library of novel trisubstituted benzimidazoles was constructed for high throughput screening, and compounds were identified that exhibited potency against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and clinical isolates, and were not toxic to Vero cells. A new series of 2-cyclohexyl-5-acylamino-6-N, N-dimethylaminobenzimidazoles derivatives has been developed based on SAR studies. Screening identified compounds with potency against M. tuberculosis. A lead compound from this series, SB-P17G-A20, was discovered to have an MIC of 0.16 µg/mL and demonstrated efficacy in the TB murine acute model of infection based on the reduction of bacterial load in the lungs and spleen by 1.73 ± 0.24 Log10 CFU and 2.68 ± Log10 CFU, respectively, when delivered at 50 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection (IP twice daily (bid. The activity of SB-P17G-A20 was determined to be concentration dependent and to have excellent stability in mouse and human plasma, and liver microsomes. Together, these studies demonstrate that SB-P17G-A20 has potency against M. tuberculosis clinical strains with varying susceptibility and efficacy in animal models of infection, and that trisubstituted benzimidazoles continue to be a platform for the development of novel inhibitors with efficacy.

  14. Flexoelectric effect in an in-plane switching (IPS) liquid crystal cell for low-power consumption display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Su; Bos, Philip J.; Kim, Dong-Woo; Yang, Deng-Ke; Lee, Joong Hee; Lee, Seung Hee

    2016-10-01

    Technology of displaying static images in portable displays, advertising panels and price tags pursues significant reduction in power consumption and in product cost. Driving at a low-frequency electric field in fringe-field switching (FFS) mode can be one of the efficient ways to save powers of the recent portable devices, but a serious drop of image-quality, so-called image-flickering, has been found in terms of the coupling of elastic deformation to not only quadratic dielectric effect but linear flexoelectric effect. Despite of the urgent requirement of solving the issue, understanding of such a phenomenon is yet vague. Here, we thoroughly analyze and firstly report the flexoelectric effect in in-plane switching (IPS) liquid crystal cell. The effect takes place on the area above electrodes due to splay and bend deformations of nematic liquid crystal along oblique electric fields, so that the obvious spatial shift of the optical transmittance is experimentally observed and is clearly demonstrated based on the relation between direction of flexoelectric polarization and electric field polarity. In addition, we report that the IPS mode has inherent characteristics to solve the image-flickering issue in the low-power consumption display in terms of the physical property of liquid crystal material and the electrode structure.

  15. Transfer of a eubacteria-type cell division site-determining factor CrMinD gene to the nucleus from the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WeiZhong; HU Yong; ZHANG RunJie; ZHOU WeiWei; ZHU JiaYing; LIU XiangLin; HE YiKun

    2007-01-01

    MinD is a ubiquitous ATPase that plays a crucial role in selection of the division site in eubacteria, chloroplasts, and probably Archaea. In four green algae, Mesostigma viride, Nephroselmis olivacea, Chlorella vulgaris and Prototheca wickerhamii, MinD homologues are encoded in the plastid genome. However, in Arabidopsis, MinD is a nucleus-encoded, chloroplast-targeted protein involved in chloroplast division, which suggests that MinD has been transferred to the nucleus in higher land plants. Yet the lateral gene transfer (LGT) of MinD from plastid to nucleus during plastid evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we identified a nucleus-encoded MinD homologue from unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a basal species in the green plant lineage. Overexpression of CrMinD in wild type E. coli inhibited cell division and resulted in the filamentous cell formation, clearly demonstrated the conservation of the MinD protein during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The transient expression of CrMinD-egfp confirmed the role of CrMinD protein in the regulation of plastid division. Searching all the published plastid genomic sequences of land plants, no MinD homologues were found, which suggests that the transfer of MinD from plastid to nucleus might have occurred before the evolution of land plants.

  16. CEH-20/Pbx and UNC-62/Meis function upstream of rnt-1/Runx to regulate asymmetric divisions of the C. elegans stem-like seam cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Hughes

    2013-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans seam cells divide in the stem-like mode throughout larval development, with the ability to both self-renew and produce daughters that differentiate. Seam cells typically divide asymmetrically, giving rise to an anterior daughter that fuses with the hypodermis and a posterior daughter that proliferates further. Previously we have identified rnt-1 (a homologue of the mammalian cancer-associated stem cell regulator Runx as being an important regulator of seam development, acting to promote proliferation; rnt-1 mutants have fewer seam cells whereas overexpressing rnt-1 causes seam cell hyperplasia. We isolated the interacting CEH-20/Pbx and UNC-62/Meis TALE-class transcription factors during a genome-wide RNAi screen for novel regulators of seam cell number. Animals lacking wild type CEH-20 or UNC-62 display seam cell hyperplasia, largely restricted to the anterior of the worm, whereas double mutants have many additional seam cells along the length of the animal. The cellular basis of the hyperplasia involves the symmetrisation of normally asymmetric seam cell divisions towards the proliferative stem-like fate. The hyperplasia is completely suppressed in rnt-1 mutants, and rnt-1 is upregulated in ceh-20 and unc-62 mutants, suggesting that CEH-20 and UNC-62 function upstream of rnt-1 to limit proliferative potential to the appropriate daughter cell. In further support of this we find that CEH-20 is asymmetrically localised in seam daughters following an asymmetric division, being predominantly restricted to anterior nuclei whose fate is to differentiate. Thus, ceh-20 and unc-62 encode crucial regulators of seam cell division asymmetry, acting via rnt-1 to regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Learning Cell Biology as a Team: A Project-Based Approach to Upper-Division Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Boggs, James

    2002-01-01

    To help students develop successful strategies for learning how to learn and communicate complex information in cell biology, we developed a quarter-long cell biology class based on team projects. Each team researches a particular human disease and presents information about the cellular structure or process affected by the disease, the cellular…

  18. DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine inhibits intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi multiplication by affecting cell division but not trypomastigote-amastigote transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, M A; Basso, B; Kierszenbaum, F

    1992-06-01

    DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific, irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), decreases the capacity of Trypanosoma cruzi to invade and multiply within different types of mammalian host cells in vitro. In this work we found that inhibition of intracellular growth results from selective impairment of amastigote division without appreciable alteration of the capacity of the invading trypomastigotes to transform into the replicative amastigote form. Addition of agmatine, the product of arginine decarboxylation, reversed the inhibitory effect of DFMA. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity by DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine present in the medium prior to and during infection did not affect trypomastigote transformation or amastigote replication and did not change the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of DFMA on parasite multiplication. Hence, neither polyamine synthesis via the ornithine decarboxylase pathway nor salvage of host cell polyamines by T. cruzi appeared to be a likely explanation for the normal rate of parasite transformation that was seen in the presence of DFMA. Two clones of T. cruzi, TMSU-1 and TMSU-2, were tested for their degrees of sensitivity to the inhibitory effects of DFMA. Both trypomastigote association with (i.e., binding to and penetration of) myoblasts, and intracellular amastigote multiplication by either clone were found to be significantly (P less than 0.05) but not completely inhibited by DFMA. Therefore, the partial inhibition of T. cruzi infectivity and replication caused by DFMA is unlikely to represent a composite of effects of the drug on DFMA-sensitive and insensitive clones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. High irradiance responses involving photoreversible multiple photoreceptors as related to photoperiodic induction of cell division in Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolige, Aoen; Goto, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Little is known about the photoreceptors involved in the photoperiodism of unicellular organisms, which we elucidated by deriving their action spectra. The flagellated alga Euglena gracilis exhibits photoperiodism, with a long-day response in cell reproduction. The underlying clock is a circadian rhythm with photoinductive capability, peaking at subjective dusk and occurring at the 26th hour in continuous darkness (DD) when transferred from continuous light (LL); it regulates photoinduction, a high-irradiance response (HIR), of a dark-capability of progressing through cell division. We derived the action spectra by irradiating E. gracilis with monochromatic light for 3h at around the 26th hour; the action maxima occurred at 380, 450-460, 480, 610, 640, 660, 680, and 740nm. Except for the maximum at 450-460nm, which was always a major maximum, the maxima greatly depended on the red (R)/far-red (FR) ratio of the prior LL. The high R/FR ratio resulted in a dominant major peak at 640nm and minor peaks at 480 and 680nm, whereas the low ratio resulted in dominant major peaks at 610 and 740nm and minor peaks at 380 and 660nm; the critical fluence was minimally about 60mmolm(-2). These HIRs resulted from the accumulation of corresponding low-fluence responses (LFRs) because we found that repetition of a 3-min light/dark cycle, with critical fluences of 1mmolm(-2), lasting for 3h resulted in the same photoinduction as the continuous 3-h irradiation. Moreover, these LFRs expressed photoreversibility. Thus, photoperiodic photoinduction involves Euglena-phytochrome (640 and 740nm) and blue photoreceptor (460nm). Although 380, 480, 610, 660, and 680nm may also represent Euglena-phytochrome, a definite conclusion awaits further study.

  20. Bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is stable against degradation by AAA family protease FtsH in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2007-06-01

    We have found that FtsH protease of Escherichia coli could degrade E. coli cell division protein FtsZ in an ATP- and Zn(2+)-dependent manner in vitro and that the degradation did not show specificity for the N-terminus or C-terminus of FtsZ, like in the case of degradation of its conventional substrate sigma(32) protein. In continuation of these observations, in the present study, we examined whether FtsH would affect the stability and turnover of FtsZ in vivo. We found that FtsZ levels were not elevated in E. coli AR754 (ftsH1 ts) cells at nonpermissive temperature as compared to the levels in an FtsH-active isogenic AR753 strain. Neither did FtsH degrade ectopically expressed FtsZ in AR754 strain nor did ectopic expression of FtsH reduced FtsZ levels in E. coli AR5090 ftsH null strain (ftsH::kan, sfhC21). Pulse chase experiments in AR754 and AR5090 strains showed that there were no compensatory changes in FtsZ turnover, in case FtsZ degradation had occurred. Even under cell division arrested conditions, wherein FtsZ was not required, FtsH protease did not degrade unutilized FtsZ. These experiments demonstrate that either FtsH protease may not have a role in regulating the levels of FtsZ in vivo under the conditions tested or that some cellular component(s) might be stabilising FtsZ against FtsH protease.

  1. Time-lapse imaging reveals symmetric neurogenic cell division of GFAP-expressing progenitors for expansion of postnatal dentate granule neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Namba

    Full Text Available Granule cells in the hippocampus, a region critical for memory and learning, are generated mainly during the early postnatal period but neurogenesis continues in adulthood. Postnatal neuronal production is carried out by primary progenitors that express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and they are assumed to function as stem cells. A central question regarding postnatal dentate neurogenesis is how astrocyte-like progenitors produce neurons. To reveal cell division patterns and the process of neuronal differentiation of astrocyte-like neural progenitors, we performed time-lapse imaging in cultured hippocampal slices from early postnatal transgenic mice with mouse GFAP promoter-controlled enhanced green fluorescent protein (mGFAP-eGFP Tg mice in combination with a retrovirus carrying a red fluorescent protein gene. Our results showed that the majority of GFAP-eGFP+ progenitor cells that express GFAP, Sox2 and nestin divided symmetrically to produce pairs of GFAP+ cells (45% or pairs of neuron-committed cells (45%, whereas a minority divided asymmetrically to generate GFAP+ cells and neuron-committed cells (10%. The present results suggest that a substantial number of GFAP-expressing progenitors functions as transient amplifying progenitors, at least in an early postnatal dentate gyrus, although a small population appears to be stem cell-like progenitors. From the present data, we discuss possible cell division patterns of adult GFAP+ progenitors.

  2. Time-lapse imaging reveals symmetric neurogenic cell division of GFAP-expressing progenitors for expansion of postnatal dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Takashi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Onodera, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Namiki, Hideo; Shioda, Seiji; Seki, Tatsunori

    2011-01-01

    Granule cells in the hippocampus, a region critical for memory and learning, are generated mainly during the early postnatal period but neurogenesis continues in adulthood. Postnatal neuronal production is carried out by primary progenitors that express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and they are assumed to function as stem cells. A central question regarding postnatal dentate neurogenesis is how astrocyte-like progenitors produce neurons. To reveal cell division patterns and the process of neuronal differentiation of astrocyte-like neural progenitors, we performed time-lapse imaging in cultured hippocampal slices from early postnatal transgenic mice with mouse GFAP promoter-controlled enhanced green fluorescent protein (mGFAP-eGFP Tg mice) in combination with a retrovirus carrying a red fluorescent protein gene. Our results showed that the majority of GFAP-eGFP+ progenitor cells that express GFAP, Sox2 and nestin divided symmetrically to produce pairs of GFAP+ cells (45%) or pairs of neuron-committed cells (45%), whereas a minority divided asymmetrically to generate GFAP+ cells and neuron-committed cells (10%). The present results suggest that a substantial number of GFAP-expressing progenitors functions as transient amplifying progenitors, at least in an early postnatal dentate gyrus, although a small population appears to be stem cell-like progenitors. From the present data, we discuss possible cell division patterns of adult GFAP+ progenitors.

  3. An extract of Uncaria tomentosa inhibiting cell division and NF-kappa B activity without inducing cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Christina; Lindgren, Hanna; Pero, Ronald W; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2003-12-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that extracts of the plant Uncaria tomentosa inhibit tumor cell proliferation and inflammatory responses. We have confirmed that C-Med 100, a hot water extract of this plant, inhibits tumor cell proliferation albeit with variable efficiency. We extend these findings by showing that this extract also inhibits proliferation of normal mouse T and B lymphocytes and that the inhibition is not caused by toxicity or by induction of apoptosis. Further, the extract did not interfere with IL-2 production nor IL-2 receptor signaling. Since there was no discrete cell cycle block in C-Med 100-treated cells, we propose that retarded cell cycle progression caused the inhibition of proliferation. Collectively, these data suggested interference with a common pathway controlling cell growth and cell cycle progression. Indeed, we provide direct evidence that C-Med 100 inhibits nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) activity and propose that this at least partially causes the inhibition of proliferation.

  4. OsRAN2, essential for mitosis, enhances cold tolerance in rice by promoting export of intranuclear tubulin and maintaining cell division under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Xu, Yunyuan; Wang, Xin; DU, Cheng; DU, Jizhou; Yuan, Ming; Xu, Zhihong; Chong, Kang

    2011-01-01

    With global climate change, abnormally low temperatures have affected the world's rice production. Many genes have been shown to be essential for molecular improvement of rice cold-tolerance traits. However, less is known about the molecular cellular mechanism of their response to cold stress. Here, we investigated OsRAN2 involved in regulation of cell division during cold stress in rice. Expression of OsRAN2 was increased under cold treatment, but not during salt and drought stress. The mean root mitotic index was closely related to the expression level of OsRAN2. Knockdown transgenic rice lines showed an aberrant organization of spindles during mitosis and stunted growth during development. Overexpression of OsRAN2 enhanced cold tolerance in rice. The transgenic rice overexpressing OsRAN2 showed maintained cell division, decreased proportion of cells with intranuclear tubulin and formation of a normal nuclear envelope under the cold condition. Our study suggests a mechanism for OsRAN2 in regulating cold resistance in rice by maintaining cell division through promoting the normal export of intranuclear tubulin at the end of mitosis. This insight could help improve the cold-tolerance trait in rice.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Cell Division Timing Accounts for a Shift in the Thermal Limits of C. elegans and C. briggsae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Begasse

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold-blooded animals, which cannot directly control their body temperatures, have adapted to function within specific temperature ranges that vary between species. However, little is known about what sets the limits of the viable temperature range. Here we show that the speed of the first cell division in C. elegans N2 varies with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation. However, it does so only within certain limits. Outside these limits we observe alterations in the cell cycle. Interestingly, these temperature limits also correspond to the animal’s fertile range. In C. briggsae AF16, isolated from a warmer climatic region, both the fertile range and the temperature range over which the speed of cell division follows the Arrhenius equation, are shifted toward higher temperatures. Our findings suggest that the viable range of an organism can be adapted in part to a different thermal range by adjusting the temperature tolerance of cell division.

  6. Involvement of ethylene and gibberellin signalings in chromosaponin I-induced cell division and cell elongation in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A; Tsurumi, S; Amakawa, T; Soga, K; Hoson, T; Goto, N; Kamisaka, S

    2000-01-01

    Chromosaponin I (CSI), a triterpenoid saponin isolated from pea, stimulates the growth of roots in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings on wetted filter paper in the light for 14 d. The growth rates of roots in Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) wild-types were 0.92 and 0.26 mm d(-1), respectively, and they were accelerated to 3.46 (Col) and 2.20 (Ler) mm d(-1) by treating with 300 microM CSI. The length of mature epidermal cells was increased by 1.8-fold (Col) and 2.81-fold (Ler) compared with control and the number of epidermal cells was increased by a factor of 1.65 (Col) and 2.12 (Ler). Treatment with 2-aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, also increased cell length but not cell number. The effects of CSI on root growth were not detected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-1. CSI did not inhibit ethylene production but stimulated the growth of roots in ctr1-1, the constitutive triple response mutant for ethylene, indicating that CSI inhibits ethylene signaling, especially downstream of CTR1. In the GA-insensitive mutant gai and the mutant spy-3, in which the basal level of GA signaling is activated, CSI did not increase cell number, although both CSI and AVG stimulated cell elongation in these mutants. These results suggest that the inhibition of ethylene signaling is the cause of CSI-induced cell elongation. A possible involvement of both GA and ethylene signalings is discussed for the CSI-induced cell division.

  7. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole; Perrier, Anselme L; Humbert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington's disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions.

  8. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  9. Reconstitution of the Escherichia coli cell division ZipA-FtsZ complexes in nanodiscs as revealed by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; García-Montañés, Concepción; Rivas, Germán; Llorca, Oscar

    2012-12-01

    ZipA is an element of the bacterial division ring complex that provides an anchor to the membrane to FtsZ, a GTPase ancestor of tubulin. In vitro reconstitution and characterization of these interactions is challenged by the difficulty to integrate a physiological membrane environment. Here a single copy of the full-length ZipA protein from Escherichia coli incorporated into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs (Nd-ZipA) has been visualized using negative-staining electron microscopy (EM). The EM images reveal the presence of discs, mostly organized in two distinct populations of 11 and 13nm in diameter. The globular FtsZ-binding C-terminal domain of ZipA (ZBD) was not visible in 3D reconstructions of Nd-ZipA or 2D averages, suggesting that this domain is separated from the membrane by the large flexible domain connecting the N-terminal trans-membrane region to the ZBD. We tested if Nd-ZipA were appropriate models for the in vitro reconstitution of ZipA-FtsZ interactions. First we observed that the ZBD region of ZipA was accessible for the interaction with other proteins in the context of the nanodisc, as revealed by its recognition by specific antibodies. In addition, Nd-ZipA attached to carbon coated EM grids, but not empty nanodiscs, were able to capture FtsZ filaments without inducing significant filament bundling, consistent with a model in which FtsZ filaments are loosely attached to the cell-membrane. These observations are compatible with the plastic nature of the ZipA-FtsZ complexes formed at the membrane, evidenced in the moderate binding affinity of Nd-ZipA to FtsZ oligomers and polymers recently measured.

  10. Neuregulin 1 Type II-ErbB Signaling Promotes Cell Divisions Generating Neurons from Neural Progenitor Cells in the Developing Zebrafish Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomomi; Sato, Fuminori; Kamezaki, Aosa; Sakaguchi, Kazuya; Tanigome, Ryoma; Kawakami, Koichi; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Post-mitotic neurons are generated from neural progenitor cells (NPCs) at the expense of their proliferation. Molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate neuron production temporally and spatially should impact on the size and shape of the brain. While transcription factors such as neurogenin1 (neurog1) and neurod govern progression of neurogenesis as cell-intrinsic mechanisms, recent studies show regulatory roles of several cell-extrinsic or intercellular signaling molecules including Notch, FGF and Wnt in production of neurons/neural progenitor cells from neural stem cells/radial glial cells (NSCs/RGCs) in the ventricular zone (VZ). However, it remains elusive how production of post-mitotic neurons from neural progenitor cells is regulated in the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ). Here we show that newborn neurons accumulate in the basal-to-apical direction in the optic tectum (OT) of zebrafish embryos. While neural progenitor cells are amplified by mitoses in the apical ventricular zone, neurons are exclusively produced through mitoses of neural progenitor cells in the sub-basal zone, later in the sub-ventricular zone, and accumulate apically onto older neurons. This neurogenesis depends on Neuregulin 1 type II (NRG1-II)-ErbB signaling. Treatment with an ErbB inhibitor, AG1478 impairs mitoses in the sub-ventricular zone of the optic tectum. Removal of AG1478 resumes sub-ventricular mitoses without precedent mitoses in the apical ventricular zone prior to basal-to-apical accumulation of neurons, suggesting critical roles of ErbB signaling in mitoses for post-mitotic neuron production. Knockdown of NRG1-II impairs both mitoses in the sub-basal/sub-ventricular zone and the ventricular zone. Injection of soluble human NRG1 into the developing brain ameliorates neurogenesis of NRG1-II-knockdown embryos, suggesting a conserved role of NRG1 as a cell-extrinsic signal. From these results, we propose that NRG1-ErbB signaling stimulates cell divisions generating neurons from

  11. Incentive and Architecture of Multi-Band Enabled Small Cell and UE for Up-/Down-Link and Control-/User-Plane Splitting for 5G Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rony Kumer; Aswakul, Chaodit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-band enabled femtocell base station (FCBS) and user equipment (UE) architecture is proposed in a multi-tier network that consists of small cells, including femtocells and picocells deployed over the coverage of a macrocell for splitting uplink and downlink (UL/DL) as well as control-plane and user-plane (C-/U-plane) for 5G mobile networks. Since splitting is performed at the same FCBS, we define this architecture as the same base station based split architecture (SBSA). For multiple bands, we consider co-channel (CC) microwave and different frequency (DF) 60 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) bands for FCBSs and UEs with respect to the microwave band used by their over-laid macrocell base station. All femtocells are assumed to be deployed in a 3-dimensional multi-storage building. For CC microwave band, cross-tier CC interference of femtocells with macrocell is avoided using almost blank subframe based enhanced inter-cell interference coordination techniques. The co-existence of CC microwave and DF mmWave bands for SBSA on the same FCBS and UE is first studied to show their performance disparities in terms of system capacity and spectral efficiency in order to provide incentives for employing multiple bands at the same FCBS and UE and identify a suitable band for routing decoupled UL/DL or C-/U-plane traffic. We then present a number of disruptive architectural design alternatives of multi-band enabled SBSA for 5G mobile networks for UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, including a disruptive and complete splitting of UL/DL and C-/U-plane as well as a combined UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, by exploiting dual connectivity on CC microwave and DF mmWave bands. The outperformances of SBSA in terms of system level capacity, average spectral efficiency, energy efficiency, and control-plane overhead traffic capacity in comparison with different base stations based split architecture (DBSA) are shown. Finally, a number of technical and business perspectives

  12. Inter- and intrachromosomal asynchrony of cell division cycle events in root meristem cells of Allium cepa: possible connection with gradient of cyclin B-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabka, Aneta; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2010-08-01

    Alternate treatments of Allium cepa root meristems with hydroxyurea (HU) and caffeine give rise to extremely large and highly elongated cells with atypical images of mitotic divisions, including internuclear asynchrony and an unknown type of interchromosomal asynchrony observed during metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Another type of asynchrony that cannot depend solely on the increased length of cells was observed following long-term incubation of roots with HU. This kind of treatment revealed both cell nuclei entering premature mitosis and, for the first time, an uncommon form of mitotic abnormality manifested in a gradual condensation of chromatin (spanning from interphase to prometaphase). Immunocytochemical study of polykaryotic cells using anti-beta tubulin antibodies revealed severe perturbations in the microtubular organization of preprophase bands. Quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of the control cells indicate that the level of cyclin B-like proteins reaches the maximum at the G2 to metaphase transition and then becomes reduced during later stages of mitosis. After long-term incubation with low doses of HU, the amount of cyclin B-like proteins considerably increases, and a significant number of elongated cells show gradients of these proteins spread along successive regions of the perinuclear cytoplasm. It is suggested that there may be a direct link between the effects of HU-mediated deceleration of S- and G2-phases and an enhanced concentration of cyclin B-like proteins. In consequence, the activation of cyclin B-CDK complexes gives rise to an abnormal pattern of premature mitotic chromosome condensation with biphasic nuclear structures having one part of chromatin decondensed, and the other part condensed.

  13. Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL proteins, play opposing roles in cell adhesion and coordination of cell and nuclear division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevorovsky, Martin; Grousl, Tomas; Stanurova, Jana; Rynes, Jan [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 7, 128 43, Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Nellen, Wolfgang [Department of Genetics, Kassel University, Heinrich Plett Strasse 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Puta, Frantisek [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 7, 128 43, Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Folk, Petr, E-mail: folk@natur.cuni.cz [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 7, 128 43, Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2009-05-01

    The CSL (CBF1/RBP-J{kappa}/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) family is comprised of transcription factors essential for metazoan development, mostly due to their involvement in the Notch receptor signaling pathway. Recently, we identified two novel classes of CSL genes in the genomes of several fungal species, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. In this study, we characterized experimentally cbf11{sup +} and cbf12{sup +}, the two CSL genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in order to elucidate the CSL function in fungi. We provide evidence supporting their identity as genuine CSL genes. Both cbf11{sup +} and cbf12{sup +} are non-essential; they have distinct expression profiles and code for nuclear proteins with transcription activation potential. Significantly, we demonstrated that Cbf11 recognizes specifically the canonical CSL response element GTG{sup A}/{sub G}GAA in vitro. The deletion of cbf11{sup +} is associated with growth phenotypes and altered colony morphology. Furthermore, we found that Cbf11 and Cbf12 play opposite roles in cell adhesion, nuclear and cell division and their coordination. Disturbed balance of the two CSL proteins leads to cell separation defects (sep phenotype), cut phenotype, and high-frequency diploidization in heterothallic strains. Our data show that CSL proteins operate in an organism predating the Notch pathway, which should be of relevance to the understanding of (Notch-independent) CSL functions in metazoans.

  14. N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine Kinase Interacts with Dynein-Lis1-NudE1 Complex and Regulates Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Syeda Ridita; Islam, Ariful; Moon, Il Soo

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-D-glucosamine kinase (GlcNAc kinase or NAGK) primarily catalyzes phosphoryl transfer to GlcNAc during amino sugar metabolism. Recently, it was shown NAGK interacts with dynein light chain roadblock type 1 (DYNLRB1) and upregulates axo-dendritic growth, which is an enzyme activity-independent, non-canonical structural role. The authors examined the distributions of NAGK and NAGK-dynein complexes during the cell cycle in HEK293T cells. NAGK was expressed throughout different stages of cell division and immunocytochemistry (ICC) showed NAGK was localized at nuclear envelope, spindle microtubules (MTs), and kinetochores (KTs). A proximity ligation assay (PLA) for NAGK and DYNLRB1 revealed NAGK-dynein complex on nuclear envelopes in prophase cells and on chromosomes in metaphase cells. NAGK-DYNLRB1 PLA followed by Lis1/NudE1 immunostaining showed NAGK-dynein complexes were colocalized with Lis1 and NudE1 signals, and PLA for NAGK-Lis1 showed similar signal patterns, suggesting a functional link between NAGK and dynein-Lis1 complex. Subsequently, NAGK-dynein complexes were found in KTs and on nuclear membranes where KTs were marked with CENP-B ICC and nuclear membrane with lamin ICC. Furthermore, knockdown of NAGK by small hairpin (sh) RNA was found to delay cell division. These results indicate that the NAGK-dynein interaction with the involvements of Lis1 and NudE1 plays an important role in prophase nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) and metaphase MT-KT attachment during eukaryotic cell division.

  15. A proposed conserved role for an avocado FW2.2-like gene as a negative regulator of fruit cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Yardena; Rosenfeld, Revital; Zadiranov, Victor; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies using 'Hass' avocado and its small fruit (SF) phenotype as a model showed that SF is limited by cell number, not by cell size. In an attempt to explore the molecular mechanisms regulating avocado fruit cell division, we isolated four distinct avocado cell proliferation-related genes and investigated their expression characteristics, comparing normal fruit (NF) and SF developmental patterns. Three cDNAs termed PaCYCA1, PaCYCB1 and PaPCNA, encoding two mitotic cyclins and a proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), were first isolated from young NF tissues. The accumulation of their transcripts was predominant in mitotically active organs, including young fruitlets, leaves and roots. Furthermore, a fourth full-length cDNA, designated Pafw2.2-like, encoding a FW2.2 (fruit-weight)-like protein, was isolated from SF tissues. FW2.2 is postulated to function as a negative regulator of cell division in tomato fruit. Remarkably, northern analysis revealed that the accumulation of the mitotic cyclins and of PCNA transcripts gradually decreased in NF tissues during growth, whereas in SF, their levels had already decreased at earlier stages of fruit development, concomitant with an earlier arrest of fruit cell division activity. In contrast, parallel sq-RT-PCR analysis showed that Pafw2.2-like mRNA accumulation was considerably higher in SF tissues than in the same NF tissues essentially at all examined stages of fruit growth. Together, our data suggest essential roles for the two mitotic cyclins genes and the PCNA gene in regulating avocado fruit development. Furthermore, the possibility that Pafw2.2-like acts as does fw2.2 in tomato, is discussed.

  16. PERSONNEL DIVISION BECOMES HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    CERN Document Server

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    In the years to come, CERN faces big challenges in the planning and use of human resources. At this moment, Personnel (PE) Division is being reorganised to prepare for new tasks and priorities. In order to accentuate the purposes of the operation, the name of the division has been changed into Human Resources (HR) Division, with effect from 1st January 2000. Human Resources DivisionTel.73222

  17. Division of Labor

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse

    2014-09-12

    The first assignment of DNA polymerases at the eukaryotic replication fork was possible after the in vitro reconstitution of the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication system. In this system, DNA polymerase α (Pol α) provides both leading and lagging strands with RNA-DNA primers that are extended by DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Extrapolating the architecture of the replication fork from the SV40 model system to an actual eukaryotic cell has been challenged by the discovery of a third DNA polymerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). A division of labor has been proposed for the eukaryotic replication fork whereby Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand. However, an alternative model of unequal division of labor in which Pol δ can still participate in leading-strand synthesis is plausible.

  18. A mechanism for ParB-dependent waves of ParA, a protein related to DNA segregation during cell division in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunding, Axel; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2003-01-01

    Prokaryotic plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci involved in segregation of DNA to daughter cells at cell division. A functional fusion protein consisting of Walker-type ParA ATPase and green fluorescent protein (Gfp) oscillates back and forth within nucleoid regions with a wave period of abou...... in an autocatalytic process. We discuss this mechanism in relation to recent models for MinDE oscillations in E.coli and to microtubule degradation in mitosis. The study points to an ancestral role for the presented pattern types in generating bipolarity in prokaryotes and eukaryotes....

  19. Germ cells may survive clipping and division of the spermatic vessels in surgery for intra-abdominal testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, J M; Cortes, D; Visfeldt, J

    1999-01-01

    of the biopsies taken at stage 2 was slightly lower (0.03) compared to the median number at stage 1 (0.06) of the operation but this difference was not significant (p = 0.2031). CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that the spermatogonia may survive clipping and division of the spermatic vessels, although the number...

  20. On the impedance of galvanic cells XXVI. Application of the complex plane method in the case of mixed currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, B.G.; Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Sluyters, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    The applicability of the complex plane method for the evaluation of the impedance parameters in the case of two simultaneously proceeding electrode reactions is discussed. It is shown that the possibility of the evaluation depends strongly on the values of the irreversibility quotients of both react

  1. Clinical observation of the plane plate in the treatment of Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion patients with temporomandibular disorders%安氏Ⅱ类2分类错牙合伴颞下颌关节紊乱病患者的平面导板矫治器临床治疗效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦金炜; 张静露; 秦妍; 陈文静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical therapeutic effects of plane plate on Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion patients with tem-poromandibular disorders (TMD). Methods 20 outpatients who had Class Ⅱ division 2 malocclusion with temporomandibular joint disorders from January 2013 to December 2014 at Jiangsu Provincial Stomatological Hospital of Orthodontics and TMJ Branch were se-lected in this study. All were treated by the plane plates and used United States Myotronics K7 (Neuromuscular Dentistry analysis sys-tem)was used to record their changes of condylar trajectory and vibration frequency before and after using the flat-screen guide appli-ance. Results ①After being treated by plane plate,maximum mouth opening,protrusion and lateral movement all had little changes compared with the previous treatment (P > 0. 05). ②The style of mouth opening was changed after treatment (P < 0. 05). ③Joint vi-brations were statistically changed compared with those before treatment (P < 0. 05). Conclusions The plane plant can lead to open bite on deep overbite patients,improve jaw movement patterns,and relieve related symptoms of temporomandibular diseases,thus provi-ding guidance for clinical treatment.%目的:对患有颞下颌关节紊乱病的安氏Ⅱ类2分类患者给予平面导板矫治器进行治疗,分析其临床效果,为正畸临床提供指导意义。方法选择2013年1月到2014年12月在南京医科大学附属口腔医院就诊的安氏Ⅱ类2分类错牙合伴颞下颌关节紊乱病患者20例,用美国Myotronics K7神经肌肉牙医学分析系统记录每位患者带用平面导板矫治器治疗前、后的下颌运动轨迹及髁突震动频率的变化。结果①平面导板矫治器治疗后下颌的最大张口度、前伸、侧方运动与治疗前相比变化不大,无统计学意义( P >0.05)。②平面导板矫治器治疗后开口型牙合位偏移与治疗前相比结果有统计学意义(P <0.05)。③平面导板

  2. The Soluble Periplasmic Domains of Escherichia coli Cell Division Proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL Form a Trimeric Complex with Submicromolar Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Marjolein; van den Berg van Saparoea, H Bart; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Roseboom, Winfried; Liu, Fan; Koningstein, Gregory M; Fish, Alexander; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Luitzen; Bitter, Wilbert; de Esch, Iwan J P; Luirink, Joen

    2015-08-28

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a central but enigmatic role in cell division. This protein associates with FtsB and FtsL, which, like FtsQ, are bitopic inner membrane proteins with a large periplasmic domain (denoted FtsQp, FtsBp, and FtsLp) that is indispensable for the function of each protein. Considering the vital nature and accessible location of the FtsQBL complex, it is an attractive target for protein-protein interaction inhibitors intended to block bacterial cell division. In this study, we expressed FtsQp, FtsBp, and FtsLp individually and in combination. Upon co-expression, FtsQp was co-purified with FtsBp and FtsLp from E. coli extracts as a stable trimeric complex. FtsBp was also shown to interact with FtsQp in the absence of FtsLp albeit with lower affinity. Interactions were mapped at the C terminus of the respective domains by site-specific cross-linking. The binding affinity and 1:1:1 stoichiometry of the FtsQpBpLp complex and the FtsQpBp subcomplex were determined in complementary surface plasmon resonance, analytical ultracentrifugation, and native mass spectrometry experiments.

  3. Casein kinase II is required for proper cell division and acts as a negative regulator of centrosome duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, Jeffrey C.; Kabara, Megan M.; Stubenvoll, Michael D.; DeMeyer, Lauren E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centrosomes are the primary microtubule-organizing centers that orchestrate microtubule dynamics during the cell cycle. The correct number of centrosomes is pivotal for establishing bipolar mitotic spindles that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. Thus, centrioles must duplicate once per cell cycle, one daughter per mother centriole, the process of which requires highly coordinated actions among core factors and modulators. Protein phosphorylation is shown to regulate the stability, localization and activity of centrosome proteins. Here, we report the function of Casein kinase II (CK2) in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The catalytic subunit (KIN-3/CK2α) of CK2 localizes to nuclei, centrosomes and midbodies. Inactivating CK2 leads to cell division defects, including chromosome missegregation, cytokinesis failure and aberrant centrosome behavior. Furthermore, depletion or inhibiting kinase activity of CK2 results in elevated ZYG-1 levels at centrosomes, restoring centrosome duplication and embryonic viability to zyg-1 mutants. Our data suggest that CK2 functions in cell division and negatively regulates centrosome duplication in a kinase-dependent manner. PMID:27881437

  4. A self-renewing division of zebrafish Müller glial cells generates neuronal progenitors that require N-cadherin to regenerate retinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Mikiko; Barthel, Linda K; Raymond, Pamela A

    2013-11-01

    Müller glia function as retinal stem cells in adult zebrafish. In response to loss of retinal neurons, Müller glia partially dedifferentiate, re-express neuroepithelial markers and re-enter the cell cycle. We show that the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Alcama is a novel marker of multipotent retinal stem cells, including injury-induced Müller glia, and that each Müller glial cell divides asymmetrically only once to produce an Alcama-negative, proliferating retinal progenitor. The initial mitotic division of Müller glia involves interkinetic nuclear migration, but mitosis of retinal progenitors occurs in situ. Rapidly dividing retinal progenitors form neurogenic clusters tightly associated with Alcama/N-cadherin-labeled Müller glial radial processes. Genetic suppression of N-cadherin function interferes with basal migration of retinal progenitors and subsequent regeneration of HuC/D(+) inner retinal neurons.

  5. Low concentrations of caffeine induce asymmetric cell division as observed in vitro by means of the CBMN-assay and iFISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karakosta, Maria; Barszczewska, Katarzyna; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel; Terzoudi, Georgia I

    2015-11-01

    The dual role of caffeine as a chromosomal damage inducer and G2/M-checkpoint abrogator is well known but it is observed mainly at relatively high concentrations. At low concentrations, caffeine enhances the cytogenetic effects of several carcinogens and its intake during pregnancy has been recently reported to cause adverse birth outcomes. Interestingly, a threshold below which this association is not apparent was not identified. Since chromosomal abnormalities and aneuploidy are the major genetic etiologies of spontaneous abortions and adverse birth outcomes, we re-evaluate here the effects of caffeine at the cytogenetic level and propose a model for the mechanisms involved. Our hypothesis is that low caffeine concentrations affect DNA replication and cause chromosomal aberrations and asymmetric cell divisions not easily detected at metaphase since damaged cells are delayed during their G2/M-phase transition and the low caffeine concentrations cannot abrogate the G2-checkpoint. To test this hypothesis, caffeine-induced chromatid breaks and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were evaluated in vitro after low caffeine concentration exposures, followed by a short treatment with 4mM of caffeine to abrogate the G2-checkpoint. The results show a statistically significant increase in chromatid breaks at caffeine concentrations ≥1mM. When caffeine was applied for G2/M-checkpoint abrogation, a statistically significant increase in chromatid breaks, compared to an active checkpoint, was only observed at 4mM of caffeine. The potential of low concentrations to induce asymmetric cell divisions was tested by applying a methodology combining the cytochalasin-B mediated cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) with interphase FISH (iFISH), using selected centromeric probes. Interestingly, low caffeine concentrations induce a dose dependent aneuploidy through asymmetric cell divisions, which are caused by misalignment of chromosomes through a mechanism

  6. Functional characterization of the Arabidopsis eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-2 that plays a crucial role in plant growth and development by regulating cell division, cell growth, and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Haizhong; Chen, Qingguo; Feng, Jian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Xiaohui; Zuo, Jianru

    2007-07-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a highly conserved protein found in all eukaryotic organisms. Although originally identified as a translation initiation factor, recent studies in mammalian and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells suggest that eIF-5A is mainly involved in RNA metabolism and trafficking, thereby regulating cell proliferation, cell growth, and programmed cell death. In higher plants, the physiological function of eIF-5A remains largely unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant fumonisin B(1)-resistant12 (fbr12). The fbr12 mutant shows an antiapoptotic phenotype and has reduced dark-induced leaf senescence. Moreover, fbr12 displays severe defects in plant growth and development. The fbr12 mutant plant is extreme dwarf with substantially reduced size and number of all adult organs. During reproductive development, fbr12 causes abnormal development of floral organs and defective sporogenesis, leading to the abortion of both female and male germline cells. Microscopic studies revealed that these developmental defects are associated with abnormal cell division and cell growth. Genetic and molecular analyses indicated that FBR12 encodes a putative eIF-5A-2 protein. When expressed in a yeast mutant strain carrying a mutation in the eIF-5A gene, FBR12 cDNA is able to rescue the lethal phenotype of the yeast mutant, indicating that FBR12 is a functional eIF-5A. We propose that FBR12/eIF-5A-2 is fundamental for plant growth and development by regulating cell division, cell growth, and cell death.

  7. Cell division and endoreduplication play important roles in stem swelling of tuber mustard (Brassica juncea Coss. var. tumida Tsen et Lee).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H; Wang, L L; Sun, L T; Dong, L L; Liu, B; Chen, L P

    2012-11-01

    We investigated spatio-temporal variations in cell division and the occurrence of endoreduplication in cells of tuber mustard stems during development. Cells in the stem had 8C nuclei (C represents DNA content of a two haploid genome), since it is an allotetraploid species derived from diploid Brassica rapa (AA) and B. nigra (BB), thus indicating the occurrence of endoreduplication. Additionally, we observed a dynamic change of cell ploidy in different regions of the swollen stems, with a decrease in 4C proportion in P4-1 and a sharp increase in 8C cells that became the dominant cell type (86.33% at most) in the inner pith cells. Furthermore, cDNAs of 14 cell cycle genes and four cell expansion genes were cloned and their spatial transcripts analysed in order to understand their roles in stem development. The expression of most cell cycle genes peaked in regions of the outer pith (P2 or P3), some genes regulating S/G2 and G2/M (BjCDKB1;2, BjCYCB1;1 and BjCYCB1;2) significantly decrease in P5 and P6, while G1/S regulators (BjE2Fa, BjE2Fb and BjE2Fc) showed a relative high expression level in the inner pith (P5) where cells were undergoing endoreduplication. Coincidentally, BjXTH1and BjXTH2 were exclusively expressed in the endoreduplicated cells. Our results suggest that cells of outer pith regions (P2 and P3) mainly divide for cell proliferation, while cells of the inner pith expand through endoreduplication. Endoreduplication could trigger expression of BjXTH1 and BjXTH2 and thus function in cell expansion of the pith tissue.

  8. STUDIES ON THE MATURATION OF MYELOBLASTS INTO MYELOCYTES AND ON AMITOTIC CELL DIVISION IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN SUBACUTE MYELOBLASTIC LEUCEMIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, F R; Austrian, C R; Cunningham, R S; Doan, C A

    1924-11-30

    1. Myeloblasts can be discriminated in the supravital technique by the great numbers of tiny mitochondria in the cytoplasm and the absence of any other vitally stainable substance. 2. There are three stages in the maturation of myelocytes. 3. These three phases can be correlated with three types of the oxidase reaction. 4. One case of myeloblastic leucemia showed such an amount of an abnormal type of amitosis as to suggest the disordered cell division of neoplasms. 5. In this case transfusions were correlated with a maturation of myeloblasts into myelocytes, with an increase of the oxidase reaction, and with an increase in amitosis.

  9. Neuron division or enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Laktionova, A A; Solovieva, I A; Krasnova, T V

    2010-10-01

    The classical Bielschowsky-Gross neurohistological method was used to reproduce all the morphological phenomena interpreted by many authors as signs of neuron division, budding, and fission. It is suggested that these signs are associated with the effects of enucleation, which occurs in many cells of other tissue types in response to a variety of chemical and physical treatments. Studies were performed using neurons isolated from the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis and exposed in tissue culture to the actin microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B. Phase contrast time-lapse video recording over periods of 4-8 h demonstrated nuclear displacement, ectopization, and budding, to the level of almost complete fission of the neuron body. This repeats the pattern seen in static fixed preparations in "normal" conditions and after different experimental treatments. Budding of the cytoplasm was also sometimes seen at the early stages of the experiments. Control experiments in which cultured neurons were exposed to the solvent for cytochalasin B, i.e., dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), did not reveal any changes in neurons over a period of 8 h. We take the view that the picture previously interpreted as neuron division and fission can be explained in terms of the inhibition of actin microfilaments, sometimes developing spontaneously in cells undergoing individual metabolic changes preventing the maintenance of cytoskeleton stability.

  10. The progression of the intra-erythrocytic cell cycle of Plasmodium falciparum and the role of the centriolar plaques in asynchronous mitotic division during schizogony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, David E; Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C

    2011-01-01

    The cell division cycle and mitosis of intra-erythrocytic (IE) Plasmodium falciparum are poorly understood aspects of parasite development which affect malaria molecular pathogenesis. Specifically, the timing of the multiple gap (G), DNA synthesis (S) and chromosome separation (M) phases of paras......The cell division cycle and mitosis of intra-erythrocytic (IE) Plasmodium falciparum are poorly understood aspects of parasite development which affect malaria molecular pathogenesis. Specifically, the timing of the multiple gap (G), DNA synthesis (S) and chromosome separation (M) phases...... of parasite mitosis are not well defined, nor whether genome divisions are immediately followed by cleavage of the nuclear envelope. Curiously, daughter merozoite numbers do not follow the geometric expansion expected from equal numbers of binary divisions, an outcome difficult to explain using the standard...

  11. A comparative proteomic analysis reveals a new bi-lobe protein required for bi-lobe duplication and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhou

    Full Text Available A Golgi-associated bi-lobed structure was previously found to be important for Golgi duplication and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei. To further understand its functions, comparative proteomics was performed on extracted flagellar complexes (including the flagellum and flagellum-associated structures such as the basal bodies and the bi-lobe and purified flagella to identify new bi-lobe proteins. A leucine-rich repeats containing protein, TbLRRP1, was characterized as a new bi-lobe component. The anterior part of the TbLRRP1-labeled bi-lobe is adjacent to the single Golgi apparatus, and the posterior side is tightly associated with the flagellar pocket collar marked by TbBILBO1. Inducible depletion of TbLRRP1 by RNA interference inhibited duplication of the bi-lobe as well as the adjacent Golgi apparatus and flagellar pocket collar. Formation of a new flagellum attachment zone and subsequent cell division were also inhibited, suggesting a central role of bi-lobe in Golgi, flagellar pocket collar and flagellum attachment zone biogenesis.

  12. Arabidopsis KCBP interacts with AIR9 but stays in the cortical division zone throughout mitosis via its MyTH4-FERM domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik; Dols, Jacqueline; Kopischke, Sarah; Peña, Eduardo J; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Heinlein, Manfred; Szymanski, Daniel B; Zachgo, Sabine; Doonan, John H; Lloyd, Clive W

    2015-06-01

    The preprophase band of microtubules performs the crucial function of marking the plane of cell division. Although the preprophase band depolymerises at the onset of mitosis, the division plane is 'memorized' by a cortical division zone to which the phragmoplast is attracted during cytokinesis. Proteins have been discovered that are part of the molecular memory but little is known about how they contribute to phragmoplast guidance. Previously, we found that the microtubule-associated protein AIR9 is found in the cortical division zone at preprophase and returns during cell plate insertion but is absent from the cortex during the intervening mitosis. To identify new components of the preprophase memory, we searched for proteins that interact with AIR9. We detected the kinesin-like calmodulin-binding protein, KCBP, which can be visualized at the predicted cortical site throughout division. A truncation study of KCBP indicates that its MyTH4-FERM domain is required for linking the motor domain to the cortex. These results suggest a mechanism by which minus-end-directed KCBP helps guide the centrifugally expanding phragmoplast to the cortical division site.

  13. Division Unit for Binary Integer Decimals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, Tomas; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    -recurrence algorithm to BID representation and implement the division unit in standard cell technology. The implementation of the proposed BID division unit is compared to that of a BCD based unit implementing the same algorithm. The comparison shows that for normalized operands the BID unit has the same latency......In this work, we present a radix-10 division unit that is based on the digit-recurrence algorithm and implements binary encodings (binary integer decimal or BID) for significands. Recent decimal division designs are all based on the binary coded decimal (BCD) encoding. We adapt the radix-10 digit...

  14. ENOD40 expression in the pericycle precedes cortical cell division in Rhizobium-legume interaction and the highly conserved internal region of the gene does not encode a peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaan, B.; Yang, W.C.; Bisseling, T.; Franssen, H.

    2001-01-01

    In situ expression studies show that MsENOD40 is expressed in pericycle cells of alfalfa roots within 3 hr after addition of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. This is about 15 hr before cortical cell divisions become apparent. All ENOD40 clones isolated so far share two conserved regions, box 1 and box 2

  15. The monofunctional glycosyltransferase of Escherichia coli localizes to the cell division site and interacts with the penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), FtsW and FtsN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, Adeline; Wolf, Benoît; Fraipont, Claudine; Breukink, E.J.; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; Terrak, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The monofunctional peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase (MtgA) catalyzes glycan chain elongation of the bacterial cell wall. Here we show that MtgA localizes at the division site of Escherichia coli cells that are deficient in PBP1b and produce a thermosensitive PBP1a and is able to interact with three

  16. Fourier plane image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  17. Fourier plane image amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  18. Exclusive Multipotency and Preferential Asymmetric Divisions in Post-Embryonic Neural Stem Cells of the Fish Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Centanin, L.; Ander, J.-J.; Hoeckendorf, B.; Lust, K.; T. Kellner; Kraemer, I.; Urbany, C.; Hasel, E.; Harris, W.A.; Simons, B. D.; Wittbrodt, J

    2014-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It has been published by The Company of Biologists Ltd in Development here: http://dev.biologists.org/content/early/2014/08/19/dev.109892.long. The potency of post-embryonic stem cells can only be addressed in the living organism, by labeling single cells after embryonic development and following their descendants. Recently, transplantation experiments involving permanently labeled cells revealed multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) of embryonic or...

  19. Fixed Sagittal Plane Imbalance

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is ...

  20. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermacore Inc. proposes an innovative titanium heat pipe thermal plane for passive thermal control of individual cells within a fuel cell stack. The proposed...

  1. Molecular evolution in bacteria: cell division Evolução molecular em bactérias: divisão celular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Trevors

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular evolution in bacteria is examined with an emphasis on the self-assembly of cells capable of primitive division and growth during early molecular evolution. Also, the possibility that some type of encapsulation structure preceeded biochemical pathways and the assembly of genetic material is examined. These aspects will be considered from an evolutionary perspective.A evolução molecular em bactérias é examinada com ênfase na auto-organização de uma célula capaz de divisão primitiva e multiplicação durante o princípio da evolução molecular. Também se discute a possibilidade de que algum tipo de estrutura de encapsulação tenha antecedido as vias bioquímicas e o agrupamento de material genético. Esses aspectos são considerados sob uma perspectiva evolutiva.

  2. Information Model for Resource of ASON Control Plane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bin; SONG Hong-sheng; GUI Xuan; ZHANG Jie; GU Wan-yi

    2004-01-01

    Automatic Switched Optical network (ASON) is the key technology for the next generation optical networks, and the recommendations for ASON were also developed by ITU-T. However, the recommendations for the management plane have not been made yet. In this paper, the management information model for the resources of control plane is proposed based on the management requirements of ASON for the first time. The managed objects for control plane could be used for the management of control Network Elements(NEs) and control channels, they can also be used for route areas division in control plane, parameter configuration and performance inspection for the control modules in a control NEs.

  3. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts...... study alternative and richer models, such as externalities in cake cutting, simultaneous cake cutting, and envy-free cake cutting. The second part of the thesis tackles the fair allocation of multiple goods, divisible and indivisible. In the realm of divisible goods, we investigate the well known...

  4. Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Growth of Leptospire, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola: Immunoreactivity and Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Triampo, W; Triampo, D; Wong-Ekkabut, J; Tang, I M; Triampo, Wannapong; Doungchawee, Galayanee; Triampo, Darapond; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the exposure of the bacterium, Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola to a constant magnetic field with magnetic flux density from a permanent ferrite magnet = 140 mT were studied. Changes in Leptospira cells after their exposure to the field were determined on the basis of changes in their growth behavior and agglutination immunoreactivity with a homologous antiserum using darkfield microscopy together with visual imaging. The data showed that the exposed Leptospira cells have lower densities and lower agglutination immunoreactivity than the unexposed control group. Interestingly, some of the exposed Leptospira cells showed abnormal morphologies such as large lengths. We discussed some of the possible reasons for these observations.

  5. Rice OsRAD21-2 is Expressed in Actively Dividing Tissues and its Ectopic Expression in Yeast Results in Aberrant Cell Division and Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyan Gong; Tang Li; Qi Li; Longfeng Yan; Tai Wang

    2011-01-01

    Rad21 and its meiotic counterpart Rec8,the key components of the cohesin complex,are essential for sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis,respectively.In contrast to yeast and vertebrates,which have only two RAD21/REC8 genes,the rice genome encodes four Rad21/Rec8 proteins.Here,we report on the cloning and characterization of OsRAD21-2 from rice (Oryza sativa L.).Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length amino acids showed that OsRad21-2 was grouped into the plant-specific Rad21 subfamily.Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed OsRAD21-2 preferentially expressed in premeiotic flowers.Further RNA in situ hybridization analysis and promoter::β-glucuronidase staining indicated that OsRAD21-2 was mainly expressed in actively dividing tissues including premeiotic stamen,stem intercalary meristem,leaf meristem,and root pericycle.Ectopic expression of OsRAD21-2 in fission yeast resulted in cell grow