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Sample records for cell disease scd

  1. Neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging, and neuropsychiatric evaluation in pediatric and adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Edwards

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Edwards1, Renee Dunn Raynor1, Miriam Feliu1, Camela McDougald1, Stephanie Johnson2, Donald Schmechel3, Mary Wood1, Gary G Bennett4, Patrick Saurona5, Melanie Bonner1, Chante’ Wellington1, Laura M DeCastro6, Elaine Whitworth6, Mary Abrams6, Patrick Logue1, Lekisha Edwards1, Salutario Martinez7, Keith E Whitfield81Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2American Psychological Association, Science Directorate, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 5Taub Institute For Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and The Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; 6Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 7Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 8Duke University, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Traditionally, neuropsychological deficits due to Sickle Cell Disease (SCD have been understudied in adults. We have begun to suspect, however, that symptomatic and asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Events (CVE may account for an alarming number of deficits in this population. In the current brief review, we critically evaluated the pediatric and adult literatures on the neurocognitive effects of SCD. We highlighted the studies that have been published on this topic and posit that early detection of CVE via neurocognitive testing, neuropsychiatric evaluations, and neuroimaging may significantly reduce adult cognitive and functional morbidities.Keywords: cerebral vascular event, neuropsychological assessment, sickle cell disease, neuroimaging

  2. Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk about donating their baby's cord blood College football player stays true to his commitment Be the ... appointment, the transplant doctor will: Review your medical history Talk with you about your options Discuss the ...

  3. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence.

  4. Plasma CXCL10, sCD163 and sCD14 Levels Have Distinct Associations with Antiretroviral Treatment and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Castley

    Full Text Available We investigate the associations of three established plasma biomarkers in the context of HIV and treatment-related variables including a comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk assessment, within a large ambulatory HIV cohort. Patients were recruited in 2010 to form the Royal Perth Hospital HIV/CVD risk cohort. Plasma sCD14, sCD163 and CXCL10 levels were measured in 475 consecutive patients with documented CVD risk (age, ethnicity, gender, smoking, blood pressure, BMI, fasting metabolic profile and HIV treatment history including immunological/virological outcomes. The biomarkers assessed showed distinct associations with virological response: CXCL10 strongly correlated with HIV-1 RNA (p0.2. Associations between higher sCD163 and protease inhibitor therapy (p = 0.05 and lower sCD14 with integrase inhibitor therapy (p = 0.02 were observed. Levels of sCD163 were also associated with CVD risk factors (age, ethnicity, HDL, BMI, with a favourable influence of Framingham score <10% (p = 0.04. Soluble CD14 levels were higher among smokers (p = 0.002, with no effect of other CVD risk factors, except age (p = 0.045. Our findings confirm CXCL10, sCD163 and sCD14 have distinct associations with different aspects of HIV infection and treatment. Levels of CXCL10 correlated with routinely monitored variables, sCD163 levels reflect a deeper level of virological suppression and influence of CVD risk factors, while sCD14 levels were not associated with routinely monitored variables, with evidence of specific effects of smoking and integrase inhibitor therapy warranting further investigation.

  5. Plasma CXCL10, sCD163 and sCD14 Levels Have Distinct Associations with Antiretroviral Treatment and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castley, Alison; Williams, Leah; James, Ian; Guelfi, George; Berry, Cassandra; Nolan, David

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the associations of three established plasma biomarkers in the context of HIV and treatment-related variables including a comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk assessment, within a large ambulatory HIV cohort. Patients were recruited in 2010 to form the Royal Perth Hospital HIV/CVD risk cohort. Plasma sCD14, sCD163 and CXCL10 levels were measured in 475 consecutive patients with documented CVD risk (age, ethnicity, gender, smoking, blood pressure, BMI, fasting metabolic profile) and HIV treatment history including immunological/virological outcomes. The biomarkers assessed showed distinct associations with virological response: CXCL10 strongly correlated with HIV-1 RNA (p0.2). Associations between higher sCD163 and protease inhibitor therapy (p = 0.05) and lower sCD14 with integrase inhibitor therapy (p = 0.02) were observed. Levels of sCD163 were also associated with CVD risk factors (age, ethnicity, HDL, BMI), with a favourable influence of Framingham score <10% (p = 0.04). Soluble CD14 levels were higher among smokers (p = 0.002), with no effect of other CVD risk factors, except age (p = 0.045). Our findings confirm CXCL10, sCD163 and sCD14 have distinct associations with different aspects of HIV infection and treatment. Levels of CXCL10 correlated with routinely monitored variables, sCD163 levels reflect a deeper level of virological suppression and influence of CVD risk factors, while sCD14 levels were not associated with routinely monitored variables, with evidence of specific effects of smoking and integrase inhibitor therapy warranting further investigation. PMID:27355513

  6. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) in relation to Alzheimer's disease and cognitive scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Combrinck, Marc; Smith, A David

    2017-01-01

    The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates with the dementia-related biomarkers phospho-tau and total-tau. Here we present data on the relation of sCD320 to Alzheimer's disease and scores of cognitive tests. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid samples from...... 42 pathologically-confirmed cases of Alzheimer's disease and 25 non-demented controls were analyzed for sCD320 employing an in-house ELISA. The participants' cognitive functions were tested using the Cambridge Cognition Examination (CAMCOG) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE...... be employed as a biomarker for differentiating Alzheimer dementia patients from controls. Further studies are warranted to explore the non-linear correlations between sCD320 and scores of cognitive function....

  7. Reduced levels of SCD1 accentuate palmitate-induced stress in insulin-producing β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovsepyan Meri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1 is an ER resident enzyme introducing a double-bond in saturated fatty acids. Global knockout of SCD1 in mouse increases fatty acid oxidation and insulin sensitivity which makes the animal resistant to diet-induced obesity. Inhibition of SCD1 has therefore been proposed as a potential therapy of the metabolic syndrome. Much of the work has focused on insulin target tissue and very little is known about how reduced levels of SCD1 would affect the insulin-producing β-cell, however. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate how reduced levels of SCD1 affect the β-cell. Results Insulin-secreting MIN6 cells with reduced levels of SCD1 were established by siRNA mediated knockdown. When fatty acid oxidation was measured, no difference between cells with reduced levels of SCD1 and mock-transfected cells were found. Also, reducing levels of SCD1 did not affect insulin secretion in response to glucose. To investigate how SCD1 knockdown affected cellular mechanisms, differentially regulated proteins were identified by a proteomic approach. Cells with reduced levels of SCD1 had higher levels of ER chaperones and components of the proteasome. The higher amounts did not protect the β-cell from palmitate-induced ER stress and apoptosis. Instead, rise in levels of p-eIF2α and CHOP after palmitate exposure was 2-fold higher in cells with reduced levels of SCD1 compared to mock-transfected cells. Accordingly, apoptosis rose to higher levels after exposure to palmitate in cells with reduced levels of SCD1 compared to mock-transfected cells. Conclusions In conclusion, reduced levels of SCD1 augment palmitate-induced ER stress and apoptosis in the β-cell, which is an important caveat when considering targeting this enzyme as a treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. SCD1 inhibition causes cancer cell death by depleting mono-unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Paul; Liang, Beirong; Li, Lingyun; Fremgen, Trisha; Murphy, Erin; Quinn, Angela; Madden, Stephen L; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Wang, Bing; Cohen, Aharon; Komarnitsky, Svetlana; Jancsics, Kate; Hirth, Brad; Cooper, Christopher G F; Lee, Edward; Wilson, Sean; Krumbholz, Roy; Schmid, Steven; Xiang, Yibin; Booker, Michael; Lillie, James; Carter, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Increased metabolism is a requirement for tumor cell proliferation. To understand the dependence of tumor cells on fatty acid metabolism, we evaluated various nodes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Using RNAi we have demonstrated that depletion of fatty-acid synthesis pathway enzymes SCD1, FASN, or ACC1 in HCT116 colon cancer cells results in cytotoxicity that is reversible by addition of exogenous fatty acids. This conditional phenotype is most pronounced when SCD1 is depleted. We used this fatty-acid rescue strategy to characterize several small-molecule inhibitors of fatty acid synthesis, including identification of TOFA as a potent SCD1 inhibitor, representing a previously undescribed activity for this compound. Reference FASN and ACC inhibitors show cytotoxicity that is less pronounced than that of TOFA, and fatty-acid rescue profiles consistent with their proposed enzyme targets. Two reference SCD1 inhibitors show low-nanomolar cytotoxicity that is offset by at least two orders of magnitude by exogenous oleate. One of these inhibitors slows growth of HCT116 xenograft tumors. Our data outline an effective strategy for interrogation of on-mechanism potency and pathway-node-specificity of fatty acid synthesis inhibitors, establish an unambiguous link between fatty acid synthesis and cancer cell survival, and point toward SCD1 as a key target in this pathway.

  9. SCD1 inhibition causes cancer cell death by depleting mono-unsaturated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mason

    Full Text Available Increased metabolism is a requirement for tumor cell proliferation. To understand the dependence of tumor cells on fatty acid metabolism, we evaluated various nodes of the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Using RNAi we have demonstrated that depletion of fatty-acid synthesis pathway enzymes SCD1, FASN, or ACC1 in HCT116 colon cancer cells results in cytotoxicity that is reversible by addition of exogenous fatty acids. This conditional phenotype is most pronounced when SCD1 is depleted. We used this fatty-acid rescue strategy to characterize several small-molecule inhibitors of fatty acid synthesis, including identification of TOFA as a potent SCD1 inhibitor, representing a previously undescribed activity for this compound. Reference FASN and ACC inhibitors show cytotoxicity that is less pronounced than that of TOFA, and fatty-acid rescue profiles consistent with their proposed enzyme targets. Two reference SCD1 inhibitors show low-nanomolar cytotoxicity that is offset by at least two orders of magnitude by exogenous oleate. One of these inhibitors slows growth of HCT116 xenograft tumors. Our data outline an effective strategy for interrogation of on-mechanism potency and pathway-node-specificity of fatty acid synthesis inhibitors, establish an unambiguous link between fatty acid synthesis and cancer cell survival, and point toward SCD1 as a key target in this pathway.

  10. Circulating sCD36 levels in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll, Sara; Poulsen, Marianne Kjær; Ørnstrup, Marie Juul

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: CD36 is implicated in fatty acid uptake in multiple tissues, including hepatocytes and adipocytes. Circulating CD36 (sCD36) is increased in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).We explored this association further by investigating correlations between sCD36 levels...... resonance imaging (n=94, subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue) and liver biopsy (n=28 NAFLD patients) performed. Plasma sCD36 was assessed by ELISA. RESULTS: NAFLD patients had elevated sCD36 levels compared to controls (0.68 (0.12-2.27) versus 0.43 (0.10-1.18), P.... An unhealthy and unbalanced CD36 expression in adipose and hepatic tissue may shift the fatty acid load to the liver.Clinical Trials.gov (NCT01464801, NCT01412645, NCT01446276).International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 05 December 2016. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.223....

  11. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  12. The SCD - Stem Cell Differentiation ESA Project: Preparatory Work for the Spaceflight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Silvia; Barenghi, Livia; van Loon, Jack; Bradamante, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Due to spaceflight, astronauts experience serious, weightlessness-induced bone loss because of an unbalanced process of bone remodeling that involves bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), as well as osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. The effects of microgravity on osteo-cells have been extensively studied, but it is only recently that consideration has been given to the role of BMSCs. Previous researches indicated that human BMSCs cultured in simulated microgravity (sim-μg) alter their proliferation and differentiation. The spaceflight opportunities for biomedical experiments are rare and suffer from a number of operative constraints that could bias the validity of the experiment itself, but remain a unique opportunity to confirm and explain the effects due to microgravity, that are only partially activated/detectable in simulated conditions. For this reason, we carefully prepared the SCD - STEM CELLS DIFFERENTIATION experiment, selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) and now on the International Space Station (ISS). Here we present the preparatory studies performed on ground to adapt the project to the spaceflight constraints in terms of culture conditions, fixation and storage of human BMSCs in space aiming at satisfying the biological requirements mandatory to retrieve suitable samples for post-flight analyses. We expect to understand better the molecular mechanisms governing human BMSC growth and differentiation hoping to outline new countermeasures against astronaut bone loss.

  13. SCD1 Confers Temozolomide Resistance to Human Glioma Cells via the Akt/GSK3β/β-Catenin Signaling Axis

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    Shuang Dai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ, the standard chemotherapy agent for glioblastoma (GBM, poses a major clinical challenge to GBM prognosis. Understanding the mechanisms of TMZ resistance can help to identify novel drug targets and more effective therapies. Recent studies suggest that bioenergetic alterations of cancer cells play important roles in drug resistance. In our study, the altered metabolism of cancer cells was observed using a metabolic PCR array. We found that stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1, a key rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, was significantly upregulated in TMZ-resistant GBM cells compared to their parental counterparts. Overexpression of SCD1 promoted resistance to TMZ in parental GBM cells, whereas SCD1 downregulation by siRNA could re-sensitize TMZ-resistant cells in vitro. Combinational treatment of TMZ and an SCD1-specific inhibitor showed a combined inhibitory effect on TMZ-resistant glioma cells. We also observed that overexpression of SCD1 promoted Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling, while silencing of SCD1 inhibited the signaling. The combination of an Akt activator with exogenous SCD1 or the combined inhibition of Akt and enforced expression of SCD1 resulted in the most significant changes of Akt signaling. Functionally, significantly lower viability and mobility rates were observed in TMZ-resistant cells when treated with Akt inhibitors and an SCD1 inhibitor simultaneously compared to when treated individually. In conclusion, our study identified SCD1 along with its functional pathway as a novel target in the development of TMZ resistance. SCD1 inhibition used alone or in combination with Akt inhibition could effectively overcome TMZ resistance in gliomas.

  14. School Performance and Disease Interference in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lori E.; Joffe, Naomi E.; Irwin, Mary Kay; Strong, Heather; Peugh, James; Shook, Lisa; Kalinyak, Karen A.; Mitchell, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) results in neuropsychological complications that place adolescents at higher risk for limited educational achievement. A first step to developing effective educational interventions is to understand the impact of SCD on school performance. The current study assessed perceptions of school performance, SCD interference and…

  15. Sickle Cell Disease

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    ... days. Your body may have trouble making enough new cells to replace the ones that you lost. Because ... Indian backgrounds. What are the symptoms of sickle cell disease? People with ... the whites of the eyes (icterus) The effects of SCD vary from person ...

  16. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, G.; Papadopoulou, A.M.; Holloway, B.; Robins, A.; Davis, J.; Murray, D.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD

  17. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Papadopoulou, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Holloway, B. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Robins, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davis, J. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Murray, D. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD.

  18. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

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    ... My doctor wants to screen me for pulmonary hypertension. Why is this? Sickle cell disease (SCD), a ... What are some of the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension? Because they are somewhat general symptoms, the characteristics ...

  19. C-reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. C.reactive protein (CRP) is known to modulate inflammation. Its role in the chronic inflammation of SCD may make it valuable as a therapeutic target. Aim: The aim was to determine CRP levels in SCD subjects in ...

  20. Oxidative stress in sickle cell disease; pathophysiology and potential implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; Otten, Hans-Martin; Brandjes, Dees P; Schnog, John-John B

    2011-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and vaso-occlusion leading to a reduced quality of life and life expectancy. Oxidative stress is an important feature of SCD and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ensuing organ damage in sickle cell patients. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the (end-)products of their oxidative reactions are potential markers of disease severity and could be targets for antioxidant therapies. This review will summarize the role of ROS in SCD and their potential implication for SCD management. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Controlling sickle cell disease in Ghana ethics and options | Edwin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a significant public health burden in Ghana. Recent studies indicate that 2% of Ghanaian newborns are affected by SCD; one in three Ghanaians has the hemoglobin S and/or C gene. As a means of controlling the disease, some authorities have recommended prenatal diagnosis (PND) and ...

  2. Proceedings of a Sickle Cell Disease Ontology workshop — Towards the first comprehensive ontology for Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mulder

    2016-06-01

    The SCD community and H3ABioNet members joined forces at a recent SCD Ontology workshop to develop an ontology covering aspects of SCD under the classes: phenotype, diagnostics, therapeutics, quality of life, disease modifiers and disease stage. The aim of the workshop was for participants to contribute their expertise to development of the structure and contents of the SCD ontology. Here we describe the proceedings of the Sickle Cell Disease Ontology Workshop held in Cape Town South Africa in February 2016 and its outcomes. The objective of the workshop was to bring together experts in SCD from around the world to contribute their expertise to the development of various aspects of the SCD ontology.

  3. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase decreases vascular oxidative stress and increases vasodilatation in sickle cell disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Hao; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Jones, Deron W; Jing, Xigang; Shi, Yang; Gourlay, David; Oldham, Keith T; Hillery, Cheryl A; Pritchard, Kirkwood A

    2013-11-01

    Activated leukocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) release myeloperoxidase (MPO), which binds to endothelial cells (EC), is translocated, and generates oxidants that scavenge nitric oxide (NO) and impair EC function. To determine whether MPO impairs EC function in sickle cell disease (SCD), control (AA) and SCD mice were treated with N-acetyl-lysyltyrosylcysteine-amide (KYC). SCD humans and mice have high plasma MPO and soluble L-selectin (sL-selectin). KYC had no effect on MPO but decreased plasma sL-selectin and malondialdehyde in SCD mice. MPO and 3-chlorotyrosine (3-ClTyr) were increased in SCD aortas. KYC decreased MPO and 3-ClTyr in SCD aortas to the levels in AA aortas. Vasodilatation in SCD mice was impaired. KYC increased vasodilatation in SCD mice more than 2-fold, to ∼60% of levels in AA mice. KYC inhibited MPO-dependent 3-ClTyr formation in EC proteins. SCD mice had high plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), which tended to decrease in KYC-treated SCD mice (P = 0.07). KYC increased MPO and XO/XDH and decreased 3-ClTyr and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NO₂Tyr) in SCD livers. These data support the hypothesis that SCD increases release of MPO, which generates oxidants that impair EC function and injure livers. Inhibiting MPO is an effective strategy for decreasing oxidative stress and liver injury and restoring EC function in SCD.

  4. Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis F; Romero-Ramos, Jose E; Olimon-Andalon, Vicente; Hernandez-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Diaz, Jose M; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Morgan-Villela, Gilberto; Toro-Arreola, Susana del; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95/Fas/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95) in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. As a first step in an attempt to design a minimally invasive test to predict the risk of developing cervical cancer in patients with precancerous lesions, we used a simple assay based on the capacity of human serum to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We evaluated the relationship between sCD95 levels and the ability to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells in cervical cancer patients and controls. Jurkat cells were exposed to serum from 63 women (20 healthy volunteers, 21 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I [CIN 1] and 22 with cervical-uterine carcinoma). The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin-V-Fluos and Propidium Iodide as markers. Serum levels of sCD95 and soluble CD95 ligand (sCD95L) were measured by ELISA kits. We found that serum from almost all healthy women induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, while only fifty percent of the sera from women with CIN 1 induced cell death in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, only one serum sample from a patient with cervical-uterine cancer was able to induce apoptosis, the rest of the sera protected Jurkat cells from this killing. We were able to demonstrate that elimination of Jurkat cells was mediated by the CD95/Fas/Apo-1 apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the serum levels of sCD95 measured by ELISA were significantly higher in women with cervical cancer. Our results demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between low levels of sCD95 in serum of normal women and higher apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. We suggest that an analysis of the apoptotic rate induced by serum in Jurkat cells and the

  5. Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo-Cuellar Alejandro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95/Fas/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95 in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. As a first step in an attempt to design a minimally invasive test to predict the risk of developing cervical cancer in patients with precancerous lesions, we used a simple assay based on the capacity of human serum to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We evaluated the relationship between sCD95 levels and the ability to induce apoptosis in Jurkat cells in cervical cancer patients and controls. Methods Jurkat cells were exposed to serum from 63 women (20 healthy volunteers, 21 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I [CIN 1] and 22 with cervical-uterine carcinoma. The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin-V-Fluos and Propidium Iodide as markers. Serum levels of sCD95 and soluble CD95 ligand (sCD95L were measured by ELISA kits. Results We found that serum from almost all healthy women induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, while only fifty percent of the sera from women with CIN 1 induced cell death in Jurkat cells. Interestingly, only one serum sample from a patient with cervical-uterine cancer was able to induce apoptosis, the rest of the sera protected Jurkat cells from this killing. We were able to demonstrate that elimination of Jurkat cells was mediated by the CD95/Fas/Apo-1 apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the serum levels of sCD95 measured by ELISA were significantly higher in women with cervical cancer. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between low levels of sCD95 in serum of normal women and higher apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. We suggest that an analysis of

  6. Circulating sCD36 levels in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll, Sara; Poulsen, Marianne Kjær; Ørnstrup, Marie Juul

    2017-01-01

    with the level of intrahepatic lipid, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. The weak association with markers of obesity and the association with hepatic CD36 mRNA expression suggest that excess sCD36 in NAFLD patients is derived from the hepatocytes, which may support that CD36 is involved in NAFLD development...... with intrahepatic lipid (rs=0.30), ALT (r=0.31), HOMA-insulin resistance (r=0.24), HDL (r=-0.32) and triglyceride (r=0.44, all P....04); yet, we found no correlations between sCD36 and other measures of fat distribution except an inverse relation to visceral adipose tissue (rs=-0.21, Phepatic CD36 mRNA expression (r=0.37, P=0.07). CONCLUSIONS: sCD36 levels increased...

  7. The SCD - Stem Cell Differentiation ESA project: preparatory work for the spaceflight mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versari, S.; Barenghi, L.; van Loon, J.; Bradamante, S.

    2016-01-01

    Due to spaceflight, astronauts experience serious, weightlessness-induced bone loss because of an unbalanced process of bone remodeling that involves bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), as well as osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. The effects of microgravity on osteo-cells have been

  8. Soluble CD163 levels in children with sickle cell disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Bartram, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by vasculopathy, which has been causally linked to intravascular haemolysis and high levels of free plasma haemoglobin. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is implicated in the clearance of free plasma haemoglobin and high plasma concentrations have been linked to ar...

  9. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric patients with SCD and congenital heart defects may require ... Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) presenting for cardiac ... fluid, calculated according to body weight, was initiated. ... oxygen mixture and intravenous fentanyl (5–10 mcg/kg) and .... erythropoiesis, and in this way reduces HbS production.

  10. Hydroxyurea therapy in adult Nigerian sickle cell disease: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The clinical prospects of hydroxyurea therapy in the management of sickle cell disease (SCD) require evaluation in the Nigerian setting to develop indigenous guidelines. This survey examines the pattern of hydroxyurea therapy, its clinico-haematologic benefits and safety profile in Nigerian SCD subjects.

  11. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase decreases vascular oxidative stress and increases vasodilatation in sickle cell disease mice1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Hao; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Jones, Deron W.; Jing, Xigang; Shi, Yang; Gourlay, David; Oldham, Keith T.; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.

    2013-01-01

    Activated leukocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) release myeloperoxidase (MPO), which binds to endothelial cells (EC), is translocated, and generates oxidants that scavenge nitric oxide (NO) and impair EC function. To determine whether MPO impairs EC function in sickle cell disease (SCD), control (AA) and SCD mice were treated with N-acetyl-lysyltyrosylcysteine-amide (KYC). SCD humans and mice have high plasma MPO and soluble L-selectin (sL-selectin). KYC had no effect on MPO but decreased plasma sL-selectin and malondialdehyde in SCD mice. MPO and 3-chlorotyrosine (3-ClTyr) were increased in SCD aortas. KYC decreased MPO and 3-ClTyr in SCD aortas to the levels in AA aortas. Vasodilatation in SCD mice was impaired. KYC increased vasodilatation in SCD mice more than 2-fold, to ∼60% of levels in AA mice. KYC inhibited MPO-dependent 3-ClTyr formation in EC proteins. SCD mice had high plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), which tended to decrease in KYC-treated SCD mice (P = 0.07). KYC increased MPO and XO/XDH and decreased 3-ClTyr and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NO2Tyr) in SCD livers. These data support the hypothesis that SCD increases release of MPO, which generates oxidants that impair EC function and injure livers. Inhibiting MPO is an effective strategy for decreasing oxidative stress and liver injury and restoring EC function in SCD. PMID:23956444

  12. Minireview: Clinical severity in sickle cell disease: the challenges of definition and prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charles T

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a monogenic, yet highly phenotypically variable disease with multisystem pathology. This manuscript provides an overview of many of the known determinants, modifiers, and correlates of disease severity in SCD. Despite this wealth of data, modeling the variable and multisystem pathology of SCD continues to be difficult. The current status of prediction of specific adverse outcomes and global disease severity in SCD is also reviewed, highlighting recent successes and ongoing challenges. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  13. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Nur, Erfan; van Beers, Eduard J.; Truijen, Jasper; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Biemond, Bart J.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with cerebral hyperperfusion and an increased risk of stroke. Also, both recurrent microvascular obstruction and chronic hemolysis affect endothelial function, potentially interfering with systemic and cerebral blood flow control. We

  14. the orthodontic management of an adult with sickle cell disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... a patient with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) needs ortho- dontic treatment ... Orthodontic Management. 215. Measures ... under strict control by the Dental Hygienists to avoid ... Ghana. Pediatrics 2008; 121 (suppl 2): 120-121. 2.

  15. Working Memory in Children With Neurocognitive Effects From Sickle Cell Disease: Contributions of the Central Executive and Processing Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelsey E.; Schatz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for working memory deficits due to multiple disease processes. We assessed working memory abilities and related functions in 32 school-age children with SCD and 85 matched comparison children using Baddeley’s working memory model as a framework. Children with SCD performed worse than controls for working memory, central executive function, and processing/rehearsal speed. Central executive function was found to mediate the relationship between SCD status and working memory, but processing speed did not. Cognitive remediation strategies that focus on central executive processes may be important for remediating working memory deficits in SCD. PMID:27759435

  16. MANAGEMENT OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a genetically transmitted multisystem disease1 which includes a group of disorders that differs in severity sign and symptoms, The disease is not uniformly seen everywhere but it has some topographical distribution. In India, it is frequently seen in Central India, in and around the vicinity of Chhattisgarh in some religions in caste like kurmis, satnami, mahar, other backward caste and some tribes, it has great pathological significance considering the high morbidity and mortality resulting from the disease process. We have studied the cases of SCD from 2001 to 2015 series of such patients, since there is no cure of this disease, in regards to prevention of this genetic autosomal recessive disorder by marriage counseling, the incidence can be significantly reduced by avoiding consanguineous marriages in the susceptible community.

  17. Self-Reported Physical Activity and Exercise Patterns in Children With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwanghe, Osarhiemen A; Muntz, Devin S; Kwon, Soyang; Montgomery, Simone; Kemiki, Opeyemi; Hsu, Lewis L; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2017-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) significantly affects physical functioning. We examined physical activity (PA) patterns in children with SCD versus a national sample and factors associated with PA and participation in physical education and organized sports. One hundred children with SCD completed a 58-item survey with questions from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) Physical Activity Questionnaire and others on physical education and sports, disease impact, and physical functioning. Compared with NHANES participants, more children with SCD (67 vs 42%, p physical education and sports, respectively. Greater disease impact on PA and physical functioning were associated with lower participation. Children with SCD are active at moderate to vigorous intensity for shorter durations. Negative personal beliefs about disease impact and poor physical functioning represent barriers to PA in SCD.

  18. Growth and nutritional status of children with homozygous sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Saqladi, A.-W. M.; Cipolotti, R.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Brabin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Poor growth and under-nutrition are common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). This review summarises evidence of nutritional status in children with SCD in relation to anthropometric status, disease severity, body composition, energy metabolism, micronutrient deficiency and

  19. Sickle cell disease pain management in adolescents: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bridget H; Nelson, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) pain continues to emerge in adolescents. More than 98,000 individuals are believed to have SCD in the United States. In fact, 1 in 500 Black infants will be affected by SCD. Identifying standards of care for this unique population can improve pain management and treatment. A significant effect of vaso-occlusive crisis is a decrease in the quality of life in children. Therefore, pain management is multidimensional and includes pharmacologic, physical, and psychological strategies. A review of the literature was conducted to identify best practices regarding pain management in adolescents with sickle cell anemia. Key words such as pain, pain management, adolescent sickle cell anemia, and acute sickle cell pain were entered into databases to reveal qualitative and quantitative studies from 2009 to the present. Many of the research articles identified poor SCD pain management. Studies showed that acute SCD pain management is essential and should be evaluated and robustly managed to achieve optimum pain relief for patients. Acute SCD pain usually occurs as a result of vaso-occlusive crisis. Untreated acute SCD pain can result in morbidity and mortality in adolescents. Nursing knowledge is critical to reducing the stigma and improving management of SCD pain. Nurses play a vital role in the introduction of evidence-based practice within the clinical setting. In an effort to educate nurses and other health care professionals about SCD, this article is a literature review of studies concerning SCD and pain management in emergency rooms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Working Memory in Children With Neurocognitive Effects From Sickle Cell Disease: Contributions of the Central Executive and Processing Speed

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Kelsey E.; Schatz, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for working memory deficits due to multiple disease processes. We assessed working memory abilities and related functions in 32 school-age children with SCD and 85 matched comparison children using Baddeley’s working memory model as a framework. Children with SCD performed worse than controls for working memory, central executive function, and processing/rehearsal speed. Central executive function was found to mediate the relationship betwee...

  1. The obstetric management of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jo; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene

    2012-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent severe pain. Pregnant women who are affected have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In view of this obstetricians should have an awareness of this condition and its complications, and pregnancies in women with SCD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience of high risk pregnancies. Ideally women should be seen preconceptually for optimisation of their SCD and partner screening. Antenatal care should include regular outpatient visits with regular monitoring for pre-eclampsia and of fetal growth. Blood transfusion should be used for the treatment of acute anaemia, acute chest syndrome or acute stroke but there is not sufficient evidence currently to recommend its use prophylactically. There is an increased prevalence of sickle crisis during pregnancy and patients should be monitored carefully throughout this time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mothers Raising Children with Sickle Cell Disease at the Intersection of Race, Gender, and Illness Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnes, David P. R.; Antle, Beverley J.; Williams, Charmaine C.; Cook, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study used the long interview method with Canadian mothers of African and Caribbean descent to understand the underresearched experience of raising a child with sickle cell disease (SCD). Mothers' realities were explored through three levels of social organization: daily caregiver coping (micro level); community views of SCD, such…

  3. Cerebrovascular reserve capacity is impaired in patients with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nur, Erfan; Kim, Yu-Sok; Truijen, Jasper; van Beers, Eduard J.; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Brandjes, Dees P.; Biemond, Bart J.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a high incidence of ischemic stroke. SCD is characterized by hemolytic anemia, resulting in reduced nitric oxide-bioavailability, and by impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics. Cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness is nitric oxide dependent and has been

  4. Sickle Cell Disease: New Opportunities and Challenges in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Makani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is one of the most common genetic causes of illness and death in the world. This is a review of SCD in Africa, which bears the highest burden of disease. The first section provides an introduction to the molecular basis of SCD and the pathophysiological mechanism of selected clinical events. The second section discusses the epidemiology of the disease (prevalence, morbidity, and mortality, at global level and within Africa. The third section discusses the laboratory diagnosis and management of SCD, emphasizing strategies that been have proven to be effective in areas with limited resources. Throughout the review, specific activities that require evidence to guide healthcare in Africa, as well as strategic areas for further research, will be highlighted.

  5. CDC Grand Rounds: Improving the Lives of Persons with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulihan, Mary; Hassell, Kathryn L; Raphael, Jean L; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Thorpe, Phoebe

    2017-11-24

    Approximately 100,000 Americans have sickle cell disease (SCD), a group of recessively inherited red blood cell disorders characterized by abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S or sickle hemoglobin, in the red blood cells. Persons with hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin Sß 0 thalassemia, also known as sickle cell anemia (SCA), have the most severe form of SCD. Hemoglobin SC disease and hemoglobin Sß + thalassemia are other common forms of SCD. Red blood cells that contain sickle hemoglobin are inflexible and can stick to vessel walls, causing a blockage that slows or stops blood flow. When this happens, oxygen cannot reach nearby tissues, leading to attacks of sudden, severe pain, called pain crises, which are the clinical hallmark of SCD. The red cell sickling and poor oxygen delivery can also cause damage to the brain, spleen, eyes, lungs, liver, and multiple other organs and organ systems. These chronic complications can lead to increased morbidity, early mortality, or both. Tremendous strides in treating and preventing the complications of SCD have extended life expectancy. Now, nearly 95% of persons born with SCD in the United States reach age 18 years (1); however, adults with the most severe forms of SCD have a life span that is 20-30 years shorter than that of persons without SCD (2).

  6. Lessons Learned from Talking with Parents about the Role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Paola; Steinfield, Elizabeth; Kim, Francis; Hays, Mary Margaret; Lehmann, Leslie; Sprinz, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but only a fraction of eligible children proceed to transplantation. We aimed to understand parental awareness and perceptions as a contributor. Purpose: To discuss HSCT with parents of children with SCD and assess their awareness…

  7. Facts about Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are important. You can call your local sickle cell organization to find out how to get tested. SCD ... a brother or sister. Bone marrow or stem cell transplants are used only in cases of severe SCD for children who have minimal organ damage from the ... Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF ...

  8. Double disadvantage: a case control study on health-related quality of life in children with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Channa T.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heijboer, Harriët; Peters, Marjolein; Grootenhuis, Martha A.

    2010-01-01

    Low health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) may be associated with consequences of the disease, or with the low socio-economic status (SES) of this patient population. The aim of this study was to investigate the HRQoL of children with SCD, controlling for

  9. Double disadvantage: A case control study on health-related quality of life in children with sickle cell disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, C.T.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Oosterlaan, J.; Heijboer, H.; Peters, M.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) may be associated with consequences of the disease, or with the low socio-economic status (SES) of this patient population. The aim of this study was to investigate the HRQoL of children with SCD,

  10. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  11. Improved Guideline Adherence With Integrated Sickle Cell Disease and Asthma Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Brandi L; Ivy, Zalaya K; Bryant, Valencia; Rodeghier, Mark; DeBaun, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    In children with sickle cell disease (SCD), concomitant asthma is associated with increased morbidity and mortality when compared with children with SCD without asthma. Despite the well-established burden of asthma in children with SCD, no paradigm of care exists for the co-management of these two diseases. To address this gap, an integrated SCD and asthma clinic was created in a community health center that included (1) a dual respiratory therapist/asthma case manager; (2) an SCD nurse practitioner with asthma educator certification; (3) an onsite pulmonary function test laboratory; (4) a pediatric hematologist with expertise in managing SCD and asthma; and (5) application of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. A before (2010-2012) and after (2013-2014) study design was used to assess for improved quality of care with implementation of an integrative care model among 61 children with SCD and asthma followed from 2010 to 2014. Asthma action plan utilization after initial diagnosis increased with the integrative care model (n=16, 56% before, 100% after, p=0.003), as did the use of spirometry in children aged ≥5 years (n=41, 65% before, 95% after, pintegrative care model for SCD and asthma improved evidence-based asthma care, longer follow-up and evaluation will be needed to determine the impact on SCD-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  13. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Sickle Cell Disease Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton; Palermo, Tonya M; Darbari, Deepika S; Hassell, Kathryn; Smith, Wally; Zempsky, William

    2017-05-01

    Pain in sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and high health care costs. Although episodic acute pain is the hallmark of this disorder, there is an increasing awareness that chronic pain is part of the pain experience of many older adolescents and adults. A common set of criteria for classifying chronic pain associated with SCD would enhance SCD pain research efforts in epidemiology, pain mechanisms, and clinical trials of pain management interventions, and ultimately improve clinical assessment and management. As part of the collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks public-private partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Pain Society, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy initiative developed the outline of an optimal diagnostic system for chronic pain conditions. Subsequently, a working group of experts in SCD pain was convened to generate core diagnostic criteria for chronic pain associated with SCD. The working group synthesized available literature to provide evidence for the dimensions of this disease-specific pain taxonomy. A single pain condition labeled chronic SCD pain was derived with 3 modifiers reflecting different clinical features. Future systematic research is needed to evaluate the feasibility, validity, and reliability of these criteria. An evidence-based classification system for chronic SCD pain was constructed for the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy initiative. Applying this taxonomy may improve assessment and management of SCD pain and accelerate research on epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatments for chronic SCD pain. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  14. Parental Problem-Solving Abilities and the Association of Sickle Cell Disease Complications with Health-related Quality of Life for School-age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Lamia P.; Daniel, Lauren C.; Smith, Kelsey; Robinson, M. Renée; Patterson, Chavis A.

    2013-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The current analysis sought to explore parent problem-solving abilities/skills as a moderator between SCD complications and HRQOL to evaluate applicability to pediatric SCD. At baseline, 83 children ages 6–12 years and their primary caregiver completed measures of the child HRQOL. Primary caregivers also completed a measure of social problem-solving. A SCD complications score was computed from medical record review. Parent problem-solving abilities significantly moderated the association of SCD complications with child self-report psychosocial HRQOL (p = .006). SCD complications had a direct effect on parent proxy physical and psychosocial child HRQOL. Enhancing parent problem-solving abilities may be one approach to improve HRQOL for children with high SCD complications; however, modification of parent perceptions of HRQOL may require direct intervention to improve knowledge and skills involved in disease management. PMID:24222378

  15. Detrimental effects of adenosine signaling in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Weiru; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Lu, Guangxiu; Alexander, Danny C; Milburn, Michael V; Carter-Dawson, Louvenia; Lewis, Dorothy E; Zhang, Wenzheng; Eltzschig, Holger K; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Juneja, Harinder S; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia can act as an initial trigger to induce erythrocyte sickling and eventual end organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Many factors and metabolites are altered in response to hypoxia and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Using metabolomic profiling, we found that the steady-state concentration of adenosine in the blood was elevated in a transgenic mouse model of SCD. Adenosine concentrations were similarly elevated in the blood of humans with SCD. Increased adenosine levels promoted sickling, hemolysis and damage to multiple tissues in SCD transgenic mice and promoted sickling of human erythrocytes. Using biochemical, genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR)-mediated induction of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an erythrocyte-specific metabolite that decreases the oxygen binding affinity of hemoglobin, underlies the induction of erythrocyte sickling by excess adenosine both in cultured human red blood cells and in SCD transgenic mice. Thus, excessive adenosine signaling through the A2BR has a pathological role in SCD. These findings may provide new therapeutic possibilities for this disease. PMID:21170046

  16. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Wen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. Methods To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Results Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. Conclusions This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  17. cAMP response element binding protein1 is essential for activation of steroyl co-enzyme a desaturase 1 (Scd1 in mouse lung type II epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Antony

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein 1 (Creb1 is a transcription factor that mediates cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP signalling in many tissues. Creb1(-/- mice die at birth due to respiratory failure and previous genome-wide microarray analysis of E17.5 Creb1(-/- fetal mouse lung identified important Creb1-regulated gene targets during lung development. The lipogenic enzymes stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1 and fatty acid synthase (Fasn showed highly reduced gene expression in Creb1(-/- lungs. We therefore hypothesized that Creb1 plays a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in pulmonary lipid biosynthetic pathways during lung development. In this study we confirmed that Scd1 and Fasn mRNA levels were down regulated in the E17.5 Creb1(-/- mouse lung while the lipogenic-associated transcription factors SrebpF1, C/ebpα and Pparγ were increased. In vivo studies using germline (Creb1(-/- and lung epithelial-specific (Creb1(EpiΔ/Δ Creb1 knockout mice showed strongly reduced Scd1, but not Fasn gene expression and protein levels in lung epithelial cells. In vitro studies using mouse MLE-15 epithelial cells showed that forskolin-mediated activation of Creb1 increased both Scd1 gene expression and protein synthesis. Additionally, MLE15 cells transfected with a dominant-negative ACreb vector blocked forskolin-mediated stimulation of Scd1 gene expression. Lipid profiling in MLE15 cells showed that dominant-negative ACreb suppressed forskolin-induced desaturation of ether linked lipids to produce plasmalogens, as well as levels of phosphatidylethanolamine, ceramide and lysophosphatidylcholine. Taken together these results demonstrate that Creb1 is essential for the induction and maintenance of Scd1 in developing fetal mouse lung epithelial cells.

  18. Best practices for transfusion for patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wun, Ted; Hassell, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The β-globin gene mutation in sickle cell anemia results in anemia and repeated bouts of vascular occlusion. The cumulative effect of these vasocclusive events is progressive damage to many organs including the kidneys, lungs, and brain. The transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) can ameliorate many of these complications, but can be associated with both acute and chronic complications, including iron overload. The objective of the Best Practices in Transfusion Medicine for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Conference was to review the available published evidence and clinical experience surrounding the use of RBC transfusions for sickle cell disease by a panel of experts. The expert panel developed explicit clinical guidelines for the use of RBC in SCD patients. The panel also made recommendations for further research. A set of guidelines were produced for dissemination to pertinent stakeholders. If implemented, these clinical pathways have the potential to optimize the use of red blood cell transfusions in SCD.

  19. Controlling sickle cell disease in Ghana - ethics and options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyerewaa Edwin, Ama; Edwin, Frank; Etwire, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a significant public health burden in Ghana. Recent studies indicate that 2% of Ghanaian newborns are affected by SCD; one in three Ghanaians has the hemoglobin S and/or C gene. As a means of controlling the disease, some authorities have recommended prenatal diagnosis (PND) and selective abortion. In the current era, SCD has a good prognosis and fairly reasonable quality of life. Advances in bone marrow transplantation have shown the disease is curable in selected patients. PND and selective abortion therefore raises a myriad of ethical dilemmas which are considered in this review. In the light of the demonstration of improved prognosis in recent times, PND and selective abortion appears to be applying capital punishment to the unborn child for “crimes” only the parents can be responsible for. In this review, we recommend control of SCD on three levels – preconception genetic testing and strategic reproductive choices, PND and education for carrier parents, and holistic management of persons with SCD. We emphasize the critical importance of self-management, especially self-awareness, in assuring a good quality of life for persons with SCD. We believe such an approach is cost-effective, and consistent with sound ethical principles and good conscience. PMID:22187596

  20. SICKLE CELL DISEASE: REAPPRAISAL OF THE ROLE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... SUMMARY. Background: Foetal haemoglobin has been implicated in the modulation of sickle cell crisis. Its level is gener- ally inversely proportional to the severity of sickle cell disease (SCD) for a given sickle cell phenotypes. The main aim of therapy for vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), which is the hallmark of ...

  1. Dynamics of von Willebrand factor reactivity in sickle cell disease during vaso-occlusive crisis and steady state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, J. W. R.; Schimmel, M.; Luken, B. M.; Nur, E.; Zeerleder, S. S.; van Tuijn, C. F. J.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Kopatz, W. F.; Urbanus, R. T.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Biemond, B. J.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endothelial activation plays a central role in the pathophysiology of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease (SCD), facilitating adhesive interactions with circulating blood cells. Upon activation, various adhesive molecules are expressed, including von Willebrand factor (VWF). Increased

  2. Hematological profile of sickle cell disease from South Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Shyam Rao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine hematological profile of sickle cell disease (SCD from Surat, South Gujarat, India. This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics and Sickle Cell Anemia Laboratory, Faculty of Pathology, Government Medical College, Surat, India, between July 2009 and December 2010. Patients included in this study were in their steady state for a long period of time without any symptoms related to SCD or other diseases which could affect the hematological parameters. Venous blood of all patients was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and hematological indices were measured. Thirty-three subjects homozygous in all were studied for their hematological parameters for sickle cell anemia. Moderate to severe anemia, low mean cell volume and high foetal hemoglobin dominate the hematological profile of SCD children.

  3. Child-rearing practices of primary caregivers of children with sickle cell disease: the perspective of professionals and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, R B; McKellop, J M; Vannatta, K; Kalinyak, K

    1998-04-01

    To obtain caregiver and medical professional opinions regarding the child-rearing practices of caregivers of children with sickle cell diseases (SCD). We obtained self-reports of parenting practices from 48 caregivers of children with SCD and 48 caregivers of matched classroom comparison peers using the Child-Rearing Practices Report (CRPR). CRPR ratings were also obtained from 12 experts in pediatric SCD regarding their predictions of how a parent of a child with SCD would respond. The experts predicted differences in protectiveness, discipline, and excessive worry. Objective interim and lifetime illness severity scores were obtained for the children with SCD. Caregivers showed similarity between the two groups, disagreement with the experts, and minimal relationship to illness severity. Experts who work with children with chronic illnesses such as SCD seem to have stereotyped ideas that do not correspond with parental reports of their child-rearing practices, suggesting the need for careful clinical evaluations.

  4. Fertility challenges for women with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafuri, Djamila L; Stimpson, Sarah-Jo; Day, Melissa E; James, Andra; DeBaun, Michael R; Sharma, Deva

    2017-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) represents one of the most common monogenic blood disorders worldwide, with an incidence of over 300,000 newborns affected per year. Reproductive challenges for men and women with SCD have been previously reviewed; however, evidence-based strategies to prevent and manage infertility and increase fecundity are lacking in women with SCD, which is one of the most important factors for quality of life. Areas covered: This review article summarizes the known risk factors for infertility, low fecundity, and premature menopause related to SCD. Expert commentary: Women with SCD have unique risk factors that may impact their ability to conceive, including chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, transfusion-related hemochromatosis, and ovarian sickling, causing ischemia and reperfusion injury to the ovary. Contraception is strongly recommended while on hydroxyurea therapy during reproductive years and discontinuing hydroxyurea for family planning and during pregnancy based on teratogenicity in animal studies. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the only curative therapy, sometimes involves conditioning regimens containing alkylating agents and total body irradiation that contribute to infertility and premature ovarian failure. Prior to HSCT or gene therapy, we strongly recommend referral to a reproductive endocrinologist to discuss fertility preservation and surrogacy options for all women with SCD.

  5. The Role of Blood Transfusion in the Management of Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). There is general lack of appreciation by clinicians, of the sub-optimal or frankly harmful effects, of inappropriate transfusion in SCD. This article discusses the relevant pathophysiology of sickle cell ...

  6. Prevalence and burden of Sickle Cell Disease among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common form of haemoglobin opathy in Nigeria but there is paucity of data for its effects on undergraduate students in universities despite the fact that this population of people suffer more burdens of the disease due to relative lack of parental care and their recently ...

  7. Attitudes toward Management of Sickle Cell Disease and Its Complications: A National Survey of Academic Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arch G. Mainous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disease that requires a significant degree of medical intervention, and family physicians are one potential provider of care for patients who do not have access to specialists. The extent to which family physicians are comfortable with the treatment of and concerned about potential complications of SCD among their patients is unclear. Our purpose was to examine family physician’s attitudes toward SCD management. Methods. Data was collected as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA survey in the United States and Canada that targeted family physicians who were members of CERA-affiliated organizations. We examined attitudes regarding management of SCD. Results. Overall, 20.4% of respondents felt comfortable with treatment of SCD. There were significant differences in comfort level for treatment of SCD patients depending on whether or not physicians had patients who had SCD, as well as physicians who had more than 10% African American patients. Physicians also felt that clinical decision support (CDS tools would be useful for treatment (69.4% and avoiding complications (72.6% in managing SCD patients. Conclusions. Family physicians are generally uncomfortable with managing SCD patients and recognize the utility of CDS tools in managing patients.

  8. DIFFERENCES IN HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE RECEIVING HYDROXYUREA

    OpenAIRE

    Thornburg, Courtney D.; Calatroni, Agustin; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a safe and efficacious medication for children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our objective was to compare health related quality of life (HRQL) between children taking hydroxyurea and those not taking hydroxyurea. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children with SCD who had completed the PedsQL 4.0 at Duke University Medical Center or the Midwest Sickle Cell Center. Our primary outcome was HRQL in children receiving hydroxyurea therapy compared to those not receivin...

  9. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  10. Health policy for sickle cell disease in Africa: experience from Tanzania on interventions to reduce under-five mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratias; Rwezaula, Stella; Krag, Marlene; Mghamba, Janneth; Ramaiya, Kaushik; Cox, Sharon E; Grosse, Scott D

    2015-02-01

    Tanzania has made considerable progress towards reducing childhood mortality, achieving a 57% decrease between 1980 and 2011. This epidemiological transition will cause a reduction in the contribution of infectious diseases to childhood mortality and increase in contribution from non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Haemoglobinopathies are amongst the most common childhood NCDs, with sickle cell disease (SCD) being the commonest haemoglobinopathy in Africa. In Tanzania, 10,313 children with SCD under 5 years of age (U5) are estimated to die every year, contributing an estimated 7% of overall deaths in U5 children. Key policies that governments in Africa are able to implement would reduce mortality in SCD, focusing on newborn screening and comprehensive SCD care programmes. Such programmes would ensure that interventions such as prevention of infections using penicillin plus prompt diagnosis and treatment of complications are provided to all individuals with SCD. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children With Sickle Cell Disease Referred for an Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquazzino, Melissa A; Miller, Meghan; Myrvik, Matthew; Newby, Robert; Scott, John Paul

    2017-07-01

    Neuropsychological deficits, including difficulties with attention, are well described in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Very little is known about attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with SCD. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of ADHD in children with SCD referred for neuropsychological evaluation. This prospective, cross-sectional study included patients (age, 4 to 18 y) with SCD and completion of a neuropsychological evaluation between December 2013 and March 2016. Patients were referred for neuropsychological evaluation because of concern regarding school performance, development, and/or behavior. The diagnosis of ADHD was made by a neuropsychologist on the basis of the diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual-Fourth or Fifth Editions. ADHD medication usage rate was obtained by medical record review. Of the 89 patients with SCD referred for neuropsychological evaluation, 25% (95% confidence interval, 16%-35%) met diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Only 21% of the patients with SCD and ADHD were prescribed an ADHD medication. Our study supports routine ADHD screening in children with SCD who have poor school performance or behavioral concerns. Despite the benefits of pharmacologic treatment, the majority of patients with SCD and ADHD did not receive a medication for management of their ADHD.

  12. Caregiver Perspectives of Stigma Associated With Sickle Cell Disease in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Kimberly M; Zhao, Mimi; Carroll, Yvonne; Porter, Jerlym S

    2016-01-01

    Patients and families affected by various medical conditions report experiencing health-related stigma, which contributes to detrimental physical, psychological, and social outcomes. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that affects 89,000 individuals in the United States and is often associated with negative stereotypes and incorrect assumptions. The present study explored the perception of stigma as reported by caregivers of adolescents with SCD. Focus groups were conducted with 20 caregivers of patients with SCD. Focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were coded independently by two authors, and then reviewed conjointly until consensus was reached. Caregivers reported the perception of stigma in academic, medical, community, and family settings. They also reported internalized stigma including negative feelings toward having a child with SCD, feeling upset with others, and seeing negative emotions in their child due to SCD. Caregivers reported a general lack of knowledge about SCD across settings. These results demonstrated that stigma may affect individuals with SCD across multiple settings. These results also highlighted areas for intervention, with a focus on increasing communication and education toward medical providers, schools, and communities. Interventions can utilize technology, social media, and advertisement campaigns. Additionally, support groups for patients with SCD may help decrease stigma and validate patients' experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydroxyurea in Pediatric Patients With Sickle Cell Disease: What Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Allison L

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited disorder in which sickled red blood cells occlude the small vessels of the body, reducing oxygen delivery to tissues and ultimately negatively affecting many of the body's major organs. Hydroxyurea has proven beneficial in the treatment of SCD and prevention of disease-related complications. The 2014 guidelines put forth by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend hydroxyurea treatment in infants 9 months and older, children, and adolescents with SCD-SS or SCD-Sβ(0) thalassemia regardless of clinical severity. This is a change from the 2002 guidelines in which hydroxyurea was recommended for adolescents and children with SCD-SS or SCD-Sβ(0) thalassemia with frequent episodes of pain, a history of acute chest syndrome, severe and symptomatic anemia or other severe vaso-occlusive events. Nurses play a critical role in working with patients and families to provide education, guidance, and support to improve compliance to mitigate the long-term effects of SCD. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  14. Controlling sickle cell disease in Ghana ethics and options

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-10-03

    Oct 3, 2011 ... Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) refers to a group of conditions characterized by ... reflects the interaction between individual biology and environmental factors. .... autonomy, genetic counseling should be non-directive; but is this realistic? .... The risks versus benefits of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion.

  15. Addiction or pseudoaddiction in sickle cell disease patients: Time to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this report is to highlight the background factors associated with opioid abuse among Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) patients. Patients: Eleven patients aged 13-53 years (mean, 26.1yrs) which included six female and five male were seen in the last six year at a tertiary health facility. The modes of ...

  16. Sickle cell disease clinical phenotypes in children from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-20

    Jul 20, 2014 ... Background:The clinical phenotypes of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are poorly described in many sub-Saharan countries ..... World Health Organization. ... apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA59/A59_9‑en.pdf.

  17. Perceptions about Sickle Cell Disease and its Prevention among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceptions about Sickle Cell Disease and its Prevention among ... Methods Three hundred undergraduate students from Bayero University Kano and Federal ... about SCD prevention to youths in schools and through other media; as well as strengthen prenatal screening and premarital counseling and testing services.

  18. PYOMYOSITIS IN SICKLE-CELL DISEASE - AN UNEXPECTED DIAGNOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMID, WM; BREUKELMAN, F; KONINGS, JG; DAENEN, S

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of muscle, leading to abscess formation. Pyomyositis is frequent in tropical areas but uncommon in areas with a temperate climate [4]; therefore, diagnosis can be difficult and can be delayed [6]. Sickle cell disease (SCD) can be complicated by vascular occlusion

  19. Sickle cell disease in Sierra Leone: a neglected problem | Roberts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleven (2.4%) were Sickle Cell-HbC disease, median age 14 years. Patients demonstrated many of the typical features of SCD. The most common reason for hospital admission was bone pain crisis associated with an infection, followed by severe anemia. Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head, leg ulcers, septic osteomyelitis ...

  20. Large and medium-sized pulmonary artery obstruction does not play a role of primary importance in the etiology of sickle-cell disease-associated pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, Eduard J.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; Mac Gillavry, Melvin R.; van Tuijn, Charlotte F. J.; van Esser, Joost W. J.; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Kappers-Klunne, Mies C.; Duits, Ashley J.; Biemond, Bart J.; Schnog, John-John B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) occurs in approximately 30% of adult patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and is a risk factor for early death. The potential role of pulmonary artery obstruction, whether due to emboli or in situ thrombosis, in the etiology of SCD-related PHT is unknown.

  1. Secondhand Smoke Is an Important Modifiable Risk Factor in Sickle Cell Disease: A Review of the Current Literature and Areas for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Christy Sadreameli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is an autosomal recessive hemoglobinopathy that causes significant morbidity and mortality related to chronic hemolytic anemia, vaso-occlusion, and resultant end-organ damage. Tobacco smoke exposure (TSE through secondhand smoke exposure in people with SCD of all ages and through primary smoking in adolescents and adults is associated with significantly increased morbidity, with increased rates of emergency department visits and hospitalizations for painful vaso-occlusive crises and acute chest syndrome (ACS. Secondhand smoke is also associated with pulmonary function abnormalities in children with SCD who are already at risk for pulmonary function abnormalities on the basis of SCD. TSE is emerging as one of the few modifiable risk factors of SCD. This review discusses the current state of the evidence with respect to TSE and SCD morbidity, discusses potential mechanisms, and highlights current gaps in the evidence and future research directions.

  2. Microfluidics for investigating vaso-occlusions in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Renita E

    2017-07-01

    SCD stems from amutation in the beta globin gene. Upon deoxygenation, hemoglobin polymerizes and triggers RBC remodeling. This phenomenon is central to SCD pathogenesis as individuals suffering from the disease are plagued by painful vaso-occlusive crises episodes. These episodes are the result of a combination of processes including inflammation, thrombosis, and blood cell adhesion to the vascular wall which leads to blockages within the vasculature termed vaso-occlusions. Vaso-occlusive episodes deprive tissues of oxygen and are a major contributor to SCD-related complications; unfortunately, the complex mechanisms that contribute to vaso-occlusions are not well understood. Vaso-occlusions can occur in post-capillary venules; hence, the microvasculature is a prime target for SCD therapies. Traditional in vitro systems poorly recapitulate architectural and dynamic flow properties of in vivo systems. However, microfluidic devices can capture features of the native vasculature such as cellular composition, flow, geometry, and ECM presentation. This review, although not comprehensive, highlights microfluidic approaches that aim to improve our current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms surrounding SCD. Microfluidic platforms can aid in identifying factors that may contribute to disease severity and can serve as suitable test beds for novel treatment strategies which may improve patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cerebro vascular accident in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.; Lodhi, M.A.; Khan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by the presence of sickle shaped erythrocytes in the blood. It can cause stroke in around 10% of children. Repeated blood transfusions are often used in an attempt to dilute blood thus reducing the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke. We report a case of an 11 years old girl, known patient of sickle cell disease, who did not follow regular blood transfusion protocol and as a result presented with recurrent stroke. (author)

  4. Epidemiology and treatment of relative anemia in children with sickle cell disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Manga, Halima; DeBaun, Michael R; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy in the world, with the majority of cases in sub-Saharan Africa. Concomitant nutritional deficiencies, infections or exposure to environmental toxins exacerbate chronic anemia in children with SCD. The resulting relative anemia is associated with increased risk of strokes, poor cognitive function and impaired growth. It may also attenuate optimal response to hydroxyurea therapy, the only effective and practical treatment option for SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will focus on the epidemiology, clinical sequelae, and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD living in low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Areas covered: The causes and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. The MEDLINE database was searched using medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords for articles regarding relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. Expert commentary: Anemia due to nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases such as helminthiasis and malaria are prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Their co-existence in children with SCD increases morbidity and mortality. Therefore, preventing, diagnosing and treating the underlying cause of this relative anemia will improve SCD-related outcomes in children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Oswaldo L.; Machado, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  6. Perioperative Management of Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjepong, Kwame Ofori; Otegbeye, Folashade; Adjepong, Yaw Amoateng

    2018-01-01

    Over 30 million people worldwide have sickle cell disease (SCD). Emergent and non-emergent surgical procedures in SCD have been associated with relatively increased risks of peri-operative mortality, vaso-occlusive (painful) crisis, acute chest syndrome, post-operative infections, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular accident and acute kidney injury. Pre-operative assessment must include a careful review of the patient's known crisis triggers, baseline hematologic profile, usual transfusion requirements, pre-existing organ dysfunction and opioid use. Use of preoperative blood transfusions should be selective and decisions individualized based on the baseline hemoglobin, surgical procedure and anticipated volume of blood loss. Intra- and post-operative management should focus on minimizing hypoxia, hypothermia, acidosis, and intravascular volume depletion. Pre- and post-operative incentive spirometry use should be encouraged.

  7. Information Exploration System for Sickle Cell Disease and Repurposing of Hydroxyfasudil

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2013-06-10

    Background:Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a fatal monogenic disorder with no effective cure and thus high rates of morbidity and sequelae. Efforts toward discovery of disease modifying drugs and curative strategies can be augmented by leveraging the plethora of information contained in available biomedical literature. To facilitate research in this direction we have developed a resource, Dragon Exploration System for Sickle Cell Disease (DESSCD) (http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/desscd/) that aims to promote the easy exploration of SCD-related data.Description:The Dragon Exploration System (DES), developed based on text mining and complemented by data mining, processed 419,612 MEDLINE abstracts retrieved from a PubMed query using SCD-related keywords. The processed SCD-related data has been made available via the DESSCD web query interface that enables: a/information retrieval using specified concepts, keywords and phrases, and b/the generation of inferred association networks and hypotheses. The usefulness of the system is demonstrated by: a/reproducing a known scientific fact, the "Sickle_Cell_Anemia-Hydroxyurea" association, and b/generating novel and plausible "Sickle_Cell_Anemia-Hydroxyfasudil" hypothesis. A PCT patent (PCT/US12/55042) has been filed for the latter drug repurposing for SCD treatment.Conclusion:We developed the DESSCD resource dedicated to exploration of text-mined and data-mined information about SCD. No similar SCD-related resource exists. Thus, we anticipate that DESSCD will serve as a valuable tool for physicians and researchers interested in SCD. © 2013 Essack et al.

  8. Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Patients Post Caesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent painful crisis. Pregnant women who are affected are known to have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Acute chest syndrome (ACS is an uncommon but serious complication in pregnant women with SCD that can lead to death. We present two cases of patients with SCD, both of whom had severe ACS within 24 hours post Caesarean section. By accurate diagnosis and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team, both mothers and fetuses had excellent outcomes. It is suggested that prompt recognition of ACS in a pregnant woman with SCD and collaborative medical and obstetric management are essential to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  9. Newborn blood spot screening for sickle cell disease by using tandem mass spectrometry: implementation of a protocol to identify only the disease states of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, Stuart J; Rees, Derek; King, Lawrence; Ifederu, Adeboye; Harvey, Katie; Hall, Kate; Lloyd, Geoff; Morrell, Christine; Hillier, Sharon

    2014-02-01

    The currently recommended technologies of HPLC and isoelectric focusing for newborn blood spot screening for sickle cell disease (SCD) identify both the disease and carrier states, resulting in large numbers of infants being followed up unnecessarily. Analysis of blood spot tryptic peptides performed by using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is an alternative technology to detect hemoglobin (Hb) variant disorders. We analyzed 2154 residual newborn blood spots and 675 newborn blood spots from infants with Hb variants by using MS/MS after trypsin digestion. Screening cutoffs were developed by using the ratio between the variant peptide-to-wild-type peptide abundance for HbS, C, D(Punjab), O(Arab), Lepore, and E peptides. A postanalytical data analysis protocol was developed using these cutoffs to detect only the disease states of SCD and not to identify carrier states. A parallel study of 13 249 newborn blood spots from a high-prevalence SCD area were analyzed by both MS/MS and HPLC. Screening cutoffs developed distinguished the infants with the disease states of SCD, infants who were carriers of SCD, and infants with normal Hb. In the parallel study no false-negative results were identified, and all clinically relevant cases were correctly identified using the MS/MS protocol. Unblinding the data revealed a total of 328 carrier infants that were successfully excluded by the protocol. The screening protocol developed correctly identified infants with the disease states of SCD. Furthermore, large numbers of sickle cell carrier infants were successfully not identified, thereby avoiding unnecessary follow-up testing and referral for genetic counseling.

  10. Hydroxyurea therapy contributes to infertility in adult men with sickle cell disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Hydroxyurea therapy, a chemotherapeutic agent, is the only US FDA approved therapy for the prevention of vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell disease (SCD). The National Institutes of Health has sponsored two Phase III randomized, placebo-controlled trials, initially in adults, and subsequently in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the overwhelming evidence that hydroxyurea therapy is beneficial to children and adults with SCA, individuals with SCA and their families express reservations about its use, in part because of the concerns about fertility, particularly in men. As adolescent boys with SCD are now expected to reach their reproductive years, a new concern is emerging about the role of hydroxyurea therapy as a barrier to their progeny. This review will systemically evaluate compromised fertility in men with SCD, and the evidence that hydroxyurea therapy is associated with further decreasing fertility in men with SCD.

  11. Myocardial SPECT in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunoury, C.; Hallaj, I.; Barritault, L.; Acar, P.; Montalembert, M. de

    2002-01-01

    Aim: While cerebral and bones strokes are well documented in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), impairment of myocardial perfusion is an unknown complication. Conventional techniques such as exercise testing and echocardiography have a low sensitivity and specificity to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with SCD. The aim of this prospective study was to assess myocardial perfusion with 201 Tl SPECT in children with SCD. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients, aged 12 ± 4 years, were included. Myocardial perfusion was assessed by 201 Tl SPECT after stress and 3 hours later after reinjection on a single head gammacamera equipped with a LEAP collimator (64x64 matrix size format, 30 projections over 180 0 , 30 seconds per step). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed by equilibrium radionuclide angiography at rest on the same day. Results: Myocardial perfusion was impaired in 13/22 patients: 8 had reversible defects and 5 had fixed defects. The left ventricular cavity was dilated in 13/22 patients. The mean LVEF was 63 ± 9%. There was no relationship between myocardial perfusion and left ventricular dilation or function. Conclusion: Myocardial perfusion is frequently impaired in children with SCD. Treatment with hydroxyurea should be considered in SCD patients with perfusion defects

  12. Sickle cell disease: time for a targeted neonatal screening programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, C

    2015-02-01

    Ireland has seen a steady increase in paediatric sickle cell disease (SCD). In 2005, only 25% of children with SCD were referred to the haemoglobinopathy service in their first year. A non-funded screening programme was implemented. This review aimed to assess the impact screening has had. All children referred to the haemoglobinopathy service born in Ireland after 2005 were identified. Data was collected from the medical chart and laboratory system. Information was analysed using Microsoft Excel. 77 children with SCD were identified. The median age at antibiotic commencement in the screened group was 56 days compared with 447 days in the unscreened group, p = < 0.0003. 22 (28%) of infants were born in centre\\'s that do not screen and 17 (81%) were over 6 months old at referral, compared with 14 (21%) in the screened group. 6 (27%) of those in the unscreened group presented in acute crisis compared with 2 (3%) in the screened population. The point prevalence of SCD in Ireland is 0.2% in children under 15 yr of African and Asian descent. We identified delays in referral and treatment, which reflect the lack of government funded support and policy. We suggest all maternity units commence screening for newborns at risk of SCD. It is a cost effective intervention with a number needed to screen of just 4 to prevent a potentially fatal crisis.

  13. Role of the Hemostatic System on SCD Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaz, Zahra; Wun, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Recent studies suggest that sickle cell disease is a hypercoagulable state contributing to the vaso-occlusive events in microcirculation resulting in acute and chronic sickle cell related organ damage. In this article, we will review the existing evidence for contribution of hemostatic system perturbation to sickle cell disease pathophysiology. We will also review the data showing increased risk of thromboembolic events, particularly newer information on the incidence of VTE. Finally, the potential role of platelet inhibitors and anticoagulants in SCD will be briefly reviewed. PMID:24589271

  14. Double disadvantage: a case control study on health-related quality of life in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heijboer Harriët

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low health-related quality of life (HRQoL of children with sickle cell disease (SCD may be associated with consequences of the disease, or with the low socio-economic status (SES of this patient population. The aim of this study was to investigate the HRQoL of children with SCD, controlling for SES by comparing them to healthy siblings (matched for age and gender, and to a Dutch norm population. Methods The HRQoL of 40 children with homozygous SCD and 36 healthy siblings was evaluated by the KIDSCREEN-52. This self-report questionnaire assesses ten domains of HRQoL. Differences between children with SCD and healthy siblings were analyzed using linear mixed models. One-sample t-tests were used to analyze differences with the Dutch norm population. Furthermore, the proportion of children with SCD with impaired HRQoL was evaluated. Results In general, the HRQoL of children with SCD appeared comparable to the HRQoL of healthy siblings, while children with SCD had worse HRQoL than the Dutch norm population on five domains (Physical Well-being, Moods & Emotions, Autonomy, Parent Relation, and Financial Resources. Healthy siblings had worse HRQoL than the Dutch norm population on three domains (Moods & Emotions, Parent Relation, and Financial Resources. More than one in three children with SCD and healthy siblings had impaired HRQoL on several domains. Conclusion These findings imply that reduced HRQoL in children with SCD is mainly related to the low SES of this patient population, with the exception of disease specific effects on the physical and autonomy domain. We conclude that children with SCD are especially vulnerable compared to other patient populations, and have special health care needs.

  15. Pain management in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer; Naser, Basem

    2003-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited diseases worldwide. The disease is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, as well as acute and chronic complications. One of the most intractable problems encountered by children with SCD is the painful episode that results from tissue ischemia due to vaso-occlusion. Pain related to SCD is unique among pain syndromes due to the unpredictable, recurrent, and often persistent nature of the disease, as well as the recurring and essential need for the use of opioids. Painful vaso-occlusive episodes (VOE) are a principal cause of morbidity and account for a significant number of emergency department and hospital admissions. When untreated or inadequately managed, the pain of VOE may cause both short- and long-term consequences. Despite the fact that pain is an almost universal feature of the disease, children with SCD may form one of the most undertreated and understudied populations. One of the factors contributing to poor pain management is conflicting perceptions between patients, their families, and healthcare professionals about pain that is reported and analgesia that is required. Pain management guidelines have recently been published in an effort to overcome barriers in the assessment and management of pain related to SCD. Although there is considerable variability in the way SCD pain is managed, the standard treatment protocol for painful episodes has been rest, rehydration, and analgesia. However, pain control for children with SCD is often a difficult and complex process, and one that requires frequent systematic pain assessments and continuous adjustment of comfort measures, especially analgesics. There are a variety of analgesic agents to choose from, such as acetaminophen (paracetamol), oral or parenteral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and oral or parenteral opioids. Each of these options has advantages and disadvantages to their use. Continuous infusions of analgesics and patient

  16. Sickle Cell Disease and Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may need special care throughout his life. What causes SCD? SCD is inherited. This means it’s passed from parent to child through genes. A gene is a part of your body’s cells that stores instructions for the way your body grows and works. Genes come in pairs—you get one of ...

  17. Autopsy findings and pattern of mortality in Nigerian sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has a high mortality rate in the environment where we practice. There is lack of contemporal autopsy studies describing causes of death among SCD patients at our centre. Methods: This is a retrospective study of SCD patients who died between January 1991 and December 2008 ...

  18. The macrophage low-grade inflammation marker sCD163 is modulated by exogenous sex steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Møller, Holger Jon; Trolle, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is a novel marker linked to states of low grade inflammation such as diabetes, obesity, liver disease and atherosclerosis, all prevalent in subjects with Turner and Klinefelter Syndromes. We aimed to assess the levels of sCD163 and the regulation of sCD163 in regards...

  19. Enhanced parenting knowledge and skills in mothers of preschool children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, W B; Armstrong, F D; Pegelow, C H; Routh, D K

    1993-10-01

    Compared 25 preschool children with sickle cell disease (SCD) to demographically matched healthy comparison children on maternal reports of child-rearing beliefs and practices and maternal and child behaviors related to social adjustment. Mothers of children with SCD possessed significantly more knowledge of appropriate discipline techniques. The groups did not differ on maternal reports of socially relevant child behavior. However, when mother-child interactions were observed in free play and structured play settings, mothers of children with SCD treated their children as competent significantly more, and treated their children as incompetent significantly less, than comparison mothers. Mothers of children with SCD also used significantly more reinforcement during the final toy pick-up condition. There were no observed differences between groups in the children's behavior.

  20. Religious coping and the use of prayer in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sian; Grossoehme, Daniel; McGrady, Meghan E

    2012-02-01

    While adolescents and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) have reported using religion to cope with SCD, there is no data examining religious coping in young children with SCD. The purpose of this qualitative study was to: (1) describe the types of religious coping used by children with SCD; (2) describe the content and frequency of prayer used in relation to SCD; and (3) examine how children viewed God/Higher Power in relation to their SCD. Children with SCD participated in a semi-structured interview and an art drawing exercise focused on the use of general coping and religious coping. Interviews were coded, organized, and analyzed using a template organizational style of interpretation and NVivo 8.0 qualitative software. Of the 19 participants, the average age was 8.05 years (SD ±1.81); 11 were female (58%); all (100%) were African-American and 9 (47%) were Protestant. Children used religion to gain control, make meaning, and find comfort. Most children reported praying to get well, to keep from getting sick, and to get out of the hospital. Children described a functional God who made them take their medicine or took them to the hospital and an emotional God who made them happy and comforted them when they were sad or scared. These children with SCD reported using religion to help cope with the illness. Providers should be aware of the importance of religion to many of these children and integrate religion, as appropriate, into discussions about coping with SCD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Towards safer surgery in patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has been associated with high morbidity and mortality. In recent years, a marked improvement in the safety of surgery and anesthesia in this high-risk group of patients has been witnessed; owing to the improvements in surgical and anesthetic care, greater awareness of pathophysiology of disease, proper perioperative preparation and attention to factors predisposing to vasoocclusive crises. However, this is not paralleled by similar improvement in countries where the disease is not prevalent. Greater population mobility in recent years makes recognition of surgical manifestations of the disease and awareness of perioperative management of sickle cell patients undergoing surgical interventions of paramount importance. This article aims to summarize steps towards safer surgery in patients with SCD. (author)

  2. Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Case Presentations and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Razdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD are at increased risk for stroke, the underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Intracardiac shunting via a patent foramen ovale (PFO is associated with cryptogenic stroke in individuals without SCD. Recent evidence suggests that PFOs are associated with stroke in children with SCD, although the role of PFOs in adults with stroke and SCD is unknown. Here, we report 2 young adults with SCD, stroke, and PFOs. The first patient had hemoglobin SC and presented with a transient ischemic attack and a subsequent ischemic stroke. There was no evidence of cerebral vascular disease on imaging studies and the PFO was closed. The second patient had hemoglobin SS and two acute ischemic strokes. She had cerebral vascular disease with moyamoya in addition to a peripheral deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Chronic transfusion therapy was recommended, and the DVT was managed with warfarin. The PFO was not closed, and the patients' neurologic symptoms were stabilized. We review the literature on PFOs and stroke in SCD. Our cases and the literature review illustrate the dire need for further research to evaluate PFO as a potential risk factor for stroke in adults with SCD.

  3. Iron deposition in cranial bone marrow with sickle cell disease: MR assessment using a fat suppression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.; Humbert, J.H.; Kogutt, M.S.; Robinson, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing transfusion therapy and 8 control patients were examined by magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate bone marrow change due to iron deposition from hematologic marrow hyperplasia. Using T1-weighted spin echo images, only two subjects showed extremely low signal intensity marrow compatible with iron deposition. However, using T2-weighted fast spin echo images with fat suppression, cranial bone marrow in SCD patients with transfusion therapy showed considerably lower signal than that of controls. The main cause of marrow signal decrease in SCD patients with transfusion therapy was considered to be iron deposition due to repeated transfusion therapy rather than red marrow hyperplasia. (orig.)

  4. Sickle cell disease in childhood in Madina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawasawi, Zakaria M.; Nabi, G.; Al-Magamci, M.S.F.; Awad, Khalid S.

    1998-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common disease in Saudi Arabia, with ahigh prevalence in the Eastern and Southern regions. This study reports on 53cases of SCD encountered in the Madina area. In a retrospective study of 6000pediatric patients, 53 children (0.88%) with sickle cell disease wereadmitted in the Maternity and Children's Hospital Madina, between November1990 and October 1991. Of these, 39 patients (73.58%) were Saudis and 14(26.41%) were non-Saudis. Thirty-six patients were homozygous SS and 17 weresickle thalassemic. The main causes of admission were vaso-occlusive crisis(77.35%), infection (67.92%), acute chest syndrome (22.64%), anemia (12.6%)and cerebrovascular accident (9.43%). The lowest and highest age groupsrecorded in this study were six months and 12 years, respectively. About 70%of patients are still being followed-up, and none of the patients has died.This disease is one of the major causes of morbidity in this region of SaudiArabia. Measures required include neonatal screening programs for the earlydetection of the disease as well as research into new drugs to counter thedisease. (author)

  5. Thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in adults with homozygous sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhadi, Loubna; Calvet, David; Rosso, Charlotte; Bartolucci, Pablo

    2017-07-28

    Stroke is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD). A specific large-vessel vasculopathy is often responsible for both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes in patients with SCD. Although intravenous thrombolysis has been considered as a therapeutic option for acute ischaemic strokes in SCD, its use remains debated because of an increased risk of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage reported in this disease. This risk of haemorrhage is mainly supported by the presence of a Moyamoya syndrome often associated with the specific vasculopathy in patients with homozygous SCD. We report two cases of patients with homozygous SCD treated with intravenous thrombolysis for an acute ischaemic stroke without haemorrhagic transformation. Our cases suggest that reperfusion strategy in acute ischaemic stroke in patients with homozygous SCD can be considered once associated Moyamoya syndrome has been ruled out. An international registry would be of interest as these situations are rare. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Clinical Interpretation of Quantitative Sensory Testing as a Measure of Pain Sensitivity in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) display significantly lower mean/median thermal and mechanical pain thresholds compared to controls. This suggests impaired pain sensitivity where stimuli produce exaggerated pain. Despite these mean/median differences, clinicians need to understand if patients meet criteria for impaired pain sensitivity. We defined thresholds for impaired cold, heat, and mechanical pain sensitivity in SCD patients. Using quantitative sensory testing (QST) we assessed c...

  7. Turf wars: exploring splenomegaly in sickle cell disease in malaria-endemic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubman, Venée N; Makani, Julie

    2017-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of recessively inherited disorders of erythrocyte function that presents an ongoing threat to reducing childhood and adult morbidity and mortality around the world. While decades of research have led to improved survival for SCD patients in wealthy countries, survival remains dismal in low- and middle-income countries. Much of the early mortality associated with SCD is attributed to increased risk of infections due to early loss of splenic function. In the West, bacterial infections with encapsulated organisms are a primary concern. In sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of infants with SCD are born, the same is true. However malaria presents an additional threat to survival. The search for factors that define variability in sickle cell phenotypes should include environmental modifiers, such as malaria. Further exploration of this relationship could lead to novel strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality attributable to infections. In this review, we explore the interactions between SCD, malaria and the spleen to better understand how splenomegaly and splenic (dys)function may co-exist in patients with SCD living in malaria-endemic areas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ravi R; Martin, Sarah R; Evans, Subhadra; Lung, Kirsten; Coates, Thomas D; Zeltzer, Lonnie K; Tsao, Jennie C

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the “hallmark” of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown. The current study assessed the effects of hypnosis on peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity in adults with and without SCD. Subjects and methods Fourteen patients with SCD and 14 healthy controls were included. Participants underwent three laboratory pain tasks before and during a 30-minute hypnosis session. Peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity before and during hypnosis were examined. Results A single 30-minute hypnosis session decreased pain intensity by a moderate amount in patients with SCD. Pain threshold and tolerance increased following hypnosis in the control group, but not in patients with SCD. Patients with SCD exhibited lower baseline peripheral blood flow and a greater increase in blood flow following hypnosis than controls. Conclusion Given that peripheral vasoconstriction plays a role in the development of VOC, current findings provide support for further laboratory and clinical investigations of the effects of cognitive–behavioral neuromodulatory interventions on pain responses and peripheral vascular flow in patients with SCD. Current results suggest that hypnosis may increase peripheral vasodilation during both the anticipation and experience of pain in patients with SCD. These findings indicate a need for further examination of the effects of hypnosis on pain and vascular responses utilizing a randomized

  9. Disease severity and slower psychomotor speed in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Dana R; Metti, Andrea; Butters, Meryl A; Mettenburg, Joseph M; Rosano, Caterina; Novelli, Enrico M

    2017-09-26

    Psychomotor slowing is common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little is known about its severity in adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify psychomotor speed, measured with the digit symbol substitution test (DSST), in relationship with disease severity in adults with SCD attending an outpatient clinic (n = 88, age 36.3 years). Genotype was used to group patients in "severe" (homozygous for hemoglobin S or compound heterozygous with β 0 thalassemia) or "moderate" groups (compound heterozygous for HbS, with either HbC or β + thalassemia). Analyses were repeated after exclusion of patients with a history of stroke (n = 11). Mild impairment in processing speed was detectable in both the "severe" and the "moderate" group (30% and 9%, respectively; age-adjusted P = .14). Compared with the "moderate" group, those in the "severe" group had significantly lower standardized DSST scores ( P = .004), independent of adjustment for factors that differed between the groups: hemoglobin, ferritin, hydroxyurea use, blood pressure parameters, and stroke history. Results were similar after excluding patients with stroke. Psychomotor slowing in SCD differs in relationship to genotype; this difference appears unrelated to history of stroke or severity of anemia and other risk factors examined cross-sectionally. Although less prevalent, mild cognitive impairment was also detectable in patients with a less severe genotype. Longitudinal studies of SCD should include all diseases genotypes and examine factors that would reduce the risk of slow processing speed and perhaps more general cognitive impairment in each subgroup.

  10. Increased theta band EEG power in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Case M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Case,1 Sina Shirinpour,1 Huishi Zhang,1 Yvonne H Datta,2 Stephen C Nelson,3 Karim T Sadak,4 Kalpna Gupta,2 Bin He1,5 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 3Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 4Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Pain is a major issue in the care of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The mechanisms behind pain and the best way to treat it are not well understood. We studied how electroencephalography (EEG is altered in SCD patients. Methods: We recruited 20 SCD patients and compared their resting state EEG to that of 14 healthy controls. EEG power was found across frequency bands using Welch’s method. Electrophysiological source imaging was assessed for each frequency band using the eLORETA algorithm. Results: SCD patients had increased theta power and decreased beta2 power compared to controls. Source localization revealed that areas of greater theta band activity were in areas related to pain processing. Imaging parameters were significantly correlated to emergency department visits, which indicate disease severity and chronic pain intensity. Conclusion: The present results support the pain mechanism referred to as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. This mechanism causes increased theta power in patients. Significance: Our findings show that EEG can be used to quantitatively evaluate differences between controls and SCD patients. Our results show the potential of EEG to differentiate between different levels of pain in an unbiased setting, where specific frequency bands could be used as biomarkers for chronic pain. Keywords: sickle cell disease, electroencephalography, chronic pain, electrophysiological source imaging, thalamocortical dysrhythmia

  11. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) enhances class switching to IgE and IgG4 in the presence of T cells via IL-9 and sCD23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannin, P; Delneste, Y; Lecoanet-Henchoz, S; Gretener, D; Bonnefoy, J Y

    1998-02-15

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a B-cell growth factor produced by both bone marrow stroma cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) located in primary lymphoid follicles and germinal centers. In this study, we have evaluated the role of IL-7 on human Ig class switching. IL-7 was added to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or tonsillar B cells in the absence or presence of IL-4 and/or anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (MoAb). Alone, IL-7 did not affect Ig production by PBMCs or by anti-CD40 MoAb-stimulated B cells. Rather, IL-7 potentiated IL-4-induced IgE and IgG4 production by PBMCs. In parallel, IgG3 production was also enhanced but to a lesser extent, whereas the production of the other isotypes was unaltered. The activity of IL-2, IL-9, or IL-15, which share usage of the common gamma chain for signaling, was also assessed. IL-9, like IL-7, potentiated mainly IgE and IgG4 production by IL-4-stimulated PBMCs. IL-15, in contrast, was ineffective, whereas IL-2 enhanced the production of all isotypes. More precisely, IL-7 potentiation of IgE and IgG4 production required the presence of T cells and was accompanied by an increase of the expression of two soluble molecules favoring preferentially IgE and IgG4 synthesis: CD23 (sCD23) and IL-9. Moreover, neutralizing anti-CD23 and anti-IL-9 antibodies partly inhibited the increase of IgE synthesis induced by IL-7. Thus, IL-7 produced locally in the germinal centers by FDCs may interact with T cells and potentiate human IgE and IgG4 switching by favoring IL-9 and sCD23 production.

  12. Associates of School Absenteeism in Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lisa A.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite high rates of school absenteeism in adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD), the issue remains understudied. Potential associates of school absenteeism in adolescents with SCD include demographic (age, income), psychosocial (IQ, self-efficacy, competence, internalizing symptoms, negative thinking), and health-related (hemoglobin, health-care utilization, pain, disease knowledge). Procedure Forty participants ages 12–18 completed measures of psychosocial functioning, IQ, and pain. Medical chart reviews identified other health-related variables. A subsample also completed an assessment of goals. Using school records, absenteeism was the percent of school days missed in the previous year. Correlations tested associates of absenteeism and linear regression tested a model of absenteeism. Results Participants missed an average of 12% of the school year and more than 35% missed at least 1 month of school. Health-related and psychosocial variables, but not demographic variables, correlated with absenteeism. Attendance at clinic appointments and parent-reported teen pain frequency were significant associates of absenteeism in the regression model. For those who completed goal assessment, over 40% of goals identified were academically focused. Absenteeism was positively related to current academic goals and health-related hindrance of academic goals, and negatively related to future-oriented academic goals. Conclusions School absenteeism is a significant problem for adolescents with SCD despite the presence of academic goals. Collaboration between schools, parents, patients, and providers to understand and manage the impact of SCD on school attendance is recommended. PMID:19006248

  13. Neurocognitive Deficits in Children With Sickle Cell Disease Are Associated With the Severity of Anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Channa T.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heijboer, Harriët; Peters, Marjolein; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Background. Although neurocognitive deficits in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) have been well documented, the etiology of these deficits has not been completely clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of laboratory markers of disease severity and radiological

  14. Psychosocial and pharmacological management of pain in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Nicholls, Elizabeth G; Daly, Brian P; Marsac, Meghan L; Tarazi, Reem; Deepti, Raybagkar

    2014-03-01

    For children with sickle cell disease (SCD), pain is associated with significant current and future morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, few evidence-based guidelines exist for the management of pain episodes in children with SCD. To inform empirically based treatment strategies for pain management in pediatric SCD, this review integrates and evaluates the extant literature on psychosocial and pharmacological approaches to the management of pain. Findings reveal a paucity of rigorous investigations of psychosocial and pharmacological pain management interventions in children with SCD. Psychosocial interventions included were primarily cognitive-behavioral in nature, whereas pharmacological approaches targeted non-opioid analgesics (ie, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids) and opioid medications (ie, morphine and oxycodone). However, to date there is not a "gold standard" for pain management among children with SCD. Because psychosocial and physiological processes each play a role in the etiology and experience of pain, effective pain management requires multidimensional, comprehensive treatment approaches. Considering the significant impact of pain on functional outcomes and quality of life among children with SCD, additional clinical trials are warranted to ensure that interventions are safe and efficacious.

  15. Symptomatic Avascular Necrosis: An Understudied Risk Factor for Acute Care Utilization by Patients with SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tiffany; Campbell, Timothy; Ciuffetelli, Isabella; Haywood, Carlton; Carroll, C. Patrick; Resar, Linda M.S.; Strouse, John J.; Lanzkron, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with high healthcare utilization rates and poor outcomes in a subset of patients, although the underlying factors that predict this phenotype are poorly understood. Prior studies suggest that comorbid avascular necrosis (AVN) contributes to high healthcare utilization. We sought to clarify whether AVN independently predicts acute care utilization in adults with SCD and to identify characteristics of those with AVN that predict higher utilization. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 87 patients with SCD with symptomatic AVN and compared acute care utilization and clinical characteristics with 87 sex- and age-matched patients with SCD without symptomatic AVN. Patients with ≥2 years of follow-up were included. Outcomes were compared using bivariate analysis and multivariate regression. Results Our study included 1381 follow-up years, with a median of 7 years per patient. The AVN cohort had greater median rates of urgent care visits (3.2/year vs 1.3/year; P = 0.0155), admissions (1.3/year vs 0.4/year; P = 0.0002), and admission days (5.1 days/year vs 1.8 days/year; P = 0.0007). History of high utilization (odds ratio [OR] 4.28; P = 0.001), acute chest syndrome (OR 3.12; P = 0.005), pneumonia (OR 3.20; P = 0.023), hydroxyurea therapy (OR 2.23; P = 0.0136), and long-term transfusion (OR 2.33; P = 0.014) were associated with AVN. In a median regression model, AVN, acute chest syndrome, and pneumonia were independently associated with greater urgent care visits and admissions. Conclusions Symptomatic AVN was found to be an independent risk factor for acute care utilization in patients with SCD. Because this is a potentially modifiable factor, further studies are urgently needed to determine whether AVN prevention/early treatment interventions will alter utilization and improve outcomes for patients with SCD. PMID:27598353

  16. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in children with sickle cell disease: results of conservative and operative treatments at skeletal maturity

    OpenAIRE

    Mallet, C.; Abitan, A.; Vidal, C.; Holvoet, L.; Mazda, K.; Simon, A.-L.; Ilharreborde, B.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common cause of femoral head osteonecrosis (ONFH) during childhood with an overall prevalence of 10%. In children, spontaneous revascularization can occur, as in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Consequently, the aim of treatment is to restore proper hip containment to prevent joint arthritis. This is the first study reporting long-term results at skeletal maturity of non-operative and surgical treatments for ONFH in SCD children. Methods All ...

  17. Implementation of Indigenous Electronic Medical Record System to Facilitate Care of Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Chhattisgarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Mona; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Soni, Khushboo; Patra, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is prevalent in central India including Chhattisgarh. Screening for SCD is being carried out by Government of Chhattisgarh. Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system was developed and implemented in two phases. Aim was to use informatics techniques and indigenously develop EMR system to improve the care of SCD patients in Chhattisgarh. EMR systems had to be developed to store and manage: i) huge data generated through state wide screening for SCD; ii) clinical data for SCD patients attending the outpatient department (OPD) of institute. 'State Wide Screening Data Interface' (SWSDI) was designed and implemented for storing and managing data generated through screening program. Further, 'Sickle Cell Patients Temporal Data Management System' (SCPTDMS) was developed and implemented for storing, managing and analysing sickle cell disease patients' data at OPD. Both systems were developed using VB.Net and MS SQL Server 2012. Till April 2015, SWSDI has data of 1294558 persons, out of which 121819 and 4087 persons are carriers and patients of sickle cell disease respectively. Similarly till June 2015, SCPTDMS has data of 3760 persons, of which 923 are sickle cell disease patients (SS) and 1355 are sickle cell carriers (AS). Both systems are proving to be useful in efficient storage, management and analysis of data for clinical and research purposes. The systems are an example of beneficial usage of medical informatics solutions for managing large data at community level.

  18. The role of the arginine metabolome in pain: implications for sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitya Bakshi,1–2 Claudia R Morris3–6 1Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Emory-Children’s Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 6Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the US, affecting approximately 100,000 individuals in the US and millions worldwide. Pain is the hallmark of SCD, and a subset of patients experience pain virtually all of the time. Of interest, the arginine metabolome is associated with several pain mechanisms highlighted in this review. Since SCD is an arginine deficiency syndrome, the contribution of the arginine metabolome to acute and chronic pain in SCD is a topic in need of further attention. Normal arginine metabolism is impaired in SCD through various mechanisms that contribute to endothelial dysfunction, vaso-occlusion, pulmonary complications, risk of leg ulcers, and early mortality. Arginine is a semiessential amino acid that serves as a substrate for protein synthesis and is the precursor to nitric oxide (NO, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, and agmatine. Since arginine is involved in multiple metabolic processes, a deficiency of this amino acid has the potential to disrupt many cellular and organ functions. NO is a potent vasodilator that is depleted in SCD and may contribute to vaso-occlusive pain. As the obligate substrate for NO production, arginine also plays a mechanistic role in SCD-related pain, although its

  19. Otoacoustic emission testing in Ghanaian children with sickle-cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegele, Josua; Hurth, Helene; Lackner, Peter; Enimil, Anthony; Sylverkin, Justice; Ansong, Daniel; Nkyi, Clara; Bonsu, Benedicta; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Schartinger, Volker H; Schmutzhard, Erich; Zorowka, Patrick; Kremsner, Peter; Schmutzhard, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate hearing loss in children as a complication of sickle-cell disease. In Kumasi, Ghana, 35 children with SCD aged 6 months to 10 years underwent transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions testing (TEOAE) to investigate the function of the inner ear. Healthy Ghanaian children recruited in school and kindergarten served as controls. One of 35 children with SCD and 13 of 115 control children failed the otoacoustic emissions testing. This difference between the control group and the children with SCD was not statistically significant. Early hearing impairment does not regularly occur in sickle-cell disease, and in children, it is not a likely cause of delayed or impaired language development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Best practices for transfusion for patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Wun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The beta-globin gene mutation in sickle cell anemia results in anemia and repeated bouts of vascular occlusion. The cumulative effect of these vasocclusive events is progressive damage to many organs including the kidneys, lungs, and brain. The transfusion of red blood cells (RBC can ameliorate many of these complications, but can be associated with both acute and chronic complications, including iron overload. The objective of the Best Practices in Transfusion Medicine for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD Conference was to review the available published evidence and clinical experience surrounding the use of RBC transfusions for sickle cell disease by a panel of experts. The expert panel developed explicit clinical guidelines for the use of RBC in SCD patients. The panel also made recommendations for further research.  A set of guidelines were produced for dissemination to pertinent stakeholders. If implemented, these clinical pathways have the potential to optimize the use of red blood cell transfusions in SCD.

  1. Impairment of myocardial perfusion in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunoury, C.; Acar, P.; Montalembert, M. de

    2003-01-01

    While brain, bone and spleen strokes are well documented in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), impairment of myocardial perfusion is an unknown complication. Non invasive techniques such as exercise testing and echocardiography have a low sensitivity to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with SCD. We have prospectively assessed myocardial perfusion with Tl-201 SPECT in 23 patients with SCD (10 female, 13 male, mean age 12 ± 5 years). Myocardial SPECT was performed after stress and 3 hours later after reinjection on a single head gamma camera equipped with a LEAP collimator (64 x 64 matrix size format, 30 projections over 180 deg C, 30 seconds per step). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed by equilibrium radionuclide angiography at rest on the same day. Myocardial perfusion was impaired in 14/23 patients: 9 reversible defects and 5 fixed defects. The left ventricular cavity was dilated in 14/23 patients. The mean LVEF was 63 ± 9%. There was no relationship between myocardial perfusion and left ventricular dilation or function. The frequent impairment of myocardial perfusion in children with SCD could lead to suggest a treatment with hydroxyurea, an improvement of perfusion can be noted with hydroxyurea. (author)

  2. Mantle Cell Hyperplasia of Peripheral Lymph Nodes as Initial Manifestation of Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monabbati, Ahmad; Noori, Sadat; Safaei, Akbar; Ramzi, Mani; Eghbali, Seyedsajjad; Adib, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a well known hemoglobinopathy with usual manifestations including anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and vasoocclusive complications. Despite presence of mild splenomegaly in early phase of the disease, lymphadenopathy is not an often finding of SCD. We introduce an undiagnosed case of SCD who presented in third decade of his life with multiple cervical lymphadenopathies and mild splenomegaly persistent for about five years. Histopathologic examination of the resected lymph nodes showed expansion of the mantle cell layers of secondary follicles as well as several monomorphic mantle cell nodules. To rule out possibility of a malignant process involving lymph nodes, an immunohistochemical panel was ordered which was in favor of benign mantle cell hyperplasia. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement study showed no clonal bands and confirmed benign nature of the process. Respecting mild abnormalities on Complete Blood Count, peripheral blood smear was reviewed revealing some typical sickle red blood cells as well as rare nucleated red blood cells. Solubility test for hemoglobin (HB) S was positive. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed diagnosis of homozygous HbS disease.

  3. Cellular, pharmacological, and biophysical evaluation of explanted lungs from a patient with sickle cell disease and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Natasha M; Yao, Mingyi; Sembrat, John; George, M Patricia; Knupp, Heather; Ross, Mark; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Milosevic, Jadranka; St Croix, Claudette; Rajkumar, Revathi; Frid, Maria G; Hunter, Kendall S; Mazzaro, Luciano; Novelli, Enrico M; Stenmark, Kurt R; Gladwin, Mark T; Ahmad, Ferhaan; Champion, Hunter C; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is recognized as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We now report benchtop phenotyping from the explanted lungs of the first successful lung transplant in SCD. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) cultured from the explanted lungs were analyzed for proliferate capacity, superoxide (O2 (•-)) production, and changes in key pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-associated molecules and compared with non-PAH PASMCs. Upregulation of several pathologic processes persisted in culture in SCD lung PASMCs in spite of cell passage. SCD lung PASMCs showed growth factor- and serum-independent proliferation, upregulation of matrix genes, and increased O2 (•-) production compared with control cells. Histologic analysis of SCD-associated PAH arteries demonstrated increased and ectopically located extracellular matrix deposition and degradation of elastin fibers. Biomechanical analysis of these vessels confirmed increased arterial stiffening and loss of elasticity. Functional analysis of distal fifth-order pulmonary arteries from these lungs demonstrated increased vasoconstriction to an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist and concurrent loss of both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vasodilation compared with normal pulmonary arteries. This is the first study to evaluate the molecular, cellular, functional, and mechanical changes in end-stage SCD-associated PAH.

  4. Malevolent ogbanje: recurrent reincarnation or sickle cell disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzewi, E

    2001-05-01

    The Igbo of Nigeria believe that everyone is ogbanje (reincarnates) but malevolent ogbanje differ from others in being revenge-driven, chronically ill and engaging in repeated cycles of birth, death and reincarnation. This study examined culturally defined symptoms of 100 children classified as malevolent ogbanje; and investigated their family history and child mortality experience. There was concordance between cultural descriptions of malevolent ogbanje and symptoms as manifested in sickle cell patients. Hemoglobin analysis showed that 70 of the 100 children had sickle cell disease (SCD); while 68 families had death-related names. The symptoms associated with Igbo cases of reincarnation, high child mortality rates, and the high prevalence of sickle cell disease among children classified as malevolent ogbanje all support the conclusion that the symptomatology and early mortality experience are related to sickle cell. Names with themes of death were prevalent in families of children described as malevolent ogbanje. The findings are discussed with reference to cultural resistance to SCD as an explanation for malevolent ogbanje and the implications for the health care of children with SCD in Nigeria.

  5. Glomerular function in sickle cell disease patients during crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderibigbe, A; Arije, A; Akinkugbe, O O

    1994-06-01

    An 8 month prospective study was carried out in 20 adult sickle cell disease (SCD) patients 16 sickle cell anaemia (Hbss) and 4 sickle cell Hbc disease (Hbsc); who had vaso-occlusive crises within the study period to determine the extent of the effect of sickle cell crisis on glomerular function in SCD patients during crisis. The male: female ratio was 1:57 and their mean age was 21.1 +/- 7.9 years. Creatinine clearance (CCr), as an index of glomerular function, was determined at the pre-crisis, crisis, 2 and 4 weeks post-crisis and at the end of the study period. The mean values of their CCr dropped from 113.37 +/- 33.80mls/min at pre-crisis stage to 96.39 +/- 30.13mls/min during crisis (p pre-crisis stage (p > 0.05). It is concluded that glomerular dysfunction in SCD patients during crisis is potentially reversible.

  6. Free tissue transfer in patients with sickle cell disease: Considerations for multi-disciplinary peri-operative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Seth, Rohit; Rhodes, Elizabeth; Alousi, Mohammed; Sivakumar, Bran

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an increasingly common condition in the UK. The safety of free tissue transfer in these patients is controversial, and no specific guidelines exist. The aim of this paper is to create recommendations for the plastic surgical multidisciplinary team for use in the assessment and management of SCD patients undergoing free tissue transfer and reconstruction. A literature review was performed in PubMed of 'sickle [TiAb] AND plast* adj3 surg*. Sickle cell disease is explained, as is the relative peri-operative risk in different genotypes of SCD. Acute and chronic manifestations of SCD are described by system, for consideration at pre-operative assessment and post-operative review. The evidence surrounding free tissue transfer and SCD is discussed and the outcomes in published cases summarised. An algorithm for peri-operative multi-disciplinary management is outlined and justified. Free tissue transfer theoretically carries a high risk of a crisis, due not only to long anaesthetic times, but the potential requirement for tourniquet use, and the relatively hypoxic state of the transferred tissue. This paper outlines a useful, practical algorithm to optimise the safety of free tissue transfer in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutagenicity of hydroxyurea in lymphocytes from patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayat André Salim

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyurea is commonly used in the treatment of myeloproliferative diseases and in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The use of this antineoplastic agent in patients with SCD is justified because of the drug's ability to increase fetal hemoglobin levels, thereby decreasing the severity of SCD. However, high doses or prolonged treatment with hydroxyurea can be cytotoxic or genotoxic for these patients, with an increased risk of developing acute leukemia. This danger can be avoided by monitoring the lymphocytes of patients treated with hydroxyurea. Cytogenetic tests are important endpoints for monitoring the physiological effects of physical and chemical agents, including drugs. In this work, we assessed the genotoxicity of hydroxyurea in short-term cultures of lymphocytes from SCD patients. Hydroxyurea was not cytotoxic or genotoxic at the concentrations tested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. These results support the use of hydroxyurea in the treatment of SCD, although further work is necessary to understand the effects of this drug in vivo.

  9. The clinical impact of MTHFR polymorphism on the vascular complications of sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moreira Neto

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is one of the most common inherited diseases in the world and the patients present notorious clinical heterogeneity. It is known that patients with SCD present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises, but also during the steady state of the disease. We determined if the presence of the factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden, the prothrombin gene G20210A variant, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T polymorphism may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. We studied 53 patients with SCD (60% being women, 29 with SS (sickle cell anemia; 28 years, range: 13-52 years and 24 with SC (sickle-hemoglobin C disease; 38.5 years, range: 17-72 years hemoglobinopathy. Factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, and prothrombin G20210A variant were identified by PCR followed by further digestion of the PCR product with specific endonucleases. The following vascular complications were recorded: stroke, retinopathy, acute thoracic syndrome, and X-ray-documented avascular necrosis. Only one patient was heterozygous for factor V Leiden (1.8% and there was no prothrombin G20210A variant. MTHFR 677TT polymorphism was detected in 1 patient (1.8% and the heterozygous form 677TC was observed in 18 patients (34%, 9 with SS and 9 with SC disease, a prevalence similar to that reported by others. No association was detected between the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele and other genetic modulation factors, such as alpha-thalassemia, ß-globin gene haplotype and fetal hemoglobin. The presence of the MTHFR 677T allele was associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in SCD, although this association was not significant when each complication was considered separately. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a risk factor for vascular complications in SCD.

  10. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colah, Roshan B; Mukherjee, Malay B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with β-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of α-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Orissa and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease.

  11. Posttransplant sCD30 as a predictor of kidney graft outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsal, Caner; Döhler, Bernd; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Salmela, Kaija T; Weimer, Rolf; Zeier, Martin; Opelz, Gerhard

    2011-06-27

    Reliable markers for assessing the biological effect of immunosuppressive drugs and identification of transplant recipients at risk of developing rejection are not available. In a prospective multicenter study, we investigated whether posttransplant measurement of the T-cell activation marker soluble CD30 (sCD30) can be used for estimating the risk of graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Pre- and posttransplant sera of 2322 adult deceased-donor kidney recipients were tested for serum sCD30 content using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. sCD30 decreased posttransplant and reached a nadir on day 30. Patients with a high sCD30 of more than or equal to 40 U/mL on day 30 showed a subsequent graft survival rate after 3 years of 78.3±4.1%, significantly lower than the 90.3±1.0% rate in recipients with a low sCD30 on day 30 of less than 40 U/mL (log-rank PsCD30 levels, patients with high sCD30 on posttransplant day 30 demonstrated significantly lower 3-year graft survival irrespective of the pretransplant level. Our data suggest that posttransplant measurement of sCD30 on day 30 is a predictor of subsequent graft loss in kidney transplant recipients and that sCD30 may potentially serve as an indicator for adjustment of immunosuppressive medication.

  12. Risk factor analysis of cerebral white matter hyperintensities in children with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, Veronica; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Engelen, Marc; Heijboer, Harriët; Roest, Mark; Hollestelle, Martine J.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is complicated by silent cerebral infarcts, visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both local vaso-occlusion, elicited by endothelial dysfunction, and insufficiency of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been proposed to be involved

  13. Malaria, HIV and sickle cell disease in Ghana : Towards tailor-made interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owusu, E.D.A.

    2018-01-01

    Ghana has made many strides in the fight against malaria. This research looked at the contribution of malaria transmission heterogeneity to malaria, and the effect of geographical overlap between malaria, HIV and sickle cell disease. Our systematic review of the interactions between HIV and SCD

  14. Mortality rate in Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Crisis at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Haematology Day Care Unit (HDCU) of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria was established in 1975 with the main goal of providing immediate and specialized care to haematological emergencies, particularly sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Since inception, a systematic analysis of its effectiveness has ...

  15. [Coexisting systemic lupus erythematosus and sickle cell disease: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina M V; Alves, Crésio; Abreu, Laís; Lemos, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of coexisting systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and sickle cell disease (SCD) with a review of the literature on the topic. Report of case and research of the association between SLE and SCD in literature through scientific articles in health sciences databases, such as LILACS, MEDLINE/Pubmed and Scielo, until May 2012. Descriptors used: 1. Sickle cell anemia; 2. Sickle cell disease; 3. Systemic lupus erythematosus; 4. Hemoglobinopathies. The authors describe an association between SLE and SS hemoglobinopathy in an eight-year-old female patient displaying articular, hematologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations during clinical evolution. Forty-five cases of association between SLE and SCD are described in literature, mostly adult (62.2%), women (78%) and with the SS phenotype in 78% of the cases, and different clinical manifestations. Compared with our patient, articular, hematologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations were present in 76%, 36% and 27% of the cases, respectively. SLE and SCD are chronic diseases that have several clinical and laboratory findings in common, meaning difficult diagnosis and difficulty in finding the correct treatment. Although the association between these diseases is not common, it is described in literature, so it is imperative that physicians who treat such diseases be alert to this possibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Newborn Screening for Sickle Cell Disease in Liberia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubman, Venée N; Marshall, Roseda; Jallah, Wilhemina; Guo, Dongjing; Ma, Clement; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; London, Wendy B; Heeney, Matthew M

    2016-04-01

    In malaria-endemic countries in West Africa, sickle cell disease (SCD) contributes to childhood mortality. Historically, Liberia had regions wherein hemoglobin S and beta-thalassemia trait were mutually exclusive. Data on hemoglobinopathies in the Monrovia, the capital, are outdated and do not reflect urban migration. Updating the epidemiology of SCD is necessary to plan a public health and clinical agenda. Neither newborn screening (NBS) nor screening tools were available in country. This pilot study aimed to determine the feasibility of NBS using a South-South partnership and define the incidence of sickle cell trait (SCT) and SCD in Monrovia. This descriptive epidemiologic feasibility study collected dried blood spots from 2,785 consecutive newborns delivered at a hospital in Monrovia. Samples were analyzed by isoelectric focusing at a regional reference laboratory. Infants with SCD were referred for preventive care. SCT occurred in 10.31% of infants screened. SCD occurred in 33 infants screened [1.19% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79-1.59%)] (FS: 28/33, FSB: 2/33, FSA: 2/33, FSX: 1/33). There were no infants with FSC phenotype observed. Nonsickling hemoglobin phenotypes "FC" and "F" were each present in three infants screened. Seventy-six percent of infants with SCD were brought to care, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. The incidence of SCD and other hemoglobinopathies remains high in Liberia. Additional studies are needed to clarify sickle genotypes and identify the contribution of silent beta-thalassemia alleles. By developing regional partnerships, countries similar to Liberia can acquire current data to inform NBS as an important public health initiative toward improving child health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reproductive health choices for young adults with sickle cell disease or trait: randomized controlled trial immediate posttest effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Diana J; Gallo, Agatha M; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Stahl, Christine; Hershberger, Patricia E; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L; Labotka, Robert J; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigo; Angulo, Veronica; Carrasco, Jesus; Shuey, David; Pelligra, Stephanie; Wang, Edward; Rogers, Dennie T; Thompson, Alexis A

    2013-01-01

    People with sickle cell disease (SCD) or sickle cell trait (SCT) may not have information about genetic inheritance needed for making informed reproductive health decisions. CHOICES is a Web-based, multimedia educational intervention that provides information about reproductive options and consequences to help those with SCD or SCT identify and implement an informed parenting plan. Efficacy of CHOICES compared with usual care must be evaluated. The purpose was to compare immediate posttest effects of CHOICES versus an attention-control usual care intervention (e-Book) on SCD-/SCT-related reproductive health knowledge, intention, and behavior. In a randomized controlled study, we recruited subjects with SCD/SCT from clinics, community settings, and online networks with data collected at sites convenient to the 234 subjects with SCD (n = 136) or SCT (n = 98). Their ages ranged from 18 to 35 years; 65% were women, and 94% were African American. Subjects completed a measure of sickle cell reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior before and immediately after the intervention. Compared with the e-Book group, the CHOICES group had significantly higher average knowledge scores and probability of reporting a parenting plan to avoid SCD or SCD and SCT when pretest scores were controlled. Effects on intention and planned behavior were not significant. The CHOICES group showed significant change in their intention and planned behavior, whereas the e-Book group did not show significant change in their intention, but their planned behavior differed significantly. Initial efficacy findings are encouraging but warrant planned booster sessions and outcome follow-ups to determine sustained intervention efficacy on reproductive health knowledge, intention, and actual behavior of persons with SCD/SCT.

  18. Reproductive Health CHOICES for Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Trait: Randomized Controlled Trial Immediate Posttest Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Diana J; Gallo, Agatha M.; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E.; Stahl, Christine; Hershberger, Patricia E.; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L.; Labotka, Robert J.; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigo; Angulo, Veronica; Carrasco, Jesus; Shuey, David; Pelligra, Stephanie; Wang, Edward; Rogers, Dennie T.; Thompson, Alexis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background People with sickle cell disease (SCD) or sickle cell trait (SCT) may not have information about genetic inheritance needed for making informed reproductive health decisions. CHOICES is a web-based, multimedia educational intervention that provides information about reproductive options and consequences to help those with SCD or SCT identify and implement an informed parenting plan. Efficacy of CHOICES compared with usual care must be evaluated. Objective The purpose was to compare immediate posttest effects of CHOICES versus an attention control usual care intervention (e-Book) on SCD/SCT-related reproductive health knowledge, intention, and behavior. Methods In a randomized controlled study, we recruited subjects with SCD/SCT from clinics, community settings, and online networks with data collected at sites convenient to the 234 subjects with SCD (n = 136) or SCT (n = 98) (age ranged from18-35 years, 65% were female, and 94% were African American). Subjects completed a measure of sickle cell reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior before and immediately after the intervention. Results Compared to the e-Book group, the CHOICES group had significantly higher average knowledge scores and probability of reporting a parenting plan to avoid SCD or SCD and SCT when pretest scores were controlled. Effects on intention and planned behavior were not significant. The CHOICES group showed significant change in their intention and planned behavior; the e-Book group did not show significant change in their intention, but their planned behavior differed significantly. Discussion Initial efficacy findings are encouraging but warrant planned booster sessions and outcome follow-ups to determine sustained intervention efficacy on reproductive health knowledge, intention, and actual behavior of persons with SCD/SCT. PMID:23995469

  19. Sickle cell disease in western Sudan: genetic epidemiology and predictors of knowledge attitude and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daak, Ahmed A; Elsamani, Elfatih; Ali, Eltigani H; Mohamed, Fatma A; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E; Elderdery, Abozer Y; Talbot, Octavious; Kraft, Peter; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Elbashir, Mustafa I; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of sickle cell disease (SCD) and determinants of knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) towards SCD in western Kordofan State, Sudan. A community-based, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in three towns. Three hundred and seventy-two households were polled, and blood samples for haemoglobin phenotyping were collected from 1116 individuals. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and KAP data were collected using investigator-administered questionnaires. Descriptive, frequency distribution and multiple regression analyses were performed. About 50.9% of the study population were Misseriya tribes. Consanguineous marriages were reported by 67.5% of the households. The highest percentage of homozygous SCD was 2.8% among children under 5 years of age. About 24.9% were carriers of HbS allele (HbAS). HbS allele frequency was highest in children aged 5-11 years (18.3%, CI: 13.7-22.9%) and lowest in males >15 years old (12.0%, CI: 6.1-17.9%). The average HbS frequency across all age groups was 14.5% (95% CI: 12.2-16.8%). The most frequent β-globin gene cluster haplotype was the Cameroon (30.8%), followed by the Benin (21.8%), the Senegal (12.8%) and the Bantu (2.2%) haplotypes. About 17.0% of all-cause child deaths were due to SCD. The estimated change in log odds of having the SS genotype per year increase in age was (-) 0.0058 (95% CI -0.0359, 0.0242). This represents a non-statistically significant 2.9% increase in 5-year mortality for individuals with the SS genotype relative to those with AS and AA genotypes. About 46.9% of the households had poor knowledge, 26.1% had satisfactory knowledge, and 26.9% had good knowledge about sickle cell disease. Mothers' and fathers' educational levels were significant predictors of good knowledge about SCD (P < 0.05). About 48.0% had a satisfactory attitude towards sickle cell disease while 30.7% had poor attitude and only 21.3 showed good attitudes. Poor knowledge about SCD and low socio

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monica Bhatia,1 Sujit Sheth21Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplantation, Columbia University Medical Center, 2Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative treatment currently in use for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The first successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed in 1984. To date, approximately 1,200 transplants have been reported. Given the high prevalence of this disorder in Africa, and its emergence in the developed world through immigration, this number is relatively small. There are many reasons for this; primary among them are the availability of a donor, the risks associated with this complex procedure, and the cost and availability of resources in the developing world. Of these, it is fair to say that the risks associated with the procedure have steadily decreased to the point where, if currently performed in a center with experience using a matched sibling donor, overall survival is close to 100% and event-free survival is over 90%. While there is little controversy around offering hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to symptomatic SCD patients with a matched sibling donor, there is much debate surrounding the use of this modality in “less severe” patients. An overview of the current state of our understanding of the pathology and treatment of SCD is important to show that our current strategy is not having the desired impact on survival of homozygous SCD patients, and should be changed to significantly impact the small proportion of these patients who have matched siblings and could be cured, especially those without overt clinical manifestations. Both patient families and providers must be made to understand the progressive nature of SCD, and should be encouraged to screen full siblings of patients with homozygous SCD for their potential to

  1. Impact of PCA Strategies on Pain Intensity and Functional Assessment Measures in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease during Hospitalized Vaso-Occlusive Episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Dampier, Carlton D.; Wager, Carrie G.; Harrison, Ryan; Hsu, Lewis L.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Smith, Wally R.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials of sickle cell disease (SCD) pain treatment usually observe only small decrements in pain intensity during the course of hospitalization. Sub-optimal analgesic management and inadequate pain assessment methods are possible explanations for these findings. In a search for better methods for assessing inpatient SCD pain in adults, we examined several pain intensity and interference measures in both arms of a randomized controlled trial comparing two different opioid PCA therapie...

  2. Psychosocial stressors of sickle cell disease on adult patients in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonkam, Ambroise; Mba, Caryl Zameyo; Mbanya, Dora; Ngogang, Jeanne; Ramesar, Raj; Angwafo, Fru F

    2014-12-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a debilitating illness that affects quality of life. Studies of the psychosocial burden of SCD on patients have been rarely reported in Africa. We used a quantitative method, with face-to-face administered questionnaires, to study indices of psychosocial stressors on adult SCD patients in Cameroon. The questionnaire included a 36-item stress factors scale evaluating general perceptions of stress and five main stressors' domain: disease factors, hospital factors, financial factors, family factors and quality of personal-life factors. Items pertaining to psychosocial stressors involved four response options with increasing severity: 0, 1, 2 or 3. Non-parametric tests were used for analysis. The majority of the 83 participants were urban dwellers, female, 20-30 years old, single, unemployed, with at least a secondary or tertiary education. Median age at diagnosis was 100 months; 47.8% had >3 painful vaso-oclusive crises annually. Only 4.8% had been treated with hydroxyurea. The majority reported moderate to severe difficulty coping with SCD. The "degree of clinical severity" category displayed the highest median score (2.0), while familial stressors showed the lowest (0.8). Being female, married, with low education level, an additional affected sibling and low direct income were significantly associated with specific stressors' categories. In Cameroon, there is an urgent need to implement policies that ensure affordable access to health-care and practices to reduce SCD morbidity and improve patients' quality of life.

  3. Translating scientific advances to improved outcomes for children with sickle cell disease: a timely opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jean L; Kavanagh, Patricia L; Wang, C Jason; Mueller, Brigitta U; Zuckerman, Barry

    2011-07-01

    Despite the recent advances made in the care of children with sickle cell disease (SCD), premature mortality, especially among older children and young adults, remains a hallmark of this disease. The lack of survival gains highlights the translational gap of implementing innovations found efficacious in the controlled trial setting into routine clinical practice. Health services research (HSR) examines the most effective ways to finance, organize, and deliver high quality care in an equitable manner. To date, HSR has been underutilized as a means to improve the outcomes for children with SCD. Emerging national priorities in health care delivery, new sources of funding, and evolving electronic data collection systems for patients with SCD have provided a unique opportunity to overcome the translational gap in pediatric SCD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive HSR agenda to create patient-specific evidence of clinical effectiveness for interventions used in the routine care setting, understand the barriers faced by clinicians to providing high quality care, assess and improve the interactions of patients with the health care system, and measure the quality of care delivered to increase survival for all children and young adults with SCD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Hydroxyurea therapy in adult Nigerian sickle cell disease: a monocentric survey on pattern of use, clinical effects and patient's compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoyin, Ademola Samson; Oghuvwu, Omokiniovo Sunday; Awodu, Omolade Augustina

    2017-03-01

    The clinical prospects of hydroxyurea therapy in the management of sickle cell disease (SCD) require evaluation in the Nigerian setting to develop indigenous guidelines. This survey examines the pattern of hydroxyurea therapy, its clinico-haematologic benefits and safety profile in Nigerian SCD subjects. A cross sectional pilot survey was carried out among 60 adult SCD subjects over 3 months. Data on clinical phenotypes, relevant haematological parameters and details of hydroxyurea therapy were obtained using a structured questionnaire through an interview process and case file review. The median age was 30 years. Thirty-four (56.7%) of the subjects are aware of hydroxyurea therapy in SCD. Twenty-four (40%) SCD patients had previously used hydroxyurea. Only 4 subjects were fully compliant. Reasons for non-compliance included poor knowledge and lack of funds. In particular, hydroxyurea reduced leucocyte count and increased mean red cell volume (MCV) in compliant subjects. Hydroxyurea use is low among Nigerian SCD subjects despite its proven efficacy/clinical prospects in the developed nations. Large scale multicenter studies and clinical trials are needed to form a basis for developing standard local treatment protocol for its use.

  5. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dyspnea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Hatem F.; Alem, A.; Al-Momen, A.; Kardas, W.; Owais, M.; Jehangir, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine pulmonary function, dyspnea, and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The patients were recruited from the hematology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh from January to December 2005. The study involved 39 patients with stable SCD 20 women and 19 men, with a mean age of 22.7+/- 7.1 years, hemoglobin level of 95.5+/-14.6g/L and hemoglobin F level of 13.7+/08.6. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests PFT forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide [DLco] data are presented as a percentage of the normal prediction, a 6- minute walk test 6MWT and echocardiography. Dyspnea was assessed using the Borg score. The 6MWT data were compared to body mass index matched healthy controls. Forty-one percent of SCD patients had mild dyspnea at rest and this increased to 61% at the end of the 6MWT. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 51%, 36% of patients had a restrictive pattern, 10% had isolated decrease in DLco and 5% had a mixed restrictive-obstrutive pattern. The 6MWD was shorter in SCD patients compared to the controls 368+/-67 versus 407+/-47m, p=0.005. No hematological variables correlated with outcome variables. Chronic pulmonary complications in adult Saudi SCD patients are relatively mild but common. Pulmonary function in these patients differs from that published for African-origin SCD patients. The difference may reflect a different natural history of SCD in the 2 populations. (author)

  7. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE: A NARRATIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Ofori Adjepong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 30 million people worldwide have sickle cell disease (SCD.  Emergent and non-emergent surgical procedures in SCD have been associated with relatively increased risks of peri-operative mortality, vaso-occlussive (painful crisis, acute chest syndrome, post-operative infections, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular accident and acute kidney injury.  Pre-operative assessment must include careful review of the patient’s known crisis triggers, baseline hematologic profile, usual transfusion requirements, pre-existing organ dysfunction and narcotic use. Use of preoperative blood transfusions should be selective and decisions individualized based on the baseline hemoglobin, surgical procedure and anticipated volume of blood loss.  Intra- and post-operative management should focus on minimizing hypoxia, hypothermia, acidosis, and intravascular volume depletion. Pre- and post-operative incentive spirometry use should be encouraged.

  8. Circulating endothelial cells: a potential parameter of organ damage in sickle cell anemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Michiel H.; Landburg, Precious P.; Nur, Erfan; Teerlink, Tom; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Rijneveld, Anita W.; Biemond, Bart J.; Sleijfer, Stefan; Gratama, Jan W.; Duits, Ashley J.; Schnog, John-John B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective laboratory tools are needed to monitor developing organ damage in sickle cell disease (SCD). Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are indicative of vascular injury. We determined whether elevated CEC can be detected in asymptomatic SCD with the CellSearch system and whether the CEC count

  9. Incidence of sickle cell disease and other hemoglobin variants in 10,095 Lebanese neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Khoriaty

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are highly prevalent diseases and impose a public health burden. Early diagnosis and treatment can ameliorate the course of these diseases and improve survival. Despite purported high incidence of hemoglobinopathies in Lebanon, there are no nationwide screening programs. In this study, newborn screening utilizing high pressure liquid chromatography was executed in all public hospitals across Lebanon between 2010 and 2013. All newborns with an abnormal hemoglobin (Hb were offered genetic counseling and all those with disease were enrolled in comprehensive hemoglobinopathy clinics. Among newborns, 2.1% were found to have an abnormal Hb variant with sickle Hb being the most common while 0.1% were found to have sickle cell disease (SCD. The majority of those with SCD had non-Lebanese origins. The most common causes of hospitalizations in infants with SCD were acute splenic sequestration and pain crises. No bacteremia or other life threatening infections were noted. At a median follow up 14 months (follow up range 7 to 34 months, all children with disease are alive and compliant with treatment. Systematic screening for SCD and other Hb variants was shown to be feasible, cost effective, and of accurate predictive value. This program was also clinically effective because it led to the identification of babies with disease and to providing them with free early multidisciplinary care. Conclusively, a newborn screening program should be implemented across Lebanon to detect hemoglobinopathies and initiate early therapeutic and preventive strategies and genetic counseling.

  10. State of the Art Management of Acute Vaso-occlusive Pain in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Latika; Nottage, Kerri A; Hankins, Jane S; Anghelescu, Doralina L

    2018-02-01

    Acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is a hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD). Multiple complex pathophysiological processes can result in pain during a VOC. Despite significant improvements in the understanding and management of SCD, little progress has been made in the management of pain in SCD, although new treatments are being explored. Opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain the mainstay of treatment of VOC pain, but new classes of drugs are being tested to prevent and treat acute pain. Advancements in the understanding of the pathophysiology of SCD and pain and the pharmacogenomics of opioids have yet to be effectively utilized in the management of VOC. Opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia are significant problems associated with the long-term use of opioids, and better strategies for chronic pain therapy are needed. This report reviews the mechanisms of pain associated with acute VOC, describes the current management of VOC, and describes some of the new therapies under evaluation for the management of acute VOC in SCD.

  11. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejda, Katherine R.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Hansbury, Eileen N.; McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J.; Hankins, Jane S.

    2012-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  12. The impact of preparation and support procedures for children with sickle cell disease undergoing MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cejda, Katherine R. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Child Life Program, Memphis, TN (United States); Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hansbury, Eileen N. [Baylor International Hematology Center of Excellence and the Texas Children' s Center for Global Health, Houston, TX (United States); McCarville, Mary Elizabeth; Helton, Kathleen J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Hankins, Jane S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Hematology, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) often undergo MRI studies to assess brain injury or to quantify hepatic iron. MRI requires the child to lie motionless for 30-60 min, thus sedation/anesthesia might be used to facilitate successful completion of exams, but this poses additional risks for SCD patients. To improve children's ability to cope with MRI examinations and avoid sedation, our institution established preparation and support procedures (PSP). To investigate the impact of PSP in reducing the need for sedation during MRI exams among children with SCD. Data on successful completion of MRI testing were compared among 5- to 12-year-olds who underwent brain MRI or liver R2*MRI with or without receiving PSP. Seventy-one children with SCD (median age 9.85 years, range 5.57-12.99 years) underwent a brain MRI (n = 60) or liver R2*MRI (n = 11). Children who received PSP were more likely to complete an interpretable MRI exam than those who did not 30 of 33; 91% vs. 27 of 38; 71%, unadjusted OR = 4.1 (P = 0.04) and OR = 8.5 (P < 0.01) when adjusting for age. PSP can help young children with SCD complete clinically interpretable, nonsedated MRI exams, avoiding the risks of sedation/anesthesia. (orig.)

  13. Multicenter COMPACT study of COMplications in patients with sickle cell disease and utilization of iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lanetta; Adams-Graves, Patricia; Kanter-Washko, Julie; Oneal, Patricia A; Sasane, Medha; Vekeman, Francis; Bieri, Christine; Magestro, Matthew; Marcellari, Andrea; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Over the past few decades, lifespans of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have increased; hence, they encounter multiple complications. Early detection, appropriate comprehensive care, and treatment may prevent or delay onset of complications. We collected longitudinal data on sickle cell disease (SCD) complication rates and associated resource utilization relative to blood transfusion patterns and iron chelation therapy (ICT) use in patients aged ≥16 years to address a gap in the literature. Medical records of 254 SCD patients ≥16 years were retrospectively reviewed at three US tertiary care centers. We classified patients into cohorts based on cumulative units of blood transfused and ICT history: ICT (Cohort 1 [C1]), ≥15 units, no ICT (Cohort 2 [C2]), and ≥15 units with ICT (Cohort 3 [C3]). We report SCD complication rates per patient per year; cohort comparisons use rate ratios (RRs). Cohorts had 69 (C1), 91 (C2), and 94 (C3) patients. Pain led to most hospitalizations (76%) and emergency department (ED) (82%) visits. Among transfused patients (C2+C3), those receiving ICT were less likely to experience SCD complications than those who did not (RR [95% CI] C2 vs. C3: 1.33 [1.25-1.42]). Similar trends (RR [95% CI]) were observed in ED visits and hospitalizations associated with SCD complications (C2 vs. C3, ED: 1.94 [1.70-2.21]; hospitalizations: 1.61 [1.45-1.78]), but not in outpatient visits. Although the most commonly reported SCD complication among all patients was pain, patients who received ICT were less likely to experience pain and other complications than those who did not. These results highlight the need for increased patient and provider education on the importance of comprehensive disease management.

  14. SCD1 Expression is dispensable for hepatocarcinogenesis induced by AKT and Ras oncogenes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    Full Text Available Increased de novo lipogenesis is one of the major metabolic events in cancer. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, de novo lipogenesis has been found to be increased and associated with the activation of AKT/mTOR signaling. In mice, overexpression of an activated form of AKT results in increased lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis, ultimately leading to liver tumor development. Hepatocarcinogenesis is dramatically accelerated when AKT is co-expressed with an oncogenic form of N-Ras. SCD1, the major isoform of stearoyl-CoA desaturases, catalyzing the conversion of saturated fatty acids (SFA into monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, is a key enzyme involved in de novo lipogenesis. While many studies demonstrated the requirement of SCD1 for tumor cell growth in vitro, whether SCD1 is necessary for tumor development in vivo has not been previously investigated. Here, we show that genetic ablation of SCD1 neither inhibits lipogenesis and hepatic steatosis in AKT-overexpressing mice nor affects liver tumor development in mice co-expressing AKT and Ras oncogenes. Molecular analysis showed that SCD2 was strongly upregulated in liver tumors from AKT/Ras injected SCD1(-/- mice. Noticeably, concomitant silencing of SCD1 and SCD2 genes was highly detrimental for the growth of AKT/Ras cells in vitro. Altogether, our study provides the evidence, for the first time, that SCD1 expression is dispensable for AKT/mTOR-dependent hepatic steatosis and AKT/Ras-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Complete inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity may be required to efficiently suppress liver tumor development.

  15. The super sickling haemoglobin HbS-Oman: a study of red cell sickling, K+ permeability and associations with disease severity in patients heterozygous for HbA and HbS-Oman (HbA/S-Oman genotype).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Halima W M; Wali, Yasser; Al Awadi, Maha; Al-Subhi, Taimoora; Rees, David C; Brewin, John N; Hannemann, Anke; Gibson, John S

    2017-10-01

    Studying different sickle cell genotypes may throw light on the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease (SCD). Here, the clinical profile, red cell sickling and K + permeability in 29 SCD patients (15 patients with severe disease and 14 with a milder form) of HbA/S-Oman genotype were analysed. The super sickling nature of this Hb variant was confirmed. The red cell membrane permeability to K + was markedly abnormal with elevated activities of P sickle , Gardos channel and KCl cotransporter (KCC). Results were consistent with Ca 2+ entry and Mg 2+ loss via P sickle stimulating Gardos channel and KCC activities. The abnormal red cell behaviour was similar to that in the commonest genotype of SCD, HbSS, in which the level of mutated Hb is considerably higher. Although activities of all three K + transporters also correlated with the level of HbS-Oman, there was no association between transport phenotype and disease severity. The super sickling behaviour of HbS-Oman may obviate the need for solute loss and red cell dehydration to encourage Hb polymerisation, required in other SCD genotypes. Disease severity was reduced by concurrent α thalassaemia, as observed in other SCD genotypes, and represents an obvious genetic marker for prognostic tests of severity in young SCD patients of the HbA/S-Oman genotype. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence of SCD as compared to other parts of Odisha. Cord blood screening of SCD was carried out on 761 newborn samples of which 13 were screened to be homozygous for SCD. Information on area of parent's residence was also collected. Madanpur Rampur area was found to be with the highest prevalence of SCD (10.52 %) and the gene distribution did not follow Hardy-Weinberg Equation indicating un-natural selection. The approach of conducting neonatal screening in a district hospital for identification of SCD is feasible and appropriate for prioritizing area for the implementation of large-scale screening and planning control measures thereof.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived virus-like particle parvovirus B19 vaccine elicits binding and neutralizing antibodies in a mouse model for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Young, Neal S; Surman, Sherri L; Sealy, Robert E; Rosch, Jason; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C; Chandramouli, Sumana; Wong, Susan; Hankins, Jane S; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2017-06-22

    Parvovirus B19 infections are typically mild in healthy individuals, but can be life threatening in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD). A Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived B19 VLP vaccine, now in pre-clinical development, is immunogenic in wild type mice when administered with the adjuvant MF59. Because SCD alters the immune response, we evaluated the efficacy of this vaccine in a mouse model for SCD. Vaccinated mice with SCD demonstrated similar binding and neutralizing antibody responses to those of heterozygous littermate controls following a prime-boost-boost regimen. Due to the lack of a mouse parvovirus B19 challenge model, we employed a natural mouse pathogen, Sendai virus, to evaluate SCD respiratory tract responses to infection. Normal mucosal and systemic antibody responses were observed in these mice. Results demonstrate that mice with SCD can respond to a VLP vaccine and to a respiratory virus challenge, encouraging rapid development of the B19 vaccine for patients with SCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Current Standards of Care and Long Term Outcomes for Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonat, Satheesh; Quinn, Charles T

    2017-01-01

    Thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD) are disorders of hemoglobin that affect millions of people worldwide. The carrier states for these diseases arose as common, balanced polymorphisms during human history because they afforded protection against severe forms of malaria. These complex, multisystem diseases are reviewed here with a focus on current standards of clinical management and recent research findings. The importance of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and lifelong system of care is also emphasized.

  19. Sickle cell disease and complex congenital cardiac surgery: a case report and review of the pathophysiology and perioperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D B; Smith, B P; Sowell, S R; Nguyen, D H; Derby, C; Eshun, F; Nigro, J J

    2014-03-01

    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia are hemoglobinopathies rarely encountered in the United States. Compounded with congenital heart disease, patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and open-heart surgery represent the proverbial "needle in the haystack". As such, there is some trepidation on the part of clinicians when these patients present for complex cardiac surgery. SCD is an autosomal, recessive condition that results from a single nucleotide polymorphism in the β-globin gene. Hemoglobin SS molecules (HgbSS) with this point mutation can polymerize under the right conditions, stiffening the erythrocyte membrane and distorting the cellular structure to the characteristic sickle shape. This shape change alters cellular transit through the microvasculature. As a result, circumstances such as hypoxia, hypothermia, acidosis or diminished blood flow can lead to aggregation, vascular occlusion and thrombosis. Chronically, SCD can give rise to multiorgan damage secondary to hemolysis and vascular obstruction. This review and case study details an 11-year-old African-American male with known SCD who presented to the cardiothoracic surgical service with congenital heart disease consisting of an anomalous, intramural right coronary artery arising from the left coronary sinus for surgical consultation and subsequent surgical correction. This case report will include a review of the pathophysiology and current literature regarding preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of SCD patients.

  20. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C among children with steady-state sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seixas Magda O

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for sickle cell disease (SCD prognosis biomarkers is a challenge. These markers identification can help to establish further therapy, later severe clinical complications and with patients follow-up. We attempted to study a possible involvement of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C in steady-state children with SCD, once that this lipid marker has been correlated with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-aggregation, anti-coagulant and pro-fibrinolytic activities, important aspects to be considered in sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Methods We prospectively analyzed biochemical, inflammatory and hematological biomarkers of 152 steady-state infants with SCD and 132 healthy subjects using immunochemistry, immunoassay and electronic cell counter respectively. Clinical data were collected from patient medical records. Results Of the 152 infants investigated had a significant positive association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with hemoglobin (P Conclusions We hypothesize that some SCD patients can have a specific dyslipidemic subphenotype characterized by low HDL-C with hypertriglyceridemia and high VLDL-C in association with other biomarkers, including those related to inflammation. This represents an important step toward a more reliable clinical prognosis. Additional studies are warranted to test this hypothesis and the probably mechanisms involved in this complex network of markers and their role in SCD pathogenesis.

  1. Reduced IL-7R T Cell Expression and Increased Plasma sCD127 in Late Presenting HIV-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans J; Jespersen, Sofie; Gaardbo, Julie C

    2017-01-01

    homeostasis. This study aimed to describe IL-7R and IL-7 before and after initiation of cART in late presenting HIV-infected individuals, and the impact on immune recovery and T cell subset distribution after initiation of cART. METHODS: A total of 100 HIV-infected individuals initiating cART were included......BACKGROUND: Late presentation of HIV infection is associated with reduced chance of optimal immune recovery after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) and the corresponding receptor, IL-7 receptor (IL-7R) made up of CD127 and CD132, are crucial for T cell...

  2. Management of Sickle Cell Disease: A Review for Physician Education in Nigeria (Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola Samson Adewoyin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD predominates in sub-Saharan Africa, East Mediterranean areas, Middle East, and India. Nigeria, being the most populous black nation in the world, bears its greatest burden in sub-Saharan Africa. The last few decades have witnessed remarkable scientific progress in the understanding of the complex pathophysiology of the disease. Improved clinical insights have heralded development and establishment of disease modifying interventions such as chronic blood transfusions, hydroxyurea therapy, and haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Coupled with parallel improvements in general supportive, symptomatic, and preventive measures, current evidence reveals remarkable appreciation in quality of life among affected individuals in developed nations. Currently, in Nigeria and other West African states, treatment and control of SCD are largely suboptimal. Improved knowledge regarding SCD phenotypes and its comprehensive care among Nigerian physicians will enhance quality of care for affected persons. This paper therefore provides a review on the aetiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and management of SCD in Nigeria, with a focus on its local patterns and peculiarities. Established treatment guidelines as appropriate in the Nigerian setting are proffered, as well as recommendations for improving care of affected persons.

  3. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. Methods: Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal, haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA, using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS® version 14.0. Results: Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p = 0.001 and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p = 0.044. The presence of α-thal (p = 0.196, the CAR haplotype (p = 0.543, and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  4. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela O W; Ribeiro, Luiz C; Sudário, Lysla C; Teixeira, Maria T B; Martins, Marina L; Pittella, Anuska M O L; Junior, Irtis de O Fernandes

    To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal), haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS ® version 14.0. Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR) was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p=0.001) and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p=0.044). The presence of α-thal (p=0.196), the CAR haplotype (p=0.543), and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. An analysis of the NIH-supported sickle cell disease research portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavini, Nara; Hoots, W Keith; Mensah, George A; Hanspal, Manjit

    2015-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited blood disorder is due to a single amino acid substitution on the beta chain of hemoglobin, and is characterized by anemia, severe infections, acute and chronic pain, and multi-organ damage. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is dedicated to support basic, translational and clinical science research to improve care and ultimately, to find a cure for SCD that causes such suffering. This report provides a detailed analysis of grants funded by the NIH for SCD research in Fiscal Years 2007 through 2013. During this period, the NIH supported 247 de novo grants totaling $272,210,367 that address various aspects of SCD. 83% of these funds supported research project grants investigating the following 5 scientific themes: Pathology of Sickle Red Blood Cells; Globin Gene Expression; Adhesion and Vascular Dysfunction; Neurological Complications and Organ-specific Dysfunction; and Pain Management and Intervention. The remaining 17% of total funds supported career development and training grants; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants; large Center grants; and Conference grants. Further analysis showed that the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is the largest funder of SCD research within NIH with 67% of total grants, contributing 77% of total funds; followed by the National Institute for Digestive Diseases and Kidney (NIDDK) that is funding 19% of grants, contributing 13% of total funds. The remaining 14% of grants totaling 10% of the funds were supported by all other NIH Institutes/Centers (ICs) combined. In summary, the NIH is using multiple funding mechanisms to support a sickle cell disease research agenda that is intended to advance the detection, treatment, and cure of this debilitating genetic disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Immunological role of CD4+CD28null T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and interferon-gamma in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease: relation to disease severity and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAlfy, Mohsen Saleh; Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ebeid, Fatma Soliman ElSayed; Eissa, Deena Samir; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Mohammed, Yasser Hassan; Ahmed, Manar Elsayed; Saad, Aya Sayed

    2018-06-20

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with alterations in immune phenotypes. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes have pro-inflammatory functions and are linked to vascular diseases. To assess the percentage of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NK), and IFN-gamma levels, we compared 40 children and adolescents with SCD with 40 healthy controls and evaluated their relation to disease severity and response to therapy. Patients with SCD steady state were studied, focusing on history of frequent vaso-occlusive crisis, hydroxyurea therapy, and IFN-gamma levels. Analysis of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes and NK cells was done by flow cytometry. Liver and cardiac iron overload were assessed. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes, NK cells, and IFN-gamma levels were significantly higher in patients than controls. Patients with history of frequent vaso-occlusive crisis and those with vascular complications had higher percentage of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes and IFN-gamma while levels were significantly lower among hydroxyurea-treated patients. CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes were positively correlated to transfusional iron input while these cells and IFN-gamma were negatively correlated to cardiac T2* and duration of hydroxyurea therapy. NK cells were correlated to HbS and indirect bilirubin. Increased expression of CD4 + CD28 null T lymphocytes highlights their role in immune dysfunction and pathophysiology of SCD complications.

  7. Verbal autopsy as a tool for identifying children dying of sickle cell disease: a validation study conducted in Kilifi district, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where it is associated with high early mortality. In the absence of newborn screening, most deaths among children with SCD go unrecognized and unrecorded. As a result, SCD does not receive the attention it deserves as a leading cause of death among children in SSA. In the current study, we explored the potential utility of verbal autopsy (VA) as a tool for attributing underlying cause of death (COD) in children to SCD. Methods We used the 2007 WHO Sample Vital Registration with Verbal Autopsy (SAVVY) VA tool to determine COD among child residents of the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS), Kenya, who died between January 2008 and April 2011. VAs were coded both by physician review (physician coded verbal autopsy, PCVA) using COD categories based on the WHO International Classification of Diseases 10th Edition (ICD-10) and by using the InterVA-4 probabilistic model after extracting data according to the 2012 WHO VA standard. Both of these methods were validated against one of two gold standards: hospital ICD-10 physician-assigned COD for children who died in Kilifi District Hospital (KDH) and, where available, laboratory confirmed SCD status for those who died in the community. Results Overall, 6% and 5% of deaths were attributed to SCD on the basis of PCVA and the InterVA-4 model, respectively. Of the total deaths, 22% occurred in hospital, where the agreement coefficient (AC1) for SCD between PCVA and hospital physician diagnosis was 95.5%, and agreement between InterVA-4 and hospital physician diagnosis was 96.9%. Confirmatory laboratory evidence of SCD status was available for 15% of deaths, in which the AC1 against PCVA was 87.5%. Conclusions Other recent studies and provisional data from this study, outlining the importance of SCD as a cause of death in children in many parts of the developing world, contributed to the inclusion of specific SCD

  8. Ultrasonic assessment of the prevalence of gall stones in sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gallstone is a common problem in patients with sickle cell disease. Prevalence of this problem among sickle cell disease (SCD) children may vary with age, and geographic location. Studies on gallstone prevalence in SCD children are scanty in the South-South zone of Nigeria. Aim: To determine by ...

  9. IMPACT OF MANNOSE-BINDING PROTEIN GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN OMANI SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Mathew Zachariah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our objective was to study mannose binding protein (MBP polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC episodes, since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods: We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q of the MBL2 gene, in sickle cell disease (SCD patients as increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (voluntary blood donors. Results: The observed frequencies of MBL2 promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without vasoocculsive crisis (VOC attacks (p=0.162; OR-0.486; CI=0.177 -1.33, however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR-3.55; CI 1.25-10.04. Conclusions: Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05. However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. Keywords: Mannose-binding lectin, polymorphism, promoter, Sickle cell disease, MBL2, MBP

  10. Family, Community, and Health System Considerations for Reducing the Burden of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease in Uganda Through Newborn Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Green MD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is associated with high mortality for children under 5 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. Newborn sickle screening program and enhanced capacity for SCD treatment are under development to reduce disease burden in Uganda and elsewhere in the region. Based on an international stakeholder meeting and a family-directed conference on SCD in Kampala in 2015, and interviews with parents, multinational experts, and other key informants, we describe health care, community, and family perspectives in support of these initiatives. Key stakeholder meetings, discussions, and interviews were held to understand perspectives of public health and multinational leadership, patients and families, as well as national progress, resource needs, medical and social barriers to program success, and resources leveraged from HIV/AIDS. Partnering with program leadership, professionals, patients and families, multinational stakeholders, and leveraging resources from existing programs are needed for building successful programs in Uganda and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. Optimization of folic acid, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 supplements in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Dijs, Fey P L; Fokkema, M Rebecca; Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Niessink, Bram; van der Wal, Thaliet I C; Schnog, John-John B; Duits, Ashley J; Muskiet, Fred D; Muskiet, Frits A J

    Using homocysteine as a functional marker, we determined optimal folic acid, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 dosages in 21 pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD) patients (11 HbSS, 10 HbSC; 7-16 years). Daily supplements of folic acid (400, 700, or 1,000 mug), vitamin B-12 (1, 3, or 5 U.S. 1989 RDA), and

  12. Pharmacotherapeutical strategies in the prevention of acute, vaso-occlusive pain in sickle cell disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sins, Joep W. R.; Mager, David J.; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Biemond, Bart J.; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Sickle-cell disease (SCD) is characterized by frequent and painful vaso-occlusive crises (VOCs). Various treatments have been evaluated over the years. However, a clear overview is lacking. The objective of this study was to systematically review all pharmacotherapeutical strategies in the

  13. Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: The Role of Intrapersonal Characteristics and Stress Processing Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katherine; Barakat, Lamia P.; Patterson, Chavis A.; Dampier, Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) complications place patients at risk for poor psychosocial adaptation, including depression and anxiety symptoms. This study aimed to test a mediator model based on the Risk and Resistance model to explore the role of intrapersonal characteristics and stress processing variables in psychosocial functioning. Participants…

  14. Socio-environmental exposures and health outcomes among persons with sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Asnani, Monika R.; Knight Madden, Jennifer; Reid, Marvin; Greene, Lisa-Gaye; Lyew-Ayee, Parris

    2017-01-01

    There is much variability in the expression of sickle cell disease (SCD) and recent works suggest that environmental and social factors may also influence this variability. This paper aims to use geographic information systems technology to examine the association between socio-environmental exposures and health outcomes in all persons who have attended or currently attend the Sickle Cell Unit in Jamaica. Rural patients presented for clinical care at older ages and had less annual visits to c...

  15. The post-mortem diagnosis of vasocclusive crisis in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Bhatia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD comprises a group of genetic blood disorders that affect the hemoglobin molecular structure, and in some cases, the association with hemoglobin synthesis. In sickle cell anemia, the replacement of glutamic acid by valine at the 6th position on the beta chain from the N terminal results in the synthesis of the abnormal hemoglobin, called hemoglobin S (HbS.

  16. Changing practice: red blood cell typing by molecular methods for patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jessica; Friedman, David F; Jackson, Tannoa; Vege, Sunitha; Westhoff, Connie M; Chou, Stella T

    2015-06-01

    Extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching is recommended to limit alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). DNA-based testing to predict blood group phenotypes has enhanced availability of antigen-negative donor units and improved typing of transfused patients, but replacement of routine serologic typing for non-ABO antigens with molecular typing for patients has not been reported. This study compared the historical RBC antigen phenotypes obtained by hemagglutination methods with genotype predictions in 494 patients with SCD. For discrepant results, repeat serologic testing was performed and/or investigated by gene sequencing for silent or variant alleles. Seventy-one typing discrepancies were identified among 6360 antigen comparisons (1.1%). New specimens for repeat serologic testing were obtained for 66 discrepancies and retyping agreed with the genotype in 64 cases. One repeat Jk(b-) serologic phenotype, predicted Jk(b+) by genotype, was found by direct sequencing of JK to be a silenced allele, and one N typing discrepancy remains under investigation. Fifteen false-negative serologic results were associated with alleles encoding weak antigens or single-dose Fy(b) expression. DNA-based RBC typing provided improved accuracy and expanded information on RBC antigens compared to hemagglutination methods, leading to its implementation as the primary method for extended RBC typing for patients with SCD at our institution. © 2015 AABB.

  17. Challenges in Shifting Management Responsibility From Parents to Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayle, Mariam; Tanabe, Paula; Shah, Nirmish R; Baker-Ward, Lynne; Docherty, Sharron L

    This study explored the challenges faced by adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) and their parents and the work they engage in to progressively shift from parent management to independent adolescent self-management. A qualitative descriptive focus-group design with semi-structured interviews was used with adolescents (11-18 years) with SCD (HbSS genotype) and their parents/primary caregivers. Interviews were analyzed using content analysis. Two adolescent focus groups, with a total of 14 adolescents, and two parent focus groups, with a total of 15 parents, described adaptive challenges. Adolescents' adaptive challenges included mastering complex symptom management, communicating about SCD and symptoms, and maintaining control. Parents' adaptive challenges included giving over the complex management, communicating the management with the adolescent, balancing protection against risk with fostering independence, changing a comfortable rhythm, and releasing the adolescent into an "SCD-naive" world. Adolescents' adaptive work included pushing back at parents, defaulting back to parental care, stepping up with time, learning how SCD affects them, and educating friends about SCD. Parents' adaptive work included engaging the adolescent in open dialogue and co-managing with the adolescent. Shifting management responsibility from parents to adolescents imposes adaptive challenges for both. Future research is needed to develop and test interventions that improve adaptive capacity in adolescents and parents. Health care providers need to assess the parent-child relationship and their progress in shifting the management responsibility, facilitate discussions to arrive at a shared understanding of the challenges, and collaborate on adaptive work to address these challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Randomized Trial of Hypnosis as a Pain and Symptom Management Strategy in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Gwenyth R; Middleton, Kimberly R; Ames, Nancy; Brooks, Alyssa T; Handel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disease in African-Americans, characterized by recurrent painful vaso-occlusive crises. Medical therapies for controlling or preventing crises are limited because of efficacy and/or toxicity. This is a randomized, controlled, single-crossover protocol of hypnosis for managing pain in SCD patients. Participants receive hypnosis from a trained hypnosis therapist followed by six weeks of self-hypnosis using digital media. Those in the control arm receive SCD education followed by a six-week waiting period before crossing over to the hypnosis arm of the study. Outcome measures include assessments of pain (frequency, intensity and quality), anxiety, coping strategies, sleep, depression, and health care utilization. To date, there are no published randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of hypnosis on SCD pain modulation in adults. Self-hypnosis for pain management may be helpful in modulating chronic pain, improving sleep quality, and decreasing use of narcotics in patients with SCD. TRIAL REGISTRATION ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00393250 PMID:25520557

  19. Randomized Trial of Hypnosis as a Pain and Symptom Management Strategy in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenyth R. Wallen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common genetic disease in African-Americans, characterized by recurrent painful vaso-occlusive crises. Medical therapies for controlling or preventing crises are limited because of efficacy and/or toxicity. This is a randomized, controlled, single-crossover protocol of hypnosis for managing pain in SCD patients. Participants receive hypnosis from a trained hypnosis therapist followed by six weeks of self-hypnosis using digital media. Those in the control arm receive SCD education followed by a six-week waiting period before crossing over to the hypnosis arm of the study. Outcome measures include assessments of pain (frequency, intensity and quality, anxiety, coping strategies, sleep, depression, and health care utilization. To date, there are no published randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of hypnosis on SCD pain modulation in adults. Self-hypnosis for pain management may be helpful in modulating chronic pain, improving sleep quality, and decreasing use of narcotics in patients with SCD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00393250

  20. Simultaneous point-of-care detection of anemia and sickle cell disease in Tanzania: the RAPID study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Luke R; Ambrose, Emmanuela E; Raphael, Kevin C; Hokororo, Adolfine; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Tyburski, Erika A; Lam, Wilbur A; Ware, Russell E; McGann, Patrick T

    2018-02-01

    Both anemia and sickle cell disease (SCD) are highly prevalent across sub-Saharan Africa, and limited resources exist to diagnose these conditions quickly and accurately. The development of simple, inexpensive, and accurate point-of-care (POC) assays represents an important advance for global hematology, one that could facilitate timely and life-saving medical interventions. In this prospective study, Robust Assays for Point-of-care Identification of Disease (RAPID), we simultaneously evaluated a POC immunoassay (Sickle SCAN™) to diagnose SCD and a first-generation POC color-based assay to detect anemia. Performed at Bugando Medical Center in Mwanza, Tanzania, RAPID tested 752 participants (age 1 day to 20 years) in four busy clinical locations. With minimally trained medical staff, the SCD POC assay diagnosed SCD with 98.1% sensitivity and 91.1% specificity. The hemoglobin POC assay had 83.2% sensitivity and 74.5% specificity for detection of severe anemia (Hb ≤ 7 g/dL). Interobserver agreement was excellent for both POC assays (r = 0.95-0.96). Results for the hemoglobin POC assay have informed the second-generation assay design to be more suitable for low-resource settings. RAPID provides practical feasibility data regarding two novel POC assays for the diagnosis of anemia and SCD in real-world field evaluations and documents the utility and potential impact of these POC assays for sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial consequences of sickle cell disease: the case of patients in a public hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzika, Vincent A; Glozah, Franklin N; Ayim-Aboagye, Desmond; Ahorlu, Collins S K

    2017-01-31

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is of major public health concern globally, with majority of patients living in Africa. Despite its relevance, there is a dearth of research to determine the socio-demographic distribution and psychosocial impact of SCD in Ghana. The objective of this study was to examine the socio-demographic distribution and psychosocial consequences of SCD among patients in Ghana and to assess their quality of life and coping mechanisms. A cross-sectional research design was used that involved the completion of questionnaires on socio-demographic characteristics, quality of life, coping mechanisms, anxiety and depression. Participants were 387 male and female patients attending a sickle cell clinic in a public hospital. Results showed that majority of the patients were single, female, less than 39 years old and had attained secondary school level of education or less. Also, patients were more satisfied by the presence of love, friends and relatives as well as home, community and neighbourhood environment. While pains of varied nature and severity were the major reasons for attending hospital in SCD condition, going to the hospital as well as having faith in God was the most frequently reported mechanisms for coping with an unbearable SCD attacks. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that some socio-demographic and quality of life indicators had strong associations with anxiety and/or depression. It is recommended that a holistic intervention strategy incorporating psychosocial dimensions should be considered in the treatment and management of SCD.

  2. Anti-HI can cause a severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis in sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Clara; Habibi, Anoosha; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Chadebech, Philippe; Chami, Btissam; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Rieux, Claire; Nataf, Joëlle; Bartolucci, Pablo; Peyrard, Thierry; Pirenne, France

    2016-07-01

    Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is a life-threatening condition in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients that is frequently complicated by hyperhemolysis. Antibodies resulting from antigen disparity between donors of European ancestry and patients of African ancestry are common, but situations involving antibodies not classically of clinical significance are also encountered. Anti-HI is generally considered to be an innocuous naturally occurring antibody. We describe two cases of hyperhemolysis with anti-HI and provide details of the reported cases. Both SCD patients were polyimmunized and belonged to blood group B. They developed anti-HI that was reactive at 37°C, after the transfusion of group O red blood cell units matched for all known and produced antibodies classically considered to be clinically significant. Both patients developed DHTR with hyperhemolysis. In the first case, a pregnant woman, a second transfusion was unavoidable and the patient died from cardiac arrest. The state of the second patient improved without the need for further transfusion. Three other cases of DHTR with anti-HI have been described in the literature in SCD patients. The two additional cases reported here definitively demonstrate that anti-HI is dangerous in SCD patients. As a result, ABO-identical matching (including A1 status) must be considered in SCD patients with anti-HI. © 2016 AABB.

  3. Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease Reverses Hypogonadism Without Promoting Priapism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda F. Morrison

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Delayed puberty secondary to hypogonadism is commonly seen in sickle cell disease (SCD, affecting normal growth and development. The condition is rarely treated in SCD for fear of inducing priapism episodes. We present a case report of an Afro-Jamaican adolescent male at 16 years of age who presented with symptoms of delayed puberty as well as frequent stuttering priapism episodes. Endocrinological assessment revealed low serum total testosterone levels. Treatment was commenced monthly with testosterone enanthate which resulted in improved symptoms of delayed puberty, improvement in anthropometric parameters while apparently ameliorating priapism episodes.

  4. The impact of the oral condition of children with sickle cell disease on family quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza da Matta Felisberto FERNANDES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the impact of oral conditions of children with sickle cell disease (SCD on their parents’ quality of life (QoL. A cross-sectional study was performed with parents of outpatients suffering from SCD at a hematology referral center in Belo Horizonte, MG. A qualified dentist performed an intraoral exam. The Family Impact Scale (FIS was used to assess the parents’ perception of QoL. The parents answered some questions regarding sociodemographic and medical information about their children. The dmft/DMFT score, DAI, gum bleeding and SCD severity were evaluated in terms of their impacts on the overall mean FIS scores and subscale scores. The chance of more frequent impacts was greater in parents of adolescents (OR = 2.04; 95%CI = 1.2, 3.4 than of younger children. Dental caries (dmft/DMFT ≥ 1 had a negative impact on the QoL of parents of younger children and adolescents (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively. Among the parents of younger children, dental caries and SCD severity significantly affected the subscales for parental activities (PA and parental emotions (PE (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively. Among parents of adolescents, dental caries (DMFT and severe malocclusion adversely affected the PE and PA subscales (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively. SCD severity affected the overall FIS score among young children’s parents (p < 0.05. In conclusion, dental caries, age and SCD severity were associated with a negative impact on the QoL of parents of children with SCD

  5. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD.

  6. Chronic kidney disease is common in sickle cell disease: a cross-sectional study in the Tema Metropolis, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Richard Kobina Dadzie; Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Cudjoe, Obed; Oduro, Enos Amoako; Asante-Asamani, Lyudmila; Mitchell, Juliana; Agbodzakey, Hope; Adoba, Prince

    2015-05-29

    Renal involvement in sickle cell disease (SCD) contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) amongst SCD patients, and how basic clinical variables differ across haemoglobin genotypes. A hospital-based cross-sectional study conducted from December 2013 to May 2014 at the Sickle cell clinic of the Tema General Hospital. One hundred and ninety-four (194) participants with SCD, receiving medical care at the outpatient sickle cell clinic were enrolled onto the study. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain information on demography, clinical history, blood pressure and anthropometry. Blood and urine samples were taken for serum creatinine and proteinuria determination respectively. The estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated using the CKD-EPI and Schwartz equations. CKD was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines. Analysis was performed using GraphPad prism and P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. CKD was present in 39.2% of participants. Using KDIGO guidelines, 40.8% of the HbSS participants had stage 1 CKD and none had stage 2 CKD. In addition, 30.8% of the HbSC participants had stage 1 CKD and 3.8% had stage 2 CKD. There was a trend of increasing age across CKD stages and stage 2 CKD participants were oldest (P < 0.001). Results from the current study suggest that CKD is common amongst SCD patients and prevalence and intensity increases with age. Proteinuria and CKD was more common in HbSS genotype than in HbSC genotype.

  7. CD209-336A/G promotor polymorphism and its clinical associations in sickle cell disease Egyptian Pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Rasha Abdel-Raouf; Kamal, Dina; Sayed, Riham El; Ekladious, Sherif M M; Shaheen, Gehan H; Yousry, Sherif M; Hussein, Rania Elsayed

    2018-06-01

    To detect the frequency of CD209 A>G polymorphism in sickle cell disease (SCD) Egyptian patients and to evaluate the use of CD209 A>G polymorphism as a genetic predictor of SCD clinical heterogeneity. A total of 100 Egyptian children with SCD and 100 Egyptian controls were tested for CD209 A>G polymorphism and were followed up prospectively between June 2012 and December 2014. Comparison of CD209 A>G polymorphism among cases and controls did not show statistically significant difference (p = .742). In addition, comparison of the allelic frequency did not show statistically significant difference (p = .738). Infections occurred more frequently among the heterozygous genotype (AG; 60.5%) and homozygous genotype (GG; 75%) patients than among the wild (AA) genotype (24.1%; p G polymorphism. Infections occurred more frequently among the heterozygous genotype (AG) and homozygous genotype (GG) patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Jones, Ashley P; Howard, Jo

    2017-04-20

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited diseases worldwide. It is associated with lifelong morbidity and a reduced life expectancy. Hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide), an oral chemotherapeutic drug, ameliorates some of the clinical problems of SCD, in particular that of pain, by raising fetal haemoglobin. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To assess the effects of hydroxyurea therapy in people with SCD (all genotypes), of any age, regardless of setting. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Register, comprising of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also searched online trial registries.Date of the most recent search: 16 January 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials, of one month or longer, comparing hydroxyurea with placebo, standard therapy or other interventions for people with SCD. Authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, carried out data extraction and assessed the risk of bias. Seventeen studies were identified in the searches; eight randomised controlled trials were included, recruiting 899 adults and children with SCD (haemoglobin SS (HbSS), haemoglobin SC (HbSC) or haemoglobin Sβºthalassaemia (HbSβºthal) genotypes). Studies lasted from six to 30 months.Four studies (577 adults and children with HbSS or HbSβºthal) compared hydroxyurea to placebo; three recruited individuals with only severe disease and one recruited individuals with all disease severities. There were statistically significant improvements in terms of pain alteration (using measures such as pain crisis frequency, duration, intensity, hospital admissions and opoid use), measures of fetal haemoglobin and neutrophil counts and fewer occurrences of acute chest syndrome and blood transfusions in the hydroxyurea groups. There were no consistent

  9. Using Quality Improvement Methods to Implement an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) Supported Individualized Home Pain Management Plan for Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lori E; Simmons, Kenya; Kaiser, Peggy; Davis, Blair; Boyd, Patricia; Eichhorn, Tiffany; Mahaney, Tracy; Joffe, Naomi; Morgan, Darice; Schibler, Kathy; Anderson, Viia; Quinn, Charles T; Kalinyak, Karen A

    2014-05-01

    Using quality improvement methodology, our goal was to develop and implement individualized home pain management plans (HPMP) that included pharmacologic as well as non-pharmacologic strategies for children with sickle cell disease (SCD). We hypothesized that successfully implemented HPMPs would have an impact on Emergency Department (ED) use, decreasing ED visits for uncomplicated SCD pain episodes. A multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed a questionnaire to assess the frequency, location and severity of a patient's pain during a routine, comprehensive visit in order to help the patient and family develop an effective pain management strategy using both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic actions. Using plan do study act cycles (PDSAs), this team was able to build this process into the daily workflow for all SCD patients age 5 years to 21 years of age. Patients with comprehensive visits scheduled from January 2012 to May 2013 were included (N=188) in the intervention. By May of 2013, 88% of eligible patients had an individualized HPMP in place. There was a concomitant reduction in the percentage of SCD patients seen in the ED for uncomplicated SCD pain (6.9% vs. 1.1%). Using quality improvement methods, an individualized HPMP intervention was incorporated successfully into the daily workflow of a busy outpatient SCD clinic. This intervention has the potential to improve patient outcomes by decreasing avoidable ED visits as well as reducing overall healthcare costs.

  10. Cation Homeostasis in Red Cells From Patients With Sickle Cell Disease Heterologous for HbS and HbC (HbSC Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hannemann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD in patients of HbSC genotype is considered similar, albeit milder, to that in homozygous HbSS individuals — but with little justification. In SCD, elevated red cell cation permeability is critical as increased solute loss causes dehydration and encourages sickling. Recently, we showed that the KCl cotransporter (KCC activity in red cells from HbSC patients correlated significantly with disease severity, but that in HbSS patients did not. Two transporters involved in red cell dehydration, the conductive channels Psickle and the Gardos channel, behaved similarly in red cells from the two genotypes, but were significantly less active in HbSC patients. By contrast, KCC activity was quantitatively greater in HbSC red cells. Results suggest that KCC is likely to have greater involvement in red cell dehydration in HbSC patients, which could explain its association with disease severity in this genotype. This work supports the hypothesis that SCD in HbSC patients is a distinct disease entity to that in HbSS patients. Results suggest the possibility of designing specific treatments of particular benefit to HbSC patients and a rationale for the development of prognostic markers, to inform early treatment of children likely to develop more severe complications of the disease.

  11. [Formula: see text]Executive functioning and health-related quality of life in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Taryn M; Anderson, Lindsay M; Rothman, Jennifer A; Bonner, Melanie J

    2017-11-01

    Research consistently indicates that children with sickle cell disease (SCD) face multiple risk factors for neurocognitive impairment. Despite this, no empirical research to date has examined the impact of neurocognitive functioning on quality of life for this pediatric group. Thus, the current study aims to examine the relationship between executive functioning and quality of life in a sample of children with SCD and further explore psychosocial and family/caregiver resources as moderators of this relationship. A total of 45 children with SCD aged 8 to 16 years and their caregivers completed measures of quality of life, behavioral ratings of executive functioning, and psychosocial functioning. Hierarchical linear regression models were utilized to determine the impact of executive functioning on quality of life and further test the interaction effects of proposed moderating variables. Controlling for age, pain, and socioeconomic status (SES), executive functioning was found to significantly predict child- and parent-reported quality of life among youth with SCD. Psychosocial resources of the primary caregiver or family was not found to moderate the relationship between executive functioning and quality of life. These results provide the first empirical evidence that lower executive skills negatively predict quality of life for children with SCD, supporting clinical and research efforts which aim to establish efficacious interventions that target cognitive decrements within this pediatric population.

  12. Influence of βS-Globin Haplotypes and Hydroxyurea on Arginase I Levels in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Moreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sickle cell disease (SCD is characterized by hemoglobin S homozygosity, leading to hemolysis and vasoocclusion. The hemolysis releases arginase I, an enzyme that decreases the bioavailability of nitric oxide, worsening the symptoms. The different SCD haplotypes are related to clinical symptoms and varied hemoglobin F (HbF concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the βS gene haplotypes and HbF concentration on arginase I levels in SCD patients. Methods. Fifty SCD adult patients were enrolled in the study and 20 blood donors composed the control group. Arginase I was measured by ELISA. The βS haplotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Statistical analyses were performed with GraphPad Prism program and the significance level was p<0.05. Results. Significant increase was observed in the arginase I levels in SCD patients compared to the control group (p<0.0001. The comparison between the levels of arginase I in three haplotypes groups showed a difference between the Bantu/Bantu × Bantu/Benin groups; Bantu/Bantu × Benin/Benin, independent of HU dosage. An inverse correlation with the arginase I levels and HbF concentration was observed. Conclusion. The results support the hypothesis that arginase I is associated with HbF concentration, also measured indirectly by the association with haplotypes.

  13. Prevalence of sickle cell disease among children attending plateau specialist hospital, Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanbur Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An estimate of 250,000 children are born annually with sickle cell disease (SCD worldwide and 75%–85% of the affected children are born in Africa; where mortality rates for those under age 5 years range from 50% to 80%. Objective: The present study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of SCD among children in Plateau State Specialist Hospital (PSSH, Jos, Nigeria. Methodology: Ethical approval was obtained from the Health Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital. Secondary data on age, gender, and region from the case notes of infants, children and/or adolescents; who received medical care in PSSH from 2012 to 2014 were used. Data were analyzed using frequency tables and Chi-square statistics. Results: The findings revealed that the prevalence of SCD in PSSH, Jos from 2012 to 2014 was 26.9/1000 population of pediatric patients. There was a gradual increase in the prevalence rate from 25.8/1000 in 2012 to 26.8/1000 in 2013 and 28.1/1000 in 2014. However, the case fatality rate of SCD gradually decreased from 15.4% in 2012 to 11.1% in 2013 and 10.3% in 2014. Chi-square test shows that the prevalence of the disease in relation to sex, age, and residence was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Even though the case fatality rate of the disease decreased, its prevalence increased during the study. Conclusion: Therefore, preventive measure for SCD such as premarital genetic screening and counseling should be emphasized, especially in the southern and central geopolitical zones of Plateau state, where the prevalence was found to be higher.

  14. Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Alloimmunization is a recognized complication of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and causes delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and provides problems sourcing compatible blood for future transfusions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of RBC alloimmunization in SCD patients in ...

  15. Original Research: Parvovirus B19 infection in children with sickle cell disease in the hydroxyurea era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Lavoie, Paul; Tang, Li; Sun, Yilun; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes transient aplastic crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to a temporary interruption in the red blood cell production. Toxicity from hydroxyurea includes anemia and reticulocytopenia, both of which also occur during a transient aplastic crisis event. Hydroxyurea inhibits proliferation of hematopoietic cells and may be immunosuppressive. We postulated that hydroxyurea could exacerbate parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis and inhibit the development of specific immune responses in children with SCD. We conducted a retrospective review of parvovirus B19 infection in 330 children with SCD. Altogether there were 120 known cases of aplastic crisis attributed to parvovirus B19 infection, and 12% of children were on hydroxyurea treatment during the episode. We evaluated hematological and immune responses. Children with HbSS or HbSβ0-thalassemia treated with hydroxyurea, when compared with untreated children, required fewer transfusions and had higher Hb concentration nadir during transient aplastic crisis. Duration of hospital stays was no different between hydroxyurea-treated and untreated groups. Children tested within a week following aplastic crisis were positive for parvovirus-specific IgG. Immune responses lasted for the duration of the observation period, up to 13 years after transient aplastic crisis, and there were no repeat aplastic crisis episodes. The frequencies of parvovirus-specific antibodies in all children with SCD increased with age, as expected due to the increased likelihood of a parvovirus exposure, and were comparable to frequencies reported for healthy children. Approximately one-third of children had a positive parvovirus B19-specific IgG test without a documented history of transient aplastic crisis, and 64% of them were treated with hydroxyurea. Hydroxyurea may reduce requirements for blood transfusions and may attenuate symptoms during transient aplastic crisis episodes caused by parvovirus B19 infections

  16. Original Research: Parvovirus B19 infection in children with sickle cell disease in the hydroxyurea era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Jane S; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Lavoie, Paul; Tang, Li; Sun, Yilun; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-04-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes transient aplastic crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to a temporary interruption in the red blood cell production. Toxicity from hydroxyurea includes anemia and reticulocytopenia, both of which also occur during a transient aplastic crisis event. Hydroxyurea inhibits proliferation of hematopoietic cells and may be immunosuppressive. We postulated that hydroxyurea could exacerbate parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis and inhibit the development of specific immune responses in children with SCD. We conducted a retrospective review of parvovirus B19 infection in 330 children with SCD. Altogether there were 120 known cases of aplastic crisis attributed to parvovirus B19 infection, and 12% of children were on hydroxyurea treatment during the episode. We evaluated hematological and immune responses. Children with HbSS or HbSβ(0)-thalassemia treated with hydroxyurea, when compared with untreated children, required fewer transfusions and had higher Hb concentration nadir during transient aplastic crisis. Duration of hospital stays was no different between hydroxyurea-treated and untreated groups. Children tested within a week following aplastic crisis were positive for parvovirus-specific IgG. Immune responses lasted for the duration of the observation period, up to 13 years after transient aplastic crisis, and there were no repeat aplastic crisis episodes. The frequencies of parvovirus-specific antibodies in all children with SCD increased with age, as expected due to the increased likelihood of a parvovirus exposure, and were comparable to frequencies reported for healthy children. Approximately one-third of children had a positive parvovirus B19-specific IgG test without a documented history of transient aplastic crisis, and 64% of them were treated with hydroxyurea. Hydroxyurea may reduce requirements for blood transfusions and may attenuate symptoms during transient aplastic crisis episodes caused by parvovirus B19 infections

  17. Elevated homocysteine levels indicate suboptimal folate status in pediatric sickle cell patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Dijs, FPL; Schnog, JJB; Brouwer, DAJ; Velvis, HJR; van den Berg, GA; Bakker, AJ; Duits, AJ; Muskiet, FD

    1998-01-01

    We investigated whether pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) (9 +/- 4 years; 27 homozygous SCD [HbSS]; 19 sickle-C disease [HbSC]) have different folate status compared with age-, sex-, and race-matched normal hemoglobin (HbAA) controls (n = 20), and whether their folate status can be

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in children with sickle cell disease - detecting alterations in the apparent diffusion coefficient in hips with avascular necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, John D.; Hernandez, Andrea; Pena, Andres; Khrichenko, Dmitry; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Jaramillo, Diego; Ruppert, Kai; Jawad, Abbas F.; Wells, Lawrence; Smith-Whitley, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common morbidity in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) that leads to pain and joint immobility. However, the diagnosis is often uncertain or delayed. To examine the ability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements on diffusion-weighted imaging to detect AVN in children with SCD. ADC values were calculated at the hips of normal children (n = 19) and children with SCD who were either asymptomatic with no known previous hip disease (n = 13) or presented for the first time with clinical symptoms of hip pathology (n = 12). ADC values were compared for differences among groups with and without AVN using non-parametric statistical methods. The ADC values were elevated in the hips of children with AVN (median ADC = 1.57 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s [95% confidence interval = 0.86-2.10]) and differed significantly in pairwise comparisons (all P < 0.05) from normal children (0.74 [0.46-0.98]), asymptomatic children with SCD (0.55 [0.25-0.85]), and SCD children who had symptoms referable to their hips but did not show findings of hip AVN on conventional MRI or radiographs (0.46 [0.18-0.72]). Children with sickle cell disease have elevated apparent diffusion coefficient values in their affected hips on initial diagnosis of avascular necrosis. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in children with sickle cell disease - detecting alterations in the apparent diffusion coefficient in hips with avascular necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, John D. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hernandez, Andrea; Pena, Andres; Khrichenko, Dmitry; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruppert, Kai [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jawad, Abbas F. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatrics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Orthopedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith-Whitley, Kim [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Hematology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common morbidity in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) that leads to pain and joint immobility. However, the diagnosis is often uncertain or delayed. To examine the ability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements on diffusion-weighted imaging to detect AVN in children with SCD. ADC values were calculated at the hips of normal children (n = 19) and children with SCD who were either asymptomatic with no known previous hip disease (n = 13) or presented for the first time with clinical symptoms of hip pathology (n = 12). ADC values were compared for differences among groups with and without AVN using non-parametric statistical methods. The ADC values were elevated in the hips of children with AVN (median ADC = 1.57 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [95% confidence interval = 0.86-2.10]) and differed significantly in pairwise comparisons (all P < 0.05) from normal children (0.74 [0.46-0.98]), asymptomatic children with SCD (0.55 [0.25-0.85]), and SCD children who had symptoms referable to their hips but did not show findings of hip AVN on conventional MRI or radiographs (0.46 [0.18-0.72]). Children with sickle cell disease have elevated apparent diffusion coefficient values in their affected hips on initial diagnosis of avascular necrosis. (orig.)

  20. Hemoglobin to Hematocrit Ratio: The Strongest Predictor of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis in Children With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Douglas; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Wells, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    Femoral head osteonecrosis (ON) secondary to sickle cell disease (SCD) often progresses to femoral head collapse, requiring total hip arthroplasty. However, this treatment has a limited durability and patients with SCD have higher rates of complications, requiring multiple revision operations. Identifying risk factors linked to ON in SCD can facilitate earlier precollapse diagnosis and surgical treatment aimed at preservation of the native hip joint. Fifty-nine children treated at our institution between January 2001 and April 2012 with SCD and ON, as diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging or radiographic imaging, were compared with age-matched and sickle cell phenotype-matched (SS, SC, Sβ, Sβ) controls with no evidence of ON. Two sided t-tests assuming unequal variances determined statistically risk factors and threshold values were assigned to calculate odds ratios. Systolic blood pressure (P=1.2×10, OR=3.68), diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0084, OR=1.41), weight in the SCD-SS population (P=0.04, OR=1.85), and hemoglobin (Hb) in the SCD-SS population (P=0.036, OR=2.56) were elevated in cases. Curiously, dividing the Hb by the hematocrit to serve as a clinical proxy for the mean corpuscular Hb concentration (MCHC) produced an excellent predictor of ON (P=2.06×10, OR=5.17), which was especially pronounced in the SCD-SS subpopulation (P=2.28×10, OR=8.65). Among children with SCD, the overall prevalence of ON was 9% (59/658) and the phenotype with the highest prevalence of ON was Sβ thalassemia with an ON prevalence of 11.1%. There was no observed correlation between ON and height, body mass index, cholesterol, mean corpuscular volume, hematocrit, or glucocorticoid use. These data support a novel clinical marker, the MCHC proxy, as the strongest predictor of ON in children with SCD. High-risk children should receive hip magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose early ON and facilitate interventions focused on hip preservation, forestalling, or possibly preventing

  1. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head in sickle cell disease: prevalence, comorbidities, and surgical outcomes in California

    OpenAIRE

    Adesina, Oyebimpe; Brunson, Ann; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Wun, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a prevalent complication of sickle cell disease (SCD) that has not been well described in population-based cohort studies. Using California's Office of Statewide Planning and Development discharge databases (1991-2013), we estimated the cumulative incidence of ONFH after accounting for the competing risk of death and used a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to identify factors associated with ONFH diagnosis. We also calculated rates ...

  2. Social skills and executive function among youth with sickle cell disease: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensler, Molly; Wolfe, Kelly; Lebensburger, Jeffrey; Nieman, Jilian; Barnes, Margaux; Nolan, William; King, Allison; Madan-Swain, Avi

    2014-06-01

    To explore the relationship between executive function (EF) and social skills in youth with sickle cell disease (SCD).   20 youth with SCD completed objective tests of EF (Tasks of Executive Control; Animal Sorting subtest from the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment-Second Edition), an IQ screener, and paper-and-pencil measures of social skills (Social Skills Improvement System [SSIS]). Primary caregivers completed paper-and-pencil measures of EF (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function) and social skills (SSIS).   EF scores from the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function related to parent- and child-reported social skills such that EF deficits correlated with poorer overall and domain-specific social skills. Similarly, EF scores from the Animal Sorting test related to child-reported social skills. Worse parent-reported EF predicted worse parent-reported social skills above the variance accounted for by IQ.   EF is related to social skills and may be necessary for successful social interaction among youth with SCD. These results provide rationale and guidance for future larger-scale investigations of EF and social skills among children with SCD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Parent Perspectives on Pain Management in Preschool-Age Children With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelsey; Reinman, Laura; Schatz, Jeffrey; Roberts, Carla W

    Pain episodes occur for many preschoolers with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little is known about parent perceptions of managing pain episodes in young children. We surveyed parents of young children with SCD who had managed pain episodes in the past year to assess their management and satisfaction with their strategies, challenges of pain management, and interest in additional education. Parents were recruited from health maintenance visits at a SCD specialty clinic. Forty-two of 51 parents (82%) of 2- to-6-year-olds reported managing pain over the past year. Parents who had managed pain primarily reported using medications. These parents reported at least moderate satisfaction with current management strategies and resources. At least one-third of parents found each facet of pain management queried as at least somewhat challenging. Identifying when their child was in pain, encouraging functional activities, and managing irritable behavior were reported as most challenging. Parents of young children with SCD reported interest in additional pain management education, which could promote better parent and child coping skills.

  4. Pediatric to Adult Care Transition: Perspectives of Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jerlym S; Wesley, Kimberly M; Zhao, Mimi S; Rupff, Rebecca J; Hankins, Jane S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore perspectives of transition and transition readiness of young adult patients (YAs) with sickle cell disease (SCD) who have transitioned to adult health care. In all, 19 YAs with SCD (ages 18-30 years) participated in one of three focus groups and completed a brief questionnaire about transition topics. Transcripts were coded and emergent themes were examined using the social-ecological model of adolescent and young adult readiness for transition (SMART). Themes were consistent with most SMART components. Adult provider relationships and negative medical experiences emerged as salient factors. YAs ranked choosing an adult provider, seeking emergency care, understanding medications/medication adherence, knowing SCD complications, and being aware of the impact of health behaviors as the most important topics to include in transition programming. The unique perspectives of YAs can inform the development and evaluation of SCD transition programming by incorporating the identified themes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Sonographic assessment of spleen size in Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salem, Ahmed H.; Al-Aithan, S.; Al-Jama, A.; Al-Dabbous, I.; Bhamidipati, P.

    1998-01-01

    In patients with SCD, the spleen commonly enlarges during the first two decades of life but then undergoes autosplenectomy due to repeated attacks of vaso-occlusion and infarction. This, however, is not the case in Saudi patients with SCD (340 SCD and 23-sickle beta-thalassemia). A total of 363 patients were evaluated. There ages ranged from 1-60 years (mean 60 years). Only 24 (6.6%) of our patients had autosplenectomy. The splenic index increased with age until about 40 years of age and then gradually decreased indicating persistence of splenomegaly in our patients into an older age group. Forty-three patients (11.8%) had marked-massive splenomegaly (splenic index >120cm) and these had higher HbF levels (mean HbF=22.2%) when compared with those who had autosplenectomy (mean HbF=14.6). This is significant (P-value=0.0169) and confirms the effect of HbF on persistence of splenomegaly in SCD patients. Ultrasonography is a simple, safe and accurate method of assessing splenic size in patients with sickle cell disease. Patients with persistent splenomegaly should be followed closely for development of complications which may necessitate splenectomy. (author)

  6. Cellular normoxic biophysical markers of hydroxyurea treatment in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Poorya; Abidi, Sabia Z; Du, E; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios P; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, YongKeun; Higgins, John M; Kato, Gregory J; Suresh, Subra; Dao, Ming; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T C

    2016-08-23

    Hydroxyurea (HU) has been used clinically to reduce the frequency of painful crisis and the need for blood transfusion in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. However, the mechanisms underlying such beneficial effects of HU treatment are still not fully understood. Studies have indicated a weak correlation between clinical outcome and molecular markers, and the scientific quest to develop companion biophysical markers have mostly targeted studies of blood properties under hypoxia. Using a common-path interferometric technique, we measure biomechanical and morphological properties of individual red blood cells in SCD patients as a function of cell density, and investigate the correlation of these biophysical properties with drug intake as well as other clinically measured parameters. Our results show that patient-specific HU effects on the cellular biophysical properties are detectable at normoxia, and that these properties are strongly correlated with the clinically measured mean cellular volume rather than fetal hemoglobin level.

  7. Pain Management for Sickle Cell Disease in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Medications and Hospitalization Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciotti, Chantel; Vaiselbuh, Sarah; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny

    2017-10-01

    The majority of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are pain related. Adequate and timely pain management may improve quality of life and prevent worsening morbidities. We conducted a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients with SCD seen in the ED, selected by sickle cell-related ICD-9 codes. A total of 176 encounters were reviewed from 47 patients to record ED pain management and hospitalization trends. Mean time to pain medication administration was 63 minutes. Patients received combination (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID] + narcotic) pain medications for initial treatment at a minority of ED encounters (19%). A higher percentage of patients who received narcotics alone as initial treatment were hospitalized as compared with those who received combination treatment initially ( P= 0.0085). Improved patient education regarding home pain management as well as standardized ED guidelines for assessment and treatment of sickle cell pain may result in superior and more consistent patient care.

  8. Quality of life in patients with sickle cell disease in Jamaica: rural-urban differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Monika R; Reid, Marvin E; Ali, Susanna B; Lipps, Garth; Williams-Green, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) refers to people's ability to function in the ordinary tasks of living. It moves beyond direct manifestations of illness to the patient's personal morbidity. These assessments are an important aspect of chronic disease management. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic and potentially, quite a debilitating disease. The disease is severe and may result in significant morbidity, as well as a shortened life span. It is the most common genetic disorder seen in Jamaica and impacts on physical, psychological, social and occupational wellbeing. Jamaica is a developing country where support systems that exist for patients with SCD are sparse. Health related QOL has been shown to be poorer in people living in the rural areas as compared with urban populations. Utilization of comprehensive sickle cells disease services has also been shown to be lower for individuals with the disease living in rural areas than for those living in urban areas. As there are rural-urban differences in Jamaica's health services, it is hypothesized that there may be rural-urban differences in the experiences of the disease and the QOL of these patients in these subgroups. The SF 36 v2 (Short Form 36) questionnaire has been validated for use in the Jamaican SCD population. This validated questionnaire was interviewer-administered to 166 patients presenting to an urban clinic for routine health maintenance visits and to 90 patients presenting to the rural clinics for routine visits. Socio-demographic information was also collected on these two groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to study predictors of QOL in these two sub-populations. The study received ethical approval from the University of the West Indies/University Hospital of the West Indies Ethics Committee. There were no significant differences in the measured socio-demographic characteristics of the rural and urban patients. Living in rural areas compared with urban areas (p <0.001), being

  9. Outcome of cholelithiasis in Sudanese children with Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the commonest inherited haemoglobinopathy. Its most common clinical manifestation is anemia due to chronic haemolysis. The occurrence of gallstones is one of the most important manifestations of SCD in the digestive tract1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Excessive production of bilirubin from chronic haemolysis ...

  10. Patient Perspectives on Gene Transfer Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Heather; Mitchell, Monica J; Goldstein-Leever, Alana; Shook, Lisa; Malik, Punam; Crosby, Lori E

    2017-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic genetic disease with high morbidity and early mortality; it affects nearly 100,000 individuals in the USA. Bone marrow transplantation, the only curative treatment, is available to less than 20% of patients because of a number of access barriers. Gene transfer therapy (GTT) has been shown to be curative in animal models and is approved for use in humans for early-phase studies at a few centers. GTT would offer a more accessible treatment option available to all patients. It is important to understand patient perspectives on GTT to help ensure human clinical trial success. Two focus groups were conducted with younger (18-30 years) and older (31 years and older) adults with SCD to obtain data on patient knowledge and beliefs about GTT. Data from these two focus groups was used to develop a GTT educational brochure. A third focus group was conducted to obtain participant feedback on acceptability and feasibility of education and the brochure. Most adults, especially young adults, had little knowledge about GTT and expressed fear and uncertainty about the side effects of chemotherapy (e.g., hair loss, infertility), use of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-derived viral vector, and potential for cancer risk. Participants wanted full transparency in educational materials, but advised researchers not to share the vector's relation to HIV because of cultural stigma and no HIV virus is used for the GTT vector. Older adults had more desire to participate in human clinical GTT trials than younger participants. When recruiting for trials, researchers should develop GTT educational materials that address participant lack of trust in the healthcare system, cultural beliefs, fears related to side effects, and include visual illustrations. Use of such materials will provide adults with SCD the information they need to fully evaluate GTT.

  11. Exploring the link between innate immune activation and thymic function by measuring sCD14 and TRECs in HIV patients living in Belgium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien De Voeght

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation is now viewed as a central event in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation during HIV infection. Thymic function failure is another crucial factor involved in HIV disease progression. The goal of this study was to explore the hypothesis of potential links between microbial translocation and thymic function in HIV-1 patients living in Belgium. The extent of microbial translocation was assessed through the measurement of soluble CD14 (sCD14. T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTRECs and dβTRECs were used as a measure of thymic function. Data were collected from 75 HIV-infected patients. Simple and complex linear regressions were done to analyze the link between these two processes. We found a statistically relevant negative correlation between thymopoiesis (sjTREC and sCD14 level (p = 0.004. These results suggest a link between thymic function failure, microbial translocation and innate immune activation.

  12. Circulating sCD14 is associated with virological response to pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT through the gut accounts for immune activation and CD4+ loss in HIV and may influence HCV disease progression in HIV/HCV co-infection. We asked whether increased MT and immune activation may hamper anti-HCV response in HIV/HCV patients.98 HIV/HCV patients who received pegylated-alpha-interferon (peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline MT (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, host response to MT (sCD14, CD38+HLA-DR+CD4+/CD8+, HCV genotype, severity of liver disease were assessed according to Early Virological Response (EVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL at week 12 of therapy or ≥2 log(10 reduction from baseline after 12 weeks of therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL 24 weeks after end of therapy. Mann-Whitney/Chi-square test and Pearson's correlation were used. Multivariable regression was performed to determine factors associated with EVR/SVR.71 patients displayed EVR; 41 SVR. Patients with HCV genotypes 1-4 and cirrhosis presented a trend to higher sCD14, compared to patients with genotypes 2-3 (p = 0.053 and no cirrhosis (p = 0.052. EVR and SVR patients showed lower levels of circulating sCD14 (p = 0.0001, p = 0.026, respectively, but similar T-cell activation compared to Non-EVR (Null Responders, NR and Non-SVR (N-SVR subjects. sCD14 resulted the main predictive factor of EVR (0.145 for each sCD14 unit more, 95%CI 0.031-0.688, p = 0.015. SVR was associated only with HCV genotypes 2-3 (AOR 0.022 for genotypes 1-4 vs 2-3, 95%CI 0.001-0.469, p = 0.014.In HIV/HCV patients sCD14 correlates with the severity of liver disease and predicts early response to peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin, suggesting MT-driven immune activation as pathway of HIV/HCV co-infection and response to therapy.

  13. Blood transfusion in children with sickle cell disease undergoing tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Carlyn M; Gnagi, Sharon H; Teufel, Ronald J; Nguyen, Shaun A; White, David R

    2017-12-01

    Tonsillectomy is the second most common surgery in children with sickle cell disease. These children are at an increased risk of perioperative complications due to vaso-occlusive events. Although controversial, preoperative blood transfusions are sometimes given in an effort to prevent such complications. The purpose of this study is to analyze trends in the use of blood transfusion for management of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing tonsillectomy in a national database. Patients in the 1997-2012 KID with a primary procedure matching the ICD-9 procedure code for tonsillectomy (28.2-28.3) and diagnosis code for SCD (282.60-282.69) were examined. Patients were split into groups by blood transfusion status and compared across variables including complication rate, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges. Statistical analysis included chi-square test for trend, Mann-Whitney U test, and independent t-test. 1133 patients with SCD underwent tonsillectomy. There was a strong positive correlation between increasing chronologic year and the proportion of patients receiving blood transfusions, 47 (30.1%) in 1997 to 78 (42.5%) in 2012 (r = 0.94, p = 0.005). During this period, there was no significant change in the rate of complications (r = -0.1, p = 0.87). Overall, patients receiving blood transfusion had a longer mean LOS (3.1 ± 2.4 days vs. 2.5 ± 2.2 days, p blood transfusion. The rate of complications in the transfusion group, 18 of 352(5.1%), was not significantly different (p = 0.48) from the group without transfusion, 40 of 626 (6.4%). From 1997 to 2012, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with SCD receiving perioperative blood transfusions for tonsillectomy. While the frequency of transfusion rose, those who received a transfusion had similar complication rates with increased charges and length of hospital stays compared to those who did not receive a transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. Lead Toxicity in the Pediatric Patient with Sickle Cell Disease: Unique Risks and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Josephine Misun; Peddinti, Radhika

    2018-01-01

    Lead toxicity is the result of lead ingestion, one of the most common ingestions in the pediatric population. Nationwide and statewide efforts to recognize and curtail this epidemic have led to declining rates of toxicity. In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), lead toxicity can be an elusive diagnosis due to overlapping symptom profiles, and inconsistent follow-up with a primary care physician can make the diagnosis even more difficult. In this article, two illustrative cases of lead toxicity in patients with SCD are described. The discussion reviews the current risk factors, screening, and inpatient management of lead toxicity, as well as describing the unique and sometimes confounding presentations of lead toxicity versus sickle cell crisis. [Pediatr Ann. 2018;47(1):e36-e40.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. NT-pro brain natriuretic peptide levels and the risk of death in the cooperative study of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Roberto F; Hildesheim, Mariana; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Remaley, Alan T; Kato, Gregory J; Gladwin, Mark T

    2011-08-01

    Epidemiological studies support a hypothesis that pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD) that is associated with a high risk of death and evolves as a complication of haemolytic anaemia. This fundamental hypothesis has been recently challenged and remains controversial. In order to further test this hypothesis in a large and independent cohort of SCD patients we obtained plasma samples from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD) for analysis of a biomarker, N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), which is elevated in the setting of pulmonary arterial and venous hypertension. A NT-pro-BNP value previously identified to predict PH in adults with SCD was used to determine the association between the risk of mortality in 758 CSSCD participants (428 children and 330 adults). An abnormally high NT-proBNP level ≥160ng/l was present in 27·6% of adult SCD patients. High levels were associated with markers of haemolytic anaemia, such as low haemoglobin level (P<0·001), high lactate dehydrogenase (P<0·001), and high total bilirubin levels (P<0·007). A NT-proBNP level ≥160ng/l was an independent predictor of mortality (RR 6·24, 95% CI 2·9-13·3, P<0·0001). These findings provide further support for an association between haemolytic anaemia and cardiovascular complications in this patient population. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Acute pain in children and adults with sickle cell disease: management in the absence of evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Joshua J; Knight-Perry, Jessica E; Debaun, Michael R

    2009-05-01

    Acute, vaso-occlusive pain is the most characteristic complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). Although there has been rigorous work examining the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusion, fewer studies have focused on approaches to the clinical management of acute pain. In this review, we will examine the epidemiology and management strategies of acute pain events and we will identify limitations in the best available studies. Most acute pain events in adults with SCD are managed at home without physician contact. Prior descriptions of the natural history of pain episodes from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease relied on physician contact, limiting the generalizability of these findings to current practice. Patient-controlled analgesia has replaced on-demand therapy to become the standard for management of severe pain events in children and adults with SCD requiring hospital admission. Unfortunately, most clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pain are not based on randomized clinical trials. As a result, our practice of pain management is primarily limited to expert opinion and inferences from observational studies. Additional clinical trials in management of acute pain in children and adults with SCD are critical for the development of evidence-based guidelines.

  17. Comparative analysis of iron homeostasis in sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease and their unaffected siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma eGomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element subject to tight regulation to ensure adequate running of biological processes. In sub-Saharan Africa where hemoglobinopathies are common, iron homeostasis is likely to be impaired by these conditions. Here we assessed and compared key serum proteins associated with iron metabolism between sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease (SCD and their unaffected siblings. Complete blood counts and serum concentrations of four key proteins involved in iron regulation (ferritin, transferrin, sTfR and hepcidin were measured for 73 children with SCD and 68 healthy siblings in Benin, West Africa. We found significant differences in concentration of transferrin, sTfR and ferritin between the two groups. Hepcidin concentrations were found at unusually high concentrations but did not differ among the two groups. We found a significant negative correlation between hepcidin levels and both MCH and MCV in the SCD group and report that sTfR concentrations show a correlation with MCV and MHC in opposite directions in the two groups. These results highlight the unusually high levels of hepcidin in the Beninese population and the patterns of differential iron homeostasis taking place under sickle cell disease status. These results lay the foundation for a systematic evaluation of the underlying mechanisms deregulating iron homeostasis in populations with SCD or high prevalence of iron deficiency.

  18. Cross-stream distribution of red blood cells in sickle-cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Lam, Wilbur; Graham, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Experiments revealed that in blood flow, red blood cells (RBCs) tend to migrate away from the vessel walls, leaving a cell-free layer near the walls, while leukocytes and platelets tend to marginate towards the vessel walls. This segregation behavior of different cellular components in blood flow can be driven by their differences in stiffness and shape. An alteration of this segregation behavior may explain endothelial dysfunction and pain crisis associated with sickle-cell disease (SCD). It is hypothesized that the sickle RBCs, which are considerably stiffer than the healthy RBCs, may marginate towards the vessel walls and exert repeated damage to the endothelial cells. Direct simulations are performed to study the flowing suspensions of deformable biconcave discoids and stiff sickles representing healthy and sickle cells, respectively. It is observed that the sickles exhibit a strong margination towards the walls. The biconcave discoids in flowing suspensions undergo a so-called tank-treading motion, while the sickles behave as rigid bodies and undergo a tumbling motion. The margination behavior and tumbling motion of the sickles may help substantiate the aforementioned hypothesis of the mechanism for the SCD complications and shed some light on the design of novel therapies.

  19. Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: trend and pregnancy outcomes at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Projestine S Muganyizi

    Full Text Available SCD in pregnancy is associated with increased adverse fetal and maternal outcomes. In Tanzania where the frequency of sickle cell trait is 13% there has been scanty data on SCD in pregnancy. With progressive improvement in childhood survival the burden of SCD in pregnancy will increase. We analyzed all deliveries at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH from 1999 to 2011. Fetal and maternal outcomes of SCD deliveries were compared with non-SCD. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS statistics version 19. Chi square and Fisher Exact tests were used to compare proportions and the independent t-test for continuous data. To predict risks of adverse effects, odds ratios were determined using multivariate logistic regression. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant. In total, 157,473 deliveries occurred at MNH during the study period, of which 149 were SCD (incidence of 95 SCD per 100,000 deliveries. The incidence of SCD had increased from 76 per 100,000 deliveries in the 1999-2002 period to over 100 per 100,000 deliveries in recent years. The mean maternal age at delivery was lower in SCD (24.0±5.5 years than in non-SCD deliveries (26.2±6.0 years, p<0.001. Compared with non-SCD (2.9±0.7 Kg, SCD deliveries had less mean birth-weight (2.6±0.6 Kg, p<0.001. SCD were more likely than non-SCD to deliver low APGAR score at 5 minutes (34.5% Vs 15.0%, OR = 3.0, 95%CI: 2.1-4.2, stillbirths (25.7% Vs 7.5%, OR = 4.0, 95%CI: 2.8-5.8. There was excessive risk of maternal deaths in SCD compared to non-SCD (11.4% Vs 0.4%, OR = 29, 95%CI: 17.3-48.1. The leading cause of deaths in SCD was infections in wholly 82% in contrast to only 32% in non-SCD. In conclusion SCD in pregnancy is an emerging problem at MNH with increased adverse fetal outcomes and excessive maternal mortality mainly due to infections.

  20. Development, Content Validity, and User Review of a Web-based Multidimensional Pain Diary for Adolescent and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Nitya; Stinson, Jennifer N; Ross, Diana; Lukombo, Ines; Mittal, Nonita; Joshi, Saumya V; Belfer, Inna; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2015-06-01

    Vaso-occlusive pain, the hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD), is a major contributor to morbidity, poor health-related quality of life, and health care utilization associated with this disease. There is wide variation in the burden, frequency, and severity of pain experienced by patients with SCD. As compared with health care utilization for pain, a daily pain diary captures the breadth of the pain experience and is a superior measure of pain burden and its impact on patients. Electronic pain diaries based on real-time data capture methods overcome methodological barriers and limitations of paper pain diaries, but their psychometric properties have not been formally established in patients with SCD. To develop and establish the content validity of a web-based multidimensional pain diary for adolescents and young adults with SCD and conduct an end-user review to refine the prototype. Following identification of items, a conceptual model was developed. Interviews with adolescents and young adults with SCD were conducted. Subsequently, end-user review with use of the electronic pain diary prototype was conducted. Two iterative cycles of in-depth cognitive interviews in adolescents and young adults with SCD informed the design and guided the addition, removal, and modification of items in the multidimensional pain diary. Potential end-users provided positive feedback on the design and prototype of the electronic diary. A multidimensional web-based electronic pain diary for adolescents and young adults with SCD has been developed and content validity and initial end-user reviews have been completed.

  1. Phase 1 Study of a Sulforaphane-Containing Broccoli Sprout Homogenate for Sickle Cell Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F Doss

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy worldwide. Our previous results indicate that the reduced oxidative stress capacity of sickle erythrocytes may be caused by decreased expression of NRF2 (Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2, an oxidative stress regulator. We found that activation of NRF2 with sulforaphane (SFN in erythroid progenitors significantly increased the expression of NRF2 targets HMOX1, NQO1, and HBG1 (subunit of fetal hemoglobin in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that NRF2 activation with SFN may offer therapeutic benefits for SCD patients by restoring oxidative capacity and increasing fetal hemoglobin concentration. To test this hypothesis, we performed a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study of SFN, contained in a broccoli sprout homogenate (BSH that naturally contains SFN, in adults with SCD. The primary and secondary study endpoints were safety and physiological response to NRF2 activation, respectively. We found that BSH was well tolerated, and the few adverse events that occurred during the trial were not likely related to BSH consumption. We observed an increase in the mean relative whole blood mRNA levels for the NRF2 target HMOX1 (p = 0.02 on the last day of BSH treatment, compared to pre-treatment. We also observed a trend toward increased mean relative mRNA levels of the NRF2 target HBG1 (p = 0.10 from baseline to end of treatment, but without significant changes in HbF protein. We conclude that BSH, in the provided doses, is safe in stable SCD patients and may induce changes in gene expression levels. We therefore propose investigation of more potent NRF2 inducers, which may elicit more robust physiological changes and offer clinical benefits to SCD patients. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01715480.

  2. Non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboot, Jason B; Jawad, Abbas F; McDonough, Joseph M; Bowdre, Cheryl Y; Arens, Raanan; Marcus, Carole L; Mason, Thornton B A; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Allen, Julian L

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of oxyhemoglobin saturation in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is vital for prompt recognition of hypoxemia. The accuracy of pulse oximeter measurements of blood oxygenation in SCD patients is variable, partially due to carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb), which decrease the oxygen content of blood. This study evaluated the accuracy and reliability of a non-invasive pulse co-oximeter in measuring COHb and MetHb percentages (SpCO and SpMet) in children with SCD. We hypothesized that measurements of COHb and MetHb by non-invasive pulse co-oximetry agree within acceptable clinical accuracy with those made by invasive whole blood co-oximetry. Fifty children with SCD-SS underwent pulse co-oximetry and blood co-oximetry while breathing room air. Non-invasive COHb and MetHb readings were compared to the corresponding blood measurements. The pulse co-oximeter bias was 0.1% for COHb and -0.22% for MetHb. The precision of the measured SpCO was ± 2.1% within a COHb range of 0.4-6.1%, and the precision of the measured SpMet was ± 0.33% within a MetHb range of 0.1-1.1%. Non-invasive pulse co-oximetry was useful in measuring COHb and MetHb levels in children with SCD. Although the non-invasive technique slightly overestimated the invasive COHb measurements and slightly underestimated the invasive MetHb measurements, there was close agreement between the two methods. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Post-transplant sCD30 and neopterin as predictors of chronic allograft nephropathy: impact of different immunosuppressive regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, R; Süsal, C; Yildiz, S; Staak, A; Pelzl, S; Renner, F; Dietrich, H; Daniel, V; Kamali-Ernst, S; Ernst, W; Padberg, W; Opelz, G

    2006-08-01

    Immunological monitoring for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is of great potential interest. We assessed serum soluble CD30 (sCD30) together with in vitro Th2-type responses (IL-4, IL-10, CD4 helper activity) and neopterin in a prospective study of 84 renal transplant recipients with 2-year follow-up. Patients were randomized to CsA/Aza, CsA/MMF and Tacr/Aza, respectively, to analyze the effect of immunosuppression on posttransplant sCD30 and neopterin. ATG induction and acute rejections did not alter sCD30 levels whereas CMV disease was associated with transient upregulation of sCD30 (p = 0.003 at 4 months) and sustained upregulation of neopterin (corrected for graft function (Neo/CR) p = 0.005 at 2 years). Tacr versus CsA treatment proved to be an independent variable associated with downregulation of 1-year sCD30, which was positively related to Neo/CR (p = 0.007 and 0.01, respectively; logistic regression). Importantly, increased 1-year sCD30 and Neo/CR were associated with decreased glomerular filtration rate at 2 years (p = 0.02 and p sCD30 could not be attributed to enhanced Th2-type responses and was not associated with HLA antibody formation. Our data suggest that elevated sCD30 and neopterin predict graft deterioration by CAN. Tacr effectively downregulates these responses and might be of advantage in patients with elevated sCD30 or neopterin.

  4. A randomized trial of artesunate-amodiaquine versus artemether-lumefantrine in Ghanaian paediatric sickle cell and non-sickle cell disease patients with acute uncomplicated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, George O; Goka, Bamenla Q; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C

    2014-01-01

    of the SCD patients were also compared with a group of malaria-negative SCD children (n = 82) in steady state. RESULTS: The parasite densities on admission were significantly lower in the SCD group, compared with the non-SCD group (p = 0.0006). The parasite reduction ratio (PRR) was lower, clearance....../57) in the SCD group and 96.4% (53/55) in the non-SCD group. The fractional changes in haemoglobin, platelets and white blood cell counts between baseline (day 0) and endpoint (day 42) were 16.9, 40.6 and 92.3%, respectively, for the SCD group, and, 12.3, 48.8 and 7.5%, respectively, for the non-SCD group....... There were no differences in these indices between AA- and AL-treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The parasite clearance of SCD children with uncomplicated malaria was slower compared with non-SCD children. AA and AL showed similar clinical and parasitological effects in the SCD and non-SCD groups...

  5. Clinical significance of sCD86 levels in patients with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nahla Hamed

    2011-06-12

    Jun 12, 2011 ... The aim: The present study was to assess levels of sCD86 in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients and to ..... script and mCD86 protein; thus both cell types provide a po- tential source of .... tryptophan catabolism in vivo.

  6. Randomized phase 2 study of GMI-1070 in SCD: reduction in time to resolution of vaso-occlusive events and decreased opioid use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wun, Ted; McCavit, Timothy L.; De Castro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Lanzkron, Sophie; Hsu, Lewis L.; Smith, Wally R.; Rhee, Seungshin; Magnani, John L.; Thackray, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) or events in sickle cell disease (SCD) remains limited to symptom relief with opioids. Animal models support the effectiveness of the pan-selectin inhibitor GMI-1070 in reducing selectin-mediated cell adhesion and abrogating VOC. We studied GMI-1070 in a prospective multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 2 study of 76 SCD patients with VOC. Study drug (GMI-1070 or placebo) was given every 12 hours for up to 15 doses. Other treatment was per institutional standard of care. All subjects reached the composite primary end point of resolution of VOC. Although time to reach the composite primary end point was not statistically different between the groups, clinically meaningful reductions in mean and median times to VOC resolution of 41 and 63 hours (28% and 48%, P = .19 for both) were observed in the active treatment group vs the placebo group. As a secondary end point, GMI-1070 appeared safe in acute vaso-occlusion, and adverse events were not different in the two arms. Also in secondary analyses, mean cumulative IV opioid analgesic use was reduced by 83% with GMI-1070 vs placebo (P = .010). These results support a phase 3 study of GMI-1070 (now rivipansel) for SCD VOC. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01119833. PMID:25733584

  7. Increased rates of body dissatisfaction, depressive symptoms, and suicide attempts in Jamaican teens with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt-Poulose, Komal; James, Kenneth; Reid, Marvin; Harrison, Abigail; Asnani, Monika

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to examine the association of body image and weight perceptions with risk of depression and suicidal attempts in Jamaican adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). Adolescents with SCD and a national sample of Jamaican adolescents completed a questionnaire examining body image, weight perceptions, and risk for depression. Perceived and desired body images were similar for both groups. Adolescents with SCD had higher levels of "negative body satisfaction" (43.9% vs. 33.9%; P = 0.03), risk for depression (28.7% vs. 19.3%; P = 0.01), and attempted suicide (12.4% vs. 6.6%; P = 0.02) than national sample. Risk of depression was higher in those who perceived themselves to be over or underweight, and lower in those with more friends and attending school. Females and those with body image dissatisfaction were more likely to have attempted suicide. Within the SCD adolescents, girls were at greater odds of having mental health issues. Jamaican adolescents with SCD have significantly higher rates of negative body satisfaction and depressive symptoms, and nearly twice the rate of attempted suicide, compared with their healthy peers. This underscores the need for healthcare professionals to better explore and discuss healthy weight, body satisfaction, and coping with the demands and uncertainties of having a chronic illness with Jamaican adolescents with SCD, even while promoting body acceptance and good self-esteem. Screening for mood disorders is strongly recommended and gender-specific interventions should be developed. Healthcare professionals need to encourage positive social interactions that improve adolescents' mental health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Feasibility of Home-Based Computerized Working Memory Training With Children and Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Steven J; Hardy, Kristina K; Schatz, Jeffrey C; Thompson, Amanda L; Meier, Emily R

    2016-09-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at increased risk for neurocognitive deficits, yet the literature describing interventions to ameliorate these problems and promote academic achievement is limited. We evaluated the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a home-based computerized working memory (WM) training intervention (Cogmed) in children with SCD. Youth with SCD between the age of 7 and 16 years completed an initial neuropsychological assessment; those with WM deficits were loaned an iPad on which they accessed Cogmed at home. Participants were instructed to work on Cogmed 5 days each week for 5 weeks (25 training sessions). We examined Cogmed usage characteristics and change on WM assessment scores following the intervention. Of the 21 participants (M age = 11.38, SD = 2.78; Mdn age = 10.00, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.00; 52% female) screened, 60% exhibited WM deficits (n = 12) and received the intervention and 50% (n = 6) completed Cogmed. The mean number of sessions completed was 15.83 (SD = 7.73; Mdn = 17.00, IQR = 16.00); females were more likely to complete Cogmed, χ(2) (1) = 6.00, P = 0.01. Participants who reported lower SCD-related pain impact completed more sessions (r = 0.71, P = 0.01). Children who completed Cogmed exhibited improvements in verbal WM, visuospatial short-term memory, and visuospatial WM. Initial findings suggest Cogmed is associated with WM improvement in youth with SCD; however, adherence was lower than expected. Home-based WM interventions may ameliorate SCD-related WM deficits but strategies are needed to address barriers to program completion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interethnic diversity of the CD209 (rs4804803 gene promoter polymorphism in African but not American sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenelle A. Noble

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genomic diversity of CD209 gene promoter polymorphism could assist in clarifying disease pathophysiology as well as contribution to co-morbidities. CD209 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to infection. We hypothesize that CD209 mutant variants occur at a higher frequency among Africans and in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the frequency of the CD209 gene (rs4804803 in healthy control and sickle cell disease (SCD populations and determined association with disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from 145 SCD and 231 control Africans (from Mali, 331 SCD and 379 control African Americans and 159 Caucasians. Comparative analysis among and between groups was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Per ethnic diversification, we found significant disparity in genotypic (23.4% versus 16.9% versus 3.2% and allelic frequencies (48.7% versus 42.1% versus 19.8% of the homozygote mutant variant of the CD209 (snp 309A/G gene promoter between Africans, African Americans and Caucasians respectively. Comparative evaluation between disease and control groups reveal a significant difference in genotypic (10.4% versus 23.4%; p = 0.002 and allelic frequencies (39.7% versus 48.7%; p = 0.02 of the homozygote mutant variant in African SCD and healthy controls respectively, an observation that is completely absent among Americans. Comparing disease groups, we found no difference in the genotypic (p = 0.19 or allelic (p = 0.72 frequencies of CD209 homozygote mutant variant between Africans and Americans with sickle cell disease. The higher frequency of CD209 homozygote mutant variants in the African control group reveals a potential impairment of the capacity to mount an immune response to infectious diseases, and possibly delineate susceptibility to or severity of infectious co-morbidities within and between groups.

  10. Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: trend and pregnancy outcomes at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muganyizi, Projestine S; Kidanto, Hussein

    2013-01-01

    SCD in pregnancy is associated with increased adverse fetal and maternal outcomes. In Tanzania where the frequency of sickle cell trait is 13% there has been scanty data on SCD in pregnancy. With progressive improvement in childhood survival the burden of SCD in pregnancy will increase. We analyzed all deliveries at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) from 1999 to 2011. Fetal and maternal outcomes of SCD deliveries were compared with non-SCD. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS statistics version 19. Chi square and Fisher Exact tests were used to compare proportions and the independent t-test for continuous data. To predict risks of adverse effects, odds ratios were determined using multivariate logistic regression. A p-valueMNH during the study period, of which 149 were SCD (incidence of 95 SCD per 100,000 deliveries). The incidence of SCD had increased from 76 per 100,000 deliveries in the 1999-2002 period to over 100 per 100,000 deliveries in recent years. The mean maternal age at delivery was lower in SCD (24.0±5.5 years) than in non-SCD deliveries (26.2±6.0 years), pMNH with increased adverse fetal outcomes and excessive maternal mortality mainly due to infections.

  11. Prophylactic red blood cell exchange may be beneficial in the management of sickle cell disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Suheyl; Kozanoglu, Ilknur; Tarım, Ebru; Sarıturk, Cagla; Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Akdeniz, Aydan; Kasar, Mutlu; Turgut, Nurhilal H; Yeral, Mahmut; Kandemir, Fatih; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with chronic hemolysis and painful episodes. Pregnancy accelerates sickle cell complications, including prepartum and postpartum vasoocclusive crisis, pulmonary complications, and preeclampsia or eclampsia. Fetal complications include preterm birth and its associated risks, intrauterine growth restriction, and a high rate of perinatal mortality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pregnancy outcomes in patients with SCD who underwent planned preventive red blood cell exchange (RBCX). We retrospectively evaluated the complications of SCD in 37 pregnant patients. Patients with SCD who had undergone prophylactic RBCX were compared with a control group who had not undergone RBCX during pregnancy. Forty-three exchange procedures were performed in 24 patients. The control group comprised 13 patients with a mean age of 27.4 ± 3.3 years who had not undergone RBCX during pregnancy. Four of the five patients who developed a vasoocclusive crisis died. There was a significant difference in maternal mortality between the study and control groups (p = 0.011). There was also a significant difference in the incidence of vasoocclusive crisis between the study and control groups. One fetal death occurred in the 20th gestational week in a patient in the control group, although there were no postpartum complications in either the babies or the mothers in the control group. This study has demonstrated that prophylactic RBCX during pregnancy is a feasible and safe procedure for prevention of complications. Given the decrease in the risks of transfusion, RBCX warrants further study. © 2014 AABB.

  12. Normal Non-HDL Cholesterol, Low Total Cholesterol, and HDL Cholesterol Levels in Sickle Cell Disease Patients in the Steady State: A Case-Control Study of Tema Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Richard K D; Adu, Patrick; Ake, Edem; Agbodzakey, Hope; Adoba, Prince; Cudjoe, Obed; Agoni, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Background. Abnormal lipid homeostasis in sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by defects in plasma and erythrocyte lipids and may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study assessed the lipid profile and non-HDL cholesterol level of SCD patients. Methods. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 50 SCD patients, in the steady state, aged 8-28 years, attending the SCD clinic, and 50 healthy volunteers between the ages of 8-38 years. Serum lipids were determined by enzymatic methods and non-HDL cholesterol calculated by this formula: non-HDL-C = TC-HDL-C. Results. Total cholesterol (TC) ( p = 0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ( p < 0.0001) were significantly decreased in cases compared to controls. The levels of non-HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride (TG) were similar among the participants. The levels of decrease in TC and HDL were associated with whether a patient was SCD-SS or SCD-SC. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were each significantly associated with increased VLDL [SBP, p = 0.01, OR: 0.74 (CI: 0.6-0.93); DBP, p = 0.023, OR: 1.45 (CI: 1.05-2.0)]. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is common among participants in this study. It was more pronounced in the SCD-SS than in SCD-SC. This dyslipidemia was associated with high VLDL as well as increased SBP and DBP.

  13. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R.

    2010-04-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  14. Exercise tolerance, lung function abnormalities, anemia, and cardiothoracic ratio in sickle cell patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, Eduard J.; van der Plas, Mart N.; Nur, Erfan; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; van Steenwijk, Reindert P.; Biemond, Bart J.; Bresser, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a reduced exercise capacity and abnormal lung function. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) can identify causes of exercise limitation. Forty-four consecutive SCD patients (27 HbSS, 11 HbSC, and 6 HbS-beta thalassemia) with a median age

  15. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R

    2012-02-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  16. Reproductive Health CHOICES for Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Trait: Randomized Controlled Trial Outcomes over Two Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Agatha M; Wilkie, Diana J; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Stahl, Christiane; Hershberger, Patricia E; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Suarez, Marie L; Johnson, Bonnye; Angulo, Rigoberto; Carrasco, Jesus; Angulo, Veronica; Thompson, Alexis A

    2016-04-01

    Interventions to assist reproductive health decision-making in populations affected by sickle cell disease (SCD) or trait (SCT) lack proven efficacy over time. Our aim was to compare effects of CHOICES, a Web-based multimedia education program on implementing informed reproductive plans, and usual care education (e-Book) on reproductive knowledge, intention, and behavior over 24 months. We randomized 234 participants with SCD (n = 138) or SCT (n = 96) (age 18-35 years, 35 % male, 94 % African American) to CHOICES and e-Book groups. Participants completed a sickle cell-specific reproductive measure before and four times after the intervention (6, 12, 18 and 24 months). Compared to the e-Book group the CHOICES group had significantly more improvement in knowledge over time (p = .004) but not intention (p = .18) or behavior (p = .69). At baseline, 114 (48.7 %) participants reported having partners who would not put the couple at risk for their children inheriting SCD. Of the 116 (49.6 %) at-risk participants, a higher poroportion of those who were in the CHOICES group chose partners that reduced their risk by the last visit than the e-Book group (p = .04). Study findings provide important insights for designing a national trial of the CHOICES intervention focusing on subjects whose partner status puts them at risk for having a child with SCD.

  17. Development and evaluation of iManage: A self-management app co-designed by adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lori E; Ware, Russell E; Goldstein, Alana; Walton, Ashley; Joffe, Naomi E; Vogel, Craig; Britto, Maria T

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with sickle cell disease (SCD) are a vulnerable population with high risk of morbidity that could be decreased with effective self-management. Previous research suggests that mobile applications (apps) may facilitate AYA engagement in health-promoting behaviors. The objectives of this study were: (i) describe Internet access and use in AYA with SCD; (ii) identify barriers for self-management in this population; (iii) collaborate with AYA to co-design a mobile app that would minimize barriers; and (iv) evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the app. In phase 1, 46 AYAs with SCD 16-24 years of age completed a survey of Internet access and use. During phase 2, 19 AYAs with SCD (average age 20 ± 2.5 years) and eight healthcare providers participated in interviews to identify barriers and co-design sessions to develop the app. In phase 3, five AYAs with SCD completed app feasibility and usability testing. AYAs with SCD had daily Internet access (69%) using their computers (84%) or mobile phones (70%). Participants went online for health information (71%) and preferred Web sites with interactive/social features (83%). Barriers to self-management included failing to believe that their health would suffer, lack of tailored self-management support, lack of a mechanism to visualize self-management progress, and limited opportunities for peer interaction around self-management. The prototype app (iManage) was rated as highly feasible and beneficial. A mobile app prototype co-designed by AYAs with SCD may be a useful tool for engaging them in self-management strategies designed to improve health. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell anemia disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco Junior, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years). All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically…

  20. Feasibility and Acceptability of Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Dudeney, Joanne; Santanelli, James P; Carletti, Alexie; Zempsky, William T

    2018-03-01

    Pain is a clinical hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD), and is rarely optimally managed. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain has been effectively delivered through the Internet in other pediatric populations. We tested feasibility and acceptability of an Internet-delivered CBT intervention in 25 adolescents with SCD (64% female, mean age=14.8 y) and their parents randomized to Internet CBT (n=15) or Internet Pain Education (n=10). Participants completed pretreatment/posttreatment measures. Eight dyads completed semistructured interviews to evaluate treatment acceptability. Feasibility indicators included recruitment and participation rates, engagement and adherence to intervention, and completion of outcome measures. In total, 87 referrals were received from 9 study sites; our recruitment rate was 60% from those families approached for screening. Among participants, high levels of initial intervention engagement (>90%), and adherence (>70%) were demonstrated. Most participants completed posttreatment outcome and diary measures (>75%). Retention at posttreatment was 80%. High treatment acceptability was reported in interviews. Our findings suggest that Internet-delivered CBT for SCD pain is feasible and acceptable to adolescents with SCD and their parents. Engagement and adherence were good. Next steps are to modify recruitment plans to enhance enrollment and determine efficacy of Internet CBT for SCD pain in a large multisite randomized controlled trial.

  1. An accurate and affordable test for the rapid diagnosis of sickle cell disease could revolutionize the outlook for affected children born in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas N

    2015-09-23

    Each year, at least 280,000 children are born with sickle cell disease (SCD) in resource-limited settings. For cost, logistic and political reasons, the availability of SCD testing is limited in such settings and consequently 50-90 % of affected children die undiagnosed before their fifth birthday. The recent development of a point of care method for the diagnosis of SCD - the Sickle SCAN™ device - could afford such children the prompt access to appropriate services that has transformed the outlook for affected children in resource-rich areas. In research published in BMC Medicine, Kanter and colleagues describe a small but carefully conducted study involving 208 children and adults, in which they found that by using Sickle SCAN™ it was possible to diagnose the common forms of SCD with 99 % sensitivity and 99 % specificity, in under 5 minutes. If repeatable both in newborn babies and under real-life conditions, and if marketed at an affordable price, Sickle SCAN™ could revolutionize the survival prospects for children born with SCD in resource-limited areas.Please see related article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-015-0473-6.

  2. The Effects of a Single Electronic Music Improvisation Session on the Pain of Adults with Sickle Cell Disease: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers-Melnick, Samuel N; Matthie, Nadine; Jenerette, Coretta; Griest Pell, Tara J; Lane, Deforia; Fu, Pingfu; Margevicius, Seunghee; Little, Jane A

    2018-06-07

    Adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) experience acute pain that is multidimensional. Despite recent improvements in treatment, pain management remains a significant challenge for these individuals. Music therapy interventions have the potential to address several dimensions of SCD pain, but they require systematic investigation. This study investigated feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a single-session electronic music improvisation with a music therapist to diminish pain intensity and improve pain relief and mood in adults with SCD. Using a three-group mixed methods intervention design, we randomized 60 adults with SCD to standard care plus one of three 20-minute study conditions: 1) electronic music improvisation with a music therapist (MT); 2) recorded music listening (ML); or 3) no intervention (control). Measures of pain intensity (VASPI), pain relief (VASPR), and mood (VASMOOD) were assessed before and after the study conditions, with a subset of MT and ML participants interviewed after measure completion. Compared to control, MT produced significant improvements in VASPI (odds ratio (OR) = 5.12, P = 0.035) and VASMOOD (OR = 11.60, P = 0.005). ML produced significant improvements in VASMOOD compared to control (OR = 5.76, P = 0.040). Qualitatively, there were two prominent themes directly related to music: 1) ML and MT offered many positive and few negative effects; and 2) music therapists provided comfort beyond the music. Preliminary findings were promising and support the need for additional studies evaluating improvisational music therapy interventions for acute pain management in adults with SCD.

  3. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / Sickle Cell Disease What's ... español Enfermedad de células falciformes What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is a condition in ...

  4. Atomic structure of the murine norovirus protruding domain and sCD300lf receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Turgay; Koromyslova, Anna; Malak, Virginie; Hansman, Grant S

    2018-03-21

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in human. Noroviruses also infect animals such as cow, mice, cat, and dog. How noroviruses bind and enter host cells is still incompletely understood. Recently, the type I transmembrane protein CD300lf was recently identified as the murine norovirus receptor, yet it is unclear how the virus capsid and receptor interact at the molecular level. In this study, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the soluble CD300lf (sCD300lf) and murine norovirus capsid-protruding domain complex at 2.05 Å resolution. We found that the sCD300lf binding site is located on the topside of the protruding domain and involves a network of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. The sCD300lf locked nicely into a complementary cavity on the protruding domain that is additionally coordinated with a positive surface charge on the sCD300lf and a negative surface charge on the protruding domain. Five of six protruding domain residues interacting with sCD300lf were maintained between different murine norovirus strains, suggesting that the sCD300lf was capable of binding to a highly conserved pocket. Moreover, a sequence alignment with other CD300 paralogs showed that the sCD300lf interacting residues were partially conserved in CD300ld, but variable in other CD300 family members, consistent with previously reported infection selectivity. Overall, these data provide insights into how a norovirus engages a protein receptor and will be important for a better understanding of selective recognition and norovirus attachment and entry mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Noroviruses exhibit exquisite host-range specificity due to species-specific interactions between the norovirus capsid protein and host molecules. Given this strict host-range restriction it has been unclear how the viruses are maintained within a species between relatively sporadic epidemics. While much data demonstrates that noroviruses can interact with carbohydrates

  5. Hospitalist management of vaso-occlusive pain crisis in patients with sickle cell disease using a pathway of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen Liles, Edmund; Kirsch, Jonathan; Gilchrist, Michael; Adem, Mukhtar

    2014-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from intermittent vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs). These crises lead to frequent hospitalizations, significant morbidity, and increased mortality risk. Care pathways can enhance efficiency and quality of care. Our study sought to evaluate the development and implementation of a care pathway for patients with SCD experiencing VOCs. The University of North Carolina (UNC) Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program provides all levels of care for a large population of patients with sickle cell anemia. All patients admitted to UNC Hospitals with SCD VOCs from January 2009 through June 2011 were evaluated. During this time period, we also assessed sequential prospective cohorts during progressive phases of developing and implementing a quality improvement and pathway of care program for this patient population in our study. The developed pathway entailed geographic localization for VOC patients, a single group of faculty physicians caring for these patients, and early use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) to achieve pain control. Physicians from the UNC Hospital Medicine Program were responsible for the initiatives. Cohorts were compared to a baseline historical control. Outcomes of interest included patient length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, 30-day readmission rate, need for transfusion, incidence of acute chest syndrome, use of naloxone, and use of PCA. Compared with an historical baseline cohort, the development and implementation of a VOC care pathway for patients with SCD led to reduction in average hospital LOS by 1.44 days (P management of patients with SCD VOCs using a care pathway that emphasizes early, aggressive PCA-based pain control is associated with reduced hospital LOS. The LOS reduction seen in our study is clinically meaningful. Notably, other measures of patient outcomes and quality of care metrics did not change significantly, and some trended towards improvement.

  6. AETIOPATHOGENESIS OF FEVER IN HOSPITALISED SICKLE CELL DISEASE CHILDREN REVISITED WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO BLOOD CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana Panda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Sickle Cell Disease (SCD poses a considerable health burden in India. The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 percent. The disease has multiple acute and chronic complications, including haemolytic crises, severe pain, renal complications, thromboembolic phenomenon and overwhelming infections; some complications of SCD generate high mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a cross-sectional, hospital inpatient based, observational study. Convenience sampling technique was used to include 74 consecutively diagnosed cases of sickle cell disease children less than 14 years of age and suffering from fever. A blood culture was performed in each case prior to starting of antibiotics. RESULTS The present study comprised of 74 children with confirmed sickle cell disease admitted to ward with fever. The largest numbers of cases were between 1 to 3 years age group. Febrile episodes decreased as the age advanced. Around 30% of febrile patients presented with cough followed by 24% with pain in limbs. Anaemia was the most common physical finding (92% followed by splenomegaly in 86% cases. URTI being most common aetiology. Most common organism isolated by blood culture was Staph. aureus in 8 samples. CONCLUSION As because fever is a consistent finding in severe bacterial infections, extensive evaluation, early intervention in febrile SCD children may reduce the morbidity and mortality rates. Although, the greatest concern has traditionally been S. pneumoniae, effective vaccination has reduced its incidence. It is probably wise to treat all highly febrile children with sickle cell disease with antibiotics pending the results of blood culture. Strengthening of routine immunisation programme is needed.

  7. Detection of cerebrovascular disease in patients with sickle cell disease using transcranial Doppler sonography: correlation with MRI, MRA and conventional angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlhac, S. [Service de Radiologie, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, 94 - Creteil (France); Bernaudin, F. [Service de Pediatrie, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, 94 - Creteil (France); Tortrat, D. [Association Claude Bernard, 75 - Paris (France); Brugieres, P. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Henri Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France); Mage, K. [Service de Radiologie, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, 94 - Creteil (France); Gaston, A. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Henri Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France); Reinert, P. [Service de Pediatrie, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective study of 58 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) included both MRI and MRA in patients over 7 years of age and those with abnormal TCD. Arteriography was performed in cases where a stenosis was suspected on TCD. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and basilar artery (BA) velocities were significantly higher in the sickle cell hemoglobin SS group than in the hemoglobin SC group. Patients with a MCA mean velocity of over 1.90 m/s had stenoses found by arteriography. Patients with unilaterally undetectable MCA flow had experienced a stroke and MCA thrombosis was confirmed at MRA and arteriography. We concluded that TCD is valuable in detecting arterial stenosis in SCD and will lead to consideration of these patients for intensive therapy, such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or transfusion regimes. (orig.)

  8. Detection of cerebrovascular disease in patients with sickle cell disease using transcranial Doppler sonography: correlation with MRI, MRA and conventional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlhac, S.; Bernaudin, F.; Tortrat, D.; Brugieres, P.; Mage, K.; Gaston, A.; Reinert, P.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study of 58 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) included both MRI and MRA in patients over 7 years of age and those with abnormal TCD. Arteriography was performed in cases where a stenosis was suspected on TCD. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and basilar artery (BA) velocities were significantly higher in the sickle cell hemoglobin SS group than in the hemoglobin SC group. Patients with a MCA mean velocity of over 1.90 m/s had stenoses found by arteriography. Patients with unilaterally undetectable MCA flow had experienced a stroke and MCA thrombosis was confirmed at MRA and arteriography. We concluded that TCD is valuable in detecting arterial stenosis in SCD and will lead to consideration of these patients for intensive therapy, such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or transfusion regimes. (orig.)

  9. Socio-environmental exposures and health outcomes among persons with sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika R Asnani

    Full Text Available There is much variability in the expression of sickle cell disease (SCD and recent works suggest that environmental and social factors may also influence this variability. This paper aims to use geographic information systems technology to examine the association between socio-environmental exposures and health outcomes in all persons who have attended or currently attend the Sickle Cell Unit in Jamaica. Rural patients presented for clinical care at older ages and had less annual visits to clinic. Persons travelled relatively long distances to seek SCD care and those travelling longer had less health maintenance visits. Urban patients had a higher prevalence of significant pain crises (69.4% vs. 55.8%, p value<0.001 and respiratory events (21.2% vs. 14%, p value<0.001. Prevalence of leg ulcers did not vary between rural and urban patients but was higher in males than in females. Females also had lower odds of having respiratory events but there was no sex difference in history of painful crises. Persons with more severe genotypes lived in higher poverty and travelled longer for healthcare services. Persons in areas with higher annual rainfall, higher mean temperatures and living farther from factories had less painful crises and respiratory events. The paper highlights a need for better access to healthcare services for Jamaicans with SCD especially in rural areas of the island. It also reports interesting associations between environmental climatic exposures and health outcomes.

  10. Caregiver's Health Locus of Control and Medication Adherence in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Kusum; Swaminathan, Neeraja; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy; Lakkaraja, Madhavi

    2015-03-01

    The authors would like to thank Dr. Morisky for giving us permission to use the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale To explore caregivers' Health Locus of Control's relationship to self-reported adherence to penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). A questionnaire-based study was conducted of caregivers of children with SCD who visited a comprehensive sickle cell center in an inner city hospital, who were either on penicillin prophylaxis or hydroxyurea or both. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) questionnaires were used for the study. Caregivers of 43 children (27 on penicillin prophylaxis, 13 on hydroxyurea, and 3 on both) completed the MHLC and the MMAS-8. There was no significant difference in adherence between the penicillin and the hydroxyurea groups. The mean Powerful Others score of caregivers of the hydroxyurea only group (25.5+5.6) was higher than that of the penicillin only group (21.2+6.1, p=0.043). Regression analysis revealed an inverse relationship of Chance Locus of Control to adherence in the entire group (Beta = -0.306, R2=0.093, F[1,40]=4.12, p=0.049). Chance Locus of control may identify caregivers of children with SCD at risk for non-adherence to treatment. © 2015 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relevance of blood groups in transfusion of sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2013-03-01

    Blood groups are clinically significant in sickle cell disease (SCD) as transfusion remains a key treatment in this pathology. The occurrence of a delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is not rare and is a life-threatening event. The main cause of DHTR is the production of alloantibodies against red blood cell antigens. The high rate of alloimmunization in SCD patients is mainly due to the differences of red blood groups between patients of African descent, and the frequently Caucasian donors. From an immuno-haematological point of view, DHTR in SCD patients has specific features: classical antibodies known to be haemolytic can be encountered, but otherwise non significant antibodies, autoantibodies and antibodies related to partial and rare blood groups are also frequently found in individuals of African descent. In some cases, there are no detectable antibodies. As alloimmunization remains the main cause of DHTR, it is extremely important to promote blood donation by individuals of African ancestry to make appropriate blood available. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Perceived injustice predicts stress and pain in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, Miriam O; Molokie, Robert E; Wilkie, Diana J; Suarez, Marie L; Yao, Yingwei

    2015-06-01

    Research evidence shows that perceived injustice is a context-based unfair treatment that has negative influence on health outcomes. We examined the contribution of patients' perceived injustice regarding interactions with health care providers to stress and pain in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). This study was a cross-sectional correlational pilot study. Included in the study were adults with SCD who received their care from a university-affiliated comprehensive sickle cell clinic. Participants were 52 adults whose mean age was 34 ± 11 years (minimum [min] 20 years, maximum [max] 70 years). Most of the patients were African American (n = 48, 92%) and female (n = 41, 79%). Forty-eight patients (92%) reported having a high school diploma or higher. Participants completed the perceived injustice questionnaire, perceived stress questionnaire, and the PAINReportIt, which includes questions to measure pain and demographics. We analyzed the data using the linear regression analyses. Perceived injustice from doctors was a significant predictor of perceived stress (p pain (p = .002). Perceived injustice from nurses also was a significant predictor of perceived stress (p pain (p = .02). The procedural, distributive, and informational domains of perceived injustice attributed to both doctors and nurses consistently predicted patients' perceived stress, but only the procedural and distributive domains of perceived injustice consistently predicted patients' pain. Findings suggest that perceived injustice was negatively associated with stress and pain in adults with SCD and warrant further investigation in a larger sample. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Serum sCD30: A promising biomarker for predicting the risk of bacterial infection after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Parra, Patricia; López-Medrano, Francisco; Ruiz-Merlo, Tamara; González, Esther; Polanco, Natalia; Origüen, Julia; San Juan, Rafael; Andrés, Amado; Aguado, José María

    2017-04-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein CD30 contributes to regulate the balance between Th 1 and Th 2 responses. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on the utility of its soluble form (sCD30) to predict post-transplant infection. Serum sCD30 was measured by a commercial ELISA assay at baseline and post-transplant months 1, 3, and 6 in 100 kidney transplant (KT) recipients (279 monitoring points). The impact of sCD30 levels on the incidence of overall, bacterial and opportunistic infection during the first 12 months after transplantation was assessed by Cox regression. There were no differences in serum sCD30 according to the occurrence of overall or opportunistic infection. However, sCD30 levels were higher in patients with bacterial infection compared to those without at baseline (P=.038) and months 1 (Ptransplantation (P=.006). Patients with baseline sCD30 levels ≥13.5 ng/mL had lower 12-month bacterial infection-free survival (35.0% vs 80.0%; PsCD30 levels ≥13.5 ng/mL remained as an independent risk factor for bacterial infection (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 4.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.05-10.53; sCD30 levels ≥6.0 ng/mL at month 1 acted as a risk factor for subsequent bacterial infection (aHR: 5.29; 95% CI: 1.11-25.14; P=.036). Higher serum sCD30 levels were associated with an increased risk of bacterial infection after KT. We hypothesize that this biomarker reflects a Th 2 -polarized T-cell response, which exerts a detrimental effect on the immunity against bacterial pathogens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Outpatient Pain Predicts Subsequent One-Year Acute Health Care Utilization Among Adults With Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, Miriam O.; Molokie, Robert E.; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Yao, Yingwei; Suarez, Marie L.; Angulo, Veronica; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient demographic and clinical factors have known associations with acute health care utilization (AHCU) among patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), but it is unknown if pain measured predominantly in an outpatient setting is a predictor of future AHCU in patients with SCD. Objectives To determine whether multidimensional pain scores obtained predominantly in an outpatient setting predicted subsequent one-year AHCU by 137 adults with SCD and whether the pain measured at a second visit also predicted AHCU. Methods Pain data included the Composite Pain Index (CPI), a single score representative of a multidimensional pain experience (number of pain sites, intensity, quality, and pattern). Based on the distribution of AHCU events, we divided patients into three groups: (1) zero events (Zero), (2) 1–3 events (Low), or (3) 4–23 events (High). Results The initial CPI scores differed significantly by the three groups (F(2,134)=7.38, P=0.001). Post hoc comparisons showed that the Zero group had lower CPI scores than both the Low group (Pgroup (Page, and CPI scores (at both measurement times) were statistically significant predictors of utilization events. Pain intensity scores at both measurement times were significant predictors of utilization, but other pain scores (number of pain sites, quality, and pattern) were not. Conclusion Findings support use of outpatient CPI scores or pain intensity and age to identify at-risk young adults with SCD who are likely to benefit from improved outpatient pain management plans. PMID:24636960

  15. A double-blind, randomized, multicenter phase 2 study of prasugrel versus placebo in adult patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wun Ted

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease (SCD suggesting antiplatelet agents may be therapeutic. To evaluate the safety of prasugrel, a thienopyridine antiplatelet agent, in adult patients with SCD, we conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Methods The primary endpoint, safety, was measured by hemorrhagic events requiring medical intervention. Patients were randomized to prasugrel 5 mg daily (n = 41 or placebo (n = 21 for 30 days. Platelet function by VerifyNow® P2Y12 and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein assays at days 10 and 30 were significantly inhibited in prasugrel- compared with placebo-treated SCD patients. Results There were no hemorrhagic events requiring medical intervention in either study arm. Mean pain rate (percentage of days with pain and intensity in the prasugrel arm were decreased compared with placebo. However, these decreases did not reach statistical significance. Platelet surface P-selectin and plasma soluble P-selectin, biomarkers of in vivo platelet activation, were significantly reduced in SCD patients receiving prasugrel compared with placebo. In sum, prasugrel was well tolerated and not associated with serious hemorrhagic events. Conclusions Despite the small size and short duration of this study, there was a decrease in platelet activation biomarkers and a trend toward decreased pain.

  16. The mediating effects of family functioning on psychosocial outcomes in healthy siblings of children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jeffrey I; Treadwell, Marsha; Weissman, Lina; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2011-12-01

    Children with siblings coping with chronic illness experience stresses and disruptions in daily life as families work together to care for the affected child. Research suggests that children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) may be at risk for adjustment problems, impaired psychosocial functioning, and reduced quality of life. These potential stressors affect the child with SCD as well as their caregivers and other family members. This study examined the role of family functioning on the psychosocial functioning of healthy siblings of children with SCD. Participants were 65 healthy African-American siblings of children with SCD with a mean age of 11.19 years (range: 7-16) and their primary caregiver. Caregivers completed questionnaires assessing family functioning and child adjustment including demographic surveys, the Family Relations Scale (FRS), and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Increased number of emergency room visits (β = -0.28, P Family functioning mediated this effect (β = 0.27; P family expressiveness (total score, r = -0.34; P family conflict (total score, r = 0.41; P family expressiveness, support, and conflict are indicated for this population. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Cranial epidural hematomas: A case series and literature review of this rare complication associated with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jennifer; Rathore, Nisha; Lee, Pearlene; LeBlanc, Zachary; Lebensburger, Jeffrey; Meier, Emily Riehm; Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2017-03-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may experience many complications of the central nervous system (CNS) including stroke, silent cerebral infarcts, and neuropsychological deficits. Cranial epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication. Case series of cranial epidural hematomas in children with SCD from three different institutions is considered, along with a literature review of cranial epidural hematomas in this population. Seven children with SCD with cranial epidural hematomas were identified from three different institutions. All patients were male and the age at presentation ranged from 10 to 18 years. Two patients presented with headache (28.6%), while the rest had no neurologic symptoms at presentation. Four patients required urgent neurosurgical intervention (57.1%) and one patient died (14.3%). A literature review identified 18 additional cases of cranial epidural hematomas in children with SCD. Of these, treatment ranged from supportive care to neurosurgical intervention. Twelve patients completely recovered (66.7%), one patient had long-term cognitive impairment (5.6%), and four patients died (22.2%). Combined with our data, cranial epidural hematomas have a mortality rate of 20.0%. Although rare, cranial epidural hematoma can be fatal and should be considered in patients with acute neurological symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Learn Tips for Receiving Better Care in the Emergency Department in Our Fact ... related care in the United States. Read Supplement » VIDEO Sickle Cell Disease: When to Transfuse Learn about indications for blood transfusion in patients with ...

  19. ENERCA clinical recommendations for disease management and prevention of complications of sickle cell disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ferster, Alina; Colombatti, Raffaella; Rees, David C; Gulbis, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    Universal neonatal screening is performed in the United States, England, the Netherlands, and several cities in Belgium, with selective screening targeted on "high-risk" population in France (globally, one quarter of all the babies born in France are screened). Newborns diagnosed with a major sickle cell syndrome (SCD) should be referred to a designated pediatric sickle cell centre, and the parents are informed that their child has SCD; this may be in the sickle cell centre by an expert physician or in the community by an experienced nurse counsellor. The pediatric sickle cell centre should organize the care of the baby.

  20. Effects of vaccines in patients with sickle cell disease: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyeh, Alison Beriliy; Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Wonkam, Ambroise; Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Kaba, Mamadou

    2018-03-25

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited haematological disorder caused by a single point mutation (Glub6Val) that promotes polymerisation of haemoglobin S and sickling of erythrocytes. Inflammation, haemolysis, microvascular obstruction and organ damage characterise the highly variable clinical expression of SCD. People with SCD are at increased risk of severe infections, hence the need for vaccination against common disease-causing organisms in this population. We aim to review the evidence on the efficacy and safety of vaccines in people with SCD. The present systematic review will examine the current data as indexed in PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and EBSCOHost. We will consult Strategic Advisory Group of Experts practice statements, conference abstracts, reference lists of relevant articles, WHO ICTRP trial registry and experts in the field. Two authors will independently screen search outputs, select studies, extract data and assess risk of bias; resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus between the two authors or arbitration by a third author when necessary. We will perform a meta-analysis for clinically homogenous studies. Evidence from clinically diverse studies will be aggregated using narrative synthesis of the findings. In either case, we will use the GRADE approach to assess the strength of the available evidence. The study draws on data that are readily available in the public domain, hence no formal ethical review and approval is required. The findings of this review will be disseminated through conference presentations and a publication in a peer-reviewed journal. CRD42018084051. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. What is Sickle Cell Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to take liquid penicillin. Older children can take tablets. Many doctors will stop prescribing penicillin after a ... silent” strokes that can only be seen with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. People with SCD should ...

  2. Determination of the best method to estimate glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine in adult patients with sickle cell disease: a prospective observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlet Jean-Benoît

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD leads to tissue hypoxia resulting in chronic organ dysfunction including SCD associated nephropathy. The goal of our study was to determine the best equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR in SCD adult patients. Methods We conducted a prospective observational cohort study. Since 2007, all adult SCD patients in steady state, followed in two medical departments, have had their GFR measured using iohexol plasma clearance (gold standard. The Cockcroft-Gault, MDRD-v4, CKP-EPI and finally, MDRD and CKD-EPI equations without adjustment for ethnicity were tested to estimate GFR from serum creatinine. Estimated GFRs were compared to measured GFRs according to the graphical Bland and Altman method. Results Sixty-four SCD patients (16 men, median age 27.5 years [range 18.0-67.5], 41 with SS-genotype were studied. They were Sub-Saharan Africa and French West Indies natives and predominantly lean (median body mass index: 22 kg/m2 [16-33]. Hyperfiltration (defined as measured GFR >110 mL/min/1.73 m2 was detected in 53.1% of patients. Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was higher in patients with hyperfiltration than in patients with normal GFR (4.05 mg/mmol [0.14-60] versus 0.4 mg/mmol [0.7-81], p = 0.01. The CKD-EPI equation without adjustment for ethnicity had both the lowest bias and the greatest precision. Differences between estimated GFRs using the CKP-EPI equation and measured GFRs decreased with increasing GFR values, whereas it increased with the Cockcroft-Gault and MDRD-v4 equations. Conclusions We confirm that SCD patients have a high rate of glomerular hyperfiltration, which is frequently associated with microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. In non-Afro-American SCD patients, the best method for estimating GFR from serum creatinine is the CKD-EPI equation without adjustment for ethnicity. This equation is particularly accurate to estimate high GFR values, including glomerular

  3. Health-related quality of life and adherence to hydroxyurea in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Penedo, Frank J; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-06-01

    Complications related to sickle cell disease (SCD) result in significant declines in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). While hydroxyurea reduces SCD complications, adherence remains suboptimal. The study's objectives were to assess the feasibility of Internet-based electronic assessment of HRQOL in SCD clinic and to examine the relationship between HRQOL and hydroxyurea adherence in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with SCD. A cross-sectional survey was administered on tablets to 34 AYAs (12-22 years old) in a SCD clinic from January through December 2015. Study measures included Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® ) computerized adaptive testing and ©Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items (©MMAS-8). Participants (59% male, 91% Black) had median age of 13.5 (range 12-18) years. Ninety-one percent completed PROMIS® measures electronically in the clinic, meeting our feasibility criterion of ≥85% completion rate. ©MMAS-8 scores positively correlated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) (r s = 0.34, P = 0.04) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) (r s = 0.42, P = 0.01) and inversely correlated with fatigue (r s = -0.45, P = 0.01), depression (r s = -0.3, P = 0.08), and social isolation (r s = -0.78, P = 0.02). Low ©MMAS-8 scores, indicating poor adherence, were associated with worse fatigue (P = 0.001) and trended toward significance for pain (P = 0.07) and depression (P = 0.06). Homozygous hemoglobin S disease patients with low HbF (<16%) had worse social isolation (P = 0.04) and those with low MCV (<102 fl) reported worse fatigue (P = 0.001), pain (P = 0.01), mobility (P = 0.01), and social isolation (P = 0.04). HRQOL assessment in the SCD clinic is feasible. SCD patients with low hydroxyurea adherence and/or low HbF or MCV levels had worse HRQOL scores, particularly fatigue. Future prospective studies examining the relationship between HRQOL and hydroxyurea adherence are warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quality of life among adolescents with sickle cell disease: Mediation of pain by internalizing symptoms and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lauren C

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to clarify associations between pain, psychological adjustment, and family functioning with health-related quality of life (HRQOL in a sample of adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD utilizing teen- and parent-report. Methods Forty-two adolescents (between the ages of 12 and 18 with SCD and their primary caregivers completed paper-and-pencil measures of pain, teen's psychological adjustment, and HRQOL. In addition, primary caregivers completed a measure of disease-related parenting stress. Medical file review established disease severity. Results Pearson correlations identified significant inverse associations of pain frequency with physical and psychosocial domains of HRQOL as rated by the teen and primary caregiver. Generally, internalizing symptoms (i.e. anxiety and depression and disease-related parenting stress were also significantly correlated with lower HRQOL. Examination of possible mediator models via a series of regression analyses confirmed that disease-related parenting stress served as a mediator between pain frequency and physical and psychosocial HRQOL. Less consistent were findings for mediation models involving internalizing symptoms. For these, parent-rated teen depression and teen anxiety served as mediators of the association of pain frequency and HRQOL. Conclusion Results are consistent with extant literature that suggests the association of pain and HRQOL and identify concomitant pain variables of internalizing symptoms and family variables as mediators. Efforts to improve HRQOL should aim to address internalizing symptoms associated with pain as well as parenting stress in the context of SCD management.

  5. Reactivation of fetal hemoglobin in thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been recently devoted to mechanisms involved in the perinatal hemoglobin switch, as it was long ago established that the survival of fetal hemoglobin (HbF production in significant amount can reduce the severity of the clinical course in severe disorders like β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD. For instance, when β-thalassemia is associated with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH the disease takes a mild course, labeled as thalassemia intermedia. The same clinical amelioration occurs for the association between HPFH and SCD. As for the mechanism of this effect, some information has been obtained from the study of natural mutations at the human β-globin locus in patients with increased HbF, like the Corfu thalassemia mutations. Important evidence came from the discovery that drugs capable of improving the clinical picture of SCD, like decitabine ad hydroxycarbamide, are acting through the reactivation, to some extent, of HbF synthesis. The study of the mechanism of action of these compounds was followed by the identification of some genetic determinants, which promote this event. In particular, among a few genetic factors involved in this process, the most relevant appears the BCL11A gene, which is now credited to be able to silence γ-globin genes in the perinatal period by interaction with several erythroid-specific transcription factors and is actually considered as a barrier to HbF reactivation by known HbF inducing agents. Epigenetics is also a player in the process, mainly through DNA demethylation. This is certified by the recent demonstration that hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine, the first compounds used for HbF induction by pharmacology, act as irreversible inhibitors of demethyltransferase enzymes. Great interest has also been raised by the finding that several micro-RNAs, which act as negative regulators of gene expression, have been implicated in the

  6. Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Deficiency in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

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    Zeynep Ozdemir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bone disorders such as osteopenia or osteoporosis are the most common clinical manifestations seen in sickle cell disease (SCD with a high of morbidity. There are many reasons, including vitamin D deficiency for the appearance of bone problems. In the present study we aimed to evaluate osteopathy in patients with SCD using bone mineral densitometry (BMD and biochemical indices. Material and Method: 61 patients (29 female, 32 male were included in the study. The age, gender, and biochemical parameters with BMD were evaluated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry from lumbar vertebrae. According to Z scores, [-2] was considered as osteoporosis. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the factors influencing BMD. Results: There were a total of 61 SCD patients. The average age was 21.06±5.06 (15-27 years and the mean BMI was 19.15±2.98 kg/m2. 23 patients were osteopenic (11 female, 12 male (37.7% and 26 were osteoporotic (12 female, 13 male (44.3%. Twelve patients (6 female and 6 male (18% had normal Z scores. Vitamin D was found severely deficient (

  7. MRA of the intracranial circulation in asymptomatic patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillams, A.R.; McMahon, L.; Weinberg, G.; Carter, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Background. MR angiography (MRA) provides a mechanism for non-invasively studying blood flow, thus providing a new opportunity to study the intracranial circulation in asymptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Although conventional angiography is the gold standard for the depiction of vascular anatomy, this is too invasive for an asymptomatic population. Objective. To establish the range of appearances in asymptomatic SCD patients and to correlate brain MRI results (either sub-clinical abnormalities or normal brain parenchyma) with the MRA findings. Materials and methods. Brain MRI and MRA of the intracranial circulation was performed on 22 patients (13 male and 9 female, median age 7.5 years, range 1.3-20 years). Fourteen were homozygous SS and eight were SC. The median haematocrit at the time of MRI was 25.9 (range 13.8-33.3). Results. On MR imaging, four patients had infarcts in eight vascular territories (six anterior and two posterior). In 3/4 of anterior vascular territories with infarction, long (≥ 6 mm) segments of abnormal signal were seen at the internal carotid artery bifurcation with associated reduced distal flow. Short focal areas of abnormal signal were commonly seen where vessels branched, bifurcated or curved and were not associated with infarcts. These areas probably represent turbulence-related dephasing secondary to high velocity flow found in SCD. Conclusion. Long segments (≥ 6 mm) of abnormal signal with reduced distal flow correlated with sub-clinical infarction. (orig.)

  8. Extent of silent cerebral infarcts in adult sickle-cell disease patients on magnetic resonance imaging: is there a correlation with the clinical severity of disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Solomou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to correlate the extent of silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with the clinical severity of sickle cell disease (SCD in adult patients. Twenty-four consecutive adult asymptomatic SCD patients (11 male and 13 female with a mean age of 38.4 years (range 20-59 were submitted to brain MRI on a 1 Tesla Gyroscan Intera, Philips MR scanner with a dedicated head coil. The protocol consisted of TSE T2-weighted and FLAIR images on the axial and coronal planes. MRI readings were undertaken by two radiologists and consensus readings. Patients were compound heterozygotes (HbS/β-thal. The extent of SCIs was classified from 0-2 with 0 designating no lesions. Clinical severity was graded as 0-2 by the hematologist, according to the frequency and severity of vaso-occlusive crises. There was no statistically significant correlation between the severity of clinical disease and the extent of SCIs on MR imaging. The extent of SCI lesions did not differ statistically between younger and older patients. Patients receiving hydroxyurea had no statistically significant difference in the extent of SCI lesions. The extent of SCIs in heterozygous (HbS/β-thal SCD patients is not age related and may be quite severe even in younger (<38.4 years patients. However the extent of SCIs is not correlated with the severity of clinical disease.

  9. [Blood transfusion assessment to 112 homozygous sickle-cell disease patients in university hospital of Brazzaville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokekias, A Elira; Ossini, L Ngolet; Tsiba, F O Atipo; Malanda, F; Koko, I; De Montalembert, M

    2009-01-01

    Homozygous, sickle-cell disease (SCD) is responsible for acute complication, especially anaemic crisis and special situation such as acute chest syndrome, stroke and acute priapism. Pregnancy sickle-cell disease presents high risk for the mother and the fetus. In these indications, blood transfusion is the main therapy aiming to reduce anaemia in order to restore hemoglobin's rate or to increase normal Hb proportion. This study aims to assess the short-term efficiency of the red cell transfusion in SCD homozygous form. One hundred and twelve homozygous sickle-cell patients were enrolled in this prospective study: 59 females and 53 males, median age is 21,8 years (extremes: 2 and 45 years). These patients are mostly with very low income. Two groups of patients are included in this study. In the first group, patients present acute anemia crisis caused by infections disease (malaria, bacterial infections). In the second group (20 cases), SCD patients have particularly situations: pregnancy (10 cases); stroke (six cases); cardiac failure (two cases) and priapism (two cases). Transfusion treatment in first group is simple regimen. Transfusion of EC increased median Hb level at 2,9 g/dl (extremes: 1,1 and 4,7). In the second group of patients, 16 cases were transfused by manual partial exchange (1-3) and four patients received simple regimen of transfusion. Median Hb level was 3,1g/dl (extremes: 2,4-4,9 g/dl). HbS percentage reduction was after PTE between -30 and -66,8% (median: -52,6%). According to our diagnostic possibilities (blood serologic test), we have not found any contamination by HIV, HBV and HCV (virus).

  10. Testosterone-dependent sex differences in red blood cell hemolysis in storage, stress, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanias, Tamir; Sinchar, Derek; Osei-Hwedieh, David; Baust, Jeffrey J; Jordan, Andrew; Zimring, James C; Waterman, Hayley R; de Wolski, Karen S; Acker, Jason P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis represents an intrinsic mechanism for human vascular disease. Intravascular hemolysis releases hemoglobin and other metabolites that inhibit nitric oxide signaling and drive oxidative and inflammatory stress. Although these pathways are important in disease pathogenesis, genetic and population modifiers of hemolysis, including sex, have not been established. We studied sex differences in storage or stress-induced hemolysis in RBC units from the United States and Canada in 22 inbred mouse strains and in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) using measures of hemolysis in 315 patients who had homozygous SS hemoglobin from the Walk-PHASST cohort. A mouse model also was used to evaluate posttransfusion recovery of stored RBCs, and gonadectomy was used to determine the mechanisms related to sex hormones. An analysis of predisposition to hemolysis based on sex revealed that male RBCs consistently exhibit increased susceptibility to hemolysis compared with females in response to routine cold storage, under osmotic or oxidative stress, after transfusion in mice, and in patients with SCD. The sex difference is intrinsic to the RBC and is not mediated by plasmatic factors or female sex hormones. Importantly, orchiectomy in mice improves RBC storage stability and posttransfusion recovery, whereas testosterone repletion therapy exacerbates hemolytic response to osmotic or oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that testosterone increases susceptibility to hemolysis across human diseases, suggesting that male sex may modulate clinical outcomes in blood storage and SCD and establishing a role for donor genetic variables in the viability of stored RBCs and in human hemolytic diseases. © 2016 AABB.

  11. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors

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    Aleem Aamer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD is associated with signi-ficant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with pro-teinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients′ charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was consi-dered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2 years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3% had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8 g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF level of 14.4% (± 7.3%. Majority of the patients (61 had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-β0 thala-ssemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a border-line association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respec-tively. Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  12. Opioid management strategy decreases admissions in high-utilizing adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Amy; Pelot, Kristin; Koch, Kathryn; Miller, Lawrence; Hubler, Collin; Ndifor, Anisah; Coan, Canice; Leonard, Cynthia; Field, Joshua J

    A subset of adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) heavily utilizes the emergency department (ED) and hospital. The objective of our study was to determine the efficacy of a multidisciplinary strategy to address unmet needs in highly utilizing adults with SCD. In a prospective study, adults with SCD with ≥10 admissions per year were assessed by a multidisciplinary team for gaps in medical, social, and psychological care. Thereafter, the team decided upon the subject's predominant domain that drove admissions and instituted an interventional plan. All plans included an opioid management strategy. Preintervention and postintervention admission rate, as well as opioid use, was compared. Twelve subjects were enrolled. Median rate of ED and hospital admissions preintervention was 25 per year. The predominant domains identified were social needs (n = 6), psychological disorder (n = 1), and substance use disorder (n = 5). Multifaceted interventional plans were developed to address a wide range of gaps in care, but an opioid management strategy was the only intervention successfully completed. Even so, when the preintervention versus postintervention admission rate was compared, regardless of the domain, there was a 40 percent decline in hospital admissions (p = 0.03). Consistent with the successful implementation of an opioid management plan, the decrease in admissions was accompanied by a 37 percent decrease in intravenous opioid use (p = 0.02) and 10 percent decrease in oral opioid use (p = 0.04). An opioid management strategy, as part of a larger effort to improve care for high-utilizing adults with SCD, decreased rate of admissions and opioid use.

  13. Gene therapy for sickle cell disease: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John F

    2018-05-30

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common life-threatening monogenic diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Allogenic hematopietic stem cell transplantation is the only known cure for the disease with high success rates, but the limited availability of matched sibling donors and the high risk of transplantation-related side effects force the scientific community to envision additional therapies. Ex vivo gene therapy through globin gene addition has been investigated extensively and is currently being tested in clinical trials that have begun reporting encouraging data. Recent improvements in our understanding of the molecular pathways controlling mammalian erythropoiesis and globin switching offer new and exciting therapeutic options. Rapid and substantial advances in genome engineering tools, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, have raised the possibility of genetic correction in induced pluripotent stem cells as well as patient-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, these techniques are still in their infancy, and safety/efficacy issues remain that must be addressed before translating these promising techniques into clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

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    Michael Tetteh Anim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research revealed high prevalence of psychological symptoms among sickle cell disease (SCD patients in the West and Europe. In some Black SCD populations such as Nigeria and Jamaica, anxiety and depression had low prevalence rates compared to Europe. With difficulty locating research data on the prevalence of psychological symptoms in Ghana, this study aimed at exploring psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in a Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. Methods Two hundred and one participants (males 102 and females 99 who were HbSS (n = 131 and HbSC (n = 70, aged 18 years and above were purposively recruited. Using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI in a cross-sectional survey, the research answered questions about the prevalence of psychological symptoms. It also examined gender and genotype differences in psychological symptoms scores. Results Results indicated that adults with SCD had non-distress psychological symptoms scores. Although paranoid ideation as a psychological symptom indicated “a little bit” score, its prevalence was only 1 %. The prevalence of psychological symptoms as indexed by the Positive Symptom Total (PST was 10 %. Anxiety, hostility, and depression were psychological symptoms with low scores. Furthermore, except psychoticism scores, males did not differ significantly from females in other psychological symptoms. On the contrary, HbSS participants differed significantly, reporting more psychological symptoms than their HbSC counterparts. Conclusions The study concluded that there was low prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in this Ghanaian study. Although psychological symptoms distress scores were not observed among study participants at this time, females differed significantly by experiencing more psychoticism symptoms than males. HbSS participants also differed significantly by experiencing more depression, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation

  15. A pilot study of parent education intervention improves early childhood development among toddlers with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Melanie E; Hoyt-Drazen, Catherine; Abel, Regina; Rodeghier, Mark J; Yarboi, Janet M; Compas, Bruce E; King, Allison A

    2016-12-01

    Young children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for cognitive delay. In addition to biologic risk factors associated with SCD, environmental factors contribute to cognitive dysfunction within this cohort. We completed a single-arm, prospective cohort study. Children with SCD between the ages of 3 and 36 months and their caregivers were followed between October 2010 and December 2013. The aim was to describe the role of a home visitation model, the home environment, and socioeconomic status in the development of young children with SCD. Primary outcome measures were the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID-III) and the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME). We hypothesized that the home visitation model, Parents as Teachers ® (PAT), would encourage positive parent-child interactions and improve cognitive outcomes. Thirty-five participants had at least two PAT visits and BSID-III assessments. Mean scores within all five subtests of the BSID-III improved between enrollment and exit, with significant changes within cognitive (P = 0.016) and expressive language (EL) domains (P = 0.002). Multivariate modeling found the HOME score associated with the exit results of the cognitive domain. We report longitudinal results of the first home visitation program within the early childhood SCD population and show significant improvement in cognitive and EL development. Additionally, home environment was a significant predictor of cognitive development. Randomized controlled trials to test the impact of interventions targeting the home environment are warranted for this vulnerable population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. INCREASED VASOOCCLUSIVE CRISIS IN “O” BLOOD GROUP SICKLE CELL DISEASE PATIENTS: ASSOCIATION WITH UNDERLYING THROMBOSPONDIN LEVELS.

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    M. Al Huneini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objectives: To explore the incidence of vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC in Blood Group “O” sickle cell disease (SCD patients, and correlate it with the blood group and thrombospondin (TSP levels. Methods: In 89 consecutive SCD patients, blood samples were obtained for vWF antigen, collagen binding activity, blood group typing, C-reactive protein, variant hemoglobin analysis (HPLC, Serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels, complete blood counts, liver function tests, LDH and renal function tests during VOC episodes and in steady state conditions. Results: In the steady state SCD patients (n=72, “O” blood group patients (n=37 showed significantly higher median serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels than the non “O” blood group patients [n=35] [p <0.05, Mann-Whitney test], with an inverse relation between VWF:Ag, Factor VIII:C and TSP levels. Furthermore, the serum TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels were significantly higher in patients presenting with acute VOC [n=17], and in those with repeated VOC’s (group 1, n=16 especially amongst those patients with blood group “O” [p, <0.05, Mann-Whitney test]. Conclusions: The study shows that there was an inverse relation between TSP and vWF levels, in blood group “O” SCD patients with an upregulation of the TSP levels. Expectedly, during active VOC crisis, the TSP 1 and TSP 2 levels were significantly elevated.    Key Words: VOC; SCD; TSP; vWD; Blood groups

  17. Macrophage activation marker sCD163 correlates with accelerated lipolysis following LPS exposure: a human-randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Rittig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Macrophage activation determined by levels of soluble sCD163 is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. This suggests that macrophage activation is involved in the pathogenesis of conditions is characterised by adaptions in the lipid metabolism. Since sCD163 is shed to serum by inflammatory signals including lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin, we investigated sCD163 and correlations with lipid metabolism following LPS exposure. Methods: Eight healthy male subjects were investigated on two separate occasions: (i following an LPS exposure and (ii following saline exposure. Each study day consisted of a four-hour non-insulin-stimulated period followed by a two-hour hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp period. A 3H-palmitate tracer was used to calculate the rate of appearance (Rapalmitate. Blood samples were consecutively obtained throughout each study day. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for western blotting. Results: We observed a significant two-fold increase in plasma sCD163 levels following LPS exposure (P < 0.001, and sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with the plasma concentration of free fatty acids, Rapalmitate, lipid oxidation rates and phosphorylation of the hormone-sensitive lipase at serine 660 in adipose tissue (P < 0.05, all. Furthermore, sCD163 concentrations correlated positively with plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucagon, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10 (P < 0.05, all. Conclusion: We observed a strong correlation between sCD163 and stimulation of lipolysis and fat oxidation following LPS exposure. These findings support preexisting theory that inflammation and macrophage activation play a significant role in lipid metabolic adaptions under conditions such as obesity, DM2 and NAFLD.

  18. Role of hydroxycarbamide in prevention of complications in patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Wiles

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available NM Wiles, J HowardDepartment of Haematology, St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster, Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UKAbstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD is a genetically inherited condition caused by a point mutation in the beta globin gene. This results in the production of the abnormal hemoglobin, sickle hemoglobin (HbS. Hydroxycarbamide, is an antimetabolite/cytotoxic which works by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, blocking the synthesis of DNA and arresting cells in the S phase. In sickle cell anemia, it promotes fetal hemoglobin (HbF synthesis, improves red cell hydration, decreases neutrophil and platelet count, modifies red cell endothelial cell interactions and acts as a nitric oxide donor. Trials have shown the clinical benefit of hydroxycarbamide in a subpopulation of adult patients with SCD, with a 44% reduction in the median annual rate of painful crises, a decrease in the incidence of acute chest syndrome and an estimated 40% reduction in overall mortality over a 9-year observational period. Its use in pediatrics has also been well established; trials have shown it is well tolerated and does not impair growth or development. In addition it decreases the number and duration of hospital attendences. A number of emerging uses of hydroxycarbamide currently are being investigated, such as stroke prevention.Keywords: sickle cell anemia, hydroxycarbamide, hydroxyurea, maximum tolerated dose, vaso-occlusive crisis

  19. Outcomes, utilization, and costs among thalassemia and sickle cell disease patients receiving deferoxamine therapy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delea, Thomas E; Hagiwara, May; Thomas, Simu K; Baladi, Jean-Francois; Phatak, Pradyumna D; Coates, Thomas D

    2008-04-01

    Deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) reduces morbidity and mortality associated with transfusional iron overload. Data on the utilization and costs of care among U.S. patients receiving DFO in typical clinical practice are limited however. This was a retrospective study using a large U.S. health insurance claims database spanning 1/97-12/04 and representing 40 million members in >70 health plans. Study subjects (n = 145 total, 106 sickle cell disease [SCD], 39 thalassemia) included members with a diagnosis of thalassemia or SCD, one or more transfusions (whole blood or red blood cells), and one or more claims for DFO. Mean transfusion episodes were 12 per year. Estimated mean DFO use was 307 g/year. Central venous access devices were required by 20% of patients. Cardiac disease was observed in 16% of patients. Mean total medical costs were $59,233 per year including $10,899 for DFO and $8,722 for administration of chelation therapy. In multivariate analyses, potential complications of iron overload were associated with significantly higher medical care costs. In typical clinical practice, use of DFO in patients with thalassemia and SCD receiving transfusions is low. Administration costs represent a large proportion of the cost of chelation therapy. Potential complications of iron overload are associated with increased costs. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Progression and prognostic indicators of bronchial disease in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sophia N; Nussbaum, Eliezer; Yoonessi, Leila; Morphew, Tricia; Randhawa, Inderpal

    2014-06-01

    The pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality (MacLean et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 178:1055-1059, 2008; Klings et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 173:1264-1269, 2006; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2009). Despite this recognition, predictive markers of lung dysfunction progression remain elusive (Klings et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 173:1264-1269, 2006; Platt et al. N Engl J Med 330:1639-1644, 1994; Caboot et al. Curr Opin Pediatr 20:279-287, 2008; Field et al. Am J Hematol 83:574-576, 2008; Shirlo et al. Peadiatr Respir Review 12:78-82, 2011). This study was designed describe the longitudinal progression and identify specific markers that influence bronchial disease in SCD. A retrospective, chart review of 89 patients with SCD was conducted. All patients underwent spirometry in conjunction with body plethysmography as part of routine care. Eleven lung function variables were assessed, five of which were selected to establish patterns of normal, obstructive, restrictive, or mixed obstructive-restrictive physiology (Klings et al. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 173:1264-1269, 2006; Field et al. Am J Hematol 83:574-576, 2008). In the unadjusted model, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)% of predicted trended downward with age, while total lung capacity (TLC)% of predicted showed a bimodal distribution and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity corrected for hemoglobin (DLCOcor)% of predicted remained stable. Adjusting for acute chest syndrome (ACS) episodes, medication status, and growth velocity (GV), the final model demonstrated that the downward trend between FEV1% of predicted with age was further influenced by the latter two factors. Initial decline in FEV1% of predicted is associated with worsening pulmonary dysfunction over time. Independent of ACS episodes, the factors most influential on the progression of FEV1% predicted include the introduction of medications as well as the

  1. Patients with sickle cell disease are frequently excluded from the benefits of transcranial doppler screening for the risk of stroke despite extensive and compelling evidence

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    Daniela Laranja Gomes Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Transcranial doppler (TCD is a strategic component of primary stroke prevention in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. This study was conducted to examine the TCD characteristics of children with SCD in nine different medical centers in Brazil. Methods: Transcranial doppler was performed in accordance with the Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia Protocol. Results: Of the 396 patients, 69.5% had homozygous SS hemoglobin. The TCD result was abnormal in 4.8%, conditional in 12.6%, inadequate in 4.3% and abnormally low in 1% of patients. The highest mean flow velocities were 121±23.83cm/s and 124±27.21cm/s in the left and right middle cerebral artery respectively. A total of 28.8% patients (mean age 9.19±5.92 years were evaluated with TCD for the first time. Conclusions: The SCD patients were evaluated with TCD at an older age, representing an important missed opportunity for stroke prevention. Since TCD screening in patients with SCD is important to detect those at high risk for stroke, it is recommended that this screening should be made more readily available.

  2. Sonographic evaluation of the spleen among sickle cell disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    confirmed to have either HbSS/HbSC or HbAA gen- otype, were negative for malaria and typhoid disease, with no history of surgical splenectomy nor any other surgery in the last one year. The controls had no history of blood transfusion and no chronic or acute ailment of recurrent nature; while SCD subjects had no crisis in.

  3. Mathematical modeling of erythrocyte chimerism informs genetic intervention strategies for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrock, Philipp M; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Orkin, Stuart H; Williams, David A; Michor, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in gene therapy and genome-engineering technologies offer the opportunity to correct sickle cell disease (SCD), a heritable disorder caused by a point mutation in the β-globin gene. The developmental switch from fetal γ-globin to adult β-globin is governed in part by the transcription factor (TF) BCL11A. This TF has been proposed as a therapeutic target for reactivation of γ-globin and concomitant reduction of β-sickle globin. In this and other approaches, genetic alteration of a portion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment leads to a mixture of sickling and corrected red blood cells (RBCs) in periphery. To reverse the sickling phenotype, a certain proportion of corrected RBCs is necessary; the degree of HSC alteration required to achieve a desired fraction of corrected RBCs remains unknown. To address this issue, we developed a mathematical model describing aging and survival of sickle-susceptible and normal RBCs; the former can have a selective survival advantage leading to their overrepresentation. We identified the level of bone marrow chimerism required for successful stem cell-based gene therapies in SCD. Our findings were further informed using an experimental mouse model, where we transplanted mixtures of Berkeley SCD and normal murine bone marrow cells to establish chimeric grafts in murine hosts. Our integrative theoretical and experimental approach identifies the target frequency of HSC alterations required for effective treatment of sickling syndromes in humans. Our work replaces episodic observations of such target frequencies with a mathematical modeling framework that covers a large and continuous spectrum of chimerism conditions. Am. J. Hematol. 91:931-937, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. New Nitric Oxide Donor NCX 1443: Therapeutic Effects on Pulmonary Hypertension in the SAD Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease.

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    Abid, Shariq; Kebe, Kanny; Houssaïni, Amal; Tomberli, Françoise; Marcos, Elisabeth; Bizard, Emilie; Breau, Marielle; Parpaleix, Aurelien; Tissot, Claire-Marie; Maitre, Bernard; Lipskaia, Larissa; Derumeaux, Genevieve; Bastia, Elena; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Adnot, Serge

    2018-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors may be useful for treating pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating sickle cell disease (SCD), as endogenous NO is inactivated by hemoglobin released by intravascular hemolysis. Here, we investigated the effects of the new NO donor NCX1443 on PH in transgenic SAD mice, which exhibit mild SCD without severe hemolytic anemia. In SAD and wild-type (WT) mice, the pulmonary pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar and was abolished by 100 mg/kg NCX1443. The level of PH was also similar in SAD and WT mice exposed to chronic hypoxia (9% O2) alone or with SU5416 and was similarly reduced by daily NCX1443 gavage. Compared with WT mice, SAD mice exhibited higher levels of HO-1, endothelial NO synthase, and PDE5 but similar levels of lung cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from SAD mice grew faster than those from WT mice and had higher PDE5 protein levels. Combining NCX1443 and a PDE5 inhibitor suppressed the growth rate difference between SAD and WT cells and induced a larger reduction in hypoxic PH severity in SAD than in WT mice. By amplifying endogenous protective mechanisms, NCX1443 in combination with PDE5 inhibition may prove useful for treating PH complicating SCD.

  5. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in sickle cell disease: a cross-sectional study

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    Roye-Green Karen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background It is known that there is significant morbidity associated with urinary tract infection and with renal dysfunction in sickle cell disease (SCD. However, it is not known if there are potential adverse outcomes associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB infections in sickle cell disease if left untreated. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of ASB, in a cohort of patients with SCD. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of patients in the Jamaican Sickle Cell Cohort. Aseptically collected mid-stream urine (MSU samples were obtained from 266 patients for urinalysis, culture and sensitivity analysis. Proteinuria was measured by urine dipsticks. Individuals with abnormal urine culture results had repeat urine culture. Serum creatinine was measured and steady state haematology and uric acid concentrations were obtained from clinical records. This was completed at a primary care health clinic dedicated to sickle cell diseases in Kingston, Jamaica. There were 133 males and 133 females in the sample studied. The mean age (mean ± sd of participants was 26.6 ± 2.5 years. The main outcome measures were the culture of ≥ 105 colony forming units of a urinary tract pathogen per milliliter of urine from a MSU specimen on a single occasion (probable ASB or on consecutive occasions (confirmed ASB. Results Of the 266 urines collected, 234 were sterile and 29 had significant bacteriuria yielding a prevalence of probable ASB of 10.9% (29/266. Fourteen patients had confirmed ASB (prevalence 5.3% of which 13 had pyuria. Controlling for genotype, females were 14.7 times more likely to have confirmed ASB compared to males (95%CI 1.8 to 121.0. The number of recorded visits for symptomatic UTI was increased by a factor of 2.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 4.5, p Conclusion ASB is a significant problem in individuals with SCD and may be the source of pathogens in UTI. However, further research is needed to determine the clinical significance of ASB in

  6. Therapeutic hemoglobin levels after gene transfer in β-thalassemia mice and in hematopoietic cells of β-thalassemia and sickle cells disease patients.

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    Laura Breda

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate the feasibility of treating β-thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD by lentiviral-mediated transfer of the human β-globin gene. However, previous studies have not addressed whether the ability of lentiviral vectors to increase hemoglobin synthesis might vary in different patients.We generated lentiviral vectors carrying the human β-globin gene with and without an ankyrin insulator and compared their ability to induce hemoglobin synthesis in vitro and in thalassemic mice. We found that insertion of an ankyrin insulator leads to higher, potentially therapeutic levels of human β-globin through a novel mechanism that links the rate of transcription of the transgenic β-globin mRNA during erythroid differentiation with polysomal binding and efficient translation, as reported here for the first time. We also established a preclinical assay to test the ability of this novel vector to synthesize adult hemoglobin in erythroid precursors and in CD34(+ cells isolated from patients affected by β-thalassemia and SCD. Among the thalassemic patients, we identified a subset of specimens in which hemoglobin production can be achieved using fewer copies of the vector integrated than in others. In SCD specimens the treatment with AnkT9W ameliorates erythropoiesis by increasing adult hemoglobin (Hb A and concurrently reducing the sickling tetramer (Hb S.Our results suggest two major findings. First, we discovered that for the purpose of expressing the β-globin gene the ankyrin element is particularly suitable. Second, our analysis of a large group of specimens from β-thalassemic and SCD patients indicates that clinical trials could benefit from a simple test to predict the relationship between the number of vector copies integrated and the total amount of hemoglobin produced in the erythroid cells of prospective patients. This approach would provide vital information to select the best candidates for these

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Disease KidsHealth / For Kids / Sickle Cell Disease What's ... to stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell disease is an inherited (say: ...

  8. [Neonatal screening of hemoglobinopathies and G6PD deficiency in Catalonia (Spain). Molecular study of sickle cell disease associated with alpha thalassemia and G6PD deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañú Pereira, María Del Mar; Cabot, Anna; Martínez González, Ana; Sitjà Navarro, Eulalia; Cararach, Vicent; Sabrià, Josep; Boixaderas, Jordi; Teixidor, Roser; Bosch, Albert; López Vílchez, M Angeles; Martín Ibáñez, Itziar; Carrión, Teresa; Plaja, Pere; Sánchez, Mario; Vives Corrons, José Luis

    2007-06-30

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies and glucose-6-phosphate dehidrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the Catalan neonatal population is increasing due to immigration. Coinheritance of more than a single RBC genetic defect is becoming more frequent and diagnostic pitfalls are also increasing. We intended to demonstrate the need to perform an early diagnosis of sickle cell disease (SCD) by means of neonatal screening, to establish the prevalence of SCD associated with alpha thalassemia and G6PD deficiency and to identify genotypes associated with sickle cell disease and G6PD deficiency. 4,020 blood samples from newborns were screened. For the screening of hemoglobinopathies the high performance liquid chromatography method was used and for G6PD deficiency the fluorescent spot test was employed. We studied the association between betaS gene and alpha thalassaemia del-3.7 Kb. SCD and G6PD deficiency genotypes were established. Prevalence of SCD in population at risk was 1/475 newborns. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency in population at risk was 1/43, and in autochthonous population was 1/527 newborns. In all the cases, sickle hemoglobin was confirmed by ARMS (amplification refractory mutation system). Association between betaS gene and alpha thalassaemia del-3.7 Kb was found in 32.2% of the samples, and an association between betaS gene and G6PD deficiency was observed in 7% of the samples. This study confirms the high prevalence of SCD and G6PD deficiency in population at risk as well as their genetic and clinical heterogeneity. The study of genotype/phenotype relationships allows a better knowledge of molecular mechanism and is useful to establish suitable criteria of diagnosis.

  9. Clinical events in a large prospective cohort of children with sickle cell disease in Nagpur, India: evidence against a milder clinical phenotype in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipty; Arjunan, Aishwarya; Sarathi, Vijaya; Jain, Harshwardhan; Bhandarwar, Amol; Vuga, Marike; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2016-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be milder in India than in the United States. The objective of this large single-center study was to examine the rate of complications to define the phenotype of SCD in India. The rate of complications per 100 person-years in 833 pediatric SCD patients for 1954 person-years in Nagpur, India including those diagnosed on newborn screen (NBS) and those presenting later in childhood (non-NBS) was compared to those reported in the cooperative study of sickle cell disease (CSSCD). Event rates were also compared between patients belonging to scheduled castes (SCs), scheduled tribes (STs), and other backward classes (OBC). Comparison of CSSCD versus Nagpur NBS versus Nagpur non-NBS for rates of pain (32.4 vs. 85.2 vs. 62.4), severe anemia (7.1 vs. 27 vs. 6.6), stroke (0.7 vs. 0.8 vs. 1.4), splenic sequestration (3.4 vs. 6.7 vs. 1.6), acute chest syndrome (24.5 vs. 23.6 vs. 1.0), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed more frequent complications in Nagpur compared to CSSCD. Comparison of ST, SC, and OBC for rates of pain (84.6 vs. 71.9 vs. 63.5), acute chest syndrome (3.6 vs. 2.8 vs. 2.2), severe anemia (5.4 vs. 9.5 vs. 11.4), stroke (1.2 vs. 0.4 vs. 0.3), splenic sequestration (0.6 vs. 2.4 vs. 1.9), and meningitis (0.8 vs. 0 vs. 0.1) revealed significantly more frequent complications among ST. SCD-related complications are more frequent in Indian children than that observed in CSSCD. Further study is indicated to define SCD phenotype in India. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Increased Bone Marrow (BM) Plasma Level of Soluble CD30 and Correlations with BM Plasma Level of Interferon (IFN)-γ, CD4/CD8 T-Cell Ratio and Disease Severity in Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Ge, Meili; Li, Xingxin; Shao, Yingqi; Yao, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. Immune abnormalities such as decreased lymphocyte counts, inverted CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio and increased IFN-γ-producing T cells have been found in AA. CD30, a surface protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor family and releasing from cell surface as a soluble form (sCD30) after activation, marks a subset of activated T cells secreting IFN-γ when exposed to allogeneic antigens. Our study found elevated BM plasma levels of sCD30 in patients with SAA, which were closely correlated with disease severity, including absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and absolute netrophil count (ANC). We also noted that sCD30 levels were positively correlated with plasma IFN-γ levels and CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio in patients with SAA. In order to explain these phenomena, we stimulated T cells with alloantigen in vitro and found that CD30+ T cells were the major source of IFN-γ, and induced CD30+ T cells from patients with SAA produced significantly more IFN-γ than that from healthy individuals. In addition, increased proportion of CD8+ T cells in AA showed enhanced allogeneic response by the fact that they expressed more CD30 during allogeneic stimulation. sCD30 levels decreased in patients responded to immunosuppressive therapy. In conclusion, elevated BM plasma levels of sCD30 reflected the enhanced CD30+ T cell-mediated immune response in SAA. CD30 as a molecular marker that transiently expresses on IFN-γ-producing T cells, may participate in mediating bone marrow failure in AA, which also can facilitate our understanding of AA pathogenesis to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:25383872

  11. Posttransplant sCD30 as a biomarker to predict kidney graft outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsal, Caner; Opelz, Gerhard

    2012-09-08

    In current clinical praxis, monitoring of immunosuppressive agents in organ transplantation is restricted to measurement of drug blood levels and does not consider the drug's variable effect on the individual patient's immune system. Establishment of biological markers that measure the biological effect of immunosuppressive drugs is desirable and would enable the identification of patients who are at risk of developing rejection, or patients who are suitable for minimization or weaning of immunosuppressive therapy. Several studies demonstrated that the technically simple posttransplant measurement in serum of the T cell activation marker soluble CD30 (sCD30) allows prediction of subsequent graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. sCD30 is a relatively large molecule and therefore an attractive biological marker which is resistant to repeated thawing cycles and temperature differences and easily determined using commercial ELISA. Whether sCD30-based prospective adjustment of immunosuppressive therapy can prevent irreversible graft damage and improve long-term graft outcome awaits evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Respect, trust, and the management of sickle cell disease pain in hospital: comparative analysis of concern-raising behaviors, preliminary model, and agenda for international collaborative research to inform practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, James; Beach, Mary Catherine; Haywood, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    Background/objectives Qualitative interview studies suggest that adult patients’ experiences of hospital treatment for sickle cell disease (SCD) pain reflect an absence of respect by providers for patients, and an absence or breakdown of trust. Systematic comparisons between treatment settings could help identify contextual influences on respect and trust. Design Quantitative comparison of concern-raising behaviors (pain treatment outcomes indicating breakdowns of trust) among adult SCD patients in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, and London, UK, followed by analysis of potential explanations for differences, including socio-cultural and behavioral factors, with a preliminary model of the processes leading to concern-raising behaviors. Results Rates of concern-raising behaviors were significantly higher in Baltimore than London. The model identifies respect and trust as key factors which could be targeted in efforts to improve the quality of SCD pain management in hospital. Conclusion An agenda for international, interdisciplinary research to improve the treatment of SCD pain in hospital should include: comparative analyses between countries and treatment settings of factors that could influence respect and trust; research to test hypotheses derived from models about the roles of respect and trust in the treatment of pain; studies of the impact of healthcare structures and policy on patients’ experiences of care; research focusing on developmental and interpersonal processes related to respect and trust; applications of attribution and other social psychology theories; and development and evaluation of interventions to improve the hospital treatment of SCD pain by increasing respect and trust. PMID:21797726

  13. Immunogenicity and Safety of 10-valent Pneumococcal Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Protein D Conjugate Vaccine (PHiD-CV) Administered to Children With Sickle Cell Disease Between 8 Weeks and 2 Years of Age: A Phase III, Open, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirima, Sodiomon B; Tiono, Alfred; Gansané, Zakaria; Siribié, Mohamadou; Zongo, Angèle; Ouédraogo, Alphonse; François, Nancy; Strezova, Ana; Dobbelaere, Kurt; Borys, Dorota

    2017-05-01

    Immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of the 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) were evaluated in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), who are at increased risk for infections. In this phase III, open-label, single-center, controlled study in Burkina Faso (NCT01175083), children with SCD (S) or without SCD (NS) were assigned to 6 groups (N = 300): children 8-11 weeks of age (vaccines; children 7-11 months of age (7-11S and 7-11NS groups) received 2 primary doses and a booster dose of PHiD-CV; children 12-23 months of age (12-23S and 12-23NS groups) received 2 catch-up doses of PHiD-CV. Pneumococcal antibody responses were measured using 22F-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and functional opsonophagocytic activity. Responses to other antigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adverse events were recorded. One month postprimary vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥98% of infants in the vaccination in children vaccination. Safety and reactogenicity profiles were similar in children with or without SCD. PHiD-CV was immunogenic with an acceptable safety profile in children with and without SCD starting vaccination at 8 weeks to 23 months of age.

  14. Stroke Prevalence in Children With Sickle Cell Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Lianna J; Munube, Deogratias; Kasirye, Philip; Mupere, Ezekiel; Jin, Zhezhen; LaRussa, Philip; Idro, Richard; Green, Nancy S

    2018-01-01

    Objectives . The prevalence of stroke among children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in sub-Saharan Africa was systematically reviewed. Methods . Comprehensive searches of PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were performed for articles published between 1980 and 2016 (English or French) reporting stroke prevalence. Using preselected inclusion criteria, titles and abstracts were screened and full-text articles were reviewed. Results . Ten full-text articles met selection criteria. Cross-sectional clinic-based data reported 2.9% to 16.9% stroke prevalence among children with SCD. Using available sickle gene frequencies by country, estimated pediatric mortality, and fixed- and random-effects model, the number of affected individuals is projected as 29 800 (95% confidence interval = 25 571-34 027) and 59 732 (37 004-82 460), respectively. Conclusion . Systematic review enabled the estimation of the number of children with SCD stroke in sub-Saharan Africa. High disease mortality, inaccurate diagnosis, and regional variability of risk hamper more precise estimates. Adopting standardized stroke assessments may provide more accurate determination of numbers affected to inform preventive interventions.

  15. Survival among children and adults with sickle cell disease in Belgium: Benefit from hydroxyurea treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, Phu Quoc; Gulbis, Béatrice; Dedeken, Laurence; Dupont, Sophie; Vanderfaeillie, Anna; Heijmans, Catherine; Huybrechts, Sophie; Devalck, Christine; Efira, André; Dresse, Marie-Françoise; Rozen, Laurence; Benghiat, Fleur Samantha; Ferster, Alina

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the survival of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) recorded in the Belgian SCD Registry and to assess the impact of disease-modifying treatments (DMT). The Registry created in 2008 included patients of eight centers. All available data in 2008 were retrospectively encoded in the database. After 2008 and until 2012, all data were recorded prospectively for already registered patients as well as newly diagnosed subjects. Data were registered from neonatal screening or from diagnosis (first contact) until last follow-up or death. Data included diagnosis, demography, and outcome data. We collected data from 469 patients over a 5,110 patient years (PY) follow-up period. The global mortality rate was low (0.25/100 PY), although 13 patients died (2.8%) and was similar between children, adolescents (10-18 years), and young adults (P = 0.76). Out of the cohort, 185 patients received hydroxyurea at last follow-up (median duration of treatment: 10.3 years), 90 underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), 24 were chronically transfused, and 170 had never had any DMT. Hydroxyurea showed significant benefit on patients outcome as reflected by a lower mortality rate compared to transplanted individuals or people without DMT (0.14, 0.36, and 0.38 per 100 PY, respectively) and by higher Kaplan-Meier estimates of 15 year survival (99.4%) compared to HSCT (93.8%; P = 0.01) or no DMT groups (95.4%; P = 0.04). SCD mortality in Belgium is low with no increase observed in young adults. Patients treated with hydroxyurea demonstrate a significant benefit in survival when compared to those without DMT or transplanted. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cold hypersensitivity increases with age in mice with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappia, Katherine J.; Garrison, Sheldon R.; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with acute vaso-occlusive crises that trigger painful episodes and frequently involves ongoing, chronic pain. Additionally, both humans and mice with SCD experience heighted cold sensitivity. However, studies have not addressed the mechanism(s) underlying the cold sensitization, nor its progression with age. Here we measured thermotaxis behavior in young and aged mice with severe SCD. Sickle mice had a marked increase in cold sensitivity measured by a cold preference test. Further, cold hypersensitivity worsened with advanced age. We assessed whether enhanced peripheral input contributes to the chronic cold pain behavior by recording from C fibers, many of which are cold-sensitive, in skin-nerve preparations. We observed that C fibers from sickle mice displayed a shift to warmer (more sensitive) cold-detection thresholds. To address mechanisms underlying the cold sensitization in primary afferent neurons, we quantified mRNA expression levels for ion channels thought to be involved in cold detection. These included the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (Trpm8) and TRP Ankyrin 1 (Trpa1) channels, as well as the two-pore domain potassium channels, TREK-1 (Kcnk2), TREK-2 (Kcnk4), and TRAAK (Kcnk10). Surprisingly, transcript expression levels of all of these channels were comparable between sickle and control mice. We further examined transcript expression of 83 additional pain-related genes and found increased mRNA levels for endothelin 1 and tachykinin receptor 1. These factors may contribute to hypersensitivity in sickle mice at both the afferent and behavioral levels. Sensory neurons from sickle cell disease mice are sensitized to cold, mirroring behavioral observations, and have increased expression of endothelin 1 and tachykinin receptor 1. PMID:24953902

  17. Scintigraphic follow-up of the effects of therapy with hydroxyurea on splenic function in patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allan [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital das Clinicas da UNICAMP, Campina (Brazil); Pinheiro, Vitoria; Anjos, Ana Claudia; Brandalise, Silvia [Centro Infantil Domingos A. Boldrini, Campinas (Brazil); Fahel, Fernanda; Lima, Mariana; Etchebehere, Elba; Ramos, Celso; Camargo, Edwaldo E. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Campinas State University (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil)

    2002-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may develop functional asplenia as a chronic complication, secondary to repeated episodes of polymerisation of haemoglobin S. It is known that increased plasma concentrations of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) reduce the polymerisation of haemoglobin S. Hydroxyurea is a chemotherapeutic agent capable of increasing HbF levels in the red blood cells and its use has recently been proposed in the treatment of SCD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term therapy with hydroxyurea on recovery of splenic function. Twenty-one patients (aged 3-22 years; 14 with SS haemoglobinopathy, 7 with S{beta}{sup 0} haemoglobinopathy) were studied with liver/spleen scintigraphy before and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. All studies were submitted to visual inspection and semi-quantitative analyses using spleen/liver ratios. Imaging prior to treatment demonstrated functional asplenia in nine SS patients and one S{beta}{sup 0} patient and impaired splenic function in five SS patients and six S{beta}{sup 0} patients. After treatment, splenic function improved in ten patients, remained unchanged in eight and worsened in three. Using liver/spleen imaging, it was possible to demonstrate that hydroxyurea is capable of improving splenic function in some SCD patients. Improvement is not always possible and frequently does not lead to a normal splenic function even after 1 year of treatment. (orig.)

  18. Scintigraphic follow-up of the effects of therapy with hydroxyurea on splenic function in patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Allan; Pinheiro, Vitoria; Anjos, Ana Claudia; Brandalise, Silvia; Fahel, Fernanda; Lima, Mariana; Etchebehere, Elba; Ramos, Celso; Camargo, Edwaldo E.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may develop functional asplenia as a chronic complication, secondary to repeated episodes of polymerisation of haemoglobin S. It is known that increased plasma concentrations of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) reduce the polymerisation of haemoglobin S. Hydroxyurea is a chemotherapeutic agent capable of increasing HbF levels in the red blood cells and its use has recently been proposed in the treatment of SCD. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term therapy with hydroxyurea on recovery of splenic function. Twenty-one patients (aged 3-22 years; 14 with SS haemoglobinopathy, 7 with Sβ 0 haemoglobinopathy) were studied with liver/spleen scintigraphy before and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. All studies were submitted to visual inspection and semi-quantitative analyses using spleen/liver ratios. Imaging prior to treatment demonstrated functional asplenia in nine SS patients and one Sβ 0 patient and impaired splenic function in five SS patients and six Sβ 0 patients. After treatment, splenic function improved in ten patients, remained unchanged in eight and worsened in three. Using liver/spleen imaging, it was possible to demonstrate that hydroxyurea is capable of improving splenic function in some SCD patients. Improvement is not always possible and frequently does not lead to a normal splenic function even after 1 year of treatment. (orig.)

  19. Characterization of functional brain activity and connectivity using EEG and fMRI in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Michelle; Zhang, Huishi; Mundahl, John; Datta, Yvonne; Nelson, Stephen; Gupta, Kalpna; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a red blood cell disorder that causes many complications including life-long pain. Treatment of pain remains challenging due to a poor understanding of the mechanisms and limitations to characterize and quantify pain. In the present study, we examined simultaneously recording functional MRI (fMRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) to better understand neural connectivity as a consequence of chronic pain in SCD patients. We performed independent component analysis and seed-based connectivity on fMRI data. Spontaneous power and microstate analysis was performed on EEG-fMRI data. ICA analysis showed that patients lacked activity in the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network compared to controls. EEG-fMRI data revealed that the insula cortex's role in salience increases with age in patients. EEG microstate analysis showed patients had increased activity in pain processing regions. The cerebellum in patients showed a stronger connection to the periaqueductal gray matter (involved in pain inhibition), and negative connections to pain processing areas. These results suggest that patients have reduced activity of DMN and increased activity in pain processing regions during rest. The present findings suggest resting state connectivity differences between patients and controls can be used as novel biomarkers of SCD pain.

  20. Impact of Undertreated Sickle Cell Pain in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Shah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Undertreated pain around the world includes the acute and chronic pain caused by sickle cell disease (SCD. In collaboration with a Caribbean association that aims to provide assistance to those diagnosed with SCD, we surveyed adults with SCD about pain management and impact of SCD pain. Methods: Participants were recruited from a group of 55 adults with SCD. A survey was administered to those who agreed to participate. Questions centred on their self-assessed level of pain due to SCD, the extent to which that pain interferes with daily activities, and how they seek and obtain pain relief. Results: Responses were received from 39 participants (female: n = 28, 72%, male: n = 11, 28%; mean age: 31.6 (SD ± 13.7 years. Sickle cell disease pain significantly disrupts participants’ daily activities (62%, mood (72%, work (64% and sleep (69%. Prescription medicine was ineffective for 41% and about half (n = 19 sought alternate means of relief. Conclusion: Sickle cell disease pain is undertreated in the Caribbean, disrupts daily activities and affects quality of life by impinging on education, employment and marital status. Sickle cell disease and other types of pain can be clinically managed safely, effectively and inexpensively. By failing to palliate and overcome the problem of undertreated pain, healthcare systems and providers contribute to socio-economic amongst other repercussions for sufferers, their families and caregivers, and their nations.

  1. Macrophage-related serum biomarkers soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble mannose receptor (sMR) to differentiate mild liver fibrosis from cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E S; Rødgaard-Hansen, S; Moessner, B

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages regulate the fibrotic process in chronic liver disease. The aim of the present pilot study was to evaluate two new macrophage-specific serum biomarkers [soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble mannose receptor (sMR, sCD206)] as potential fibrosis markers in patients chronically infected wi...

  2. Molecular blood typing augments serologic testing and allows for enhanced matching of red blood cells for transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Katie; Harris, Samantha; Gaur, Prashant; Haile, Askale; Armour, Rosalind; Teramura, Gayle; Delaney, Meghan

    2012-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have dissimilar red blood cell (RBC) phenotypes compared to the primarily Caucasian blood donor base due, in part, to underlying complex Rh and silenced Duffy expression. Gene array-based technology offers high-throughput antigen typing of blood donors and can identify patients with altered genotypes. The purpose of the study was to ascertain if RBC components drawn from predominantly Caucasian donors could provide highly antigen-matched products for molecularly typed SCD patients. SCD patients were genotyped by a molecular array (HEA Beadchip, BioArray Solutions). The extended antigen phenotype (C, c, E, e, K, k, Jk(a) , Jk(b) , Fy(a) , Fy(b) , S, s) was used to query the inventory using different matching algorithms; the resulting number of products was recorded. A mean of 96.2 RBC products was available for each patient at basic-level, 34 at mid-level, and 16.3 at high-level stringency. The number of negative antigens correlated negatively with the number of available products. The Duffy silencing mutation in the promoter region (67T>C) (GATA) was found in 96.5% of patients. Allowing Fy(b+) products for patients with GATA increased the number of available products by up to 180%, although it does not ensure prevention of Duffy antibodies in all patients. This feasibility study provides evidence that centers with primarily Caucasian donors may be able to provide highly antigen-matched products. Knowledge of the GATA status expands the inventory of antigen-matched products. Further work is needed to determine the most clinically appropriate match level for SCD patients. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Impairment of myocardial perfusion in children with sickle cell disease; Alteration de la perfusion myocardique chez l'enfant drepanocytaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunoury, C. [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Acar, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital des Enfants, Service de Cardiologie Pediatrique, 31 - Toulouse (France); Montalembert, M. de [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, Service de Pediatrie Generale, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    While brain, bone and spleen strokes are well documented in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), impairment of myocardial perfusion is an unknown complication. Non invasive techniques such as exercise testing and echocardiography have a low sensitivity to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with SCD. We have prospectively assessed myocardial perfusion with Tl-201 SPECT in 23 patients with SCD (10 female, 13 male, mean age 12 {+-} 5 years). Myocardial SPECT was performed after stress and 3 hours later after reinjection on a single head gamma camera equipped with a LEAP collimator (64 x 64 matrix size format, 30 projections over 180 deg C, 30 seconds per step). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed by equilibrium radionuclide angiography at rest on the same day. Myocardial perfusion was impaired in 14/23 patients: 9 reversible defects and 5 fixed defects. The left ventricular cavity was dilated in 14/23 patients. The mean LVEF was 63 {+-} 9%. There was no relationship between myocardial perfusion and left ventricular dilation or function. The frequent impairment of myocardial perfusion in children with SCD could lead to suggest a treatment with hydroxyurea, an improvement of perfusion can be noted with hydroxyurea. (author)

  4. Gene and Cell Therapy for β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs): The Next Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, breakthroughs in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) research, namely cellular reprogramming and the emergence of sophisticated genetic engineering technologies, have opened new frontiers for cell and gene therapy. The prospect of using hPSCs, either autologous or histocompatible, as targets of genetic modification and their differentiated progeny as cell products for transplantation, presents a new paradigm of regenerative medicine of potential tremendous value for the treatment of blood disorders, including beta-thalassemia (BT) and sickle cell disease (SCD). Despite advances at a remarkable pace and great promise, many roadblocks remain before clinical translation can be realistically considered. Here we discuss the theoretical advantages of cell therapies utilizing hPSC derivatives, recent proof-of-principle studies and the main challenges towards realizing the potential of hPSC therapies in the clinic.

  5. Risk of classical Kaposi sarcoma by plasma levels of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies, sCD26, sCD23 and sCD30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviano Enza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the immunological alterations leading to classical Kaposi sarcoma (cKS among people infected with KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. Methods In a population-based study of 119 cKS cases, 105 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 155 KSHV-seronegative controls, we quantified plasma soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD levels and antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (anti-EBNA-1 and viral capsid antigen (anti-VCA. Differences between groups in prevalence of low-tertile anti-EBNA-1 and high-tertile anti-VCA were compared by logistic regression. Continuous levels between groups and by presence of cKS co-factors among controls were compared by linear regression and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon methods. Results Comparisons of cKS cases to seropositive controls and of seropositive to seronegative controls revealed no significant differences. However, controls with known cKS cofactors (male sex, nonsmoking, diabetes and cortisone use had significantly lower levels of anti-EBNA (P = 0.0001 - 0.07 and anti-VCA (P = 0.0001 - 0.03. Levels of sCD26 were significantly lower for male and non-smoking controls (Padj ≤ 0.03, and they were marginally lower with older age and cortisone use (Padj ≤ 0.09. Conclusions Anti-EBV and sCD26 levels were associated with cofactors for cKS, but they did not differ between cKS cases and matched controls. Novel approaches and broader panels of assays are needed to investigate immunological contributions to cKS.

  6. Sickle cell disease in Madhya Pradesh, Central India: A comparison of clinical profile of sickle cell homozygote vs. sickle-beta thalassaemia individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajiv; Lazarus, Monica; Ghanghoria, Pawan; Singh, Mpss; Gupta, Rasik Behari; Kumar, Surendra; Sharma, Ravendra K; Shanmugam, Rajasubramaniam

    2016-10-01

    The clinical manifestation in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients varies from one individual to another due to factors like the presence of alpha-thalassaemia mutation, foetal haemoglobin, and β-globin gene haplotype. The present study enumerates the clinical profile of sickle cell anaemia patients from Central India. Seven hundred seventy-six SCD patients from Jabalpur and surrounding districts (Madhya Pradesh) in central India were registered with the sickle cell clinic of NIRTH, Jabalpur. The present study reveals recorded signs and symptoms of genetically confirmed sickle cell anaemia (404) and sickle beta thalassaemia (92) patients. Majority of the patients were from scheduled caste communities (47.9%) and Gond tribal community (13.8%). Splenomegaly was the most common clinical manifestation observed (71.4%). Overall, 63.5% patients had a history of blood transfusion. The most frequent signs and symptoms observed were Pallor, Icterus, Joint pain, Fever, and Fatigue. Majority of the patients revealed onset of disease prior to attaining the age of 3 years (sickle cell anaemia 44.3% and sickle beta thalassaemia 35.9%). Mean haemoglobin levels among SCA individuals were marginally higher than SBT patients. On the other hand, mean foetal haemoglobin levels among SBT individuals showed the reverse trend. Notably, the present study reports the first incidence of priapism recorded in Central India. The study revealed a high prevalence of SCD among scheduled caste, backward caste, and tribal communities. Dissemination of study findings, screening, pre-marriage counselling, and pre-natal diagnosis are fundamental to preventing or lowering of birth of sickle cell anaemia children in the affected populations.

  7. Characterization of CBD-CdS layers with different S/Cd ratios in the chemical bath and their relation with the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil-Galan, O.; Morales-Acevedo, A.; Cruz-Gandarilla, F.; Jimenez-Escamilla, M.G.; Aguilar-Hernandez, J.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Sanchez-Meza, E.; Ramon-Garcia, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    In previous papers we have reported the improvement of the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells by varying the thiourea/CdCl 2 ratio (R tc ) in the chemical bath solution used for the deposition of the CdS layers. In this work, a more complete study concerning the physical properties of Chemical Bath Deposited (CBD) CdS layers studied by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and optical spectroscopy are correlated to the I-V characteristics under AM 1.5 sunlight and the spectral response of CdS/CdTe solar cells. It is confirmed that the optimum R tc for the CBD CdS films is R tc = 5, since in this case the best solar cells were obtained and these films show the better optical and structural characteristics

  8. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Crosby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD. The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU, barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%. The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P<.01 and older age (P<.05 were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD.

  9. Hydroxyurea prescription, availability and use for children with sickle cell disease in Italy: Results of a National Multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Palazzi, Giovanni; Masera, Nicoletta; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Bonetti, Elisa; Samperi, Piera; Barone, Angelica; Perrotta, Silverio; Facchini, Elena; Miano, Maurizio; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Guerzoni, Maria Elena; Corti, Paola; Menzato, Federica; Cesaro, Simone; Casale, Maddalena; Rigano, Paolo; Forni, Gian Luca; Russo, Giovanna; Sainati, Laura

    2018-02-01

    The number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has increased in Italy in the past decade due to immigration. In spite of the established efficacy of hydroxyurea (HU) in childhood, population-based data regarding its prescription and effectiveness come mainly from studies performed in adults or outside Europe. The Hydroxyurea in SCD: A Large Nation-wide Cohort Study from Italy was a retrospective cohort study of adult and pediatric patients with SCD attending 32 centers. Pediatric data are analyzed separately. Out of 504 children followed in 11 centers, 206 (40%) were on HU (194 SS/Sβ°, 12 SC/Sß+); 74% came from Sub-Saharian Africa and 18% from Europe. HU therapy indications for SS/Sβ° patients were as follows: 57% painful vaso-occlusive crisis, acute chest syndrome or both, 24% anemia, 8% anemia, and other reasons (the majority had Hb ≤ 8-8.5 g/dl, revealing scarce acceptance of low Hb values by pediatric hematologist). Mean starting dose was 15.5 mg/kg, and dose at full regimen was 17.1 mg/kg. Mean age at HU therapy was 7.68 years, although it was lower for SS/Sβ° patients. Only 10% started HU before 3 years. In 92%, 500 mg capsule was used; in 6%, the galenic was used; and in 2%, 100 mg tablet was used. Significant reduction of clinical events and inpatients admissions, with improvement in hematological parameters, was observed for SS/Sβ° patients and a trend toward improvement for SC/Sß+ patients was also observed. HU effectiveness is demonstrated in a national cohort of children with SCD living in Italy, even at a lower dose than recommended, revealing good adherence to a treatment program by a socially vulnerable group of patients such as immigrants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Regional cerebral blood flow in patients with sickle cell disease: study with single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, F.A.; Owunwanne, A.; Syed, G.M.; Elgazzar, A.H.; Rizui, A.M.; Al-Ajmi, J.A.; Mohammed, A.M.; Ar Marouf, R.; Shiekh, M.

    2007-01-01

    Neurological complications have been reported in patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) using positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT), but not with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The objective of this study was to investigate brain perfusion in the patients with SCD using SPECT after technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ( 99m Tc-HMPAO), was administered and compare the findings with those of demography, physical examination, MRI and hematological profile. The study involved 21 patients (12 males, 9 females, age at study 8-45 years) who were known to be having SCD for a duration of at least 5 years. The patients were not in acute crisis and had normal neurological assessments with no known history of stroke or transient ischemic episode or previous abnormal CT or MRI brain scan, and were right-handed. The brain SPECT was performed after intravenous injection of 740 MBq (20 mCi) 99m Tc-HMPAO in adults or an appropriate dose in pediatric patients. The scans were visually interpreted by two nuclear medicine physicians and a decision was reached by consensus. An MRI done 3 months later was interpreted by a radiologist. The demographic data and hematological profile were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Of the 21 patients, 7 (age 11-22 years) had brain perfusion deficit mostly in the frontal lobe either alone or in combination with temporal and/or parietal lobe. The MRI was abnormal in 2 patients. The brain perfusion deficit was not associated with the demographic data of the patients or hematological profiles. The findings show that SPECT was useful in detecting brain perfusion deficit in SCD patients, and such an early detection may be clinically useful in the subsequent follow-up of such patients, since it is known that cerebral perfusion deficit can lead to silent infarct and/or overt stroke, and affect cognitive skills. (author)

  11. Cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Liu; Hongyun Huang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved by cell transplantation,which has caught general attention from the field of the therapy for PD recently. In this paper, we summarize the cell-based therapy for PD.DATA SOURCES: A search for English literature related to the cellular transplantation of PD from January 1979to July 2006 was conducted in Medline with the key words of "Parkinson's disease, cell transplantation,embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells".STUDY SELECTTON: Data were checked in the first trial, and literatures about PD and cell transplantation were selected. Inclusive criteria: ① PD; ② Cell transplantation. Exclusive criteria: repetitive researches.DATA EXTRACTTON: A total of 100 papers related to cellular transplant and PD were collected and 41literatures were in accordance with the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: PD is a neural degeneration disease that threatens the health of the aged people, and most traditional therapeusis cannot delay its pathological proceeding. Cell transplantation is becoming popular as a new therapeutic tool, and the cells used to transplant mainly included dopamine-secreting cells, fetal ventral mesencephalic cells, embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells up to now. Animal experiment and clinical test demonstrate that cell transplantation can relieve the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease obviously, but there are some problems need to be solved.CONCLUSTON: Cell transplantation has visible therapeutic efficacy on PD. Following the improvement of technique, and we have enough cause to credit that cell therapy may cure PD in the future.

  12. The psychosocial impact of leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell disease: I don't want them to know my little secret.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkeiruka I Umeh

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD impacts millions of individuals worldwide and more than 100,000 people in the United States. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of SCD. The health status of individuals living with chronic leg ulcers is not only influenced by clinical manifestations such as pain duration and intensity, but also by psychosocial factors. Garnering insights into the psychosocial impact can provide a more holistic view of their influence on quality of life.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants living with active SCD-associated leg ulcers or with a history of ulcers. Subjects were recruited from an ongoing study (INSIGHTS, Clin Trial.Gov NCT02156102 and consented to this qualitative phase of the study. Five areas were explored: leg ulcer pain, physical function, social-isolation, social relationships and religious support. Data was collected from 20 individuals during these interviews and a thematic analysis was performed and reported.Twenty participants with a mean age of 42.4 (SD ± 11.1years were included in the study. Major themes identified included:1 pain (acute and chronic; 2 compromised physical function as demonstrated by decreased ability to walk, run, and play sports; 3 social isolation from activities either by others or self-induced as a means of avoiding certain emotions, such as embarrassment; 4 social relationships (family support and social network; 5 support and comfort through their religion or spirituality.SCD patients with leg ulcers expressed that they experience social isolation, intense and frequent ulcer pain, and difficulty in physical function. SCD-associated leg ulcers have been studied from a clinical approach, but the psychosocial factors investigated in this study informs how quality of life is impacted by the leg ulcers.

  13. Cell Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Madani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Recently, cell therapy has sparked a revolution in ischemic heart disease that will in the future help clinicians to cure patients. Earlier investigations in animal models and clinical trials have suggested that positive paracrine effects such as neoangiogenesis and anti-apoptotic can improve myocardial function. In this regard the Royan cell therapy center designed a few trials in collaboration with multi hospitals such as Baqiyatallah, Shahid Lavasani, Tehran Heart Center, Shahid rajaee, Masih daneshvari, Imam Reza, Razavi and Sasan from 2006. Their results were interesting. However, cardiac stem cell therapy still faces great challenges in optimizing the treatment of patients. Keyword: Cardiovascular disease, Cell therapy.  

  14. Extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver in a child with sickle cell disease: A rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, Angela; Willy, Simo; Slone, Jeremy S

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 7-year-old Cameroonian girl with sickle cell disease (SCD) who presented with progressive abdominal distension, fever, severe anemia, respiratory distress, and fatigue. Abdominal ultrasound showed a 15.3 cm × 11.5 cm × 15.5 cm solid echogenic mass within the left lobe of the liver. Fine-needle aspiration showed features of extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Despite transfusions, antibiotics, and initiation of hydroxyurea the patient died of respiratory failure during the hospital stay. There is a paucity of information on EMH in the pediatric sickle cell population, especially from resource-limited settings such as western Africa. EMH, however, is a known complication of SCD and should be considered in patients presenting with mass lesions in the setting of chronic anemia. With limited therapeutic interventions for EMH, including radiation and hydroxyurea, the emphasis should be on improving overall treatment of patients with chronic and untreated hemolytic anemia, especially in low-income countries. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis syndrome in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, Julie-An M; Hillery, Cheryl A; Gottschall, Jerome L; Baylerian, Diane M; Scott, J Paul

    2003-06-01

    Alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has a reported incidence of 5% to 36%. One complication of alloimmunization is delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis (DHTR/H) syndrome, which has a reported incidence of 11%. In patients with SCD, clinical findings in DHTR/H syndrome occur approximately 1 week after the red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and include the onset of increased hemolysis associated with pain and profound anemia. The hemoglobin (Hb) often drops below pretransfusion levels. In many reported adult cases, the direct antiglobulin test (DAT) remains negative and no new alloantibody is detected as the cause for these transfusion reactions. To date, few pediatric cases have been reported with this phenomenon. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and laboratory findings of a case series in children who had SCD and experienced a DHTR/H syndrome at our institution. An 11-year retrospective chart review of patients with discharge diagnosis of SCD and transfusion reaction was performed. DHTR/H syndrome was defined as the abrupt onset of signs and symptoms of accelerated hemolysis evidenced by an unexplained fall in Hb, elevated lactic dehydrogenase, elevated bilirubin above baseline, and hemoglobinuria, all occurring between 4 and 10 days after an RBC transfusion. Patient characteristics, time from transfusion, symptoms, reported DAT, new autoantibody or alloantibody formation, laboratory abnormalities, and complications were recorded. Patients with acute transfusion reactions were excluded. We encountered 7 patients who developed 9 episodes of DHTR/H syndrome occurring 6 to 10 days after RBC transfusion. Each presented with fever and hemoglobinuria. All but 1 patient experienced pain initially ascribed to vaso-occlusive crisis. The DAT was positive in only 2 of the 9 episodes. The presenting Hb was lower than pretransfusion levels in 8 of the 9 events. Severe complications were observed after the onset of

  16. Environmental Influences on Daily Emergency Admissions in Sickle-Cell Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Contou, Damien; Dandine-Roulland, Claire; Hemery, François; Habibi, Anoosha; Charles-Nelson, Anaïs; Galacteros, Frederic; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Maitre, Bernard; Katsahian, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous reports have suggested a role for weather conditions and air pollution on the variability of sickle cell disease (SCD) severity, but large-scale comprehensive epidemiological studies are lacking. In order to evaluate the influence of air pollution and climatic factors on emergency hospital admissions (EHA) in SCD patients, we conducted an 8-year observational retrospective study in 22 French university hospitals in Paris conurbation, using distributed lag non-linear models, a methodology able to flexibly describe simultaneously non-linear and delayed associations, with a multivariable approach. During the 2922 days of the study, there were 17,710 EHA, with a mean daily number of 6.1 ± 2.8. Most environmental factors were significantly correlated to each other. The risk of EHA was significantly associated with higher values of nitrogen dioxide, atmospheric particulate matters, and daily mean wind speed; and with lower values of carbon monoxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, daily temperature (minimal, maximal, mean, and range), day-to-day mean temperature change, daily bright sunshine, and occurrence of storm. There was a lag effect for 12 of 15 environmental factors influencing hospitalization rate. Multivariate analysis identified carbon monoxide, day-to-day temperature change, and mean wind speed, along with calendar factors (weekend, summer season, and year) as independent factors associated with EHA. In conclusion, most weather conditions and air pollutants assessed were correlated to each other and influenced the rate of EHA in SCD patients. In multivariate analysis, lower carbon monoxide concentrations, day-to-day mean temperature drop and higher wind speed were associated with increased risk of EHA. PMID:25546672

  17. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    remodeling, wound healing, and tumor repression or growth. The broad scope .... lesions, and (iv) MC leukemia, probably representing the ..... Slow-release Vitamin C (increased degranulation of histamine; inhibition of mast cell degranulation ...

  18. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  19. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  20. Development and Production of Array Barrier Detectors at SCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Dobromislin, R.; Fraenkel, R.; Gershon, G.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Karni, Y.; Klin, O.; Kodriano, Y.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nevo, I.; Nitzani, M.; Pivnik, I.; Rappaport, N.; Rosenberg, O.; Shtrichman, I.; Shkedy, L.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tessler, R.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2017-09-01

    XB n or XB p barrier detectors exhibit diffusion-limited dark currents comparable with mercury cadmium telluride Rule-07 and high quantum efficiencies. In 2011, SemiConductor Devices (SCD) introduced "HOT Pelican D", a 640 × 512/15- μm pitch InAsSb/AlSbAs XB n mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector with a 4.2- μm cut-off and an operating temperature of ˜150 K. Its low power (˜3 W), high pixel operability (>99.5%) and long mean time to failure make HOT Pelican D a highly reliable integrated detector-cooler product with a low size, weight and power. More recently, "HOT Hercules" was launched with a 1280 × 1024/15- μm format and similar advantages. A 3-megapixel, 10- μm pitch version ("HOT Blackbird") is currently completing development. For long-wave infrared applications, SCD's 640 × 512/15- μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" XB p type II superlattice (T2SL) detector has a ˜9.3- μm cut-off wavelength. The detector contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, and is fabricated into focal plane array (FPA) detectors using standard production processes including hybridization to a digital silicon read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), glue underfill and substrate thinning. The ROIC has been designed so that the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector family. The Pelican-D LW FPA has a quantum efficiency of ˜50%, and operates at 77 K with a pixel operability of >99% and noise equivalent temperature difference of 13 mK at 30 Hz and F/2.7.

  1. Presence of pain on three or more days of the week is associated with worse patient reported outcomes in adults with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi N

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitya Bakshi,1,2 Diana Ross,1 Lakshmanan Krishnamurti1,2 1Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology-BMT, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: While acute episodic pain is the hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD, transition to chronic pain is a major cause of morbidity and impaired quality of life. One of the core diagnostic criteria used by Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations Innovations Opportunities and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT to define chronic SCD pain is the presence of pain on a “majority of days” in the past 6 months in one or more locations. The frequency characteristic of “majority of days” is adapted from the criteria of 15 days or more per month, used to define chronic migraine, but there are inadequate data to support this cutoff in SCD. Using an existing dataset of adults with SCD who completed patient-reported outcomes of pain interference, physical functioning, anxiety, depression, and fatigue using the National Institutes of Health (NIH patient-reported outcomes measures information system (PROMIS short-form instruments, we examined the association of the presence of pain on 3 or more days per week with patient-reported outcomes of functioning. In unadjusted analyses, presence of pain on 3 or more days a week was associated with higher median PROMIS scores of pain interference, anxiety, and depression. Median PROMIS scores of fatigue and physical function were worse in women compared with men in unadjusted analyses. We did not find any difference in median PROMIS pain scores between adults aged ≤35 years compared with those aged ≥35 years. In linear regression models, after adjustment for age and sex, the presence of pain on 3 or more days a week was found to be associated with worse pain interference and anxiety. These data support

  2. Pregnancy outcome in patients with sickle cell disease in the UK--a national cohort study comparing sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) with HbSC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Ayensah, Benjamin; Knight, Marian; Howard, Jo

    2015-04-01

    We describe the findings from a national study of maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease (SCD). Data were collected via the United Kingdom Obstetric Surveillance System between 1 February 2010 and 31 January 2011 from 109 women, of whom 51 (46·8%) had HbSS and 44 (40·4%) had HbSC. Data included antenatal, maternal and fetal outcomes. Comparisons were made between women with HbSS and HbSC. Incidence of complications were acute pain (57%), blood transfusion (26%), urinary tract infection (UTI; 12%) and critical care unit admission (23%) and these were all more common in women with HbSS than HbSC. There was no difference in the incidence of acute chest syndrome, hypertension and venous thromboembolism between HbSS and HbSC. Women with HbSS were more likely to deliver at pregnancy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Ankylosis of the hips and knees due to sickle cell disease [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/S7w2Gz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Saleh Abdullah Al Elayan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a 29-year-old Saudi male with sickle cell disease (SCD with severe stiffness of his joints, mainly both knees and hips, secondary to complications of SCD. He was severely crippled: unable to sit, stand or walk, and was bedridden for 8 years when he was presented to us. Radiographs showed fusion of both knees and hips. There was no evidence of active osteomyelitis by Gallium scan. The patient’s hemoglobin S decreased to levels below 30% by exchange transfusion. Bilateral total hip replacement, as well as unilateral total knee replacement, was carried out to improve his level of function. There is only one reported case of such severe and multiple joint complications in a single patient suffering from SCD. The increased life expectancy that medical advances have offered to the sickle-cell patients has led to the appearance of sickle-cell-related complications, which were previously only seen rarely. These complications were successfully managed and the patient was able to move and transfer using a wheel chair.

  4. Targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the transgenic sickle cell mouse penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Sezen, Sena F; Burnett, Arthur L

    2012-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a state of chronic vasculopathy characterized by endothelial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, but the sources and mechanisms responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are unknown. We evaluated whether SCD activates NADPH oxidase, induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreases antioxidants in the SCD mouse penis. We further tested the hypothesis that targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the SCD mouse penis. SCD transgenic (sickle) mice were used as an animal model of SCD. Hemizygous (hemi) mice served as controls. Mice received an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Penes were excised at baseline for molecular studies. Markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase subunits p67(phox) , p47(phox) , and gp91(phox) ), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase-1 [GPx1]) were measured by Western blot in penes. Sources of ROS, oxidative stress, and enzymatic antioxidants in the SCD penis. Relative to hemi mice, SCD increased (Ppenis. Apocynin treatment of sickle mice reversed (P0.05) prevented eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of hemi mice did not affect any of these parameters. NADPH oxidase and eNOS uncoupling are sources of oxidative stress in the SCD penis; decreased GPx1 further contributes to oxidative stress. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase upregulation decreases oxidative stress, implying a major role for NADPH oxidase as a ROS source and a potential target for improving vascular function in the SCD mouse penis. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Lung function and six-minute walk test performance in individuals with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela G. Ohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle Cell Disease (SCD, which is characterized by a mutation in the gene encoding beta hemoglobin, causes bodily dysfunctions such as impaired pulmonary function and reduced functional capacity. Objective : To assess changes in pulmonary function and functional capacity in patients with SCD and to identify the relationships between these variables. Method: We evaluated sociodemographic, anthropometric, lung function (spirometry, respiratory (manovacuometer, peripheral muscle strength (Handgrip strength - HS and functional capacity (i.e., the six-minute walk test parameters in 21 individuals with SCD (average age of 29±6 years. Shapiro-Wilk, paired Student's, Wilcoxon, Pearson and Spearman correlation tests were used for statistical analyses, and the significance threshold was set at p<0.05. Results : A total of 47.6% of the study subjects exhibited an altered ventilation pattern, 42.8% had a restrictive ventilatory pattern (RVP and 4.8% exhibited a mixed ventilatory pattern (MVP. The observed maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP values were below the predicted values for women (64 cmH2O, and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP values, HS values and distance walked during the 6MWT were below the predicted values for both men (103 cmH2O, 39 Kgf and 447 m, respectively and women (64 cmH2O; 27 Kgf; 405 m, respectively. Positive correlations were observed between maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV and MEP (r=0.4; p=0.046; MVV and BMI (r=0.6; p=0.003; and between HS and MIP (r=0.7; p=0.001, MEP (r=0.6; p=0.002, MVV (r=0.5; p=0.015, distance walked in the 6MWT (r=0.4; p=0.038 and BMI (r=0.6; p=0.004. Conclusions : SCD promoted changes in lung function and functional capacity, including RVPs and a reduction in the distance walked in the 6MWT when compared to the predictions. In addition, significant correlations between the variables were observed.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease children under 10 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Maschietto, Nicola; Varotto, Elena; Grison, Alessandra; Grazzina, Nicoletta; Meneghello, Linda; Teso, Simone; Carli, Modesto; Milanesi, Ornella; Sainati, Laura

    2010-09-01

    Despite the finding of elevated Tricuspid Regurgitant Velocity (TRV) in children below 5 years of age, the prevalence and evolution of Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) in young children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are unclear. In order to identify predictive factors of precocious PH development, SCD children > or =3 years old, at steady state, underwent annual echocardiography and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). Patients receiving chronic transfusion were excluded. Thirty-seven of seventy-five patients were > or =3 years, with measurable TRV. In our young population (mean age 6.2 years) of mainly African, HbS/HbS patients, 8/37 (21.6%) had TRV > or =2.5 m/s, 8% being only 3 years old. Significant correlation was found between precocious TRV elevation and high platelet and reticulocyte counts and frequent acute chest syndromes (ACS). In multivariate analysis, ACS was the only variable predicting TRV > or =2.5 m/s. TDI of the 37 patients showed signs of diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. At follow-up all eight patients with high TRV displayed further increase and seven more developed TRV > or =2.5 m/s. PH seems to begin in children earlier than expected. Factors involved in its early onset might be different from the ones causing its development in older children or adults. African children might benefit from early screening and re-assessment once a year.

  7. Impact of individualized pain plan on the emergency management of children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Smith-Packard, Bethanny; Gupta, Ashish; Campbell, Mary; Gunawardena, Sriya; Saladino, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) the hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) is often treated inadequately in the emergency department (ED). We hypothesized that pain management plans individualized for each patient can improve pain management and lead to high levels of patient satisfaction. Starting in 2002, we treated all patients with SCD reporting to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) ED with VOC using a structured algorithm. We recorded regimens used successfully for each patient as an "individualized pain plan" and implemented it during subsequent VOC visits and adjusted it to patient response. We compared rates of hospitalization following an ED visit with VOC and readmission within 1 week after discharge for CHP with that of four comparable hospitals from Pediatric Health Information (PHIS) database. Patients and parents completed surveys of satisfaction with pain management and with care. Between 2002 and 2008 there was a greater decline in the rate of admission of patients presenting to the ED at CHP (78% to 52%) as compared to PHIS (71% to 68%), (P pain score during ED management was 2.0 or more on a Wong Baker scale of 0-5 (P pain management as very good or higher. Individualized pain management plans in the ED are effective in delivering high quality management of VOC and are associated with a high level of patient satisfaction and decreased avoidable hospitalizations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Evaluation of bone mineral density in children with sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Colino, C; Beléndez Bieler, C; Pérez Díaz, M; Cela de Julián, E

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the Community of Madrid. The BMD was estimated in 40 children with SCD, and with an age range between 3 and 16 years, using densitometry (DXA), as recommended by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD). The mean age at the time of the study was 7.97±3.95 years, the mean value of the DXA expressed in Z -score was -0.91±1.46 with a range of minimum values - 5.30 and 2.30 maximum. More than half (57.5%) of all the children had normal BMD (Z>-1), 25% had low BMD (Z between -1 and -2), and 17.5% showed an abnormal Z -score values of osteoporosis (Z -score<-2). The Pearson linear correlation was statistically significant between Z -score value and the haemoglobin level (r=0.368, p=.019), finding no correlation with the levels of 25 (OH) vitamin D. Prospective studies are needed with a larger number of patients to understand the future implications of bone densitometry changes and associated risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. NKT cells in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Kuiper, Johan

    2017-12-05

    Despite life-style advice and the prescription of cholesterol-lowering and anti-thrombotic drugs, cardiovascular diseases are still the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies focussing on atherosclerosis, the major underlying pathology of cardiovascular diseases characterized by an accumulation of lipids in an inflamed arterial/vessel wall. CD1d-restricted lipid-sensing natural killer T (NKT) cells, bridging the innate and adaptive immunity, and CD1d-expressing antigen-presenting cells are detected in atherosclerotic lesions of mice and humans. In this review we will summarize studies that point to a critical role for NKT cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases by the secretion of pro-atherogenic cytokines and cytotoxins. These pro-atherogenic NKT cells are potential targets for new therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, proteins transferring lipids during atherosclerosis, which are also important in the loading of lipids onto CD1d and possible endogenous ligands responsible for the activation of NKT cells during atherosclerosis will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency Department (ED, ED Observation, Day Hospital, and Hospital Admissions for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of alternative venues to manage uncomplicated vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC, such as a day hospital (DH or ED observation unit, for patients with sickle cell anemia, may significantly reduce admission rates, which may subsequently reduce 30-day readmission rates. Methods: In the context of a two-institution quality improvement project to implement best practices for management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD VOC, we prospectively compared acute care encounters for utilization of 1 emergency department (ED; 2 ED observation unit; 3 DH, and 4 hospital admission, of two different patient cohorts with SCD presenting to our two study sites. Using a representative sample of patients from each institution, we also tabulated SCD patient visits or admissions to outside hospitals within 20 miles of the patients’ home institutions. Results: Over 30 months 427 patients (297 at Site 1 and 130 at Site 2 initiated 4,740 institutional visits, totaling 6,627 different acute care encounters, including combinations of encounters. The range of encounters varied from a low of 0 (203 of 500 patients [40.6%] at Site 1; 65 of 195 patients [33.3%] at Site 2, and a high of 152 (5/month acute care encounters for one patient at Site 2. Patients at Site 2 were more likely to be admitted to the hospital during the study period (88.4% vs. 74.4%, p=0.0011 and have an ED visit (96.9% vs. 85.5%, p=0.0002. DH was used more frequently at Site 1 (1.207 encounters for 297 patients at Site 1, vs. 199 encounters for 130 patients at Site 2, and ED observation was used at Site 1 only. Thirty-five percent of patients visited hospitals outside their home academic center. Conclusion: In this 30-month assessment of two sickle cell cohorts, healthcare utilization varied dramatically between individual patients. One cohort had more hospital admissions and ED encounters, while the other cohort had more day hospital encounters and used a sickle cell disease

  11. Development of quality indicators for transition from pediatric to adult care in sickle cell disease: A modified Delphi survey of adult providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Amy E; Shah, Nishita; Mack, Jennifer W

    2017-06-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult care is a vulnerable time for young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD); however, improvements in transition are limited by a lack of quality indicators. The purpose of this study was to establish quality indicators for transition in SCD and to determine the optimal timing between the final pediatric visit and the first adult provider visit. We conducted a modified Delphi survey to reach a consensus on which quality indicators are most important for a successful transition. Our expert panel consisted of members of the Sickle Cell Adult Provider Network. In the first round, the participants ranked a list of quality indicators by importance. In the second round, the participants chose their "top 5" quality indicators in terms of importance and also ranked them on feasibility. The response rates for the two rounds were 68 and 96%, respectively. Nine quality indicators were chosen as "top 5" by a majority of respondents, including communication between pediatric and adult providers, timing of first adult visit, patient self-efficacy, quality of life, and trust with their adult provider. Based on the comments from round 1, respondents were also asked for the optimal timing between leaving pediatric care and entering adult care. Most recommended a first adult visit within 2 months of the final pediatric visit. By using these quality indicators chosen by the majority of respondents, we can better develop and evaluate transition programs for young adults with SCD and improve health outcomes for these vulnerable patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Renal Replacement Therapy in End-Stage Sickle Cell Nephropathy: Presentation of Two Cases and Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mueilo, Samir H.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic renal failure develops in 4-18% of patients with sickle cell anemia. Hemodialysis and kidney transplant are viable options in the management of end-stage renal disease in patients with sickle cell diseases (SCD). Information on kidney disease among Saudi patients with SCD is non-existing. In this report, the clinical course of two adult males with end-stage sickle cell nephropathy from Eastern Saudi Arabia is described. Literature on renal replacement therapy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) is discussed. (author)

  13. Imaging of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.J.; Sarnaik, S.

    1999-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an important health care issue in the United States and in certain areas in Africa, the Middle East and India. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the disease at the molecular and pathophysiologic level, specific treatment which is safe and accessible for most patients is still elusive. Going into the next millennium, the management of this disease is still largely dependent on early diagnosis and the treatment of complications with supportive care. Thus, diagnosis and evaluation of the complications of the disease are crucial in directing clinical care at the bedside. Modern imaging modalities have greatly improved, and their application in the patient with the sickling disorders has enhanced the decision - making process. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical aspects of common complications of the disease and to discuss imaging approaches which are useful in their evaluation. (orig.)

  14. Improvement of field matching in segmented-field electron conformal therapy using a variable-SCD applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richert, John D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fields, Robert S [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809-3482 (United States); II, Kenneth L Matthews [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Boyd, Robert A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2007-05-07

    . Reductions were most significant for abutted fields of nonadjacent energies. Planning segmented-field ECT using the variable-SCD applicator for a patient with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the left ear showed the dose spread, {sigma}, and D{sub 90-10} of the dose distribution in the PTV being reduced by an average of 38%, 22% and 22%, respectively. The measured and calculated dose in a polystyrene phantom resulting from the variable-SCD, segmented-field ECT plans for the hypothetical PTVs showed good agreement; however, isolated differences between dose calculation and measurement indicated the need for a more accurate dose algorithm than the PBA for segmented-field ECT. These results confirmed our hypothesis that using the variable-SCD applicator for segmented-field ECT results in the PTV dose distribution becoming more homogenous and being within the range of 85-105% of the 'given dose'. Clinical implementation of this method requires variable-SCD applicators, and the design used in the present work should be acceptable, as should our methods for construction of the inserts. Dose verification measurements in a polystyrene phantom and the recommended improvements in dose calculation should be appropriate for quality assurance of segmented-field ECT.

  15. Measurement of soluble CD59 in CSF in demyelinating disease: Evidence for an intrathecal source of soluble CD59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelek, Wioleta M; Watkins, Lewis M; Howell, Owain W; Evans, Rhian; Loveless, Sam; Robertson, Neil P; Beenes, Marijke; Willems, Loek; Brandwijk, Ricardo; Morgan, B Paul

    2018-02-01

    CD59, a broadly expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, is the principal cell inhibitor of complement membrane attack on cells. In the demyelinating disorders, multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), elevated complement protein levels, including soluble CD59 (sCD59), were reported in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We compared sCD59 levels in CSF and matched plasma in controls and patients with MS, NMOSD and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and investigated the source of CSF sCD59 and whether it was microparticle associated. sCD59 was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Hycult; HK374-02). Patient and control CSF was subjected to western blotting to characterise anti-CD59-reactive materials. CD59 was localised by immunostaining and in situ hybridisation. CSF sCD59 levels were double those in plasma (CSF, 30.2 ng/mL; plasma, 16.3 ng/mL). Plasma but not CSF sCD59 levels differentiated MS from NMOSD, MS from CIS and NMOSD/CIS from controls. Elimination of microparticles confirmed that CSF sCD59 was not membrane anchored. CSF levels of sCD59 are not a biomarker of demyelinating diseases. High levels of sCD59 in CSF relative to plasma suggest an intrathecal source; CD59 expression in brain parenchyma was low, but expression was strong on choroid plexus (CP) epithelium, immediately adjacent the CSF, suggesting that this is the likely source.

  16. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-12-04

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  17. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Radovanovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  18. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  19. First successful automated red cell exchange (erythrocytapheresis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION: Despite several documented challenges, Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative therapy for Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). However HSCT is expensive with its complications, therefore supportive care remains the main available option to many Nigerians. Frequent blood ...

  20. Chronic complications and quality of life of patients living with sickle cell disease and receiving care in three hospitals in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andong, Anne M; Ngouadjeu, Eveline D T; Bekolo, Cavin E; Verla, Vincent S; Nebongo, Daniel; Mboue-Djieka, Yannick; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is associated with chronic multisystem complications that significantly influence the quality of life (QOL) of patients early in their life. Although sub-Saharan Africa bears 75% of the global burden of SCD, there is a paucity of data on these complications and their effects on the QOL. We aimed to record these chronic complications, to estimate the QOL, and to identify the corresponding risk factors in patients with SCD receiving care in three hospitals in Cameroon. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was used to collect data from consecutive consenting patients. Information recorded included data on the yearly frequency of painful crisis, the types of SCD, and the occurrence of chronic complications. A 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) standard questionnaire that examines the level of physical and mental well-being, was administered to all eligible participants. Data were analyzed with STATA® software. Of 175 participants included, 93 (53.1%) were female and 111 (aged ≥14 years) were eligible for QOL assessment. The median (interquartile range, IQR) age at diagnosis was 4.0 (2.0-8.0) years and the median (IQR) number of yearly painful crisis was 3.0 (1.0-7.0). The most frequent chronic complications reported were: nocturnal enuresis, chronic leg ulcers, osteomyelitis and priapism (30.9%, 24.6%, 19.4%, and 18.3% respectively). The prevalence of stroke and avascular necrosis of the hip were 8.0% and 13.1% respectively. The median (IQR) physical and mental scores were 47.3 (43.9-58.5) and 41.0 (38.8-44.6) respectively. Age and chronic complications such as stroke and avascular necrosis were independently associated with poor QOL. In this population of patients living with SCD, chronic complications are frequent and their QOL is consequently poor. Our results highlight the need for national guidelines for SCD control, which should include new-born screening programs and strategies to prevent chronic complications.

  1. Primary stroke prevention for sickle cell disease in north-east Italy: the role of ethnic issues in establishing a Transcranial Doppler screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierobon Marta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a serious complication of sickle cell disease (SCD in children. Transcranic Doppler (TCD is a well-established predictor of future cerebrovascular symptoms: a blood flow velocity >200 cm/sec in the Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA correlates with a high risk of stroke in cohorts of African-american HbS/HbS patients. In North-East Italy the recent increase in SCD patients is mainly due to immigration from Africa. A comprehensive care program for children with SCD was established in our Center since 2004, but a wide and routine screening for Primary stroke prevention needs to be developed. Methods In order to verify the feasibility of TCD and Transcranial color coded Sonography (TCCS screening in our setting and the applicability of international reference values of blood velocities to our population of African immigrants with HbS/HbS SCD, we performed TCD and TCCD in 12 HbS/HbS African children and two groups of age-matched controls of Caucasian and African origin respectively. TCD and TCCS were performed on the same day of the scheduled routine hematologic visit after parental education. Results All parents accepted to perform the sonography to their children. TCD and TCCD were performed in all patients and an adequate temporal window could be obtained in all of them. Pulsatility index and depth values in both the MCA and the Basilar Artery (BA were similar at TCD and TCCS evaluation in the three groups while time-average maximum velocities (TAMM, peak systolic velocity and diastolic velocity in the MCA and BA were higher in the patients' group on both TCD and TCCS evaluation. African and Caucasian healthy controls had similar lower values. Conclusion Our preliminary data set the base to further evaluate the implementation of a primary stroke prevention program in our setting of HbS/HbS African immigrants and HbS/beta thalassemia Italians. Parental education-preferably in the native language- on stroke risk and

  2. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  3. Reduced sTWEAK and increased sCD163 levels in HIV-infected patients: modulation by antiretroviral treatment, HIV replication and HCV co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Beltrán

    Full Text Available Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease due to increased inflammation and persistent immune activation. CD163 is a macrophage scavenger receptor that is involved in monocyte-macrophage activation in HIV-infected patients. CD163 interacts with TWEAK, a member of the TNF superfamily. Circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease, but no previous studies have fully analyzed their association with HIV.The aim of this study was to analyze circulating levels of sTWEAK and sCD163 as well as other known markers of inflammation (hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII and endothelial dysfunction (sVCAM-1 and ADMA in 26 patients with HIV before and after 48 weeks of antiretroviral treatment (ART and 23 healthy subjects.Patients with HIV had reduced sTWEAK levels and increased sCD163, sVCAM-1, ADMA, hsCRP, IL-6 and sTNFRII plasma concentrations, as well as increased sCD163/sTWEAK ratio, compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment significantly reduced the concentrations of sCD163, sVCAM-1, hsCRP and sTNFRII, although they remained elevated when compared with healthy subjects. Antiretroviral treatment had no effect on the concentrations of ADMA and sTWEAK, biomarkers associated with endothelial function. The use of protease inhibitors as part of antiretroviral therapy and the presence of HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication attenuated the ART-mediated decrease in sCD163 plasma concentrations.HIV-infected patients showed a proatherogenic profile characterized by increased inflammatory, immune-activation and endothelial-dysfunction biomarkers that partially improved after ART. HCV-HIV co-infection and/or active HIV replication enhanced immune activation despite ART.

  4. Low fetal hemoglobin percentage is associated with silent brain lesions in adults with homozygous sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, David; Tuilier, Titien; Mélé, Nicolas; Turc, Guillaume; Habibi, Anoosha; Abdallah, Nassim Ait; Majhadi, Loubna; Hemery, François; Edjlali, Myriam; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bartolucci, Pablo

    2017-12-12

    Silent white matter changes (WMCs) on brain imaging are common in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) and are associated with cognitive deficits in children. We investigated the factors predictive of WMCs in adults with homozygous SCD and no history of neurological conditions. Patients were recruited from a cohort of adults with homozygous SCD followed up at an adult sickle cell referral center for which steady-state measurements of biological parameters and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain were available. WMCs were rated by consensus, on a validated age-related WMC scale. The prevalence of WMCs was 49% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39%-60%) in the 83 patients without vasculopathy included. In univariable analysis, the patients who had WMCs were more likely to be older ( P = .003) and to have hypertension ( P = .02), a lower mean corpuscular volume ( P = .005), a lower corpuscular hemoglobin concentration ( P = .008), and a lower fetal hemoglobin percentage (%HbF) ( P = .003). In multivariable analysis, only a lower %HbF remained associated with the presence of WMCs (odds ratio [OR] per 1% increase in %HbF, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; P = .021). %HbF was also associated with WMC burden ( P for trend = .007). Multivariable ordinal logistic regression showed an inverse relationship between WMC burden (age-related WMC score divided into 4 strata) and HbF level (OR for 1% increase in %HbF, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-0.99; P = .039). Our study suggests that HbF may protect against silent WMCs, decreasing the likelihood of WMCs being present and their severity. It may therefore be beneficial to increase HbF levels in patients with WMCs.

  5. Real-life experience with hydroxyurea in sickle cell disease: A multicenter study in a cohort of patients with heterogeneous descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, Paolo; De Franceschi, Lucia; Sainati, Laura; Piga, Antonio; Piel, Frédéric B; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Fidone, Carmelo; Masera, Nicoletta; Palazzi, Giovanni; Gianesin, Barbara; Forni, Gian Luca

    2018-03-01

    We conducted the first nation-wide cohort study of sickle cell disease (SCD) in Italy, a Southern European country exposed to intense recent flux migration from endemic areas for SCD. We evaluate the impact of hydroxyurea on a total of 652 pediatric and adult patients from 33 Reference Centers for SCD (mean age 24.5±15years, 51.4% males). Hydroxyurea median treatment duration was 7years (range: crisis (-34.1%, p<0.001), hospitalization (-53.2%, p<0.001), and bone necrosis (-6.9%, p<0.001). New silent cerebral infarction (SCI) occurred during treatment (+42.4%, p<0.001) but not stroke (+0.5%, p=0.572). These observations were generally consistent upon stratification for age, descent (Caucasian or African), genotype (βS/βS, βS/β 0 or βS/β + ) and duration of treatment (< or ≥10years). There were no new safety concerns observed compared to those commonly reported in the literature. Our study, conducted on a large population of patients with different descent and compound state supports the benefits of hydroxyurea therapy as a treatment option. Registered at clinical trials.gov (NCT02709681). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-Based Practice Standard Care for Acute Pain Management in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease in an Urgent Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Brathwaite, Ron; Kim, Ook

    Vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs) with sickle cell disease (SCD) require opioid treatment. Despite evidence to support rapid pain management within 30 minutes, care for these patients does not consistently meet this benchmark. This quality improvement study sought to decrease the first analgesic administration time, increase patient satisfaction, and expedite patient flow. A prospective pre-/postevaluation design was used to evaluate outcomes with patients 18 years or older with VOEs in an urgent care (UC) center after implementation of evidence-based practice standard care (EBPSC). A pre- and postevaluation survey of SCD patients' satisfaction with care and analogous surveys of the UC team to assess awareness of EBPSC were used. A retrospective review of the electronic medical records of patients with VOEs compared mean waiting time from triage to the first analgesic administration and the mean length of stay (LOS) over 6 months. Implementing EBPSC decreased the mean time of the first analgesic administration (P = .001), significantly increased patient satisfaction (P = .002), and decreased the mean LOS (P = .010). Implementing EBPSC is a crucial step for improving the management of VOEs and creating a positive patient experience. The intervention enhances the quality of care for the SCD population in a UC center.

  7. Impact of PCA Strategies on Pain Intensity and Functional Assessment Measures in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease during Hospitalized Vaso-Occlusive Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampier, Carlton D.; Wager, Carrie G.; Harrison, Ryan; Hsu, Lewis L.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Smith, Wally R.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials of sickle cell disease (SCD) pain treatment usually observe only small decrements in pain intensity during the course of hospitalization. Sub-optimal analgesic management and inadequate pain assessment methods are possible explanations for these findings. In a search for better methods for assessing inpatient SCD pain in adults, we examined several pain intensity and interference measures in both arms of a randomized controlled trial comparing two different opioid PCA therapies. Based upon longitudinal analysis of pain episodes, we found that scores from daily average Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and several other measures, especially the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), were sensitive to change in daily improvements in pain intensity associated with resolution of vaso-occlusive pain. In this preliminary trial, the low demand, high basal infusion (LDHI) strategy demonstrated faster, larger improvements in various measures of pain than the high demand, low basal infusion (HDLI) strategy for opioid PCA dosing, however, verification in larger studies is required. The measures and statistical approaches used in this analysis may facilitate design, reduce sample size, and improve analyses of treatment response in future SCD clinical trials of vaso-occlusive episodes. PMID:22886853

  8. Red blood cell alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease in Turkey: a single center retrospective cohort study

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    Soner Solmaz

    2016-12-01

    Results: Of 216 SCD patients included in the study. Alloimmunization was detected in 67 (31.0% out of 216 patients who underwent transfusion, and in 17 (30.4% out of 56 patients in Group 1 and in 50 (31.3% out of 160 patients in Group 2. When the patients were analyzed according to alloimmunization development, our study revealed that neither SCD complications are a risk factor for alloimmunization nor alloimmunization increases mortality rates. Conclusion: High alloimmunization frequency found in our study suggests the insufficient adherence of alloimmunization-prevention policies in RBC transfusions performed except experienced institutions. Therefore alloimmunization may be reduced or prevented through performing extended red cell typing among SCD patients. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 622-627

  9. High frequency of the CCR5delta32 variant among individuals from an admixed Brazilian population with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.B. Chies

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. In Brazil, the main cause of death of individuals with SCD is recurrent infection. The CCR5delta32 allele, which confers relative resistance to macrophage-tropic HIV virus infection, probably has reached its frequency and world distribution due to other pathogens that target macrophage in European populations. In the present investigation a relatively higher prevalence (5.1% of the CCR5delta32 allele was identified, by PCR amplification using specific primers, in 79 SCD patients when compared to healthy controls (1.3% with the same ethnic background (Afro-Brazilians. Based on a hypothesis that considers SCD as a chronic inflammatory condition, and since the CCR5 chemokine receptor is involved in directing a Th1-type immune response, we suggest that a Th1/Th2 balance can influence the morbidity of SCD. If the presence of the null CCR5delta32 allele results in a reduction of the chronic inflammation state present in SCD patients, this could lead to differential survival of SCD individuals who are carriers of the CCR5delta32 allele. This differential survival could be due to the development of less severe infections and consequently reduced or less severe vaso-occlusive crises.

  10. Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound in Peninsular Arab Patients With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekile, Adekunle; Hassan, Meaad; Asbeutah, Akram; Al-Hinai, Mohamed; Trad, Omar; Farhan, Nayef

    2018-05-06

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is used to identify patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) at risk for stroke. We performed transcranial Doppler studies in patients from 4 countries in the Arabian Peninsula (Kuwait, Oman, Iraq, and United Arab Emirates) to document the prevalence of abnormal transcranial Doppler findings. The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics and studied in a steady state. Transcranial Doppler examinations were performed with standard equipment by experienced operators. The time-averaged maximum mean velocity (TAMMV) was documented in the arteries of the circle of Willis. The hemoglobin (Hb) genotype was confirmed, and the fetal Hb level and complete blood counts were determined. There were 415 patients in the study, aged 2 to 18 years (mean ± SD, 8.6 ± 3.5 years). None of the patients had an abnormal TAMMV (ie, > 200 cm/s), whereas only 13 (3.1%), all from Iraq, had conditional values (170-200 cm/s) in the right middle cerebral artery and 7 (1.7%) in the left middle cerebral artery. There were no consistent TAMMV differences among male and female patients or in patients with different Hb genotypes (sickle cell anemia, sickle cell β 0- thalassemia, and sickle D). The use of hydroxyurea was associated with a lower TAMMV, whereas a blood transfusion history had no influence. Total hemoglobin, reticulocyte count, serum bilirubin, and fetal Hb values showed varying degrees of association with the TAMMV in the different vessels. This study has demonstrated the rarity of abnormal transcranial Doppler findings among Peninsular Arab patients with SCD. The guidelines for transcranial Doppler screening in this population need further studies and recommendations. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Changes in urine albumin to creatinine ratio with the initiation of hydroxyurea therapy among children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehseen, Sarah; Joiner, Clinton H; Lane, Peter A; Yee, Marianne E

    2017-12-01

    Renal damage is a progressive complication of sickle cell disease (SCD) that begins in childhood and may progress to renal failure and early mortality in 12% of adults with hemoglobin SS (HbSS) SCD. Early sickle nephropathy is characterized by hyperfiltration and microalbuminuria; therefore, urine albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) is an effective screening tool for its detection. This study investigated the effect of hydroxyurea (HU) therapy on urine ACR levels among children with SCD. A retrospective review was conducted to identify all patients with HbSS or HbSβ 0 thalassemia of age 7-18 years who began HU therapy in 2011-2013; a control group of patients not on HU were matched by age and baseline hemoglobin. All urine ACR measurements ≤24 months prior to and ≥24 months after HU initiation were recorded. There were 63 eligible patients on HU and 13 (25%) with albuminuria prior to HU initiation. Among those with baseline albuminuria, the median ACR was 96 mg/g prior to HU, 39 mg/g at 1 year (P = 0.02), and 25 mg/g at 2 years (P = 0.03). Albuminuria normalized in 37.5% (6/16) after 1 year and 61% (8/13) after 2 years of HU therapy. Among those without albuminuria prior to HU, 13% (6/47) developed albuminuria during HU therapy. Sixteen percent (13/80) of control patients had albuminuria in the beginning of study period, which normalized in 15% (two of 13) of patients at 1-year follow up. Introduction of HU is associated with significant decreases in urine ACR in children with SCD and albuminuria. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  13. Behavioral and Pharmacological Adherence in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: Parent-Child Agreement and Family Factors Associated With Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Page H; Carmody, Julia K; Belkin, Mary H; Janicke, David M

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate agreement between children and parents on a measure of behavioral and pharmacological adherence in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), and the associations among family factors (i.e., problem-solving skills, routines, communication) and adherence behaviors. In all, 85 children (aged 8-18 years) with SCD and their parents completed questionnaires assessing individual and family factors. Overall parent-child agreement on an adherence measure was poor, particularly for boys and older children. Greater use of child routines was associated with better overall child-reported adherence. Open family communication was associated with higher overall parent-reported adherence. While further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn, results suggest the need to assess child adherence behaviors via both child and parent reports. Findings also suggest that more daily family routines and open family communication may be protective factors for better disease management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Differences in pain management between hematologists and hospitalists caring for patients with sickle cell disease hospitalized for vasoocclusive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmish; Rollins, Margo; Landi, Daniel; Shah, Radhika; Bae, Jonathan; De Castro, Laura M

    2014-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic disease characterized by multiple vaso-occlusive complications and is increasingly cared for by hospitalists. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in pain management between hematologists and hospitalists. We performed a single-institution, retrospective review of pain management patterns and outcomes in adult SCD patients hospitalized for vaso-occlusive crisis. Over 26 months, we found a total of 298 patients (120 cared for by the hematologists and 178 by hospitalists), with a mean age of 32 (range 19-58). Patients cared for by hospitalists had a lower total number of hours on a patient controlled analgesia (PCA) device (171 vs. 212 hours, P=0.11). Hospitalists also were significantly more likely to utilize demand only PCA (42% vs. 23%, P=0.002) and had a significantly lower rate of using both continuous and demand PCA (54% vs. 67%, P=0.04). In addition, patients cared for by hospitalists had a significantly shorter hospitalization (8.4 days) compared to hematologists (10 days, P=0.04) with a non-significant difference in 7 and 30 day readmission rates (7.2% vs. 6.7% and 40% vs. 35% respectively). We found patients cared for by hospitalists more frequently utilized home oral pain medication during admission, had shorter lengths of hospitalization, and did not have a significant increase in readmission rates.

  15. Decreased plasma levels of soluble CD18 link leukocyte infiltration with disease activity in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Hvid, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of arthritis patients to have anti-inflammatory functions. Here, we study the mechanisms for these alterations and their association with SpA disease activity. METHODS: Plasma levels of sCD18 in a study population with 84 SpA patients and matched healthy controls were analyzed with a time resolved......A patients compared with healthy volunteers (P levels in the HLA-B27-positive subgroup (P levels exhibited an inverse correlation with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) (P level of morning...... immunoflourometric assay (TRIFMA). Binding of sCD18 to endothelial cells and fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS) was studied with confocal microscopy. Shedding of CD18 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied with flow cytometry and TRIFMA. RESULTS: Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in Sp...

  16. Evaluation of Partial and Total Splenectomy in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Using an Internet-Based Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouttalib, Sofia; Rice, Henry E.; Snyder, Denise; Levens, Justin S.; Reiter, Audra; Soler, Pauline; Rothman, Jennifer A.; Thornburg, Courtney D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) who undergo total or partial splenectomy are poorly defined. The purpose of this retrospective study was to initiate an internet-based registry to facilitate analysis of clinical outcomes for these children. We hypothesized that both surgical procedures would be well tolerated and would eliminate risk of splenic sequestration. Methods We developed a web-based registry using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) platform. Children were included if they had SCD and underwent total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) between 2003 to 2010. Clinical outcomes were compared between cohorts, with follow-up to one year. Results Twenty-four children were included, total splenectomy (n=15) and partial splenectomy (n=9). There were no differences in surgical time or intraoperative blood loss. The length of stay was longer after PS (4.1±1.7 days) compared to TS, (2.4±1.2 days, p=0.02). Within 30 days of surgery, 2 (20%) patients had acute chest syndrome following TS and 2 (15%) patients had acute chest syndrome after PS. During one year follow-up, no patient in either cohort had recurrent splenic sequestration, venous thrombosis or overwhelming post-splenectomy sepsis. All children who were transfused preoperatively to prevent recurrent splenic sequestration successfully discontinued transfusions. Conclusions Both TS and PS result in favorable hematologic outcomes and low risk of adverse events for children with SCD. A REDCap based registry may facilitate data entry and analysis of clinical outcomes to allow for comparison between different types of splenectomy. PMID:22238140

  17. Brain morphometric analysis predicts decline of intelligence quotient in children with sickle cell disease: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Krejza, Jaroslaw; Arkuszewski, Michal; Zimmerman, Robert A; Herskovits, Edward H; Melhem, Elias R

    2017-03-01

    For children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and at low risk category of stroke, we aim to build a predictive model to differentiate those with decline of intelligence-quotient (IQ) from counterparts without decline, based on structural magnetic-resonance (MR) imaging volumetric analysis. This preliminary prospective cohort study included 25 children with SCD, homozygous for hemoglobin S, with no history of stroke and transcranial Doppler mean velocities below 170cm/s at baseline. We administered the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (K-BIT) to each child at yearly intervals for 2-4 years. Each child underwent MR examination within 30 days of the baseline K-BIT evaluation date. We calculated K-BIT change rates, and used rate of change in K-BIT to classify children into two groups: a decline group and a non-decline group. We then generated predictive models to predict K-BIT decline/non-decline based on regional gray-matter (GM) volumes computed from structural MR images. We identified six structures (the left median cingulate gyrus, the right middle occipital gyrus, the left inferior occipital gyrus, the right fusiform gyrus, the right middle temporal gyrus, the right inferior temporal gyrus) that, when assessed for volume at baseline, are jointly predictive of whether a child would suffer subsequent K-BIT decline. Based on these six regional GM volumes and the baseline K-BIT, we built a prognostic model using the K * algorithm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 0.84, 0.78 and 0.86, respectively. GM volumetric analysis predicts subsequent IQ decline for children with SCD. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  19. The Properties of Red Blood Cells from Patients Heterozygous for HbS and HbC (HbSC Genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hannemann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is one of the commonest severe inherited disorders, but specific treatments are lacking and the pathophysiology remains unclear. Affected individuals account for well over 250,000 births yearly, mostly in the Tropics, the USA, and the Caribbean, also in Northern Europe as well. Incidence in the UK amounts to around 12–15,000 individuals and is increasing, with approximately 300 SCD babies born each year as well as with arrival of new immigrants. About two thirds of SCD patients are homozygous HbSS individuals. Patients heterozygous for HbS and HbC (HbSC constitute about a third of SCD cases, making this the second most common form of SCD, with approximately 80,000 births per year worldwide. Disease in these patients shows differences from that in homozygous HbSS individuals. Their red blood cells (RBCs, containing approximately equal amounts of HbS and HbC, are also likely to show differences in properties which may contribute to disease outcome. Nevertheless, little is known about the behaviour of RBCs from HbSC heterozygotes. This paper reviews what is known about SCD in HbSC individuals and will compare the properties of their RBCs with those from homozygous HbSS patients. Important areas of similarity and potential differences will be emphasised.

  20. Multiple bone and joint disease in a sickle cell anaemia patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ayodele Olaniyi

    2012-05-01

    Multidisciplinary approach was applied to her management and she was finally discharged home on a wheelchair. This case reflects not only the high susceptibility of SCD patients to infection, but also the morbidity and the attendant complications. It also highlights the need to forestall vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC which often predisposes them to developing osteomyelitis. There is a need to have a highly organized, well-equipped and highly subsidized Sickle Cell and rehabilitation Center in order to further improve the care of SCD patients.

  1. Current status and developments in gene therapy for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Yannaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available β-thalassemias and sickle cell anemia (SCA are the most common monogenic diseases worldwide for which curative treatments remain a desired goal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT, - the only curative treatment currently available for hemoglobinopaties-, has a narrow application window whereas it incurs several immunological risks. Gene therapy (GT, that is the autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+, represents a promising new therapeutic strategy which is anticipated to reestablish effective hemoglobin production and render patients transfusion- and drug- independent without the immunological complications that normally accompany allo-HCT. Prior to the application of GT for hemoglobinopathies in the clinic, many years of extensive preclinical research were spent for the optimization of the gene transfer tools and conditions. To date, three GT clinical trials for β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD have been conducted or are in progress and 3 cases of transfusion independence in thalassemic β0/βΕ patients have been reported. In the present review, the prerequisites for successful implementation of GT, the tough pathway of GT for hemoglobinopathies towards the clinic and the knowledge gained from the first clinical trials as well as the remaining questions and challenges, will be discussed. Overall, after decades of research including achievements but pitfalls as well, the path to GT of human patients with hemoglobinopathies is currently open and highly promising...

  2. [Chronic renal failure in sickle cell disease: A retrospective analysis of 100 adults sickle cell patients from black Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackoundou-N'Guessan, Clément; Guei, Cyr Monley; Lagou, Delphine Amélie; Gbekedi, Serges; Tia, Mélanie Weu; Coulibaly, Pessa Albert; Nzoue, Sita; Konan, Serges; Koffi, Gustave; Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic renal failure (CRF) in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients could vary from one country to another depending on the modalities of management. The aim of the present study was to appreciate the epidemiology of CRF in SCD patients from black Africa in order to search for promoting factors. One hundred SCD adult patients have been considered for the study. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has been estimated according to the CKD-EPI formula. Three groups of patients have been identified according to the value of their GFR. The mean age of the patients was 30.84±8.26 years. Male gender has represented 51% of the study population. The mean GFR value was 175.4±86.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2). The prevalence of CRF was 11%. About 3% of them had severe CRF. Subjects with normal GFR were 20%. Subjects with glomerular hyperfiltration (HF) were 69%. By univariate analysis, when subjects with HF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, the following factors have appeared to be significantly associated: female gender (female 60.9% versus male 39.1%; P60 kg; 59.9±9.41 kg; P30 years; OR=0.12 [CI95% 0.03-04]; P60 kg; OR=0.19 [CI95% 0.05-0.72]; P<0.01) were associated with HF. By univariate analysis, when subjects with CRF were compared with those presenting normal GFR, a lower hemoglobin value was significantly associated with CRF (7.92±2.7 g/dL versus 10.43±2.5 g/dL; P<0.009). There was a trend for subjects not being under maintenance therapy to more experience CRF (36.4% versus 70%; P<0.07). By logistic regression analysis, only a low hemoglobin value was associated to CRF (higher hemoglobin level; OR=0.55 [0.20-6.3]; P<0.01). In total, CRF and HF are frequent complications in SCD adult patients from black Africa. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Carvalho Abreu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases.As células-tronco têm uma infinidade de implicações clínicas no pulmão. Este artigo é uma revisão crítica que inclui estudos clínicos e experimentais advindos do banco de dados do MEDLINE e SciElo nos últimos 10 anos, onde foram destacados os efeitos da terapia celular na síndrome do desconforto respiratório agudo ou doenças mais crônicas, como fibrose pulmonar e enfisema. Apesar de muitos estudos demonstrarem os efeitos benéficos das células-tronco no desenvolvimento, reparo e remodelamento pulmonar; algumas questões ainda precisam ser respondidas para um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos que controlam a divisão celular e diferenciação, permitindo o uso da terapia celular nas doenças respiratórias.

  4. CD161+ MAIT cells are severely reduced in peripheral blood and lymph nodes of HIV-infected individuals independently of disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Maria Eberhard

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are characterized by the combined expression of the semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR Vα7.2, the lectin receptor CD161, as well as IL-18R, and play an important role in antibacterial host defense of the gut. The current study characterized CD161(+ MAIT and CD161-TCRVα7.2(+ T cell subsets within a large cohort of HIV patients with emphasis on patients with slow disease progression and elite controllers. Mononuclear cells from blood and lymph node samples as well as plasma from 63 patients and 26 healthy donors were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry and ELISA for IL-18, sCD14 and sCD163. Additionally, MAIT cells were analyzed after in vitro stimulation with different cytokines and/or fixed E.coli. Reduced numbers of CD161(+ MAIT cells during HIV infection were detectable in the blood and lymph nodes of all patient groups, including elite controllers. CD161+ MAIT cell numbers did not recover even after successful antiretroviral treatment. The loss of CD161(+ MAIT cells was correlated with higher levels of MAIT cell activation; an increased frequency of the CD161-TCRVα7.2(+T cell subset in HIV infection was observed. In vitro stimulation of MAIT cells with IL-18 and IL-12, IL-7 and fixed E.coli also resulted in a rapid and additive reduction of the MAIT cell frequency defined by CD161, IL-18R and CCR6. In summary, the irreversible reduction of the CD161(+ MAIT cell subset seems to be an early event in HIV infection that is independent of later stages of the disease. This loss appears to be at least partially due to the distinctive vulnerability of MAIT cells to the pronounced stimulation by microbial products and cytokines during HIV-infection.

  5. Evidence review of hydroxyurea for the prevention of sickle cell complications in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaku, Mercy; Opiyo, Newton; Karumbi, Jamlick; Kitonyi, Grace; Thoithi, Grace; English, Mike

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyurea is widely used in high-income countries for the management of sickle cell disease (SCD) in children. In Kenyan clinical guidelines, hydroxyurea is only recommended for adults with SCD. Yet many deaths from SCD occur in early childhood, deaths that might be prevented by an effective, disease modifying intervention. The aim of this review was to summarise the available evidence on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of hydroxyurea in the management of SCD in children below 5 years of age to support guideline development in Kenya. We undertook a systematic review and used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system to appraise the quality of identified evidence. Overall, available evidence from 1 systematic review (n=26 studies), 2 randomised controlled trials (n=354 children), 14 observational studies and 2 National Institute of Health reports suggest that hydroxyurea may be associated with improved fetal haemoglobin levels, reduced rates of hospitalisation, reduced episodes of acute chest syndrome and decreased frequency of pain events in children with SCD. However, it is associated with adverse events (eg, neutropenia) when high to maximum tolerated doses are used. Evidence is lacking on whether hydroxyurea improves survival if given to young children. Majority of the included studies were of low quality and mainly from high-income countries. Overall, available limited evidence suggests that hydroxyurea may improve morbidity and haematological outcomes in SCD in children aged below 5 years and appears safe in settings able to provide consistent haematological monitoring.

  6. [Usefulness of sCD14-ST in the diagnosis of sepsis in patient with renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since many years, researchers have focused their studies to find out early sepsis biomarkers for the purpose of gaining time in the application of early goal-directed therapy protocol. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a reliable biomarker for sepsis, although it has a low specificity and prognostic value. Other recently proposed sepsis biomarkers such as interleukins, C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloid cells expressing triggering receptor-1 (TREM-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) still have a controversial and uncertain clinical value. In 2004 a new biomarker, soluble CD14 SubType (sCD14-ST, Presepsin), with a good performance in the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of sepsis has been proposed. First studies highlighted that Presepsin is highly sensitive and specific at the same time. However, further studies on the clinical value of Presepsin are needed, particularly in order to explain the relationship between Presepsin and kidney failure. Indeed, Presepsin is a 13 KDa molecule theoretically totally filtered by glomerulus and reabsorbed and metabolized by proximal convoluted tubules. Therefore, the Presepsin plasmatic level could be highly influenced by an acute kidney injury in the course of sepsis or by a pre-existing chronic kidney disease. In this article we reviewed the latest evidences about the diagnostic and prognostic performances of Presepsin as a sepsis biomarker. We evaluated the usefulness of Presepsin in the context of acute and chronic kidney dysfunction. The great number of articles have been collected and the thorough revision of data from the nephrologists perspective let us consider this work exhaustive and scientifically reliable, although concise: a good starting point for the physician who wants to make use of Presepsin.

  7. Three family members with elevated plasma cobalamin, transcobalamin and soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Lücke, Elke; Arendt, Johan F B; Nissen, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    deficiency were found. DNA sequencing of the TCN2 gene revealed several known polymorphisms not associated with highly elevated transcobalamin levels. Upon gel filtration, sCD320 eluted as a larger molecule than previously reported. By incubation with anti-transcobalamin antibodies, we precipitated both...... transcobalamin and part of sCD320. CONCLUSIONS: The high cobalamin levels were mainly explained by high levels of holoTC, possibly caused by complex formation with its soluble receptor, sCD320. The family occurrence points to a genetic explanation....

  8. Priapism in paediatric patients with sickle cell disease - a report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Of the 185 SCD cases, three (1.6%) had priapism. They were adolescents aged 17years, 11years and 10 years 9months respectively. Two patients had never attended a sickle cell clinic, never been on routine drugs nor received advice on oral liberal fluids intake. One patient had stuttering priapism, 24hours before ...

  9. Comparison of immunodulatory properties of dental pulp stem cells derived from healthy and inflamed teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazid, Farinawati Binti; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunodulatory properties of dental pulp stem cells derived from healthy (SCD) and inflamed pulp deciduous (SCDIP) tissues. The overall hypothesis is that SCDIP possess equal immune properties with SCD and could be used as an alternative tissue source in regenerative medicine. An intra-oral examination was carried out to assess the status of the pulp tissues and group them according to healthy or inflamed. Primary cells were established from these groups, and basic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) characterizations were conducted. The expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), namely HLA-G, HLA-DR, and HLA-ABC were examined in both cell lines using flow cytometry. We further compared the immunosuppressive effects of SCD and SCDIP on phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation. Supernatants were tested for cytokine profiling using multiplex array. While SCD exhibited typical MSC characteristics, SCDIP on the other hand, did not. Compared with SCDIP, SCD effectively suppresses mitogen-induced T cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, as well as express a higher percentage of HLA-ABC and HLA-G. In addition, levels of several cytokines, such as TNF-α, TNF-β, and IL-2, were drastically suppressed in SCD than SCDIP. Furthermore, a high level of IL-10, an important anti-inflammatory cytokine, was present in SCD compared with SCDIP. These findings suggest that SCDIP is highly dysfunctional in terms of their stemness and immunomodulatory properties. SCDIP is not a viable therapeutic cell source especially when used in graft versus host disease (GvHD) and organ rejection.

  10. Validation of the HCM Risk-SCD model in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy following alcohol septal ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebregts, Max; Faber, Lothar; Jensen, Morten K

    2018-01-01

    Aims: The HCM Risk-SCD model for prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy recommended by the 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines has not been validated after septal reduction therapy. The aim of this study was to validate the HCM Risk-SCD model...

  11. A Systematic Review of Known Mechanisms of Hydroxyurea-induced Foetal Haemoglobin for Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pule, Gift D.; Mowla, Shaheen; Novitzky, Nicolas; Wiysonge, Charles S.; Wonkam, Ambroise

    2016-01-01

    Aims To report on molecular mechanisms of foetal haemoglobin (HbF) induction by hydroxyurea (HU) for the treatment of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Study Design Systematic review. Results Studies have provided consistent associations between genomic variations in HbF-promoting loci and variable HbF level in response to HU. Numerous signal transduction pathways have been implicated, through the identification of key genomic variants in BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, SAR1 or XmnI polymorphism that predispose the response to the treatment, and signal transduction pathways, that modulate γ-globin expression (cAMP/cGMP; Giα/JNK/Jun; methylation and microRNA). Three main molecular pathways have been reported: 1) Epigenetic modifications, transcriptional events and signalling pathways involved in HU-mediated response, 2) Signalling pathways involving HU-mediated response and 3) Post-transcriptional pathways (regulation by microRNAs). Conclusions The complete picture of HU-mediated mechanisms of HbF production in SCD remains elusive. Research on post-transcriptional mechanisms could lead to therapeutic targets that may minimize alterations to the cellular transcriptome. PMID:26327494

  12. Barriers to hydroxyurea adherence and health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Penedo, Frank J; Lai, Jin-Shei; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-06-01

    To identify barriers to hydroxyurea adherence (negative beliefs, access, and/or recall barriers), and their relationship to adherence rates and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with sickle cell disease (SCD). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 34 AYAs (12-22 years old) in SCD clinics from January to December 2015. Study measures included Brief Medication Questionnaire, Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items, visual analog scale, and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Participants (59% male; 91% Black) had a median age of 13.5 years (IQR 12-18). Participants reported negative beliefs (32%), recall barriers (44%), and access barriers (32%). Participants with recall barriers reported worse pain (P=.02), fatigue (P=.05), and depression (P=.05). The number of adherence barriers inversely correlated with adherence level using ©MMAS-8 (r s =-.38, P=.02) and VAS dose (r s =-.25, P=.14) as well as MCV (r s =-.45, P=.01) and HbF% (r s =-.36, P=.05), suggesting higher hydroxyurea adherence in patients with fewer barriers. Patients with fewer barriers to hydroxyurea adherence were more likely to have higher adherence rates and better HRQOL scores. Routine assessment of hydroxyurea adherence and its related barriers could provide actionable information to improve adherence rates, HRQOL, and other clinical outcomes. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Risk factors for death in 632 patients with sickle cell disease in the United States and United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Gladwin

    Full Text Available The role of pulmonary hypertension as a cause of mortality in sickle cell disease (SCD is controversial.We evaluated the relationship between an elevated estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure and mortality in patients with SCD. We followed patients from the walk-PHaSST screening cohort for a median of 29 months. A tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV≥ 3.0 m/s cuttof, which has a 67-75% positive predictive value for mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg was used. Among 572 subjects, 11.2% had TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec. Among 582 with a measured NT-proBNP, 24.1% had values ≥ 160 pg/mL. Of 22 deaths during follow-up, 50% had a TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec. At 24 months the cumulative survival was 83% with TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec and 98% with TRV 47 years, male gender, chronic transfusions, WHO class III-IV, increased hemolytic markers, ferritin and creatinine were also associated with increased risk of death.A TRV ≥ 3.0 m/sec occurs in approximately 10% of individuals and has the highest risk for death of any measured variable. The study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier: NCT00492531.

  14. Comparison of Tc-99m Ciprofloxacin (Infecton) and Tc-99m Methylene diphosphonate (MDP) three-phase bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bererhi, H.; Hussein, S.; Wali, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The high incidence of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a major health problem in Oman. These patients are more prone to infections than the general population, and in particular, they are highly susceptible to osteomyelitis. Because bone infarction is more common than osteomyelitis in SCD, an accurate and rapid differential diagnosis is essential before initiating appropriate treatment. The present prospective study evaluates the usefulness of the new radiopharmaceutical, Tc- 99m Ciprofloxacin (Infecton) for the differential diagnosis of infection and infarction in patients with SCD. Majority of subjects studied were children. The results of Tc-99m Infecton imaging were compared with those of the 3-phase bone scintigraphy using Tc- 99m Methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP). Twenty-five patients referred for ruling out infection were imaged after intravenous injection of 5.5 MBq/kg body weight of Tc-99m Infecton. First pass, blood pool and late images (at one, four and 24 hours post injection) were performed. Subsequently all patients were also studied by three-phase bone scintigraphy using Tc-99m MDP. No adverse effects were observed. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and positive likelihood ratio of Tc-99m Infecton imaging for osteomyelitis were 100%, 92%, 94% and 12.5 respectively. Although bone scintigraphy would rarely be used by itself as a stand-alone test in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in patients with SCD, its corresponding values were: 88%, 64%, 71% and 2.4. The results of this study suggest that the use of Tc-99m Infecton imaging is extremely beneficial in the management of patients of Sickle Cell Disease with suspected osteomyelitis. (author)

  15. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tue Wenzel Kragstrup

    Full Text Available In rheumatoid arthritis (RA immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18 in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis.The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1 plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort, 2 plasma from chronic RA patients, 3 serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4 supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab.Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab.The plasma sCD18 levels were altered in patients with RA, in mice

  16. Knowledge of and attitudes toward heel prick screening for sickle cell disease in Saint Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Sonia; Belmar-George, Sharon; Eugene, Alisha; Elias, Vanessa

    2017-06-08

    In the Caribbean country of Saint Lucia, umbilical-cord-blood screening for sickle cell disease (SCD) was the testing method that health care workers (HCWs) on the maternity wards of the hospitals preferred until the new heel prick (HP) testing method was introduced in the country in 2014. This SCD study sought to assess HCWs' knowledge of and attitude toward HP screening and also determine new mothers' favorability toward HP screening. A total of 70 HCWs and 132 new mothers answered survey questionnaires in three hospitals. In addition, four focus group discussions were held, two with HCWs and two with the mothers. Among the HCWs interviewed, 85.7% of them had knowledge of the HP test. However, only 25.7% had attended training sessions on the procedure. Among the HCWs, 64.3% of them felt the HP test should be mandatory, 27.1% said it should not be mandatory, and 8.6% did not know if it should be mandatory. In their focus groups, the HCWs said they believed the mothers would accept the HP method. For their part, 22.0% of the mothers said they had heard about the HP test, and 63.6% reported knowing the reason why the baby would be tested. Further, 83.3% indicated that the test would be beneficial for the baby. In addition, 88.6% of the mothers said that more information on the HP test was needed. In their focus group discussions, the mothers said they were generally not concerned about the pain the heel prick method might cause the baby. The HCWs' knowledge of the HP screening method was high. The mothers trust HCWs, and the mothers would accept the HP procedure irrespective of their knowledge of the test and any discomfort associated with this screening method.

  17. Knowledge of and attitudes toward heel prick screening for sickle cell disease in Saint Lucia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives In the Caribbean country of Saint Lucia, umbilical-cord-blood screening for sickle cell disease (SCD was the testing method that health care workers (HCWs on the maternity wards of the hospitals preferred until the new heel prick (HP testing method was introduced in the country in 2014. This SCD study sought to assess HCWs’ knowledge of and attitude toward HP screening and also determine new mothers’ favorability toward HP screening. Methods A total of 70 HCWs and 132 new mothers answered survey questionnaires in three hospitals. In addition, four focus group discussions were held, two with HCWs and two with the mothers. Results Among the HCWs interviewed, 85.7% of them had knowledge of the HP test. However, only 25.7% had attended training sessions on the procedure. Among the HCWs, 64.3% of them felt the HP test should be mandatory, 27.1% said it should not be mandatory, and 8.6% did not know if it should be mandatory. In their focus groups, the HCWs said they believed the mothers would accept the HP method. For their part, 22.0% of the mothers said they had heard about the HP test, and 63.6% reported knowing the reason why the baby would be tested. Further, 83.3% indicated that the test would be beneficial for the baby. In addition, 88.6% of the mothers said that more information on the HP test was needed. In their focus group discussions, the mothers said they were generally not concerned about the pain the heel prick method might cause the baby. Conclusions The HCWs’ knowledge of the HP screening method was high. The mothers trust HCWs, and the mothers would accept the HP procedure irrespective of their knowledge of the test and any discomfort associated with this screening method.

  18. Evaluation of serum sCD30 in renal transplantation patients with and without acute rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, C; Fontecchio, G; Scimitarra, M; Azzarone, R; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Battistoni, C; Di Iulio, B; Fracassi, D; Scarnecchia, M A; Papola, F

    2009-05-01

    Despite new immunosuppressive approaches, acute rejection episodes (ARE) are still a major cause of early kidney dysfunction with a negative impact on long-term allograft survival. Noninvasive markers able to identify renal ARE earlier than creatinine measurement include sCD30. We sought to establish whether circulating levels of sCD30 in pretransplantation and posttransplantation periods were of clinical relevance to avoid graft damage. Quantitative detection of serum sCD30 was performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated that the mean concentrations of sCD30 were significantly higher in the sera of renal transplant recipients with ARE (30.04 U/mL) and in uremic patients on the waiting list (37.7 U/mL) compared with healthy controls (HC; 9.44 U/mL), but not nonrejecting patients (12.01 U/mL). Statistical analysis revealed a strong association between high sCD30 levels in posttransplantation sera and ARE risk. This study suggested that sCD30 levels were a reliable predictor of ARE among deceased-donor kidney recipients.

  19. Single-case synthesis tools I: Comparing tools to evaluate SCD quality and rigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Kathleen N; Ledford, Jennifer R; Severini, Katherine E; Pustejovsky, James E; Barton, Erin E; Lloyd, Blair P

    2018-03-03

    Tools for evaluating the quality and rigor of single case research designs (SCD) are often used when conducting SCD syntheses. Preferred components include evaluations of design features related to the internal validity of SCD to obtain quality and/or rigor ratings. Three tools for evaluating the quality and rigor of SCD (Council for Exceptional Children, What Works Clearinghouse, and Single-Case Analysis and Design Framework) were compared to determine if conclusions regarding the effectiveness of antecedent sensory-based interventions for young children changed based on choice of quality evaluation tool. Evaluation of SCD quality differed across tools, suggesting selection of quality evaluation tools impacts evaluation findings. Suggestions for selecting an appropriate quality and rigor assessment tool are provided and across-tool conclusions are drawn regarding the quality and rigor of studies. Finally, authors provide guidance for using quality evaluations in conjunction with outcome analyses when conducting syntheses of interventions evaluated in the context of SCD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas L Lintermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations support a key role for T lymphocytes in these disease pathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies in several autoimmune diseases have demonstrated a significant role for a specific subset of CD4+ T cells termed effector memory T cells. This expanded population of effector memory T cells may contribute to tissue injury and disease progression. These cells exert multiple pro-inflammatory functions through the release of effector cytokines. Many of these cytokines have been detected in the inflammatory lesions and participate in the vasculitic reaction, contributing to recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, NK cells, B cells and T cells. In addition, functional impairment of regulatory T cells paralyzes anti-inflammatory effects in vasculitic disorders. Interestingly, activation of effector memory T cells in uniquely dependent on the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel providing an anchor for specific drug targeting. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ T cells in the context of vascular inflammation and describe the evidence supporting the role of different T cell subsets in vascular inflammation. Selective targeting of pathogenic effector memory T cells might enable a more tailored therapeutic approach that avoids unwanted adverse side effects of generalized immunosuppression by modulating the effector functions of T cell responses to inhibit the development of vascular inflammation.

  1. Malaria, sickle cell disease, HIV, and co-trimoxazole prophylaxis: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewurama D.A. Owusu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This observational study recorded the malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD profile of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA and determined whether prophylactic co-trimoxazole (CTX and the haemoglobin S (Hb S allele influenced malaria episodes. Methods: Sickling status, malaria episodes, and HIV type, as well as other data, were extracted retrospectively from the clinical records of 1001 patients attending the antiretroviral therapy clinic at Ridge Regional Hospital in Accra, Ghana between 2010 and 2015. Finger-prick capillary blood of returning patients (n = 501 was tested for the haemoglobin (Hb level and malaria, after information on malaria prevention methods was obtained through the administration of a questionnaire. Results: The use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets was low (22.8%. CTX prophylaxis showed no significant influence on the overall number of malaria episodes from 2010 to 2015; however, it did show a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.026 with the time elapsed since the last malaria episode. Even though 19% of participants possessed Hb S, it had no influence on malaria episodes. Conclusions: Hb S did not influence malaria in PLHA. Further studies in Hb SS and Hb SC are needed, as there are suggestions of increased frequency and severity of malaria. The impact of CTX prophylaxis on this cohort will be insightful. Keywords: Malaria, HIV, Sickle cell disease, Co-trimoxazole, Ghana

  2. Is renal medullary carcinoma the seventh nephropathy in sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Previous studies had enlisted renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) as the seventh nephropathy in sickle cell disease (SCD). Clinical experience has contradicted this claim and this study is targeted at refuting or supporting this assumption. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of RMC and describe other renal ...

  3. Sight threatening retinopathy in a child with sickle cell &beta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sight threatening changes in the retina are a well-recognized complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). However they usually occur in older patients with Haemoglobin SC or Sβ+thal patterns. It is rarely found under the age of 20 years in patients who are Hb SS or Sβ<°thal. This is a report of sight threatening retinopathy in ...

  4. The significance of inadequate transcranial Doppler studies in children with sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Greenwood

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is a common cause of cerebrovascular disease in childhood. Primary stroke prevention is effective using transcranial Doppler (TCD scans to measure intracranial blood velocities, and regular blood transfusions or hydroxycarbamide when these are abnormal. Inadequate TCD scans occur when it is not possible to measure velocities in all the main arteries. We have investigated the prevalence and significance of this in a retrospective audit of 3915 TCD scans in 1191 children, performed between 2008 and 2015. 79% scans were normal, 6.4% conditional, 2.8% abnormal and 12% inadequate. 21.6% of 1191 patients had an inadequate scan at least once. The median age of first inadequate scan was 3.3 years (0.7-19.4, with a U-shaped frequency distribution with age: 28% aged 2-3 years, 3.5% age 10 years, 25% age 16 years. In young children reduced compliance was the main reason for inadequate TCDs, whereas in older children it was due to a poor temporal ultrasound window. The prevalence of inadequate TCD was 8% in the main Vascular Laboratory at King's College Hospital and significantly higher at 16% in the outreach clinics (P<0.0001, probably due to the use of a portable ultrasound machine. Inadequate TCD scans were not associated with underlying cerebrovascular disease.

  5. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease -- can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A; Green, Abby M; Jaramillo, Diego; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children.

  6. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in children with sickle cell disease: results of conservative and operative treatments at skeletal maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, C.; Abitan, A.; Vidal, C.; Holvoet, L.; Mazda, K.; Simon, A.-L.; Ilharreborde, B.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common cause of femoral head osteonecrosis (ONFH) during childhood with an overall prevalence of 10%. In children, spontaneous revascularization can occur, as in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Consequently, the aim of treatment is to restore proper hip containment to prevent joint arthritis. This is the first study reporting long-term results at skeletal maturity of non-operative and surgical treatments for ONFH in SCD children. Methods All children with ONFH due to SCD were retrospectively reviewed. At initial evaluation, extension of osteonecrosis was radiographically defined using Catterall, lateral pillar Herring and Ficat classifications. Subluxation of the femoral head with Reimers migration index > 30% required surgical treatment including femoral varus osteotomy and/or pelvic osteotomies. Conservative treatment including non-weight bearing and physiotherapy was performed in the remaining cases. Outcomes were assessed at skeletal maturity using the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Stulberg classification. Total hip arthroplasty and Stulberg 5 were defined as failures. Results A total of 25 hips in 17 patients were included (mean follow-up 7.5 years SD 3.4). Mean age at diagnosis was 11.4 years SD 2.9. In all, 15 hips (60%) were classified Catterall 3 and 4 and Herring B and C. A total of 13 patients (52%) underwent surgical treatment. At skeletal maturity, mean HHS was good (81 SD 17), 12 hips (48%) were classified Stulberg 1 and 2, seven hips (28%) were classified Stulberg 3 and 4. Conclusion Both treatments led to good functional results with 75% of congruent hips at skeletal maturity. Level of Evidence IV PMID:29456754

  7. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in children with sickle cell disease: results of conservative and operative treatments at skeletal maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, C; Abitan, A; Vidal, C; Holvoet, L; Mazda, K; Simon, A-L; Ilharreborde, B

    2018-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common cause of femoral head osteonecrosis (ONFH) during childhood with an overall prevalence of 10%. In children, spontaneous revascularization can occur, as in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Consequently, the aim of treatment is to restore proper hip containment to prevent joint arthritis. This is the first study reporting long-term results at skeletal maturity of non-operative and surgical treatments for ONFH in SCD children. All children with ONFH due to SCD were retrospectively reviewed. At initial evaluation, extension of osteonecrosis was radiographically defined using Catterall, lateral pillar Herring and Ficat classifications. Subluxation of the femoral head with Reimers migration index > 30% required surgical treatment including femoral varus osteotomy and/or pelvic osteotomies. Conservative treatment including non-weight bearing and physiotherapy was performed in the remaining cases. Outcomes were assessed at skeletal maturity using the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Stulberg classification. Total hip arthroplasty and Stulberg 5 were defined as failures. A total of 25 hips in 17 patients were included (mean follow-up 7.5 years SD 3.4). Mean age at diagnosis was 11.4 years SD 2.9. In all, 15 hips (60%) were classified Catterall 3 and 4 and Herring B and C. A total of 13 patients (52%) underwent surgical treatment. At skeletal maturity, mean HHS was good (81 SD 17), 12 hips (48%) were classified Stulberg 1 and 2, seven hips (28%) were classified Stulberg 3 and 4. Both treatments led to good functional results with 75% of congruent hips at skeletal maturity. IV.

  8. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease - can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A.; Green, Abby M.; Jaramillo, Diego; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children. (orig.)

  9. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease - can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Green, Abby M. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego; Ho-Fung, Victor [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children. (orig.)

  10. Elevated soluble CD163 plasma levels are associated with disease severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junning Wang

    Full Text Available Hantaan virus is a major zoonotic pathogen that causesing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Although HFRS pathogenesis has not been entirely elucidated, the importance of host-related immune responses in HFRS pathogenesis has been widely recognized. CD163, a monocyte and macrophage-specific scavenger receptor that plays a vital function in the hosts can reduce inflammation, is shed during activation as soluble CD163 (sCD163. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological significance of sCD163 in patients with HFRS.Blood samples were collected from 81 hospitalized patients in Tangdu Hospital from October 2011 to January 2014 and from 15 healthy controls. The sCD163 plasma levels were measured using a sandwich ELISA, and the relationship between sCD163 and disease severity was analyzed. Furthermore, CD163 expression in 3 monocytes subset was analyzed by flow cytometry.The results demonstrated that sCD163 plasma levels during the HFRS acute phase were significantly higher in patients than during the convalescent stage and the levels in the healthy controls (P<0.0001. The sCD163 plasma levels in the severe/critical group were higher than those in the mild/moderate group during the acute (P<0.0001. A Spearman correlation analysis indicated that the sCD163 levels were positively correlated with white blood cell, serum creatine, blood urea nitrogen levels, while they were negatively correlated with blood platelet levels in the HFRS patients. The monocyte subsets were significantly altered during the acute stage. Though the CD163 expression levels within the monocyte subsets were increased during the acute stage, the highest CD163 expression level was observed in the CD14++CD16+ monocytes when compared with the other monocyte subsets.sCD163 may be correlated with disease severity and the disease progression in HFRS patients; however, the underlying mechanisms should be explored further.

  11. Fentanyl Buccal Tablet: A New Breakthrough Pain Medication in Early Management of Severe Vaso-Occlusive Crisis in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, Lucia; Mura, Paolo; Schweiger, Vittorio; Vencato, Elisa; Quaglia, Francesca Maria; Delmonte, Letizia; Evangelista, Maurizio; Polati, Enrico; Olivieri, Oliviero; Finco, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder. The principal clinical manifestations of SCD are the chronic hemolytic anemia and the acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOCs), which are mainly characterized by ischemic/reperfusion tissue injury. Pain is the main symptom of VOCs, and its management is still a challenge for hematologists, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. We carried out a crossover study on adult SCD patients, who received two different types of multimodal analgesia during two separate severe VOCs with time interval between VOCs of at least 6 months. The first VOC episode was treated with ketorolac (0.86 mg/kg/day) and tramadol (7.2 mg/kg/day) (TK treatment). In the second VOC episode, fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT; 100 μg) was introduced in a single dose after three hours from the beginning of TK analgesia (TKF treatment). We focused on the first 24 hours of acute pain management. The primary efficacy measure was the time-weighted-sum of pain intensity differences (SPID24). The secondary efficacy measures included the pain intensity difference (PID), the total pain relief (TOTPAR), and the time-wighted sum of anxiety (SAID24). SPID24 was significantly higher in TKF than in TK treatment. All the secondary measures were significantly ameliorated in TKF compared to TK treatment, without major opioid side effects. Patients satisfaction was higher with TKF treatment than with TK one. We propose that VOCs might require breakthrough pain drug strategy as vaso-occlusive phenomena and enhanced vasoconstriction promoting acute ischemic pain component exacerbate the continuous pain of VOCs. FBT might be a powerful and feasible tool in early management of acute pain during VOCs in emergency departments. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (Pchildren undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes of deferasirox (Exjade, ICL670) versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease patients with transfusional hemosiderosis. Substudy of a randomized open-label phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Pakbaz, Zahra; Onyekwere, Onyinye; Porter, John; Swerdlow, Paul; Coates, Thomas; Lane, Peter; Files, Beatrice; Mueller, Brigitta U; Coïc, Lena; Forni, Gian Luca; Fischer, Roland; Marks, Peter; Rofail, Diana; Abetz, Linda; Baladi, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence demonstrating the value of transfusions in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, resultant iron overload can be life threatening if untreated. Chelation therapy with deferoxamine requires parenteral infusions that can negatively impact quality of life and adherence to treatment. As part of a phase II trial, SCD patient-reported outcomes were evaluated. One hundred and ninety-five patients were randomized (2:1) to receive oral deferasirox (5-30 mg/kg/day) or deferoxamine (20-50 mg/kg, 5 days per week); 121 had previously received deferoxamine. At each time point, significantly more patients who had previously received deferoxamine were 'satisfied/very satisfied' with deferasirox, or found treatment to be 'convenient/very convenient' compared with deferoxamine (p < 0.001). In these patients, fewer hours were lost from daily activities with deferasirox than deferoxamine treatment. Most patients (77%) preferred deferasirox, and more were willing to continue taking deferasirox than deferoxamine at end-of-study (84 vs. 11%, respectively). Patients with SCD are therefore more satisfied with deferasirox, which has a lower impact on daily activities than deferoxamine. Given the high levels of satisfaction, it is likely that quality of life will be improved. These results also suggest that treatment adherence with deferasirox may be better than with deferoxamine, which should lead to improved long-term outcomes. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  15. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. High prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among patients with sickle cell disease in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, South West, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busari, A A; Mufutau, M A

    2017-06-07

    Attention and interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been reignited globally, most especially in patients with chronic diseases. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of such chronic diseases associated with devastating clinical and psychosocial consequences, thus leading those affected to seek alternative treatment apart from orthodox medicine. Hence, this study aimed to determine the prevalence, pattern and tolerability of the use of CAM in patients with SCD in the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). This was a cross-sectional survey of 200 respondents with SCD attending the hematology clinics of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a period of 3 months. Data on socio-demographic characteristic, clinical profile, the types and sources of CAM used were collected using a well structured pretested questionnaire. The data obtained were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS®) version 17. Of the 200 patients who participated in the study, 113; 56.5% were males and 87; 43.5% were females. Majority of the SCD patients were 1-10 years old and their mean age was 18.8 ± 14.39 years. CAM was reportedly used by 88.5% of the respondents. Biological (herbal) products 156; 62.9% were the most commonly used CAM, followed by alternative medical systems 52; 20.9% and mind-body interventions 30; 12.1%. Relations, friends and neighbors influenced 85.2% of CAM users by recommending CAM to them. Tolerability of CAM was perceived to be excellent as only 33 (18.6%) of the respondents abandoned the use of CAM. Comparing CAM users and CAM non-users, there was no statistical significant difference in the proportion of those >18 years (45.76% vs 52.17%; p = 0.658), those who experienced two or more crises (51.41% vs 34.78%; p = 0.183), and those with stable haemoglobin concentration of >7 g/dL (15.81% vs 8.69%; p = 0.539) More patients among CAM non-users (91.30%) significantly spend over 3000 Naira (USD 15) per

  17. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  18. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Kai; Zhu, Jinyun; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases, especially the myocardial infarction, is a major hazard problem to human health. Despite substantial advances in control of risk factors and therapies with drugs and interventions including bypass surgery and stent placement, the ischemic heart diseases usually result in heart failure (HF), which could aggravate social burden and increase the mortality rate. The current therapeutic methods to treat HF stay at delaying the disease progression without repair and regeneration of the damaged myocardium. While heart transplantation is the only effective therapy for end-stage patients, limited supply of donor heart makes it impossible to meet the substantial demand from patients with HF. Stem cell-based transplantation is one of the most promising treatment for the damaged myocardial tissue. Key recent published literatures and ClinicalTrials.gov. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the damaged myocardial tissue. Different kinds of stem cells have their advantages for treatment of Ischemic heart diseases. The efficacy and potency of cell therapies vary significantly from trial to trial; some clinical trials did not show benefit. Diverged effects of cell therapy could be affected by cell types, sources, delivery methods, dose and their mechanisms by which delivered cells exert their effects. Understanding the origin of the regenerated cardiomyocytes, exploring the therapeutic effects of stem cell-derived exosomes and using the cell reprogram technology to improve the efficacy of cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Recently, stem cell-derived exosomes emerge as a critical player in paracrine mechanism of stem cell-based therapy. It is promising to exploit exosomes-based cell-free therapy for ischemic heart diseases in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Alignment of single-case design (SCD) research with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing with the what Works Clearinghouse standards for SCD research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Erica; Cawthon, Stephanie W; Ge, Jin Jin; Beretvas, S Natasha

    2015-04-01

    The authors assessed the quality of single-case design (SCD) studies that assess the impact of interventions on outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH). More specifically, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) standards for SCD research were used to assess design quality and the strength of evidence of peer-reviewed studies available in the peer-reviewed, published literature. The analysis yielded four studies that met the WWC standards for design quality, of which two demonstrated moderate to strong evidence for efficacy of the studied intervention. Results of this review are discussed in light of the benefits and the challenges to applying the WWC design standards to research with DHH individuals and other diverse, low-incidence populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal antigens. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of distinct cell lineages and to suppress immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The main goal of this thesis was to study the s...

  1. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  2. sCD30, interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme and anti-Annexin V autoantibodies concentrations in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglen, Sławomir; Zakliczyński, Michał; Nozyński, Jerzy; Rogala, Barbara; Zembala, Marian

    2006-11-01

    sCD30 and ICE/caspase-1 as apoptosis-regulating factors are suspected to be involved in the survival rate of immunocompetent cells during immunosuppression after allotransplantation. Serum CD30 and ICE/caspase-1 concentrations were estimated and associated with unspecific serum apoptosis marker--anti-Annexin V antibodies and myocardial biopsies results. 28 clinically stabile patients--heart transplant recipients at least 3 months after cardiac transplantation performed due to heart failure caused by ischaemic and/or congestive cardiomyopathy or/and primary valvular heart disease (26 men and 2 women, mean age=36.8 years, S.D.=7.6) with normal heart function assessed by use of ultrasound scan--were involved in the trial. The patients were divided and analyzed in two ways: first according to the results of elective endomyocardial biopsies and second to main immunosuppressive agent used. The enzyme immunoassay (CD30, Dako; interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme (ICE)/Caspase-1 ELISA and anti-Annexin V BENDER MedSystem) for soluble CD30, caspase-1 and anti-Annexin V autoantibodies serum levels was used. sCD30 and caspase-1 concentrations were non-significantly up-regulated in all analysed groups--with or without rejection signs or immunosuppressed with cyclosporine or especially tacrolimus. In contrast anti-Annexin V autoantibodies concentration was non-significantly down-regulated also in all studied groups. Moreover in the group with signs of transplant rejection, strong negative correlation between anti-Annexin antibodies and rejection grade was observed (-0.65, psCD30 and caspase-1 as well as the decrease in anti-Annexin V autoantibodies concentrations in heart recipients could be the result of post-transplant apoptosis disturbances. This tendency seems to be inhibited in a greater degree by tacrolimus than by cyclosporine. Anti-Annexin V autoantibodies might be considered as negative rejection markers due to their strong negative correlation with the rejection grade.

  3. Effects of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural on the volume and membrane permeability of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Anke; Cytlak, Urszula M; Rees, David C; Tewari, Sanjay; Gibson, John S

    2014-01-01

    The heterocyclic aldehyde 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) interacts allosterically with the abnormal form of haemoglobin (Hb), HbS, in red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thereby increasing oxygen affinity and decreasing HbS polymerization and RBC sickling during hypoxia. We hypothesized that should 5HMF also inhibit the main cation pathways implicated in the dehydration of RBCs from SCD patients – the deoxygenation-induced cation pathway (Psickle), the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (the Gardos channel) and the K+–Cl− cotransporter (KCC) – it would have a synergistic effect in protection against sickling, directly through interacting with HbS, and indirectly through maintaining hydration and reducing [HbS]. This study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of 5HMF on RBC volume and K+ permeability in vitro. 5HMF markedly reduced the deoxygenation-induced dehydration of RBCs whether in response to maintained deoxygenation or to cyclical deoxygenation/re-oxygenation. 5HMF was found to inhibit Psickle, an effect which correlated with its effects on sickling. Deoxygenation-induced activation of the Gardos channel and exposure of phosphatidylserine were also inhibited, probably indirectly via reduced entry of Ca2+ through the Psickle pathway. Effects of 5HMF on KCC were more modest with a slight inhibition in N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, 1 mm)-treated RBCs and stimulation in RBCs untreated with NEM. These findings support the hypothesis that 5HMF may also be beneficial through effects on RBC ion and water homeostasis. PMID:25015917

  4. Effects of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural on the volume and membrane permeability of red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Anke; Cytlak, Urszula M; Rees, David C; Tewari, Sanjay; Gibson, John S

    2014-09-15

    The heterocyclic aldehyde 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) interacts allosterically with the abnormal form of haemoglobin (Hb), HbS, in red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thereby increasing oxygen affinity and decreasing HbS polymerization and RBC sickling during hypoxia. We hypothesized that should 5HMF also inhibit the main cation pathways implicated in the dehydration of RBCs from SCD patients - the deoxygenation-induced cation pathway (Psickle), the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (the Gardos channel) and the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC) - it would have a synergistic effect in protection against sickling, directly through interacting with HbS, and indirectly through maintaining hydration and reducing [HbS]. This study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of 5HMF on RBC volume and K(+) permeability in vitro. 5HMF markedly reduced the deoxygenation-induced dehydration of RBCs whether in response to maintained deoxygenation or to cyclical deoxygenation/re-oxygenation. 5HMF was found to inhibit Psickle, an effect which correlated with its effects on sickling. Deoxygenation-induced activation of the Gardos channel and exposure of phosphatidylserine were also inhibited, probably indirectly via reduced entry of Ca(2+) through the Psickle pathway. Effects of 5HMF on KCC were more modest with a slight inhibition in N-ethylmaleimide (NEM, 1 mm)-treated RBCs and stimulation in RBCs untreated with NEM. These findings support the hypothesis that 5HMF may also be beneficial through effects on RBC ion and water homeostasis. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  5. BK Virus Load Associated with Serum Levels of sCD30 in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Salma N.; Al-Saffer, Jinan M.; Jawad, Rana S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rejection is the main drawback facing the renal transplant operations. Complicated and overlapping factors, mainly related to the immune system, are responsible for this rejection. Elevated serum levels of sCD30 were frequently recorded as an indicator for renal allograft rejection, while BV virus is considered as one of the most serious consequences for immunosuppressive treatment of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Aims. This study aimed to determine the association of BK virus load with serum levels of sCD30 in RTRs suffering from nephropathy. Patients and Methods. A total of 50 RTRs with nephropathy and 30 age-matched apparently healthy individuals were recruited for this study. Serum samples were obtained from each participant. Real-time PCR was used to quantify BK virus load in RTRs serum, while ELISA technique was employed to estimate serum levels of sCD30. Results. Twenty-two percent of RTRs had detectable BKV with mean viral load of 1.094E + 06 ± 2.291E + 06. RTRs showed higher mean serum level of sCD30 (20.669 ± 18.713 U/mL) than that of controls (5.517 ± 5.304 U/mL) with significant difference. BK virus load had significant positive correlation with the serum levels of sCD30 in RTRs group. Conclusion. These results suggest that serum levels of sCD30 could be used as an indicator of BK viremia, and accordingly the immunosuppressive regime should be adjusted. PMID:27051424

  6. Expression and Association of SCD Gene Polymorphisms and Fatty Acid Compositions in Chicken Cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Furqon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD is an integral membrane protein of endoplasmic reticulum (ER that catalyzes the rate limiting step in the monounsaturated fatty acids from saturated fatty acids. Selection for fatty acids traits based on molecular marker assisted selection is needed to increase a value of chicken meat. This study was designed to analyze expression and associations of SCD gene polymorphisms with fatty acid traits in F2 kampung-broiler chicken cross. A total of 62 F2 kampung-broiler chicken cross (29 males and 33 females were used in this study. Fatty acid traits were measured at 26 weeks of age. Samples were divided into two groups based on fatty acid traits (the highest and the lowest. Primers in exon 2 region were designed from the genomic chicken sequence. The SNP g.37284A>G was detected and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method was then used to genotype. The expression of SCD gene was analyzed using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR. The result showed that there were three genotypes (AA, AG, and GG found in this study. The SCD|AciI polymorphism was significantly associated with palmitoleic acid (C16:1, fatty acids total and saturated fatty acid in 26 weeks old of F2 kampung-broiler chicken cross (P<0.05. The SCD gene was expressed for polyunsaturated fatty acids in liver tissue in two groups of chickens. In conclusion, the SCD gene could be a candidate gene that affects fatty acids traits in F2 kampung-broiler chicken cross.

  7. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  8. Long-term safety and efficacy of deferasirox (Exjade) for up to 5 years in transfusional iron-overloaded patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Bernaudin, Françoise; Forni, Gian Luca; Gardner, Renee; Hassell, Kathryn; Heeney, Matthew M; Inusa, Baba; Kutlar, Abdullah; Lane, Peter; Mathias, Liesl; Porter, John; Tebbi, Cameron; Wilson, Felicia; Griffel, Louis; Deng, Wei; Giannone, Vanessa; Coates, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    To date, there is a lack of long-term safety and efficacy data for iron chelation therapy in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of deferasirox (a once-daily oral iron chelator), patients with SCD completing a 1-year, Phase II, randomized, deferoxamine (DFO)-controlled study entered a 4-year extension, continuing to receive deferasirox, or switching from DFO to deferasirox. Average actual deferasirox dose was 19·4 ± 6·3 mg/kg per d. Of 185 patients who received at least one deferasirox dose, 33·5% completed the 5-year study. The most common reasons for discontinuation were withdrawal of consent (23·8%), lost to follow-up (9·2%) and adverse events (AEs) (7·6%). Investigator-assessed drug-related AEs were predominantly gastrointestinal [including nausea (14·6%), diarrhoea (10·8%)], mild-to-moderate and transient in nature. Creatinine clearance remained within the normal range throughout the study. Despite conservative initial dosing, serum ferritin levels in patients with ≥ 4 years deferasirox exposure significantly decreased by -591 μg/l (95% confidence intervals, -1411, -280 μg/l; P = 0·027; n = 67). Long-term deferasirox treatment for up to 5 years had a clinically acceptable safety profile, including maintenance of normal renal function, in patients with SCD. Iron burden was substantially reduced with appropriate dosing in patients treated for at least 4 years. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Long-term safety and efficacy of deferasirox (Exjade®) for up to 5 years in transfusional iron-overloaded patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Bernaudin, Françoise; Forni, Gian Luca; Gardner, Renee; Hassell, Kathryn; Heeney, Matthew M; Inusa, Baba; Kutlar, Abdullah; Lane, Peter; Mathias, Liesl; Porter, John; Tebbi, Cameron; Wilson, Felicia; Griffel, Louis; Deng, Wei; Giannone, Vanessa; Coates, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    To date, there is a lack of long-term safety and efficacy data for iron chelation therapy in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of deferasirox (a once-daily oral iron chelator), patients with SCD completing a 1-year, Phase II, randomized, deferoxamine (DFO)-controlled study entered a 4-year extension, continuing to receive deferasirox, or switching from DFO to deferasirox. Average actual deferasirox dose was 19·4 ± 6·3 mg/kg per d. Of 185 patients who received at least one deferasirox dose, 33·5% completed the 5-year study. The most common reasons for discontinuation were withdrawal of consent (23·8%), lost to follow-up (9·2%) and adverse events (AEs) (7·6%). Investigator-assessed drug-related AEs were predominantly gastrointestinal [including nausea (14·6%), diarrhoea (10·8%)], mild-to-moderate and transient in nature. Creatinine clearance remained within the normal range throughout the study. Despite conservative initial dosing, serum ferritin levels in patients with ≥4 years deferasirox exposure significantly decreased by −591 μg/l (95% confidence intervals, −1411, −280 μg/l; P=0·027; n=67). Long-term deferasirox treatment for up to 5 years had a clinically acceptable safety profile, including maintenance of normal renal function, in patients with SCD. Iron burden was substantially reduced with appropriate dosing in patients treated for at least 4 years. PMID:21592110

  10. Serum sCD30 in monitoring of alloresponse in well HLA-matched cadaveric kidney transplantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlauri, Irma H; Kyllönen, Lauri E J; Salmela, Kaija T; Helin, Heikki; Pelzl, Steffen; Süsal, Caner

    2005-12-27

    In kidney transplantation, pretransplant serum sCD30 testing has been proposed in immunological risk estimation together with anti-HLA antibodies. We evaluated the risks associated with high pretransplant serum sCD30 in well HLA-matched cadaveric kidney recipients recruited in a clinical study comparing different immunosuppressive regimens. Rejection rate was similar in 37 recipients with high pretransplant serum sCD30 compared to 117 recipients with low serum sCD30 (16% vs. 15%, P=NS). Compared to pretransplant levels, the posttransplant sCD30 levels generally decreased, also in patients with rejection, although on day 21 posttransplant, rejecting patients had significantly higher relative sCD30 than nonrejecting patients (PsCD30 levels. High pretransplant sCD30 values were associated with tubulointerstitial rejection. There was no correlation of sCD30 with delayed graft function. Good HLA matching seems to be effective in neutralizing the negative effect of a high pretransplant serum sCD30.

  11. A Mismatch Between Patient Education Materials About Sickle Cell Disease and the Literacy Level of Their Intended Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Elizabeth; Ng, Jared; Vitzthum, Kelly; Rudd, Rima

    2016-05-12

    Despite the first goal of the 2010 National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy, the literacy demands of much health information exceeds the reading skills of most US adults. The objective of this study was to assess the health literacy level of publicly available patient education materials for people with sickle cell disease (SCD). We used 5 validated tools to evaluate 9 print and 4 online patient education materials: the simple measure of gobbledygook (SMOG) to assess reading grade level, the Peter Mosenthal and Irwin Kirsch readability formula (PMOSE/IKIRSCH) to assess structure and density, the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) to assess actionability (how well readers will know what to do after reading the material) and understandability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Clear Communication Index (Index) to obtain a comprehensive literacy demand score, and the Printed Cancer Education Materials for African Americans Cultural Sensitivity Assessment Tool. Materials' scores reflected high reading levels ranging from 8th grade to 12th grade, appropriate (low) structural demand, and low actionability relative to understandability. CDC suggests that an appropriate Index score should fall in or above the 90th percentile. The scores yielded by materials evaluated in this assessment ranged from the 44th to the 76th percentiles. Eight of the 13 materials scored within the acceptable range for cultural sensitivity. Reading levels of available patient education materials exceed the documented average literacy level of the US adult population. Health literacy demands should be a key consideration in the revision and development of patient education materials for people with SCD.

  12. Structural and Functional Insight of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate-Mediated Pathogenic Metabolic Reprogramming in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaiqi; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Ahmed, Mostafa H; Zhang, Yujin; Song, Anren; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Nemkov, Travis; Reisz, Julie A; Wu, Hongyu; Adebiyi, Morayo; Peng, Zhangzhe; Gong, Jing; Liu, Hong; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan Edward; Wen, Alexander Q; Berka, Vladimir; Bogdanov, Mikhail V; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Han, Leng; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Idowu, Modupe; Juneja, Harinder S; Kellems, Rodney E; Dowhan, William; Hansen, Kirk C; Safo, Martin K; Xia, Yang

    2017-11-10

    Elevated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is detrimental in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), but the mechanistic basis remains obscure. Here, we report that increased erythrocyte S1P binds to deoxygenated sickle Hb (deoxyHbS), facilitates deoxyHbS anchoring to the membrane, induces release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes and in turn switches glucose flux towards glycolysis relative to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Suppressed PPP causes compromised glutathione homeostasis and increased oxidative stress, while enhanced glycolysis induces production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) and thus increases deoxyHbS polymerization, sickling, hemolysis and disease progression. Functional studies revealed that S1P and 2,3-BPG work synergistically to decrease both HbA and HbS oxygen binding affinity. The crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution deciphered that S1P binds to the surface of 2,3-BPG-deoxyHbA and causes additional conformation changes to the T-state Hb. Phosphate moiety of the surface bound S1P engages in a highly positive region close to α1-heme while its aliphatic chain snakes along a shallow cavity making hydrophobic interactions in the "switch region", as well as with α2-heme like a molecular "sticky tape" with the last 3-4 carbon atoms sticking out into bulk solvent. Altogether, our findings provide functional and structural bases underlying S1P-mediated pathogenic metabolic reprogramming in SCD and novel therapeutic avenues.

  13. Pentazocine dependence among sickle cell disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sickle cell disease is a chronic disease. Severe bone pain is commonly the hallmark of clinical features. This commonly necessitates the use of analgesics especially Opioids which unfortunately have a high potential to produce dependence. The complications of dependence in patients on any psychoactive ...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung S.; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of neuronal cells in the central nervous system may occur in many neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is a common senile disease in people over 65 years, and it causes impairment characterized by the decline of mental function, including memory loss and cognitive impairment, and affects the quality of life of patients. However, the current therapeutic strategies against AD are only to relieve symptoms, but not to cure it. Because there are only a few therapeutic strategie...

  15. Soluble CD206 plasma levels in rheumatoid arthritis reflect decrease in disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heftdal, Line Dam; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll

    2017-01-01

    internalization and degradation. The soluble form has been suggested as a biomarker of M2A-macrophage activation. The aim of this study was to investigate sCD206 plasma levels in early RA patients initiating anti-TNFα treatment. Plasma levels of sCD206 were measured by ELISA in samples from 155 early RA patients...... from baseline after 6 months. In the ADA group, however, levels remained lower than baseline throughout the treatment period. In conclusion, initially, plasma sCD206 in early RA patients decreased in accordance with disease activity and initiation of DMARD treatment. Treatment with anti-TNFα preserved......Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and infiltration by activated macrophages. TNFα is a central mediator in this process. The mannose receptor, CD206, is a scavenger receptor expressed by M2A-macrophages and dendritic cells. It is involved in collagen...

  16. Duodenal endocrine cells in adult coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, K; Alumets, J; Berg, N O; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1979-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques we studied duodenal biopsies from 18 patients with coeliac disease and 24 patients with normal duodenal morphology. We had access to antisera against the following gastrointestinal peptides: cholecystokinin (CCK), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin-17, glucagon-enteroglucagon, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic peptide (PP), secretin, somatostatin, substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The somatostatin, GIP, CCK, and glucagon cells were increased in number in coeliac disease. The number of motilin cells was slightly increased, while secretin cells were reduced. Cells storing gastrin-17, substance P, or neurotensin were rare in all patients regardless of diagnosis. No PP immunoreactive cells were found and VIP was localised to neurons only. In biopsies from patients having a mucosa with ridging of villi the number of the various endocrine cell types did not differ from that in the control group. Images Fig. 2 PMID:385455

  17. NKT cells in cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijvelde, van G.H.M.; Kuiper, J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite life-style advice and the prescription of cholesterol-lowering and anti-thrombotic drugs, cardiovascular diseases are still the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies focussing on atherosclerosis, the major underlying pathology of

  18. Psychosocial impact of sickle cell disease in children seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the Rutter Scale A2, the SCD children were more likely than the controls to report neurotic symptoms but less likely than controls to bully other children. SCD children (30%) were more likely to be identified as probable cases with psychological problems than asthmatics (25%) and AMI children (20%). These differences ...

  19. Are Haemopoietic Stem Cells Precursor Cells in Secondary Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, J. L. [Central Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Moscow, USSR (Russian Federation)

    1969-07-15

    The paper gives data on acute secondary disease developing in supra-lethally irradiated dogs and monkeys after transplantation of allogenic bone marrow. On the basis of the experimental data obtained, the author discusses the question whether haemopoietic stem cells play a role as first links in the histogenesis of the lymphoid elements responsible for acute secondary disease. (author)

  20. Prevention and management of stroke in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kilinç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Disease(SCD is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies in the world which causes stroke. The management of stroke depends on the manifestations and the age of the patient. Especially in childhood, anatomic and physiological abnormalities of CNS may be a predisposing factors. Stroke mostly affects the distal segments of the Internal Carotid Artery, but also middle and anterior segments of the cerebral arteries are involved. The most important predisposing factors are the arterial malformations, stenosis and obstructions in cranial arteries, generally involving Internal Carotid Artery, frequently Proximal Middle Cerebral or Anterior Cerebral Arteries. After infarcts at brain vessels, most frequent clinical findings are hemiparesis or hemiplegia, impaired speech, focal seizures, gait disturbances. Risk factors for predisposing stroke are prior transient ischemia, baseline Hb decrease, acute chest sydrome within previous two weeks, systolic blood pressure rises, leucocyte increases. The patient with silent stroke or transient ischemic attacks may be asymptomatic or without neurological symptoms. Neuroimaging abnormalities may be seen without significant clinical findings in children with SCD. We talk about silent stroke if there are neuroradiological abnormalities without clinical findings. Children with silent strokes are more prone to new strokes. If there is a significant stroke a ischemic stroke often present with focal neurological signs and symptoms. If patient is asymptomatic or have suspected stroke, first step may be performance of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD. Children with time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV, measured in Middle Carotid Artery or in distal internal carotid Artery abnormally elevated, defined as TAMV≥200cm/sec, have sixfold increase for stroke than those with normal TAMV≤170cm/sec. For these patients under the risk of stroke, chronic blood transfusion is recommended for prevention of primary

  1. Beam test of a dual layer silicon charge detector (SCD) for the CREAM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, N.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Jeon, J.A.; Kim, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Lutz, L.; Lee, M.H.; Malinin, A.; Nam, S.; Park, I.H.; Park, J.H.; Seo, E.S.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoo, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zinn, S.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) balloon-borne experiment is designed for direct measurement of high-energy cosmic rays. The experimental goal is to measure single-element fluxes of all cosmic-ray nuclei from hydrogen to iron with energies up to the 'knee', or spectral index change near 10 15 eV, observed in the all-particle spectrum. The dual layer Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) was designed to provide precise charge measurements. Each SCD layer has an active area of 77.9cmx79.5cm and consists of 156 silicon sensors mounted on 24 ladders. Each sensor contains a 4 x 4 array of single-sided DC type silicon pixels with an active area of 2.1cm 2 . The detector was flown on the second CREAM flight (December 2005-January 2006) and recovered successfully. The SCD was refurbished for the third CREAM flight and tested with high-energy electron and hadron beams at CERN. This paper reports on the performance of the SCD during the beam test

  2. Effect of polymorphisms in the ABCG2, LEPR and SCD1 genes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sahand Rayaneh

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... Abstract. This study was performed to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the ABCG2 (ATP- binding cassette sub-family G member 2), LEPR (leptin receptor) and SCD1 (stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1) genes and milk production traits in Holstein dairy cows in Iran. The analysis was ...

  3. Impact of a dedicated infusion clinic for acute management of adults with sickle cell pain crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzkron, Sophie; Carroll, C Patrick; Hill, Peter; David, Mandy; Paul, Nicklaine; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-05-01

    Most adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) receive care for their acute painful episodes in an emergency department (ED) setting. The purpose of this article is to describe the impact of opening a dedicated treatment center for adults with SCD [Sickle Cell Infusion Clinic (SCIC)] on patient outcomes and on hospital discharges for SCD. Descriptive data including demographics, time to first dose of narcotic, and pain scores were collected on patients presenting to the SCIC and ED. Maryland hospital discharge data were obtained from the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission. Analyses were conducted using T tests, χ(2) tests, and simple generalized estimating equation regression models accounting for the clustered nature of observations, as appropriate. There were 3,874 visits to the SCIC by 361 unique patients; 85% of those visits resulted in the patient being sent home. During the same time period, there were 3,408 visits to the ED by 558 unique patients with SCD. The overall admission rate from the ED for these patients was 35.9% but decreased significantly over the time period with a rate of 20% in December 2011. There was a significant decrease in readmissions over time for the entire Baltimore Metro area with the likelihood of readmission decreasing by 7% over time. The SCIC model provides adults with SCD access to high quality care that decreases the need for hospital admission. Further research needs to be done to evaluate the cost effectiveness of this model. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Plasma sCD14 as a biomarker to predict pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S Quon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One in four cystic fibrosis (CF patients diagnosed with a pulmonary exacerbation will not recover their baseline lung function despite standard treatment. This highlights the importance of preventing such events. Clinical decision-making can be improved through a simple blood test that predicts individuals at elevated short-term risk of an exacerbation. METHODS: We obtained plasma samples from 30 stable CF patients from the St. Paul's Hospital Adult CF Clinic (Vancouver, Canada. For 15 patients, an additional plasma sample was obtained during an exacerbation. Soluble CD14 (sCD14 and C-reactive protein (CRP were quantified using ELISA kits. Myeloperoxidase (MPO, interleukin(IL-6, IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF were quantified using Luminex™ immunoassays. Stable state biomarker levels were examined in their ability to predict individuals that would experience a pulmonary exacerbation requiring intravenous (IV antibiotics within 4 months. Paired stable and exacerbation plasma biomarker levels were also compared. RESULTS: sCD14 levels were significantly higher in patients that experienced a pulmonary exacerbation requiring IV antibiotics within 4 months (p = 0.001. sCD14 cut-off value of 1450 ng/mL was associated with an area under the curve of 0.91 (95% CI 0.83-0.99 for predicting an exacerbation within 4 months of a stable visit, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 82%. Plasma sCD14 levels were significantly higher during exacerbations than during periods of clinical stability (p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma sCD14 is a promising biomarker for identifying CF patients who will exacerbate within 4 months of a stable visit but requires further study in larger, independent cohorts.

  5. Parsing the Dictionary of Modern Literary Russian Language with the Method of SCD Configurations. The Lexicographic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neculai Curteanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends the experience of parsing other five, sensibly different, Romanian, French, and German largest dictionaries, to \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}} (Dictionary of Modern Literary Russian Language [18], using the optimal and portable parsing method of SCD (Segmentation-Cohesion-Dependency configurations [7], [11], [15]. The purpose of the present paper is to elaborate the lexicographic modeling of \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}}, which necessarily precedes the sense tree parsing dictionary entries. The following \\textbf{\\textit{three}} SCD configurations are described: the \\textbf{\\textit{first one}} has to separate the lexicographic segments in a \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}} entry, the \\textbf{\\textit{second}} SCD-configuration concentrates on the SCD marker classes and their hypergraph hierarchy for \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}} primary and secondary senses, while the \\textbf{\\textit{third}} SCD configuration hands down the same modeling process to the atomic sense definitions and their examples-to-definitions. The dependency hypergraph of the third SCD configuration, interconnected to the one of the second SCD configuration, is specified completely at the atomic sense level for the first time, exceeding the SCD configuration modeling for other five dictionaries [15], [14]. Numerous examples from \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}} and comparison to \\textbf{\\textit{DLR-DAR}} Romanian thesaurus-dictionary support the proposed \\textbf{\\textit{DMLRL}} lexicographic modeling.

  6. Assessing the Effect of an Educational Intervention on Nurses' and Patient Care Assistants' Comprehension and Documentation of Functional Ability in Pediatric Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Katherine M; Strobel, Megan; Lucas, Ruth

    2018-04-13

    In 2014, the Youth Acute Pain Functional Ability Questionnaire (YAPFAQ) was developed to investigate patient's self-rated functional ability during times of acute pain in the inpatient clinical setting. Although it has great potential, the application of this tool has not been made a standard of care. The purpose of this multiple methods study was to determine if, through an educational intervention, hospital staff could consistently document the YAPFAQ in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) during a vaso-occlusive episode. Twenty-two staff members participated in an educational intervention and semi-structured group discussions. Pre/post surveys measured knowledge of the YAPFAQ before and after the intervention. Group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic clusters. Retrospective chart reviews of children with SCD were reviewed for YAPFAQ documentation frequency before and after the intervention. Staff knowledge of who completes the YAPFAQ increased after the intervention, (pcontinues to hold high potential for directing nursing care, but requires staff investment for clinical practice change. A seamless integration between nursing education and translation through EHR is recommended as technology continues to integrate into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunologic effects of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Howard M; Connolly, Margaret A; Kalpatthi, Ram; Ware, Russell E; Wang, Winfred C; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Waclawiw, Myron; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Swift, Andrea; Casella, James F

    2014-10-01

    Susceptibility to encapsulated bacteria is well known in sickle cell disease (SCD). Hydroxyurea use is common in adults and children with SCD, but little is known about hydroxyurea's effects on immune function in SCD. Because hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase, causing cell cycle arrest at the G1-S interface, we postulated that hydroxyurea might delay transition from naive to memory T cells, with inhibition of immunologic maturation and vaccine responses. T-cell subsets, naive and memory T cells, and antibody responses to pneumococcal and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines were measured among participants in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea in infants and young children with SCD (BABY HUG). Compared with placebo, hydroxyurea treatment resulted in significantly lower total lymphocyte, CD4, and memory T-cell counts; however, these numbers were still within the range of historical healthy controls. Antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination were not affected, but a delay in achieving protective measles antibody levels occurred in the hydroxyurea group. Antibody levels to measles, mumps, and rubella showed no differences between groups at exit, indicating that effective immunization can be achieved despite hydroxyurea use. Hydroxyurea does not appear to have significant deleterious effects on the immune function of infants and children with SCD. Additional assessments of lymphocyte parameters of hydroxyurea-treated children may be warranted. No changes in current immunization schedules are recommended; however, for endemic disease or epidemics, adherence to accelerated immunization schedules for the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine should be reinforced. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Stem cell treatment for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Ntolios, Paschalis; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a considerable human, societal and financial burden. In view of the current disappointing status of available pharmaceutical agents, there is an urgent need for alternative more effective therapeutic approaches that will not only help to relieve patient symptoms but will also affect the natural course of the respective disease. Regenerative medicine represents a promising option with several fruitful therapeutic applications in patients suffering from chronic lung diseases. Nevertheless, despite relative enthusiasm arising from experimental data, application of stem cell therapy in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by several safety concerns arising from the major lack of knowledge on the fate of exogenously administered stem cells within chronically injured lung as well as the mechanisms regulating the activation of resident progenitor cells. On the other hand, salient data arising from few 'brave' pilot investigations of the safety of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases seem promising. The main scope of this review article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the application status of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases, address important safety and efficacy issues and present future challenges and perspectives. In this review, we argue in favor of large multicenter clinical trials setting realistic goals to assess treatment efficacy. We propose the use of biomarkers that reflect clinically inconspicuous alterations of the disease molecular phenotype before rigid conclusions can be safely drawn. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Adverse Effects of a Clinically Relevant Dose of Hydroxyurea Used for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease on Male Fertility Endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were conducted to determine: 1 whether the adult male transgenic sickle cell mouse (Tg58 × Tg98; TSCM, exhibits the patterns of reproductive endpoints (hypogonadism characteristic of men with sickle cell disease (SCD and 2 whether hydroxyurea (HU exacerbates this condition. In Experiment 1, blood samples were collected from adult age-matched TSCM and ICR mice (ICRM (N = 10/group for plasma testosterone measurements. Subsequently, mice were sacrificed, testes excised and weighed and stored spermatozoa recovered for the determination of sperm density, progressive motility and percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology. In experiment 2, adult male TSCM were orally treated with 25 mg HU/kg body weight/day for 28 or 56 days. Control mice received the vehicle for HU (saline as described above. At the end of the treatment periods, blood samples were collected for quantification of circulating testosterone. Subsequently, mice were sacrificed, testes and epididymides were recovered and weighed and one testis per mouse was subjected to histopathology. Stored spermatozoa were recovered for the determination of indices of sperm quality mentioned in Experiment 1. Testis weight, stored sperm density, progressive motility, percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology and plasma testosterone concentrations of TSCM were significantly lower by 40, 65, 40, 69 and 66%, respectively than those of ICRM. These data indicate that adult TSCM used in this study suffered from hypogonadism, characteristically observed among adult male SCD patients. In Experiment 2, HU treatment significantly decreased testis weight on day 28, (0.09 ± 0.004g that was further decreased on day 56 (0.06 ± 0.003g; treatment x time interaction compared with controls (day 28, 0.15 ± 0.01g; day 56, 2, 0.16 ± 0.01g. Concomitant with a 52% shrinkage (P<0.001 in area of testes in 56 days of HU treatment, testes from HU-treated TSCM exhibited significant atrophic

  10. Are mast cells instrumental for fibrotic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eOvered-Sayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a fatal lung disorder of unknown etiology characterised by accumulation of lung fibroblasts and extracellular matrix deposition, ultimately leading to compromised tissue architecture and lung function capacity. IPF has a heterogeneous clinical course; however the median survival after diagnosis is only 3-5 years. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry has made many attempts to find effective treatments for IPF, but the disease has so far defied all attempts at therapeutic intervention. Clinical trial failures may arise for many reasons, including disease heterogeneity, lack of readily measurable clinical end points other than overall survival, and, perhaps most of all, a lack of understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the progression of IPF.The precise link between inflammation and fibrosis remains unclear, but it appears that immune cells can promote fibrosis by releasing fibrogenic factors. So far, however, therapeutic approaches targeting macrophages, neutrophils, or lymphocytes have failed to alter disease pathogenesis. A new cell to garner research interest in fibrosis is the mast cell. Increased numbers of mast cells have long been known to be present in pulmonary fibrosis and clinically correlations between mast cells and fibrosis have been reported. More recent data suggests that mast cells may contribute to the fibrotic process by stimulating fibroblasts resident in the lung, thus driving the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss the mast cell and its physiological role in tissue repair and remodelling, as well as its pathological role in fibrotic diseases such as IPF, where the process of tissue repair and remodelling is thought to be dysregulated.

  11. Soluble CD52 is an indicator of disease activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vojdeman, Fie J.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Kirkby, Nikolai; Wiestner, Adrian; van T' Veer, Mars B.; Tjønnfjord, Geir E.; Itälä-Remes, Maija A.; Kimby, Eva; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.; Polliack, Aaron; Wu, Ka Lung; Doorduijn, Jeanette K.; Alemayehu, Wendimagegn G.; Wittebol, Shulamiet; Kozak, Tomas; Walewski, Jan; Abrahamse-Testroote, Martine C. J.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Geisler, Christian H.; Niemann, Carsten U.

    2017-01-01

    CD52 is a glycoprotein expressed on normal as well as leukemic immune cells and shed as soluble CD52 (sCD52). We studied sCD52 levels in three CLL cohorts: the 'early', the 'high-risk', and the 'ibrutinib-treated'. The 'high-risk' patients had significantly higher sCD52 levels than the 'early'

  12. Accelerating stem cell trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Joshua G; Rao, Mahendra; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Bulte, Jeff W M; Atala, Anthony; LaFerla, Frank M; Greely, Henry T; Sawa, Akira; Gandy, Sam; Schneider, Lon S; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2016-02-01

    At present, no effective cure or prophylaxis exists for Alzheimer's disease. Symptomatic treatments are modestly effective and offer only temporary benefit. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have the potential to enable development of so-called disease-in-a-dish personalised models to study disease mechanisms and reveal new therapeutic approaches, and large panels of iPSCs enable rapid screening of potential drug candidates. Different cell types can also be produced for therapeutic use. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration granted investigational new drug approval for the first phase 2A clinical trial of ischaemia-tolerant mesenchymal stem cells to treat Alzheimer's disease in the USA. Similar trials are either underway or being planned in Europe and Asia. Although safety and ethical concerns remain, we call for the acceleration of human stem cell-based translational research into the causes and potential treatments of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic Modifiers of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with unusual clinical heterogeneity for a Mendelian disorder. Fetal hemoglobin concentration and coincident ∝ thalassemia, both which directly affect the sickle erythrocyte, are the major modulators of the phenotype of disease. Understanding the genetics underlying the heritable subphenotypes of sickle cell anemia would be prognostically useful, could inform personalized therapeutics, and might help the discovery of new “druggable” pathophysiologic targets. Genotype-phenotype association studies have been used to identify novel genetic modifiers. In the future, whole genome sequencing with its promise of discovering hitherto unsuspected variants could add to our understanding of the genetic modifiers of this disease. PMID:22641398

  14. Knowledge insufficient: the management of haemoglobin SC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecker, Lydia H; Schaefer, Beverly A; Luchtman-Jones, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Although haemoglobin SC (HbSC) accounts for 30% of sickle cell disease (SCD) in the United States and United Kingdom, evidence-based guidelines for genotype specific management are lacking. The unique pathology of HbSC disease is complex, characterized by erythrocyte dehydration, intracellular sickling and increased blood viscosity. The evaluation and treatment of patients with HbSC is largely inferred from studies of SCD consisting mostly of haemoglobin SS (HbSS) patients. These studies are underpowered to allow definitive conclusions about HbSC. We review the pathophysiology of HbSC disease, including known and potential differences between HbSS and HbSC, and highlight knowledge gaps in HbSC disease management. Clinical and translational research is needed to develop targeted treatments and to validate management recommendations for efficacy, safety and impact on quality of life for people with HbSC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Radiopharmaceutical Stem Cell Tracking for Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases.

  16. Role of the Hemostatic System on SCD Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Pakbaz, Zahra; Wun, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that sickle cell disease is a hypercoagulable state contributing to the vaso-occlusive events in microcirculation resulting in acute and chronic sickle cell related organ damage. In this article, we will review the existing evidence for contribution of hemostatic system perturbation to sickle cell disease pathophysiology. We will also review the data showing increased risk of thromboembolic events, particularly newer information on the incidence of VTE. Finally, the pot...

  17. Stem Cell Therapy for Avascular Necrosis of Femoral Head in Sickle Cell Disease: Report of 11 Cases and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Azam, Md Q; Elshabouri, Ezzat M; Tantawy, Ahmad M; Acharya, Sadananda

    2017-11-30

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is quite common in eastern Saudi Arabia and Avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH) occurs in 30% of the young patients leading to early joint arthroplasty. This study was conducted to assess the benefits of injection of osteoblasts in the avascular lesions of the head of femur. A preset technique was used, 10 CC of bone marrow aspiration was performed under local anesthesia and aseptic technique. Osteoblasts were separated from the bone marrow cells. The avascular area was drilled and 10 million osteoblasts were transplanted at the lesion site. Patients were seen in the out patient clinic after two weeks for removal of the suture and addressed the questionnaire and examined for the range of movement. The follow up MRI was performed at 4 months. The average age was 20.2±3.9 years. The mean hemoglobin S was 81.6±4.8 percent. Quality of Life Score for Chronic Hip Disease was assessed and found at 8.6 (1 being the severe limitation and 10 being normal), whereas Harris hip score improved from 41.7±5.1 to 88.93±3.6 (p avascular lesions. The short term results were good and we believe the injection of osteoblast in the avascular lesion of head of femur is a less invasive procedure devoid of any untoward complications and merits such treatment in large patient group with longer follow up.

  18. High-field-strength MR imaging evaluation of stroke in the sickle cell population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bello, J.A.; Pavlakis, S.G.; Prohovnik, I.; Hilal, S.K.; De Vivo, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Stroke is a well-known but understudied complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). The authors have studied the incidence and patterns of clinical and subclinical stroke in 73 SCD patients. The patients underwent formal neurologic evaluation and high-field strength, heavily T2-weighted axial cranial MR imaging (TR = 3,500 msec, TE = 80 msec). Eighteen of the 73 patients had clinical strokes, acute, nonconvulsive neurologic events with lateralizing neurological signs lasting 1 hour. All but two of these patients demonstrated focal MR imaging abnormalities. The remaining 55 patients were controls. Ten percent of them had focal MR imaging abnormalities suggesting subclinical stroke. A feature of the SCD population is the preponderance of strokes in the distal field and watershed distribution

  19. Associations among emergency room visits, parenting styles, and psychopathology among pediatric patients with sickle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Shishido, Yuri; Latzman, Natasha E; Elkin, T David; Majumdar, Suvankar

    2014-10-01

    To examine associations between frequency of emergency room (ER) visits and various parenting styles, both conjointly and interactively, and psychopathological outcomes among pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Ninety-eight parents/caregivers of 6- to 18-year-old patients with SCD completed instruments assessing parenting style, child psychopathology, and reported on the frequency of ER visits during the previous year. ER visits were found to significantly explain Withdrawn/Depressed problems and parenting styles were found to incrementally contribute to the explanation of all forms of psychopathology. Further, Permissive parenting was found to explain Rule Breaking Behavior for those patients with low ER visit frequency but not for those with high ER visit frequency. Results of the current study confirm the importance of considering both the frequency of ER visits and parenting style in the explanation of psychopathology among pediatric patients with SCD. Results have important implications for both research and treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Impaired pubertal development and testicular hormone function in males with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Kerbauy, José; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Pereira, Gilberto de Araújo; Figueiredo, Maria Stella; Verreschi, Ieda Therezinha

    2015-01-01

    Changes in weight/height ratio, delayed sexual maturation, hypogonadism and impaired fertility have been demonstrated in sickle cell disease (SCD). This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and laboratory views of the Leydig cells function after stimulation with hCG in adults with sickle cell disease. We studied 15 patients with SCD (18 to 40 years; median=27 years old), fourteen homozygous S, and one with SC disease. The control group, composed by adult males, was divided into two groups: I - 10 relatives (18-39 years, median=26 years) with the same socioeconomic level of the patients, and II - 9 normal individuals (23-28, median=31 years) randomly chosen. Clinically it was observed a slight degree of malnutrition, important puberty delay, rarefaction of chest, underarm and pubic hair, and important reduction of the testis and penis size, featuring a mild hypogonadism in patients with SCD. The hormonal level assessment of testosterone at baseline and at 24, 48 and 72 h after hCG stimulation showed no significant differences between the groups studied. We can presume that adult men with SCD showed clinical hypoandrogenism with normal testicular hormonal function, a fact inconsistent with the hypothesis of primary hypogonadism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shizukuda Y, Plehn JF, Minter K, Brown B, Coles WA, Nichols JS, Ernst I, Hunter LA, Blackwelder WC, Schechter AN, Rodgers GP, Castro O, Ognibene FP. Pulmonary hypertension as a risk factor for death in patients with sickle cell disease. N Engl J Med. 2004 Feb 26;350( ...

  2. Neurocognitive Aspects of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This literature review on neurocognitive functioning and learning of children with sickle cell disease found diffuse neurocognitive deficits, with much variability across subjects. Studies of psychosocial development of these children indicate that behavioral problems, low self-esteem, and body image disturbances are frequently characteristic.…

  3. Sickle Cell Disease: What You Should Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-10

    This podcast is for a general audience and gives information about sickle cell disease.  Created: 9/10/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Division of Blood Disorders.   Date Released: 9/15/2008.

  4. Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Habits People with sickle cell disease should drink 8 to 10 glasses of water every day and eat healthy food. Try not to get too hot, too cold, or too tired. Children can, and should, participate in ... tired, and drink plenty of water. Look for clinical studies New ...

  5. PARTITIONING OF BENZENE IN SICKLE CELL BLOOD AND NORMAL BLOOD AND IN THE BLOOD OF THE GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, AND RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractBenzene was used as a prototypic volatile organic chemical to ascertain whether the insoluble form of hemoglobin (HbS) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD) has a greater VOC carrying capacity than hemoglobin (Hb) from normal subjects (HbA) which is ...

  6. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  7. [The relationship between acute rejection and expression of sCD30 for the patients after kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Lin; Hao, Hong-Jun; Qin, Bin; Bang, Ling-Qing; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Xin, Dian-Qi; Guo, Ying-Lu; Na, Yan-Qun

    2005-03-16

    To study the relationship between the sCD30 and acute rejection. We tested the sCD30 level in serum for 58 cases with kidney transplantation before and the 7th day and 28th day after operation by ELISA. 31 healthy individual for control group, and simultaneously recorded the incidence of rejection after kidney transplantation. The results showed that there is an obviously relation before kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 4.843, P = 0.028, P kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 7.201, P = 0.007, P kidney transplantation between the sCD30 level in serum and the incidence of acute rejection (chi = 2.095, P = 0.148, P > 0.05). The results suggested that the expressions of sCD30 are related to acute rejection. We speculated that the expressions of sCD30 could play an important role in acute rejection.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Manual Partial Red Cell Exchange in the Management of Severe Complications of Sickle Cell Disease in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. F. Faye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The realization of red cell exchange (RCE in Africa faces the lack of blood, transfusion safety, and equipment. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in severe complications of sickle cell disease. Patients and Method. Manual partial RCE was performed among sickle cell patients who had severe complications. Efficacy was evaluated by clinical evolution, blood count, and electrophoresis of hemoglobin. Safety was evaluated on adverse effects, infections, and alloimmunization. Results. We performed 166 partial RCE among 44 patients including 41 homozygous (SS and 2 heterozygous composites SC and 1 S/β0-thalassemia. The mean age was 27.9 years. The sex ratio was 1.58. The regression of symptoms was complete in 100% of persistent vasoocclusive crisis and acute chest syndrome, 56.7% of intermittent priapism, and 30% of stroke. It was partial in 100% of leg ulcers and null in acute priapism. The mean variations of hemoglobin and hematocrit rate after one procedure were, respectively, +1.4 g/dL and +4.4%. That of hemoglobin S after 2 consecutive RCE was −60%. Neither alloimmunization nor viral seroconversion was observed. Conclusion. This work shows the feasibility of manual partial RCE in a low-resource setting and its efficacy and safety during complications of SCD outside of acute priapism.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Manual Partial Red Cell Exchange in the Management of Severe Complications of Sickle Cell Disease in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, D.; Seck, M.; Dieng, N.; Toure, S. A.; Gadji, M.; Senghor, A. B.; Gueye, Y. B.; Sy, D.; Sall, A.; Dieye, T. N.; Toure, A. O.; Diop, S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The realization of red cell exchange (RCE) in Africa faces the lack of blood, transfusion safety, and equipment. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in severe complications of sickle cell disease. Patients and Method Manual partial RCE was performed among sickle cell patients who had severe complications. Efficacy was evaluated by clinical evolution, blood count, and electrophoresis of hemoglobin. Safety was evaluated on adverse effects, infections, and alloimmunization. Results We performed 166 partial RCE among 44 patients including 41 homozygous (SS) and 2 heterozygous composites SC and 1 S/β0-thalassemia. The mean age was 27.9 years. The sex ratio was 1.58. The regression of symptoms was complete in 100% of persistent vasoocclusive crisis and acute chest syndrome, 56.7% of intermittent priapism, and 30% of stroke. It was partial in 100% of leg ulcers and null in acute priapism. The mean variations of hemoglobin and hematocrit rate after one procedure were, respectively, +1.4 g/dL and +4.4%. That of hemoglobin S after 2 consecutive RCE was −60%. Neither alloimmunization nor viral seroconversion was observed. Conclusion This work shows the feasibility of manual partial RCE in a low-resource setting and its efficacy and safety during complications of SCD outside of acute priapism. PMID:28584527

  10. Application of a Proactive Risk Analysis to Emergency Department Sickle Cell Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Thornton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD often seek care in emergency departments (EDs for severe pain. However, there is evidence that they experience inaccurate assessment, suboptimal care, and inadequate follow-up referrals. The aim of this project was to 1 explore the feasibility of applying a failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA in two EDs examining four processes of care (triage, analgesic management, high risk/high users, and referrals made for patients with SCD, and 2 report the failures of these care processes in each ED. Methods: A FMECA was conducted of ED SCD patient care at two hospitals. A multidisciplinary group examined each step of four processes. Providers identified failures in each step, and then characterized the frequency, impact, and safeguards, resulting in risk categorization. Results: Many “high risk” failures existed in both institutions, including a lack of recognition of high-risk or high-user patients and a lack of emphasis on psychosocial referrals. Specific to SCD analgesic management, one setting inconsistently used existing analgesic policies, while the other setting did not have such policies. Conclusion: FMECA facilitated the identification of failures of ED SCD care and has guided quality improvement activities. Interventions can focus on improvements in these specific areas targeting improvements in the delivery and organization of ED SCD care. Improvements should correspond with the forthcoming National Heart, Lung and Blood-sponsored guidelines for treatment of patients with sickle cell disease. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:446–458.

  11. Evaluation of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pattern and prevalence of beta-thalassaemia trait among sickle cell disease patients in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Titilope; Ojewunmi, Oyesola; Oyetunji, Ajoke

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited disorder of haemoglobin worldwide. This study evaluated the chromatographic patterns and red blood cell indices of sickle cell patients to determine the co-inheritance of other haemoglobin(Hb) variants and β-thalassaemia trait. Red cell indices, blood film, sickle solubility test, Hb electrophoresis using alkaline cellulose acetate membrane, and chromatographic patterns using Bio Rad HPLC Variant II were evaluated for 180 subjects. Based on low MCV 4.0% on HPLC and Hb variants eluting outside the S and C windows, at least four haemoglobin phenotypes (SS: 87.7%; SC: 1.1%; SD Punjab: 0.6%; Sβ-thalassemia: 10.6%) were identified. Mean Hb F% was 8.1±5.1 (median 7.65) for Hb SS and 6.03±5.2 (median 3.9) for Hb Sβ-thalassemia trait. Majority of Hb SS (69.1%) had Hb F% less than 10 while 27.6% had 10-19.9 and 3.2% had ≥ 20. Mean Hb F% was higher in female Hb SS (9.55±5.09; mean age 7.4±3.8 years) than the males (7.63±4.80; mean age 6.9±3.8 years) (P=0.02). A borderline significant negative correlation between age and Hb F levels among Hb SS subjects (r= -0.169 P=0.038) was also observed. Our data suggests that α and β- thalassaemia traits, and other haemoglobin variants co-exist frequently with SCD in our population.

  12. Stomach development, stem cells and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2016-01-01

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. PMID:26884394

  13. Vitamin D status and serum level of some elements in children with sickle cell disease in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, J.A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship of Vitamin D deficiency and some minerals metabolism in the children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the city of Jeddah, western region of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A total of 51 children with sickle cell disease (both gender) included 28 males (54.9%) and 23 females (45.1%) aged between newborn and 12 years old and 70 healthy matching controls were admitted or visited sickle cell section in the Maternity and Children Hospital in the city of Jeddah. Fasting blood samples were collected and the serum was separated and stored at -30 deg. C until the time of analysis. Serum 25 (OH) Vitamin D was determined using a commercially available kit (VDBP, Gc globulin), calcium, phosphorus and magnesium were measured using a clinical autoanalyser. Results: The patients were divided into two groups according to the ages, Group-A included 21 patients (both gender) aged between newborn and 6 years, group-B included 30 patients (both gender) aged between 7-12 years. The results obtained showed that the serum concentrations of 25(OH) Vitamin D in both patients groups were significantly lower than the healthy matching controls (P 0.05) and significantly higher in the serum magnesium of group-B (P<0.05). Conclusion: A significant relation between Vitamin D deficiency and children with sickle cell disease which is normal due to confined patients indoor. The serum calcium concentration had no affect in the early stage of ages but a significant lower appeared with increasing of ages. The serum magnesium concentration was higher in group-B which can be explained to the important role of Mg/sup -2/ in the nature of erythrocyte membrane in sickle cell patients. (author)

  14. Stem cell therapy for severe autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmont Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense immunosuppresion followed by alogenic or autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a relatively recent procedure which was used for the first time in severe, refractory cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. Currently three agressive procedures are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases: high dose chemotherapy without stem cell rescue, intense immunosuppression with subsequent infusion of the alogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with or without the selection of CD34+ cells, and the autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Proof of the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed define SCT as a form of immunotherapy, with additional evidence of an similar Graft-vs-Autoimmunity effect which is suggestive of a cure for autoimmune diseases in this type of therapy. The use of alogenic SCT improved due to its safety compared to autogenic transplantations. In this report, data of multiply sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus are reported, with the conclusion that Immunoablation followed by SCT is clearly indicated in such cases.

  15. Adherence to hydroxyurea, health-related quality of life domains, and patients' perceptions of sickle cell disease and hydroxyurea: a cross-sectional study in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Penedo, Frank J; Rychlik, Karen; Liem, Robert I

    2017-07-05

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have impaired domains of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Hydroxyurea is safe and efficacious in SCD; however, adherence is suboptimal, and patients' perceptions are poorly understood amongst adolescents and young adults (AYA). Study objectives were to: (1) examine patients' perceptions of SCD and hydroxyurea; and (2) explore the relationship of their perceptions to clinical characteristics, HRQOL domains and hydroxyurea adherence. Thirty-four SCD patients on hydroxyurea (≥6 months) participated in a single-institution study. Study measures included Brief-Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, ©Modified Morisky Adherence Scale 8-items, and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). We assessed the relationship of patients' perceptions to hydroxyurea adherence using Wilcoxon rank-sum test, the number of hospitalizations using Kruskal-Wallis test, and the number of ED visits, adherence level, HRQOL domain scores using Spearman's rho correlations. We conducted a sub-analysis in HbSS patients to evaluate the relationship of patients' perceptions to laboratory markers of hydroxyurea adherence. Participants were 59% male and 91% Black, and had a median age of 13.5 (range 12-18) years. Participants with ≥4 hospitalizations over 1-year prior (using electronic medical chart review) reported more negative perceptions of SCD-related symptoms and emotional response, and perceived hydroxyurea as less beneficial; all p-values ≤0.01. Most participants (74%) reported low hydroxyurea adherence. Participants with higher hydroxyurea adherence perceived more hydroxyurea benefits (r s  = 0.44, p hydroxyurea positively correlated with HbF (r s  = 0.37, p = 0.05) and MCV values (r s  = 0.35, p = 0.05). Participants with more negative perceptions of SCD-related consequences, concerns, and emotional response, and fewer perceived hydroxyurea benefits reported worse fatigue (r s  = 0.68; r s  = 0.44; r s

  16. Is psoriasis a T-cell disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickoloff, B J; Schröder, J M; von den Driesch, P; Raychaudhuri, S P; Farber, E M; Boehncke, W H; Morhenn, V B; Rosenberg, E W; Schön, M P; Holick, M F

    2000-10-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis--one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, hyperproliferative skin disorders of man--have long fascinated dermatologists, pathologists and biologists alike. Here, we have a model disease that offers to study neuroectodermal-mesenchymal interactions in the widest sense possible. Epithelial, endothelial, and hematopoietic cells as well as neurons projecting into the skin apparently all interact with each other to generate the characteristic psoriatic lesion. For decades, the ongoing controversy on the molecular nature, choreography and hierarchy of these complex interactions e.g. between epidermal keratinocytes, T cells, neurotrophils, endothelial cells and sensory nerves has served as a driving force propelling investigative dermatology to ever new horizons. This debate has not only been at the heart of our quest to develop more effective forms of therapy for this socially crippling disease, but it also has profoundly influenced how we view the skin as a whole: the numerous competing theories on the pathogenesis of psoriasis published so far also are reflections on the evolution of mainstream thought in skin biology over the last decades. These days, conventional wisdom infatuated with a T-cell-centered approach to inflammatory skin diseases-- portrays psoriasis as an autoimmune disease, where misguided T lymphocyte activities cause secondary epithelial abnormalities. And yet, as this CONTROVERSIES feature reminds us, some authoritative "pockets of academic resistance" are still quite alive, and interpret psoriasis e.g. as a genetically determined, abnormal epithelial response pattern to infectious and/or physicochemical skin insults. Weighing the corresponding lines of argumentation is not only an intriguing, clinically relevant intellectual exercise, but also serves as a wonderful instrument for questioning our own views of the skin universe and its patterns of deviation from a state of homeostasis.

  17. [Partial splenectomy in sickle cell disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Díaz, A I; Svarch, E; Arencibia Núñez, A; Sabournin Ferrier, V; Machín García, S; Menendez Veitía, A; Ramón Rodriguez, L; Serrano Mirabal, J; García Peralta, T; López Martin, L G

    2015-04-01

    Total splenectomy in sickle cell disease is related to a high risk of fulminant sepsis and increased incidence of other events, which have not been reported in patients with partial splenectomy. In this study we examined the patients with sickle cell disease and partial splenectomy and compared the clinical and laboratory results with non-splenectomized patients. We studied 54 patients with sickle cell disease who underwent partial splenectomy in childhood from 1986 until 2011 at the Institute of Hematology and Immunology. They were compared with 54 non-splenectomized patients selected by random sampling with similar characteristics. Partial splenectomy was performed at a mean age of 4.1 years, with a higher frequency in homozygous hemoglobin S (70.4%), and the most common cause was recurrent splenic sequestration crisis. The most common postoperative complications were fever of unknown origin (14.8%) and acute chest syndrome (11.1%). After splenectomy there was a significant increase in leukocytes, neutrophils, and platelets, the latter two parameters remained significantly elevated when compared with non-splenectomized patients. There was no difference in the incidence of clinical events, except hepatic sequestration, which was more common in splenectomized patients. Partial splenectomy was a safe procedure in patients with sickle cell disease. There were no differences in the clinical picture in children splenectomized and non-splenectomized except the greater frequency of hepatic sequestration crisis in the first group. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Orbital infarction in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, M.H.; Sty, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Bone infarction is common in sickle cell disease; however, involvement of the orbit is not. Only four cases have been reported in the English literature. We describe a patient who presented with headache, proptosis and lid edema due to infarction of the sphenoid bone. The combination of radionuclide bone imaging and computed tomography (CT) of the orbit were useful in differentiating bone infarction from other etiologies of proptosis. (orig.)

  19. Hepatitis C virus in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohamed; Hasan, Syed; Giday, Samuel; Alamgir, Laila; Banks, Alpha; Frederick, Winston; Smoot, Duane; Castro, Oswaldo

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV) in patients with sickle cell disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1983 and 2001, 150 patients from the Howard University Hospital Center for Sickle Cell Disease were screened for HCV antibody (52% women, 48% men, mean age 34 years). Frozen serum samples from 56 adult sickle cell patients who had participated in previous surveys (1983-92) of HIV and HTLV-1 serology and who were tested in 1992 for anti-HCV antibody--when commercial ELISA test (Ortho) became available--were included in this paper. Of the 150 patients in the study, 132 had sickle cell anemia genotype (SS), 15 had sickle cell hemoglobin-C disease (SC) and three had sickle beta thalassemia. Clinical charts were reviewed for history of blood transfusion, IV drug abuse, homosexuality, tattooing, iron overload, and alcohol abuse. RESULTS: Antibodies to HCV were detected in 53 patients (35.3%). Of the 55 patients who had frozen serum samples tested in 1992, 32 (58%) were reactive for anti-HCV, while only 21 of the 95 patients (22%) tested after 1992 were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). Thirty-nine of 77 patients (51%) who received more than 10 units of packed red blood cells were positive for HCV antibody, and only 14 of 61 patients (23%) who received less than 10 units of packed red blood cells transfusion were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). None of the 12 patients who never received transfusion were positive for HCV antibody. In the 53 anti-HCV positive patients, the mean alanine amino-transferase (ALT) value was 98- and 81 U/L, respectively, for males and females. These values were normal for the HCV-antibody negative patients. The aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and the total bilirubin were also higher in the anti-HCV positive patients compared to patients in the anti-HCV negative group. Forty-four patients (57.1%) who were transfused more than 10 units developed iron overload defined by a serum ferritin

  20. [Evaluation of immune status of kidney transplant recipients by combined HLA-G5 and sCD30].

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIN, Zhan-kui; TIAN, Pu-xun; XUE, Wu-jun; DING, Xiao-ming; PAN, Xiao-ming; DING, Chen-guang; JIA, Li-ning; GE, Guan-qun; HAO, Jun-jun

    2010-09-28

    to study the relationship between the expression of serum human leucocyte antigen-G5 (HLA-G5)/soluble CD30 (sCD30) and the function of renal graft in kidney transplant recipients and investigate the immune status of recipients with combined HLA-G5 and sCD30. from January 2002 to November 2008, a total of 66 kidney transplant recipients in our centre were selected as subjects and divided into three groups: stable function of renal graft (n = 38), acute rejection (n = 15) and chronic rejection (n = 13). The expressions of serum HLA-G5 and sCD30 were detected. There were two different immune conditions with acute/chronic allograft rejection and normal renal graft in kidney transplant recipients as evaluated by combined HLA-G5 and sCD30. The sensitivity, specificity and critical value of the method were analyzed by the curve of receiver operating characteristic. the levels of HLA-G5 and sCD30 were significantly correlated with serum creatinine (r = -0.493, 0.691, both P transplantation, the sensitivity was 78.6% and the specificity 85.7% when HLA-G5 critical value 82 microg/L and sCD30 critical value 12.2 microg/L. After one year post-transplantation: the sensitivity was 92.3% and the specificity 84.6% when HLA-G5 critical value 141 microg/L and sCD30 critical value 10.3 microg/L. the immune state of recipients are evaluated by combine HLA-G5 and sCD30 which may be a simple and valid method.

  1. Oral tetrahydrouridine and decitabine for non-cytotoxic epigenetic gene regulation in sickle cell disease: A randomized phase 1 study.

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    Robert Molokie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD, a congenital hemolytic anemia that exacts terrible global morbidity and mortality, is driven by polymerization of mutated sickle hemoglobin (HbS in red blood cells (RBCs. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF interferes with this polymerization, but HbF is epigenetically silenced from infancy onward by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1.To pharmacologically re-induce HbF by DNMT1 inhibition, this first-in-human clinical trial (NCT01685515 combined 2 small molecules-decitabine to deplete DNMT1 and tetrahydrouridine (THU to inhibit cytidine deaminase (CDA, the enzyme that otherwise rapidly deaminates/inactivates decitabine, severely limiting its half-life, tissue distribution, and oral bioavailability. Oral decitabine doses, administered after oral THU 10 mg/kg, were escalated from a very low starting level (0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, or 0.16 mg/kg to identify minimal doses active in depleting DNMT1 without cytotoxicity. Patients were SCD adults at risk of early death despite standard-of-care, randomized 3:2 to THU-decitabine versus placebo in 5 cohorts of 5 patients treated 2X/week for 8 weeks, with 4 weeks of follow-up. The primary endpoint was ≥ grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity. This endpoint was not triggered, and adverse events (AEs were not significantly different in THU-decitabine-versus placebo-treated patients. At the decitabine 0.16 mg/kg dose, plasma concentrations peaked at approximately 50 nM (Cmax and remained elevated for several hours. This dose decreased DNMT1 protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by >75% and repetitive element CpG methylation by approximately 10%, and increased HbF by 4%-9% (P < 0.001, doubling fetal hemoglobin-enriched red blood cells (F-cells up to approximately 80% of total RBCs. Total hemoglobin increased by 1.2-1.9 g/dL (P = 0.01 as reticulocytes simultaneously decreased; that is, better quality and efficiency of HbF-enriched erythropoiesis elevated hemoglobin using fewer reticulocytes. Also

  2. Resultados maternos e perinatais em gestações complicadas por doenças falciformes Maternal and perinatal outcomes in pregnancies complicated by sickle cell diseases

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    Roseli Mieko Yamamoto Nomura

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os resultados maternos e perinatais de gestações complicadas por doenças falciformes, comparando-as com portadoras de traço falciforme. MÉTODOS: este estudo é uma coorte retrospectiva, abrangendo o período de Março de 2001 a Abril de 2008, tendo sido incluídas todas as gestantes portadoras de doença falciforme (n=42 acompanhadas em hospital universitário da região sudeste do Brasil. Os resultados maternos e perinatais foram comparados com os de gestantes portadoras de traço falciforme (n=56 acompanhadas no mesmo serviço. RESULTADOS:a hemoglobinopatia SS foi diagnosticada em 42 gestantes (82,4% e a SC em nove (17,6%. A idade materna foi significativamente menor no grupo com doença falciforme (média=26,0; SD=4,3 quando comparadas às com traço falciforme (média=28,7, DP=7,1; p=0,018. As seguintes complicações maternas foram significativamente mais frequentes no grupo com doença falciforme em comparação ao grupo com traço falciforme: infecção do trato urinário (25,5 versus 8,9%; p=0,04, pneumonia (23,5 versus 1,8%; p=0,002, hipertensão pulmonar (15,7 versus 0%; p=0,002, e transfusão no parto/pós-parto (33,3 versus 5,4%; p=0,001. Resultados perinatais adversos foram significativamente mais frequentes no grupo com doença falciforme quando comparados ao grupo com traço falciforme: prematuridade (49 versus 25%; p=0,01, média da idade gestacional no parto (35,2 versus 37,9 semanas; pPURPOSE: the aim of this study was to describe perinatal and maternal outcomes of pregnancies complicated by sickle cell disease (SCD, comparing to pregnancies of women with sickle cell trait (SCT. METHODS: this was a retrospective cohort study, covering the period from March 2001 to April 2008, which included all pregnant women with SCD (n=42 followed up at a university hospital in the Southeast region of Brazil. The maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared to those of pregnant women with SCT (n=56 who were followed up

  3. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  4. Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues From the Director: Stem Cell Research: Unlocking the Mystery of Disease Past Issues / ... Zerhouni, NIH Director, described the need for expanding stem cell research. Recently, he spoke about stem cell research ...

  5. Fetal microchimeric cells in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepez, Trees; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) show a female predominance, with an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of AITD. However, only the presence of fetal microchimeric cells in blood and in the thyroid gland of these patients has been proven, but not an actual active role in AITD. Is fetal microchimerism harmful for the thyroid gland by initiating a Graft versus Host reaction (GvHR) or being the target of a Host versus Graft reaction (HvGR)? Is fetal microchimerism beneficial for the thyroid gland by being a part of tissue repair or are fetal cells just innocent bystanders in the process of autoimmunity? This review explores every hypothesis concerning the role of fetal microchimerism in AITD. PMID:23723083

  6. Skeletal MR imaging in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effmann, E.L.; Kinney, T.R.; Utz, J.A.; Merten, D.F.; Herfkens, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated eight patients with sickle cell disease (mean age, 15.75 years; range 5-19 years) using MR imaging performed 24-72 hours after hospital admission for crisis. Coronal images of the lower extremities were obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T system and pulse sequences of TR/TE = 500/25 msec and 2,000/40, 80 msec. In three patients a mild decrease in signal intensity was seen on both T1- and T2-weighted images, probably secondary to marrow hyperplasia. In two patients a marked decrease in signal intensity was seen on both T1- and T2-weighted images, probably secondary to the diamagnetic effects of marrow iron. Six patients had bone infarct(s) which appeared as well-defined areas with prolonged T2 relaxation times. MR imaging appears promising for the evaluation of bone marrow in sickle cell anemia

  7. Tracking of stem cells for treatment in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Won Jun

    2005-01-01

    Various stem cells or progenitor cells are being used to treat cardiovascular disease. In ischemic heart disease, stem cell therapy is expected to regenerate damaged myocardium. To evaluate effects of stem cell treatment, the method to image stem cell location, distribution and differentiation is necessary. Optical imaging, MRI, nuclear imaging methods have been used for tracking stem cells. The methods and problems of each imaging technique are reviewed

  8. Cardiomyopathies as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD in Egypt: Recognition and Preventive Strategies Needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Fnon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the epidemiological characteristics and pathological features of different types of cardiomyopathies in Egypt, highlighting the role of the forensic pathologist in identifying cases of cardiomyopathies and initiating for their families a possible genetic study aiming at prevention of sudden death. All cases with sudden cardiac death (SCD due to cardiomyopathies during the period from the beginning of January 2010 until the end of December 2014 (5 years were included in this study. All hearts underwent detailed gross and histological examination. Circumstances of death, medical history, and post-mortem pathological findings were thoroughly  investigated. Out of 535 cases of sudden cardiac death, there were 22 cases (4.1% diagnosed as having cardiomyopathies; sudden death was their first presentation. Eighteen cases (81.8% were male, with the 4th decade (11 cases, 50% being the most affected age; severe physical activity and exertion were evident in death circumstances of 14 cases (63.6%; pathological evaluation revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was the most frequent type, being diagnosed in 10 cases (45%. Cardiomyopathies are an infrequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Most deaths are in children and adults, so cases are of high social impact that demands multidisciplinary research and resources. In all cases of SCD, forensic autopsy should be done. Forensic study is the key to identifying an affected family and the starting point regarding assessing them.

  9. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

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    Lisa M. Shook

    <