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Sample records for cell density heterogeneity

  1. Energy Efficient Pico Cell Range Expansion and Density Joint Optimization for Heterogeneous Networks with eICIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanzan; Xia, Wenqing; Zhang, Shunqing; Wu, Yating; Wang, Tao; Fang, Yong

    2018-03-02

    Heterogeneous networks, constituted by conventional macro cells and overlaying pico cells, have been deemed a promising paradigm to support the deluge of data traffic with higher spectral efficiency and Energy Efficiency (EE). In order to deploy pico cells in reality, the density of Pico Base Stations (PBSs) and the pico Cell Range Expansion (CRE) are two important factors for the network spectral efficiency as well as EE improvement. However, associated with the range and density evolution, the inter-tier interference within the heterogeneous architecture will be challenging, and the time domain Enhanced Inter-cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) technique becomes necessary. Aiming to improve the network EE, the above factors are jointly considered in this paper. More specifically, we first derive the closed-form expression of the network EE as a function of the density of PBSs and pico CRE bias based on stochastic geometry theory, followed by a linear search algorithm to optimize the pico CRE bias and PBS density, respectively. Moreover, in order to realize the pico CRE bias and PBS density joint optimization, a heuristic algorithm is proposed to achieve the network EE maximization. Numerical simulations show that our proposed pico CRE bias and PBS density joint optimization algorithm can improve the network EE significantly with low computational complexity.

  2. Energy Efficient Pico Cell Range Expansion and Density Joint Optimization for Heterogeneous Networks with eICIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzan Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous networks, constituted by conventional macro cells and overlaying pico cells, have been deemed a promising paradigm to support the deluge of data traffic with higher spectral efficiency and Energy Efficiency (EE. In order to deploy pico cells in reality, the density of Pico Base Stations (PBSs and the pico Cell Range Expansion (CRE are two important factors for the network spectral efficiency as well as EE improvement. However, associated with the range and density evolution, the inter-tier interference within the heterogeneous architecture will be challenging, and the time domain Enhanced Inter-cell Interference Coordination (eICIC technique becomes necessary. Aiming to improve the network EE, the above factors are jointly considered in this paper. More specifically, we first derive the closed-form expression of the network EE as a function of the density of PBSs and pico CRE bias based on stochastic geometry theory, followed by a linear search algorithm to optimize the pico CRE bias and PBS density, respectively. Moreover, in order to realize the pico CRE bias and PBS density joint optimization, a heuristic algorithm is proposed to achieve the network EE maximization. Numerical simulations show that our proposed pico CRE bias and PBS density joint optimization algorithm can improve the network EE significantly with low computational complexity.

  3. Heterogeneity of spine bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskey, M.A.; Crisp, A.J.; Compston, J.E.; Khaw, K.-T. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01

    This short communication investigates how accurate bone density measured in the lumbar spine (L1-L4 or L2-L4) reflects the bone density of vertebrae where many compression fractures occur (T12 and L1). The ability of two dual-energy X-ray absorptiometers (Lunar DPX and Hologic QDR-1000) to determine the bone density of T12 was also investigated. (Author).

  4. Density dependence of clutch size: habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain density- dependent patterns in reproduction. The habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) explains density-dependent reproduction at the population level from poorer quality territories in heterogeneous environments only being occupied at high densities.

  5. Heterogeneous Cell Density and Genetic Structure of Bacterial Pools Associated with Various Soil Microenvironments as Determined by Enumeration and DNA Fingerprinting Approach (RISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjard; Poly; Combrisson; Richaume; Gourbière; Thioulouse; Nazaret

    2000-05-01

    The cell density and the genetic structure of bacterial subcommunities (further named pools) present in the various microenvironments of a silt loam soil were investigated. The microenvironments were isolated first using a procedure of soil washes that separated bacteria located outside aggregates (outer part) from those located inside aggregates (inner part). A nondestructive physical fractionation was then applied to the inner part in order to separate bacteria located inside stable aggregates of different size (size fractions, i.e., two macroaggregate fractions, two microaggregate fractions, and the dispersible day fraction). Bacterial densities measured by acridine orange direct counts (AODC) and viable heterotrophic (VH) cell enumerations showed the heterogeneous quantitative distribution of cells in soil. Bacteria were preferentially located in the inner part with 87.6% and 95.4% of the whole AODC and VH bacteria, respectively, and in the microaggregate and dispersible clay fractions of this part with more than 70% and 80% of the whole AODC and VH bacteria, respectively. The rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) was used to study the genetic structure of the bacterial pools. Different fingerprints and consequently different genetic structures were observed between the unfractionated soil and the microenvironments, and also among the various microenvironments, giving evidence that some populations were specific to a given location in addition to the common populations of all the microenvironments. Cluster and multivariate analysis of RISA profiles showed the weak contribution of the pools located in the macroaggregate fractions to the whole soil community structure, as well as the clear distinction between the pool associated to the macroaggregate fractions and the pools associated to the microaggregate ones. Furthermore, these statistical analyses allowed us to ascertain the influence of the clay and organic matter content of microenvironments on the genetic

  6. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  7. Density heterogeneity of the cratonic lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    correlation between mantle density variations and the tectonic setting. Three types of cratonic mantle are recognized from mantle density anomalies. 'Pristine' cratonic regions not sampled by kimberlites have the strongest depletion with density deficit of 1.8-3.0% (and SPT density of 3.29-3.33 t/m3...... variations in the isopycnic state, correlated with mantle depletion and best achieved for the Anabar Shield region and other intracratonic domains with a strongly depleted mantle. A comparison of synthetic Mg# for the bulk lithospheric mantle calculated from density with Mg# from petrological studies...... of peridotite xenoliths from the Siberian kimberlites suggests that melt migration may produce local patches of metasomatic material in the overall depleted mantle....

  8. Density dependence of clutch size : habitat heterogeneity or individual adjustment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.   Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain density-dependent patterns in reproduction. The habitat heterogeneity hypothesis (HHH) explains density-dependent reproduction at the population level from poorer quality territories in hetero geneous environments only being occupied at high

  9. Density functional theory in surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Scheffler, M.; Toulhoat, H.

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces are used extensively as catalysts throughout the chemical industry, in the energy sector, and in environmental protection. Recently, density functional theory has started providing new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, helping to interpret the large...... amount of experimental data gathered during the last decades. This article shows how density functional theory can be used to describe the state of the surface during reactions and the rate of catalytic reactions. It will also show how we are beginning to understand the variation in catalytic activity...

  10. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level......, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells and affect their metabolism and consequently affect...

  11. Measuring single-cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-07-05

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL(-1). We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient's own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes.

  12. Optical metabolic imaging quantifies heterogeneous cell populations

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    Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of cancers can contribute to tumor aggressiveness, invasion, and resistance to therapy. Fluorescence imaging occupies a unique niche to investigate tumor heterogeneity due to its high resolution and molecular specificity. Here, heterogeneous populations are identified and quantified by combined optical metabolic imaging and subpopulation analysis (OMI-SPA). OMI probes the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic enzymes in cells to provide images of cellular metabolism, and SPA models cell populations as mixed Gaussian distributions to identify cell subpopulations. In this study, OMI-SPA is characterized by simulation experiments and validated with cell experiments. To generate heterogeneous populations, two breast cancer cell lines, SKBr3 and MDA-MB-231, were co-cultured at varying proportions. OMI-SPA correctly identifies two populations with minimal mean and proportion error using the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of NAD(P)H divided by the intensity of FAD), mean NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime, and OMI index. Simulation experiments characterized the relationships between sample size, data standard deviation, and subpopulation mean separation distance required for OMI-SPA to identify subpopulations. PMID:25780745

  13. Snail heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldumbide, Laura; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Pulido, Rafael; Cortés, Jesús M; López, José I

    2016-03-08

    Intratumor heterogeneity may be responsible of the unpredictable aggressive clinical behavior that some clear cell renal cell carcinomas display. This clinical uncertainty may be caused by insufficient sampling, leaving out of histological analysis foci of high grade tumor areas. Although molecular approaches are providing important information on renal intratumor heterogeneity, a focus on this topic from the practicing pathologist' perspective is still pending. Four distant tumor areas of 40 organ-confined clear cell renal cell carcinomas were selected for histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Tumor size, cell type (clear/granular), Fuhrman's grade, Staging, as well as immunostaining with Snail, ZEB1, Twist, Vimentin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, PTEN, p-Akt, p110α, and SETD2, were analyzed for intratumor heterogeneity using a classification and regression tree algorithm. Cell type and Fuhrman's grade were heterogeneous in 12.5 and 60 % of the tumors, respectively. If cell type was homogeneous (clear cell) then the tumors were low-grade in 88.57 % of cases. Immunostaining heterogeneity was significant in the series and oscillated between 15 % for p110α and 80 % for Snail. When Snail immunostaining was homogeneous the tumor was histologically homogeneous in 100 % of cases. If Snail was heterogeneous, the tumor was heterogeneous in 75 % of the cases. Average tumor diameter was 4.3 cm. Tumors larger than 3.7 cm were heterogeneous for Vimentin immunostaining in 72.5 % of cases. Tumors displaying negative immunostaining for both ZEB1 and Twist were low grade in 100 % of the cases. Intratumor heterogeneity is a common event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which can be monitored by immunohistochemistry in routine practice. Snail seems to be particularly useful in the identification of intratumor heterogeneity. The suitability of current sampling protocols in renal cancer is discussed.

  14. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

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    Almeida, Luis [CNRS UMR 7598, LJLL, & INRIA MAMBA team, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, luis@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Chisholm, Rebecca [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, rebecca.chisholm@gmail.com (Australia); Clairambault, Jean [INRIA MAMBA team & LJLL, UMR 7598, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, jean.clairambault@inria.fr, Corresponding author (France); Escargueil, Alexandre [INSERM “Cancer Biology and Therapeutics”, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 938, CDR St Antoine, Hôpital St Antoine, 184 Fbg. St Antoine, 75571 Paris cedex 12, France, alexandre.escargueil@upmc.fr (France); Lorenzi, Tommaso [CMLA, ENS Cachan, 61, Av. du Président Wilson, 94230 Cachan cedex & INRIA MAMBA team, & LJLL, UMR 7598, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, tommaso.lorenzi@gmail.com (France); Lorz, Alexander [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598 & INRIA Boîte courrier 187, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, alex.lorz@ann.jussieu.fr (France); Trélat, Emmanuel [Institut Universitaire de France, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LJLL, UMR 7598, Boîte courrier 187, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 4 Pl. Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France, emmanuel.trelat@upmc.fr (France)

    2016-06-08

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as “bet hedging” of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  15. Heterogeneity of limbal basal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Yasutaka; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-Ting; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-yu; Kheirkah, Ahmad; Zhu, Ying-Tien; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2010-11-01

    Although corneal epithelial stem cells (SCs) are located at the limbus between the cornea and the conjunctiva, not all limbal basal epithelial cells are SCs. Using 2 dispase digestions to remove different amounts of limbal basal epithelial cells for cross-sections, flat mounts, and cytospin preparations, double immunostaining to pancytokeratins (PCK) and vimentin (Vim) identified 3 p63+ epithelial progenitors such as PCK-/Vim+, PCK/Vim, and PCK-/Vim+ and 1 p63+ mesenchymal cell, PCK-/Vim+. PCK-/Vim- progenitors had the smallest cell size were 10-20 times more enriched on collagen I-coated dishes in the 5-minute rapid adherent fraction that contained the highest percentage of p63+ cells but the lowest percentage of cytokeratin12+ cells, and gave rise to high Ki67 labeling and vivid clonal growth. In contrast, PCK+/Vim+ and PCK+/Vim- progenitors were found more in the slow-adherent fraction and yielded poor clonal growth. PCK/Vim progenitors and clusters of PCK-/Vim+ mesenchymal cells, which were neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells, were located in the limbal basal region. Therefore, differential expression of PCK and Vim helps identify small PCK-/Vim- cells as the most likely candidate for SCs among a hierarchy of heterogeneous limbal basal progenitors, and their close association with PCK-/Vim+ presumed "niche" cells.

  16. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments...... facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view...... of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function....

  17. Limited Trabecular Bone Density Heterogeneity in the Human Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habiba Chirchir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence for variation in trabecular bone density and volume within an individual skeleton, albeit in a few anatomical sites, which is partly dependent on mechanical loading. However, little is known regarding the basic variation in trabecular bone density throughout the skeleton in healthy human adults. This is because research on bone density has been confined to a few skeletal elements, which can be readily measured using available imaging technology particularly in clinical settings. This study comprehensively investigates the distribution of trabecular bone density within the human skeleton in nine skeletal sites (femur, proximal and distal tibia, third metatarsal, humerus, ulna, radius, third metacarpal, and axis in a sample of N=20 individuals (11 males and 9 females. pQCT results showed that the proximal ulna (mean = 231.3 mg/cm3 and axis vertebra (mean = 234.3 mg/cm3 displayed significantly greater (p0.01. The homogeneity of the majority of elements suggests that these sites are potentially responsive to site-specific genetic factors. Secondly, the lack of correlation between elements (p>0.05 suggests that density measurements of one anatomical region are not necessarily accurate measures of other anatomical regions.

  18. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  19. Flavivirus structural heterogeneity: implications for cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Heinz, Franz X

    2017-06-01

    The explosive spread of Zika virus is the most recent example of the threat imposed to human health by flaviviruses. High-resolution structures are available for several of these arthropod-borne viruses, revealing alternative icosahedral organizations of immature and mature virions. Incomplete proteolytic maturation, however, results in a cloud of highly heterogeneous mosaic particles. This heterogeneity is further expanded by a dynamic behavior of the viral envelope glycoproteins. The ensemble of heterogeneous and dynamic infectious particles circulating in infected hosts offers a range of alternative possible receptor interaction sites at their surfaces, potentially contributing to the broad flavivirus host-range and variation in tissue tropism. The potential synergy between heterogeneous particles in the circulating cloud thus provides an additional dimension to understand the unanticipated properties of Zika virus in its recent outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fractal density modeling of crustal heterogeneity from the KTB deep hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoxiong; Cheng, Qiuming

    2017-03-01

    Fractal or multifractal concepts have significantly enlightened our understanding of crustal heterogeneity. Much attention has focused on 1/f scaling natures of physicochemical heterogeneity of Earth crust from fractal increment perspective. In this study, fractal density model from fractal clustering point of view is used to characterize the scaling behaviors of heterogeneous sources recorded at German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB) main hole, and of special contribution is the local and global multifractal analysis revisited by using Haar wavelet transform (HWT). Fractal density modeling of mass accumulation generalizes the unit of rock density from integer (e.g., g/cm3) to real numbers (e.g., g/cmα), so that crustal heterogeneities with respect to source accumulation are quantified by singularity strength of fractal density in α-dimensional space. From that perspective, we found that the bulk densities of metamorphic rocks exhibit fractal properties but have a weak multifractality, decreasing with the depth. The multiscaling natures of chemical logs also have been evidenced, and the observed distinct fractal laws for mineral contents are related to their different geochemical behaviors within complex lithological context. Accordingly, scaling distributions of mineral contents have been recognized as a main contributor to the multifractal natures of heterogeneous density for low-porosity crystalline rocks. This finally allows us to use de Wijs cascade process to explain the mechanism of fractal density. In practice, the proposed local singularity analysis based on HWT is suggested as an attractive high-pass filtering to amplify weak signatures of well logs as well as to delineate microlithological changes.

  1. Gene expression heterogeneities in embryonic stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Brickman, Joshua M

    2011-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are populations of cells that retain the capacity to populate specific lineages and to transit this capacity through cell division. However, attempts to define markers for stem cells have met with limited success. Here we consider whether this limited success reflects...... an intrinsic requirement for heterogeneity with stem cell populations. We focus on Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, in vitro derived cell lines from the early embryo that are considered both pluripotent (able to generate all the lineages of the future embryo) and indefinitely self renewing. We examine the relevance...... of recently reported heterogeneities in ES cells and whether these heterogeneities themselves are inherent requirements of functional potency and self renewal....

  2. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density......-q behavior of S4(q,t) provides an estimate of the range of correlated particle motion. We find that xi4(t) has a maximum as a function of time t, and that the value of the maximum of xi4(t) increases steadily from less than one particle diameter to a value exceeding nine particle diameters in the temperature...

  3. Low dose transdermal estradiol induces breast density and heterogeneity changes comparable to those of raloxifene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Raundahl, Jakob; Pettersen, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether transdermal low dose estradiol treatment induces changes in mammographic density or heterogeneity compared to raloxifene. Secondarily, if these changes relate to changes in bone formation/resorption markers, and if these findings indicate elevation of breast canc...

  4. Origin of heterogeneous spiking patterns from continuously distributed ion channel densities: a computational study in spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandar, Arjun; Prescott, Steven A

    2018-01-20

    Distinct spiking patterns may arise from qualitative differences in ion channel expression (i.e. when different neurons express distinct ion channels) and/or when quantitative differences in expression levels qualitatively alter the spike generation process. We hypothesized that spiking patterns in neurons of the superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of spinal cord reflect both mechanisms. We reproduced SDH neuron spiking patterns by varying densities of K V 1- and A-type potassium conductances. Plotting the spiking patterns that emerge from different density combinations revealed spiking-pattern regions separated by boundaries (bifurcations). This map suggests that certain spiking pattern combinations occur when the distribution of potassium channel densities straddle boundaries, whereas other spiking patterns reflect distinct patterns of ion channel expression. The former mechanism may explain why certain spiking patterns co-occur in genetically identified neuron types. We also present algorithms to predict spiking pattern proportions from ion channel density distributions, and vice versa. Neurons are often classified by spiking pattern. Yet, some neurons exhibit distinct patterns under subtly different test conditions, which suggests that they operate near an abrupt transition, or bifurcation. A set of such neurons may exhibit heterogeneous spiking patterns not because of qualitative differences in which ion channels they express, but rather because quantitative differences in expression levels cause neurons to operate on opposite sides of a bifurcation. Neurons in the spinal dorsal horn, for example, respond to somatic current injection with patterns that include tonic, single, gap, delayed and reluctant spiking. It is unclear whether these patterns reflect five cell populations (defined by distinct ion channel expression patterns), heterogeneity within a single population, or some combination thereof. We reproduced all five spiking patterns in a computational model by

  5. Heterogeneity in Immune Cell Content in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnema-Luiting, Jorien; Vroman, Heleen; Aerts, Joachim; Cornelissen, Robin

    2018-03-30

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a highly aggressive cancer with limited therapy options and dismal prognosis. In recent years, the role of immune cells within the tumor microenvironment (TME) has become a major area of interest. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of heterogeneity in immune cell content and checkpoint expression in MPM in relation to prognosis and prediction of treatment efficacy. Generally, immune-suppressive cells such as M2 macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells are present within the TME, with extensive heterogeneity in cell numbers. Infiltration of effector cells such as cytotoxic T cells, natural killer cells and T helper cells is commonly found, also with substantial patient to patient heterogeneity. PD-L1 expression also varied greatly (16-65%). The infiltration of immune cells in tumor and associated stroma holds key prognostic and predictive implications. As such, there is a strong rationale for thoroughly mapping the TME to better target therapy in mesothelioma. Researchers should be aware of the extensive possibilities that exist for a tumor to evade the cytotoxic killing from the immune system. Therefore, no "one size fits all" treatment is likely to be found and focus should lie on the heterogeneity of the tumors and TME.

  6. Human FOXP3+ T regulatory cell heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Audrey; Malhotra, Rajneesh; Mayer, Gaell; Gorochov, Guy; Miyara, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Abstract FOXP3‐expressing CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells are instrumental for the maintenance of self‐tolerance. They are also involved in the prevention of allergy, allograft rejection, foetal rejection during pregnancy and of exaggerated immune response towards commensal pathogens in mucosal tissues. They can also prevent immune responses against tumors and promote tumor progression. FOXP3‐expressing Treg cells are not a homogenous population. The different subsets of Treg cells can have di...

  7. Density heterogeneity and fluid-blood levels in patients aged over 55 with lobar hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, D; Waconge, A; Bouly, S; Castelli, C; Thouvenot, E

    2016-01-01

    Density heterogeneity and fluid-blood levels (FBLs) are frequently seen on acute CT scans of deep brain hemorrhage. Our aim was to analyze the density heterogeneity and FBLs seen on acute/subacute CT in patients aged>55 with lobar haemorrhage (LH), and to study the relationship of these brain abnormalities with other parameters, including cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA)-related abnormalities. This was an observational study and retrospective analysis of early CT scans (55 years with acute lobar hemorrhage who, between 2012 and 2015, were entered into our stroke database. A total of 37 LH episodes (without trauma, abnormal coagulation/platelet counts, vascular malformation, tumor or vasculitis) in 35 patients were analyzed. Other studied parameters were gender, age, history of hypertension, blood pressure on admission, prior antiplatelet treatment, aPTT, PTT, platelet count, hematocrit, timing of first CT, LH volume, involved lobe, cortical superficial siderosis, microbleeds, chronic LH and CAA (classic and modified Boston) criteria. CAA-related abnormalities seen on MRI were also scored. Overall, in 26 LH episodes (70%), CT was performed within 24h. Density heterogeneity and FBLs were seen in 19 (51%) and 9 (24%) LH episodes, respectively. Also, according to classic and modified Boston criteria, 18 (51%) and 24 (69%) patients, respectively, fulfilled criteria for probable/definite CAA. As for the presence of FBLs, a statistically significant association was found with both the presence of probable/definite CAA according to modified Boston criteria (P=0.033) and the presence of superficial siderosis (P=0.019). Density heterogeneity and, to a lesser degree, FBLs are frequently seen in patients aged>55 with LH. FBLs may also be associated with CAA-related hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-12-15

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. PMID:27965438

  10. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on the optical estimate of breast density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Ganino, Serena; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Breast density is a recognized strong and independent risk factor for developing breast cancer. At present, breast density is assessed based on the radiological appearance of breast tissue, thus relying on the use of ionizing radiation. We have previously obtained encouraging preliminary results with our portable instrument for time domain optical mammography performed at 7 wavelengths (635–1060 nm). In that case, information was averaged over four images (cranio-caudal and oblique views of both breasts) available for each subject. In the present work, we tested the effectiveness of just one or few point measurements, to investigate if tissue heterogeneity significantly affects the correlation between optically derived parameters and mammographic density. Data show that parameters estimated through a single optical measurement correlate strongly with mammographic density estimated by using BIRADS categories. A central position is optimal for the measurement, but its exact location is not critical. PMID:23082283

  11. Solute dispersion for stable density-driven flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oca, Aronne; Riva, Monica; Carrera, Jesus; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the processes underpinning the reduced longitudinal spreading documented in stable variable density flows, as opposed to constant density settings, within heterogeneous porous media. We do so by decomposing velocity and pressure in terms of stationary and dynamic components. The former corresponds to the solution of the constant density flow problem, while the latter accounts for the effects induced by density variability. We focus on a stable flow configuration and analyze the longitudinal spread of saltwater injected from the bottom of a column formed by a heterogeneous porous medium initially fully saturated by freshwater. We adopt a perturbation expansion approach and derive the equations satisfied by section-averaged concentrations and their ensemble mean values. These formulations are respectively characterized by a single realization and an ensemble dispersive flux, which we determine through appropriate closure equations. The latter are solved via semi-analytical and numerical approaches. Our formulations and associated results enable us to discriminate the relative impact on the density-driven solute displacement of (a) covariance of the permeability of the porous medium, (b) cross-covariance between permeability and concentration, which is in turn linked to the coupling of flow and transport problems, and (c) cross-covariance between the dynamic and stationary velocities.

  12. Cell Load Balancing in Heterogeneous Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eduardo, Simao; Rodrigues, Antonio; Mihovska, Albena D.

    2013-01-01

    . It jointly performs congestion control and inter-cell interference avoidance by means of a utility describing the cell's channel. Centralized and uncoordinated schemes are studied. The first is defined as an integer linear program, while the second builds on the best channel utility developed for the first...

  13. Mapping of spatiotemporal heterogeneous particle dynamics in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duits, Michael H.G.; Li, Y.; Vanapalli Veera, V.S.A.R.; Vanapalli, Srinivas; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particles embedded in the cytoplasm of living mammalian cells have been found to display remarkable heterogeneity in their amplitude of motion. However, consensus on the significance and origin of this phenomenon is still lacking. We conducted experiments on Hmec-1 cells loaded with about

  14. Well-Controlled Cell-Trapping Systems for Investigating Heterogeneous Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Koki; Abe, Yuta; Inoue, Kosuke; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2018-03-01

    Microfluidic systems have been developed for patterning single cells to study cell-cell interactions. However, patterning multiple types of cells to understand heterogeneous cell-cell interactions remains difficult. Here, it is aimed to develop a cell-trapping device to assemble multiple types of cells in the well-controlled order and morphology. This device mainly comprises a parylene sheet for assembling cells and a microcomb for controlling the cell-trapping area. The cell-trapping area is controlled by moving the parylene sheet on an SU-8 microcomb using tweezers. Gentle downward flow is used as a driving force for the cell-trapping. The assembly of cells on a parylene sheet with round and line-shaped apertures is demonstrated. The cell-cell contacts of the trapped cells are then investigated by direct cell-cell transfer of calcein via connexin nanopores. Finally, using the device with a system for controlling the cell-trapping area, three different types of cells in the well-controlled order are assembled. The correct cell order rate obtained using the device is 27.9%, which is higher than that obtained without the sliding parylene system (0.74%). Furthermore, the occurrence of cell-cell contact between the three cell types assembled is verified. This cell-patterning device will be a useful tool for investigating heterogeneous cell-cell interactions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Human FOXP3+ T regulatory cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Audrey; Malhotra, Rajneesh; Mayer, Gaell; Gorochov, Guy; Miyara, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    FOXP3-expressing CD4 + T regulatory (Treg) cells are instrumental for the maintenance of self-tolerance. They are also involved in the prevention of allergy, allograft rejection, foetal rejection during pregnancy and of exaggerated immune response towards commensal pathogens in mucosal tissues. They can also prevent immune responses against tumors and promote tumor progression. FOXP3-expressing Treg cells are not a homogenous population. The different subsets of Treg cells can have different functions or roles in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and can therefore be differentially targeted in the management of autoimmune diseases or in cancer. We discuss here how Treg cell subsets can be differentiated phenotypically, functionally and developmentally in humans.

  16. Cell heterogeneity problems in the analysis of zero power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.; Stevenson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Methods are described for treating plate and pin cell heterogeneity in the preparation of broad group cross-sections used in the analysis of zero power fast reactor experiments. Methods used at Karlsruhe and Winfrith are summarised and compared, with particular reference to the treatment of resonance shielding, the calculation of broad group spatial fine structure, the treatment of leakage and the calculation of anisotropic diffusion coefficients. The problems of cells near boundaries such as core-breeder interfaces and of singularities such as control rods are also considered briefly. Numerical studies carried out to investigate approximations in the methods are described. These include tests of the accuracy of one-dimensional cell modelling techniques, and the validation by Monte Carlo of methods for treating streaming in the calculation of diffusion coefficients. Comparisons are shown between the heterogeneity effects calculated by the Karlsruhe and Winfrith methods for typical pin and plate cells used in the BIZET experimental programme, and their effect in a whole reactor calculation is indicated. Comparisons are given with measurements which provide tests of the heterogeneity calculations. These include reaction rate scans within pin and plate cells, and reaction rate measurements across sectors of pin and plate fuel, where the flux tilt is determined by the relative reactivity of the pin and plate cells. Finally, the heterogeneity problems arising in the interpretation of reaction rate measurements are discussed. (author)

  17. Unmasking Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Senescent Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Segura, Alejandra; de Jong, Tristan V; Melov, Simon; Guryev, Victor; Campisi, Judith; Demaria, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversibly arrested proliferation, often induced by genotoxic stress [1]. Senescent cells participate in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumor suppression [2], embryonic development [3, 4], tissue repair [5-8], and organismal

  18. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1 single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase, and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems. Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  19. Heterogeneous response of isolated adult rat heart cells to insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, R.A.; Hunter, D.R.; Berkoff, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    3-O-Methylglucose uptake by Ca2+-resistant adult rat heart cells in suspension was measured, free of artifactual inhibitor-insensitive uptake, and with an accuracy of +/- 1.9% pellet water. (Ca2+-resistant cells are cells which retain their original rod-shaped morphology in the presence of physiological levels of Ca2+.) High levels of insulin (10(-6) M) stimulated the rate of 3-O-methylglucose uptake approximately 10-fold. In the presence of low levels of insulin (3 X 10(-11) M, 10(-10) M) uptake was biphasic; it could not be described by a single exponential function within experimental error, but required the sum of two exponentials. Deviation from a single exponential function was not so great with high levels of insulin (10(-6) M) or no insulin. Cell sugar uptake was also investigated using autoradiography of cells which had accumulated [2-14C]deoxyglucose under similar conditions. This showed considerable heterogeneity of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by cells treated with low levels of insulin, but significantly less heterogeneity of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by cells treated with high levels of insulin. It is concluded that the deviation of 3-O-methylglucose uptake from a single exponential observed at low insulin levels can be accounted for in terms of a heterogeneous response of cells to insulin

  20. High-density biosynthetic fuels: the intersection of heterogeneous catalysis and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Meylemans, Heather A; Gough, Raina V; Quintana, Roxanne L; Garrison, Michael D; Bruno, Thomas J

    2014-05-28

    Biosynthetic valencene, premnaspirodiene, and natural caryophyllene were hydrogenated and evaluated as high performance fuels. The parent sesquiterpenes were then isomerized to complex mixtures of hydrocarbons with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Nafion SAC-13. High density fuels with net heats of combustion ranging from 133-141 000 Btu gal(-1), or up to 13% higher than commercial jet fuel could be generated by this approach. The products of caryophyllene isomerization were primarily tricyclic hydrocarbons which after hydrogenation increased the fuel density by 6%. The isomerization of valencene and premnaspirodiene also generated a variety of sesquiterpenes, but in both cases the dominant product was δ-selinene. Ab initio calculations were conducted to determine the total electronic energies for the reactants and products. In all cases the results were in excellent agreement with the experimental distribution of isomers. The cetane numbers for the sesquiterpane fuels ranged from 20-32 and were highly dependent on the isomer distribution. Specific distillation cuts may have the potential to act as high density diesel fuels, while use of these hydrocarbons as additives to jet fuel will increase the range and/or time of flight of aircraft. In addition to the ability to generate high performance renewable fuels, the powerful combination of metabolic engineering and heterogeneous catalysis will allow for the preparation of a variety of sesquiterpenes with potential for pharmaceutical, flavor, and fragrance applications.

  1. Parallel single-cell sequencing links transcriptional and epigenetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermueller, Christof; Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Macaulay, Iain C; Teng, Mabel J; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sebastien; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry; Kelsey, Gavin; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf

    2016-03-01

    We report scM&T-seq, a method for parallel single-cell genome-wide methylome and transcriptome sequencing that allows for the discovery of associations between transcriptional and epigenetic variation. Profiling of 61 mouse embryonic stem cells confirmed known links between DNA methylation and transcription. Notably, the method revealed previously unrecognized associations between heterogeneously methylated distal regulatory elements and transcription of key pluripotency genes.

  2. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in densities of the Taiwanese humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis taiwanensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dares, Lauren E.; Araújo-Wang, Claryana; Yang, Shih Chu; Wang, John Y.

    2017-03-01

    The inshore, estuarine distribution of Taiwanese humpback dolphins (THD) along the west coast of Taiwan puts them in direct conflict with many anthropogenic activities. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (depth, sea surface temperature (SST), salinity and distance to the nearest freshwater source) and coastal developments on THD density. Clear heterogeneity in density was found across the range of the THD, and there was significant spatial and temporal variation in mean densities. Density was not directly related to any environmental factors examined, which may be due to temporal variability and hydrological and oceanographic conditions that create, in effect, a continuous river delta along the central west coast of Taiwan rather than isolated, separate river estuaries. A high abundance of dolphins per unit of survey effort (DPUE) and mother-calf pairs per unit of survey effort (MCPUE) were found in waters adjacent to major coastal developments in which shallow waters had been filled to create new land (reclamation areas), but neither distance to reclamation area nor distance to the nearest river were found to be significant predictors of density. Most reclamation projects in THD habitat are situated near the mouths of major rivers or result in the creation of artificial confluences of smaller rivers, streams and other freshwater outlets, such as waste outflows. Thus, dolphins appear to use these areas in the absence of high quality natural habitat that has been lost to large-scale coastal reclamation throughout their range.

  3. Restoring physiological cell heterogeneity in the mesenchyme during tooth engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Laetitia-Véronique; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Lesot, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Tooth development is controlled by reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Complete teeth can form when culturing and implanting re-associations between single embryonic dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Although epithelial histogenesis is clear, very little is known about cell diversity and patterning in the mesenchyme. The aim of this work was to compare the situation in engineered and developing teeth at similar developmental stages. To this end, the expression of cell surface markers in the mesenchyme was investigated by immunostaining in: 1) embryonic mouse molars at embryonic day 14, as the initial cell source for re-associations, 2) cultured cell re-associations just before their implantation and 3) cultured cell re-associations implanted for two weeks. Surface markers allowed visualization of the complex patterning of different cell types and the differential timing in their appearance. The phenotype of mesenchymal cells rapidly changed when they were grown as a monolayer, even without passage. This might explain the rapid loss of their potential to sustain tooth formation after re-association. Except for markers associated with vascularization, which is not maintained in vitro, the staining pattern in the mesenchyme of cultured re-associations was similar to that observed in situ. After implantation, vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Besides tissue oxygenation and its role in mineralization of dental matrices, vascularization is involved in the progressive increase in mesenchymal cell heterogeneity, by allowing external cells to enter the mesenchyme.

  4. Probing heterogeneous dynamics from spatial density correlation in glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-12-01

    We numerically investigate the connection between spatial density correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. We demonstrate that the cluster size defined by the spatial aggregation of densely packed particles (DPPs) can better capture the difference between the dynamics of the Lennard-Jones glass model and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen truncation model than the commonly used pair correlation functions. More interestingly, we compare the mobility of DPPs and loosely packed particles, and we find that high local density correlates well with slow dynamics in systems with relatively hard repulsive interactions but links to mobile ones in the system with soft repulsive interactions at one relaxation time scale. Our results show clear evidence that the above model dependence behavior stems from the hopping motion of DPPs at the end of the caging stage due to the compressive nature of soft repulsive spheres, which activates the dynamics of DPPs in the α relaxation stage.

  5. Muscle Satellite Cell Heterogeneity and Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio eMotohashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD.

  6. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  7. Single-Cell Behavior and Population Heterogeneity: Solving an Inverse Problem to Compute the Intrinsic Physiological State Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Spetsieris, Konstantinos; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of isogenic cell populations can be described by cell population balance models that account for phenotypic heterogeneity. To utilize the predictive power of these models, however, we must know the rates of single-cell reaction and division and the bivariate partition probability density function. These three intrinsic physiological state (IPS) functions can be obtained by solving an inverse problem that requires knowledge of the phenotypic distributions for the overall cell popu...

  8. Heterogeneity and Developmental Connections between Cell Types Inhabiting Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Krivanek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Every tissue is composed of multiple cell types that are developmentally, evolutionary and functionally integrated into the unit we call an organ. Teeth, our organs for biting and mastication, are complex and made of many different cell types connected or disconnected in terms of their ontogeny. In general, epithelial and mesenchymal compartments represent the major framework of tooth formation. Thus, they give rise to the two most important matrix–producing populations: ameloblasts generating enamel and odontoblasts producing dentin. However, the real picture is far from this quite simplified view. Diverse pulp cells, the immune system, the vascular system, the innervation and cells organizing the dental follicle all interact, and jointly participate in transforming lifeless matrix into a functional organ that can sense and protect itself. Here we outline the heterogeneity of cell types that inhabit the tooth, and also provide a life history of the major populations. The mouse model system has been indispensable not only for the studies of cell lineages and heterogeneity, but also for the investigation of dental stem cells and tooth patterning during development. Finally, we briefly discuss the evolutionary aspects of cell type diversity and dental tissue integration.

  9. Interpreting heterogeneity in intestinal tuft cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; von Moltke, Jakob; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2018-05-01

    Intestinal tuft cells are a morphologically unique cell type, best characterized by striking microvilli that form an apical tuft. These cells represent approximately 0.5% of gut epithelial cells depending on location. While they are known to express chemosensory receptors, their function has remained unclear. Recently, numerous groups have revealed startling insights into intestinal tuft cell biology. Here, we review the latest developments in understanding this peculiar cell type's structure and function. Recent advances in volumetric microscopy have begun to elucidate tuft cell ultrastructure with respect to its cellular neighbors. Moreover, single-cell approaches have revealed greater diversity in the tuft cell population than previously appreciated and uncovered novel markers to characterize this heterogeneity. Finally, advanced model systems have revealed tuft cells' roles in mucosal healing and orchestrating type 2 immunity against eukaryotic infection. While much remains unknown about intestinal tuft cells, these critical advances have illuminated the physiological importance of these previously understudied cells and provided experimentally tractable tools to interrogate this rare cell population. Tuft cells act as luminal sensors, linking the luminal microbiome to the host immune system, which may make them a potent clinical target for modulating host response to a variety of acute or chronic immune-driven conditions.

  10. Dynamic heterogeneity and DNA methylation in embryonic stem cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Singer, Zakary S

    2014-07-01

    Cell populations can be strikingly heterogeneous, composed of multiple cellular states, each exhibiting stochastic noise in its gene expression. A major challenge is to disentangle these two types of variability and to understand the dynamic processes and mechanisms that control them. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an ideal model system to address this issue because they exhibit heterogeneous and dynamic expression of functionally important regulatory factors. We analyzed gene expression in individual ESCs using single-molecule RNA-FISH and quantitative time-lapse movies. These data discriminated stochastic switching between two coherent (correlated) gene expression states and burst-like transcriptional noise. We further showed that the "2i" signaling pathway inhibitors modulate both types of variation. Finally, we found that DNA methylation plays a key role in maintaining these metastable states. Together, these results show how ESC gene expression states and dynamics arise from a combination of intrinsic noise, coherent cellular states, and epigenetic regulation.

  11. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  12. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  13. Characterization of size, anisotropy, and density heterogeneity of nanoparticles by sedimentation velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Demeler, Borries

    2014-08-05

    A critical problem in materials science is the accurate characterization of the size dependent properties of colloidal inorganic nanocrystals. Due to the intrinsic polydispersity present during synthesis, dispersions of such materials exhibit simultaneous heterogeneity in density ρ, molar mass M, and particle diameter d. The density increments ∂ρ/∂d and ∂ρ/∂M of these nanoparticles, if known, can then provide important information about crystal growth and particle size distributions. For most classes of nanocrystals, a mixture of surfactants is added during synthesis to control their shape, size, and optical properties. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine the amount of passivating ligand bound to the particle surface post synthesis. The presence of the ligand shell hampers an accurate determination of the nanocrystal diameter. Using CdSe and PbS semiconductor nanocrystals, and the ultrastable silver nanoparticle (M4Ag 44(p-MBA)30), as model systems, we describe a Custom Grid method implemented in UltraScan-III for the characterization of nanoparticles and macromolecules using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that multiple parametrizations are possible, and that the Custom Grid method can be generalized to provide high resolution composition information for mixtures of solutes that are heterogeneous in two out of three parameters. For such cases, our method can simultaneously resolve arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of hydrodynamic parameters when a third property can be held constant. For example, this method extracts partial specific volume and molar mass from sedimentation velocity data for cases where the anisotropy can be held constant, or provides anisotropy and partial specific volume if the molar mass is known. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  14. Modelling and predicting the spatial distribution of tree root density in heterogeneous forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhun; Saint-André, Laurent; Bourrier, Franck; Stokes, Alexia; Cordonnier, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In mountain ecosystems, predicting root density in three dimensions (3-D) is highly challenging due to the spatial heterogeneity of forest communities. This study presents a simple and semi-mechanistic model, named ChaMRoots, that predicts root interception density (RID, number of roots m(-2)). ChaMRoots hypothesizes that RID at a given point is affected by the presence of roots from surrounding trees forming a polygon shape. The model comprises three sub-models for predicting: (1) the spatial heterogeneity - RID of the finest roots in the top soil layer as a function of tree basal area at breast height, and the distance between the tree and a given point; (2) the diameter spectrum - the distribution of RID as a function of root diameter up to 50 mm thick; and (3) the vertical profile - the distribution of RID as a function of soil depth. The RID data used for fitting in the model were measured in two uneven-aged mountain forest ecosystems in the French Alps. These sites differ in tree density and species composition. In general, the validation of each sub-model indicated that all sub-models of ChaMRoots had good fits. The model achieved a highly satisfactory compromise between the number of aerial input parameters and the fit to the observed data. The semi-mechanistic ChaMRoots model focuses on the spatial distribution of root density at the tree cluster scale, in contrast to the majority of published root models, which function at the level of the individual. Based on easy-to-measure characteristics, simple forest inventory protocols and three sub-models, it achieves a good compromise between the complexity of the case study area and that of the global model structure. ChaMRoots can be easily coupled with spatially explicit individual-based forest dynamics models and thus provides a highly transferable approach for modelling 3-D root spatial distribution in complex forest ecosystems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  15. Heterogeneous occupancy and density estimates of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in waters of North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Chestnut

    Full Text Available Biodiversity losses are occurring worldwide due to a combination of stressors. For example, by one estimate, 40% of amphibian species are vulnerable to extinction, and disease is one threat to amphibian populations. The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, is a contributor to amphibian declines worldwide. Bd research has focused on the dynamics of the pathogen in its amphibian hosts, with little emphasis on investigating the dynamics of free-living Bd. Therefore, we investigated patterns of Bd occupancy and density in amphibian habitats using occupancy models, powerful tools for estimating site occupancy and detection probability. Occupancy models have been used to investigate diseases where the focus was on pathogen occurrence in the host. We applied occupancy models to investigate free-living Bd in North American surface waters to determine Bd seasonality, relationships between Bd site occupancy and habitat attributes, and probability of detection from water samples as a function of the number of samples, sample volume, and water quality. We also report on the temporal patterns of Bd density from a 4-year case study of a Bd-positive wetland. We provide evidence that Bd occurs in the environment year-round. Bd exhibited temporal and spatial heterogeneity in density, but did not exhibit seasonality in occupancy. Bd was detected in all months, typically at less than 100 zoospores L(-1. The highest density observed was ∼3 million zoospores L(-1. We detected Bd in 47% of sites sampled, but estimated that Bd occupied 61% of sites, highlighting the importance of accounting for imperfect detection. When Bd was present, there was a 95% chance of detecting it with four samples of 600 ml of water or five samples of 60 mL. Our findings provide important baseline information to advance the study of Bd disease ecology, and advance our understanding of amphibian exposure to free

  16. Intraclonal protein expression heterogeneity in recombinant CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Pilbrough

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic glycoproteins have played a major role in the commercial success of biotechnology in the post-genomic era. But isolating recombinant mammalian cell lines for large-scale production remains costly and time-consuming, due to substantial variation and unpredictable stability of expression amongst transfected cells, requiring extensive clone screening to identify suitable high producers. Streamlining this process is of considerable interest to industry yet the underlying phenomena are still not well understood. Here we examine an antibody-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO clone at single-cell resolution using flow cytometry and vectors, which couple light and heavy chain transcription to fluorescent markers. Expression variation has traditionally been attributed to genetic heterogeneity arising from random genomic integration of vector DNA. It follows that single cell cloning should yield a homogeneous cell population. We show, in fact, that expression in a clone can be surprisingly heterogeneous (standard deviation 50 to 70% of the mean, approaching the level of variation in mixed transfectant pools, and each antibody chain varies in tandem. Phenotypic variation is fully developed within just 18 days of cloning, yet is not entirely explained by measurement noise, cell size, or the cell cycle. By monitoring the dynamic response of subpopulations and subclones, we show that cells also undergo slow stochastic fluctuations in expression (half-life 2 to 11 generations. Non-genetic diversity may therefore play a greater role in clonal variation than previously thought. This also has unexpected implications for expression stability. Stochastic gene expression noise and selection bias lead to perturbations from steady state at the time of cloning. The resulting transient response as clones reestablish their expression distribution is not ordinarily accounted for but can contribute to declines in median expression over timescales of up to 50

  17. Functional heterogeneity of side population cells in skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Ojima, Koichi; Fukada, So-ichiro; Ikemoto, Madoka; Masuda, Satoru; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2006-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration has been exclusively attributed to myogenic precursors, satellite cells. A stem cell-rich fraction referred to as side population (SP) cells also resides in skeletal muscle, but its roles in muscle regeneration remain unclear. We found that muscle SP cells could be subdivided into three sub-fractions using CD31 and CD45 markers. The majority of SP cells in normal non-regenerating muscle expressed CD31 and had endothelial characteristics. However, CD31 - CD45 - SP cells, which are a minor subpopulation in normal muscle, actively proliferated upon muscle injury and expressed not only several regulatory genes for muscle regeneration but also some mesenchymal lineage markers. CD31 - CD45 - SP cells showed the greatest myogenic potential among three SP sub-fractions, but indeed revealed mesenchymal potentials in vitro. These SP cells preferentially differentiated into myofibers after intramuscular transplantation in vivo. Our results revealed the heterogeneity of muscle SP cells and suggest that CD31 - CD45 - SP cells participate in muscle regeneration

  18. Impact of cell culture on recombinant monoclonal antibody product heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Nowak, Christine; Shao, Mei; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Neill, Alyssa

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant monoclonal antibodies are commonly expressed in mammalian cell culture and purified by several steps of filtration and chromatography. The resulting high purity bulk drug substance still contains product variants differing in properties such as charge and size. Posttranslational modifications and degradations occurring during cell culture are the major sources of heterogeneity in bulk drug substance of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The focus of the current review is the impact of cell culture conditions on the types and levels of various modifications and degradations of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Understanding the relationship between cell culture and product variants can help to make consistently safe and efficacious products. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1103-1112, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. The ability to generate senescent progeny as a mechanism underlying breast cancer cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Mumcuoglu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a remarkably heterogeneous disease. Luminal, basal-like, "normal-like", and ERBB2+ subgroups were identified and were shown to have different prognoses. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity are poorly understood. In our study, we explored the role of cellular differentiation and senescence as a potential cause of heterogeneity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A panel of breast cancer cell lines, isogenic clones, and breast tumors were used. Based on their ability to generate senescent progeny under low-density clonogenic conditions, we classified breast cancer cell lines as senescent cell progenitor (SCP and immortal cell progenitor (ICP subtypes. All SCP cell lines expressed estrogen receptor (ER. Loss of ER expression combined with the accumulation of p21(Cip1 correlated with senescence in these cell lines. p21(Cip1 knockdown, estrogen-mediated ER activation or ectopic ER overexpression protected cells against senescence. In contrast, tamoxifen triggered a robust senescence response. As ER expression has been linked to luminal differentiation, we compared the differentiation status of SCP and ICP cell lines using stem/progenitor, luminal, and myoepithelial markers. The SCP cells produced CD24+ or ER+ luminal-like and ASMA+ myoepithelial-like progeny, in addition to CD44+ stem/progenitor-like cells. In contrast, ICP cell lines acted as differentiation-defective stem/progenitor cells. Some ICP cell lines generated only CD44+/CD24-/ER-/ASMA- progenitor/stem-like cells, and others also produced CD24+/ER- luminal-like, but not ASMA+ myoepithelial-like cells. Furthermore, gene expression profiles clustered SCP cell lines with luminal A and "normal-like" tumors, and ICP cell lines with luminal B and basal-like tumors. The ICP cells displayed higher tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Luminal A and "normal-like" breast cancer cell lines were able to generate luminal-like and

  20. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on earth rotation in tidal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chao, Benjamin F; Sun, Wenke; Kuang, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D) density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD) in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8) and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal) are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle only contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. Nevertheless, including the 3D variation of the density in the mantle into account explained a substantial portion of the discrepancy between the observed signals in PM and LOD extracted from the lump-sum values based on continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94) and the computed contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon). In other word, the difference of the two, at all tidal frequencies (long-periods, diurnals, and semi-diurnals) contains contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the Reference Earth Model (REM), which is the next major objective in global geophysics research beyond PREM.

  1. Heterogeneity of functional properties of Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells expressing various stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R; O'Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J Graham

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. The proportion of cells expressing CD44(high)CD24(low/neg), side population (SP) cells, ALDH1(+), CD49f(high), CD133(high), and CD34(high) differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1(+), CD34(low), and CD49f(high) suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1(-) and non-SP cells than ALDH1(+) and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than "non-stem" cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1(+) cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells.

  2. Stem Cell Heterogeneity of Mononucleated Cells from Murine Peripheral Blood: Molecular Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dain Yazid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper was to determine the heterogeneity of primary isolated mononucleated cells that originated from the peripheral blood system by observing molecular markers. The isolated cells were cultured in complete medium for 4 to 7 days prior to the separation of different cell types, that is, adherent and suspension. Following a total culture time of 14 days, adherent cells activated the Cd105 gene while suspension cells activated the Sca-1 gene. Both progenitor markers, Cbfa-1 and Ostf-1, were inactivated in both suspension and adherent cells after 14-day culture compared to cells cultured 3 days in designated differentiation medium. In conclusion, molecular analyses showed that primary mononucleated cells are heterogeneous, consisting of hematopoietic stem cells (suspension and mesenchymal stem cells (adherent while both cells contained no progenitor cells.

  3. Simulation of density-driven flow in heterogeneous and fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, A.; Stichel, S.; Wittum, G.

    2015-01-01

    The study of fractured porous media is an important and challenging problem in hydrogeology. One of the difficulties is that mathematical models have to account for heterogeneity introduced by fractures in hydrogeological media. Heterogeneity may strongly influence the physical processes taking place in these media. Moreover, the thickness of the fractures, which is usually negligible in comparison with the size of the whole domain, and the complicated geometry of fracture networks reduce essentially the efficiency of numerical methods. In order to overcome these difficulties, fractures are sometimes considered as objects of reduced dimensionality (surfaces in three dimensions), and the field equations are averaged along the fracture width. Fractures are assumed to be thin regions of space filled with a porous material whose properties differ from those of the porous medium enclosing them. The interfaces separating the fractures from the embedding medium are assumed to be ideal. We consider two approaches: (i) the fractures have the same dimension, d, as the embedding medium and are said to be d-dimensional; (ii) the fractures are considered as (d-1)-dimensional manifolds, and the equations of density-driven flow are found by averaging the d-dimensional laws over the fracture width. We show that the second approach is a valid alternative to the first one. For this purpose, we perform numerical experiments using a finite-volume discretization for both approaches. The results obtained by the two methods are in good agreement with each other. We derive a criterion for the validity of the simplified representation. The criterion characterizes the transition of a mainly parallel flow to a rotational flow, which cannot be reasonably approximated using a d-1 dimensional representation. We further present a numerical algorithm using adaptive dimensional representation.

  4. Tumor cell heterogeneity: impact on mechanisms of therapeutic drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Mary E.; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of these studies was to determine whether chemotherapy-resistant tumor cell sublines derived from a single starting cell population with identical treatment protocols, have the same mechanism of resistance. Methods and Materials: Twelve cyclophosphamide-resistant sublines were derived from KHT-iv murine sarcoma cells by repeated exposures to 2, 4, or 8 μg/ml doses of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-OOHCP). To investigate possible mechanisms of resistance, glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity were determined. In addition, studies with the GSH depletor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and the ALDH inhibitor diethylamino-benzaldehyde (DEAB) were undertaken. Results: Resistant factors to 4-OOHCP, assessed at 10% clonogenic cell survival, ranged from 1.5-7.0 for the various cell lines. Crossresistance to melphalan and adriamycin also were commonly observed. Increased GSH levels, GST activity and ALDH activity were detected in the sublines but not all exhibited the same pattern of biochemical alterations. The response to GSH and ALDH inhibitors also varied among the sublines; the resistance being reversible in some cell lines but not others. Conclusion: The present results indicate that when resistant sublines are derived simultaneously from the same starting cell population, the observed mechanisms of resistance may not be the same in each of the variants. These findings support the hypothesis that preexisting cellular heterogeneity may affect mechanisms of acquired resistance

  5. Dose prediction accuracy of anisotropic analytical algorithm and pencil beam convolution algorithm beyond high density heterogeneity interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh B Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It is well known that photon beam radiation therapy requires dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this study was to measure and assess the ability of pencil beam convolution (PBC and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA to predict doses beyond high density heterogeneity. Materials and Methods: An inhomogeneous phantom of five layers was created in Eclipse planning system (version 8.6.15. Each layer of phantom was assigned in terms of water (first or top, air (second, water (third, bone (fourth, and water (fifth or bottom medium. Depth doses in water (bottom medium were calculated for 100 monitor units (MUs with 6 Megavoltage (MV photon beam for different field sizes using AAA and PBC with heterogeneity correction. Combinations of solid water, Poly Vinyl Chloride (PVC, and Styrofoam were then manufactured to mimic phantoms and doses for 100 MUs were acquired with cylindrical ionization chamber at selected depths beyond high density heterogeneity interface. The measured and calculated depth doses were then compared. Results: AAA′s values had better agreement with measurements at all measured depths. Dose overestimation by AAA (up to 5.3% and by PBC (up to 6.7% was found to be higher in proximity to the high-density heterogeneity interface, and the dose discrepancies were more pronounced for larger field sizes. The errors in dose estimation by AAA and PBC may be due to improper beam modeling of primary beam attenuation or lateral scatter contributions or combination of both in heterogeneous media that include low and high density materials. Conclusions: AAA is more accurate than PBC for dose calculations in treating deep-seated tumor beyond high-density heterogeneity interface.

  6. Heterogeneous occupancy and density estimates of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in waters of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnut, Tara E.; Anderson, Chauncey; Popa, Radu; Blaustein, Andrew R.; Voytek, Mary; Olson, Deanna H.; Kirshtein, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversity losses are occurring worldwide due to a combination of stressors. For example, by one estimate, 40% of amphibian species are vulnerable to extinction, and disease is one threat to amphibian populations. The emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is a contributor to amphibian declines worldwide. Bd research has focused on the dynamics of the pathogen in its amphibian hosts, with little emphasis on investigating the dynamics of free-living Bd. Therefore, we investigated patterns of Bd occupancy and density in amphibian habitats using occupancy models, powerful tools for estimating site occupancy and detection probability. Occupancy models have been used to investigate diseases where the focus was on pathogen occurrence in the host. We applied occupancy models to investigate free-living Bd in North American surface waters to determine Bd seasonality, relationships between Bd site occupancy and habitat attributes, and probability of detection from water samples as a function of the number of samples, sample volume, and water quality. We also report on the temporal patterns of Bd density from a 4-year case study of a Bd-positive wetland. We provide evidence that Bd occurs in the environment year-round. Bd exhibited temporal and spatial heterogeneity in density, but did not exhibit seasonality in occupancy. Bd was detected in all months, typically at less than 100 zoospores L−1. The highest density observed was ∼3 million zoospores L−1. We detected Bd in 47% of sites sampled, but estimated that Bd occupied 61% of sites, highlighting the importance of accounting for imperfect detection. When Bd was present, there was a 95% chance of detecting it with four samples of 600 ml of water or five samples of 60 mL. Our findings provide important baseline information to advance the study of Bd disease ecology, and advance our understanding of amphibian exposure

  7. Ciliary heterogeneity within a single cell: the Paramecium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Cohen, Jean; Lemullois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a single cell able to divide in its morphologically differentiated stage that has many cilia anchored at its cell surface. Many thousands of cilia are thus assembled in a short period of time during division to duplicate the cell pattern while the cell continues swimming. Most, but not all, of these sensory cilia are motile and involved in two main functions: prey capture and cell locomotion. These cilia display heterogeneity, both in their length and their biochemical properties. Thanks to these properties, as well as to the availability of many postgenomic tools and the possibility to follow the regrowth of cilia after deciliation, Paramecium offers a nice opportunity to study the assembly of the cilia, as well as the genesis of their diversity within a single cell. In this paper, after a brief survey of Paramecium morphology and cilia properties, we describe the tools and the protocols currently used for immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry to analyze cilia, with special recommendations to overcome the problem raised by cilium diversity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Cell-Division Behavior in a Heterogeneous Swarm Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Adam; Herrmann, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present a system of virtual particles that interact using simple kinetic rules. It is known that heterogeneous mixtures of particles can produce particularly interesting behaviors. Here we present a two-species three-dimensional swarm in which a behavior emerges that resembles cell division. We show that the dividing behavior exists across a narrow but finite band of parameters and for a wide range of population sizes. When executed in a two-dimensional environment the swarm's characteristics and dynamism manifest differently. In further experiments we show that repeated divisions can occur if the system is extended by a biased equilibrium process to control the split of populations. We propose that this repeated division behavior provides a simple model for cell-division mechanisms and is of interest for the formation of morphological structure and to swarm robotics.

  9. Single-cell behavior and population heterogeneity: solving an inverse problem to compute the intrinsic physiological state functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetsieris, Konstantinos; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2012-04-15

    The dynamics of isogenic cell populations can be described by cell population balance models that account for phenotypic heterogeneity. To utilize the predictive power of these models, however, we must know the rates of single-cell reaction and division and the bivariate partition probability density function. These three intrinsic physiological state (IPS) functions can be obtained by solving an inverse problem that requires knowledge of the phenotypic distributions for the overall cell population, the dividing cell subpopulation and the newborn cell subpopulation. We present here a robust computational procedure that can accurately estimate the IPS functions for heterogeneous cell populations. A detailed parametric analysis shows how the accuracy of the inverse solution is affected by discretization parameters, the type of non-parametric estimators used, the qualitative characteristics of phenotypic distributions and the unknown partitioning probability density function. The effect of finite sampling and measurement errors on the accuracy of the recovered IPS functions is also assessed. Finally, we apply the procedure to estimate the IPS functions of an E. coli population carrying an IPTG-inducible genetic toggle network. This study completes the development of an integrated experimental and computational framework that can become a powerful tool for quantifying single-cell behavior using measurements from heterogeneous cell populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Epigenetic Memory Underlies Cell-Autonomous Heterogeneous Behavior of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Yusuf, Rushdia Z; Oki, Toshihiko; Wu, Juwell; Saez, Borja; Wang, Xin; Cook, Colleen; Baryawno, Ninib; Ziller, Michael J; Lee, Eunjung; Gu, Hongcang; Meissner, Alexander; Lin, Charles P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Scadden, David T

    2016-11-17

    Stem cells determine homeostasis and repair of many tissues and are increasingly recognized as functionally heterogeneous. To define the extent of-and molecular basis for-heterogeneity, we overlaid functional, transcriptional, and epigenetic attributes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at a clonal level using endogenous fluorescent tagging. Endogenous HSC had clone-specific functional attributes over time in vivo. The intra-clonal behaviors were highly stereotypic, conserved under the stress of transplantation, inflammation, and genotoxic injury, and associated with distinctive transcriptional, DNA methylation, and chromatin accessibility patterns. Further, HSC function corresponded to epigenetic configuration but not always to transcriptional state. Therefore, hematopoiesis under homeostatic and stress conditions represents the integrated action of highly heterogeneous clones of HSC with epigenetically scripted behaviors. This high degree of epigenetically driven cell autonomy among HSCs implies that refinement of the concepts of stem cell plasticity and of the stem cell niche is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredict......Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly...

  12. Heterogeneous Stem Cells in Skin Homeostatis and Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meilana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skin protects mammals from insults, infection and dehydration and enables thermoregulation and sensory perception. Various skin-resident cells carry out these diverse functions. Constant turnover of cells and healing upon injury necessitate multiple reservoirs of stem cells. The skin is a complex organ harboring several distinct populations of stem cells and a rich array of cell types. Advances in genetic and imaging tools have brought new findings about the lineage relationships between skin stem cells and their progeny. Such knowledge may offer novel avenues for therapeutics and regenerative medicine. CONTENT: In the past years, our view of the mechanisms that govern skin homeostasis and regeneration have markedly changed. New populations of stem cells have been identified that behave spatio-temporally differently in healthy tissues and in situations of damage, indicating that a great level of stem cell heterogeneity is present in the skin. There are believed to be distinct populations of stem cells in different locations. The lineages that they feed are normally constrained by signals from their local environment, but they can give rise to all epidermal lineages in response to appropriate stimuli. Given the richness of structures such as blood vessels, subcutaneous fat, innervation and the accumulation of fibroblasts under the upper parts of the rete ridges (in the case of human skin, it is reasonable to speculate that the microenvironment might be essential for interfollicular epidermal homeostasis. The bloodstream is probably the main source of long-range signals reaching the skin, and cues provided by the vascular niche might be essential for skin homeostasis. SUMMARY: A key function of the interfollicular epidermis is to act as a protective interface between the body and the external environment, and it contains several architectural elements that enable it to fulfill this function. All elements of the epidermis play

  13. Understanding and exploiting nanoscale surface heterogeneity for particle and cell manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalasin, Surachate

    signatures. Following the approach taken by biophysicists for describing the interactions of leukocytes with the endothelial vasculature near an injury, the state spaces in this thesis map regimes of free particle motion, immediate firm arrest, and persistent rolling against macroscopic average patch density, Debye length, particle size, and shear rate. Surprisingly, the electrostatic heterogeneity state space resembles that for selectin-mediated leukocyte motion, and reasons are put forth. This finding is important because it demonstrates how synthetic nanoscale constructs can be exploited to achieve the selective cell capture mechanism previously attributed only to specialized cell adhesion molecules. This thesis initiates studies that extend these fundamental principles, developed for a tunable and well-characterized synthetic model to biological systems. For instance, it is demonstrated that general behaviors seen with the electrostatic model are observed when fibrinogen proteins are substituted for the electrostatic patches. This shows that the nature of the attractions is immaterial to adhesion, and that the effect of added salt primarily alters the range of the electrostatic repulsion and, correspondingly, the contact area. Also, studies with Staphylococcus aureus run parallel to those employing 1 mum silica spheres, further translating the concepts. Inaugural studies with mammalian cells, in the future work section, indicate that application of the surface heterogeneity approach to cell manipulation holds much future promise.

  14. Pathological Bases and Clinical Impact of Intratumor Heterogeneity in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, José I; Angulo, Javier C

    2018-01-27

    Intratumor heterogeneity is an inherent event in tumor development that is receiving much attention in the last years since it is responsible for most failures of current targeted therapies. The purpose of this review is to offer clinicians an updated insight of the multiple manifestations of a complex event that impacts significantly patient's life. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most common renal tumor and a paradigmatic example of a heterogeneous neoplasm. Next-generation sequencing has demonstrated that intratumor heterogeneity encompasses genetic, epigenetic, and microenvironmental variability. Currently accepted protocols of tumor sampling seem insufficient in unveiling intratumor heterogeneity with reliability and need to be updated. This variability challenges the precise morphological diagnosis, its molecular characterization, and the selection of optimal personalized therapies in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, a neoplasm traditionally considered chemo- and radio-resistant. We review the state of the art of the different approaches to intratumor heterogeneity in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, from the simple morphology to the most sophisticated massive sequencing tools.

  15. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  16. Heterogeneity in white blood cells has potential to confound DNA methylation measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn T Adalsteinsson

    Full Text Available Epigenetic studies are commonly conducted on DNA from tissue samples. However, tissues are ensembles of cells that may each have their own epigenetic profile, and therefore inter-individual cellular heterogeneity may compromise these studies. Here, we explore the potential for such confounding on DNA methylation measurement outcomes when using DNA from whole blood. DNA methylation was measured using pyrosequencing-based methodology in whole blood (n = 50-179 and in two white blood cell fractions (n = 20, isolated using density gradient centrifugation, in four CGIs (CpG Islands located in genes HHEX (10 CpG sites assayed, KCNJ11 (8 CpGs, KCNQ1 (4 CpGs and PM20D1 (7 CpGs. Cellular heterogeneity (variation in proportional white blood cell counts of neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophils, counted by an automated cell counter explained up to 40% (p<0.0001 of the inter-individual variation in whole blood DNA methylation levels in the HHEX CGI, but not a significant proportion of the variation in the other three CGIs tested. DNA methylation levels in the two cell fractions, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, differed significantly in the HHEX CGI; specifically the average absolute difference ranged between 3.4-15.7 percentage points per CpG site. In the other three CGIs tested, methylation levels in the two fractions did not differ significantly, and/or the difference was more moderate. In the examined CGIs, methylation levels were highly correlated between cell fractions. In summary, our analysis detects region-specific differential DNA methylation between white blood cell subtypes, which can confound the outcome of whole blood DNA methylation measurements. Finally, by demonstrating the high correlation between methylation levels in cell fractions, our results suggest a possibility to use a proportional number of a single white blood cell type to correct for this confounding effect in analyses.

  17. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition

  18. Heterogeneity of neuroblastoma cell identity defined by transcriptional circuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeva, Valentina; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Peltier, Agathe; Durand, Simon; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; Raynal, Virginie; Etchevers, Heather C; Thomas, Sophie; Lermine, Alban; Daudigeos-Dubus, Estelle; Geoerger, Birgit; Orth, Martin F; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Diaz, Elise; Ducos, Bertrand; Surdez, Didier; Carcaboso, Angel M; Medvedeva, Irina; Deller, Thomas; Combaret, Valérie; Lapouble, Eve; Pierron, Gaelle; Grossetête-Lalami, Sandrine; Baulande, Sylvain; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Barillot, Emmanuel; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2017-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is a tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, derived from multipotent neural crest cells (NCCs). To define core regulatory circuitries (CRCs) controlling the gene expression program of neuroblastoma, we established and analyzed the neuroblastoma super-enhancer landscape. We discovered three types of identity in neuroblastoma cell lines: a sympathetic noradrenergic identity, defined by a CRC module including the PHOX2B, HAND2 and GATA3 transcription factors (TFs); an NCC-like identity, driven by a CRC module containing AP-1 TFs; and a mixed type, further deconvoluted at the single-cell level. Treatment of the mixed type with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enrichment of NCC-like cells. The noradrenergic module was validated by ChIP-seq. Functional studies demonstrated dependency of neuroblastoma with noradrenergic identity on PHOX2B, evocative of lineage addiction. Most neuroblastoma primary tumors express TFs from the noradrenergic and NCC-like modules. Our data demonstrate a previously unknown aspect of tumor heterogeneity relevant for neuroblastoma treatment strategies.

  19. Stochastic population growth in spatially heterogeneous environments: the density-dependent case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hening, Alexandru; Nguyen, Dang H; Yin, George

    2018-02-01

    This work is devoted to studying the dynamics of a structured population that is subject to the combined effects of environmental stochasticity, competition for resources, spatio-temporal heterogeneity and dispersal. The population is spread throughout n patches whose population abundances are modeled as the solutions of a system of nonlinear stochastic differential equations living on [Formula: see text]. We prove that r, the stochastic growth rate of the total population in the absence of competition, determines the long-term behaviour of the population. The parameter r can be expressed as the Lyapunov exponent of an associated linearized system of stochastic differential equations. Detailed analysis shows that if [Formula: see text], the population abundances converge polynomially fast to a unique invariant probability measure on [Formula: see text], while when [Formula: see text], the population abundances of the patches converge almost surely to 0 exponentially fast. This generalizes and extends the results of Evans et al. (J Math Biol 66(3):423-476, 2013) and proves one of their conjectures. Compared to recent developments, our model incorporates very general density-dependent growth rates and competition terms. Furthermore, we prove that persistence is robust to small, possibly density dependent, perturbations of the growth rates, dispersal matrix and covariance matrix of the environmental noise. We also show that the stochastic growth rate depends continuously on the coefficients. Our work allows the environmental noise driving our system to be degenerate. This is relevant from a biological point of view since, for example, the environments of the different patches can be perfectly correlated. We show how one can adapt the nondegenerate results to the degenerate setting. As an example we fully analyze the two-patch case, [Formula: see text], and show that the stochastic growth rate is a decreasing function of the dispersion rate. In particular, coupling two

  20. Deconstructing stem cell population heterogeneity: Single-cell analysis and modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Isogenic stem cell populations display cell-to-cell variations in a multitude of attributes including gene or protein expression, epigenetic state, morphology, proliferation and proclivity for differentiation. The origins of the observed heterogeneity and its roles in the maintenance of pluripotency and the lineage specification of stem cells remain unclear. Addressing pertinent questions will require the employment of single-cell analysis methods as traditional cell biochemical and biomolecular assays yield mostly population-average data. In addition to time-lapse microscopy and flow cytometry, recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling are reviewed. The application of multiple displacement amplification, next generation sequencing, mass cytometry and spectrometry to stem cell systems is expected to provide a wealth of information affording unprecedented levels of multiparametric characterization of cell ensembles under defined conditions promoting pluripotency or commitment. Establishing connections between single-cell analysis information and the observed phenotypes will also require suitable mathematical models. Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are orchestrated by the coordinated regulation of subcellular, intercellular and niche-wide processes spanning multiple time scales. Here, we discuss different modeling approaches and challenges arising from their application to stem cell populations. Integrating single-cell analysis with computational methods will fill gaps in our knowledge about the functions of heterogeneity in stem cell physiology. This combination will also aid the rational design of efficient differentiation and reprogramming strategies as well as bioprocesses for the production of clinically valuable stem cell derivatives. PMID:24035899

  1. Physiological responses to acid stress by Saccharomyces cerevisiae when applying high initial cell density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    High initial cell density is used to increase volumetric productivity and shorten production time in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation. Comparison of physiological parameters in high initial cell density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic, formic, levulinic and cinnamic acids demonstrated general and acid-specific responses of cells. All the acids studied impaired growth and inhibited glycolytic flux, and caused oxidative stress and accumulation of trehalose. However, trehalose may play a role other than protecting yeast cells from acid-induced oxidative stress. Unlike the other acids, cinnamic acid did not cause depletion of cellular ATP, but abolished the growth of yeast on ethanol. Compared with low initial cell density, increasing initial cell density reduced the lag phase and improved the bioconversion yield of cinnamic acid during acid adaptation. In addition, yeast cells were able to grow at elevated concentrations of acid, probable due to the increase in phenotypic cell-to-cell heterogeneity in large inoculum size. Furthermore, the specific growth rate and the specific rates of glucose consumption and metabolite production were significantly lower than at low initial cell density, which was a result of the accumulation of a large fraction of cells that persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. PMID:27620460

  2. High Efficiency, High Density Terrestrial Panel. [for solar cell modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Wihl, M.; Rosenfield, T.

    1979-01-01

    Terrestrial panels were fabricated using rectangular cells. Packing densities in excess of 90% with panel conversion efficiencies greater than 13% were obtained. Higher density panels can be produced on a cost competitive basis with the standard salami panels.

  3. Effect of temperature and density fluctuations on the spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glass-forming Van der Waals liquids under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, K; Grzybowski, A; Grzybowska, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Sokolov, A P; Paluch, M

    2013-09-20

    In this Letter, we show how temperature and density fluctuations affect the spatially heterogeneous dynamics at ambient and elevated pressures. By using high-pressure experimental data for van der Waals liquids, we examine contributions of the temperature and density fluctuations to the dynamics heterogeneity. We show that the dynamic heterogeneity decreases significantly with increasing pressure at a constant structural relaxation time (isochronal condition), while the broadening of the relaxation spectrum remains constant. This observation questions the relationship between spectral broadening and dynamic heterogeneity.

  4. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  5. All-in-one processing of heterogeneous human cell grafts for gene and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Y Lukianova-Hleb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell processing technologies for gene and cell therapies are often slow, expensive, labor intensive and are compromised by high cell losses and poor selectivity thus limiting the efficacy and availability of clinical cell therapies. We employ cell-specific on-demand mechanical intracellular impact from laser pulse-activated plasmonic nanobubbles (PNB to process heterogeneous human cell grafts ex vivo with dual simultaneous functionality, the high cell type specificity, efficacy and processing rate for transfection of target CD3+ cells and elimination of subsets of unwanted CD25+ cells. The developed bulk flow PNB system selectively processed human cells at a rate of up to 100 million cell/minute, providing simultaneous transfection of CD3+ cells with the therapeutic gene (FKBP12(V36-p30Caspase9 with the efficacy of 77% and viability 95% (versus 12 and 60%, respectively, for standard electroporation and elimination of CD25+ cells with 99% efficacy. PNB flow technology can unite and replace several methodologies in an all-in-one universal ex vivo simultaneous procedure to precisely and rapidly prepare a cell graft for therapy. PNB's can process various cell systems including cord blood, stem cells, and bone marrow.

  6. Cell‐to‐cell heterogeneity emerges as consequence of metabolic cooperation in a synthetic yeast community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cells that grow together respond heterogeneously to stress even when they are genetically similar. Metabolism, a key determinant of cellular stress tolerance, may be one source of this phenotypic heterogeneity, however, this relationship is largely unclear. We used self‐establishing metabolically cooperating (SeMeCo) yeast communities, in which metabolic cooperation can be followed on the basis of genotype, as a model to dissect the role of metabolic cooperation in single‐cell heterogeneity. Cells within SeMeCo communities showed to be highly heterogeneous in their stress tolerance, while the survival of each cell under heat or oxidative stress, was strongly determined by its metabolic specialization. This heterogeneity emerged for all metabolite exchange interactions studied (histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine) as well as oxidant (H2O2, diamide) and heat stress treatments. In contrast, the SeMeCo community collectively showed to be similarly tolerant to stress as wild‐type populations. Moreover, stress heterogeneity did not establish as sole consequence of metabolic genotype (auxotrophic background) of the single cell, but was observed only for cells that cooperated according to their metabolic capacity. We therefore conclude that phenotypic heterogeneity and cell to cell differences in stress tolerance are emergent properties when cells cooperate in metabolism. PMID:27312776

  7. Single-Cell Analysis of the Impact of Host Cell Heterogeneity on Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiu; Wang, Hailong; Han, Lingling; Wang, Mingzhen; Fang, Hui; Hao, Yao; Li, Jiadai; Zhang, Hu; Zheng, Congyi; Shen, Chao

    2018-05-01

    Viral infection and replication are affected by host cell heterogeneity, but the mechanisms underlying the effects remain unclear. Using single-cell analysis, we investigated the effects of host cell heterogeneity, including cell size, inclusion, and cell cycle, on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection (acute and persistent infections) and replication. We detected various viral genome replication levels in FMDV-infected cells. Large cells and cells with a high number of inclusions generated more viral RNA copies and viral protein and a higher proportion of infectious cells than other cells. Additionally, we found that the viral titer was 10- to 100-fold higher in cells in G 2 /M than those in other cell cycle phases and identified a strong correlation between cell size, inclusion, and cell cycle heterogeneity, which all affected the infection and replication of FMDV. Furthermore, we demonstrated that host cell heterogeneity influenced the adsorption of FMDV due to differences in the levels of FMDV integrin receptors expression. Collectively, these results further our understanding of the evolution of a virus in a single host cell. IMPORTANCE It is important to understand how host cell heterogeneity affects viral infection and replication. Using single-cell analysis, we found that viral genome replication levels exhibited dramatic variability in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells. We also found a strong correlation between heterogeneity in cell size, inclusion number, and cell cycle status and that all of these characteristics affect the infection and replication of FMDV. Moreover, we found that host cell heterogeneity influenced the viral adsorption as differences in the levels of FMDV integrin receptors' expression. This study provided new ideas for the studies of correlation between FMDV infection mechanisms and host cells. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity of breast carcinomas as determined by fine needle aspiration and TaqMan low density array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Maria B.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2007-01-01

    surgery were split in halves and FNAs were obtained from each half. A tissue biopsy of the tumors was also snap-frozen for comparison. Non-amplified RNA was investigated by the novel qRT-PCR-based technique, Low Density Array (LDA) using 4 reference genes and 44 target genes. RESULTS: Comparison of gene...... expression at the single gene level in the two FNA samples from each tumor demonstrated various degrees of heterogeneity. However, compared as gene expression profiles, intratumor correlations for 9/12 patients were high and these pairs could in a theoretical blinding of all the FNAs be correctly matched...... by statistical analysis. High correlations between the gene profiles of tumor FNAs and tissue biopsies from the same patient were observed for all patients. A cluster analysis identified clustering of both the two FNAs and the tissue biopsy of the same 9 patients. CONCLUSION: The overall genetic heterogeneity...

  9. Density-Gradient Determination of Osmotic Potential in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring osmotic potential which is suitable for high school and college biology classes. This method introduces students to the hard-to-visualize technique of using density gradients to separate cells or cell constituents of differing densities. (JR)

  10. Heterogeneous Red Blood Cell Adhesion and Deformability in Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Little, Jane A.; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a microfluidic approach that allows simultaneous interrogation of RBC properties in physiological flow conditions at a single cell level. With this method, we studied healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs using whole blood samples from twelve subjects. We report that HbS-containing RBCs are heterogeneous in terms of adhesion and deformability in flow.

  11. Supervised learning methods in modeling of CD4+ T cell heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Pinyi; Abedi, Vida; Mei, Yongguo; Hontecillas, Raquel; Hoops, Stefan; Carbo, Adria; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background Modeling of the immune system – a highly non-linear and complex system – requires practical and efficient data analytic approaches. The immune system is composed of heterogeneous cell populations and hundreds of cell types, such as neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells. Each cell type is highly diverse and can be further differentiated into subsets with unique and overlapping functions. For example, CD4+ T cells can be differentiated into T...

  12. Recognizing the Continuous Nature of Expression Heterogeneity and Clinical Outcomes in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaona; Choudhury, Yukti; Lim, Weng Khong; Anema, John; Kahnoski, Richard J; Lane, Brian; Ludlow, John; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Belldegrun, Arie; Kim, Hyung L; Rogers, Craig; Nicol, David; Teh, Bin Tean; Tan, Min-Han

    2017-08-04

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) has been previously classified into putative discrete prognostic subtypes by gene expression profiling. To investigate the robustness of these proposed subtype classifications, we evaluated 12 public datasets, together with a new dataset of 265 ccRCC gene expression profiles. Consensus clustering showed unstable subtype and principal component analysis (PCA) showed a continuous spectrum both within and between datasets. Considering the lack of discrete delineation and continuous spectrum observed, we developed a continuous quantitative prognosis score (Continuous Linear Enhanced Assessment of RCC, or CLEAR score). Prognostic performance was evaluated in independent cohorts from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 414) and EMBL-EBI (n = 53), CLEAR score demonstrated both superior prognostic estimates and inverse correlation with anti-angiogenic tyrosine-kinase inhibition in comparison to previously proposed discrete subtyping classifications. Inverse correlation with high-dose interleukin-2 outcomes was also observed for the CLEAR score. Multiple somatic mutations (VHL, PBRM1, SETD2, KDM5C, TP53, BAP1, PTEN, MTOR) were associated with the CLEAR score. Application of the CLEAR score to independent expression profiling of intratumoral ccRCC regions demonstrated that average intertumoral heterogeneity exceeded intratumoral expression heterogeneity. Wider investigation of cancer biology using continuous approaches may yield insights into tumor heterogeneity; single cell analysis may provide a key foundation for this approach.

  13. Experimental methods and modeling techniques for description of cell population heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Nierychlo, M.; Lundin, L.

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous development, in the last decades, of analytical techniques providing complex information at single cell level, the study of cell heterogeneity has been the focus of several research projects within analytical biotechnology. Nonetheless, the complex interplay between...... environmental changes and cellular responses is yet not fully understood, and the integration of this new knowledge into the strategies for design, operation and control of bioprocesses is far from being an established reality. Indeed, the impact of cell heterogeneity on productivity of large scale cultivations...... methods for monitoring cell population heterogeneity as well as model frameworks suitable for describing dynamic heterogeneous cell populations. We will furthermore underline the highly important coordination between experimental and modeling efforts necessary to attain a reliable quantitative description...

  14. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in tunica media of aorta in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the tunica media of goat aorta are phenotypically heterogeneous and run in multiple directions. These characteristics probably confer mechanical strength and functional plasticity to the aortic wall. Designers of aortic substitutes should bear this in mind. Keywords: Vascular, Smooth Muscle Cells, Heterogeneity, Aorta ...

  15. Modelling T cell proliferation: Dynamics heterogeneity depending on cell differentiation, age, and genetic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Cell proliferation is the common characteristic of all biological systems. The immune system insures the maintenance of body integrity on the basis of a continuous production of diversified T lymphocytes in the thymus. This involves processes of proliferation, differentiation, selection, death and migration of lymphocytes to peripheral tissues, where proliferation also occurs upon antigen recognition. Quantification of cell proliferation dynamics requires specific experimental methods and mathematical modelling. Here, we assess the impact of genetics and aging on the immune system by investigating the dynamics of proliferation of T lymphocytes across their differentiation through thymus and spleen in mice. Our investigation is based on single-cell multicolour flow cytometry analysis revealing the active incorporation of a thymidine analogue during S phase after pulse-chase-pulse experiments in vivo, versus cell DNA content. A generic mathematical model of state transition simulates through Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) the evolution of single cell behaviour during various durations of labelling. It allows us to fit our data, to deduce proliferation rates and estimate cell cycle durations in sub-populations. Our model is simple and flexible and is validated with other durations of pulse/chase experiments. Our results reveal that T cell proliferation is highly heterogeneous but with a specific “signature” that depends upon genetic origins, is specific to cell differentiation stages in thymus and spleen and is altered with age. In conclusion, our model allows us to infer proliferation rates and cell cycle phase durations from complex experimental 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) data, revealing T cell proliferation heterogeneity and specific signatures. PMID:28288157

  16. Cell Density Plays a Critical Role in Ex Vivo Expansion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangzhong Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful ex vivo expansion of a large numbers of T cells is a prerequisite for adoptive immunotherapy. In this study, we found that cell density had important effects on the process of expansion of T cells in vitro. Resting T cells were activated to expand at high cell density but failed to be activated at low cell density. Activated T cells (ATCs expanded rapidly at high cell density but underwent apoptosis at low cell density. Our studies indicated that low-cell-density related ATC death is mediated by oxidative stress. Antioxidants N-acetylcysteine, catalase, and albumin suppressed elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in low-density cultures and protected ATCs from apoptosis. The viability of ATCs at low density was preserved by conditioned medium from high-density cultures of ATCs in which the autocrine survival factor was identified as catalase. We also found that costimulatory signal CD28 increases T cell activation at lower cell density, paralleled by an increase in catalase secretion. Our findings highlight the importance of cell density in T cell activation, proliferation, survival and apoptosis and support the importance of maintaining T cells at high density for their successful expansion in vitro.

  17. Realizations of highly heterogeneous collagen networks via stochastic reconstruction for micromechanical analysis of tumor cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hanqing; Liang, Long; Chen, Guo; Liu, Liyu; Liu, Ruchuan; Jiao, Yang

    2018-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collective cell migration in a collagen-based extracellular matrix (ECM) is among one of the most significant topics in developmental biology, cancer progression, tissue regeneration, and immune response. Recent studies have suggested that collagen-fiber mediated force transmission in cellularized ECM plays an important role in stress homeostasis and regulation of collective cellular behaviors. Motivated by the recent in vitro observation that oriented collagen can significantly enhance the penetration of migrating breast cancer cells into dense Matrigel which mimics the intravasation process in vivo [Han et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 11208 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1610347113], we devise a procedure for generating realizations of highly heterogeneous 3D collagen networks with prescribed microstructural statistics via stochastic optimization. Specifically, a collagen network is represented via the graph (node-bond) model and the microstructural statistics considered include the cross-link (node) density, valence distribution, fiber (bond) length distribution, as well as fiber orientation distribution. An optimization problem is formulated in which the objective function is defined as the squared difference between a set of target microstructural statistics and the corresponding statistics for the simulated network. Simulated annealing is employed to solve the optimization problem by evolving an initial network via random perturbations to generate realizations of homogeneous networks with randomly oriented fibers, homogeneous networks with aligned fibers, heterogeneous networks with a continuous variation of fiber orientation along a prescribed direction, as well as a binary system containing a collagen region with aligned fibers and a dense Matrigel region with randomly oriented fibers. The generation and propagation of active forces in the simulated networks due to polarized contraction of an embedded ellipsoidal cell and a small group

  18. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  19. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in healthy Turkish eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arıcı, Ceyhun; Arslan, Osman Sevki; Dikkaya, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the normative values of corneal endothelial cell density, morphology, and central corneal thickness in healthy Turkish eyes. Methods. Specular microscopy was performed in 252 eyes of 126 healthy volunteers (M : F, 42 : 84). Parameters studied included mean endothelial cell density (MCD), mean cell area (MCA), coefficient of variation (CV) in cell size, percentage of hexagonal cells, and central corneal thickness (CCT). Results. The mean age of volunteers was 44.3 ± 13.5 (range, 20 to 70) years. There was a statistically significant decrease in MCD (P Filipino eyes and higher than that described in Indian, Thai, and Iranian eyes.

  20. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Garkier Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-05-15

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredictable. In heterogeneous populations, synchronization of events becomes a cardinal problem-particularly for phase coherence in oscillating systems. The present article presents a novel strategy for construction of large-scale simulation programs of heterogeneous biological entities. The strategy is designed to be tractable, to handle heterogeneity and to handle computational cost issues simultaneously, primarily by writing a generator of the 'model to be simulated'. We apply the strategy to model glycolytic oscillations among thousands of yeast cells coupled through the extracellular medium. The usefulness is illustrated through (i) benchmarking, showing an almost linear relationship between model size and run time, and (ii) analysis of the resulting simulations, showing that contrary to the experimental situation, synchronous oscillations are surprisingly hard to achieve, underpinning the need for tools to study heterogeneity. Thus, we present an efficient strategy to model the biological heterogeneity, neglected by ordinary mean-field models. This tool is well posed to facilitate the elucidation of the physiologically vital problem of synchronization. The complete python code is available as Supplementary Information. bjornhald@gmail.com or pgs@kiku.dk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  2. Systematic Evaluation of the Prognostic Impact and Intratumour Heterogeneity of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Sakshi; Martinez, Pierre; Joshi, Tejal

    2014-01-01

    of published biomarkers to predict the survival of patients with clear cell kidney cancer in an independent patient cohort. Only one molecular test adds prognostic information to routine clinical assessments. This marker showed good and poor prognosis results within most individual cancers. Future biomarkers......BackgroundCandidate biomarkers have been identified for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients, but most have not been validated. ObjectiveTo validate published ccRCC prognostic biomarkers in an independent patient cohort and to assess intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) of the most promising...... markers to guide biomarker optimisation. Design, setting, and participantsCancer-specific survival (CSS) for each of 28 identified genetic or transcriptomic biomarkers was assessed in 350 ccRCC patients. ITH was interrogated in a multiregion biopsy data set of 10 ccRCCs. Outcome measurements...

  3. Wetting of heterogeneous substrates. A classical density-functional-theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Peter; Parry, Andrew O.; Rascón, Carlos; Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2017-11-01

    Wetting is a nucleation of a third phase (liquid) on the interface between two different phases (solid and gas). In many experimentally accessible cases of wetting, the interplay between the substrate structure, and the fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate intermolecular interactions leads to the appearance of a whole ``zoo'' of exciting interface phase transitions, associated with the formation of nano-droplets/bubbles, and thin films. Practical applications of wetting at small scales are numerous and include the design of lab-on-a-chip devices and superhydrophobic surfaces. In this talk, we will use a fully microscopic approach to explore the phase space of a planar wall, decorated with patches of different hydrophobicity, and demonstrate the highly non-trivial behaviour of the liquid-gas interface near the substrate. We will present fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and wetting phase diagrams. Our analysis is based on a formulation of statistical mechanics, commonly known as classical density-functional theory. It provides a computationally-friendly and rigorous framework, suitable for probing small-scale physics of classical fluids and other soft-matter systems. EPSRC Grants No. EP/L027186,EP/K503733;ERC Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  4. Modelling the collective response of heterogeneous cell populations to stationary gradients and chemical signal relay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, M.; Eftimie, R.

    2017-12-01

    The directed motion of cell aggregates toward a chemical source occurs in many relevant biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms that control this complex behavior is of great relevance for our understanding of developmental biological processes and many diseases. In this paper, we consider a self-propelled particle model for the movement of heterogeneous subpopulations of chemically interacting cells towards an imposed stable chemical gradient. Our simulations show explicitly how self-organisation of cell populations (which could lead to engulfment or complete cell segregation) can arise from the heterogeneity of chemotactic responses alone. This new result complements current theoretical and experimental studies that emphasise the role of differential cell-cell adhesion on self-organisation and spatial structure of cellular aggregates. We also investigate how the speed of individual cell aggregations increases with the chemotactic sensitivity of the cells, and decreases with the number of cells inside the aggregates

  5. Tissue specific heterogeneity in effector immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba eTufail

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct ‘homing codes’ (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A and sunlight (vitamin D3 prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centrestage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues alongwith giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells.

  6. Navigating Glycerol Conversion Roadmap and Heterogeneous Catalyst Selection Aided by Density Functional Theory: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol has been utilized in an extremely diversified manner throughout human civilization—ranging from food, to various consumer products, to pharmaceuticals, and even explosives. Large surplus in glycerol supply thanks to biodiesel production and biomass processing has created a demand to further boost its utility. One growing area is to expand the use of glycerol as an alternative feedstock to supplement fuels and chemicals production. Various catalytic processes have been developed. This review summarizes catalytic materials for glycerol reforming, hydrodeoxygenation, and oxidation. In particular, rationale for catalyst selection and new catalyst design will be discussed aided by the knowledge of reaction mechanisms. The role of theoretical density functional theory (DFT in elucidating complex glycerol conversion chemistries is particularly emphasized.

  7. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  8. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  9. Unexpected heterogeneity derived from Cas9 ribonucleoprotein-introduced clonal cells at the HPRT1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mochida, Keiji; Nakade, Shota; Ezure, Toru; Minagawa, Sachi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2018-02-09

    Single-cell cloning is an essential technique for establishing genome-edited cell clones mediated by programmable nucleases such as CRISPR-Cas9. However, residual genome-editing activity after single-cell cloning may cause heterogeneity in the clonal cells. Previous studies showed efficient mutagenesis and rapid degradation of CRISPR-Cas9 components in cultured cells by introducing Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). In this study, we investigated how the timing for single-cell cloning of Cas9 RNP-transfected cells affected the heterogeneity of the resultant clones. We carried out transfection of Cas9 RNPs targeting several loci in the HPRT1 gene in HCT116 cells, followed by single-cell cloning at 24, 48, 72 hr and 1 week post-transfection. After approximately 3 weeks of incubation, the clonal cells were collected and genotyped by high-resolution microchip electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, long-term incubation before single-cell cloning resulted in highly heterogeneous clones. We used a lipofection method for transfection, and the media containing transfectable RNPs were not removed before single-cell cloning. Therefore, the active Cas9 RNPs were considered to be continuously incorporated into cells during the precloning incubation. Our findings provide a warning that lipofection of Cas9 RNPs may cause continuous introduction of gene mutations depending on the experimental procedures. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Inference of Cell Mechanics in Heterogeneous Epithelial Tissue Based on Multivariate Clone Shape Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Alice; Umetsu, Daiki; Kuranaga, Erina; Fujimoto, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Cell populations in multicellular organisms show genetic and non-genetic heterogeneity, even in undifferentiated tissues of multipotent cells during development and tumorigenesis. The heterogeneity causes difference of mechanical properties, such as, cell bond tension or adhesion, at the cell–cell interface, which determine the shape of clonal population boundaries via cell sorting or mixing. The boundary shape could alter the degree of cell–cell contacts and thus influence the physiological consequences of sorting or mixing at the boundary (e.g., tumor suppression or progression), suggesting that the cell mechanics could help clarify the physiology of heterogeneous tissues. While precise inference of mechanical tension loaded at each cell–cell contacts has been extensively developed, there has been little progress on how to distinguish the population-boundary geometry and identify the cause of geometry in heterogeneous tissues. We developed a pipeline by combining multivariate analysis of clone shape with tissue mechanical simulations. We examined clones with four different genotypes within Drosophila wing imaginal discs: wild-type, tartan (trn) overexpression, hibris (hbs) overexpression, and Eph RNAi. Although the clones were previously known to exhibit smoothed or convoluted morphologies, their mechanical properties were unknown. By applying a multivariate analysis to multiple criteria used to quantify the clone shapes based on individual cell shapes, we found the optimal criteria to distinguish not only among the four genotypes, but also non-genetic heterogeneity from genetic one. The efficient segregation of clone shape enabled us to quantitatively compare experimental data with tissue mechanical simulations. As a result, we identified the mechanical basis contributed to clone shape of distinct genotypes. The present pipeline will promote the understanding of the functions of mechanical interactions in heterogeneous tissue in a non-invasive manner. PMID

  11. Single-Cell Genome-Wide Bisulfite Sequencing for Assessing Epigenetic Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermueller, Christof; Krueger, Felix; Saadeh, Heba; Peat, Julian; Andrews, Simon R; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf; Kelsey, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    We report a single-cell bisulfite sequencing method (scBS-Seq) capable of accurately measuring DNA methylation at up to 48.4% of CpGs. We observed that ESCs grown in serum or 2i both display epigenetic heterogeneity, with “2i-like” cells present in serum cultures. In silico integration of 12 individual mouse oocyte datasets largely recapitulates the whole DNA methylome, making scBS-Seq a versatile tool to explore DNA methylation in rare cells and heterogeneous populations. PMID:25042786

  12. Leydig cells in the testis of the rat : heterogeneity, development and similarities with macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Molenaar (Rinkje)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractLeydig cells are present in the interstitium of the testis and are responsible for the steroid production of the testis. This production is regulated by the pituitary hormone LH and there are indications that it is also under the influence of local factors. Heterogeneity of cell

  13. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberger, Stefan M; Unger, Anne L; Legewie, Stefan; Lymperopoulos, Konstantinos; Klingmüller, Ursula; Eils, Roland; Herten, Dirk-Peter

    2017-09-01

    Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  14. Correlated receptor transport processes buffer single-cell heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Kallenberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells typically vary in their response to extracellular ligands. Receptor transport processes modulate ligand-receptor induced signal transduction and impact the variability in cellular responses. Here, we quantitatively characterized cellular variability in erythropoietin receptor (EpoR trafficking at the single-cell level based on live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling. Using ensembles of single-cell mathematical models reduced parameter uncertainties and showed that rapid EpoR turnover, transport of internalized EpoR back to the plasma membrane, and degradation of Epo-EpoR complexes were essential for receptor trafficking. EpoR trafficking dynamics in adherent H838 lung cancer cells closely resembled the dynamics previously characterized by mathematical modeling in suspension cells, indicating that dynamic properties of the EpoR system are widely conserved. Receptor transport processes differed by one order of magnitude between individual cells. However, the concentration of activated Epo-EpoR complexes was less variable due to the correlated kinetics of opposing transport processes acting as a buffering system.

  15. Developmental heterogeneity in DNA packaging patterns influences T-cell activation and transmigration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Gupta

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation programs are accompanied by large-scale changes in nuclear organization and gene expression. In this context, accompanying transitions in chromatin assembly that facilitates changes in gene expression and cell behavior in a developmental system are poorly understood. Here, we address this gap and map structural changes in chromatin organization during murine T-cell development, to describe an unusual heterogeneity in chromatin organization and associated functional correlates in T-cell lineage. Confocal imaging of DNA assembly in cells isolated from bone marrow, thymus and spleen reveal the emergence of heterogeneous patterns in DNA organization in mature T-cells following their exit from the thymus. The central DNA pattern dominated in immature precursor cells in the thymus whereas both central and peripheral DNA patterns were observed in naïve and memory cells in circulation. Naïve T-cells with central DNA patterns exhibited higher mechanical pliability in response to compressive loads in vitro and transmigration assays in vivo, and demonstrated accelerated expression of activation-induced marker CD69. T-cell activation was characterized by marked redistribution of DNA assembly to a central DNA pattern and increased nuclear size. Notably, heterogeneity in DNA patterns recovered in cells induced into quiescence in culture, suggesting an internal regulatory mechanism for chromatin reorganization. Taken together, our results uncover an important component of plasticity in nuclear organization, reflected in chromatin assembly, during T-cell development, differentiation and transmigration.

  16. Heterogeneity of cell adhesion molecules in the developing nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Cell-surface molecules, especially glycoproteins, are believed to mediate interactions between developing neurons and their environment. These interactions include pathfinding by growing processes, recognition of appropriate targets, and formation of synaptic structures. In order to identify neuronal cell-surface molecules, monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) were prepared against synaptic fractions from adult rat brain. From this group three monoclonal antibodies, designated 3C5.59, 3G5.34, and 3G6.41, that react with cell-surface antigens of embryonic neurons were selected for further study. In immunofluoresence experiments each of these antibodies strongly reacted with the processes of cultured granule cell neurons, the major class of small cerebellar neurons, cultured from developing rat cerebellum. Mab's 3C5.59 and 3G5.34 reacted only with neurons in the cerebellar cultures. Mab 3G6.41, however, also reacted with cultured brain astrocytes. On frozen sections Mab's 3G5.34 and 3G6.41 also strongly stained the molecular layer, the site of active granule cell axon growth, in the developing cerebellum. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) were used to compare the two glycoproteins recognized by Mab 3G6.41 with N-CAM. Band 1, another large neuronal cell-surface glycoprotein was originally identified in mouse N18 neuroblastoma cells. In this study 125 I-labeled N18-derived band 1 was tested for binding to 9 plant lectins and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin coupled to agarose beads. Band 1 solubilized from brain also specifically bound to LCA-agarose, indicating that mannose containing sugar moieties are present on band 1 from brain

  17. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (-23%) and dentate gyrus (-48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression.

  18. Corneal Endothelial Cell Density and Morphology in Healthy Turkish Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyhun Arıcı

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the normative values of corneal endothelial cell density, morphology, and central corneal thickness in healthy Turkish eyes. Methods. Specular microscopy was performed in 252 eyes of 126 healthy volunteers (M : F, 42 : 84. Parameters studied included mean endothelial cell density (MCD, mean cell area (MCA, coefficient of variation (CV in cell size, percentage of hexagonal cells, and central corneal thickness (CCT. Results. The mean age of volunteers was 44.3±13.5 (range, 20 to 70 years. There was a statistically significant decrease in MCD (P<0.001; correlation, −0.388 and percentage of hexagonal cells, (P<0.001; correlation, −0.199 with age. There was also a statistically significant increase in MCA (P<0.001; correlation, 0.363 with increasing age. There was no statistically significant difference in MCD, MCA, CV in cell size, percentage of hexagonal cells, and CCT between genders and there was also no significant difference in these parameters between fellow eyes of subjects. Conclusions. Normotive data for the endothelium in the Turkish population are reported. Endothelial cell density in the Turkish eyes is less than that described in the Japanese, American, Chinese, and Filipino eyes and higher than that described in Indian, Thai, and Iranian eyes.

  19. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Degradation at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Hauch, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current densities was studied. The degradation was examined at 850°C, at current densities of −1.0, −1.5, and −2.0 A/cm2, with a 50:50 (H2O:H2) gas supplied to the Ni/YSZ hydrogen electrode...

  20. Microselection - Affinity Selecting Antibodies against a Single Rare Cell in a Heterogeneous Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Agerholm, Inge Errebo; Christensen, Britta

    2009-01-01

    antibodies. Here we have generated a microselection method allowing antibody selection, by phage display, targeting a single cell in a heterogeneous population. One K562 cell (female origin) was positioned on glass-slide among millions of lymphocytes from male donor, identifying the K562 cell by FISH (XX......). Several single cell selections were performed on such individual slides. The phage particles bound to the target cell is protected by a minute disc, while inactivating all remaining phage by UV-irradiation; leaving only the phage bound to the target cell viable. We hereby retrieved up to eight antibodies...

  1. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  2. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  3. Targeting population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae batch fermentation for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Lundin, L.

    and affect their metabolism and consequently affect the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were......)). Significant gradients of e.g. dissolved oxygen, substrates, and pH are typically observed in many industrial scale fermentation processes. Consequently, the microbial cells experience rapid changes in environmental conditions as they circulate throughout the reactor, which might pose stress on the cells...

  4. Modeling and experimental validation of CO heterogeneous chemistry and electrochemistry in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurkiv, Vitaly

    2010-12-17

    In the present work experimental and numerical modeling studies of the heterogeneously catalyzed and electrochemical oxidation of CO at Nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode systems were performed to evaluate elementary charge-transfer reaction mechanisms taking place at the three-phase boundary of CO/CO{sub 2} gas-phase, Ni electrode, and YSZ electrolyte. Temperature-programmed desorption and reaction experiments along with density functional theory calculations were performed to determine adsorption/desorption and surface diffusion kinetics as well as thermodynamic data for the CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni and CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ systems. Based on these data elementary reaction based models with four different charge transfer mechanisms for the electrochemical CO oxidation were developed and applied in numerical simulations of literature experimental electrochemical data such as polarization curves and impedance spectra. Comparison between simulation and experiment demonstrated that only one of the four charge transfer mechanisms can consistently reproduce the electrochemical data over a wide range of operating temperatures and CO/CO{sub 2} gas compositions. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden experimentelle und numerische Untersuchungen zur heterogen katalysierten und elektrochemischen Oxidation von CO an Anodensystemen (bestehend aus Nickel und yttriumdotiertem Zirkoniumdioxid, YSZ) von Festoxidbrennstoffzellen (engl. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, SOFCs) ausgefuehrt, um den mikroskopischen Mechanismus der an der CO/CO{sub 2}-Gasphase/Ni-Elektrode/YSZ-Elektrolyt- Dreiphasen-Grenzflaeche ablaufenden Ladungsuebertragungsreaktion aufzuklaeren. Temperaturprogrammierte Desorptionsmessungen (TPD) und Temperaturprogrammierte Reaktionsmessungen (TPR) sowie Dichtefunktionaltheorierechnungen wurden ausgefuehrt, um adsorptions-, desorptions- und reaktionskinetische sowie thermodynamische Daten fuer die CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni- und CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ

  5. Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a versatile method for fabricating complex and heterogeneous three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using simultaneous ink-jetting of multiple cell types. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), canine smooth muscle cells (dSMCs), and bovine aortic endothelial cells (bECs), were separately mixed with ionic cross-linker calcium chloride (CaCl(2)), loaded into separate ink cartridges and printed using a modified thermal inkjet printer. The three cell types were delivered layer-by-layer to pre-determined locations in a sodium alginate-collagen composite located in a chamber under the printer. The reaction between CaCl(2) and sodium alginate resulted in a rapid formation of a solid composite gel and the printed cells were anchored in designated areas within the gel. The printing process was repeated for several cycles leading to a complex 3D multi-cell hybrid construct. The biological functions of the 3D printed constructs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Each of the printed cell types maintained their viability and normal proliferation rates, phenotypic expression, and physiological functions within the heterogeneous constructs. The bioprinted constructs were able to survive and mature into functional tissues with adequate vascularization in vivo. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types using inkjet printing technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cattle NK Cell Heterogeneity and the Influence of MHC Class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alasdair J; Sanderson, Nicholas D; Gubbins, Simon; Ellis, Shirley A; Hammond, John A

    2015-09-01

    Primate and rodent NK cells form highly heterogeneous lymphocyte populations owing to the differential expression of germline-encoded receptors. Many of these receptors are polymorphic and recognize equally polymorphic determinants of MHC class I. This diversity can lead to individuals carrying NK cells with different specificities. Cattle have an unusually diverse repertoire of NK cell receptor genes predicted to encode receptors that recognize MHC class I. To begin to examine whether this genetic diversity leads to a diverse NK cell population, we isolated peripheral NK cells from cattle with different MHC homozygous genotypes. Cytokine stimulation differentially influenced the transcription of five receptors at the cell population level. Using dilution cultures, we found that a further seven receptors were differentially transcribed, including five predicted to recognize MHC class I. Moreover, there was a statistically significant reduction in killer cell lectin-like receptor mRNA expression between cultures with different CD2 phenotypes and from animals with different MHC class I haplotypes. This finding confirms that cattle NK cells are a heterogeneous population and reveals that the receptors creating this diversity are influenced by the MHC. The importance of this heterogeneity will become clear as we learn more about the role of NK cells in cattle disease resistance and vaccination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors.

  7. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Latent and Reactivated HIV-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbeanu, Monica; Cristinelli, Sara; Rato, Sylvie; Munoz, Miguel; Cavassini, Matthias; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ciuffi, Angela

    2018-04-24

    Despite effective treatment, HIV can persist in latent reservoirs, which represent a major obstacle toward HIV eradication. Targeting and reactivating latent cells is challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of HIV-infected cells. Here, we used a primary model of HIV latency and single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity during HIV latency and reactivation. Our analysis identified transcriptional programs leading to successful reactivation of HIV expression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

  9. Shape-controlled high cell-density microcapsules by electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeyang; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Cell encapsulation within alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has been developed to provide a miniaturized three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with an aqueous core while promoting development of encapsulated cells into high cell-density structures. In this paper, a novel method for fabricating shape-controlled alginate-PLL microcapsules to construct 3D cell structures based on electrodeposition method is provided. Two-dimensional Ca-alginate cell-laden gel membranes were electrodeposited onto a micro-patterned electrode and further detached from the electrode. The PLL was coated onto the gel structures to form alginate-PLL complex as an outer shell and sodium citric solution was utilized to melt the internal alginate to achieve miniaturized 3D microcapsules (sphere, cuboid, and rod shape). By this proposed method, rat liver cells (RLC-18) formed multi-cellular aggregates with high cell-density after cultivation for 2weeks. The use of alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has shown great potential in fabricating 3D cell structures with high cell density. Despite their success related to their ability to provide a miniaturized microenvironment with an aqueous core, alginate-PLL microcapsules has drawback such as a limited shape-control ability. Because of the mechanism of Ca-induced alginate gel formation, it is still difficult to precisely control the gelation process to produce alginate-PLL microcapsules with specific shape. The present study provides an electrodeposition-based method to generate shape-controlled microcapsules for 3D cell structures. Sphere, cuboid, and rod shaped microcapsules of RLC-18 cells were produced for long-term culture to obtain desired morphologies of cell aggregates. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reversible adaptive plasticity: A mechanism for neuroblastoma cell heterogeneity and chemo-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina eChakrabarti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel form of tumor cell plasticity characterized by reversible adaptive plasticity in murine and human neuroblastoma. Two cellular phenotypes were defined by their ability to exhibit adhered, anchorage dependent (AD or sphere forming, anchorage independent (AI growth. The tumor cells could transition back and forth between the two phenotypes and the transition was dependent on the culture conditions. Both cell phenotypes exhibited stem-like features such as expression of nestin, self-renewal capacity and mesenchymal differentiation potential. The AI tumorspheres were found to be more resistant to chemotherapy and proliferated slower in vitro compared to the AD cells. Identification of specific molecular markers like MAP2, β-catenin and PDGFRβ enabled us to characterize and observe both phenotypes in established mouse tumors. Irrespective of the phenotype originally implanted in mice, tumors grown in vivo show phenotypic heterogeneity in molecular marker signatures and are indistinguishable in growth or histologic appearance. Similar molecular marker heterogeneity was demonstrated in primary human tumor specimens. Chemotherapy or growth factor receptor inhibition slowed tumor growth in mice and promoted initial loss of AD or AI heterogeneity, respectively. Simultaneous targeting of both phenotypes led to further tumor growth delay with emergence of new unique phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that neuroblastoma cells are plastic, dynamic and may optimize their ability to survive by changing their phenotype. Phenotypic switching appears to be an adaptive mechanism to unfavorable selection pressure and could explain the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of neuroblastoma.

  11. Exploring Functional β-Cell Heterogeneity In Vivo Using PSA-NCAM as a Specific Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Melis; Castel, Julien; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Brun, Manuel; Géant, Anne; Dubois, Mathilde; Catesson, Sandra; Rodriguez, Marianne; Luquet, Serge; Cattan, Pierre; Lockhart, Brian; Lang, Jochen; Ktorza, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Background The mass of pancreatic β-cells varies according to increases in insulin demand. It is hypothesized that functionally heterogeneous β-cell subpopulations take part in this process. Here we characterized two functionally distinct groups of β-cells and investigated their physiological relevance in increased insulin demand conditions in rats. Methods Two rat β-cell populations were sorted by FACS according to their PSA-NCAM surface expression, i.e. βhigh and βlow-cells. Insulin release, Ca2+ movements, ATP and cAMP contents in response to various secretagogues were analyzed. Gene expression profiles and exocytosis machinery were also investigated. In a second part, βhigh and βlow-cell distribution and functionality were investigated in animal models with decreased or increased β-cell function: the Zucker Diabetic Fatty rat and the 48 h glucose-infused rat. Results We show that β-cells are heterogeneous for PSA-NCAM in rat pancreas. Unlike βlow-cells, βhigh-cells express functional β-cell markers and are highly responsive to various insulin secretagogues. Whereas βlow-cells represent the main population in diabetic pancreas, an increase in βhigh-cells is associated with gain of function that follows sustained glucose overload. Conclusion Our data show that a functional heterogeneity of β-cells, assessed by PSA-NCAM surface expression, exists in vivo. These findings pinpoint new target populations involved in endocrine pancreas plasticity and in β-cell defects in type 2 diabetes. PMID:19440374

  12. Exploring functional beta-cell heterogeneity in vivo using PSA-NCAM as a specific marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Karaca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mass of pancreatic beta-cells varies according to increases in insulin demand. It is hypothesized that functionally heterogeneous beta-cell subpopulations take part in this process. Here we characterized two functionally distinct groups of beta-cells and investigated their physiological relevance in increased insulin demand conditions in rats. METHODS: Two rat beta-cell populations were sorted by FACS according to their PSA-NCAM surface expression, i.e. beta(high and beta(low-cells. Insulin release, Ca(2+ movements, ATP and cAMP contents in response to various secretagogues were analyzed. Gene expression profiles and exocytosis machinery were also investigated. In a second part, beta(high and beta(low-cell distribution and functionality were investigated in animal models with decreased or increased beta-cell function: the Zucker Diabetic Fatty rat and the 48 h glucose-infused rat. RESULTS: We show that beta-cells are heterogeneous for PSA-NCAM in rat pancreas. Unlike beta(low-cells, beta(high-cells express functional beta-cell markers and are highly responsive to various insulin secretagogues. Whereas beta(low-cells represent the main population in diabetic pancreas, an increase in beta(high-cells is associated with gain of function that follows sustained glucose overload. CONCLUSION: Our data show that a functional heterogeneity of beta-cells, assessed by PSA-NCAM surface expression, exists in vivo. These findings pinpoint new target populations involved in endocrine pancreas plasticity and in beta-cell defects in type 2 diabetes.

  13. Spatial and temporal heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus density in La Reunion Island: rise and weakness of entomological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Sebastien; Foray, Coralie; Dehecq, Jean-Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index) plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week) and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas) heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better.

  14. Spatial and temporal heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus density in La Reunion Island: rise and weakness of entomological indices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Boyer

    Full Text Available Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better.

  15. Single-cell sequencing reveals karyotype heterogeneity in murine and human malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Bjorn; Taudt, Aaron; Belderbos, Mirjam E; Porubsky, David; Spierings, Diana C J; de Jong, Tristan V; Halsema, Nancy; Kazemier, Hinke G; Hoekstra-Wakker, Karina; Bradley, Allan; de Bont, Eveline S J M; van den Berg, Anke; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter M; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Foijer, Floris

    2016-05-31

    Chromosome instability leads to aneuploidy, a state in which cells have abnormal numbers of chromosomes, and is found in two out of three cancers. In a chromosomal instable p53 deficient mouse model with accelerated lymphomagenesis, we previously observed whole chromosome copy number changes affecting all lymphoma cells. This suggests that chromosome instability is somehow suppressed in the aneuploid lymphomas or that selection for frequently lost/gained chromosomes out-competes the CIN-imposed mis-segregation. To distinguish between these explanations and to examine karyotype dynamics in chromosome instable lymphoma, we use a newly developed single-cell whole genome sequencing (scWGS) platform that provides a complete and unbiased overview of copy number variations (CNV) in individual cells. To analyse these scWGS data, we develop AneuFinder, which allows annotation of copy number changes in a fully automated fashion and quantification of CNV heterogeneity between cells. Single-cell sequencing and AneuFinder analysis reveals high levels of copy number heterogeneity in chromosome instability-driven murine T-cell lymphoma samples, indicating ongoing chromosome instability. Application of this technology to human B cell leukaemias reveals different levels of karyotype heterogeneity in these cancers. Our data show that even though aneuploid tumours select for particular and recurring chromosome combinations, single-cell analysis using AneuFinder reveals copy number heterogeneity. This suggests ongoing chromosome instability that other platforms fail to detect. As chromosome instability might drive tumour evolution, karyotype analysis using single-cell sequencing technology could become an essential tool for cancer treatment stratification.

  16. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Mouse Esophagus Implicates the Presence of a Nonquiescent Epithelial Stem Cell Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. DeWard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  17. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  18. Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or Mast Cell Density in Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any Defining Role of Mast Cell or. Mast Cell Density in. Oral Squamous Cell. Carcinoma? Dear Sir,. I read an article by Zaidi et al. titled to “A study on assessment of mast cell (MCs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)” with great interest.[1] We are concerned about their meandering conclusion presuming close ...

  19. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    to determine the density and compressibility of individual cells enables the prediction and alteration of the separation outcome for a given cell mixture. We apply the method on white blood cells (WBCs) and DU145 prostate cancer cells (DUCs) aiming to improve isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood......, an emerging tool in the monitoring and characterizing of metastatic cancer....

  20. Molecular heterogeneity in adjacent cells in triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebschman ML

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Huebschman,1 Nancy L Lane,1 Huaying Liu,1 Venetia R Sarode,2 Judith L Devlin,1 Eugene P Frenkel1,3 1Harold C Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, 2Department of Pathology, 3Division of Hematology-Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Purpose: This study interrogates the molecular status of individual cells in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and explores the molecular identification and characterization of these tumors to consider the exploitation of a potential-targeted therapeutic approach. Patients and methods: Hyperspectral immunologic cell by cell analysis was applied to touch imprint smears obtained from fresh tumors of breast cancer patients. Results: Cell by cell analysis confirms significant intratumoral molecular heterogeneity in cancer markers with differences from polymerase chain reaction marker reporting. The individual cell heterogeneity was recognized in adjacent cells examined with panels of ten molecular markers in each single cell and included some markers that are considered to express “stem-cell” character. In addition, heterogeneity did not relate either to the size or stage of the primary tumor or to the site from within the cancer. Conclusion: There is a very significant molecular heterogeneity when “adjacent cells” are examined in triple-negative breast cancer, thereby making a successful targeted approach unlikely. In addition, it is not reasonable to consider that these changes will provide an answer to tumor dormancy. Keywords: hyperspectral, cancer stem cells, CSC, CD44, CD24, ALDH1, uPAR, CD133, Her-2

  1. Interaction of low density lipoproteins with rat liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Harkes (Leendert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe most marked conclusion is the establishment of the important role of non-parenchymal cells in the catabolism of the low density lipoproteins by the rat liver. Because the liver is responsible for 70-80% of the removal of LDL from blood this conclusion can be extended to total

  2. Discrimination of the heterogeneity of bone marrow‑derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Dai, Xiaomin; Hsu, Chiaching; Ming, Changsheng; He, Ying; Zhang, Ji; Wei, Lai; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Cong-Yi; Yang, Jun; Gong, Nianqiao

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to discriminate different subsets of cultured dendritic cells (DCs) to evaluate their immunological characteristics. DCs offer an important foundation for immunological studies, and mouse bone marrow (BM) cells cultured with granulocyte‑macrophage colony‑stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) have been used extensively to generate CD11c+/major histocompatibility complex II+ BM‑derived DCs (BMDCs). Immature DCs are considered to have strong migration and phagocytic antigen‑capturing abilities, whereas mature DCs are thought to activate naive T cells and express high levels of costimulatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. In most culture systems, non‑adherent cells are collected as mature and qualified DCs, and the remaining adherent cells are discarded. The output from GM‑CSF cultures comprises mostly adherent cells, and only a small portion of them is non‑adherent. This situation has resulted in ambiguities in the attempts to understand results from the use of cultured DCs. In the present study, DCs were divided into three subsets: i) Non‑adherent cells; ii) adherent cells and iii) mixed cells. The heterogeneous features of cultured DCs were identified by evaluating the maturation status, cytokine secretion and the ability to activate allogeneic T cells according to different subsets. Results from the study demonstrated that BMDC culture systems were a heterogeneous group of cells comprising non‑adherent cells, adherent cells, mixed cells and firmly adherent cells. Non‑adherent cells may be used in future studies that require relatively mature DCs such as anticancer immunity. Adherent cells may be used to induce tolerance DCs, whereas mixed cells may potentiate either tolerogenicity or pro‑tumorigenic responses. Firmly adherent cells were considered to have macrophage‑like properties. The findings may aid in immunological studies that use cultured DCs and may lead to more precise DC research.

  3. Effect of cell density on adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongxu [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Likun [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wozniak, Michal J. [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kawazoe, Naoki [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tateishi, Tetsuya [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Xingdong [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, Guoping, E-mail: Guoping.CHEN@nims.go.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2009-04-10

    The effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated by using a patterning technique to induce the formation of a cell density gradient on a micropatterned surface. The adipogenic differentiation of MSCs at a density gradient from 5 x 10{sup 3} to 3 x 10{sup 4} cells/cm{sup 2} was examined. Lipid vacuoles were observed at all cell densities after 1-3 weeks of culture in adipogenic differentiation medium although the lipid vacuoles were scarce at the low cell density and abundant at the high cell density. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that adipogenesis marker genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4) were detected in the MSCs cultured at all cell densities. The results suggest that there was no apparent effect of cell density on the adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

  4. Cell-to-cell heterogeneity of EWSR1-FLI1 activity determines proliferation/migration choices in Ewing sarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzetti, G-A; Laud-Duval, K; van der Ent, W; Brisac, A; Irondelle, M; Aubert, S; Dirksen, U; Bouvier, C; de Pinieux, G; Snaar-Jagalska, E; Chavrier, P; Delattre, O

    2017-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is characterized by the expression of the chimeric EWSR1-FLI1 transcription factor. Proteomic analyses indicate that the decrease of EWSR1-FLI1 expression leads to major changes in effectors of the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and the adhesion processes with a shift from cell-to-cell to cell-matrix adhesion. These changes are associated with a dramatic increase of in vivo cell migration and invasion potential. Importantly, EWSR1-FLI1 expression, evaluated by single-cell RT-ddPCR/immunofluorescence analyses, and activity, assessed by expression of EWSR1-FLI1 downstream targets, are heterogeneous in cell lines and in tumours and can fluctuate along time in a fully reversible process between EWSR1-FLI1high states, characterized by highly active cell proliferation, and EWSR1-FLI1low states where cells have a strong propensity to migrate, invade and metastasize. This new model of phenotypic plasticity proposes that the dynamic fluctuation of the expression level of a dominant oncogene is an intrinsic characteristic of its oncogenic potential. PMID:28135250

  5. Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    individual cell types within human adipose tissue interact to regulate adipose tissue physiology . Specifically, we have developed the molecular and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0251 TITLE: “Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal Heterogeneity in Metabolic Disease Using Single Cell RNA...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2016 - 31 Aug 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of Human Adipose Tissue Stromal

  6. Single-Cell Mass Spectrometry for Discovery Proteomics: Quantifying Translational Cell Heterogeneity in the 16-Cell Frog (Xenopus) Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard-Banek, Camille; Moody, Sally A; Nemes, Peter

    2016-02-12

    We advance mass spectrometry from a cell population-averaging tool to one capable of quantifying the expression of diverse proteins in single embryonic cells. Our instrument combines capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrospray ionization, and a tribrid ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) to enable untargeted (discovery) proteomics with ca. 25 amol lower limit of detection. CE-μESI-HRMS enabled the identification of 500-800 nonredundant protein groups by measuring 20 ng, or embryo, amounting to a total of 1709 protein groups identified between n=3 biological replicates. By quantifying ≈150 nonredundant protein groups between all blastomeres and replicate measurements, we found significant translational cell heterogeneity along multiple axes of the embryo at this very early stage of development when the transcriptional program of the embryo has yet to begin. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Stable Regulation of Cell Cycle Events in Mycobacteria: Insights From Inherently Heterogeneous Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Michelle M.; Aldridge, Bree B.

    2018-01-01

    Model bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtilis, tightly regulate cell cycle progression to achieve consistent cell size distributions and replication dynamics. Many of the hallmark features of these model bacteria, including lateral cell wall elongation and symmetric growth and division, do not occur in mycobacteria. Instead, mycobacterial growth is characterized by asymmetric polar growth and division. This innate asymmetry creates unequal birth sizes and growth rates for daughter cells with each division, generating a phenotypically heterogeneous population. Although the asymmetric growth patterns of mycobacteria lead to a larger variation in birth size than typically seen in model bacterial populations, the cell size distribution is stable over time. Here, we review the cellular mechanisms of growth, division, and cell cycle progression in mycobacteria in the face of asymmetry and inherent heterogeneity. These processes coalesce to control cell size. Although Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) utilize a novel model of cell size control, they are similar to previously studied bacteria in that initiation of DNA replication is a key checkpoint for cell division. We compare the regulation of DNA replication initiation and strategies used for cell size homeostasis in mycobacteria and model bacteria. Finally, we review the importance of cellular organization and chromosome segregation relating to the physiology of mycobacteria and consider how new frameworks could be applied across the wide spectrum of bacterial diversity. PMID:29619019

  8. SinCHet: a MATLAB toolbox for single cell heterogeneity analysis in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiannong; Smalley, Inna; Schell, Michael J; Smalley, Keiran S M; Chen, Y Ann

    2017-09-15

    Single-cell technologies allow characterization of transcriptomes and epigenomes for individual cells under different conditions and provide unprecedented resolution for researchers to investigate cellular heterogeneity in cancer. The SinCHet ( gle ell erogeneity) toolbox is developed in MATLAB and has a graphical user interface (GUI) for visualization and user interaction. It analyzes both continuous (e.g. mRNA expression) and binary omics data (e.g. discretized methylation data). The toolbox does not only quantify cellular heterogeneity using S hannon P rofile (SP) at different clonal resolutions but also detects heterogeneity differences using a D statistic between two populations. It is defined as the area under the P rofile of S hannon D ifference (PSD). This flexible tool provides a default clonal resolution using the change point of PSD detected by multivariate adaptive regression splines model; it also allows user-defined clonal resolutions for further investigation. This tool provides insights into emerging or disappearing clones between conditions, and enables the prioritization of biomarkers for follow-up experiments based on heterogeneity or marker differences between and/or within cell populations. The SinCHet software is freely available for non-profit academic use. The source code, example datasets, and the compiled package are available at http://labpages2.moffitt.org/chen/software/ . ann.chen@moffitt.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Cell density overrides the effect of substrate stiffness on human mesenchymal stem cells' morphology and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Balu; Mogha, Pankaj; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Majumder, Abhijit

    2018-03-12

    The effect of substrate stiffness on the cellular morphology, proliferation, and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has been extensively researched and well established. However, the majority of these studies are done with a low seeding density where cell to cell interactions do not play a significant role. While these conditions permit an analysis of cell-substratum interactions at the single cell level, such a model system fails to capture a critical aspect of the cellular micro-environment in vivo, i.e. the cell-cell interaction via matrix deformation (i.e., strain). To address this question, we seeded hMSCs on soft poly-acrylamide (PAA) gels, at a seeding density that permits cells to be mechanically interacting via the underlying substrate. We found that as the intercellular distance decreases with the increasing seeding density, cellular sensitivity towards the substrate rigidity becomes significantly diminished. With the increasing seeding density, the cell spread area increased on a soft substrate (500 Pa) but reduced on an even slightly stiffer substrate (2 kPa) as well as on glass making them indistinguishable at a high seeding density. Not only in terms of cell spread area but also at a high seeding density, cells formed mature focal adhesions and prominent stress fibres on a soft substrate similar to that of the cells being cultured on a stiff substrate. The decreased intercellular distance also influenced the proliferation rate of the cells: higher seeding density on the soft substrate showed cell cycle progression similar to that of the cells on glass substrates. In summary, this paper demonstrates how the effect of substrate rigidity on the cell morphology and fate is a function of inter-cellular distance when seeded on a soft substrate. Our AFM data suggest that such changes happen due to local strain stiffening of the soft PAA gel, an effect that has been rarely reported in the literature so far.

  10. Time scales in epigenetic dynamics and phenotypic heterogeneity of embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Sasai

    Full Text Available A remarkable feature of the self-renewing population of embryonic stem cells (ESCs is their phenotypic heterogeneity: Nanog and other marker proteins of ESCs show large cell-to-cell variation in their expression level, which should significantly influence the differentiation process of individual cells. The molecular mechanism and biological implication of this heterogeneity, however, still remain elusive. We address this problem by constructing a model of the core gene-network of mouse ESCs. The model takes account of processes of binding/unbinding of transcription factors, formation/dissolution of transcription apparatus, and modification of histone code at each locus of genes in the network. These processes are hierarchically interrelated to each other forming the dynamical feedback loops. By simulating stochastic dynamics of this model, we show that the phenotypic heterogeneity of ESCs can be explained when the chromatin at the Nanog locus undergoes the large scale reorganization in formation/dissolution of transcription apparatus, which should have the timescale similar to the cell cycle period. With this slow transcriptional switching of Nanog, the simulated ESCs fluctuate among multiple transient states, which can trigger the differentiation into the lineage-specific cell states. From the simulated transitions among cell states, the epigenetic landscape underlying transitions is calculated. The slow Nanog switching gives rise to the wide basin of ESC states in the landscape. The bimodal Nanog distribution arising from the kinetic flow running through this ESC basin prevents transdifferentiation and promotes the definite decision of the cell fate. These results show that the distribution of timescales of the regulatory processes is decisively important to characterize the fluctuation of cells and their differentiation process. The analyses through the epigenetic landscape and the kinetic flow on the landscape should provide a guideline to

  11. Dual-trap Raman tweezers for probing dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting microbial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Guiwen; Yao, Hui-Lu; Liu, Junxian; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-11-01

    We report on development of dual-trap Raman tweezers for monitoring cellular dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting living cells suspended in a liquid medium. Dual-beam optical tweezers were combined with Raman spectroscopy, which allows capturing two cells that are in direct contact or closely separated by a few micrometers and simultaneously acquiring their Raman spectra with an imaging CCD spectrograph. As a demonstration, we recorded time-lapse Raman spectra of budding yeast cells held in dual traps for over 40 min to monitor the dynamic growth in a nutrient medium. We also monitored two germinating Bacillus spores after the initiation with L-alanine and observed their heterogeneity in the release of CaDPA under identical microenvironment.

  12. Surface determinants of low density lipoprotein uptake by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeroeg, P.; Pearson, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The surface sialic acid content of aortic endothelial cells in vitro was substantially lower in sparse cultures than at confluence. Binding of LDL to endothelial cells did not change at different culture densities and was unaffected by brief pretreatment with neuraminidase to partially remove surface sialic acid residues. In contrast, internalisation of LDL declined by a factor of 3 between low density cell cultures and confluent monolayers; neuraminidase pretreatment increased LDL uptake and the effect was most marked (>10-fold) at confluence. Pretreatment with cationised ferritin, which removed most of the surface sialic acid residues as well as glycosaminoglycans, increased LDL internalisation by up to 20-fold, again with most effect on confluent monolayers. Thus LDL uptake is inversely correlated with sialic acid content. We conclude that changes in the surface density of sialic acid (and possibly other charged) residues significantly modulate endothelial LDL uptake, and suggest that focal increases in LDL accumulation during atherogenesis may be related to alterations in endothelial endocytic properties at sites of increased cell turnover or damage. (author)

  13. Heterogeneity in cancer cells: variation in drug response in different primary and secondary colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arul, Melanie; Roslani, April Camilla; Cheah, Swee Hung

    2017-05-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may give rise to differential responses to chemotherapy drugs. Therefore, unraveling tumor heterogeneity has an implication for biomarker discovery and cancer therapeutics. To test this phenomenon, we investigated the differential responses of three secondary colorectal cancer cell lines of different origins (HCT116, HT29, and SW620 cells) and four novel primary cell lines obtained from different colorectal cancer patients to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (L-OHP) and explored the differences in gene expression among the primary cell lines in response to exposure to cytotoxic drugs. Cells were exposed to different doses of 5-FU and L-OHP separately or in combinations of equitoxic drug or equimolar drug ratios (median effect of Chou-Talalay principle). Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay and the respective IC 50 values were determined. Changes in gene expression in primary cell lines after exposure to the same drug doses were compared using real-time PCR array. The sensitivities (IC 50 ) of different cell lines, both secondary and primary, to 5-FU and L-OHP were significantly different, whether in monotherapy or combined treatment. Primary cell lines needed higher doses to reach IC 50 . There were variations in gene expression among the primary cell lines of different chemosensitivities to the challenge of the same combined dose of 5-FU and L-OHP. The results confirm the heterogeneous nature of colorectal cancer cells from different patient tumors. Studies using primary cancer cells established from patient's tumors rather than secondary cell lines will more closely reflect the actual character of the disease.

  14. Nanofiber density determines endothelial cell behavior on hydrogel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Fernanda V., E-mail: fernanda@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Rambo, Carlos R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dias, Paulo F. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Porto, Luismar M. [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    When cultured under static conditions, bacterial cellulose pellicles, by the nature of the polymer synthesis that involves molecular oxygen, are characterized by two distinct surface sides. The upper surface is denser in fibers (entangled) than the lower surface that shows greater surface porosity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exploit how the microarchitecture (i.e., surface porosity, fiber network structure, surface topology, and fiber density) of bacterial cellulose pellicle surfaces influence cell–biomaterial interaction and therefore cell behavior. Adhesion, cell ingrowth, proliferation, viability and cell death mechanisms were evaluated on the two pellicle surface sides. Cell behavior, including secondary necrosis, is influenced only by the microarchitecture of the surface, since the biomaterial is extremely pure (constituted of cellulose and water only). Cell–cellulose fiber interaction is the determinant signal in the cell–biomaterial responses, isolated from other frequently present interferences such as protein and other chemical traces usually present in cell culture matrices. Our results suggest that microarchitecture of hydrogel materials might determine the performance of biomedical products, such as bacterial cellulose tissue engineering constructs (BCTECs). - Highlights: • Topography of BC pellicle is relevant to determine endothelial cells' fate. • Cell–biomaterial response is affected by the topography of BC-pellicle surface. • Endothelial cells exhibit different behavior depending on the BC topography. • Apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells were affected by the BC topography.

  15. Nanofiber density determines endothelial cell behavior on hydrogel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, Fernanda V.; Rambo, Carlos R.; Dias, Paulo F.; Porto, Luismar M.

    2013-01-01

    When cultured under static conditions, bacterial cellulose pellicles, by the nature of the polymer synthesis that involves molecular oxygen, are characterized by two distinct surface sides. The upper surface is denser in fibers (entangled) than the lower surface that shows greater surface porosity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exploit how the microarchitecture (i.e., surface porosity, fiber network structure, surface topology, and fiber density) of bacterial cellulose pellicle surfaces influence cell–biomaterial interaction and therefore cell behavior. Adhesion, cell ingrowth, proliferation, viability and cell death mechanisms were evaluated on the two pellicle surface sides. Cell behavior, including secondary necrosis, is influenced only by the microarchitecture of the surface, since the biomaterial is extremely pure (constituted of cellulose and water only). Cell–cellulose fiber interaction is the determinant signal in the cell–biomaterial responses, isolated from other frequently present interferences such as protein and other chemical traces usually present in cell culture matrices. Our results suggest that microarchitecture of hydrogel materials might determine the performance of biomedical products, such as bacterial cellulose tissue engineering constructs (BCTECs). - Highlights: • Topography of BC pellicle is relevant to determine endothelial cells' fate. • Cell–biomaterial response is affected by the topography of BC-pellicle surface. • Endothelial cells exhibit different behavior depending on the BC topography. • Apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells were affected by the BC topography

  16. Single-cell profiling reveals heterogeneity and functional patterning of GPCR expression in the vascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, H; Carvalho, J; Looso, M; Singh, P; Chennupati, R; Preussner, J; Günther, S; Albarrán-Juárez, J; Tischner, D; Classen, S; Offermanns, S; Wettschureck, N

    2017-06-16

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression is extensively studied in bulk cDNA, but heterogeneity and functional patterning of GPCR expression in individual vascular cells is poorly understood. Here, we perform a microfluidic-based single-cell GPCR expression analysis in primary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC). GPCR expression is highly heterogeneous in all cell types, which is confirmed in reporter mice, on the protein level and in human cells. Inflammatory activation in murine models of sepsis or atherosclerosis results in characteristic changes in the GPCR repertoire, and we identify functionally relevant subgroups of cells that are characterized by specific GPCR patterns. We further show that dedifferentiating SMC upregulate GPCRs such as Gpr39, Gprc5b, Gprc5c or Gpr124, and that selective targeting of Gprc5b modulates their differentiation state. Taken together, single-cell profiling identifies receptors expressed on pathologically relevant subpopulations and provides a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in vascular diseases.

  17. Analytical Study on Multi-Tier 5G Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks: Coverage Performance and Energy Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhu; Liu, Hongjing; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-11-04

    In this paper, we investigate the coverage performance and energy efficiency of multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) which are composed of macrocells and different types of small cells, i.e., picocells and femtocells. By virtue of stochastic geometry tools, we model the multi-tier HetNets based on a Poisson point process (PPP) and analyze the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) via studying the cumulative interference from pico-tier and femto-tier. We then derive the analytical expressions of coverage probabilities in order to evaluate coverage performance in different tiers and investigate how it varies with the small cells' deployment density. By taking the fairness and user experience into consideration, we propose a disjoint channel allocation scheme and derive the system channel throughput for various tiers. Further, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem for multi-tier HetNets in terms of throughput performance and resource allocation fairness. To solve this problem, we devise a linear programming based approach to obtain the available area of the feasible solutions. System-level simulations demonstrate that the small cells' deployment density has a significant effect on the coverage performance and energy efficiency. Simulation results also reveal that there exits an optimal small cell base station (SBS) density ratio between pico-tier and femto-tier which can be applied to maximize the energy efficiency and at the same time enhance the system performance. Our findings provide guidance for the design of multi-tier HetNets for improving the coverage performance as well as the energy efficiency.

  18. Survival-associated heterogeneity of marker-defined perivascular cells in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Lindh, Maja Bradic; Guren, Tormod Kyrre

    2016-01-01

    of vessel characteristics and PC, which was applied to two collections of human metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).Initial analyses identified marker-defined subsets of PC, including cells expressing PDGFR-β or α-SMA or both markers. PC subsets were largely independently expressed in a manner unrelated......Perivascular cells (PC) were recently implied as regulators of metastasis and immune cell activity. Perivascular heterogeneity in clinical samples, and associations with other tumor features and outcome, remain largely unknown.Here we report a novel method for digital quantitative analyses...

  19. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  20. Enhanced photocurrent density of HTM-free perovskite solar cells by carbon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Guo, Daipeng; He, Bowen; Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Ke

    2018-02-01

    Full-printable and hole transport material (HTM)-free perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with carbon counter electrodes feature high stability and low cost. However, the perovskite film prepared by conventional one-step solution-coating method always shows a relatively poor coverage on the substrate, leading to the limit of the photocurrent density. In this study, we incorporated carbon quantum dots (CQDs) in the perovskite films, and investigated their effects on the performance of TiO2 nanosheet-based and HTM-free PSCs. It was found that the addition of CQDs to the perovskite film can enhance the photocurrent density of PSCs, and the optimal PSC with 0.1% CQDs evolved 60% higher photocurrent density than the pristine one. The improved photocurrent density was attributed to the heterogeneous nuclei derived from CQDs during perovskite crystallization, which would increase amount of perovskite nuclei and form a fine perovskite grain, leading to a better coverage on the substrate. Moreover, due to the excellent conductivity, CQDs in perovskite films could efficiently transport the photo-excited electrons, accelerating the separation and mobilization of charge carriers. This study presents the incorporation of CQDs in perovskite as an efficient approach to promote the performance of HTM-free PSCs.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated oral Kaposi's sarcoma. A heterogeneous cell population dominated by spindle-shaped endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; MacPhail, L A; Daniels, T E; DeSouza, Y G; Greenspan, J S; Greenspan, D

    1993-07-01

    Cell lineage and cell function antigens were studied immunohistochemically in human immunodeficiency virus-associated oral Kaposi's sarcoma to provide insight into tumor pathogenesis. All tumors were composed predominantly of spindle cells that expressed endothelium-associated antigens, CD34 and CD36 (factor VIII-related antigen was expressed by considerably fewer numbers of tumor cells). Infrequently, spindle tumor cells also expressed actin. Factor XIIIa positive spindle and dendritic stromal cells comprised up to 9% of the tumor cell population. Other spindle and dendritic cells expressing macrophage-associated antigen, CD68, accounted for up to 15% of the tumor cells. Mast cells occurred frequently within and around tumors. Leukocyte function antigen (CD18) was expressed by approximately 13% of tumor cells, and its ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), was expressed by some tumor-associated capillaries (which also expressed endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, ELAM) and occasional stromal cells. Staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen was noted in both interstitial and vascular lining cells. All tumors were non-reactive for human Papillomavirus antigen and HIV p24 antigen. Oral KS is a heterogeneous cellular proliferation composed predominantly of endothelial or endothelium-related spindle cells. Other spindle/dendritic (XIIIa-positive and CD68-positive) cells and mast cells are also present and may contribute to tumor development. ICAM and ELAM expression within tumors may assist infiltration of macrophages and other inflammatory cells into these lesions.

  2. Cell density, negative proliferation control, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, R M

    1993-04-01

    Cell density negative control (CDNC) of normal human fibroblast proliferation occurs after stimulation by mitogens with different signal transduction mechanism. Delayed exposure to agents that interfere with CDNC, such as double-stranded RNA and vanadate, reveals the existence of a biochemical event, involved in CDNC, that occurs 5-8 hr after the beginning of mitogenic stimulation. This is earlier than the point of "mitogenic commitment," defined by the duration of mitogen exposure required for cell cycle entry (8-18 hr). Phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) begins 8-10 hr after mitogen stimulation and is nearly complete at 18 hr, just as the first cells enter S-phase. CDNC prevents pRB phosphorylation. Interferon beta delays pRB phosphorylation by up to 20 hr but has little effect on the timing of mitogenic commitment. Thus mitogenic commitment is located in time between CDNC and pRB phosphorylation. When agents that cause a release from CDNC are applied to dense, negatively controlled cultures after 18 hr of EGF stimulation, pRB phosphorylation occurs 6-8 hr after release. This suggests that the negatively controlled cells process the mitogenic signal but accumulate at a restriction point. The relatively early timing of CDNC-related events in the prereplicative phase raises the possibility that pRB phosphorylation is a consequence rather than a prerequisite for release from cell density negative control.

  3. Bistable Epigenetic States Explain Age-Dependent Decline in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Rother, Karen; Przybilla, Jens; Krinner, Axel; Clay, Denis; Hopp, Lydia; Fabian, Claire; Stolzing, Alexandra; Binder, Hans; Charbord, Pierre; Galle, Joerg

    2017-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which heterogeneity, a major characteristic of stem cells, is achieved are yet unclear. We here study the expression of the membrane stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clones. We show that subpopulations with varying Sca-1 expression profiles regenerate the Sca-1 profile of the mother population within a few days. However, after extensive replication in vitro, the expression profiles shift to lower values and the regeneration time increases. Study of the promoter of Ly6a unravels that the expression level of Sca-1 is related to the promoter occupancy by the activating histone mark H3K4me3. We demonstrate that these findings can be consistently explained by a computational model that considers positive feedback between promoter H3K4me3 modification and gene transcription. This feedback implicates bistable epigenetic states which the cells occupy with an age-dependent frequency due to persistent histone (de-)modification. Our results provide evidence that MSC heterogeneity, and presumably that of other stem cells, is associated with bistable epigenetic states and suggest that MSCs are subject to permanent state fluctuations. Stem Cells 2017;35:694-704. © The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  4. The senescent microenvironment promotes the emergence of heterogeneous cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Vega, Luis Jaime; Jouravleva, Karina; Ortiz-Montero, Paola; Liu, Win-Yan; Galeano, Jorge Luis; Romero, Martha; Popova, Tatiana; Bacchetti, Silvia; Vernot, Jean Paul; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-10-01

    There is a well-established association between aging and the onset of metastasis. Although the mechanisms through which age impinges upon the malignant phenotype remain uncharacterized, the role of a senescent microenvironment has been emphasized. We reported previously that human epithelial cells that undergo telomere-driven chromosome instability (T-CIN) display global microRNA (miR) deregulation and develop migration and invasion capacities. Here, we show that post-crisis cells are not able to form tumors unless a senescent microenvironment is provided. The characterization of cell lines established from such tumors revealed that these cells have acquired cell autonomous tumorigenicity, giving rise to heterogeneous tumors. Further experiments demonstrate that explanted cells, while displaying differences in cell differentiation markers, are all endowed of enhanced stem cell properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Treatments of T-CIN+ cells with senescence-conditioned media induce sphere formation exclusively in cells with senescence-associated tumorigenicity, a capacity that depends on miR-145 repression. These results indicate that the senescent microenvironment, while promoting further transdifferentiations in cells with genome instability, is able to propel the progression of premalignant cells towards a malignant, cell stem-like state. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A review of recent progress in heterogeneous silicon tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Lee, Kan-Hua; Araki, Kenji; Kojima, Nobuaki

    2018-04-01

    Silicon solar cells are the most established solar cell technology and are expected to dominate the market in the near future. As state-of-the-art silicon solar cells are approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit, stacking silicon solar cells with other photovoltaic materials to form multi-junction devices is an obvious pathway to further raise the efficiency. However, many challenges stand in the way of fully realizing the potential of silicon tandem solar cells because heterogeneously integrating silicon with other materials often degrades their qualities. Recently, above or near 30% silicon tandem solar cell has been demonstrated, showing the promise of achieving high-efficiency and low-cost solar cells via silicon tandem. This paper reviews the recent progress of integrating solar cell with other mainstream solar cell materials. The first part of this review focuses on the integration of silicon with III-V semiconductor solar cells, which is a long-researched topic since the emergence of III-V semiconductors. We will describe the main approaches—heteroepitaxy, wafer bonding and mechanical stacking—as well as other novel approaches. The second part introduces the integration of silicon with polycrystalline thin-film solar cells, mainly perovskites on silicon solar cells because of its rapid progress recently. We will also use an analytical model to compare the material qualities of different types of silicon tandem solar cells and project their practical efficiency limits.

  6. Cloning of transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells; an efficient method to analyse and reduce high natural heterogeneity of transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Lukas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic characterization of transgenic cell lines, frequently used in plant biology studies, is complicated because transgene expression in individual cells is often heterogeneous and unstable. To identify the sources and to reduce this heterogeneity, we transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. BY-2 cells with a gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP using Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and then introduced a simple cloning procedure to generate cell lines derived from the individual transformed cells. Expression of the transgene was monitored by analysing GFP fluorescence in the cloned lines and also in lines obtained directly after transformation. Results The majority (~90% of suspension culture lines derived from calli that were obtained directly from transformation consisted of cells with various levels of GFP fluorescence. In contrast, nearly 50% of lines generated by cloning cells from the primary heterogeneous suspensions consisted of cells with homogenous GFP fluorescence. The rest of the lines exhibited "permanent heterogeneity" that could not be resolved by cloning. The extent of fluorescence heterogeneity often varied, even among genetically identical clones derived from the primary transformed lines. In contrast, the offspring of subsequent cloning of the cloned lines was uniform, showing GFP fluorescence intensity and heterogeneity that corresponded to the original clone. Conclusion The results demonstrate that, besides genetic heterogeneity detected in some lines, the primary lines often contained a mixture of epigenetically different cells that could be separated by cloning. This indicates that a single integration event frequently results in various heritable expression patterns, which are probably accidental and become stabilized in the offspring of the primary transformed cells early after the integration event. Because heterogeneity in transgene expression has proven to be a serious problem, it is

  7. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  8. Heterogeneity of Metazoan Cells and Beyond: To Integrative Analysis of Cellular Populations at Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barteneva, Natasha S; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we review some of the recent advances in cellular heterogeneity and single-cell analysis methods. In modern research of cellular heterogeneity, there are four major approaches: analysis of pooled samples, single-cell analysis, high-throughput single-cell analysis, and lately integrated analysis of cellular population at a single-cell level. Recently developed high-throughput single-cell genetic analysis methods such as RNA-Seq require purification step and destruction of an analyzed cell often are providing a snapshot of the investigated cell without spatiotemporal context. Correlative analysis of multiparameter morphological, functional, and molecular information is important for differentiation of more uniform groups in the spectrum of different cell types. Simplified distributions (histograms and 2D plots) can underrepresent biologically significant subpopulations. Future directions may include the development of nondestructive methods for dissecting molecular events in intact cells, simultaneous correlative cellular analysis of phenotypic and molecular features by hybrid technologies such as imaging flow cytometry, and further progress in supervised and non-supervised statistical analysis algorithms.

  9. Cell-to-cell heterogeneity in cortical tension specifies curvature of contact surfaces in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Fujita

    Full Text Available In the two-cell stage embryos of Caenorhabditis elegans, the contact surface of the two blastomeres forms a curve that bulges from the AB blastomere to the P₁ blastomere. This curve is a consequence of the high intracellular hydrostatic pressure of AB compared with that of P₁. However, the higher pressure in AB is intriguing because AB has a larger volume than P₁. In soap bubbles, which are a widely used model of cell shape, a larger bubble has lower pressure than a smaller bubble. Here, we reveal that the higher pressure in AB is mediated by its higher cortical tension. The cell fusion experiments confirmed that the curvature of the contact surface is related to the pressure difference between the cells. Chemical and genetic interferences showed that the pressure difference is mediated by actomyosin. Fluorescence imaging indicated that non-muscle myosin is enriched in the AB cortex. The cell killing experiments provided evidence that AB but not P₁ is responsible for the pressure difference. Computer simulation clarified that the cell-to-cell heterogeneity of cortical tensions is indispensable for explaining the pressure difference. This study demonstrates that heterogeneity in surface tension results in significant deviations of cell behavior compared to simple soap bubble models, and thus must be taken into consideration in understanding cell shape within embryos.

  10. Regional heterogeneity of endothelial cells in the porcine vortex vein system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Priscilla Ern Zhi; Yu, Paula K; Cringle, Stephen J; Morgan, William H; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether region-dependent endothelial heterogeneity is present within the porcine vortex vein system. The superior temporal vortex vein in young adult pig eyes were dissected out and cannulated. The intact vortex vein system down to the choroidal veins was then perfused with labels for f-actin and nucleic acid. The endothelial cells within the choroidal veins, pre-ampulla, anterior portion of the ampulla, mid-ampulla, posterior portion of the ampulla, post-ampulla, intra-scleral canal and the extra-ocular vortex vein regions were studied in detail using a confocal microscopy technique. The endothelial cell and nuclei length, width, area and perimeter were measured and compared between the different regions. Significant regional differences in the endothelial cell and nuclei length, width, area and perimeter were observed throughout the porcine vortex vein system. Most notably, very narrow and elongated endothelia were found in the post-ampulla region. A lack of smooth muscle cells was noted in the ampulla region compared to other regions. Heterogeneity in endothelial cell morphology is present throughout the porcine vortex vein system and there is a lack of smooth muscle cells in the ampulla region. This likely reflects the highly varied haemodynamic conditions and potential blood flow control mechanisms in different regions of the vortex vein system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clonal Heterogeneity in the Neuronal and Glial Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser I. Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity presents an important challenge to the development of cell-based therapies where there is a fundamental requirement for predictable and reproducible outcomes. Transplanted Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells (DPSCs have demonstrated early promise in experimental models of spinal cord injury and stroke, despite limited evidence of neuronal and glial-like differentiation after transplantation. Here, we report, for the first time, on the ability of single cell-derived clonal cultures of murine DPSCs to differentiate in vitro into immature neuronal-like and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Importantly, only DPSC clones with high nestin mRNA expression levels were found to successfully differentiate into Map2 and NF-positive neuronal-like cells. Neuronally differentiated DPSCs possessed a membrane capacitance comparable with primary cultured striatal neurons and small inward voltage-activated K+ but not outward Na+ currents were recorded suggesting a functionally immature phenotype. Similarly, only high nestin-expressing clones demonstrated the ability to adopt Olig1, Olig2, and MBP-positive immature oligodendrocyte-like phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate that appropriate markers may be used to provide an early indication of the suitability of a cell population for purposes where differentiation into a specific lineage may be beneficial and highlight that further understanding of heterogeneity within mixed cellular populations is required.

  12. Subcloning the RBL-2H3 mucosal mast cell line reduces Ca2+ response heterogeneity at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchtey, J; Fewtrell, C

    1996-03-01

    Ca2+ imaging experiments have revealed that for a wide variety of cell types, including RBL-2H3 mucosal mast cells, there are considerable cell-to-cell differences of the Ca2+ responses of individual cells. This heterogeneity is evident in both the shape and latency of the responses. Mast cells within a single microscopic field of view, which have experienced identical culture conditions and experimental preparation, display a wide variety of responses upon antigen stimulation. We have subcloned the RBL-2H3 mucosal mast cell line to test the hypothesis that genetic heterogeneity within the population is the cause of the Ca2+ response heterogeneity. We found that cell-to-cell variability was significantly reduced in four of five clonal lines. The response heterogeneity remaining within the clones was not an experimental artifact caused by differences in the amount of fura-2 loaded by individual cells. Factors other than genetic heterogeneity must partly account for Ca2+ response heterogeneity. It is possible that the complex shapes and variability of the Ca2+ responses are reflections of the fact that there are multiple factors underlying the Ca2-response to antigen stimulation. Small differences from cell to cell in one or more of these factors could be a cause of the remaining Ca2+ response heterogeneity.

  13. Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets Possess Tissue-Type Based Heterogeneity in Phenotype and Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simoni, Yannick; Fehlings, Michael; Kloverpris, Henrik N.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have highlighted the importance of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in multiple immune responses. However, technical limitations have hampered adequate characterization of ILCs in humans. Here, we used mass cytometry including a broad range of surface markers and transcription factors...... to accurately identify and profile ILCs across healthy and inflamed tissue types. High dimensional analysis allowed for clear phenotypic delineation of ILC2 and ILC3 subsets. We were not able to detect ILC1 cells in any of the tissues assessed, however, we identified intra-epithelial (ie)ILC1-like cells...... that represent a broader category of NK cells in mucosal and non-mucosal pathological tissues. In addition, we have revealed the expression of phenotypic molecules that have not been previously described for ILCs. Our analysis shows that human ILCs are highly heterogeneous cell types between individuals...

  14. Quorum sensing integrates environmental cues, cell density and cell history to control bacterial competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Gámez, Stefany; Sorg, Robin A; Domenech, Arnau; Kjos, Morten; Weissing, Franz J; van Doorn, G Sander; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2017-10-11

    Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes competent for genetic transformation when exposed to an autoinducer peptide known as competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). This peptide was originally described as a quorum-sensing signal, enabling individual cells to regulate competence in response to population density. However, recent studies suggest that CSP may instead serve as a probe for sensing environmental cues, such as antibiotic stress or environmental diffusion. Here, we show that competence induction can be simultaneously influenced by cell density, external pH, antibiotic-induced stress, and cell history. Our experimental data is explained by a mathematical model where the environment and cell history modify the rate at which cells produce or sense CSP. Taken together, model and experiments indicate that autoinducer concentration can function as an indicator of cell density across environmental conditions, while also incorporating information on environmental factors or cell history, allowing cells to integrate cues such as antibiotic stress into their quorum-sensing response. This unifying perspective may apply to other debated quorum-sensing systems.Peptide CSP regulates natural competence in pneumococci and has been proposed as a quorum-sensing signal or a probe for sensing environmental cues. Here, the authors show that CSP levels can indeed act as an indicator of cell density and also incorporate information on environmental factors or cell history.

  15. Single-cell profiling reveals GPCR heterogeneity and functional patterning during neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, Denise; Grimm, Myriam; Kaur, Harmandeep; Staudenraus, Daniel; Carvalho, Jorge; Looso, Mario; Günther, Stefan; Wanke, Florian; Moos, Sonja; Siller, Nelly; Breuer, Johanna; Schwab, Nicholas; Zipp, Frauke; Waisman, Ari; Kurschus, Florian C; Offermanns, Stefan; Wettschureck, Nina

    2017-08-03

    GPCR expression was intensively studied in bulk cDNA of leukocyte populations, but limited data are available with respect to expression in individual cells. Here, we show a microfluidic-based single-cell GPCR expression analysis in primary T cells, myeloid cells, and endothelial cells under naive conditions and during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the mouse model of multiple sclerosis. We found that neuroinflammation induces characteristic changes in GPCR heterogeneity and patterning, and we identify various functionally relevant subgroups with specific GPCR profiles among spinal cord-infiltrating CD4 T cells, macrophages, microglia, or endothelial cells. Using GPCRs CXCR4, S1P1, and LPHN2 as examples, we show how this information can be used to develop new strategies for the functional modulation of Th17 cells and activated endothelial cells. Taken together, single-cell GPCR expression analysis identifies functionally relevant subpopulations with specific GPCR repertoires and provides a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in immune disorders.

  16. Relationship between ventilation heterogeneity and exercise intolerance in adults with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Lopes

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia (SCA causes dysfunction of multiple organs, with pulmonary involvement as a major cause of mortality. Recently, there has been growing interest in the nitrogen single-breath washout (N2SBW test, which is able to detect ventilation heterogeneity and small airway disease when the results of other pulmonary function tests (PFTs are still normal. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to assess the heterogeneity in the ventilation distribution in adults with SCA and to determine the association between the ventilation distribution and the clinical, cardiovascular, and radiological findings. This cross-sectional study included 38 adults with SCA who underwent PFTs, echocardiography, computed tomography (CT, and 6-min walk test. To evaluate the ventilation heterogeneity, the patients were categorized according to the phase III slope of the N2SBW (SIIIN2. Compared with adults with lower SIIIN2 values, adults with higher SIIIN2 values showed lower hemoglobin levels (P=0.048, a history of acute chest syndrome (P=0.001, an elevated tricuspid regurgitation velocity (P=0.039, predominance of a reticular pattern in the CT (P=0.002, a shorter 6-min walking distance (6MWD (P=0.002, and lower peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 after exercise (P=0.03. SIIIN2 values correlated significantly with hemoglobin (rs=-0.344; P=0.034, forced vital capacity (rs=-0.671; P<0.0001, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (rs=-0.376; P=0.019, 6MWD (rs=-0.554; P=0.0003, and SpO2 after exercise (P=0.040. Heterogeneity in the ventilation distribution is one of the most common pulmonary dysfunctions in adults with SCA. Moreover, relationships exist between ventilation heterogeneity, worsening of pulmonary structural damage, and reduced tolerance for exercise.

  17. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  18. Quantification of cell density in rat Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Heinemeier, Katja M

    2017-01-01

    Increased tendon cell nuclei density (TCND) has been proposed to induce tendon mechanical adaptations. However, it is unknown whether TCND is increased in tendon tissue after mechanical loading and whether such an increase can be quantified in a reliable manner. The aim of this study was to develop...... a reliable method for quantification of TCND and to investigate potential changes in TCND in rat Achilles tendons in response to 12 weeks of running. Eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran (RUN) on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 weeks (which improved tendon mechanical...... properties) and were compared with 11 control rats (SED). Tissue-Tek-embedded cryosections (10 µm) from the mid region of the Achilles tendon were cut longitudinally on a cryostat. Sections were stained with alcian blue and picrosirius red. One blinded investigator counted the number of tendon cell nuclei 2...

  19. Projection specificity in heterogeneous locus coeruleus cell populations: implications for learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen; Johansen, Joshua P

    2015-09-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) play a critical role in many functions including learning and memory. This relatively small population of cells sends widespread projections throughout the brain including to a number of regions such as the amygdala which is involved in emotional associative learning and the medial prefrontal cortex which is important for facilitating flexibility when learning rules change. LC noradrenergic cells participate in both of these functions, but it is not clear how this small population of neurons modulates these partially distinct processes. Here we review anatomical, behavioral, and electrophysiological studies to assess how LC noradrenergic neurons regulate these different aspects of learning and memory. Previous work has demonstrated that subpopulations of LC noradrenergic cells innervate specific brain regions suggesting heterogeneity of function in LC neurons. Furthermore, noradrenaline in mPFC and amygdala has distinct effects on emotional learning and cognitive flexibility. Finally, neural recording data show that LC neurons respond during associative learning and when previously learned task contingencies change. Together, these studies suggest a working model in which distinct and potentially opposing subsets of LC neurons modulate particular learning functions through restricted efferent connectivity with amygdala or mPFC. This type of model may provide a general framework for understanding other neuromodulatory systems, which also exhibit cell type heterogeneity and projection specificity. © 2015 Uematsu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Projection specificity in heterogeneous locus coeruleus cell populations: implications for learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Akira; Tan, Bao Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) play a critical role in many functions including learning and memory. This relatively small population of cells sends widespread projections throughout the brain including to a number of regions such as the amygdala which is involved in emotional associative learning and the medial prefrontal cortex which is important for facilitating flexibility when learning rules change. LC noradrenergic cells participate in both of these functions, but it is not clear how this small population of neurons modulates these partially distinct processes. Here we review anatomical, behavioral, and electrophysiological studies to assess how LC noradrenergic neurons regulate these different aspects of learning and memory. Previous work has demonstrated that subpopulations of LC noradrenergic cells innervate specific brain regions suggesting heterogeneity of function in LC neurons. Furthermore, noradrenaline in mPFC and amygdala has distinct effects on emotional learning and cognitive flexibility. Finally, neural recording data show that LC neurons respond during associative learning and when previously learned task contingencies change. Together, these studies suggest a working model in which distinct and potentially opposing subsets of LC neurons modulate particular learning functions through restricted efferent connectivity with amygdala or mPFC. This type of model may provide a general framework for understanding other neuromodulatory systems, which also exhibit cell type heterogeneity and projection specificity. PMID:26330494

  1. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in Phramongkutklao Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumon Sopapornamorn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Narumon Sopapornamorn1, Manapon Lekskul1, Suthee Panichkul21Department of Ophthalmology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok, ThailandObjective: To describe the corneal endothelial density and morphology in patients of Phramongkutklao Hospital and the relationship between endothelial cell parameters and other factors.Methods: Four hundred and four eyes of 202 volunteers were included. Noncontact specular microscopy was performed after taking a history and testing the visual acuity, intraocular pressure measurement, Schirmer’s test and routine eye examination by slit lamp microscope. The studied parameters included mean endothelial cell density (MCD, coefficient of variation (CV, and percentage of hexagonality.Results: The mean age of volunteers was 45.73 years; the range being 20 to 80 years old. Their MCD (SD, mean percentage of CV (SD and mean (SD percentage of hexagonality were 2623.49(325 cell/mm2, 39.43(8.23% and 51.50(10.99%, respectively. Statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age (p < 0.01. There was a significant difference in the percentage of CV between genders. There was no statistical significance between parameters and other factors.Conclusion: The normative data of the corneal endothelium of Thai eyes indicated that, statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age. Previous studies have reported no difference in MCD, percentage of CV, and percentage of hexagonality between gender. Nevertheless, significantly different percentages of CV between genders were presented in this study.Keywords: Corneal endothelial cell, parameters, age, gender, smoking, Thailand

  2. Comparison of the Blood and Lymphatic Microvessel Density of Pleomorphic Adenoma and Basal Cell Adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa Borges Soares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common tumor of the salivary gland, while basal cell adenoma (BCA is an uncommon neoplasm. Blood and lymphatic vessels are crucial for tumor metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the blood and lymphatic vascular density and vascular and endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in PA and BCA tumors. In addition, cell proliferation was evaluated in these tumors. Methods Blood and lymphatic vessel content, VEGF expression, and cell proliferation were analyzed in 30 cases of PA and 13 cases of BCA by immu-nohistochemistry using antibodies for CD34, CD105, D2-40, VEGF, and Mcm -2. Results Regarding CD34 and CD105 expression, PA demonstrated a high vascularity and a low number of positive vessels, respectively. D2-40-positive lymphatic vessels were mainly located in the tumor capsules, with small intratumoral lymphatic vessels observed occasionally. VEGF expression revealed a remarkably heterogeneous immunoreactivity, alternating from weak or negative to positive or intense. BCA presented significantly higher CD34, CD34, CD105, D2-40, and VEGF expression compared to PA. No significant difference was found in cell proliferation between the tumors. Conclusion Although PA and BCA are considered part of the same spectrum of differentiation, this study showed that the blood and lymphatic vascularization of these tumors is different.

  3. Transcriptome dynamics along axolotl regenerative development are consistent with an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity in dedifferentiated cells

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    Carlos Díaz-Castillo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although in recent years the study of gene expression variation in the absence of genetic or environmental cues or gene expression heterogeneity has intensified considerably, many basic and applied biological fields still remain unaware of how useful the study of gene expression heterogeneity patterns might be for the characterization of biological systems and/or processes. Largely based on the modulator effect chromatin compaction has for gene expression heterogeneity and the extensive changes in chromatin compaction known to occur for specialized cells that are naturally or artificially induced to revert to less specialized states or dedifferentiate, I recently hypothesized that processes that concur with cell dedifferentiation would show an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity. The confirmation of the existence of such trend could be of wide interest because of the biomedical and biotechnological relevance of cell dedifferentiation-based processes, i.e., regenerative development, cancer, human induced pluripotent stem cells, or plant somatic embryogenesis. Here, I report the first empirical evidence consistent with the existence of an extensive reduction in gene expression heterogeneity for processes that concur with cell dedifferentiation by analyzing transcriptome dynamics along forearm regenerative development in Ambystoma mexicanum or axolotl. Also, I briefly discuss on the utility of the study of gene expression heterogeneity dynamics might have for the characterization of cell dedifferentiation-based processes, and the engineering of tools that afforded better monitoring and modulating such processes. Finally, I reflect on how a transitional reduction in gene expression heterogeneity for dedifferentiated cells can promote a long-term increase in phenotypic heterogeneity following cell dedifferentiation with potential adverse effects for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  4. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2015-07-30

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  5. Significance of higher moments for complete characterization of the travel time probability density function in heterogeneous porous media using the maximum entropy principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Andricevic, Roko

    2010-05-01

    The travel time formulation of advective transport in heterogeneous porous media is of interest both conceptually, e.g., for incorporating retention processes, and in applications where typically the travel time peak, early, and late arrivals of contaminants are of major concern in a regulatory or remediation context. Furthermore, the travel time moments are of interest for quantifying uncertainty in advective transport of tracers released from point sources in heterogeneous aquifers. In view of this interest, the travel time distribution has been studied in the literature; however, the link to the hydraulic conductivity statistics has been typically restricted to the first two moments. Here we investigate the influence of higher travel time moments on the travel time probability density function (pdf) in heterogeneous porous media combining Monte Carlo simulations with the maximum entropy principle. The Monte Carlo experimental pdf is obtained by the adaptive Fup Monte Carlo method (AFMCM) for advective transport characterized by a multi-Gaussian structure with exponential covariance considering two injection modes (in-flux and resident) and lnK variance up to 8. A maximum entropy (MaxEnt) algorithm based on Fup basis functions is used for the complete characterization of the travel time pdf. All travel time moments become linear with distance. Initial nonlinearity is found mainly for the resident injection mode, which exhibits a strong nonlinearity within first 5IY for high heterogeneity. For the resident injection mode, the form of variance and all higher moments changes from the familiar concave form predicted by the first-order theory to a convex form; for the in-flux mode, linearity is preserved even for high heterogeneity. The number of moments sufficient for a complete characterization of the travel time pdf mainly depends on the heterogeneity level. Mean and variance completely describe travel time pdf for low and mild heterogeneity, skewness is dominant

  6. Flexible and Lightweight Fuel Cell with High Specific Power Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fandi; He, Xudong; Shen, Yangbin; Jin, Hehua; Li, Qingwen; Li, Da; Li, Shuping; Zhan, Yulu; Du, Ying; Jiang, Jingjing; Yang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2017-06-27

    Flexible devices have been attracting great attention recently due to their numerous advantages. But the energy densities of current energy sources are still not high enough to support flexible devices for a satisfactory length of time. Although proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) do have a high-energy density, traditional PEMFCs are usually too heavy, rigid, and bulky to be used in flexible devices. In this research, we successfully invented a light and flexible air-breathing PEMFC by using a new design of PEMFC and a flexible composite electrode. The flexible air-breathing PEMFC with 1 × 1 cm 2 working area can be as light as 0.065 g and as thin as 0.22 mm. This new PEMFC exhibits an amazing specific volume power density as high as 5190 W L -1 , which is much higher than traditional (air-breathing) PEMFCs. Also outstanding is that the flexible PEMFC retains 89.1% of its original performance after being bent 600 times, and it retains its original performance after being dropped five times from a height of 30 m. Moreover, the research has demonstrated that when stacked, the flexible PEMFCs are also useful in mobile applications such as mobile phones. Therefore, our research shows that PEMFCs can be made light, flexible, and suitable for applications in flexible devices. These innovative flexible PEMFCs may also notably advance the progress in the PEMFC field, because flexible PEMFCs can achieve high specific power density with small size, small volume, low weight, and much lower cost; they are also much easier to mass produce.

  7. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability to...

  8. Enrichment of unlabeled human Langerhans cells from epidermal cell suspensions by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, M. B.; Wormmeester, J.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Bos, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    In this report we introduce an alternative procedure for enrichment of human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) from epidermal cell suspensions of normal skin. By means of discontinuous Ficoll-Metrizoate density gradient centrifugation, a fraction containing high numbers of viable, more than 80% pure

  9. Single-Cell Transcriptomic Analysis Defines Heterogeneity and Transcriptional Dynamics in the Adult Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben W. Dulken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs in the adult mammalian brain serve as a reservoir for the generation of new neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize adult NSC populations and examine the molecular identities and heterogeneity of in vivo NSC populations. We find that cells in the NSC lineage exist on a continuum through the processes of activation and differentiation. Interestingly, rare intermediate states with distinct molecular profiles can be identified and experimentally validated, and our analysis identifies putative surface markers and key intracellular regulators for these subpopulations of NSCs. Finally, using the power of single-cell profiling, we conduct a meta-analysis to compare in vivo NSCs and in vitro cultures, distinct fluorescence-activated cell sorting strategies, and different neurogenic niches. These data provide a resource for the field and contribute to an integrative understanding of the adult NSC lineage.

  10. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

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    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation.

  11. Heterogeneous Systems Biocatalysis: The Path to the Fabrication of Self-Sufficient Artificial Metabolic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Jackson, Erienne; Betancor, Lorena

    2017-12-19

    Industrial biocatalysis is playing a key role in the development of the global bio-economy that must change our current productive model to pair the socio-economical development with the preservation of our already harmed planet. The exploitation of isolated multi-enzyme systems and the discovery of novel biocatalytic activities are leading us to manufacture chemicals that were inaccessible through biological routes in the early past. These endeavors have been grouped under the concept of systems biocatalysis. However, by using isolated biological machineries, fundamental features underlying the protein confinement found inside the living cells are missed. To re-gain these properties, such concepts can be expanded to a new concept; heterogeneous systems biocatalysis. This new concept is based on the fabrication of heterogeneous biocatalysts inspired by the spatial organization and compartmentalization that orchestrate metabolic pathways within cells. By assembling biological machineries (including enzymes and cofactors) into artificial solid chassis, one can fabricate self-sufficient and robust cell-free systems able to catalyze orchestrated chemical processes. Furthermore, the confinement of enzymes and and "artificial cofactor" inside solid materials has also attracted our attention because these self-sufficient systems exert de novo and non-natural functionalities. Here, we intend to go beyond immobilization of multi-enzyme systems, discussing only those enzymatic systems that have been co-immobilized with their cofactor or exogenous partners to enhance their cooperative action. In this article, we review the latest architectures developed to fabricate self-sufficient heterogeneous biocatalysts with application in chemical manufacturing, biosensing or energy production. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Heterogeneity within the spleen colony-forming cell population in rat bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, A.C.; van Bekkum, D.W.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1986-01-01

    The pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell (HSC) of the rat can be enumerated in a spleen colony assay (SCA) in rats as well as mice. After injection of rat bone marrow into lethally irradiated mice, macroscopically visible spleen colonies (CFU-S) are found from day 6 through 14, but the number varies on consecutive days. In normal bone marrow a constant ratio of day-8 to day-12 colony numbers is observed. However, this ratio is changed after in vivo treatment of rats with cyclophosphamide, as well as after in vitro treatment of rat bone marrow with cyclophosphamide derivatives. This indicates that the CFU-S that form colonies on day 8 react differently to this treatment than the CFU-S that form colonies on day 12, and suggests heterogeneity among the CFU-S population. Posttreatment regrowth of day-8 and day-12 CFU-S is characterized by differences in population-doubling times (Td = 0.85 days vs 1.65 days). Another argument in support of the postulate of heterogeneity within the rat CFU-S population is derived from the fact that (in contrast to normal rat spleen) the spleen of leukemic rats contains high numbers of CFU-S that show a ratio of day-8 to day-12 CFU-S of 4.5, which is different than that observed for a CFU-S population in normal bone marrow (a ratio of 2.4). It is concluded that, in rat hemopoiesis, two populations of spleen colony-forming cells can be distinguished using the rat-to-mouse SCA. This indicates that mouse and rat hemopoiesis are comparable in this respect and that heterogeneity in the stem cell compartment is a general phenomenon

  13. Heterogeneity of astrocytes: from development to injury - single cell gene expression.

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    Vendula Rusnakova

    Full Text Available Astrocytes perform control and regulatory functions in the central nervous system; heterogeneity among them is still a matter of debate due to limited knowledge of their gene expression profiles and functional diversity. To unravel astrocyte heterogeneity during postnatal development and after focal cerebral ischemia, we employed single-cell gene expression profiling in acutely isolated cortical GFAP/EGFP-positive cells. Using a microfluidic qPCR platform, we profiled 47 genes encoding glial markers and ion channels/transporters/receptors participating in maintaining K(+ and glutamate homeostasis per cell. Self-organizing maps and principal component analyses revealed three subpopulations within 10-50 days of postnatal development (P10-P50. The first subpopulation, mainly immature glia from P10, was characterized by high transcriptional activity of all studied genes, including polydendrocytic markers. The second subpopulation (mostly from P20 was characterized by low gene transcript levels, while the third subpopulation encompassed mature astrocytes (mainly from P30, P50. Within 14 days after ischemia (D3, D7, D14, additional astrocytic subpopulations were identified: resting glia (mostly from P50 and D3, transcriptionally active early reactive glia (mainly from D7 and permanent reactive glia (solely from D14. Following focal cerebral ischemia, reactive astrocytes underwent pronounced changes in the expression of aquaporins, nonspecific cationic and potassium channels, glutamate receptors and reactive astrocyte markers.

  14. A mosaic world: puzzles revealed by adult neural stem cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Zayna; Codega, Paolo; Doetsch, Fiona

    2016-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in specialized niches in the adult mammalian brain. The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), adjacent to the lateral ventricles, gives rise to olfactory bulb (OB) neurons, and some astrocytes and oligodendrocytes throughout life. In vitro assays have been widely used to retrospectively identify NSCs. However, cells that behave as stem cells in vitro do not reflect the identity, diversity, and behavior of NSCs in vivo. Novel tools including fluorescence activated cell sorting, lineage-tracing, and clonal analysis have uncovered multiple layers of adult V-SVZ NSC heterogeneity, including proliferation state and regional identity. In light of these findings, we reexamine the concept of adult NSCs, considering heterogeneity as a key parameter for analyzing their dynamics in vivo. V-SVZ NSCs form a mosaic of quiescent (qNSCs) and activated cells (aNSCs) that reside in regionally distinct microdomains, reflecting their regional embryonic origins, and give rise to specific subtypes of OB interneurons. Prospective purification and transcriptome analysis of qNSCs and aNSCs has illuminated their molecular and functional properties. qNSCs are slowly dividing, have slow kinetics of neurogenesis in vivo, can be recruited to regenerate the V-SVZ, and only rarely give rise to in vitro colonies. aNSCs are highly proliferative, undergo rapid clonal expansion of the neurogenic lineage in vivo, and readily form in vitro colonies. Key open questions remain about stem cell dynamics in vivo and the lineage relationship between qNSCs and aNSCs under homeostasis and regeneration, as well as context-dependent plasticity of regionally distinct adult NSCs under different external stimuli. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:640-658. doi: 10.1002/wdev.248 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 The Authors. WIREs Developmental Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Heterogeneity in SDF-1 expression defines the vasculogenic potential of adult cardiac progenitor cells.

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    Claudia O Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The adult myocardium has been reported to harbor several classes of multipotent progenitor cells (CPCs with tri-lineage differentiation potential. It is not clear whether c-kit+CPCs represent a uniform precursor population or a more complex mixture of cell types.To characterize and understand vasculogenic heterogeneity within c-kit+presumptive cardiac progenitor cell populations.c-kit+, sca-1+ CPCs obtained from adult mouse left ventricle expressed stem cell-associated genes, including Oct-4 and Myc, and were self-renewing, pluripotent and clonogenic. Detailed single cell clonal analysis of 17 clones revealed that most (14/17 exhibited trilineage differentiation potential. However, striking morphological differences were observed among clones that were heritable and stable in long-term culture. 3 major groups were identified: round (7/17, flat or spindle-shaped (5/17 and stellate (5/17. Stellate morphology was predictive of vasculogenic differentiation in Matrigel. Genome-wide expression studies and bioinformatic analysis revealed clonally stable, heritable differences in stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 expression that correlated strongly with stellate morphology and vasculogenic capacity. Endogenous SDF-1 production contributed directly to vasculogenic differentiation: both shRNA-mediated knockdown of SDF-1 and AMD3100, an antagonist of the SDF-1 receptor CXC chemokine Receptor-4 (CXCR4, reduced tube-forming capacity, while exogenous SDF-1 induced tube formation by 2 non-vasculogenic clones. CPCs producing SDF-1 were able to vascularize Matrigel dermal implants in vivo, while CPCs with low SDF-1 production were not.Clonogenic c-kit+, sca-1+ CPCs are heterogeneous in morphology, gene expression patterns and differentiation potential. Clone-specific levels of SDF-1 expression both predict and promote development of a vasculogenic phenotype via a previously unreported autocrine mechanism.

  16. Calculation of the thermal utilization factor in a heterogeneous slab cell scattering neutrons anisotropically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, A. M.; Elsherbiny, E. M.; Sobhy, M.

    1995-01-01

    The P n -spatial expansion method has been used for calculating the one speed transport utilization factor in heterogenous slab cells in which neutrons may scatter anisotropically; by considering the P 1- approximation with a two-term scattering kernel in both the fuel and moderator regions, an analytical expression for the disadvantage factor has been derived. The numerical results obtained have been shown to be much better than those calculated by the usual P 1- and P 3- approximations and comparable with those obtained by some exact methods. 3 tabs

  17. AFG-MONSU. A program for calculating axial heterogeneities in cylindrical pin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neltrup, H.; Kirkegaard, P.

    1978-08-01

    The AGF-MONSU program complex is designed to calculate the flux in cylindrical fuel pin cells into which heterogeneities are introduced in a regular array. The theory - integral transport theory combined with Monte Carlo by help of a superposition principle - is described in some detail. Detailed derivation of the superposition principle as well as the formulas used in the DIT (Discrete Integral Transport) method is given in the appendices along with a description of the input structure of the AFG-MONSU program complex. (author)

  18. Heterogeneous generation of new cells in the adult echinoderm nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanov, Vladimir S.; Zueva, Olga R.; García-Arrarás, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, generation of new functional cells in the mature central nervous system (CNS), has been documented in a number of diverse organisms, ranging from humans to invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of this phenomenon is still poorly understood for many of the key phylogenetic groups. Echinoderms are one such phylum, positioned as a sister group to chordates within the monophyletic clade Deuterostomia. They are well known for the ability of their adult organs, including the CNS, to completely regenerate after injury. Nothing is known, however, about production of new cells in the nervous tissue under normal physiological conditions in these animals. In this study, we show that new cells are continuously generated in the mature radial nerve cord (RNC) of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima. Importantly, this neurogenic activity is not evenly distributed, but is significantly more extensive in the lateral regions of the RNC than along the midline. Some of the new cells generated in the apical region of the ectoneural neuroepithelium leave their place of origin and migrate basally to populate the neural parenchyma. Gene expression analysis showed that generation of new cells in the adult sea cucumber CNS is associated with transcriptional activity of genes known to be involved in regulation of various aspects of neurogenesis in other animals. Further analysis of one of those genes, the transcription factor Myc, showed that it is expressed, in some, but not all radial glial cells, suggesting heterogeneity of this CNS progenitor cell population in echinoderms. PMID:26441553

  19. Spontaneous Formation of Tumorigenic Hybrids between Breast Cancer and Multipotent Stromal Cells Is a Source of Tumor Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow–derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids be...

  20. The Effect of Shear Rate on Dissolution of Gas and Cell Density in Continuous Foaming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.N. Famili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of shear rate on dissolution of carbon dioxide in viscoelastic wheat flour matrix and cell density in a glass barrel twin screw extruder is investigated. It is found that by increasing the shear rate there will be a decrease in the required thermodynamic conditions and hence, it improves blowing agent dissolution and increases the cell density. Shear rate breaks up big bubbles and helps to better distribute the blowing agent in the matrix and hence it increases the cell density. Cell density decreases by dropping foam cooling rate. For a given cell density, a higher screw speed is needed, ifthe cooling rate is decreased.

  1. A Bayesian approach to modelling heterogeneous calcium responses in cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Tilūnaitė

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium responses have been observed as spikes of the whole-cell calcium concentration in numerous cell types and are essential for translating extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. While there are several suggestions for how this encoding is achieved, we still lack a comprehensive theory. To achieve this goal it is necessary to reliably predict the temporal evolution of calcium spike sequences for a given stimulus. Here, we propose a modelling framework that allows us to quantitatively describe the timing of calcium spikes. Using a Bayesian approach, we show that Gaussian processes model calcium spike rates with high fidelity and perform better than standard tools such as peri-stimulus time histograms and kernel smoothing. We employ our modelling concept to analyse calcium spike sequences from dynamically-stimulated HEK293T cells. Under these conditions, different cells often experience diverse stimulus time courses, which is a situation likely to occur in vivo. This single cell variability and the concomitant small number of calcium spikes per cell pose a significant modelling challenge, but we demonstrate that Gaussian processes can successfully describe calcium spike rates in these circumstances. Our results therefore pave the way towards a statistical description of heterogeneous calcium oscillations in a dynamic environment.

  2. Implication of molecular vascular smooth muscle cell heterogeneity among arterial beds in arterial calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Espitia

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification is a strong and independent predictive factor for cardiovascular complications and mortality. Our previous work identified important discrepancies in plaque composition and calcification types between carotid and femoral arteries. The objective of this study is to further characterize and understand the heterogeneity in vascular calcification among vascular beds, and to identify molecular mechanisms underlying this process. We established ECLAGEN biocollection that encompasses human atherosclerotic lesions and healthy arteries from different locations (abdominal, thoracic aorta, carotid, femoral, and infrapopliteal arteries for histological, cell isolation, and transcriptomic analysis. Our results show that lesion composition differs between these locations. Femoral arteries are the most calcified arteries overall. They develop denser calcifications (sheet-like, nodule, and are highly susceptible to osteoid metaplasia. These discrepancies may derive from intrinsic differences between SMCs originating from these locations, as microarray analysis showed specific transcriptomic profiles between primary SMCs isolated from each arterial bed. These molecular differences translated into functional disparities. SMC from femoral arteries showed the highest propensity to mineralize due to an increase in basal TGFβ signaling. Our results suggest that biological heterogeneity of resident vascular cells between arterial beds, reflected by our transcriptomic analysis, is critical in understanding plaque biology and calcification, and may have strong implications in vascular therapeutic approaches.

  3. Living with heterogeneities in bioreactors: understanding the effects of environmental gradients on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alvaro R; Galindo, Enrique; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2006-11-01

    The presence of spatial gradients in fundamental culture parameters, such as dissolved gases, pH, concentration of substrates, and shear rate, among others, is an important problem that frequently occurs in large-scale bioreactors. This problem is caused by a deficient mixing that results from limitations inherent to traditional scale-up methods and practical constraints during large-scale bioreactor design and operation. When cultured in a heterogeneous environment, cells are continuously exposed to fluctuating conditions as they travel through the various zones of a bioreactor. Such fluctuations can affect cell metabolism, yields, and quality of the products of interest. In this review, the theoretical analyses that predict the existence of environmental gradients in bioreactors and their experimental confirmation are reviewed. The origins of gradients in common culture parameters and their effects on various organisms of biotechnological importance are discussed. In particular, studies based on the scale-down methodology, a convenient tool for assessing the effect of environmental heterogeneities, are surveyed.

  4. Degradation of high density lipoprotein in cultured rat luteal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, V.P.; Menon, K.M.J.

    1986-01-01

    In rat ovary luteal cells, degradation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to tricholoracetic acid (TCA)-soluble products accounts for only a fraction of the HDL-derived cholesterol used for steroidogenesis. In this study the authors have investigated the fate of 125 I]HDL bound to cultured luteal cells using pulse-chase technique. Luteal cell cultures were pulse labeled with [ 125 I]HDL 3 and reincubated in the absence of HDL. By 24 h about 50% of the initallay bound radioactivity was released into the medium, of which 60-65% could be precipitated with 10% TCA. Gel filtration of the chase incubation medium on 10% agarose showed that the amount of TCA-soluble radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity eluted over a wide range of molecular weights (15,000-80,000), and there was very little intact HDL present. Electrophoresis of the chase medium showed that component of the TCA-precipitable portion had mobility similar to apo AI. Lysosomal inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis had no effect on the composition or quantity of radioactivity released during chase incubation. The results show that HDL 3 binding to luteal cells is followed by complete degradation of the lipoprotein, although the TCA-soluble part does not reflect the extent of degradation

  5. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  6. Strategies for Carbon and Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials, Incorporating Lessons from Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Mermelstein, Joshua; Bermúdez Menéndez, José Miguel; Ramı Rez Reina, Tomás; Brandon, Nigel P

    2016-11-23

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels, and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review, we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur poisoning, before examining the strategies toward carbon and sulfur tolerance used so far in the SOFC literature. We then study the more extensive relevant heterogeneous catalysis literature for strategies and materials which could be incorporated into carbon and sulfur tolerant fuel cells.

  7. Clonal characterization of rat muscle satellite cells: proliferation, metabolism and differentiation define an intrinsic heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo A Rossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells (SCs represent a distinct lineage of myogenic progenitors responsible for the postnatal growth, repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle. Distinguished on the basis of their unique position in mature skeletal muscle, SCs were considered unipotent stem cells with the ability of generating a unique specialized phenotype. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in mice that opposite differentiation towards osteogenic and adipogenic pathways was also possible. Even though the pool of SCs is accepted as the major, and possibly the only, source of myonuclei in postnatal muscle, it is likely that SCs are not all multipotent stem cells and evidences for diversities within the myogenic compartment have been described both in vitro and in vivo. Here, by isolating single fibers from rat flexor digitorum brevis (FDB muscle we were able to identify and clonally characterize two main subpopulations of SCs: the low proliferative clones (LPC present in major proportion (approximately 75% and the high proliferative clones (HPC, present instead in minor amount (approximately 25%. LPC spontaneously generate myotubes whilst HPC differentiate into adipocytes even though they may skip the adipogenic program if co-cultured with LPC. LPC and HPC differ also for mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m, ATP balance and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generation underlying diversities in metabolism that precede differentiation. Notably, SCs heterogeneity is retained in vivo. SCs may therefore be comprised of two distinct, though not irreversibly committed, populations of cells distinguishable for prominent differences in basal biological features such as proliferation, metabolism and differentiation. By these means, novel insights on SCs heterogeneity are provided and evidences for biological readouts potentially relevant for diagnostic purposes described.

  8. Cell identity bookmarking through heterogeneous chromatin landscape maintenance during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaibing; Xi, Yanping; Li, Wei; Li, Jin; Li, Yan; Dong, Shihua; Peng, Lina; Liu, Yaping; Yu, Wenqiang

    2017-11-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information are faithfully duplicated and accurately transmitted to daughter cells to preserve cell identity during the cell cycle. However, how the chromatin-based epigenetic information beyond DNA sequence is stably transmitted along with the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure within a cell cycle remains largely unexplored. Through comprehensive analysis DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning patterns of HepG2 cells in G0/G1, early S, late S and G2/M phases, we found that DNA methylation may act as the prime element for epigenetic inheritance after replication, as DNA methylation was extremely stable in each cell cycle phase, while nucleosome occupancy showed notable phase dependent fluctuation. Nucleosome-Secured Regions (NSRs) occupied by polycomb-repressed chromatin played a role in repressing the irrelevant cell type-specific genes and were essential for preventing irrelevant transcription factors binding, while the well-defined Nucleosome-Depleted Regions (NDRs) marked the genes crucial for cell identity maintenance. Chromatin structure at NSRs and NDRs was well maintained throughout the cell cycle, which played crucial roles in steadily preserving the transcriptional identity of the cell to fulfill cell identity maintenance. Collectively, our results demonstrated that while chromatin architecture underwent dynamic changes during cell cycle progression, DNA methylation together with NSRs and NDRs were stable epigenetic elements that were required for faithful transmission to the daughter cell to accurately maintain cell identity during the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Chromatin States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Hopp

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mature B-cell lymphoma is a clinically and biologically highly diverse disease. Its diagnosis and prognosis is a challenge due to its molecular heterogeneity and diverse regimes of biological dysfunctions, which are partly driven by epigenetic mechanisms. We here present an integrative analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression data of several lymphoma subtypes. Our study confirms previous results about the role of stemness genes during development and maturation of B-cells and their dysfunction in lymphoma locking in more proliferative or immune-reactive states referring to B-cell functionalities in the dark and light zone of the germinal center and also in plasma cells. These dysfunctions are governed by widespread epigenetic effects altering the promoter methylation of the involved genes, their activity status as moderated by histone modifications and also by chromatin remodeling. We identified four groups of genes showing characteristic expression and methylation signatures among Burkitt’s lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma and multiple myeloma. These signatures are associated with epigenetic effects such as remodeling from transcriptionally inactive into active chromatin states, differential promoter methylation and the enrichment of targets of transcription factors such as EZH2 and SUZ12.

  10. Planar Optical Nanoantennas Resolve Cholesterol-Dependent Nanoscale Heterogeneities in the Plasma Membrane of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Raju; Winkler, Pamina M.; Flauraud, Valentin; Borgman, Kyra J. E.; Manzo, Carlo; Brugger, Jürgen; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme; García-Parajo, María F.

    2017-10-01

    Optical nanoantennas can efficiently confine light into nanoscopic hotspots, enabling single-molecule detection sensitivity at biological relevant conditions. This innovative approach to breach the diffraction limit offers a versatile platform to investigate the dynamics of individual biomolecules in living cell membranes and their partitioning into cholesterol-dependent lipid nanodomains. Here, we present optical nanoantenna arrays with accessible surface hotspots to study the characteristic diffusion dynamics of phosphoethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SM) in the plasma membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. Fluorescence burst analysis and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy performed on nanoantennas of different gap sizes show that, unlike PE, SM is transiently trapped in cholesterol-enriched nanodomains of 10 nm diameter with short characteristic times around 100 {\\mu}s. The removal of cholesterol led to the free diffusion of SM, consistent with the dispersion of nanodomains. Our results are consistent with the existence of highly transient and fluctuating nanoscale assemblies enriched by cholesterol and sphingolipids in living cell membranes, also known as lipid rafts. Quantitative data on sphingolipids partitioning into lipid rafts is crucial to understand the spatiotemporal heterogeneous organization of transient molecular complexes on the membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. The proposed technique is fully biocompatible and thus provides various opportunities for biophysics and live cell research to reveal details that remain hidden in confocal diffraction-limited measurements.

  11. Sociality in Escherichia coli: Enterochelin Is a Private Good at Low Cell Density and Can Be Shared at High Cell Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Rebecca L; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-07-01

    Many bacteria produce secreted iron chelators called siderophores, which can be shared among cells with specific siderophore uptake systems regardless of whether the cell produces siderophores. Sharing secreted products allows freeloading, where individuals use resources without bearing the cost of production. Here we show that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is not evenly shared between producers and nonproducers. Wild-type Escherichia coli grows well in low-iron minimal medium, and an isogenic enterochelin synthesis mutant (ΔentF) grows very poorly. The enterochelin mutant grows well in low-iron medium supplemented with enterochelin. At high cell densities the ΔentF mutant can compete equally with the wild type in low-iron medium. At low cell densities the ΔentF mutant cannot compete. Furthermore, the growth rate of the wild type is unaffected by cell density. The wild type grows well in low-iron medium even at very low starting densities. Our experiments support a model where at least some enterochelin remains associated with the cells that produce it, and the cell-associated enterochelin enables iron acquisition even at very low cell density. Enterochelin that is not retained by producing cells at low density is lost to dilution. At high cell densities, cell-free enterochelin can accumulate and be shared by all cells in the group. Partial privatization is a solution to the problem of iron acquisition in low-iron, low-cell-density habitats. Cell-free enterochelin allows for iron scavenging at a distance at higher population densities. Our findings shed light on the conditions under which freeloaders might benefit from enterochelin uptake systems. Sociality in microbes has become a topic of great interest. One facet of sociality is the sharing of secreted products, such as the iron-scavenging siderophores. We present evidence that the Escherichia coli siderophore enterochelin is relatively inexpensive to produce and is partially privatized such

  12. The effect of landscape heterogeneity on population density and habitat preferences of the European hare (Lepus europaeus) in contrasting farmlands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavliska, P. L.; Riegert, J.; Grill, S.; Šálek, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 88, January (2018), s. 8-15 ISSN 1616-5047 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Lepus europaeus * Field size * Agricultural policy * Conservation measures * Density-dependent habitat selection Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2016

  13. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation and postirradiation incubation on heterogeneous nuclear RNA size in murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Sauerbier, W.

    1978-01-01

    We have analyzed the decrease in synthesis of individual size classes of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) in ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated Merwin plasmacytoma (MPC-11) cells at various times of postirradiation incubation. HnRNA from nonirradiated control cells is distributed over a wide range from approximately 60S to 5S, with 42S RNA carrying more label than any other size class. HnRNA from uv-irradiated cells shows a dose-dependent shift in size distribution toward lower molecular weight. The size distribution of hnRNA synthesized after prolonged times of postirradiation incubation is restored toward normal, i.e., synthesis of long RNA molecules increases relative to the synthesis of short ones. Analysis of the total number of hnRNA chains synthesized during a 20-min [ 3 H]uridine pulse shows a considerable eduction in their number with increasing uv dose. Murine cell lines are excision-repair-deficient but capable of post replication repair inhibited by caffeine. HnRNA transcripts of cells incubated in its presence were studied. The caffeine, which has no effect on hnRNA size in control cells, inhibits to a considerable extent the restoration of full-length transcripts during postirradiation incubation. The lack of excision repair in MPC-11 was confirmed by the analysis of pyrimidine dimers in trichloracetic acid-insoluble and soluble fractions within 8 h of postirradiation incubation. The size of parental and daughter strand DNA in uv-irradiated cells was correlated with RNA transcript size. The parental DNA in these experiments does not change its size as a consequence of uv exposure and postirradiation incubation. In contrast, daughter DNA strands are short in uv-irradiated cells and they increase in size during postirradiation incubation to reach the size of parental strands after 8 h

  14. [Mesh structure of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Jin-Kang; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Mo-Ling; Xia, Yu; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the structural characteristics and clinical significance of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty surgical specimens of NSCLC were collected. The sections of the tumor tissues corresponding to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected to construct the 2D-TMAP expression. Spearman correlation analysis was used to examine the relation between the 2D-TMAP expression and the clinicopathological features of NSCLC. A heterogeneity was noted in the 2D-TMAP expression of NSCLC. The microvascular density (MVD) in the area surrounding the tumor was higher than that in the central area, but the difference was not statistically significant. The density of the microvessels without intact lumen was significantly greater in the surrounding area than in the central area (P=0.030). The total MVD was not correlated to tumor differentiation (r=0.042, P=0.831). The density of the microvessels without intact lumen in the surrounding area was positively correlated to degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis (r=0.528 and 0.533, P=0.041 and 0.028, respectively), and also to the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ephrinB2, EphB4, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (r=0.504, 0.549, 0.549, and 0.370; P=0.005, 0.002, 0.002, and 0.048, respectively). The degree of tumor differentiation was positively correlated to PCNA and VEGF expression (r=0.604 and 0.370, P=0.001 and 0.048, respectively), but inversely to the integrity of microvascular basement membrane (r=-0.531, P=0.033). The 2D-TMAP suggests the overall state of the micro-environment for tumor growth. The 2D-TMAP of NSCLC regulates angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation through a mesh-like structure, and better understanding of the characteristics and possible mechanism of 2D-TMAP expression can be of great clinical importance.

  15. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  16. Simian T Lymphotropic Virus 1 Infection of Papio anubis: tax Sequence Heterogeneity and T Cell Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, James M; Magnani, Diogo M; Maxwell, Helen S; Lauer, William; Castro, Iris; Pecotte, Jerilyn; Barber, Glen N; Watkins, David I; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2017-10-15

    Baboons naturally infected with simian T lymphotropic virus (STLV) are a potentially useful model system for the study of vaccination against human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV). Here we expanded the number of available full-length baboon STLV-1 sequences from one to three and related the T cell responses that recognize the immunodominant Tax protein to the tax sequences present in two individual baboons. Continuously growing T cell lines were established from two baboons, animals 12141 and 12752. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of complete STLV genome sequences from these T cell lines revealed them to be closely related but distinct from each other and from the baboon STLV-1 sequence in the NCBI sequence database. Overlapping peptides corresponding to each unique Tax sequence and to the reference baboon Tax sequence were used to analyze recognition by T cells from each baboon using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). Individual baboons expressed more gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to Tax peptides corresponding to their own STLV-1 sequence than in response to Tax peptides corresponding to the reference baboon STLV-1 sequence. Thus, our analyses revealed distinct but closely related STLV-1 genome sequences in two baboons, extremely low heterogeneity of STLV sequences within each baboon, no evidence for superinfection within each baboon, and a ready ability of T cells in each baboon to recognize circulating Tax sequences. While amino acid substitutions that result in escape from CD8 + T cell recognition were not observed, premature stop codons were observed in 7% and 56% of tax sequences from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from animals 12141 and 12752, respectively. IMPORTANCE It has been estimated that approximately 100,000 people suffer serious morbidity and 10,000 people die each year from the consequences associated with human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection. There are no antiviral drugs and no preventive vaccine. A

  17. Discovery of Power-Law Growth in the Self-Renewal of Heterogeneous Glioma Stem Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Michiya; Hayakawa, Yumiko; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Awaji, Miharu; Kozano, Hiroko; Tamura, Ryoi; Yamamoto, Seiji; Ogata, Toru; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Endo, Shunro; Kurimoto, Masanori; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumorigenesis. This suggests that CSCs should make ideal therapeutic targets. However, because CSC populations in tumors appear heterogeneous, it remains unclear how CSCs might be effectively targeted. To investigate the mechanisms by which CSC populations maintain heterogeneity during self-renewal, we established a glioma sphere (GS) forming model, to generate a population in which glioma stem cells (GSCs) become enriched. We hypothesized, based on the clonal evolution concept, that with each passage in culture, heterogeneous clonal sublines of GSs are generated that progressively show increased proliferative ability. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether, with each passage, glioma neurosphere culture generated from four different glioma cell lines become progressively proliferative (i.e., enriched in large spheres). Rather than monitoring self-renewal, we measured heterogeneity based on neurosphere clone sizes (#cells/clone). Log-log plots of distributions of clone sizes yielded a good fit (r>0.90) to a straight line (log(% total clones) = k*log(#cells/clone)) indicating that the system follows a power-law (y = xk) with a specific degree exponent (k = -1.42). Repeated passaging of the total GS population showed that the same power-law was maintained over six passages (CV = -1.01 to -1.17). Surprisingly, passage of either isolated small or large subclones generated fully heterogeneous populations that retained the original power-law-dependent heterogeneity. The anti-GSC agent Temozolomide, which is well known as a standard therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), suppressed the self-renewal of clones, but it never disrupted the power-law behavior of a GS population. Although the data above did not support the stated hypothesis, they did strongly suggest a novel mechanism that underlies CSC heterogeneity. They indicate that power-law growth governs the self-renewal of heterogeneous

  18. Discovery of Power-Law Growth in the Self-Renewal of Heterogeneous Glioma Stem Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiya Sugimori

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer stem cells (CSCs drive tumorigenesis. This suggests that CSCs should make ideal therapeutic targets. However, because CSC populations in tumors appear heterogeneous, it remains unclear how CSCs might be effectively targeted. To investigate the mechanisms by which CSC populations maintain heterogeneity during self-renewal, we established a glioma sphere (GS forming model, to generate a population in which glioma stem cells (GSCs become enriched. We hypothesized, based on the clonal evolution concept, that with each passage in culture, heterogeneous clonal sublines of GSs are generated that progressively show increased proliferative ability.To test this hypothesis, we determined whether, with each passage, glioma neurosphere culture generated from four different glioma cell lines become progressively proliferative (i.e., enriched in large spheres. Rather than monitoring self-renewal, we measured heterogeneity based on neurosphere clone sizes (#cells/clone. Log-log plots of distributions of clone sizes yielded a good fit (r>0.90 to a straight line (log(% total clones = k*log(#cells/clone indicating that the system follows a power-law (y = xk with a specific degree exponent (k = -1.42. Repeated passaging of the total GS population showed that the same power-law was maintained over six passages (CV = -1.01 to -1.17. Surprisingly, passage of either isolated small or large subclones generated fully heterogeneous populations that retained the original power-law-dependent heterogeneity. The anti-GSC agent Temozolomide, which is well known as a standard therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, suppressed the self-renewal of clones, but it never disrupted the power-law behavior of a GS population.Although the data above did not support the stated hypothesis, they did strongly suggest a novel mechanism that underlies CSC heterogeneity. They indicate that power-law growth governs the self-renewal of heterogeneous

  19. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  20. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga

    2015-01-01

    Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrate...... for luminal-basal fusions, and we identified EN1, TBX18, and TCF4 as candidate transcriptional regulators of the luminal-to-basal switch. Our findings highlight the remarkable epigenetic plasticity of breast cancer cells....... of heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required......Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrated...

  1. The role of cell body density in ruminant retina mechanics assessed by atomic force and Brillouin microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Isabell P.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Franze, Kristian

    2017-12-01

    Cells in the central nervous system (CNS) respond to the stiffness of their environment. CNS tissue is mechanically highly heterogeneous, thus providing motile cells with region-specific mechanical signals. While CNS mechanics has been measured with a variety of techniques, reported values of tissue stiffness vary greatly, and the morphological structures underlying spatial changes in tissue stiffness remain poorly understood. We here exploited two complementary techniques, contact-based atomic force microscopy and contact-free Brillouin microscopy, to determine the mechanical properties of ruminant retinae, which are built up by different tissue layers. As in all vertebrate retinae, layers of high cell body densities (‘nuclear layers’) alternate with layers of low cell body densities (‘plexiform layers’). Different tissue layers varied significantly in their mechanical properties, with the photoreceptor layer being the stiffest region of the retina, and the inner plexiform layer belonging to the softest regions. As both techniques yielded similar results, our measurements allowed us to calibrate the Brillouin microscopy measurements and convert the Brillouin shift into a quantitative assessment of elastic tissue stiffness with optical resolution. Similar as in the mouse spinal cord and the developing Xenopus brain, we found a strong correlation between nuclear densities and tissue stiffness. Hence, the cellular composition of retinae appears to strongly contribute to local tissue stiffness, and Brillouin microscopy shows a great potential for the application in vivo to measure the mechanical properties of transparent tissues.

  2. Characterization of two novel cell lines with distinct heterogeneity derived from a single human bile duct carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intratumoral heterogeneity reflects subclonal diversity and accounts for a variety of clinically defined phenotypes including the development of drug resistance and recurrence. However, intratumoral heterogeneity of bile duct carcinoma (BDC is rarely studied. METHODS: Two highly heterogeneous cell lines named EH-CA1a and EH-CA1b were established from a primary tumor tissue of a pathologically proven BDC. Distinct heterogeneity and underlying mechanisms of two cell lines in karyotype, colony formation, tumorgenicity, and sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy were intensively studied. RESULTS: Both cell lines showed typical morphology of cancer cells. EH-CA1a cells grew as free-floating aggregates, while EH-CA1b cells grew adherently as a monolayer. EH-CA1a cells had higher cloning efficiencies and were able to keep proliferating under hypoxic condition. Coincidentally, hypoxia-induced factor-1α (HIF1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mRNA were significantly higher in EH-CA1a cells than in EH-CA1b cells. Both cell lines were tumorigenic in nude mouse, however, EH-CA1a cells showed more aggressive characteristics. Most importantly, the EH-CA1a cells showed much more resistance against radiation and chemotherapy with gemcitabine. Metastasis-related genes including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers such as Vimentin, Snail, and Twist, are more highly expressed in EH-CA1a cells than in EH-CA1b cells. Moreover, the percentage of cells expressing cancer stem cell-like marker, CD133, in EH-CA1a cells is much higher than that in EH-CA1b cells. Moreover, knockdown of CD133 in both EH-CA1a and EH-CA1b cells significantly reduced their invasive potential and increased their sensitivities to radiation and gemcitabine, suggesting the differential expression of CD133 protein may partially account for the difference in malignancy between these two cancer cells. CONCLUSION: Establishment

  3. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Heterogeneity and the Isolation of Immature and Committed Cells for Cardiac Remodeling and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells represent one promising source for cell replacement therapy in heart, but differentiating embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs are highly heterogeneous and show a variety of maturation states. In this study, we employed an ESC clonal line that contains a cardiac-restricted ncx1 promoter-driven puromycin resistance cassette together with a mass culture system to isolate ESC-CMs that display traits characteristic of very immature CMs. The cells display properties of proliferation, CM-restricted markers, reduced mitochondrial mass, and hypoxia-resistance. Following transplantation into rodent hearts, bioluminescence imaging revealed that immature cells, but not more mature CMs, survived for at least one month following injection. These data and comparisons with more mature cells lead us to conclude that immature hypoxia resistant ESC-CMs can be isolated in mass in vitro and, following injection into heart, form grafts that may mediate long-term recovery of global and regional myocardial contractile function following infarction.

  4. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  5. B cell signature during inactive systemic lupus is heterogeneous: toward a biological dissection of lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Garaud

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosous (SLE is an autoimmune disease with an important clinical and biological heterogeneity. B lymphocytes appear central to the development of SLE which is characterized by the production of a large variety of autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia. In mice, immature B cells from spontaneous lupus prone animals are able to produce autoantibodies when transferred into immunodeficient mice, strongly suggesting the existence of intrinsic B cell defects during lupus. In order to approach these defects in humans, we compared the peripheral B cell transcriptomas of quiescent lupus patients to normal B cell transcriptomas. When the statistical analysis is performed on the entire group of patients, the differences between patients and controls appear quite weak with only 14 mRNA genes having a false discovery rate ranging between 11 and 17%, with 6 underexpressed genes (PMEPA1, TLR10, TRAF3IP2, LDOC1L, CD1C and EGR1. However, unforced hierarchical clustering of the microarrays reveals a subgroup of lupus patients distinct from both the controls and the other lupus patients. This subgroup has no detectable clinical or immunological phenotypic peculiarity compared to the other patients, but is characterized by 1/an IL-4 signature and 2/the abnormal expression of a large set of genes with an extremely low false discovery rate, mainly pointing to the biological function of the endoplasmic reticulum, and more precisely to genes implicated in the Unfolded Protein Response, suggesting that B cells entered an incomplete BLIMP1 dependent plasmacytic differentiation which was undetectable by immunophenotyping. Thus, this microarray analysis of B cells during quiescent lupus suggests that, despite a similar lupus phenotype, different biological roads can lead to human lupus.

  6. Tracing Dynamics and Clonal Heterogeneity of Cbx7-Induced Leukemic Stem Cells by Cellular Barcoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Klauke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate monitoring of tumor dynamics and leukemic stem cell (LSC heterogeneity is important for the development of personalized cancer therapies. In this study, we experimentally induced distinct types of leukemia in mice by enforced expression of Cbx7. Simultaneous cellular barcoding allowed for thorough analysis of leukemias at the clonal level and revealed high and unpredictable tumor complexity. Multiple LSC clones with distinct leukemic properties coexisted. Some of these clones remained dormant but bore leukemic potential, as they progressed to full-blown leukemia after challenge. LSC clones could retain multilineage differentiation capacities, where one clone induced phenotypically distinct leukemias. Beyond a detailed insight into CBX7-driven leukemic biology, our model is of general relevance for the understanding of tumor dynamics and clonal evolution.

  7. Estimation of immune cell densities in immune cell conglomerates: an approach for high-throughput quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Halama

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Determining the correct number of positive immune cells in immunohistological sections of colorectal cancer and other tumor entities is emerging as an important clinical predictor and therapy selector for an individual patient. This task is usually obstructed by cell conglomerates of various sizes. We here show that at least in colorectal cancer the inclusion of immune cell conglomerates is indispensable for estimating reliable patient cell counts. Integrating virtual microscopy and image processing principally allows the high-throughput evaluation of complete tissue slides.For such large-scale systems we demonstrate a robust quantitative image processing algorithm for the reproducible quantification of cell conglomerates on CD3 positive T cells in colorectal cancer. While isolated cells (28 to 80 microm(2 are counted directly, the number of cells contained in a conglomerate is estimated by dividing the area of the conglomerate in thin tissues sections (< or =6 microm by the median area covered by an isolated T cell which we determined as 58 microm(2. We applied our algorithm to large numbers of CD3 positive T cell conglomerates and compared the results to cell counts obtained manually by two independent observers. While especially for high cell counts, the manual counting showed a deviation of up to 400 cells/mm(2 (41% variation, algorithm-determined T cell numbers generally lay in between the manually observed cell numbers but with perfect reproducibility.In summary, we recommend our approach as an objective and robust strategy for quantifying immune cell densities in immunohistological sections which can be directly implemented into automated full slide image processing systems.

  8. Use of the mitochondria toxicity assay for quantifying the viable cell density of microencapsulated jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, M; Biss, K; Jérôme, V; Hilbrig, F; Freitag, R; Zambrano, K; Hübner, H; Buchholz, R; Mahou, R; Wandrey, C

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondria toxicity assay (MTT assay) is an established method for monitoring cell viability based on mitochondrial activity. Here the MTT assay is proposed for the in situ quantification of the living cell density of microencapsulated Jurkat cells. Three systems were used to encapsulate the cells, namely a membrane consisting of an interpenetrating polyelectrolyte network of sodium cellulose sulphate/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (NaCS/PDADMAC), a calcium alginate hydrogel covered with poly(L-lysine) (Ca-alg-PLL), and a novel calcium alginate-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid material (Ca-alg-PEG). MTT results were correlated to data obtained by the trypan blue exclusion assay after release of the cells from the NaCS/PDADMAC and Ca-alg-PLL capsules, while a resazurin-based assay was used for comparison in case of the Ca-alg-PEG material. Analysis by MTT assay allows quick and reliable determination of viable cell densities of encapsulated cells independent of the capsule material. The assay is highly reproducible with inter-assay relative standard deviations below 10%. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Heterogenic final cell cycle by chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal progenitor cells leads to heteroploid cells with a remaining replicated genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shirazi Fard

    Full Text Available Retinal progenitor cells undergo apical mitoses during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration and newly generated post-mitotic neurons migrate to their prospective retinal layer. Whereas this is valid for most types of retinal neurons, chicken horizontal cells are generated by delayed non-apical mitoses from dedicated progenitors. The regulation of such final cell cycle is not well understood and we have studied how Lim1 expressing horizontal progenitor cells (HPCs exit the cell cycle. We have used markers for S- and G2/M-phase in combination with markers for cell cycle regulators Rb1, cyclin B1, cdc25C and p27Kip1 to characterise the final cell cycle of HPCs. The results show that Lim1+ HPCs are heterogenic with regards to when and during what phase they leave the final cell cycle. Not all horizontal cells were generated by a non-apical (basal mitosis; instead, the HPCs exhibited three different behaviours during the final cell cycle. Thirty-five percent of the Lim1+ horizontal cells was estimated to be generated by non-apical mitoses. The other horizontal cells were either generated by an interkinetic nuclear migration with an apical mitosis or by a cell cycle with an S-phase that was not followed by any mitosis. Such cells remain with replicated DNA and may be regarded as somatic heteroploids. The observed heterogeneity of the final cell cycle was also seen in the expression of Rb1, cyclin B1, cdc25C and p27Kip1. Phosphorylated Rb1-Ser608 was restricted to the Lim1+ cells that entered S-phase while cyclin B1 and cdc25C were exclusively expressed in HPCs having a basal mitosis. Only HPCs that leave the cell cycle after an apical mitosis expressed p27Kip1. We speculate that the cell cycle heterogeneity with formation of heteroploid cells may present a cellular context that contributes to the suggested propensity of these cells to generate cancer when the retinoblastoma gene is mutated.

  10. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaemisa Srisen

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL, and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal

  11. The Effect of Shear Rate on Dissolution of Gas and Cell Density in Continuous Foaming Process

    OpenAIRE

    M.H.N. Famili; M. Ako

    2009-01-01

    The effect of shear rate on dissolution of carbon dioxide in viscoelastic wheat flour matrix and cell density in a glass barrel twin screw extruder is investigated. It is found that by increasing the shear rate there will be a decrease in the required thermodynamic conditions and hence, it improves blowing agent dissolution and increases the cell density. Shear rate breaks up big bubbles and helps to better distribute the blowing agent in the matrix and hence it increases the cell density. Ce...

  12. Detecting heterogeneity in single-cell RNA-Seq data by non-negative matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Ching, Travers; Pan, Xinghua; Weissman, Sherman M; Garmire, Lana

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a fast-evolving technology that enables the understanding of biological processes at an unprecedentedly high resolution. However, well-suited bioinformatics tools to analyze the data generated from this new technology are still lacking. Here we investigate the performance of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) method to analyze a wide variety of scRNA-Seq datasets, ranging from mouse hematopoietic stem cells to human glioblastoma data. In comparison to other unsupervised clustering methods including K-means and hierarchical clustering, NMF has higher accuracy in separating similar groups in various datasets. We ranked genes by their importance scores ( D -scores) in separating these groups, and discovered that NMF uniquely identifies genes expressed at intermediate levels as top-ranked genes. Finally, we show that in conjugation with the modularity detection method FEM, NMF reveals meaningful protein-protein interaction modules. In summary, we propose that NMF is a desirable method to analyze heterogeneous single-cell RNA-Seq data. The NMF based subpopulation detection package is available at: https://github.com/lanagarmire/NMFEM.

  13. Heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity of glial cells in the mammalian enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesmans, Werend; Lasrado, Reena; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-02-01

    Enteric glial cells are vital for the autonomic control of gastrointestinal homeostasis by the enteric nervous system. Several different functions have been assigned to enteric glial cells but whether these are performed by specialized subtypes with a distinctive phenotype and function remains elusive. We used Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers and inducible lineage tracing to characterize the morphology and dynamic molecular marker expression of enteric GLIA in the myenteric plexus. Functional analysis in individually identified enteric glia was performed by Ca(2+) imaging. Our experiments have identified four morphologically distinct subpopulations of enteric glia in the gastrointestinal tract of adult mice. Marker expression analysis showed that the majority of glia in the myenteric plexus co-express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β, and Sox10. However, a considerable fraction (up to 80%) of glia outside the myenteric ganglia, did not label for these markers. Lineage tracing experiments suggest that these alternative combinations of markers reflect dynamic gene regulation rather than lineage restrictions. At the functional level, the three myenteric glia subtypes can be distinguished by their differential response to adenosine triphosphate. Together, our studies reveal extensive heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity of enteric glial cells and set a framework for further investigations aimed at deciphering their role in digestive function and disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dynamic Heterogeneity of the Heart Valve Interstitial Cell Population in Mitral Valve Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tori E. Horne

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart valve interstitial cell (VIC population is dynamic and thought to mediate lay down and maintenance of the tri-laminar extracellular matrix (ECM structure within the developing and mature valve throughout life. Disturbances in the contribution and distribution of valve ECM components are detrimental to biomechanical function and associated with disease. This pathological process is associated with activation of resident VICs that in the absence of disease reside as quiescent cells. While these paradigms have been long standing, characterization of this abundant and ever-changing valve cell population is incomplete. Here we examine the expression pattern of Smooth muscle α-actin, Periostin, Twist1 and Vimentin in cultured VICs, heart valves from healthy embryonic, postnatal and adult mice, as well as mature valves from human patients and established mouse models of disease. We show that the VIC population is highly heterogeneous and phenotypes are dependent on age, species, location, and disease state. Furthermore, we identify phenotypic diversity across common models of mitral valve disease. These studies significantly contribute to characterizing the VIC population in health and disease and provide insights into the cellular dynamics that maintain valve structure in healthy adults and mediate pathologic remodeling in disease states.

  15. Evidence for the molecular heterogeneity of sickle cell anemia chromosomes bearing the betaS/Benin haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Samperi, Piera; Lo Nigro, Luca; Kollia, Panagoula; Schiliro, Gino; Papadakis, Manoussos N

    2005-09-01

    There are at least four distinct African and one Asian chromosomal backgrounds (haplotypes) on which the sickle cell mutation has arisen. Additionally, previous data suggest that the beta(S)/Bantu haplotype is heterogeneous at the molecular level. Here, we report the presence of the (A)gamma -499 T-->A variation in sickle cell anemia chromosomes of Sicilian and North African origin bearing the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Being absent from North American beta(S)/Benin chromosomes, which were studied previously, this variation is indicative for the molecular heterogeneity of the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Flow Cytometric Quantification of Peripheral Blood Cell β-Adrenergic Receptor Density and Urinary Endothelial Cell-Derived Microparticles in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Rose

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a heterogeneous disease characterized by severe angiogenic remodeling of the pulmonary artery wall and right ventricular hypertrophy. Thus, there is an increasing need for novel biomarkers to dissect disease heterogeneity, and predict treatment response. Although β-adrenergic receptor (βAR dysfunction is well documented in left heart disease while endothelial cell-derived microparticles (Ec-MPs are established biomarkers of angiogenic remodeling, methods for easy large clinical cohort analysis of these biomarkers are currently absent. Here we describe flow cytometric methods for quantification of βAR density on circulating white blood cells (WBC and Ec-MPs in urine samples that can be used as potential biomarkers of right heart failure in PAH. Biotinylated β-blocker alprenolol was synthesized and validated as a βAR specific probe that was combined with immunophenotyping to quantify βAR density in circulating WBC subsets. Ec-MPs obtained from urine samples were stained for annexin-V and CD144, and analyzed by a micro flow cytometer. Flow cytometric detection of alprenolol showed that βAR density was decreased in most WBC subsets in PAH samples compared to healthy controls. Ec-MPs in urine was increased in PAH compared to controls. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between Ec-MPs and Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE in PAH patients. Therefore, flow cytometric quantification of peripheral blood cell βAR density and urinary Ec-MPs may be useful as potential biomarkers of right ventricular function in PAH.

  17. Single-Cell Landscape of Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Cell Fate Decisions during Mouse Early Gastrulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Mohammed

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The mouse inner cell mass (ICM segregates into the epiblast and primitive endoderm (PrE lineages coincident with implantation of the embryo. The epiblast subsequently undergoes considerable expansion of cell numbers prior to gastrulation. To investigate underlying regulatory principles, we performed systematic single-cell RNA sequencing (seq of conceptuses from E3.5 to E6.5. The epiblast shows reactivation and subsequent inactivation of the X chromosome, with Zfp57 expression associated with reactivation and inactivation together with other candidate regulators. At E6.5, the transition from epiblast to primitive streak is linked with decreased expression of polycomb subunits, suggesting a key regulatory role. Notably, our analyses suggest elevated transcriptional noise at E3.5 and within the non-committed epiblast at E6.5, coinciding with exit from pluripotency. By contrast, E6.5 primitive streak cells became highly synchronized and exhibit a shortened G1 cell-cycle phase, consistent with accelerated proliferation. Our study systematically charts transcriptional noise and uncovers molecular processes associated with early lineage decisions.

  18. Single-Cell Landscape of Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Cell Fate Decisions during Mouse Early Gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hisham; Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Savino, Aurora; Scialdone, Antonio; Macaulay, Iain; Mulas, Carla; Chandra, Tamir; Voet, Thierry; Dean, Wendy; Nichols, Jennifer; Marioni, John C; Reik, Wolf

    2017-08-01

    The mouse inner cell mass (ICM) segregates into the epiblast and primitive endoderm (PrE) lineages coincident with implantation of the embryo. The epiblast subsequently undergoes considerable expansion of cell numbers prior to gastrulation. To investigate underlying regulatory principles, we performed systematic single-cell RNA sequencing (seq) of conceptuses from E3.5 to E6.5. The epiblast shows reactivation and subsequent inactivation of the X chromosome, with Zfp57 expression associated with reactivation and inactivation together with other candidate regulators. At E6.5, the transition from epiblast to primitive streak is linked with decreased expression of polycomb subunits, suggesting a key regulatory role. Notably, our analyses suggest elevated transcriptional noise at E3.5 and within the non-committed epiblast at E6.5, coinciding with exit from pluripotency. By contrast, E6.5 primitive streak cells became highly synchronized and exhibit a shortened G1 cell-cycle phase, consistent with accelerated proliferation. Our study systematically charts transcriptional noise and uncovers molecular processes associated with early lineage decisions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dismantling papillary renal cell carcinoma classification: The heterogeneity of genetic profiles suggests several independent diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsaud, Alexandre; Dadone, Bérengère; Ambrosetti, Damien; Baudoin, Christian; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Rouleau, Etienne; Lefol, Cédrick; Roussel, Jean-François; Fabas, Thibault; Cristofari, Gaël; Carpentier, Xavier; Michiels, Jean-François; Amiel, Jean; Pedeutour, Florence

    2015-06-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) is the second most frequent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after clear cell RCC. In contrast to clear cell RCC, there is no consensual protocol using targeted therapy for metastatic pRCC. Moreover, diagnosis of some pRCC, especially pRCC of type 2 (pRCC2) may be challenging. Our aim was to identify molecular biomarkers that could be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of pRCC. We studied the clinical, histological, immunohistological, and comprehensive genetic features of a series of 31 pRCC including 15 pRCC1 and 16 pRCC2. We aimed to determine whether pRCC represents a unique entity or several diseases. In addition, we compared the genetic features of pRCC2 to those of eight RCC showing various degrees of tubulo-papillary architecture, including three TFE-translocation RCC and five unclassified RCC. We demonstrate that pRCC is a heterogeneous group of tumors with distinct evolution. While most pRCC2 had genetic profiles similar to pRCC1, some shared genomic features, such as loss of 3p and loss of chromosome 14, with clear cell RCC, TFE-translocation RCC, and unclassified RCC. We identified variants of the MET gene in three pRCC1. A mutation in the BRAF gene was also identified in one pRCC1. In addition, using next-generation sequencing (NGS), we identified several variant genes. Genomic profiling completed by NGS allowed us to classify pRCC2 in several groups and to identify novel mutations. Our findings provide novel information on the pathogenesis of pRCC that allow insights for personalized treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. B-1 cell heterogeneity and the regulation of natural and antigen-induced IgM production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Baumgarth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A small subset of B cells, termed B-1 cells, with developmental origins, phenotype and functions that are distinct from those of conventional B cells exist in mice, which contributes the vast majority of spontaneously produced natural IgM. Natural IgM is constitutively produced, even in the absence of microbiota, and fulfills many distinct functions in tissue-homeostasis and host-defense. B-1 cells also respond with IgM production to innate signals and pathogen exposure, while maintaining steady state levels natural IgM. Thus, within the B-1 cell pool, cells of distinct and heterogeneous functionality must exist to facilitate these different functions. This review considers three factors that may contribute to this heterogeneity: First, developmental differences regarding the origins of the precursors, second, tissue-specific signals that may differentially affect B-1 cells in the tissue compartments, and last responsiveness to self antigens as well as innate and antigen-specific signals. All three are likely to shape the repertoire and responsiveness of B-1 cells to homeostatic and antigen-induced signals and thus to contribute to the functional heterogeneity among these innate-like B cells.

  1. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  2. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night

  3. Joint DEnKF-albedo assimilation scheme that considers the common land model subgrid heterogeneity and a snow density-based observation operator for improving snow depth simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhui; Zhang, Feifei; Zhao, Yi; Shu, Hong; Zhong, Kaiwen

    2016-07-01

    For the large-area snow depth (SD) data sets with high spatial resolution in the Altay region of Northern Xinjiang, China, we present a deterministic ensemble Kalman filter (DEnKF)-albedo assimilation scheme that considers the common land model (CoLM) subgrid heterogeneity. In the albedo assimilation of DEnKF-albedo, the assimilated albedos over each subgrid tile are estimated with the MCD43C1 bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) parameters product and CoLM calculated solar zenith angle. The BRDF parameters are hypothesized to be consistent over all subgrid tiles within a specified grid. In the SCF assimilation of DEnKF-albedo, a DEnKF combining a snow density-based observation operator considers the effects of the CoLM subgrid heterogeneity and is employed to assimilate MODIS SCF to update SD states over all subgrid tiles. The MODIS SCF over a grid is compared with the area-weighted sum of model predicted SCF over all the subgrid tiles within the grid. The results are validated with in situ SD measurements and AMSR-E product. Compared with the simulations, the DEnKF-albedo scheme can reduce errors of SD simulations and accurately simulate the seasonal variability of SD. Furthermore, it can improve simulations of SD spatiotemporal distribution in the Altay region, which is more accurate and shows more detail than the AMSR-E product.

  4. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, Valentina

    2016-05-10

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  5. Nanoroughened adhesion-based capture of circulating tumor cells with heterogeneous expression and metastatic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weiqiang; Allen, Steven G.; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Qian, Weiyi; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Jianing; Bao, Liwei; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Fu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have shown prognostic relevance in many cancer types. However, the majority of current CTC capture methods rely on positive selection techniques that require a priori knowledge about the surface protein expression of disseminated CTCs, which are known to be a dynamic population. We developed a microfluidic CTC capture chip that incorporated a nanoroughened glass substrate for capturing CTCs from blood samples. Our CTC capture chip utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanoroughened etched glass surfaces as compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on the physical size or surface protein expression of CTCs. The microfluidic CTC capture chip was able to achieve a superior capture yield for both epithelial cell adhesion molecule positive (EpCAM+) and EpCAM- cancer cells in blood samples. Additionally, the microfluidic CTC chip captured CTCs undergoing transforming growth factor beta-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (TGF-β-induced EMT) with dynamically down-regulated EpCAM expression. In a mouse model of human breast cancer using EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, the number of CTCs captured correlated positively with the size of the primary tumor and was independent of their EpCAM expression. Furthermore, in a syngeneic mouse model of lung cancer using cell lines with differential metastasis capability, CTCs were captured from all mice with detectable primary tumors independent of the cell lines’ metastatic ability. The microfluidic CTC capture chip using a novel nanoroughened glass substrate is broadly applicable to capturing heterogeneous CTC populations of clinical interest independent of their surface marker expression and metastatic propensity. We were able to capture CTCs from a non-metastatic lung cancer model, demonstrating the potential of the chip to collect the entirety of CTC populations including subgroups of distinct biological and phenotypical properties. Further

  6. On the suitability of ultrathin detectors for absorbed dose assessment in the presence of high-density heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, M., E-mail: marta.bueno@upc.edu; Duch, M. A. [Institut de Tècniques Energètiques, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N. [Servei de Radiofísica i Radioprotecció, Hospital de la Santa Creu i de Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Muñoz-Montplet, C. [Servei de Física Mèdica i Protecció Radiològica, Institut Català d’Oncologia—Girona, 17007 Girona (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of several detectors for the determination of absorbed dose in bone. Methods: Three types of ultrathin LiF-based thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs)—two LiF:Mg,Cu,P-based (MCP-Ns and TLD-2000F) and a{sup 7}Li-enriched LiF:Mg,Ti-based (MTS-7s)—as well as EBT2 Gafchromic films were used to measure percentage depth-dose distributions (PDDs) in a water-equivalent phantom with a bone-equivalent heterogeneity for 6 and 18 MV and a set of field sizes ranging from 5×5 cm{sup 2} to 20×20 cm{sup 2}. MCP-Ns, TLD-2000F, MTS-7s, and EBT2 have active layers of 50, 20, 50, and 30 μm, respectively. Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations (PENELOPE code) were used as the reference and helped to understand the experimental results and to evaluate the potential perturbation of the fluence in bone caused by the presence of the detectors. The energy dependence and linearity of the TLDs’ response was evaluated. Results: TLDs exhibited flat energy responses (within 2.5%) and linearity with dose (within 1.1%) within the range of interest for the selected beams. The results revealed that all considered detectors perturb the electron fluence with respect to the energy inside the bone-equivalent material. MCP-Ns and MTS-7s underestimated the absorbed dose in bone by 4%–5%. EBT2 exhibited comparable accuracy to MTS-7s and MCP-Ns. TLD-2000F was able to determine the dose within 2% accuracy. No dependence on the beam energy or field size was observed. The MC calculations showed that a50 μm thick detector can provide reliable dose estimations in bone regardless of whether it is made of LiF, water or EBT’s active layer material. Conclusions: TLD-2000F was found to be suitable for providing reliable absorbed dose measurements in the presence of bone for high-energy x-ray beams.

  7. Neuroendocrine cells during human prostate development: does neuroendocrine cell density remain constant during fetal as well as postnatal life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y.; van der Laak, J.; Smedts, F.; Schoots, C.; Verhofstad, A.; de la Rosette, J.; Schalken, J.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge concerning differentiation of neuroendocrine (NE) cells during development of the human prostate is rather fragmentary. Using immunohistochemistry combined with a morphometric method, we investigated the distribution and density of NE cells in the developing human prostate, with special

  8. Influence of landscape heterogeneity on spatial patterns of wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass in Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Anderson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies using the RAINFOR network of forest plots have generated significant insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest carbon cycling in Amazonia. In this work, we map and explore the landscape context of several major RAINFOR plot clusters using Landsat ETM+ satellite data. In particular, we explore how representative the plots are of their landscape context, and test whether bias in plot location within landscapes may be influencing the regional mean values obtained for important forest biophysical parameters. Specifically, we evaluate whether the regional variations in wood productivity, wood specific density and above ground biomass derived from the RAINFOR network could be driven by systematic and unintentional biases in plot location. Remote sensing data covering 45 field plots were aggregated to generate landscape maps to identify the specific physiognomy of the plots. In the Landsat ETM+ data, it was possible to spectrally differentiate three types of terra firme forest, three types of forests over Paleovarzea geomorphologycal formation, two types of bamboo-dominated forest, palm forest, Heliconia monodominant vegetation, swamp forest, disturbed forests and land use areas. Overall, the plots were generally representative of the forest physiognomies in the landscape in which they are located. Furthermore, the analysis supports the observed regional trends in those important forest parameters. This study demonstrates the utility of landscape scale analysis of forest physiognomies for validating and supporting the finds of plot based studies. Moreover, the more precise geolocation of many key RAINFOR plot clusters achieved during this research provides important contextual information for studies employing the RAINFOR database.

  9. Performance of conversion efficiency of a crystalline silicon solar cell with base doping density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Sahin

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate theoretically the electrical parameters of a crystalline silicon solar cell in steady state. Based on a one-dimensional modeling of the cell, the short circuit current density, the open circuit voltage, the shunt and series resistances and the conversion efficiency are calculated, taking into account the base doping density. Either the I-V characteristic, series resistance, shunt resistance and conversion efficiency are determined and studied versus base doping density. The effects applied of base doping density on these parameters have been studied. The aim of this work is to show how short circuit current density, open circuit voltage and parasitic resistances are related to the base doping density and to exhibit the role played by those parasitic resistances on the conversion efficiency of the crystalline silicon solar. Keywords: Crystalline silicon solar cell, Base doping density, Series resistance, Shunt resistance, Conversion efficiency

  10. Experimental determination of grain density function of AZ91/SiC composite with different mass fractions of SiC and undercoolings using heterogeneous nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelito

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The grain density, Nv, in the solid state after solidification of AZ91/SiC composite is a function of maximum undercooling, ΔT, of a liquid alloy. This type of function depends on the characteristics of heterogeneous nucleation sites and number of SiC present in the alloy. The aim of this paper was selection of parameters for the model describing the relationship between the grain density of primary phase and undercooling. This model in connection with model of crystallisation, which is based on chemical elements diffusion and grain interface kinetics, can be used to predict casting quality and its microstructure. Nucleation models have parameters, which exact values are usually not known and sometimes even their physical meaning is under discussion. Those parameters can be obtained after mathematical analysis of the experimental data. The composites with 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4wt.% of SiC particles were prepared. The AZ91 alloy was a matrix of the composite reinforcement SiC particles. This composite was cast to prepare four different thickness plates.They were taken from the region near to the thermocouple, to analyze the undercooling for different composites and thickness plates and its influence on the grain size. The microstructure and thermal analysis gave set of values that connect mass fraction of SiC particles, and undercooling with grain size. These values were used to approximate nucleation model adjustment parameters. Obtained model can be very useful in modelling composites microstructure.

  11. Morphology of living cells cultured on nanowire arrays with varying nanowire densities and diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Persson, Henrik; Adolfsson, Karl; Oredsson, Stina; Prinz, Christelle N

    2018-04-02

    Vertical nanowire arrays are increasingly investigated for their applications in steering cell behavior. The geometry of the array is an important parameter, which influences the morphology and adhesion of cells. Here, we investigate the effects of array geometry on the morphology of MCF7 cancer cells and MCF10A normal-like epithelial cells. Different gallium phosphide nanowire array-geometries were produced by varying the nanowire density and diameter. Our results show that the cell size is smaller on nanowires compared to flat gallium phosphide. The cell area decreases with increasing the nanowire density on the substrate. We observed an effect of the nanowire diameter on MCF10A cells, with a decreased cell area on 40 nm diameter nanowires, compared to 60 and 80 nm diameter nanowires in high-density arrays. The focal adhesion morphology depends on the extent to which cells are contacting the substrate. For low nanowire densities and diameters, cells are lying on the substrate and we observed large focal adhesions at the cell edges. In contrast, for high nanowire densities and diameters, cells are lying on top of the nanowires and we observed point-like focal adhesions distributed over the whole cell. Our results constitute a step towards the ability to fine-tune cell behavior on nanowire arrays.

  12. Density-gradient centrifugation enables the purification of cultured corneal endothelial cells for cell therapy by eliminating senescent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Kusakabe, Ayaka; Hirano, Hiroatsu; Inoue, Ryota; Okazaki, Yugo; Nakano, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for maintaining corneal transparency; therefore, corneal endothelial dysfunction causes serious vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy is potentially a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We recently started a first-in-man clinical trial of cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction in Japan. However, the senescence of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) during the serial passage culture needed to obtain massive quantities of cells for clinical use is a serious technical obstacle preventing the push of this regenerative therapy to clinical settings. Here, we show evidence from an animal model confirming that senescent cells are less effective in cell therapy. In addition, we propose that density-gradient centrifugation can eliminate the senescent cells and purify high potency CECs for clinical use. This simple technique might be applicable for other types of cells in the settings of regenerative medicine. PMID:26443440

  13. Flagellum density regulates Proteus mirabilis swarmer cell motility in viscous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuson, Hannah H; Copeland, Matthew F; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming--increases in cell length and flagellum density--and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD(4)C(2), the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters.

  14. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  15. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  16. Crystalline orientation dependent photoresponse and heterogeneous behaviors of grain boundaries in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuanpeng; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2018-02-01

    Using photoconductive atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we characterize the local electrical properties of grains and grain boundaries of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films on top of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/ITO substrate. Three discrete photoconductivity levels are identified among perovskite grains, likely corresponding to the crystal orientation of each grain. Local J-V curves recorded on these grains further suggest an anti-correlation behavior between the short circuit current (JSC) and open circuit voltage (VOC). This phenomenon can be attributed to diffusion-limited surface recombination at the non-selective perovskite-tip contact, where a higher carrier mobility established in the perovskite grain results in an enhanced surface recombination and thus a lower VOC. In addition, the photoresponse of perovskite films displays a pronounced heterogeneity across the grain boundaries, with the boundaries formed between grains of the same photoconductivity level displaying even enhanced photocurrent and open circuit voltage compared to those of the adjacent grain interiors. These observations highlight the significance of controlling the microstructure of perovskite thin films, which will be a necessary route for further improving the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  17. Dynamic single-cell analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under process perturbation: Comparison of different methods for monitoring the intensity of population heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delvigne, Frank; Baert, Jonathan; Gofflot, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single cell biology has attracted a lot of attention in recent years and has led to numerous fundamental results pointing out the heterogeneity of clonal cell populations. In this context, microbial phenotypic heterogeneity under bioprocessing conditions needs to be further investigat...

  18. Heterogeneity of biomaterial-induced multinucleated giant cells: Possible importance for the regeneration process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeck, Mike; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Sader, Robert; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial-associated multinucleated giant cells (BMGCs) have been found within the implantation beds of many different biomaterials. However, their exact differentiation and their involvement in the inflammatory and healing events of the foreign body response still remain mostly unclear. Silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds, which induces a tissue reaction involving both macrophages and BMGCs, was implanted in the subcutaneous connective tissue of four CD-1 mice for 15 days using an established subcutaneous implantation model. Analysis of macrophage polarization and BMGCs was performed by immunohistochemcial detection of pro- (cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7), nuclear factor "kappa-light-chain-enhancer" (NF-κB)) and anti-(heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and mannose receptor (MR, also known as CD206)). Furthermore, histochemical detection of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was conducted to test its predictive efficiency for the pro-inflammatory differentiation of cells. An established system for histomorphometrical analysis was used for counting of BMGCs expressing these molecules. The results show that BMGCs express both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules within the implantation beds of SF scaffolds in comparable numbers, while only statistically significantly lower numbers of TRAP-positive BMGCs were measured in comparison to the BMGCs expressing the above-mentioned molecules. As these data substantiate the heterogeneity of BMGCs, the question arises to what extent BMGCs can "support" the process of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, the data prompt the question to what extent TRAP-expression within a biomaterial implantation bed can be seen as a predictive marker for an inflammatory condition, as in this study no obvious correlation between TRAP-expression and other pro-inflammatory markers could be observed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparative evaluation of optical methods and conventional isotope techniques for the detection of insulin receptors in heterogenous cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thun, C.

    1984-01-01

    The findings of studies using radioactively labelled (I-125) insulin to characterise its binding to various heterogenous cell systems had led to a classification of the relevant receptors with those of high affinity and low capacity or vice versa. This, in turn, raised questions as to the binding properties of each individual cell or cell material of a heterogenous nature. Apparently homogenous (lymphocytes) and heterogenous (blood and islet cells) cell populations were investigated on the basis of various techniques for the separate evaluation of individual cells, which were cytofluorometry using FITC insulin and the analysis of gold insulin under the electron microscope. For the association kinetics and equilibration analysis or affinity and receptor quantity a radioactive tracer and light microscope were used. Insulin was shown to bind to erythrocytes, reticulocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes and this result finds confirmation in the relevant literature. Furthermore, binding parameters could be determined for isolated islet cells. Cytofluorometry pointed to the fact that the insulin receptors of an apparently homogenous cell system differed in affinity and number and permitted the use of a multiple parameter procedure. Thus, it holds out promise as a method to be routinely used in the clinical diagnosis of binding parameters, without requiring previous separation procedures that are complicated or involve a loss of material. Transmission electron microscopy permitted conclusions to be drawn as to the type of cell to which insulin is attached. Owing to the use of gold insulin it was possible to throw some light on the factors determining the fate of membrane-bound insulin during its uptake into the cell. (TRV) [de

  20. Dual-patterned immunofiltration (DIF) device for the rapid efficient negative selection of heterogeneous circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Jiyoon; Kang, Yoon-Tae; Kim, Young Jun; Cho, Young-Ho; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Hojoong; Moon, Byung-In; Kim, Ho Gak

    2016-11-29

    The analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is an emerging field for estimating the metastatic relapse and tumor burden of cancer patients. However, the isolation of CTCs is still challenging due to their ambiguity, rarity, and heterogeneity. Here, we present an anti-CD45 antibody based dual-patterned immunofiltration (DIF) device for the enrichment of heterogeneous CTC subtypes by effective elimination of leukocytes. Our uniquely designed dual-patterned layers significantly enhance the binding chance between immuno-patterns and leukocytes due to the fluidic whirling and the increased binding sites, thus achieving superior negative selection in terms of high-throughput and high purity. From the experiments using lung cancer cells, 97.07 ± 2.79% of leukocytes were eliminated with less than 10% loss of cancerous cells at the flow rate of 1 mL h -1 . To verify the device as a potential diagnostic tool, CTCs were collected from 11 cancer patients' blood and an average of 283.3 CTC-like cells were identified while less than 1 CTC-like cells were found from healthy donors. The samples were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to identify their heterogeneous characteristics. These remarkable results demonstrate that the present device could help to understand the unknown properties or undiscovered roles of CTCs with a non-biased view.

  1. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of antibody-producing mouse myeloma NS0 cells cultivated at different cell densities in perfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, Britta; Swiderek, Halina; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2008-07-01

    A combined gene and protein expression profiling was performed to gain a deeper insight into the intracellular response of the antibody-producing GS-NS0 cell line in continuous perfusion culture. Growth rate, production rate, metabolic activity and viability declined with increasing cell density, dilution rate and time. Transcriptome and proteome analyses of cells at three different densities revealed 53 genes and 47 proteins as having significantly altered expression levels at HCD (high cell density). The results showed an increased up-regulation of genes/proteins involved in cellular energy production with increasing cell density. Furthermore, the intensified process triggered a cellular response to external stress stimuli, revealed by an overexpression of the genes/proteins implicated in cell-cycle arrest [e.g. Rb1 (retinoblastoma 1 gene) and Cdkn1b (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B gene)] and in the induction of pro-apoptotic genes/proteins [e.g. Tnfrsf (tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily gene), Nfkappa bia (gene coding for nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor), HSP60 (heat-shock protein of molecular mass 60 kDa) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K]. Interestingly, we observed a down-regulation of the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 involved in the unfolded-protein-response process and protein disulfide-isomerase family members responsible for protein folding and assembly. Additionally, subunits of proteasome complex were highly expressed at HCD. Microarray, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Western-blot analyses demonstrated a consistent trend of decrease in IgG heavy-chain level with increasing cell density. HSP60, which inhibits apoptosis by complexing with pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bax and Bak, was repressed at HCD. Overall, the data suggested that the balance among several factors involved in energy metabolism might be essential for fine-tuning the cell choice between survival and apoptosis

  2. Localization and Molecular Characterization of human Breast Cancer Initiating Cells from heterogeneous population of Breast Cancer Mesenchymal Stem cells by mmunofluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potdar P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast Cancer (BC is a heterogeneous disease and arises from breast cancer initiating stem cell population in the tumor and these cells are resistant to cancer therapies. Thus identifying this cell type within the tumor clone is an important area of research to understand the mechanism of breast cancer development. Recently, our laboratory has isolated and characterized Human breast cancer mesenchymal stem cells (hBCMSCs from human breast cancer and showed the heterogeneity of these cells existing in the tumor. Therefore, our present objective is to use this model system to identify, localize and define specific breast cancer initiating cells (BCICs from the heterogeneous population of hBCMSCs cell line developed in our laboratory. Localization of specific cell types can be done by using specific cancer marker antibodies using Immunofluorescence microscopy. In this study we have used FITC labeled specific cancer antibodies i.e. p53, Rb1, Hras, Ki67, EGFR, GST, ETS1 and ATF2 to localize BCICs in this population of cells. Our results have demonstrated that few cells among many of the BC cells gave fluorescence with specific cancer antibody indicating that these cell types are BCICs that may be responsible for supporting the growth of other cell type to form tumors. The Phase Contrast Microscopy clearly showed giant cells with enlarged nucleus and scanty cytoplasm associated with many cytoplasmic granules. It also indicates that these cells are mainly responsible for supporting proliferation of surrounding cells that form a part of the BC tumor. We have further hypothesized that molecular profiling of these tumor cells will open a new avenue of molecular targeted therapies for Breast Cancer patients even at an advanced stage of disease.

  3. RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell density in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Kawata, Koji; Taniuchi, Asami; Kakinuma, Kenji; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria show remarkable adaptability under several stressful conditions by shifting themselves into a dormant state. Less is known, however, about the mechanism underlying the cell transition to dormancy. Here, we report that the transition to dormant states is mediated by one of the major toxin-antitoxin systems, RelEB, in a cell density-dependent manner in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. We constructed a strain, IKA121, which expresses the toxin RelE in the presence of rhamnose and lacks chromosomal relBE and rhaBAD. With this strain, we demonstrated that RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell densities compared to that at low cell densities. The initiation of expression of the antitoxin RelB from a plasmid, pCA24N, reversed RelE-mediated dormancy in bacterial cultures. The activation of RelE increased the appearance of persister cells against β-lactams, quinolones, and aminoglycosides, and more persister cells appeared at high cell densities than at low cell densities. Further analysis indicated that amino acid starvation and an uncharacterized extracellular heat-labile substance promote RelE-mediated dormancy. This is a first report on the induction of RelE-mediated dormancy by high cell density. This work establishes a population-based dormancy mechanism to help explain E. coli survival in stressful environments.

  4. Cells determine cell density using a small protein bound to a unique tissue-specific phospholipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Petzold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell density is the critical parameter controlling tendon morphogenesis. Knowing its neighbors allows a cell to regulate correctly its proliferation and collagen production. A missing link to understanding this process is a molecular description of the sensing mechanism. Previously, this mechanism was shown in cell culture to rely on a diffusible factor (SNZR [sensor] with an affinity for the cell layer. This led to purifying conditioned medium over 4 columns and analyzing the final column fractions for band intensity on SDS gels versus biological activity – a 16 kD band strongly correlated between assays. N-terminal sequencing – EPLAVVDL – identified a large gene (424 AA, extremely conserved between chicken and human. In this paper we probe whether this is the correct gene. Can the predicted large protein be cleaved to a smaller protein? EPLAVVDL occurs towards the C-terminus and cleavage would create a small 94 AA protein. This protein would run at ∼10 kD, so what modifications or cofactor binding accounts for its running at 16 kD on SDS gels? This protein has no prominent hydrophobic regions, so can it be secreted? To validate its role, the chicken cDNA for this gene was tagged with myc and his and transfected into a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS. U2OS cells expressed the gene but not passively: differentiating into structures resembling spongy bone and expressing alkaline phosphatase, an early bone marker. Intracellularly, two bands were observed by Western blotting: the full length protein and a smaller form (26 kD. Outside the cell, a small band (28 kD was detected, although it was 40% larger than expected, as well as multiple larger bands. These larger forms could be converted to the predicted smaller protein (94 AA + tags by changing salt concentrations and ultrafiltering – releasing a cofactor to the filtrate while leaving a protein factor in the retentate. Using specific degradative enzymes and mass spectrometry, the

  5. Cell Growth on ("Janus") Density Gradients of Bifunctional Zeolite L Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, Nermin Seda; Motealleh, Andisheh; Schäfer, Andreas H

    2016-12-28

    Nanoparticle density gradients on surfaces have attracted interest as two-dimensional material surfaces that can mimic the complex nano-/microstructure of the native extracellular matrix, including its chemical and physical gradients, and can therefore be used to systematically study cell-material interactions. In this respect, we report the preparation of density gradients made of bifunctional zeolite L crystals on glass surfaces and the effects of the density gradient and biopolymer functionalization of zeolite L crystals on cell adhesion. We also describe how we created "Janus" density gradient surfaces by gradually depositing two different types of zeolite L crystals that were functionalized and loaded with different chemical groups and guest molecules onto the two distinct sides of the same glass substrate. Our results show that more cells adhered on the density gradient of biopolymer-coated zeolites than on uncoated ones. The number of adhered cells increased up to a certain surface coverage of the glass by the zeolite L crystals, but then it decreased beyond the zeolite density at which a higher surface coverage decreased fibroblast cell adhesion and spreading. Additionally, cell experiments showed that cells gradually internalized the guest-molecule-loaded zeolite L crystals from the underlying density gradient containing bifunctional zeolite L crystals.

  6. Dissecting mechanisms of mouse embryonic stem cells heterogeneity through a model-based analysis of transcription factor dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, Maria; Glauche, Ingmar; Zerjatke, Thomas; Winzi, Maria; Buchholz, Frank; Roeder, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) show heterogeneous expression levels of transcription factors (TFs) involved in pluripotency regulation, among them Nanog and Rex1. The expression of both TFs can change dynamically between states of high and low activity, correlating with the cells' capacity for self-renewal. Stochastic fluctuations as well as sustained oscillations in gene expression are possible mechanisms to explain this behaviour, but the lack of suitable data hampered their clear distinction. Here, we present a systems biology approach in which novel experimental data on TF heterogeneity is complemented by an agent-based model of mESC self-renewal. Because the model accounts for intracellular interactions, cell divisions and heredity structures, it allows for evaluating the consistency of the proposed mechanisms with data on population growth and on TF dynamics after cell sorting. Our model-based analysis revealed that a bistable, noise-driven network model fulfils the minimal requirements to consistently explain Nanog and Rex1 expression dynamics in heterogeneous and sorted mESC populations. Moreover, we studied the impact of TF-related proliferation capacities on the frequency of state transitions and demonstrate that cellular genealogies can provide insights into the heredity structures of mESCs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  8. Heterogeneity of high-density lipoprotein particles and insulin output during oral glucose tolerance test in men with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, J; Kwaśniak, M; Wybrańska, I; Hartwich, J; Guevara, I; Zdzienicka, A; Kruszelnicka-Kwiatkowska, O; Piwowarska, W; Miszczuk-Jamska, B; Dembińska-Kieć, A

    1996-03-01

    We compared the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) composition and particle heterogeneity in 60 nonobese (normal body mass index, BMI) men suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD) with normolipemia and normoinsulinemia with lower and higher insulin output during the oral glucose tolerance test (silent hyperinsulinemia). The apolipoprotein apoAI, apoAII, and apoE levels were higher in the high insulin response (HI) group than in low insulin response (LI) group. The ratio of apoAI versus total protein and the ratio of apoAI versus total cholesterol were increased in HI compared with LI. The lipid components in HDL were higher in LI than in HI, while for HDL2 they were higher in HI. The fractioning of HDL by gradient gel electrophoresis revealed a different pattern of HDL particles in both groups. The larger particles, HDL2b and HDL2a (mean particle diameters 10.6 and 9.2 nm, respectively), occur more frequently in HI patients (up to 60%) than in LI patients, whereas the smaller particles, HDL3a and HDL3b (mean particle diameters 8.6 and 7.8 nm, respectively), predominate in LI patients. Our results demonstrate that even in the normoglycemic, normocholesterolemic CAD patients, a high insulin output observed during the oral glucose tolerance test may be connected with a different HDL particle pattern, which suggests changes in the reverse cholesterol transport.

  9. Cell engineering of Escherichia coli allows high cell density accumulation without fed-batch process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäcklund, Emma; Markland, Katrin; Larsson, Gen

    2008-01-01

    A set of mutations in the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was used to create Escherichia coli strains with a reduced uptake rate of glucose. This allows a growth restriction, which is controlled on cellular rather than reactor level, which is typical of the fed-batch cultivation concept. Batch growth of the engineered strains resulted in cell accumulation profiles corresponding to a growth rate of 0.78, 0.38 and 0.25 h(-1), respectively. The performance of the mutants in batch cultivation was compared to fed-batch cultivation of the wild type cell using restricted glucose feed to arrive at the corresponding growth profiles. Results show that the acetate production, oxygen consumption and product formation were similar, when a recombinant product was induced from the lacUV5 promoter. Ten times more cells could be produced in batch cultivation using the mutants without the growth detrimental production of acetic acid. This allows high cell density production without the establishment of elaborate fed-batch control equipment. The technique is suggested as a versatile tool in high throughput multiparallel protein production but also for increasing the number of experiments performed during process development while keeping conditions similar to the large-scale fed-batch performance.

  10. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Going Far Beyond the Needle in the Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Bulfoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTC defined as expressing both epithelial cell adhesion molecule and cytokeratins (EpCAM+/CK+ can predict prognosis and response to therapy in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer, its clinical utility (i.e., the ability to improve patient outcome by guiding therapy has not yet been proven in clinical trials. Therefore, scientists are now focusing on the molecular characterization of CTC as a way to explore its possible use as a “surrogate” of tumor tissues to non-invasively assess the genomic landscape of the cancer and its evolution during treatment. Additionally, evidences confirm the existence of CTC in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT characterized by a variable loss of epithelial markers. Since the EMT process can originate cells with enhanced invasiveness, stemness and drug-resistance, the enumeration and characterization of this population, perhaps the one truly responsible of tumor recurrence and progression, could be more clinically useful. For these reasons, several devices able to capture CTC independently from the expression of epithelial markers have been developed. In this review, we will describe the types of heterogeneity so far identified and the key role played by the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in driving CTC heterogeneity. The clinical relevance of detecting CTC-heterogeneity will be discussed as well.

  11. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry: a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Gedye

    Full Text Available Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell

  12. Cell surface profiling using high-throughput flow cytometry: a platform for biomarker discovery and analysis of cellular heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedye, Craig A; Hussain, Ali; Paterson, Joshua; Smrke, Alannah; Saini, Harleen; Sirskyj, Danylo; Pereira, Keira; Lobo, Nazleen; Stewart, Jocelyn; Go, Christopher; Ho, Jenny; Medrano, Mauricio; Hyatt, Elzbieta; Yuan, Julie; Lauriault, Stevan; Meyer, Mona; Kondratyev, Maria; van den Beucken, Twan; Jewett, Michael; Dirks, Peter; Guidos, Cynthia J; Danska, Jayne; Wang, Jean; Wouters, Bradly; Neel, Benjamin; Rottapel, Robert; Ailles, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins have a wide range of biological functions, and are often used as lineage-specific markers. Antibodies that recognize cell surface antigens are widely used as research tools, diagnostic markers, and even therapeutic agents. The ability to obtain broad cell surface protein profiles would thus be of great value in a wide range of fields. There are however currently few available methods for high-throughput analysis of large numbers of cell surface proteins. We describe here a high-throughput flow cytometry (HT-FC) platform for rapid analysis of 363 cell surface antigens. Here we demonstrate that HT-FC provides reproducible results, and use the platform to identify cell surface antigens that are influenced by common cell preparation methods. We show that multiple populations within complex samples such as primary tumors can be simultaneously analyzed by co-staining of cells with lineage-specific antibodies, allowing unprecedented depth of analysis of heterogeneous cell populations. Furthermore, standard informatics methods can be used to visualize, cluster and downsample HT-FC data to reveal novel signatures and biomarkers. We show that the cell surface profile provides sufficient molecular information to classify samples from different cancers and tissue types into biologically relevant clusters using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Finally, we describe the identification of a candidate lineage marker and its subsequent validation. In summary, HT-FC combines the advantages of a high-throughput screen with a detection method that is sensitive, quantitative, highly reproducible, and allows in-depth analysis of heterogeneous samples. The use of commercially available antibodies means that high quality reagents are immediately available for follow-up studies. HT-FC has a wide range of applications, including biomarker discovery, molecular classification of cancers, or identification of novel lineage specific or stem cell markers.

  13. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  14. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  15. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  16. Single?Cell Mass Spectrometry for Discovery Proteomics: Quantifying Translational Cell Heterogeneity in the 16?Cell Frog (Xenopus) Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard?Banek, Camille; Moody, Sally A.; Nemes, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We advance mass spectrometry from a cell population?averaging tool to one capable of quantifying the expression of diverse proteins in single embryonic cells. Our instrument combines capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrospray ionization, and a tribrid ultrahigh?resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS) to enable untargeted (discovery) proteomics with ca. 25?amol lower limit of detection. CE??ESI?HRMS enabled the identification of 500?800 nonredundant protein groups by measuring 20?ng, or

  17. Heterogeneous Family of Cyclomodulins: Smart Weapons That Allow Bacteria to Hijack the Eukaryotic Cell Cycle and Promote Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aouar Filho, Rachid A; Nicolas, Aurélie; De Paula Castro, Thiago L; Deplanche, Martine; De Carvalho Azevedo, Vasco A; Goossens, Pierre L; Taieb, Frédéric; Lina, Gerard; Le Loir, Yves; Berkova, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Some bacterial pathogens modulate signaling pathways of eukaryotic cells in order to subvert the host response for their own benefit, leading to successful colonization and invasion. Pathogenic bacteria produce multiple compounds that generate favorable conditions to their survival and growth during infection in eukaryotic hosts. Many bacterial toxins can alter the cell cycle progression of host cells, impairing essential cellular functions and impeding host cell division. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cyclomodulins, a heterogeneous family of bacterial effectors that induce eukaryotic cell cycle alterations. We discuss the mechanisms of actions of cyclomodulins according to their biochemical properties, providing examples of various cyclomodulins such as cycle inhibiting factor, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, cytolethal distending toxins, shiga toxin, subtilase toxin, anthrax toxin, cholera toxin, adenylate cyclase toxins, vacuolating cytotoxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, phenol soluble modulins, and mycolactone. Special attention is paid to the benefit provided by cyclomodulins to bacteria during colonization of the host.

  18. Heterogeneous Family of Cyclomodulins: Smart Weapons That Allow Bacteria to Hijack the Eukaryotic Cell Cycle and Promote Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid A. El-Aouar Filho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Some bacterial pathogens modulate signaling pathways of eukaryotic cells in order to subvert the host response for their own benefit, leading to successful colonization and invasion. Pathogenic bacteria produce multiple compounds that generate favorable conditions to their survival and growth during infection in eukaryotic hosts. Many bacterial toxins can alter the cell cycle progression of host cells, impairing essential cellular functions and impeding host cell division. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cyclomodulins, a heterogeneous family of bacterial effectors that induce eukaryotic cell cycle alterations. We discuss the mechanisms of actions of cyclomodulins according to their biochemical properties, providing examples of various cyclomodulins such as cycle inhibiting factor, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, cytolethal distending toxins, shiga toxin, subtilase toxin, anthrax toxin, cholera toxin, adenylate cyclase toxins, vacuolating cytotoxin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, phenol soluble modulins, and mycolactone. Special attention is paid to the benefit provided by cyclomodulins to bacteria during colonization of the host.

  19. The use of sequential staining for detection of heterogeneous intracellular response of individual Jurkat cells to lysophosphatidylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrimzon, Elena; Zurgil, Naomi; Shafran, Yana; Leibovich, Pnina; Sobolev, Maria; Guejes, Larissa; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2013-01-31

    Living cells are known to exhibit great morphological, functional, spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Hence, the study of cells in a bulk, whether this bulk is homogenous or heterogeneous, does not provide sufficiently detailed or interpretable results. An advantageous approach would rather be a comprehensive study of cell biological activity in single isolated living cells. In this study, we present an imaging approach for studying pre-apoptotic and very early apoptotic events, during cell death induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) at the single cell level. The aim of this study is to investigate intracellular events, such as the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, before and immediately after LPC introduction to the lymphocytes at the level of individual cells. A new protocol of sequential staining was developed to study the relation between early apoptosis signs (PS externalization), MMP changes and intracellular ROS production rates at an individual Jurkat cell resolution. Simultaneous kinetic assessments of MMP, intracellular ROS levels and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization were performed at a single cell resolution, using Optical LiveCell™ Array technology and image analysis. The parameters were measured and analyzed both before and during exposure to inducers in a Jurkat cell population, including three groups of single cells: spontaneous apoptotic cells, induced apoptotic cells and fully functional living cells. Exogenous LPC caused a heterogeneous intracellular response among Jurkat cells immediately after its introduction. Subgroups of cells with opposite changes of MMP and different kinetics of ROS increase, were revealed within the whole cell population. The subset of apoptosis-induced Jurkat cells, which became apoptotic within 3h after the LPC introduction, exhibited higher initial MMP compared to fully functional or spontaneous apoptotic cells. LPC-induced apoptosis was accompanied by a

  20. Endothelial cell density after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (Melles technique)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dooren, Bart T. H.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Beekhuis, W. Houdijn; Melles, Gerrit R. J.

    2004-01-01

    To measure the recipient endothelial cell loss after the Melles technique for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. In 21 eyes of 21 patients, a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty procedure was performed. Before surgery and at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, specular microscopy was performed to

  1. Substrate compliance versus ligand density in cell on gel responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Engler, A.; Bačáková, Lucie; Newman, C.; Hategan, A.; Griffin, M.; Discher, D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2004), s. 617-628 ISSN 0006-3495 Grant - others:GA-(US) National Science Foundation; GA-(US) National Institutes of Health; GA-(US) Muscular Dystrophy Association Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : material stiffness * cell spreading * focal adhesions Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.585, year: 2004

  2. Genetic diversity in normal cell populations is the earliest stage of oncogenesis leading to intra-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory L Howk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Random mutations and epigenetic alterations provide a rich substrate for microevolutionary phenomena to occur in proliferating epithelial tissues. Genetic diversity resulting from random mutations in normal cells is critically important for understanding the genetic basis of oncogenesis. However, evaluation of the cell-specific role of individual (epi-genetic alterations in living tissues is extremely difficult from a direct experimental perspective. We have developed a theoretical model for uterine epithelial cell proliferation. Computational simulations have shown that a base-line mutation rate of two mutations per cell division is sufficient to explain sporadic endometrial cancer as a rare evolutionary consequence with an incidence similar to that reported in SEER data. Simulation of the entire oncogenic process has allowed us to analyze the features of the tumor initiating cells and their clonal expansion. Analysis of the malignant features of individual cancer cells, such as de-differentiation status, proliferation potential, and immortalization status, permits a mathematical characterization of malignancy and a comparison of intra-tumor heterogeneity between individual tumors. We found, under the conditions specified, that cancer stem cells account for approximately 7% of the total cancer cell population. Taken together, our mathematical modeling describes the genetic diversity and evolution in a normal cell population at the early stages of oncogenesis and characterizes intra-tumor heterogeneity. This model has explored the role of accumulation of a large number of genetic alterations in oncogenesis as an alternative to traditional biological approaches emphasizing the driving role of a small number of genetic mutations, and this accumulation, along with environmental factors, has a significant impact on the growth advantage of and selection pressure on individual cancer cells and the resulting tumor composition and progression.

  3. Model-driven discovery of long-chain fatty acid metabolic reprogramming in heterogeneous prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín de Mas, Igor; Aguilar, Esther; Zodda, Erika; Balcells, Cristina; Marin, Silvia; Dallmann, Guido; Thomson, Timothy M; Papp, Balázs; Cascante, Marta

    2018-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition promotes intra-tumoral heterogeneity, by enhancing tumor cell invasiveness and promoting drug resistance. We integrated transcriptomic data for two clonal subpopulations from a prostate cancer cell line (PC-3) into a genome-scale metabolic network model to explore their metabolic differences and potential vulnerabilities. In this dual cell model, PC-3/S cells express Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition markers and display high invasiveness and low metastatic potential, while PC-3/M cells present the opposite phenotype and higher proliferative rate. Model-driven analysis and experimental validations unveiled a marked metabolic reprogramming in long-chain fatty acids metabolism. While PC-3/M cells showed an enhanced entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, PC-3/S cells used long-chain fatty acids as precursors of eicosanoid metabolism. We suggest that this metabolic reprogramming endows PC-3/M cells with augmented energy metabolism for fast proliferation and PC-3/S cells with increased eicosanoid production impacting angiogenesis, cell adhesion and invasion. PC-3/S metabolism also promotes the accumulation of docosahexaenoic acid, a long-chain fatty acid with antiproliferative effects. The potential therapeutic significance of our model was supported by a differential sensitivity of PC-3/M cells to etomoxir, an inhibitor of long-chain fatty acid transport to the mitochondria.

  4. Heterogeneity of Human Breast Cancer Cell Clones with respect to Cytotoxic Susceptibility detected by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes and Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Sato, Noriyuki; Cho, Junmin; Takahashi, Shuji; Toda, Kazunori; Asaishi, Kazuaki; Hirata, Koichi; Kikuchi, Kokichi

    1991-01-01

    Clonal heterogeneity of human breast cancer cells, HMC-1, with respect to the cytotoxic susceptibility against autologous cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), TcHMC-1, and natural killer- (NK) cells was demonstrated in a ??Cr release cytotoxicity assay. We have established 8 tumor cell clones, HMC-1-1 through HMC-1-8, from HMC-1 cells and autologous TcHMC-1 clone that showed high cytotoxic activity as well. In the cytotoxicity assays, HMC-1-8 clone showed significantly high cytotoxic susceptibility...

  5. Models for high cell density bioreactors must consider biomass volume fraction: Cell recycle example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbouquette, H G

    1987-06-01

    Intrinsic models, which take into account biomass volume fraction, must be formulated for adequate simulation of high-biomass-density fermentations with cell recycle. Through comparison of corresponding intrinsic and non-intrinsic models in dimensionless form, constraints for non-intrinsic model usage in terms of biokinetic and fermenter operating parameters can be identified a priori. Analysis of a simple product-inhibition model indicates that the non-intrinsic approach is suitable only when the attainable biomass volume fraction in the fermentation broth is less than about 0.10. Inappropriate application of a non-intrinsic model can lead to gross errors in calculated substrate and product concentrations, substrate conversion, and volumetric productivity.

  6. Models for high cell density bioreactors must consider biomass volume fraction: cell recycle example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monbouquette, H.G.

    1987-06-01

    Intrinsic models, which take into account biomass volume fraction, must be formulated for adequate simulation of high-biomass-density fermentations with cell recycle. Through comparison of corresponding intrinsic and non-intrinsic models in dimensionless form, constraints for non-intrinsic model usage in terms of biokinetic and fermenter operating parameters can be identified a priori. Analysis of a simple product-inhibition model indicates that the non-intrinsic approach is suitable only when the attainable biomass volume fraction in the fermentation broth is less than about 0.10. Inappropriate application of a non-intrinsic model can lead to gross errors in calculated substrate and product concentrations, substrate conversion, and volumetric productivity. (Refs. 14).

  7. Conjunctival Goblet Cell Density Following Cataract Surgery With Diclofenac Versus Diclofenac and Rebamipide: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kumiko; Miyake, Kensaku; Kondo, Nagako; Asano, Sayaka; Takeda, Junko; Takahashi, Akiko; Takashima, Yuko; Kondo, Mineo

    2017-09-01

    To determine the effects of topical diclofenac or betamethasone with concomitant application of topical rebamipide on the conjunctival goblet cell density in eyes after cataract surgery. Randomized clinical trial. Eighty patients who were scheduled for cataract surgery. Patients were randomized into 4 groups according to the postoperative topical drugs to be given; Group A, diclofenac alone; Group B, diclofenac and rebamipide; Group C, betamethasone alone; and Group D, betamethasone and rebamipide. Impression cytology was performed before and at 1 month after the surgery, and the mean density of goblet cells was determined. The mean (± SD) density of goblet cells before the surgery in Group A was 257.0 ± 188.7 cells/mm 2 , and it decreased significantly to 86.5 ± 76.7 cells/mm 2 at 1 month after the surgery (P = .002). In Group B, the goblet cell density was not statistically different between before (238.5 ± 116.6 cells/mm 2 ) and at 1 month after the surgery (211.3 ± 184.4 cells/mm 2 , P = .55). In Groups C and D, the mean density of goblet cells was decreased at 1 month after the surgery, but the decreases were not significant (P = .11 and P = .52, respectively). After cataract surgery with postoperative topical diclofenac, the conjunctival goblet cell density was significantly reduced, and this reduction was blocked by the concomitant use of topical rebamipide. These results suggest that the concomitant use of topical rebamipide with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is beneficial, especially in cases with postoperative dry eyes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. LIF Density Measurement Calibration Using a Reference Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Williams, George J., Jr.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. A pulsed UV laser was used to pump the ground state molybdenum at 345.64nm, and the non-resonant fluorescence at 550-nm was collected using a bandpass filter and a photomultiplier tube or intensified CCD array. The sensitivity of the fluorescence was evaluated to determine the limitations of the calibration technique. The suitability of the diagnostic calibration technique was assessed for application to ion engine erosion rate measurements.

  9. Multilevel SOT-MRAM Cell with a Novel Sensing Scheme for High-Density Memory Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeinali, Behzad; Esmaeili, Mahsa; Madsen, Jens Kargaard

    2017-01-01

    in high-density memory application. To deal with this obstacle, we propose a multilevel cell which stores two bits per memory cell. In addition, we propose a novel sensing scheme to read out the stored data in the multilevel SOT-MRAM cell. Our simulation results show that the proposed cell can achieve 3X......This paper presents a multilevel spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM). The conventional SOT-MRAMs enables a reliable and energy efficient write operation. However, these cells require two access transistors per cell, hence the efficiency of the SOTMRAMs can be questioned...

  10. Heterogeneity and weak coupling may explain the synchronization characteristics of cells in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    development of force known as vasomotion. We present experimental data showing a considerable heterogeneity in cellular calcium dynamics in the vascular wall. In stimulated vessels, some SMCs remain quiescent, whereas others display waves of variable frequency. At the onset of vasomotion, all SMCs...

  11. Cytogenetic heterogeneity and their serial dynamic changes during acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in cultured mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Im, Kyong Ok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Ji Seok; Kim, Seon Young; Oh, Keunhee; Lee, Dong-Sup; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Seong Who; Jang, Mi; Lee, Gene; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Do; Lee, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluated cytogenetic aberrations of MSC during culture using G-banding and FISH. • We tracked the quantitative changes of each clone among heterogeneity upon passages. • The changes of cytogenetic profile upon passages were similar to cancer stem cell. - Abstract: To minimize the risk of tumorigenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), G-banding analysis is widely used to detect chromosomal aberrations in MSCs. However, a critical limitation of G-banding is that it only reflects the status of metaphase cells, which can represent as few as 0.01% of tested cells. During routine cytogenetic testing in MSCs, we often detect chromosomal aberrations in minor cell populations. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether such a minority of cells can expand over time or if they ultimately disappear during MSC passaging. We passaged MSCs serially while monitoring quantitative changes for each aberrant clone among heterogeneous MSCs. To investigate the cytogenetic status of interphase cells, which represent the main population, we also performed interphase FISH analysis, in combination with G-banding and telomere length determination. In human adipose tissue-derived MSCs, 4 types of chromosomal aberrations were found during culturing, and in umbilical cord MSCs, 2 types of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sequential dynamic changes among heterogeneous aberrant clones during passaging were similar to the dynamic changes observed in cancer stem cells during disease progression. Throughout all passages, the quantitative G-banding results were inconsistent with those of the interphase FISH analysis. Interphase FISH revealed hidden aberrations in stem cell populations with normal karyotypes by G-banding analysis. We found that telomere length gradually decreased during passaging until the point at which cytogenetic aberrations appeared. The present study demonstrates that rare aberrant clones at earlier passages can become predominant clones during

  12. Cytogenetic heterogeneity and their serial dynamic changes during acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in cultured mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung-Ah [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kyong Ok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Ji Seok [Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Young [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Keunhee; Lee, Dong-Sup [Laboratory of Immunology and Cancer Biology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Transplantation Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Seong Who [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Mi; Lee, Gene [Lab of Molecular Genetics, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Do [Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asthma Center and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soon, E-mail: soonlee@snu.ac.kr [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We evaluated cytogenetic aberrations of MSC during culture using G-banding and FISH. • We tracked the quantitative changes of each clone among heterogeneity upon passages. • The changes of cytogenetic profile upon passages were similar to cancer stem cell. - Abstract: To minimize the risk of tumorigenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), G-banding analysis is widely used to detect chromosomal aberrations in MSCs. However, a critical limitation of G-banding is that it only reflects the status of metaphase cells, which can represent as few as 0.01% of tested cells. During routine cytogenetic testing in MSCs, we often detect chromosomal aberrations in minor cell populations. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether such a minority of cells can expand over time or if they ultimately disappear during MSC passaging. We passaged MSCs serially while monitoring quantitative changes for each aberrant clone among heterogeneous MSCs. To investigate the cytogenetic status of interphase cells, which represent the main population, we also performed interphase FISH analysis, in combination with G-banding and telomere length determination. In human adipose tissue-derived MSCs, 4 types of chromosomal aberrations were found during culturing, and in umbilical cord MSCs, 2 types of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sequential dynamic changes among heterogeneous aberrant clones during passaging were similar to the dynamic changes observed in cancer stem cells during disease progression. Throughout all passages, the quantitative G-banding results were inconsistent with those of the interphase FISH analysis. Interphase FISH revealed hidden aberrations in stem cell populations with normal karyotypes by G-banding analysis. We found that telomere length gradually decreased during passaging until the point at which cytogenetic aberrations appeared. The present study demonstrates that rare aberrant clones at earlier passages can become predominant clones during

  13. Endothelial cell perturbation and low-density lipoprotein. Quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrel, E.M.; Holland, J.A.; Pritchard, K.A.; Colton, C.K.; Stemerman, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The focal entry and accumulation of LDL within the arterial wall of the normal animal may represent an early stage in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque. Concentrations of LDL 10 to 100 times normal medial concentrations might be difficult to clear from the arterial wall, permitting accumulation of lipid. Elevated LDL concentrations, in proximity to smooth muscle cells, appear to stimulate SMC proliferation. High LDL concentrations might also enhance mononuclear cell adhesion to endothelium. Since LDL has a high affinity for heparin and heparin for growth factors, LDL accumulation may be a mechanism for the concentration of such materials in the intima. The observation of markedly enhanced macromolecular permeability foci could be related to several potential mechanisms of initiation of atherosclerosis. This observation is of particular note when the focal occurrence of atherosclerosis is considered. Although atherosclerosis is seen as a generalized thickening of the intima, it is the focal narrowing of the lumen that is often responsible for the stenosis which produces symptoms such as angina or myocardial infarction

  14. Heterogeneity of Radial Glia-Like Cells in the Adult Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebara, Elias; Bonaguidi, Michael Anthony; Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Sultan, Sébastien; Udry, Florian; Gijs, Pieter-Jan; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun; Toni, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by the neurogenic niche. Cellular contacts between niche cells and neural stem cells are hypothesized to regulate stem cell proliferation or lineage choice. However, the structure of adult neural stem cells and the contact they form with niche cells are poorly described. Here, we characterized the morphology of radial glia-like (RGL) cells, their molecular identity, proliferative activity, and fate determination in the adult mouse hippocampus. We found the coexistence of two morphotypes of cells with prototypical morphological characteristics of RGL stem cells: Type α cells, which represented 76% of all RGL cells, displayed a long primary process modestly branching into the molecular layer and type β cells, which represented 24% of all RGL cells, with a shorter radial process highly branching into the outer granule cell layer-inner molecular layer border. Stem cell markers were expressed in type α cells and coexpressed with astrocytic markers in type β cells. Consistently, in vivo lineage tracing indicated that type α cells can give rise to neurons, astrocytes, and type β cells, whereas type β cells do not proliferate. Our results reveal that the adult subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus harbors two functionally different RGL cells, which can be distinguished by simple morphological criteria, supporting a morphofunctional role of their thin cellular processes. Type β cells may represent an intermediate state in the transformation of type α, RGL stem cells, into astrocytes. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in cultured rat hepatocytes: regulation by cell density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.D.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) receptors in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes were characterized and their regulation by cell density examined. In hepatocytes cultured at 5 X 10(5) cells per 3.8 cm2 plate [ 125 I]IGF-II bound to specific, high affinity receptors (Ka = 4.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(9) l/mol). Less than 1% cross-reactivity by IGF-I and no cross-reactivity by insulin were observed. IGF-II binding increased when cells were permeabilized with 0.01% digitonin, suggesting the presence of an intracellular receptor pool. Determined by Scatchard analysis and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity labeling, the higher binding was due solely to an increase in binding sites present on 220 kDa type II IGF receptors. In hepatocytes cultured at low densities, the number of cell surface receptors increased markedly, from 10-20,000 receptors per cell at a culture density of 6 X 10(5) cells/well to 70-80,000 receptors per cell at 0.38 X 10(5) cells/well. The increase was not due simply to the exposure of receptors from the intracellular pool, as a density-related increase in receptors was also seen in cells permeabilized with digitonin. There was no evidence that IGF binding proteins, either secreted by hepatocytes or present in fetal calf serum, had any effect on the measurement of receptor concentration or affinity. We conclude that rat hepatocytes in primary culture contain specific IGF-II receptors and that both cell surface and intracellular receptors are regulated by cell density

  16. Effect of Cell Seeding Density and Inflammatory Cytokines on Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: an in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukho, Panithi; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Hesselink, Jan Willem; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Verseijden, Femke; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M

    2017-04-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are known to be able to promote repair of injured tissue via paracrine factors. However, the effect of cell density and inflammatory cytokines on the paracrine ability of ASCs remains largely unknown. To investigate these effects, ASCs were cultured in 8000 cells/cm 2 , 20,000 cells/cm 2 , 50,000 cells/cm 2 , and 400,000 cells/cm 2 with and without 10 or 20 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and 25 or 50 ng/ml interferon gamma (IFNγ). ASC-sheets formed at 400,000 cells/cm 2 after 48 h of culture. With increasing concentrations of TNFα and IFNγ, ASC-sheets with 400,000 cells/cm 2 had increased production of angiogenic factors Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Fibroblast Growth Factor and decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes TNFA and Prostaglandin Synthase 2 (PTGS2) compared to lower density ASCs. Moreover, the conditioned medium of ASC-sheets with 400,000 cells/cm 2 stimulated with the low concentration of TNFα and IFNγ enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and fibroblast migration. These results suggest that a high cell density enhances ASC paracrine function might beneficial for wound repair, especially in pro-inflammatory conditions.

  17. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming

    quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2......High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural...

  18. A Density-Driven Method for the Placement of Biological Cells Over Two-Dimensional Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Nicolas P.

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a graphical method originating from the computer graphics domain that is used for the arbitrary placement of cells over a two-dimensional manifold. Using a bitmap image whose luminance provides cell density, this method guarantees a discrete distribution of the positions of the cells respecting the local density. This method scales to any number of cells, allows one to specify arbitrary enclosing shapes and provides a scalable and versatile alternative to the more classical assumption of a uniform spatial distribution. The method is illustrated on a discrete homogeneous neural field, on the distribution of cones and rods in the retina and on the neural density of a flattened piece of cortex.

  19. A Density-Driven Method for the Placement of Biological Cells Over Two-Dimensional Manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas P. Rougier

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a graphical method originating from the computer graphics domain that is used for the arbitrary placement of cells over a two-dimensional manifold. Using a bitmap image whose luminance provides cell density, this method guarantees a discrete distribution of the positions of the cells respecting the local density. This method scales to any number of cells, allows one to specify arbitrary enclosing shapes and provides a scalable and versatile alternative to the more classical assumption of a uniform spatial distribution. The method is illustrated on a discrete homogeneous neural field, on the distribution of cones and rods in the retina and on the neural density of a flattened piece of cortex.

  20. Effect of Cell Seeding Density and Inflammatory Cytokines on Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells : an in Vitro Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukho, Panithi; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Hesselink, Jan Willem; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Verseijden, Femke; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are known to be able to promote repair of injured tissue via paracrine factors. However, the effect of cell density and inflammatory cytokines on the paracrine ability of ASCs remains largely unknown. To investigate these effects, ASCs were cultured in 8000

  1. Effect of Cell Seeding Density and Inflammatory Cytokines on Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: an in Vitro Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukho, P. (Panithi); J. Kirpensteijn (Jolle); Hesselink, J.W. (Jan Willem); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); F. Verseijden (Femke); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAdipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are known to be able to promote repair of injured tissue via paracrine factors. However, the effect of cell density and inflammatory cytokines on the paracrine ability of ASCs remains largely unknown. To investigate these effects, ASCs were

  2. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam F Prasanphanich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The side population (SP assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity.

  3. Kinetic Modeling of ABCG2 Transporter Heterogeneity: A Quantitative, Single-Cell Analysis of the Side Population Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanphanich, Adam F.; White, Douglas E.; Gran, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The side population (SP) assay, a technique used in cancer and stem cell research, assesses the activity of ABC transporters on Hoechst staining in the presence and absence of transporter inhibition, identifying SP and non-SP cell (NSP) subpopulations by differential staining intensity. The interpretation of the assay is complicated because the transporter-mediated mechanisms fail to account for cell-to-cell variability within a population or adequately control the direct role of transporter activity on staining intensity. We hypothesized that differences in dye kinetics at the single-cell level, such as ABCG2 transporter-mediated efflux and DNA binding, are responsible for the differential cell staining that demarcates SP/NSP identity. We report changes in A549 phenotype during time in culture and with TGFβ treatment that correlate with SP size. Clonal expansion of individually sorted cells re-established both SP and NSPs, indicating that SP membership is dynamic. To assess the validity of a purely kinetics-based interpretation of SP/NSP identity, we developed a computational approach that simulated cell staining within a heterogeneous cell population; this exercise allowed for the direct inference of the role of transporter activity and inhibition on cell staining. Our simulated SP assay yielded appropriate SP responses for kinetic scenarios in which high transporter activity existed in a portion of the cells and little differential staining occurred in the majority of the population. With our approach for single-cell analysis, we observed SP and NSP cells at both ends of a transporter activity continuum, demonstrating that features of transporter activity as well as DNA content are determinants of SP/NSP identity. PMID:27851764

  4. Green heterogeneous small-cell networks: Toward reducing the CO2 emissions of mobile communications industry using uplink power adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks, or Het- SNets, are considered as a standard part of future mobile networks in which multiple lowpower low-cost user deployed base stations complement the existing macrocell infrastructure. This article proposes an energy-efficient deployment of the cells where the small cell base stations are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell, and the deployment is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) deployment. The proposed deployment ensures an increase in the network spectral and energy efficiency by facilitating cell edge mobile users with small cells. Moreover, COE deployment guarantees reduction of the carbon footprint of mobile operations by employing adaptive uplink power control. In order to calibrate the reduction in CO2 emissions, this article quantifies the ecological and associated economical impacts of energy savings in the proposed deployment. Simulation results quantify the improvements in CO2 emissions and spectral and energy gains of the proposed COE deployment compared to macro-only networks and typical small cell deployment strategies where small cells are randomly deployed within a given macrocell. © 2013 IEEE.

  5. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  6. Microfluidic Adaptation of Density-Gradient Centrifugation for Isolation of Particles and Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxi Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Density-gradient centrifugation is a label-free approach that has been extensively used for cell separations. Though elegant, this process is time-consuming (>30 min, subjects cells to high levels of stress (>350 g and relies on user skill to enable fractionation of cells that layer as a narrow band between the density-gradient medium and platelet-rich plasma. We hypothesized that microfluidic adaptation of this technique could transform this process into a rapid fractionation approach where samples are separated in a continuous fashion while being exposed to lower levels of stress (<100 g for shorter durations of time (<3 min. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we designed a microfluidic density-gradient centrifugation device and constructed a setup to introduce samples and medium like Ficoll in a continuous, pump-less fashion where cells and particles can be exposed to centrifugal force and separated via different outlets. Proof-of-concept studies using binary mixtures of low-density polystyrene beads (1.02 g/cm3 and high-density silicon dioxide beads (2.2 g/cm3 with Ficoll–Paque (1.06 g/cm3 show that separation is indeed feasible with >99% separation efficiency suggesting that this approach can be further adapted for separation of cells.

  7. Induction of xylanases by sugar cane bagasse at different cell densities of Cellulomonas flavigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Delgado, L; Vega-Estrada, J; Flores-Cotera, L B; Dendooven, L; Hidalgo-Lara, M E; Montes-Horcasitas, M C

    2006-04-01

    The effect of cell density on xylanolytic activity and productivity of Cellulomonas flavigena was evaluated under two different culturing conditions: fed-batch culture with discontinuous feed of sugar cane bagasse (SCB; condition 1) and glycerol fed-batch culture followed by addition of SBC as xylanases inducer (condition 2). The enzymatic profile of xylanases was similar in both systems, regardless of the initial cell density at time of induction. However, the xylanolytic activity changed with initial cell density at the time of induction (condition 2). The maximum volumetric xylanase activity increased with increased initial cell density from 4 to 34 g l(-1) but decreased above this value. The largest total volumetric xylanase productivity under condition 2 (1.3 IU ml(-1) h(-1)) was significantly greater compared to condition 1 (maximum 0.6 IU ml(-1) h(-1)). Consequently, induction of xylanase activity by SCB after growing of C. flavigena on glycerol at intermediate cell density can be a feasible alternative to improve activity and productivity of xylanolytic enzymes.

  8. Control of Cell Attachment and Spreading on Poly(acrylamide) Brushes with Varied Grafting Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-01-26

    To achieve spatial control of fibroblast cell attachment and spreading on a biocompatible polymer coating, the effect of poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) brushes with varied grafting density was investigated. The synthesis of the brushes was performed by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Gold substrates were modified with binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of an initiator and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) as an "inert" thiol to initiate the ATRP of AAm. By using different mixtures for the binary SAMs, a series of polymer brushes with varied grafting densities were prepared. The fractional coverage of surface bound initiator was determined by grazing incidence Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), and contact angle measurements. A linear relationship between the Br/S ratio determined by XPS and ToF-SIMS versus the fraction of initiator on the surface determined by water contact angle measurements was observed. The varied initiation concentration on the gold substrates yielded PAAm brushes with different thicknesses, indicating a transition from mushroom to brush regimes with increasing grafting density. Thereby we achieved exquisite control of the degree of cell adhesion. Cell attachment experiments with NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells revealed cell spreading on PAAm brushes with low grafting densities (initiator fractional coverage <0.2) as well as a complete passivation by polymer brushes with higher grafting densities.

  9. Isolating peripheral lymphocytes by density gradient centrifugation and magnetic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseron, Frederic; Marcus, Katrin; May, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Combining density gradient centrifugation with magnetic cell sorting provides a powerful tool to isolate blood cells with high reproducibility, yield, and purity. It also allows for subsequent separation of multiple cell types, resulting in the possibility to analyze different purified fractions from one donor's sample. The centrifugation step divides whole blood into peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), erythrocytes, and platelet-rich plasma. In the following, lymphocyte subtypes can be consecutively isolated from the PBMC fraction. This chapter describes enrichment of erythrocytes, CD14-positive monocytes and CD3-positive T lymphocytes. Alternatively, other cell types can be targeted by using magnetic beads specific for the desired subpopulation.

  10. T cell immunity. Functional heterogeneity of human memory CD4⁺ T cell clones primed by pathogens or vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Simone; Latorre, Daniela; Mele, Federico; Foglierini, Mathilde; De Gregorio, Corinne; Cassotta, Antonino; Fernandez, Blanca; Kelderman, Sander; Schumacher, Ton N; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica

    2015-01-23

    Distinct types of CD4(+) T cells protect the host against different classes of pathogens. However, it is unclear whether a given pathogen induces a single type of polarized T cell. By combining antigenic stimulation and T cell receptor deep sequencing, we found that human pathogen- and vaccine-specific T helper 1 (T(H)1), T(H)2, and T(H)17 memory cells have different frequencies but comparable diversity and comprise not only clones polarized toward a single fate, but also clones whose progeny have acquired multiple fates. Single naïve T cells primed by a pathogen in vitro could also give rise to multiple fates. Our results unravel an unexpected degree of interclonal and intraclonal functional heterogeneity of the human T cell response and suggest that polarized responses result from preferential expansion rather than priming. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Micro-view-cell for phase behaviour and in situ Raman analysis of heterogeneously catalysed CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Helena; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2017-11-01

    The operando study of CO2 hydrogenation is fundamental for a more rational optimisation of heterogeneous catalyst and reactor designs. To further complement the established efficiency of microreactors in reaction screening and bridge the operating and optical gaps, a micro-view-cell is presented for Raman microscopy at extreme conditions with minimum flow interference for genuine reaction analysis. Based on a flat sapphire window unit sealed in a plug flow-type enclosure holding the sample, the cell features unique 14 mm working distance and 0.36 numerical aperture and resists 400 °C and 500 bars. The use of the cell as an in situ tool for fast process monitoring and surface catalyst characterisation is demonstrated with phase behaviour and chemical analysis of the methanol synthesis over a commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst.

  12. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusheng Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI. In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG, forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI and a congestion game with capacity (CGC. For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE. Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  13. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  14. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  15. Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Stobbe, Per; Silvander, Christian Orrego; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells producing IgG monoclonal antibody were cultivated in a novel perfusion culture system CellTank, integrating the bioreactor and the cell retention function. In this system, the cells were harbored in a non-woven polyester matrix perfused by the culture medium and immersed in a reservoir. Although adapted to suspension, the CHO cells stayed entrapped in the matrix. The cell-free medium was efficiently circulated from the reservoir into- and through the matrix by a centrifugal pump placed at the bottom of the bioreactor resulting in highly homogenous concentrations of the nutrients and metabolites in the whole system as confirmed by measurements from different sampling locations. A real-time biomass sensor using the dielectric properties of living cells was used to measure the cell density. The performances of the CellTank were studied in three perfusion runs. A very high cell density measured as 200 pF/cm (where 1 pF/cm is equivalent to 1 × 10(6)viable cells/mL) was achieved at a perfusion rate of 10 reactor volumes per day (RV/day) in the first run. In the second run, the effect of cell growth arrest by hypothermia at temperatures lowered gradually from 37 °C to 29 °C was studied during 13 days at cell densities above 100 pF/cm. Finally a production run was performed at high cell densities, where a temperature shift to 31 °C was applied at cell density 100 pF/cm during a production period of 14 days in minimized feeding conditions. The IgG concentrations were comparable in the matrix and in the harvest line in all the runs, indicating no retention of the product of interest. The cell specific productivity was comparable or higher than in Erlenmeyer flask batch culture. During the production run, the final harvested IgG production was 35 times higher in the CellTank compared to a repeated batch culture in the same vessel volume during the same time period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  16. A Single-Cell Gene-Expression Profile Reveals Inter-Cellular Heterogeneity within Human Monocyte Subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne T Gren

    Full Text Available Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population classified into three different subsets: Classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. These subsets are distinguished by their differential expression of CD14 and CD16, and unique gene expression profile. So far, the variation in inter-cellular gene expression within the monocyte subsets is largely unknown. In this study, the cellular variation within each human monocyte subset from a single healthy donor was described by using a novel single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis tool. We investigated 86 different genes mainly encoding cell surface markers, and proteins involved in immune regulation. Within the three human monocyte subsets, our descriptive findings show multimodal expression of key immune response genes, such as CD40, NFⱪB1, RELA, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9. Furthermore, we discovered one subgroup of cells within the classical monocytes, which showed alterations of 22 genes e.g. IRF8, CD40, CSF1R, NFⱪB1, RELA and TNF. Additionally one subgroup within the intermediate and non-classical monocytes also displayed distinct gene signatures by altered expression of 8 and 6 genes, respectively. Hence the three monocyte subsets can be further subdivided according to activation status and differentiation, independently of the traditional classification based on cell surface markers. Demonstrating the use and the ability to discover cell heterogeneity within defined populations of human monocytes is of great importance, and can be useful in unravelling inter-cellular variation in leukocyte populations, identifying subpopulations involved in disease pathogenesis and help tailor new therapies.

  17. High-density polymer microarrays: identifying synthetic polymers that control human embryonic stem cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne; Mjoseng, Heidi K; Zhang, Rong; Kalloudis, Michail; Koutsos, Vasileios; de Sousa, Paul A; Bradley, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The fabrication of high-density polymer microarray is described, allowing the simultaneous and efficient evaluation of more than 7000 different polymers in a single-cellular-based screen. These high-density polymer arrays are applied in the search for synthetic substrates for hESCs culture. Up-scaling of the identified hit polymers enables long-term cellular cultivation and promoted successful stem-cell maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  19. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein; Nunes, Maria Eugenia S.

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  20. Changes in tumor oxygen tension during radiotherapy of uterine cervical cancer: relationships to changes in vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyng, Heidi; Sundfoer, Kolbein; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in oxygen tension (pO 2 ) during the early phase of fractionated radiotherapy were studied in 22 patients with uterine cervical cancer. The aims were to investigate (a) whether possible changes in pO 2 differed among and within tumors and (b) whether the changes could be attributed to changes in vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis. Methods and Materials: The pO 2 was measured polarographically in four regions of the tumors before treatment and after 2 weeks of radiotherapy. The vascular density, cell density, and frequency of mitosis and apoptosis were determined from biopsies taken from the tumor regions after each pO 2 measurement. Results: The changes in pO 2 during therapy differed among the tumors and were correlated to pO 2 before treatment (p 2 and vice versa. The tumors with increased pO 2 (n = 10) had a large decrease in cell density and a significant increase in apoptotic frequency. In contrast, the tumors with decreased pO 2 (n = 10) had a smaller decrease in cell density (p = 0.014) and no significant increase in apoptotic frequency. Vascular density and mitotic frequency showed no change during therapy; however, vascular damage other than decreased vascular density was observed. Conclusion: These results indicate that the oxygenation of cervix tumors generally changes during the early phase of radiotherapy. The change depends on the balance between the factor leading to an increase and that leading to a decrease in oxygenation; i.e., decreased cell density and vascular damage, respectively. Increased apoptotic frequency may contribute to a large decrease in cell density and hence increased oxygenation during therapy

  1. Tetramethylpyrazine-mediated regulation of CXCR4 in retinoblastoma is sensitive to cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nandan; Xu, Lijun; Yang, Ying; Yu, Na; Zhang, Zhang; Chen, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Mingjun; Yuan, Meng; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common ocular tumor in children, and it causes extensive damage. Current treatment options for retinoblastoma include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and cryotherapy. However, the majority of chemotherapy medicines cause complications and side effects that lead to severe impairment of patient health. Previous studies have reported that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), which is an extract of the Chinese herbal medicine Chuanxiong, reduces the risk of multidrug resistance in chemotherapy and inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of various types of cancer cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of TMP in retinoblastoma remains unclear. The current study demonstrated that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) was expressed in WERI‑Rb1 cells and in retinoblastoma. Using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting techniques, the current study demonstrated that TMP significantly downregulated the expression of CXCR4 in WERI‑Rb1 cells cultured at high density, whereas it had a minor effect in low‑density WERI‑Rb1 cells; additionally, this effect occurred in a time‑dependent manner. TMP inhibited the proliferation of WERI‑Rb1 cells as effectively as a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, consistent with a role of CXCR4 in cancer development. Notably, TMP did not affect the cell cycle of cells cultured at low density (1x105 cells/ml), whereas it induced G1‑phase arrest in high‑density cells (7.5x105 cells/ml; Pretinoblastoma, and also provides novel insights into the mechanisms of the anti‑cancer and neuroprotective effects of this extract.

  2. Mechanosensing of matrix by stem cells: From matrix heterogeneity, contractility, and the nucleus in pore-migration to cardiogenesis and muscle stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas; Cho, Sangkyun; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-11-01

    Stem cells are particularly 'plastic' cell types that are induced by various cues to become specialized, tissue-functional lineages by switching on the expression of specific gene programs. Matrix stiffness is among the cues that multiple stem cell types can sense and respond to. This seminar-style review focuses on mechanosensing of matrix elasticity in the differentiation or early maturation of a few illustrative stem cell types, with an intended audience of biologists and physical scientists. Contractile forces applied by a cell's acto-myosin cytoskeleton are often resisted by the extracellular matrix and transduced through adhesions and the cytoskeleton ultimately into the nucleus to modulate gene expression. Complexity is added by matrix heterogeneity, and careful scrutiny of the evident stiffness heterogeneity in some model systems resolves some controversies concerning matrix mechanosensing. Importantly, local stiffness tends to dominate, and 'durotaxis' of stem cells toward stiff matrix reveals a dependence of persistent migration on myosin-II force generation and also rigid microtubules that confer directionality. Stem and progenitor cell migration in 3D can be further affected by matrix porosity as well as stiffness, with nuclear size and rigidity influencing niche retention and fate choices. Cell squeezing through rigid pores can even cause DNA damage and genomic changes that contribute to de-differentiation toward stem cell-like states. Contraction of acto-myosin is the essential function of striated muscle, which also exhibit mechanosensitive differentiation and maturation as illustrated in vivo by beating heart cells and by the regenerative mobilization of skeletal muscle stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of dividing tumor cells detects intratumor heterogeneity linked to cell proliferation in a brain tumor model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Endaya, B.; Lam, P.Y.P.; Meedeniya, A.C.B.; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), s. 126-137 ISSN 1574-7891 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Intratumor heterogeneity * Click chemistry * Proliferation * Gene profiling Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 5.314, year: 2016

  4. LTE Micro-cell Deployment for High-Density Railway Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Kassab, Mohamed; Soler, José

    2014-01-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a serious candidate for the future releases of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). LTE offers more capacity and supports new communication-based applications and services for railways. Nevertheless, even with this technology, the classical macro......-cell radio deployments reach overload, especially in high-density areas, such as major train stations. In this paper, an LTE micro-cell deployment is investigated in high-density railway areas. Copenhagen Main Station is considered as a realistic deployment study case, with a set of relevant railway...

  5. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC) exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function), hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function). We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional...

  6. Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Roland, Joseph T; Barlow, Brittney J; O'Neal, Ryan; Rich, Amy E; Nam, Ki Taek; Shi, Chanjuan; Goldenring, James R

    2014-11-01

    The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach. We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors. The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum. Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Model-based high cell density cultivation of Rhodospirillum rubrum under respiratory dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Lisa; Grammel, Hartmut

    2010-03-01

    The potential of facultative photosynthetic bacteria as producers of photosynthetic pigments, vitamins, coenzymes and other valuable products has been recognized for decades. However, mass cultivation under photosynthetic conditions is generally inefficient due to the inevitable limitation of light supply when cell densities become very high. The previous development of a new cultivation process for maximal expression of photosynthetic genes under semi-aerobic dark conditions in common bioreactors offers a new perspective for utilizing the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum for large-scale applications. Based on this cultivation system, the present study aimed in determining the maximal achievable cell density of R. rubrum in a bioreactor, thereby providing a major milestone on the way to industrial bioprocesses. As a starting point, we focus on aerobic growth due to higher growth rates and more facile process control under this condition, with the option to extend the process by an anaerobic production phase. Process design and optimization were supported by an unstructured computational process model, based on mixed-substrate kinetics. Key parameters for growth and process control were determined in shake-flask experiments or estimated by simulation studies. For fed-batch cultivation, a computer-controlled exponential feed algorithm in combination with a pH-stat element was implemented. As a result, a maximal cell density of 59 g cell dry weight (CDW) L(-1) was obtained, representing so far not attainable cell densities for photosynthetic bacteria. The applied exponential fed-batch methodology therefore enters a range which is commonly employed for industrial applications with microbial cells. The biochemical analysis of high cell density cultures revealed metabolic imbalances, such as the accumulation and excretion of tetrapyrrole intermediates of the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The effects of daily wear contact lenses on goblet cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C G; Campbell, J B; Steel, S A; Burke, J H

    1994-11-01

    Some patients can wear contact lenses with a low tear breakup time while others with an identical tear breakup time cannot wear lenses. This suggests the current method of tear film assessment is inadequate at differentiating between these two types of patients. The study attempts to expand our knowledge of the tear film with special attention directed to a critical yet little studied component: mucin. Mucin is vital to maintenance of the tear film and functions as a tear film stabilizer. The condition of the precorneal tear film is a major determinant in the success of contact lens wear. Eighteen subjects free of ocular surface disease who had never worn contact lenses had the goblet cell density of their inferior bulbar conjunctiva determined by impression cytology. The subjects were then fit in a 38 percent water polymacon lens and their goblet cell density determined on a monthly basis for 6 months. Nearly a 2-fold increase in goblet cell density was observed in 88 percent of the subjects over the 6-month period. The first statistically significant increase occurred 5 months after the initiation of lens wear when the goblet cell density rose from 4.19-7.84 percent. We speculate the increase in goblet cells is an adaptive response of the ocular surface to a coated daily wear contact lens.

  9. Spontaneous oscillations of cell voltage, power density, and anode exit CO concentration in a PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa; Sundmacher, Kai

    2011-10-28

    The spontaneous oscillations of the cell voltage and output power density of a PEMFC (with PtRu/C anode) using CO-containing H(2) streams as anodic fuels have been observed during galvanostatic operating. It is ascribed to the dynamic coupling of the CO adsorption (poisoning) and the electrochemical CO oxidation (reactivating) processes in the anode chamber of the single PEMFC. Accompanying the cell voltage and power density oscillations, the discrete CO concentration oscillations at the anode outlet of the PEMFC were also detected, which directly confirms the electrochemical CO oxidation taking place in the anode chamber during galvanostatic operating. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  10. Degradation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    In this work the durability of solid oxide cells for co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45 % H2O + 45 % CO2 + 10 % H2) at high current densities was investigated. The tested cells are Ni-YSZ electrode supported, with a YSZ electrolyte and either a LSM-YSZ or LSCF-CGO oxygen electrode....... A current density of -1.5 and -2.0 A/cm2 was applied to the cell and the gas conversion was 45 % and 60 %, respectively. The cells were operated for a period of up to 700 hours. The electrochemical analysis revealed significant performance degradation for the ohmic process, oxygen ion interfacial transfer...

  11. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa H.; Muhl, Thuy Thanh

    2018-01-01

    For use of metal supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast startup, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the Technical...... loss, two different routes for increasing the porosity of the support layer and thus performance were explored. The first route is the introduction of gas channels by puncturing of the green tape casted support layer. The second route is modification of the co-sintering profile. In summary, the cell...... thickness and thus weight and volume was reduced and the cell power density at 0.7 V at 700°C was increased by 46% to 1.01 Wcm−2 at a fuel utilization of 48%. All modifications were performed on a stack technological relevant cell size of 12 cm × 12 cm....

  12. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Uncoupling of PUMA Expression and Apoptosis Contributes to Functional Heterogeneity in Renal Cell Carcinoma - Prognostic and Translational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoguang; Li, Jielin; Marx, Christina; Tolstov, Yanis; Rauch, Geraldine; Herpel, Esther; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Roth, Wilfried; Grüllich, Carsten; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Duensing, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterized by a profound disruption of proapoptotic signaling networks leading to chemo- and radioresistance. A key mediator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis is the BH3-only protein PUMA. Given its central role in proapoptotic signaling, we analyzed a series of more than 600 precision-annotated primary RCC specimens for PUMA protein expression. We found a reduced expression of PUMA in 22.6% of RCCs analyzed. Unexpectedly, however, PUMA deficiency was not associated with more aggressive tumor characteristic as expected. Instead, a reduced PUMA expression was associated with a lower TNM stage, lower histopathologic grade, and more favorable cancer-specific patient survival. A direct correlation in a separate patient cohort revealed a profound disconnection between PUMA expression and apoptosis as exemplified by the fact that the tumor with the highest level of apoptotic cells was PUMA deficient. In a series of in vitro studies, we corroborated these results and discovered the highest propensity to undergo apoptosis in an RCC cell line with virtually undetectable PUMA expression. At the same time, PUMA expression was not necessarily associated with stronger apoptosis induction, which underscores the striking functional heterogeneity of PUMA expression and apoptosis in RCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that PUMA-independent mechanisms of cell death exist and may play an important role in suppressing malignant progression. They underscore the functional heterogeneity of RCCs and suggest that PUMA expression alone may not be a suitable predictive biomarker. A better understanding of alternative proapoptotic pathways, however, may help to design novel therapeutic strategies for patients with advanced RCC. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enzyme controlled glucose auto-delivery for high cell density cultivations in microplates and shake flasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casteleijn Marco G

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe a novel cultivation method, called EnBase™, or enzyme-based-substrate-delivery, for the growth of microorganisms in millilitre and sub-millilitre scale which yields 5 to 20 times higher cell densities compared to standard methods. The novel method can be directly applied in microwell plates and shake flasks without any requirements for additional sensors or liquid supply systems. EnBase is therefore readily applicable for many high throughput applications, such as DNA production for genome sequencing, optimisation of protein expression, production of proteins for structural genomics, bioprocess development, and screening of enzyme and metagenomic libraries. Results High cell densities with EnBase are obtained by applying the concept of glucose-limited fed-batch cultivation which is commonly used in industrial processes. The major difference of the novel method is that no external glucose feed is required, but glucose is released into the growth medium by enzymatic degradation of starch. To cope with the high levels of starch necessary for high cell density cultivation, starch is supplied to the growing culture suspension by continuous diffusion from a storage gel. Our results show that the controlled enzyme-based supply of glucose allows a glucose-limited growth to high cell densities of OD600 = 20 to 30 (corresponding to 6 to 9 g l-1 cell dry weight without the external feed of additional compounds in shake flasks and 96-well plates. The final cell density can be further increased by addition of extra nitrogen during the cultivation. Production of a heterologous triosphosphate isomerase in E. coli BL21(DE3 resulted in 10 times higher volumetric product yield and a higher ratio of soluble to insoluble product when compared to the conventional production method. Conclusion The novel EnBase method is robust and simple-to-apply for high cell density cultivation in shake flasks and microwell plates. The

  15. A mathematical model of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells - AUTHORS’ REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDRAG M. ŽIVKOVIĆ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the equations of electrochemical kinetics for the estimation of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells is presented. This approach was employed for a theoretical explanation of the phenomena of the edge and corner effects. The effects of the geometry of the system, the kinetic parameters of the cathode reactions and the resistivity of the solution are also discussed. A procedure for a complete analysis of the current distribution in electrochemical cells is presented.

  16. Absolute choline concentration measured by quantitative proton MR spectroscopy correlates with cell density in meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato, Tokyo (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Gong, Qi-Yong [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China)]|[University of Liverpool, Division of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and pathological changes in meningioma. Twenty-two meningioma cases underwent single voxel 1H-MRS (point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, repetition time/echo time = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms). Absolute choline (Cho) concentration was calculated using tissue water as the internal reference and corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts. Pathological specimens were stained with MIB-1 antibody to measure cell density and proliferation index. Correlation analysis was performed between absolute Cho concentration and cell density and MIB-1 labeled proliferation index. Average Cho concentration of all meningiomas before correction was 2.95 {+-} 0.86 mmol/kg wet weight. It was increased to 3.23 {+-} 1.15 mmol/kg wet weight after correction. Average cell density of all meningiomas was 333 {+-} 119 cells/HPF, and average proliferation index was 2.93 {+-} 5.72%. A linear, positive correlation between cell density and Cho concentration was observed (r = 0.650, P = 0.001). After correction of Cho concentration, the correlation became more significant (r = 0.737, P < 0.001). However, no significant correlation between Cho concentration and proliferation index was found. There seemed to be a positive correlation trend after correction of Cho concentration but did not reach significant level. Absolute Cho concentration, especially Cho concentration corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts, reflects cell density of meningioma. (orig.)

  17. [Oxidized low-density lipoprotein modulates differentiation of murine memory CD8+T cell subpopulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hua; Lin, Ze-Hang; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Chen-Fei; Liu, Xuan; Wu, Sha

    2017-08-20

    To investigate effect of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on memory CD8 + T cell subpopulation differentiation in mice with autoimmune diabetes. Cultured splenic CD8 + T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice isolated with magnetic beads were treated with 30 µg/mL ox-LDL and 10 U/mL interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 24 h and the control cells were treated with IL-2 only. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of splenic CD8 + IFN-γ + T cells, expressions of CD8, CD44 and CD62L on the T cells, and the activation of T cell factor-1 (TCF-1) and STAT-3. The CD127 + memory T cells were purified and transplanted into the pre-diabetic NOD mice via the tail vein, and the blood glucose was recorded weekly and survival time of the mice was monitored. Treatment with ox-LDL significantly reduced islet β cell-specific cytotoxic CD8 + T cells as compared with the control group [(0.7∓0.03)% vs (2.7∓0.14)%, Peffector memory CD8 + T cells (Tem) in the total memory CD8 + T cells was reduced [(10.3∓0.71)% vs (30.3∓1.36)%, Pmemory T cells was significantly increased [(72.3∓3.8)% vs (55.1∓2.61)%, Pmemory T cells in pre-diabetic NOD mice obviously inhibited the increase of blood glucose and prolonged the survival time of the mice (Ptranscriptional factors TCF-1 and phosphorylation of STAT-3, inhibits the formation of effector memory CD8 + T cells with long-term cytotoxicity, but promote the generation of stem cell-like memory CD8 + T cells, which result in suppression of islet β cell-specific effector cytotoxic CD8 + T cell differentiation to lessen autoimmune injury to the islet β cells.

  18. Tumorigenic Heterogeneity in Cancer Stem Cells Evolved from Long-term Cultures of Telomerase-Immortalized

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Abdallah, Basem M; Guldberg, Per

    2005-01-01

    or if the stem cell origin allowed most cells to behave as cancer stem cells. Cultures of the hMSC-TERT20 strain at population doubling 440 were highly clonogenic (94%). From 110 single-cell clones expanded by 20 population doublings, 6 underwent detailed comparison. Like the parental population, each clone had....... Despite in vitro commonality, only four of six clones shared the growth kinetics and 100% tumorigenicity of the parental population. In contrast, one clone consistently formed latent tumors and the other established tumors with only 30% penetrance. Changing the in vitro microenvironment to mimic in vivo...... tumorigenicity correlated with good viability plus capillary morphogenesis on serum starvation and high cyclin D1 expression. Thus, hMSC-TERT20 clones represent cancer stem cells with hierarchical tumorigenicity, providing new models to explore the stem cell hypothesis for cancer....

  19. Construction of concrete hot cells; requirements for shielding windows for concrete walls with different densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The shielding windows form part of the basic equipment of hot cells for remote handling, as defined in standard DIN 25 420 part 1. The draft standard in hand is intended to specify the design and manufacture requirements, especially with regard to main dimensions, sight quality, shielding effects, and radiation resistance. The standard refers to three types of shielding window with surface area design (product of density and wall thickness) corresponding to concrete walls of the densities 2.4, 3.4, and 4.0 g/cm 3 . The windows fit to three types of concrete of common usage, and the design is made for Co-60 radiation, with attenuation factors of about 10 4 , 10 6 , or 10 7 . For concrete walls with densities between these data, a shielding window suitable to the next higher density data is to be chosen. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Method of Fabrication of High Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2008-09-09

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O(LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  1. High Density Radiation Shielding Concretes for Hot Cells of 99mTc Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.

    2006-01-01

    High density concrete [more than 3.6 ton/m 3 (3.6x10 3 kg/m 3 )] was prepared to be used as a radiation shielding concrete (RSC) for hot-cells in gel technetium project at inshas to attenuate gamma radiation emitted from radioactive sources. different types of concrete were prepared by mixing local mineral aggregates mainly gravel and ilmenite . iron shots were added to the concrete mixture proportion as partial replacement of heavy aggregates to increase its density. the physical properties of prepared concrete in both plastic and hardened phases were investigated. compressive strength and radiation attenuation of gamma rays were determined. Results showed that ilmenite concrete mixed with iron shots had the highest density suitable to be use as RSC according to the chinese hot cell design requirements. Recommendations to avoid some technical problems of manufacturing radiation shielding concrete were maintained

  2. Density increment and decreased survival of rat red blood cells induced by cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimoto, M.; Miura, T.

    1986-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were injected with CdCl 2 subcutaneously to examine in vivo effects of Cd on density and survival of red blood cells. During the 7 days after administration of 1.0 mg Cd/kg, the following sequence of events occurred: (1) a progressive increase in the amount of more dense red blood cells concomitant with a decrease in that of light red blood cells from the first to the third day; (2) an increase in the spleen weight at the third day; (3) a decrease in the hematocrit value and an increase in the amount of light red blood cells at the fifth day; and (4) a recovery of the hematocrit value at the seventh day. Five days after administration, the hematocrit value decreased in a dose-dependent mode and the decrease was significant at the 1% level at 1.0 and 1.5 mg Cd/kg. A highly significant splenomegaly was also observed at 0.5 to 1.5 mg Cd/kg. In order to label red blood cells in vivo, [ 3 H] diisopropylfluorophosphate ([ 3 H]DFP) was injected into rats. At Day 11, Cd at either 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg was administered to [ 3 H]DFP-prelabeled animals. Cd administration accelerated 3 H-labeled red cell clearance from the blood. Six days after Cd administration, the radioactivity of red blood cells was 76 and 68% of the control at 0.5 and 1.0 mg Cd/kg, respectively. In vitro treatment of rat red density and accelerated in vivo clearance of red blood cells from the recipient circulation. These results show that Cd at low dose can cause anemia by increasing red cell density and by accelerating red cell sequestration, presumably in the spleen

  3. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Rod bipolar cells in ageing human retina. 293. J. Biosci. ... During normal ageing, the rods (and other neurones) undergo a significant decrease in density in the human retina ..... Brain Res. 84 293–300. Figure 3. Immunohistochemical demonstration of protein kinase C-α labelling in the macula of the 91-year-old donor. The.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle cells in cultures on low density polyethylene modified with plasma discharge and biofunctionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pařízek, Martin; Kasálková, N.; Bačáková, Lucie; Kolářová, K.; Lisá, Věra; Švorčík, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 12, 89-91 (2009), s. 25-28 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Ar plasma discharge * low density polyethylene * vascular smooth muscle cells Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  5. Cell openness manipulation of low density polyurethane foam for efficient sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyuk Park, Ju; Suh Minn, Kyung; Rae Lee, Hyeong; Hyun Yang, Sei; Bin Yu, Cheng; Yeol Pak, Seong; Sung Oh, Chi; Seok Song, Young; June Kang, Yeon; Ryoun Youn, Jae

    2017-10-01

    Satisfactory sound absorption using a low mass density foam is an intriguing desire for achieving high fuel efficiency of vehicles. This issue has been dealt with a microcellular geometry manipulation. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between cell openness of polyurethane (PU) foam and sound absorption behaviors, both theoretically and experimentally. The objective of this work is to mitigate a threshold of mass density by rendering a sound absorber which shows a satisfactory performance. The cell openness, which causes the best sound absorption performance in all cases considered, was estimated as 15% by numerical simulation. Cell openness of PU foam was experimentally manipulated into desired ranges by adjusting rheological properties in a foaming reaction. Microcellular structures of the fabricated PU foams were observed and sound absorption coefficients were measured using a B&K impedance tube. The fabricated PU foam with the best cell openness showed better sound absorption performance than the foam with double mass density. We envisage that this study can help the manufacture of low mass density sound absorbing foams more efficiently and economically.

  6. Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Age-related decrease in rod bipolar cell density of the human retina: an immunohistochemical study. P AGGARWAL, T C NAG and S WADHWA*. Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, 91-11-26588663; Email, shashiwadhwa@hotmail.com).

  7. Stomatal and pavement cell density linked to leaf internal CO2 concentration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vráblová, M.; Šimková, Marie; Hronková, Marie; Drtinová, M.; Květoň, J.; Vrábl, D.; Kubásek, J.; Macková, J.; Wiesnerová, Dana; Neuwithová, J.; Schreiber, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 2 (2014), s. 191-202 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Stomatal density * Stomata development * Pavement cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2014

  8. Heterogeneity in c-jun gene expression in normal and malignant cells exposed to either ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horio, M.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen intermediates and protein kinase C (PKC) in induction of c-jun gene expression in human ML-2 leukemic cells and normal DET-551 fibroblasts by comparing the effects of either ionizing radiation or H 2 O 2 exposure in the presence or absence of appropriate inhibitors. In these cell types, the radiation and H 2 O 2 -mediated increase in c-jun mRNA levels could be prevented by pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, or H7, an inhibitor of PKC and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), but not by HA1004, an inhibitor of PKA. These results suggest a role for PKC and reactive oxygen intermediates in the induction of c-jun gene expression in both normal and tumor cells. We also investigated potential differences in radiation- or H 2 O 2 -induced c-jun gene expression in normal and tumor cells by examining steady-state c-jun mRNA levels in a number of human fibroblast, leukemia, melanoma, sarcoma, and carcinoma cell types. We observed heterogeneity in the steady-state level of c-jun mRNA in both the untreated normal and tumor cells and in such cells exposed to ionizing radiation or to H 2 O 2 . Exposure to radiation or to hydrogen peroxide produced a varied response which ranged from little or no induction to a more than two orders of magnitude increase in the steady-state level of the c-jun mRNA

  9. Heterogeneity of cell lines derived after transformation of early passage rodent cells by the Ha-ras1 human oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandidos, D A; Freshney, M; Wilkie, N M

    1985-01-01

    The chromosome patterns of Chinese hamster cell lines derived after immortalization or tumorigenic conversion of early passage cells with recombinants carrying the mutated T24 or the normal human Ha-ras1 gene have been characterized by trypsin-Giemsa banding. Whereas immortalized Chinese hamster cell lines exhibited a near normal karyotype, tumorigenic cell lines were found to have abnormal karyotypes carrying marker chromosomes. Moreover, chromosomal patterns correlated with growth in semisolid media and tumourigenicity in nude mice. Similarly, malignant conversion of early passage Syrian hamster cells, with a recombinant carrying the mutated T24 human Ha-ras1 gene, resulted in cells with a near diploid karyotype. On the other hand, tumorigenic conversion of early passage Wistar rat cells with the same oncogene produced cell lines with heteroploid karyotypes. More chromosomal alterations have been observed during further growth of these cells. It is suggested that the transformed phenotype in these cells may be dependent on the chromosomal instability.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated oral Kaposi's sarcoma. A heterogeneous cell population dominated by spindle-shaped endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Regezi, J. A.; MacPhail, L. A.; Daniels, T. E.; DeSouza, Y. G.; Greenspan, J. S.; Greenspan, D.

    1993-01-01

    Cell lineage and cell function antigens were studied immunohistochemically in human immunodeficiency virus-associated oral Kaposi's sarcoma to provide insight into tumor pathogenesis. All tumors were composed predominantly of spindle cells that expressed endothelium-associated antigens, CD34 and CD36 (factor VIII-related antigen was expressed by considerably fewer numbers of tumor cells). Infrequently, spindle tumor cells also expressed actin. Factor XIIIa positive spindle and dendritic strom...

  11. Phenotypical heterogeneity of testicular macrophages/dendritic cells in normal adult mice: an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoh, M.; de rooij, D. G.; Jansen, A.; Drexhage, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of macrophage/dendritic cell antigens was investigated immunohistochemically in frozen testis sections of normal A/J mice using a panel of rat monoclonal antibodies against murine macrophage/dendritic cell antigens (F4/80, BM8, MP23, MOMA1, MOMA2, M5/114, BMDM1 and NLDC145).

  12. Clinical and pathological features of testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma : a heterogeneous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper-Hommel, Marion J. J.; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Krol, Augustinus D. G.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Coebergh, Jan-Willem W.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.

    Most testicular lymphomas are of diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) type with an outcome inferior to nodal DLBCL. Within an apparently homogeneous group of testicular DLBCLs, small cell components, plasmacytoid differentiation and lymphoepithelial lesions (LELs), features of extranodal marginal zone

  13. Computational modeling of heterogeneity and function of CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adria eCarbo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is composed of many different cell types and hundreds of intersecting molecular pathways and signals. This large biological complexity requires coordination between distinct pro-inflammatory and regulatory cell subsets to respond to infection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. CD4+ T cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses and in maintaining a balance between pro- and anti- inflammatory responses. This tight balance between regulatory and effector reactions depends on the ability of CD4+ T cells to modulate distinct pathways within large molecular networks, since dysregulated CD4+ T cell responses may result in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The CD4+ T cell differentiation process comprises an intricate interplay between cytokines, their receptors, adaptor molecules, signaling cascades and transcription factors that help delineate cell fate and function. Computational modeling can help to describe, simulate, analyze, and predict some of the behaviors in this complicated differentiation network. This review provides a comprehensive overview of existing computational immunology methods as well as novel strategies used to model immune responses with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell differentiation.

  14. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in low and moderate myopic Chinese eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Mei Chun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe and compare the corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in young, low and moderate myopic Chinese adults in Malaysian Chinese population.METHODS: Non-contact specular microscopy (Topcon SP3000P, Tokyo, Japan was performed in low (n=78; 21.22±1.51 years and moderate (n=78; 21.82±1.40 years myopic subjects. The mean of three consecutive measurements of endothelial cell density (MCD, coefficient of variation (CV in the cell size, and hexagonal appearance of the cell were obtained.RESULTS: In low myopic eyes the MCD was 3 063.0±176.2/mm2, the mean CV was 33.4±4.0% and the mean hexagonal appearance of the cell was 57.9±2.7%. In moderate myopic eyes the MCD was 2961.6±159.0/mm2, the mean CV was 33.9±3.6% and mean hexagonal appearance of the cell was 56.2±4.7%. There were statistically significant differences in MCD (PPCONCLUSION:The corneal endothelial cell layer in more myopic eyes tends to have less MCD and cell hexagonality compared to lower myopic eyes. Nevertheless, there is no significant difference in CV between low and moderate myopic eyes.

  15. Phage-Bacterial Dynamics with Spatial Structure: Self Organization around Phage Sinks Can Promote Increased Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Christensen, Kelly A; Scott, Carly; Jack, Benjamin R; Crandall, Cameron J; Krone, Stephen M

    2018-01-29

    Bacteria growing on surfaces appear to be profoundly more resistant to control by lytic bacteriophages than do the same cells grown in liquid. Here, we use simulation models to investigate whether spatial structure per se can account for this increased cell density in the presence of phages. A measure is derived for comparing cell densities between growth in spatially structured environments versus well mixed environments (known as mass action). Maintenance of sensitive cells requires some form of phage death; we invoke death mechanisms that are spatially fixed, as if produced by cells. Spatially structured phage death provides cells with a means of protection that can boost cell densities an order of magnitude above that attained under mass action, although the effect is sometimes in the opposite direction. Phage and bacteria self organize into separate refuges, and spatial structure operates so that the phage progeny from a single burst do not have independent fates (as they do with mass action). Phage incur a high loss when invading protected areas that have high cell densities, resulting in greater protection for the cells. By the same metric, mass action dynamics either show no sustained bacterial elevation or oscillate between states of low and high cell densities and an elevated average. The elevated cell densities observed in models with spatial structure do not approach the empirically observed increased density of cells in structured environments with phages (which can be many orders of magnitude), so the empirical phenomenon likely requires additional mechanisms than those analyzed here.

  16. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    OpenAIRE

    J. Riba; T. Gleichmann; S. Zimmermann; R. Zengerle; P. Koltay

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1??m and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35?pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20??m in size....

  17. Canopy light heterogeneity drives leaf anatomical, eco-physiological, and photosynthetic changes in olive trees grown in a high-density plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Ajmi; Vázquez, Saúl; El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Msallem, Monji; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Morales, Fermín

    2015-02-01

    In the field, leaves may face very different light intensities within the tree canopy. Leaves usually respond with light-induced morphological and photosynthetic changes, in a phenomenon known as phenotypic plasticity. Canopy light distribution, leaf anatomy, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and pigment composition were investigated in an olive (Olea europaea, cvs. Arbequina and Arbosana) orchard planted with a high-density system (1,250 trees ha(-1)). Sampling was made from three canopy zones: a lower canopy (2 m). Light interception decreased significantly in the lower canopy when compared to the central and top ones. Leaf angle increased and photosynthetic rates and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) decreased significantly and progressively from the upper canopy to the central and the lower canopies. The largest leaf areas were found in the lower canopy, especially in the cultivar Arbequina. The palisade and spongy parenchyma were reduced in thickness in the lower canopy when compared to the upper one, in the former due to a decrease in the number of cell layers from three to two (clearly distinguishable in the light and fluorescence microscopy images). In both cultivars, the concentration of violaxanthin-cycle pigments and β-carotene was higher in the upper than in the lower canopy. Furthermore, the de-epoxidized forms zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin increased significantly in those leaves from the upper canopy, in parallel to the NPQ increases. In conclusion, olive leaves react with morphological and photosynthetic changes to within-crown light gradients. These results strengthen the idea of olive trees as "modular organisms" that adjust the modules morphology and physiology in response to light intensity.

  18. Spectral and energy efficiency analysis of uplink heterogeneous networks with small-cells on edge

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a tractable mathematical framework to analyze the spectral and energy efficiency of an operator initiated deployment of the small-cells (e.g., femtocells) where the small-cell base stations are deliberately positioned around the edge of the macrocell. The considered deployment facilitates the cell-edge mobile users in terms of their coverage, spectral, and energy efficiency and is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) configuration. The reduction in energy consumption is achieved by considering fast power control where the mobile users transmit with adaptive power to compensate the path loss, shadowing and fading. In particular, we develop a moment generating function (MGF) based approach to derive analytical bounds on the area spectral efficiency and exact expressions for the energy efficiency of the mobile users in the considered COE configuration over generalized-K fading channels. Besides the COE configuration, the derived bounds are also shown to be useful in evaluating the performance of random small-cell deployments, e.g., uniformly distributed small-cells. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the improvements in spectral and energy efficiency of the COE configuration with respect to macro-only networks and other unplanned deployment strategies. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Superhydrophilic-Superhydrophobic Patterned Surfaces as High-Density Cell Microarrays: Optimization of Reverse Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Erica; Feng, Wenqian; Levkin, Pavel A

    2016-10-01

    High-density microarrays can screen thousands of genetic and chemical probes at once in a miniaturized and parallelized manner, and thus are a cost-effective alternative to microwell plates. Here, high-density cell microarrays are fabricated by creating superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic micropatterns in thin, nanoporous polymer substrates such that the superhydrophobic barriers confine both aqueous solutions and adherent cells within each superhydrophilic microspot. The superhydrophobic barriers confine and prevent the mixing of larger droplet volumes, and also control the spreading of droplets independent of the volume, minimizing the variability that arises due to different liquid and surface properties. Using a novel liposomal transfection reagent, ScreenFect A, the method of reverse cell transfection is optimized on the patterned substrates and several factors that affect transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity are identified. Higher levels of transfection are achieved on HOOC- versus NH 2 -functionalized superhydrophilic spots, as well as when gelatin and fibronectin are added to the transfection mixture, while minimizing the amount of transfection reagent improves cell viability. Almost no diffusion of the printed transfection mixtures to the neighboring microspots is detected. Thus, superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned surfaces can be used as cell microarrays and for optimizing reverse cell transfection conditions before performing further cell screenings. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Interface state density effect on the performance of graphene silicon heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yawei; Lin, Bencai; Ma, Yulong; Liu, Yushen; Yang, Xifeng; Zhang, Debao; Shao, Zhenguang; Feng, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    A planar structure consisting of graphene layer as the hole transport material, and n-type silicon as substrate is simulated. The degradation of this cell caused by high interface state density has been carried out. The simulated results match published experimental results indicating the accuracy of the physics-based model. Using this model, the effect of interface state density as zero, 1×1016cm-2, 1×1017cm-2 on the photovoltaic performance has been studied. The obtained IV and EQE characteristic based on realistic parameters shows that the interface state playing a prominent role in graphene silicon schottky contact.

  1. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The invasive microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii: Interactive stressors regulate cell density and mucilage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronni, Sarah; Calabretti, Chiara; Cavagna, Gianluca; Ceccherelli, Giulia; Delaria, Maria Anna; Macri, Giovanni; Navone, Augusto; Panzalis, Pieraugusto

    2017-08-01

    The benthic mucilage producing microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii Lewis and Bryan (Pelagophyceae) has recently received attention for its rapid spread in the Mediterranean Sea, where its blooms have remarkable detrimental effects. So far no information on C. taylorii response to multiple stressors, especially in terms of mucilage hyperproduction, is available in the literature yet, and a manipulative field experiment in this topic was designed in Tavolara Punta Coda Cavallo Marine Protected Area. The aim of the study was to test the effects of nutrient enrichment (addition of nutrients), mechanical disturbance (partial and total benthic organisms removal) and hydrodynamics (increased water turbulence) on C. taylorii cell density and mucilage abundance. To the purpose, the three above mentioned stressors were simulated and the three treatments were assigned to 20 × 20 cm plots following a full-factorial design (n = 3). Interactive effects of the three stressors affected significantly both benthic C. taylorii cell density and mucilage cover although differently. Mechanical disturbance and high hydrodynamics produced consistent effects on cell density and mucilage production (i.e. the former factor enhancing and the latter decreasing). Nutrient enrichment on the contrary led to contrasting effects, promoting cell abundance and inhibiting mucilage production. Therefore, important mucilage blooms are expected in oligotrophic sheltered coastal locations where barren areas are present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fransolet

    Full Text Available Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2 x s(-1 for 30 h. Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU. Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis.

  4. Performance Analysis of enhanced Inter-cell Interference Coordination in LTE-Advanced Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yuanye; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) for Long Term Evolution (LTE)- Advanced with co-channel deployment of both macro and pico is analyzed. The use of pico-cell Range Extension (RE) and time domain eICIC (TDM muting) is combined. The performance is evaluated...... in different scenarios are identified. The presented performance results and findings can serve as input to guidelines for co-channel deployment of macro and pico-eNBs with eICIC....

  5. Single particle tracking of internalized metallic nanoparticles reveals heterogeneous directed motion after clathrin dependent endocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Manuela; Moya-Díaz, José; Gallo, Luciana I.; Marengo, Fernando D.; Estrada, Laura C.

    2018-01-01

    Most accepted single particle tracking methods are able to obtain high-resolution trajectories for relatively short periods of time. In this work we apply a straightforward combination of single-particle tracking microscopy and metallic nanoparticles internalization on mouse chromaffin cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of metallic-nanoparticle-loaded vesicles (MNP-V) complexes after clathrin dependent endocytosis. We found that directed transport is the major route of MNP-Vs intracellular trafficking after stimulation (92.6% of the trajectories measured). We then studied the MNP-V speed at each point along the trajectory, and found that the application of a second depolarization stimulus during the tracking provokes an increase in the percentage of low-speed trajectory points in parallel with a decrease in the number of high-speed trajectory points. This result suggests that stimulation may facilitate the compartmentalization of internalized MNPs in a more restricted location such as was already demonstrated in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells (Bronfman et al 2003 J. Neurosci. 23 3209-20). Although further experiments will be required to address the mechanisms underlying this transport dynamics, our studies provide quantitative evidence of the heterogeneous behavior of vesicles mobility after endocytosis in chromaffin cells highlighting the potential of MNPs as alternative labels in optical microscopy to provide new insights into the vesicles dynamics in a wide variety of cellular environments.

  6. Polar solvent modification of x ray induced potentially lethal damage in heterogeneous human colon tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arundel, C.M.; Leith, J.T.; Dexter, D.L.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Two subpopulations of tumor cells (clones A and D) obtained from a human colon adenocarcinoma were examined for their sensitivities to x-irradiation as unfed, early plateau phase cultures. Both the single dose survival curves and the kinetics of potentially lethal damage recovery (PLDR) were determined for the two tumor lines. Also, possible modification of PLDR by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), which has previously been shown to enhance the radiosensitivity of exponentially growing tumor cells, was investigated by adding DMF (0.8% v/v) to plateau phase cultures immediately after irradiation, and determining effects on the extent of PLDR. For non-DMF treated cells, the survival curve parameters of the diploid (clone D) and aneuploid (clone A) lines were very similar. Using initial survival levels of 3.5% (clone D) or 5.5% (clone A) to investigate PLDR, it was found that the increase in survival for clone D was 2.2, while the SFR for clone A was 1.6. DMF did not change either the kinetics or extent of PLDR in these two tumor lines when added to cultures immediately after irradiation. These results indicate that significant heterogeneity in PLDR exists between these closely related tumor subpopulations

  7. Combined Impact of Heterogeneous Lifetime and Gettering on Solar Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishige, A.; Wagner, H.; Hofstetter, J.; Avci, I.; Canizo, C.; Buonassisi, T.

    2015-03-23

    We couple numerical process and device simulations to provide a framework for understanding the combined effects of as-grown wafer impurity distribution, processing parameters, and solar cell architecture. For this study, we added the Impurity-to-Efficiency simulator to Synopsys’ Sentaurus Process software using the Alagator Scripting Language. Our results quantify how advanced processing can eliminate differences in efficiency due to different as-grown impurity concentrations and due to different area fractions of defective wafer regions. We identify combinations of as-grown impurity distributions and process parameters that produce solar cells limited by point defects and those that are limited by precipitated impurities. Gettering targeted at either point defect or precipitate reduction can then be designed and applied to increase cell efficiency. We also visualize the post-processing iron and total recombination distributions in 2D maps of the wafer cross-section. PV researchers and companies can input their initial iron distributions and processing parameters into our software and couple the resulting process simulation results with a solar cell device design of interest to conduct their own analyses. The Alagator scripts we developed are freely available online at http://pv.mit.edu/impurity-to-efficiency-i2e-simulator-for-sentaurus-tcad/.

  8. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-01-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A, PIK3CA, PTEN, CTNNB1 and RAS. Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments. PMID:29389895

  9. Enzymatically Modified Low-Density Lipoprotein Promotes Foam Cell Formation in Smooth Muscle Cells via Macropinocytosis and Enhances Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, Bijoy; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Hofmann Bowman, Marion A

    2016-06-01

    Enzyme-modified nonoxidized low-density lipoprotein (ELDL) is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective is to understand the mechanisms of ELDL uptake and its effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Transformation of murine aortic SMCs into foam cells in response to ELDL was analyzed. ELDL, but not acetylated or oxidized LDL, was potent in inducing SMC foam cell formation. Inhibitors of macropinocytosis (LY294002, wortmannin, amiloride) attenuated ELDL uptake. In contrast, inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis (dynasore, sucrose) and inhibitor of caveolae-/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis (filipin) had no effect on ELDL uptake in SMC, suggesting that macropinocytosis is the main mechanism of ELDL uptake by SMC. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is not obligatory for ELDL-induced SMC foam cell formation, but primes SMC for the uptake of oxidized LDL in a RAGE-dependent manner. ELDL increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytosolic calcium, and expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in wild-type SMC but not in RAGE(-/-) SMC. The macropinocytotic uptake of ELDL is regulated predominantly by intracellular calcium because ELDL uptake was completely inhibited by pretreatment with the calcium channel inhibitor lacidipine in wild-type and RAGE(-/-) SMC. This is in contrast to pretreatment with PI3 kinase inhibitors which completely prevented ELDL uptake in RAGE(-/-) SMC, but only partially in wild-type SMC. ELDL is highly potent in inducing foam cells in murine SMC. ELDL endocytosis is mediated by calcium-dependent macropinocytosis. Priming SMC with ELDL enhances the uptake of oxidized LDL. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Kurimoto, Akiko [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Oncology Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, 1-2-58, Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-8710 (Japan); Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  11. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells

  12. The large-scale correlations of multi-cell densities and profiles, implications for cosmic variance estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Codis, Sandrine; Bernardeau, Francis; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the error budget in the measured probability distribution functions of cell densities, the two-point statistics of cosmic densities in concentric spheres is investigated. Bias functions are introduced as the ratio of their two-point correlation function to the two-point correlation of the underlying dark matter distribution. They describe how cell densities are spatially correlated. They are computed here via the so-called large deviation principle in the quasi-linear reg...

  13. Bone marrow-derived cells for cardiovascular cell therapy: an optimized GMP method based on low-density gradient improves cell purity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Soncin, Sabrina; Bolis, Sara; Sürder, Daniel; Torre, Tiziano; Siclari, Francesco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Turchetto, Lucia

    2014-09-27

    Cardiovascular cell therapy represents a promising field, with several approaches currently being tested. The advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) for the ongoing METHOD clinical study ("Bone marrow derived cell therapy in the stable phase of chronic ischemic heart disease") consists of fresh mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated from autologous bone marrow (BM) through density gradient centrifugation on standard Ficoll-Paque. Cells are tested for safety (sterility, endotoxin), identity/potency (cell count, CD45/CD34/CD133, viability) and purity (contaminant granulocytes and platelets). BM-MNC were isolated by density gradient centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque. The following process parameters were optimized throughout the study: gradient medium density; gradient centrifugation speed and duration; washing conditions. A new manufacturing method was set up, based on gradient centrifugation on low density Ficoll-Paque, followed by 2 washing steps, of which the second one at low speed. It led to significantly higher removal of contaminant granulocytes and platelets, improving product purity; the frequencies of CD34+ cells, CD133+ cells and functional hematopoietic and mesenchymal precursors were significantly increased. The methodological optimization described here resulted in a significant improvement of ATMP quality, a crucial issue to clinical applications in cardiovascular cell therapy.

  14. Systems biology. Conditional density-based analysis of T cell signaling in single-cell data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Smita; Spitzer, Matthew H; Mingueneau, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Litvin, Oren; Stone, Erica; Pe'er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-11-28

    Cellular circuits sense the environment, process signals, and compute decisions using networks of interacting proteins. To model such a system, the abundance of each activated protein species can be described as a stochastic function of the abundance of other proteins. High-dimensional single-cell technologies, such as mass cytometry, offer an opportunity to characterize signaling circuit-wide. However, the challenge of developing and applying computational approaches to interpret such complex data remains. Here, we developed computational methods, based on established statistical concepts, to characterize signaling network relationships by quantifying the strengths of network edges and deriving signaling response functions. In comparing signaling between naïve and antigen-exposed CD4(+) T lymphocytes, we find that although these two cell subtypes had similarly wired networks, naïve cells transmitted more information along a key signaling cascade than did antigen-exposed cells. We validated our characterization on mice lacking the extracellular-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK2, which showed stronger influence of pERK on pS6 (phosphorylated-ribosomal protein S6), in naïve cells as compared with antigen-exposed cells, as predicted. We demonstrate that by using cell-to-cell variation inherent in single-cell data, we can derive response functions underlying molecular circuits and drive the understanding of how cells process signals. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti......OBJECTIVE: To develop a noninvasive method suitable for clinical prenatal diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: Fetal nucleated erythrocytes were separated from peripheral blood of 17 healthy pregnant women using small magnetically activated cell sorting columns (MiniMACS) following density gradient...

  16. Results of Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells Dependent on Operation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew A. Styczynski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents in situ measurements of a newly developed current density measurement system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. While the functional principle and technical evaluation of the measurement system were presented in a previous paper, this paper analyzes the influence of various operation parameters, including multiple start-stop operation, at the anode, cathode and cooling locations on the distribution and long-term development of the current density. The system was operated for 500 h over two years with long periods of inactivity between measurements. The measurement results are evaluated and provide additional information on how to optimize the operation modes of fuel cells, including the start and stop of such systems as well as the water balance.

  17. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...

  18. Heterogeneity of the radiosensitivity and origins of tissue macrophage colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghiso, Yoichi; Yamada, Yutaka (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that the radiosensitivity and origin of tissue macrophage precursors differ from those of hemopoietic macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-Ms) committed to macrophage-lineage cells. We assessed the origins of tissue macrophage colony-forming cells (M-CFCs) in mice by comparing their kinetics and radiosensitivities in the normal steady state and under the conditions of bone marrow depletion by [sup 89]Sr-administration and/or splenectomy. The results indicate that the radiosensitive peritoneal M-CFCs elicited by thioglycollate are derived from bone marrow macrophage precursors; where as alveolar M-CFCs, which are radioresistant, are self-sustained locally and independent of hemopoietic macrophage precursors. In contrast, highly radiosensitive liver M-CFCs are probably derived from CFU-Ms that appear to be propagated in the spleen in association with hemopoietic responses. (author).

  19. Strategies for carbon and sulfur tolerant solid oxide fuel cell materials, incorporating lessons from heterogeneous catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, P; Ruiz Trejo, E; Mermelstein, J; Bermudez Menendez, J; Ramirez Reina, T; Brandon, N

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur ...

  20. Heterogeneity of Astrocytes: From Development to Injury - Single Cell Gene Expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rusňáková, Vendula; Honsa, Pavel; Džamba, Dávid; Stahlberg, A.; Kubista, Mikael; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 8 (2013), e69734 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-02154S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Single cell expression profiling * astrocytes * GenEx Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; FH - Neurology (UEM-P) Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  1. AG490 and PF431396 Sensitive Tyrosine Kinase Control the Population Heterogeneity of Basal STAT1 Activity in Ube1l Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Now, Hesung; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    A population often contains distinct sub-populations, thereby increasing the complexity of the overall heterogeneity. However, the cellular origin and biological relevance of sub-populations in cell population have not been clearly identified. Here we demonstrated the novel roles of ISGylation, which is an IFN-induced post-translational modification, controlling heterogeneity at the population level in cultured adherent cells. Without UBE1L, an E1 enzyme of ISGylation, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) exhibited low viral resistance despite high STAT1 and ISG expression compared with the wild-type MEF. We observe that Ube1l−/− MEF populations consist of two behaviorally distinguishable sub-populations with distinct basal STAT1 activity, while wild-type MEF populations are unimodal. This population heterogeneity in Ube1l knock-out cells was perturbed by tyrosine kinase inhibitors, AG490 and PF431396. In contrast, the neutralization of type I IFN did not affect population heterogeneity. Based on these results, we concluded that UBE1L functions to adjust basal immunological states with the regulation of population heterogeneity. PMID:27427993

  2. Convective cell excitation by inertial Alfven waves in a low density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhotelov, O.A.; Onishchenko, O.G.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Srenflo, L.; Balikhin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The parametric interaction of inertial Alfven waves with large-scale convective cells in a low-density plasma is investigated. It is shown that, in plasmas where the Alfven velocity is comparable to or exceeds the speed of light, the parametric interaction is substantially suppressed. A compact expression for the optimal scale and instability growth rate of the fastest growing mode is obtained [ru

  3. "Bleaching" glycerol in a microfluidic fuel cell to produce high power density at minimal cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cauê A; Ibrahim, Omar A; Pei, Pei; Kjeang, Erik

    2018-01-07

    Glycerol/bleach flow-through microfluidic fuel cells are presented. Carbon paper-modified Pt/C nanoparticles were used as the anode and cathode. Glycerol oxidation in alkaline medium was tested against hypochlorite reduction in alkaline and acidic media. The mixed media system displayed a power density of 315 mW cm -2 and an open circuit voltage of 1.9-2.0 V.

  4. High cell density strategy for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate production by Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ienczak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB is a carbon and intracellular storage source for different microorganisms and its production can achieve high productivities by means of high cell density cultures. The aim of this study was to propose a high cell density strategy for P(3HB production by Cupriavidus necator. The exponential growth phase demands an accurate control of the oxygen transfer system in the bioreactor, due to maximum specific growth rate (µXr, and, consequently, a maximum specific oxygen uptake rate (QO2, in addition to significant residual biomass (Xr growth in high cell density cultures. In this context, this work investigated the strategy for obtaining high cell density, with the inclusion of a linear growth phase for P(3HB production by C. necator in a fed-batch culture. The linear growth phase was included between the exponential growth phase and the P(3HB production phase as a strategy to reduce the specific growth rate (µXr and specific oxygen uptake rate (QO2, with constant residual biomass growth rate (d(V.Xr/dt = k = constant and linear increase of biomass. Three strategies of culture were performed. The results showed that a high residual biomass concentration (30 gXr.L-1 can be reached by the inclusion of the linear growth strategy and specific growth rates (µXr between 0.08 and 0.05 h-1, at the beginning of the production phase, are necessary to attain a high P(3HB productivity.

  5. RelE-Mediated Dormancy Is Enhanced at High Cell Density in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Kawata, Koji; Taniuchi, Asami; Kakinuma, Kenji; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria show remarkable adaptability under several stressful conditions by shifting themselves into a dormant state. Less is known, however, about the mechanism underlying the cell transition to dormancy. Here, we report that the transition to dormant states is mediated by one of the major toxin-antitoxin systems, RelEB, in a cell density-dependent manner in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. We constructed a strain, IKA121, which expresses the toxin RelE in the presence of rhamnose and lacks chr...

  6. Evaluation of Mast Cell and Blood Vessel Density in Inflammatory Periapical Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Seifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radicular cystsand periapical granulomas are the most common periapical inflammatory lesions. However, the role of cellular immunity and microvessels in their pathogenesis remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mast cell density (MCD, mircovessel density (MVD and investigating the correlation between their densities with each other in the above mentioned lesions.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 paraffin blocks of mentioned lesions were selected from achieves of School of Dentistry, Babol University of Medical Sciences. Three sections were prepared from each block and stained by hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue, and immunohistochemically for CD34 to determine the score of inflammation, presence of mast cells and degranulatedmast cells (DMCs, and MVD, respectively. The correlation between MCD and either inflammatory infiltrate or MVD was evaluated. Data analyzed by t student, Mann-Whitney and Spearman test.Results: Mast cells were present in all periapical inflammatory lesions; 15.4±14.8 for MCD, 7.2±6.1 for DMCs, and the ratio of DMCs to total number of MCs was 0.354±0.166 and 14.8+4.44 for blood vessel density in radicular cyst and 8.52±6.75, 2.91±2.1, 0.196±0.194 and 13±8.02 in periapical granulomas, respectively. There was a positive correlation between MCD and MVD in radicular cyst (P=0.03, r=0.341, but not in periapical granulomas (P=0.6, r=0.124. MCD and MVD increased with the score of inflammation in radicular cyst (P=0.001, r=0.7 and periapical granuloma (P=0.012, r=0.54.Conclusion: Mast cells and microvessels play a role in pathogenesis of periapical inflammatory lesions. In this study, the density of mast cells and DMCs in radicular cyst was higher than periapical granulomas, but no difference was observed regarding MVD in periapical inflammatory lesions. It seems that the relationship between MCD and MVD is different based on the clinical stage of periapical

  7. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. Results Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. Conclusion Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  8. Secreted heat shock protein 90 promotes prostate cancer stem cell heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Krystal D.; Kaur, Jasmine; Isaacs, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a highly conserved molecular chaperone, is frequently upregulated in tumors, and remains an attractive anti-cancer target. Hsp90 is also found extracellularly, particularly in tumor models. Although extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) action is not well defined, eHsp90 targeting attenuates tumor invasion and metastasis, supporting its unique role in tumor progression. We herein investigated the potential role of eHsp90 as a modulator of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in...

  9. Tumor cell heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC: phenotypical and functional differences associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and DNA methylation changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krohn

    Full Text Available Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients.

  10. Heterogeneous leukemia stem cells in myeloid blast phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goardon, Nicolas; Morrison, Heather; Hamblin, Mike; Robinson, Lisa; Clark, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an excellent model of the multistep processes in cancer. Initiating BCR-ABL mutations are required for the initial phase of the disease (chronic phase, CP-CML). Some CP-CML patients acquire additional mutation(s) that transforms CP-CML to poor prognosis, hard to treat, acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia or blast phase CML (BP-CML). It is unclear where in the hemopoietic hierarchy additional mutations are acquired in BP-CML, how the hemopoietic hierarchy is altered as a consequence, and the cellular identity of the resulting leukemia-propagating stem cell (LSC) populations. Here, we show that myeloid BP-CML is associated with expanded populations that have the immunophenotype of normal progenitor populations that vary between patients. Serial transplantation in immunodeficient mice demonstrated functional LSCs reside in multiple populations with the immunophenotype of normal progenitor as well as stem cells. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization detected serial acquisition of cytogenetic abnormalities of chromosome 17, associated with transformation to BP-CML, that is detected with equal frequency in all functional LSC compartments. New effective myeloid BP-CML therapies will likely have to target all these LSC populations. PMID:29296933

  11. Knudsen cell and smog chamber study of the heterogeneous uptake of sulfur dioxide on Chinese mineral dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Weigang; Gai, Yanbo; Ge, Maofa

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneous uptake processes of sulfur dioxide on two types of Chinese mineral dust (Inner Mongolia desert dust and Xinjiang sierozem) were investigated using both Knudsen cell and smog chamber system. The temperature dependence of the uptake coefficients was studied over a range from 253 to 313 K using the Knudsen cell reactor, the initial uptake coefficients decreased with the increasing of temperature for these two mineral dust samples, whereas the steady state uptake coefficients of the Xinjiang sierozem increased with the temperature increasing, and these temperature dependence functions were obtained for the first time. In the smog chamber experiments at room temperature, the steady state uptake coefficients of SO2 decreased evidently with the increasing of sulfur dioxide initial concentration from 1.72 × 10¹² to 6.15 × 10¹² mol/cm³. Humid air had effect on the steady state uptake coefficients of SO₂onto Inner Mongolia desert dust. Consequences about the understanding of the uptake processes onto mineral dust samples and the environmental implication were also discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Heterogeneity, Cell Biology and Tissue Mechanics of Pseudostratified Epithelia: Coordination of Cell Divisions and Growth in Tightly Packed Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzyz, P J; Matejcic, M; Norden, C

    2016-01-01

    Pseudostratified epithelia (PSE) are tightly packed proliferative tissues that are important precursors of the development of diverse organs in a plethora of species, invertebrate and vertebrate. PSE consist of elongated epithelial cells that are attached to the apical and basal side of the tissue. The nuclei of these cells undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM) which leads to all mitotic events taking place at the apical surface of the epithelium. In this review, we discuss the intricacies of proliferation in PSE, considering cell biological, as well as the physical aspects. First, we summarize the principles governing the invariability of apical nuclear migration and apical cell division as well as the importance of apical mitoses for tissue proliferation. Then, we focus on the mechanical and structural features of these tissues. Here, we discuss how the overall architecture of pseudostratified tissues changes with increased cell packing. Lastly, we consider possible mechanical cues resulting from these changes and their potential influence on cell proliferation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Curcumin chemosensitizes 5-fluorouracil resistant MMR-deficient human colon cancer cells in high density cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC remains a clinical challenge, as more than 15% of patients are resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapeutic regimens, and tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 50-60%. Cancer stem cells (CSC are capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies that permits regeneration of original tumors. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of 5-FU and plant polyphenol (curcumin in context of DNA mismatch repair (MMR status and CSC activity in 3D cultures of CRC cells. METHODS: High density 3D cultures of CRC cell lines HCT116, HCT116+ch3 (complemented with chromosome 3 and their corresponding isogenic 5-FU-chemo-resistant derivative clones (HCT116R, HCT116+ch3R were treated with 5-FU either without or with curcumin in time- and dose-dependent assays. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with curcumin significantly enhanced the effect of 5-FU on HCT116R and HCR116+ch3R cells, in contrast to 5-FU alone as evidenced by increased disintegration of colonospheres, enhanced apoptosis and by inhibiting their growth. Curcumin and/or 5-FU strongly affected MMR-deficient CRC cells in high density cultures, however MMR-proficient CRC cells were more sensitive. These effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitivity to 5-FU were further supported by its ability to effectively suppress CSC pools as evidenced by decreased number of CSC marker positive cells, highlighting the suitability of this 3D culture model for evaluating CSC marker expression in a close to vivo setting. CONCLUSION: Our results illustrate novel and previously unrecognized effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitization to 5-FU-based chemotherapy on DNA MMR-deficient and their chemo-resistant counterparts by targeting the CSC sub-population. (246 words in abstract.

  14. Curcumin chemosensitizes 5-fluorouracil resistant MMR-deficient human colon cancer cells in high density cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Buhrmann, Constanze; Kraehe, Patricia; Shayan, Parviz; Lueders, Cora; Goel, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a clinical challenge, as more than 15% of patients are resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, and tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 50-60%. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies that permits regeneration of original tumors. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of 5-FU and plant polyphenol (curcumin) in context of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status and CSC activity in 3D cultures of CRC cells. High density 3D cultures of CRC cell lines HCT116, HCT116+ch3 (complemented with chromosome 3) and their corresponding isogenic 5-FU-chemo-resistant derivative clones (HCT116R, HCT116+ch3R) were treated with 5-FU either without or with curcumin in time- and dose-dependent assays. Pre-treatment with curcumin significantly enhanced the effect of 5-FU on HCT116R and HCR116+ch3R cells, in contrast to 5-FU alone as evidenced by increased disintegration of colonospheres, enhanced apoptosis and by inhibiting their growth. Curcumin and/or 5-FU strongly affected MMR-deficient CRC cells in high density cultures, however MMR-proficient CRC cells were more sensitive. These effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitivity to 5-FU were further supported by its ability to effectively suppress CSC pools as evidenced by decreased number of CSC marker positive cells, highlighting the suitability of this 3D culture model for evaluating CSC marker expression in a close to vivo setting. Our results illustrate novel and previously unrecognized effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitization to 5-FU-based chemotherapy on DNA MMR-deficient and their chemo-resistant counterparts by targeting the CSC sub-population. (246 words in abstract).

  15. High Cell Density Upregulates Calcium Oscillation by Increasing Calcium Store Content via Basal Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Morita

    Full Text Available Calcium releases of non-excitable cells are generally a combination of oscillatory and non-oscillatory patterns, and factors affecting the calcium dynamics are still to be determined. Here we report the influence of cell density on calcium increase patterns of clonal cell lines. The majority of HeLa cells seeded at 1.5 x 104/cm2 showed calcium oscillations in response to histamine and ATP, whereas cells seeded at 0.5 x 104/cm2 largely showed transient and sustained calcium increases. Cell density also affected the response of HEK293 cells to ATP in a similar manner. High cell density increased the basal activity of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase and calcium store content, and both calcium oscillation and calcium store content were down-regulated by a MAP kinase inhibitor, U0126. Thus, MAP kinase-mediated regulation of calcium store likely underlie the effect of cell density on calcium oscillation. Calcium increase patterns of HeLa cells were conserved at any histamine concentrations tested, whereas the overexpression of histamine H1 receptor, which robustly increased histamine-induced inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, converted calcium oscillations to sustained calcium increases only at high histamine concentrations. Thus, the consequence of modulating inositol phospholipid metabolism was distinct from that of changing cell density, suggesting the effect of cell density is not attributed to inositol phospholipid metabolism. Collectively, our results propose that calcium increase patterns of non-excitable cells reflect calcium store, which is regulated by the basal MAP kinase activity under the influence of cell density.

  16. Cell-surface expression of neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) in heterogeneous cultures of marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie C; Tucker, H Alan; Bunnell, Bruce A; Andreeff, Michael; Schober, Wendy; Gaynor, Andrew S; Strickler, Karen L; Lin, Shuwen; Lacey, Michelle R; O'Connor, Kim C

    2013-10-01

    Cellular heterogeneity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) impedes their use in regenerative medicine. The objective of this research is to identify potential biomarkers for the enrichment of progenitors from heterogeneous MSC cultures. To this end, the present study examines variation in expression of neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) on the surface of MSCs derived from human bone marrow in response to culture conditions and among cell populations. Multipotent cells isolated from heterogeneous MSC cultures exhibit a greater than three-fold increase in surface expression for NG2 and greater than two-fold increase for CD146 as compared with parental and lineage-committed MSCs. For both antigens, surface expression is downregulated by greater than or equal to six-fold when MSCs become confluent. During serial passage, maximum surface expression of NG2 and CD146 is associated with minimum doubling time. Upregulation of NG2 and CD146 during loss of adipogenic potential at early passage suggests some limits to their utility as potency markers. A potential relationship between proliferation and antigen expression was explored by sorting heterogeneous MSCs into rapidly and slowly dividing groups. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that rapidly dividing MSCs display lower scatter and 50% higher NG2 surface expression than slowly dividing cells, but CD146 expression is comparable in both groups. Heterogeneous MSCs were sorted based on scatter properties and surface expression of NG2 and CD146 into high (HI) and low (LO) groups. Sc(LO)NG2(HI) and Sc(LO)NG2(HI)CD146(HI) MSCs have the highest proliferative potential of the sorted groups, with colony-forming efficiencies that are 1.5-2.2 times the value for the parental controls. The Sc(LO) gate enriches for rapidly dividing cells. Addition of the NG2(HI) gate increases cell survival to 1.5 times the parental control. Further addition of the CD146(HI) gate does not significantly

  17. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppresses oxidized low density lipoprotein induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between the suppression of Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA on the oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and the mRNA and protein expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and mitogen activated protein kinase phospholipase-1 (MAKP-1, VSMCs were treated with HSYA at 10 ?mol/L and/or ox-LDL at 35 mg/L for 48 h. MTT assay was done to measure cell survival rate, flow cytometry to detect cell cycle, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot to detect the expression of ERK1/2 and MAKP-1. When compared to cells treated with ox-LDL alone, the survival rate of cells treated with two reagents was reduced and the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase significantly increased, with increased MKP-1 expression. The study suggests HSYA can inhibit VSMC proliferation via increasing MKP-1 expression, reducing p-ERK1/2 activity and suppressing cell cycle.

  18. Development of silver-zinc cells of improved cycle life and energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenyi, Roberto; James, Stanley D.

    1994-03-01

    Substantial increases in the cost effectiveness and range of naval underwater vehicles are possible by virtue of advances made, in this program, to silver-zinc, vehicle propulsion batteries. To improve battery cycle life and energy density, electropermeable membranes (EPM's) were used as additives and/or as coatings for the negative electrodes and as coatings for conventional separator materials. Also, bismuth oxide was tested as an additive to the negative electrodes and P2291-40/20, a radiation-grafted polyethylene film, as a separator used in conjunction with silver-treated cellophane. EPM's used as negative electrode additives and also as coatings for Celgard 2500 microporous polypropylene greatly improved cells. Cells with EPM's used as coatings for the negative electrodes failed rapidly because of an error in formulation. Cells with 10 percent bismuth oxide in the negative electrodes exhibited substantially lower capacity than the standard cells and were removed from the test. Cells with radiation-grafted polyethylene separators provided fewer cycles than the standard cells, with 5 percent higher capacity and 6 percent lower utilization of active materials by cycle 60. However, the slightly better capacity of these cells, realized due to the additional space available for active materials, does not compensate for their generally unimpressive performance.

  19. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  20. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A; Haut, M J; Warhol, M J

    1997-04-01

    To develop a noninvasive method suitable for clinical prenatal diagnosis. Fetal nucleated erythrocytes were separated from peripheral blood of 17 healthy pregnant women using small magnetically activated cell sorting columns (MiniMACS) following density gradient centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations of the isolated cells were subjected to in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes for the Y chromosome and chromosome 21 to confirm the fetal origin. After MiniMACS the enrichment factors for the CD71/GPA- and CD36/GPA-positive cells from maternal blood were similar, and the percentages of fetal cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti-GPA immunostaining and MiniMACS could be an accurate, sensitive and noninvasive method for prenatal diagnosis.

  1. Variable EBV DNA Load Distributions and Heterogeneous EBV mRNA Expression Patterns in the Circulation of Solid Organ versus Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A. E.; Stevens, S. J.; Verkuijlen, S. A.; Juwana, H.; Fleig, S. C.; Verschuuren, E. A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Brooimans, R. A.; Verdonck, L. F.; Middeldorp, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma and cellular

  2. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreon-Rodriguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Canedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-01-01

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue

  3. Heterogeneity of expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT markers in melanocytes and melanoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eKim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT describes a reversible switch from an epithelial-like to a mesenchymal-like phenotype. It is essential for the development of the normal epithelium and also contributes to the invasive properties of carcinomas. At the molecular level, the EMT transition is characterised by a series of coordinated changes including downregulation of the junctional protein E-cadherin (CDH1, up-regulation of transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin such as Snail (SNAI1 and Slug (SNAI2, and up-regulation of N-cadherin. We wished to determine whether cultured normal melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, which are derived from the neural crest, showed signs of a similarly coordinated phenotypic switch. We investigated normal melanocytes and 25 cell lines derived from New Zealand patients with metastatic melanoma. Most lines had been previously genotyped for common mutations such as BRAF, NRAS, PIK3CA, TP53 and CDKN2A. Expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MITF, Snail, Slug, Axl, p53 and Hdm2 was compared by western blotting. Normal melanocytes expressed each of these proteins except for Snail, while normal melanocytes and almost every melanoma line expressed Slug. Expression of individual markers among different melanoma lines varied from high to low or undetectable. Quantitation of western blots showed that expression of MITF-M, the melanocyte-specific isoform of MITF, was positively related to that of E-cadherin but inversely related to that of N-cadherin and Axl. There was also no apparent relationship between expression of any particular marker and the presence of BRAF, NRAS, PIK3CA, TP53 or CDKN2A mutations. The results suggest that melanomas do not show the classical epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes but rather display either high E-cadherin/high MITF-M expression on one hand, or high N-cadherin/high Axl expression on the other. These may correspond to differentiated and invasive phenotypes in vivo.

  4. Heterogeneity of proangiogenic features in mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord, and placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen Jing; Chi, Ying; Yang, Zhou Xin; Li, Zong Jin; Cui, Jun Jie; Song, Bao Quan; Li, Xue; Yang, Shao Guang; Han, Zhi Bo; Han, Zhong Chao

    2016-11-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely proven effective for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemia animal models as well as clinical vascular diseases. Because of the invasive method, limited resources, and aging problems of adult tissue-derived MSCs, more perinatal tissue-derived MSCs have been isolated and studied as promising substitutable MSCs for cell transplantation. However, fewer studies have comparatively studied the angiogenic efficacy of MSCs derived from different tissues sources. Here, we evaluated whether the in-situ environment would affect the angiogenic potential of MSCs. We harvested MSCs from adult bone marrow (BMSCs), adipose tissue (AMSCs), perinatal umbilical cord (UMSCs), and placental chorionic villi (PMSCs), and studied their "MSC identity" by flow cytometry and in-vitro trilineage differentiation assay. Then we comparatively studied their endothelial differentiation capabilities and paracrine actions side by side in vitro. Our data showed that UMSCs and PMSCs fitted well with the minimum standard of MSCs as well as BMSCs and AMSCs. Interestingly, we found that MSCs regardless of their tissue origins could develop similar endothelial-relevant functions in vitro, including producing eNOS and uptaking ac-LDL during endothelial differentiation in spite of their feeble expression of endothelial-related genes and proteins. Additionally, we surprisingly found that BMSCs and PMSCs could directly form tubular structures in vitro on Matrigel and their conditioned medium showed significant proangiogenic bioactivities on endothelial cells in vitro compared with those of AMSCs and UMSCs. Besides, several angiogenic genes were upregulated in BMSCs and PMSCs in comparison with AMSCs and UMSCs. Moreover, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay further confirmed that BMSCs secreted much more VEGF, and PMSCs secreted much more HGF and PGE2. Our study demonstrated the heterogeneous proangiogenic properties of MSCs derived from different tissue origins, and

  5. Plasma membrane temperature gradients and multiple cell permeabilization induced by low peak power density femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Calculations indicate that selectively heating the extracellular media induces membrane temperature gradients that combine with electric fields and a temperature-induced reduction in the electropermeabilization threshold to potentially facilitate exogenous molecular delivery. Experiments by a wide-field, pulsed femtosecond laser with peak power density far below typical single cell optical delivery systems confirmed this hypothesis. Operating this laser in continuous wave mode at the same average power permeabilized many fewer cells, suggesting that bulk heating alone is insufficient and temperature gradients are crucial for permeabilization. This work suggests promising opportunities for a high throughput, low cost, contactless method for laser mediated exogenous molecule delivery without the complex optics of typical single cell optoinjection, for potential integration into microscope imaging and microfluidic systems.

  6. Estimating the neutrally buoyant energy density of a Rankine-cycle/fuel-cell underwater propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2014-02-01

    A unique requirement of underwater vehicles' power/energy systems is that they remain neutrally buoyant over the course of a mission. Previous work published in the Journal of Power Sources reported gross as opposed to neutrally-buoyant energy densities of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell/Rankine-cycle based power system based on the exothermic reaction of aluminum with seawater. This paper corrects this shortcoming by presenting a model for estimating system mass and using it to update the key findings of the original paper in the context of the neutral buoyancy requirement. It also presents an expanded sensitivity analysis to illustrate the influence of various design and modeling assumptions. While energy density is very sensitive to turbine efficiency (sensitivity coefficient in excess of 0.60), it is relatively insensitive to all other major design parameters (sensitivity coefficients < 0.15) like compressor efficiency, inlet water temperature, scaling methodology, etc. The neutral buoyancy requirement introduces a significant (∼15%) energy density penalty but overall the system still appears to offer factors of five to eight improvements in energy density (i.e., vehicle range/endurance) over present battery-based technologies.

  7. Use of Phytone Peptone to Optimize Growth and Cell Density of Lactobacillus reuteri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olabiyi A. Atilola

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the use of phytone peptone to optimize the growth and cell density of Lactobacillus reuteri. Four strains of L. reuteri (DSM 20016, SD 2112, CF 2-7F, and MF 2-3, were used in this study. An overnight culture of individual strains was inoculated into fresh basal media with various protein sources (peptone, tryptone, proteose peptone #3, phytone peptone, tryptic soy broth, yeast extract, and beef extract. Samples were then mixed well and incubated at 37 °C for 15 h. Bacterial growth was monitored by measuring turbidity (optical density 610 nm at different time intervals during the incubation period. At the end of incubation, samples were plated on de-Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS agar to determine the bacterial population. Our results showed that phytone peptone promoted the growth of L. reuteri (p < 0.05 by 1.4 log CFU/mL on average compared to the control samples. Therefore, phytone peptone could be included in laboratory media to enhance growth and increase the cell density of L. reuteri.

  8. Heterogeneity in the multiple myeloma tumor clone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Hovenga, S; Vellenga, E; Bos, NA

    Multiple Myeloma ( MM) is a plasma cell malignancy which is characterized by a very heterogeneous disease outcome. Heterogeneity in plasma cell characteristics, including morphology, maturation status, immunophenotype and genetic abnormalities partly account for the variable disease outcome.

  9. Heterogeneity in the multiple myeloma tumor clone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Vellenga, Edo; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy which is characterized by a very heterogeneous disease outcome. Heterogeneity in plasma cell characteristics, including morphology, maturation status, immunophenotype and genetic abnormalities partly account for the variable disease outcome. Although

  10. Low density of membrane particles in auditory hair cells of lizards and birds suggests an absence of somatic motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppl, Christine; Forge, Andrew; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2004-11-08

    Hair cells are the mechanoreceptive cells of the vertebrate lateral line and inner ear. In addition to their sensory function, hair cells display motility and thus themselves generate mechanical energy, which is thought to enhance sensitivity. Two principal cellular mechanism are known that can mediate hair-cell motility in vitro. One of these is based on voltage-dependent changes of an intramembrane protein and has so far been demonstrated only in outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea. Correlated with this, the cell membranes of outer hair cells carry an extreme density of embedded particles, as revealed by freeze fracturing. The present study explored the possibility of membrane-based motility in hair cells of nonmammals, by determining their density of intramembrane particles. Replicas of freeze-fractured membrane were prepared from auditory hair cells of a lizard, the Tokay gecko, and a bird, the barn owl. These species were chosen because of independent evidence for active cochlear mechanics, in the form of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. For quantitative comparison, mammalian inner and outer hair cells, as well as vestibular hair, cells were reevaluated. Lizard and bird hair cells displayed median densities of 2,360 and 1,880 intramembrane particles/microm2, respectively. This was not significantly different from the densities in vestibular and mammalian inner hair cells; however, it was about half the density in of mammalian outer hair cells. This suggests that nonmammalian hair cells do not possess high densities of motor protein in their membranes and are thus unlikely to be capable of somatic motility. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Mast cell density and angiogenesis in oral dysplastic epithelium and low- and high-grade oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasham, Nooshin; Babakoohi, Shahab; Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Shojaee, Setareh; Sistani, Noorieh Sharifi; Firooz, Alireza

    2010-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the 10 most common malignant tumors and SCC accounts for approximately 94% of all oral malignancies. The risk of malignant transformation in dysplastic lesions is greater than that of normal oral mucosa. The definite roles of mast cells and angiogenesis in OSCC have been under debate. The aim of this study was to compare mast cell count (MCC) and microvessel density (MVD) among normal oral mucosa, oral dysplastic epithelium and low- and high- grade OSCC. A total of 42 specimens of OSCC (21 high- and 21 low-grade) were collected, along with six normal and 22 dysplastic oral mucosa. The mean MCC and MVD, as well as the correlation between them, were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Statistically significant increases in mean MCC and MVD were observed between normal oral mucosa and epithelial dysplasia, normal oral mucosa and OSCC and epithelial dysplasia and OSCC (P epithelial dysplasia.

  12. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  13. Use of Phytone Peptone to Optimize Growth and Cell Density of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilola, Olabiyi A; Gyawali, Rabin; Aljaloud, Sulaiman O; Ibrahim, Salam A

    2015-08-10

    The objective of this study was to determine the use of phytone peptone to optimize the growth and cell density of Lactobacillus reuteri. Four strains of L. reuteri (DSM 20016, SD 2112, CF 2-7F, and MF 2-3,) were used in this study. An overnight culture of individual strains was inoculated into fresh basal media with various protein sources (peptone, tryptone, proteose peptone #3, phytone peptone, tryptic soy broth, yeast extract, and beef extract). Samples were then mixed well and incubated at 37 °C for 15 h. Bacterial growth was monitored by measuring turbidity (optical density 610 nm) at different time intervals during the incubation period. At the end of incubation, samples were plated on de-Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar to determine the bacterial population. Our results showed that phytone peptone promoted the growth of L. reuteri ( p reuteri .

  14. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  15. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  16. Distribution of the Current Density in Electrolyte of the Pem Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz Kurgan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper water management in proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is considered. Firt mass convervation law for water is applied. Next proton transport is described by the Nernst-Planck equation and liqid water convection velocity is eliminated by the Schlogl equation. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient is related to hydrogen index and experimentally determined swelling coefficient. Three partial differential equations for molar water concentration Cw, electric potential ϕ and water pressure Pw are formulated. Current density vector i is derived from proton flux expression. These equations together with adequate boundary conditions were solved using finite element method. The distribution of electric potential and current density in function of geometrical parametres is investigated. At the end some illustrative example is given.

  17. Heterogeneity of Purkinje cell simple spike-complex spike interactions: zebrin- and non-zebrin-related variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tianyu; Xiao, Jianqiang; Suh, Colleen Y; Burroughs, Amelia; Cerminara, Nadia L; Jia, Linjia; Marshall, Sarah P; Wise, Andrew K; Apps, Richard; Sugihara, Izumi; Lang, Eric J

    2017-08-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, simple and complex spikes. Although they are generated by distinct mechanisms, interactions between the two spike types exist. Zebrin staining produces alternating positive and negative stripes of PCs across most of the cerebellar cortex. Thus, here we compared simple spike-complex spike interactions both within and across zebrin populations. Simple spike activity undergoes a complex modulation preceding and following a complex spike. The amplitudes of the pre- and post-complex spike modulation phases were correlated across PCs. On average, the modulation was larger for PCs in zebrin positive regions. Correlations between aspects of the complex spike waveform and simple spike activity were found, some of which varied between zebrin positive and negative PCs. The implications of the results are discussed with regard to hypotheses that complex spikes are triggered by rises in simple spike activity for either motor learning or homeostatic functions. Purkinje cells (PCs) generate two types of action potentials, called simple and complex spikes (SSs and CSs). We first investigated the CS-associated modulation of SS activity and its relationship to the zebrin status of the PC. The modulation pattern consisted of a pre-CS rise in SS activity, and then, following the CS, a pause, a rebound, and finally a late inhibition of SS activity for both zebrin positive (Z+) and negative (Z-) cells, though the amplitudes of the phases were larger in Z+ cells. Moreover, the amplitudes of the pre-CS rise with the late inhibitory phase of the modulation were correlated across PCs. In contrast, correlations between modulation phases across CSs of individual PCs were generally weak. Next, the relationship between CS spikelets and SS activity was investigated. The number of spikelets/CS correlated with the average SS firing rate only for Z+ cells. In contrast, correlations across CSs between spikelet numbers and the

  18. CD44 isoforms are heterogeneously expressed in breast cancer and correlate with tumor subtypes and cancer stem cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Eleonor; Lövgren, Kristina; Fernö, Mårten; Grabau, Dorthe; Borg, Åke; Hegardt, Cecilia; Honeth, Gabriella; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Saal, Lao H; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia; Ringnér, Markus; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Jönsson, Göran; Holm, Karolina

    2011-01-01

    The CD44 cell adhesion molecule is aberrantly expressed in many breast tumors and has been implicated in the metastatic process as well as in the putative cancer stem cell (CSC) compartment. We aimed to investigate potential associations between alternatively spliced isoforms of CD44 and CSCs as well as to various breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes. We used q-RT-PCR and exon-exon spanning assays to analyze the expression of four alternatively spliced CD44 isoforms as well as the total expression of CD44 in 187 breast tumors and 13 cell lines. ALDH1 protein expression was determined by IHC on TMA. Breast cancer cell lines showed a heterogeneous expression pattern of the CD44 isoforms, which shifted considerably when cells were grown as mammospheres. Tumors characterized as positive for the CD44 + /CD24 - phenotype by immunohistochemistry were associated to all isoforms except the CD44 standard (CD44S) isoform, which lacks all variant exons. Conversely, tumors with strong expression of the CSC marker ALDH1 had elevated expression of CD44S. A high expression of the CD44v2-v10 isoform, which retain all variant exons, was correlated to positive steroid receptor status, low proliferation and luminal A subtype. The CD44v3-v10 isoform showed similar correlations, while high expression of CD44v8-v10 was correlated to positive EGFR, negative/low HER2 status and basal-like subtype. High expression of CD44S was associated with strong HER2 staining and also a subgroup of basal-like tumors. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis of CD44 isoform expression data divided tumors into four main clusters, which showed significant correlations to molecular subtypes and differences in 10-year overall survival. We demonstrate that individual CD44 isoforms can be associated to different breast cancer subtypes and clinical markers such as HER2, ER and PgR, which suggests involvement of CD44 splice variants in specific oncogenic signaling pathways. Efforts to link CD44 to

  19. Quorum sensing integrates environmental cues, cell density and cell history to control bacterial competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Gámez, Stefany; Sorg, Robin A; Domenech, Arnau; Kjos, Morten; Weissing, Franz J; van Doorn, G Sander; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes competent for genetic transformation when exposed to an autoinducer peptide known as competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). This peptide was originally described as a quorum-sensing signal, enabling individual cells to regulate competence in response to population

  20. Heterogeneity of Prognostic Profiles in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Too Many Variables but a Few Relevant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camara, Agustin Gomez de la; Lopez-Encuentra, Angel; Ferrando, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Many prognostic factors, exceeding 150, for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are mentioned in the literature. The different statistical weight of the some variables at issue, their heterogeneity and their clinical uselessness is reviewed. Study design and setting: Survival analysis of a cohort of NSCLC operated (n = 1730, 1993-1997) was carried out utilizing different statistical approaches: Cox proportional hazard analysis (CPHA), logistic regression (LRA), and recursive partitioning (CART). Results: CPHA identified 13 prognostic variables and 11 LRA. Of the 17 possible variables, 10 are coincident. CART provided five different diagnostic groups but only three differentiated survival levels. Parsimonious models were constructed including only T and N cancer staging variables. Areas under the ROC curve of 0.68 and 0.68 were found for CPHA and LGA parsimonious models respectively, and 0.72 and 0.71 for complete models. Conclusion: Variables with a minimal impact on the respective models and thus with little or scarce predictive clinical repercussion were identified. Differences in the prognostic profile of survival can be caused by the different methodological approaches used. No relevant differences were found between the parsimonious and complete models. Although the amount of information managed is considerable, there continues to be a large predictive gap yet to be explained

  1. Bidirectional interconversion of stem and non-stem cancer cell populations: A reassessment of theoretical models for tumor heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Neerven, Sanne M.; Tieken, Mathijs; Vermeulen, Louis; Bijlsma, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Resolving the origin of intratumor heterogeneity has proven to be one of the central challenges in cancer research during recent years. Two theoretical models explaining the emergence of intratumor heterogeneity have come to dominate cancer biology literature: the clonal evolution model and the

  2. Modeling the short-circuit current density of polymer solar cells based on P3HT:PCBM blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monestier, Florent; Simon, Jean-Jacques; Torchio, Philippe; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, Francois [Institut FRESNEL, UMR-CNRS 6133, Domaine Universitaire de St-Jerome, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Bailly, Sandrine; de Bettignies, Remi; Guillerez, Stephane [INES CEA/DRT/LITEN/DTS/LCS, BP 332 50, av. du lac Leman 73370, Le Bourget du lac (France); Defranoux, Christophe [SOPRA-SA, Bois Colombes (France)

    2007-03-06

    We have investigated the short-circuit current density of organic solar cells based on poly (3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT)/6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend. In order to model charge collection efficiencies with respect to short circuit density in such blends, a full optical modeling of the cell is performed. From the distribution of the electromagnetic field, we compute the rate of exciton generation. This exciton generation rate is used as input in the transport equations of holes and electrons. Charge densities at steady state are obtained as solutions are used for computing short-circuit current densities generated in the cell. The dependence of short-circuit current densities versus the thickness of the blend is analyzed and compared with our experimental data and with data extracted from the literature. (author)

  3. Suitable housekeeping genes for normalization of transcript abundance analysis by real-time RT-PCR in cultured bovine granulosa cells during hypoxia and differential cell plating density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddela, Vijay S; Baufeld, Anja; Yenuganti, Vengala R; Vanselow, Jens; Singh, Dheer

    2014-11-27

    Bovine granulosa cell culture models are important to understand molecular mechanisms of ovarian function. Folliculogenesis and luteinization are associated with increasing density of cells and local hypoxic conditions. The current study identified two reliable housekeeping genes useful for gene normalization in granulosa cells under different in vitro conditions. During the current experiments cells were subjected to different biological and physical stimuli, follicle stimulating hormone, different initial cell plating density and hypoxia. Transcript abundance of seven housekeeping genes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR with co-amplification of the respective external standard. Three of the genes, GAPDH, HMBS, and HPRT1 were found to be regulated by initial cell plating density, five of them, GAPDH, HMBS, HPRT1, RPLP0 and RPS18 under hypoxic conditions, but none of them after FSH stimulation. In detail, GAPDH was up regulated, but HPRT1 and HMBS were down regulated at high density and under hypoxia. Expression of RPLP0 and RPS18 was inconsistent, but was significantly down-regulated in particular at high cell density combined with hypoxia. In contrast, TBP and B2M genes were neither regulated under different plating density conditions nor by hypoxia as they showed similar expression levels under all conditions analyzed. The present data indicate that TBP and B2M are appropriate housekeeping genes for normalization of transcript abundance measured by real-time RT-PCR in granulosa cells subjected to different plating densities, oxygen concentrations and FSH stimulation.

  4. Effects of extracellular nucleotides on single cells and populations of human osteoblasts: contribution of cell heterogeneity to relative potencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Dixon, C; Bowler, Wayne B; Walsh, Catherine A; Gallagher, James A

    1997-01-01

    Human osteoblasts responded to the application of extracellular nucleotides, acting at P2-receptors, with increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i).In populations of human osteoblasts, adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) evoked a rise in [Ca2+]i with less than 40% of the amplitude of that induced by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP).ATP and uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) were applied to single human osteoblasts and induced [Ca2+]i rises of comparable amplitude in every cell tested.H...

  5. SU-G-IeP1-06: Estimating Relative Tissue Density From Quantitative MR Images: A Novel Perspective for MRI-Only Heterogeneity Corrected Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Hashemi, M; Safigholi, H [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Tchistiakova, E [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of extracting the relative density from quantitative MRI measurements as well as estimate a correlation between the extracted measures and CT Hounsfield units. Methods: MRI has the ability to separate water and fat signals, producing two separate images for each component. By performing appropriate corrections on the separated images, quantitative measurement of water and fat mass density can be estimated. This work aims to test this hypothesis on 1.5T.Peanut oil was used as fat-representative, while agar as water-representative. Gadolinium Chloride III and Sodium Chloride were added to the agar solution to adjust the relaxation times and the medium conductivity, respectively. Peanut oil was added to the agar solution with different percentages: 0%, 3%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90% and 100%. The phantom was scanned on 1.5T GE Optima 450W with the body coil using a multigradient echo sequences. Water/fat separation were performed while correcting for main field (B0) inhomogeneity and T{sub 2}* relaxation time. B1+ inhomogeneities were ignored. The phantom was subsequently scanned on a Philips Brilliance CT Big Bore. MR-corrected fat signal from all vials were normalized to 100% fat signal. CT Hounsfield values were then compared to those obtained from the normalized MR-corrected fat values as well as to the phantom for validation. Results: Good agreement were found between CT HU and the MR-extracted fat values (R{sup 2} = 0.98). CT HU also showed excellent agreement with the prepared fat fractions (R{sup 2}=0.99). Vials with 70%, 80%, and 90% fat percentages showed inhomogeneous distributions, however their results were included for completion. Conclusion: Quantitative MRI water/fat imaging can be potentially used to extract the relative tissue density. Further in-vivo validation are required.

  6. Comparison of manual & automated analysis methods for corneal endothelial cell density measurements by specular microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianyan; Maram, Jyotsna; Tepelus, Tudor C; Modak, Cristina; Marion, Ken; Sadda, SriniVas R; Chopra, Vikas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-08-07

    To determine the reliability of corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) obtained by automated specular microscopy versus that of validated manual methods and factors that predict such reliability. Sharp central images from 94 control and 106 glaucomatous eyes were captured with Konan specular microscope NSP-9900. All images were analyzed by trained graders using Konan CellChek Software, employing the fully- and semi-automated methods as well as Center Method. Images with low cell count (input cells number <100) and/or guttata were compared with the Center and Flex-Center Methods. ECDs were compared and absolute error was used to assess variation. The effect on ECD of age, cell count, cell size, and cell size variation was evaluated. No significant difference was observed between the Center and Flex-Center Methods in corneas with guttata (p=0.48) or low ECD (p=0.11). No difference (p=0.32) was observed in ECD of normal controls <40 yrs old between the fully-automated method and manual Center Method. However, in older controls and glaucomatous eyes, ECD was overestimated by the fully-automated method (p=0.034) and semi-automated method (p=0.025) as compared to manual method. Our findings show that automated analysis significantly overestimates ECD in the eyes with high polymegathism and/or large cell size, compared to the manual method. Therefore, we discourage reliance upon the fully-automated method alone to perform specular microscopy analysis, particularly if an accurate ECD value is imperative. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti...

  8. Role of low density lipoprotein-bound cholesterol esters in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutts, J.L.; Madden, E.A.; Melnykovych, G.

    1986-01-01

    The glucocorticoid sensitive CEM-C7 T-cell line was derived from human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Norman and Thompson. Madden et al. have demonstrated that this growth inhibitory effect is due in part to a glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and can be partially reversed by cholesterol dispersions. To further delineate the role of cholesterol in this growth inhibition, they have examined the ability of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-bound [ 3 H]cholesterol linoleate to reverse the growth inhibitory effect of 1 μM dexamethasone (Dex) on the CEM-C7 cells. LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate was unable to reverse the Dex-mediated growth inhibition, although incorporation of [ 14 C] acetate into free cholesterol was inhibited by 29%, following the Brown and Goldstein model. The presence of Dex further inhibited acetate incorporation into free cholesterol in the LDL-treated cells. Under all conditions, more than 99% of the acetate incorporated into cholesterol was present as free cholesterol, while over 87% of the LDL-bound cholesterol linoleate taken up remained in the ester compartment. These results indicate that CEM-C7 cells are unable to utilize LDL-bound cholesterol esters as a source of free cholesterol and rely on endogenous synthesis for their free cholesterol requirements

  9. Regulation of low density lipoprotein receptor function in a human hepatoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leichtner, A.M.; Krieger, M.; Schwartz, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) processing was investigated in a human hepatoma-derived cell line, Hep G2. Hep G2 cells bound, internalized and degraded LDL via a saturable, high affinity pathway similar to that present in other mammalian cells. Although 80% of the uptake and degradation of 125 I-LDL was inhibited by 40-fold excess native LDL, the same concentration of methylated LDL, which cannot bind to LDL receptors, had virtually no effect on processing. When added at low concentrations, the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, inhibited degradation without affecting the rate of lipoprotein internalization. Receptor activity was decreased 60% by preincubation of the cells in medium containing a source of cholesterol (LDL or unesterified cholesterol) and increased 1.7-fold by preincubation with compactin, a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. The Hep G2 cell line may prove a useful system both for the further study of hepatic lipoprotein metabolism and for the evaluation of new antihypercholesterolemic agents

  10. Dissecting the actin cortex density and membrane-cortex distance in living cells by super-resolution microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Colin-York, H.; Schneider, Falk

    2017-01-01

    and accurately measure the density distribution of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and the distance between the actin cortex and the membrane in live Jurkat T-cells. We found an asymmetric cortical actin density distribution with a mean width of 230 (+105/-125) nm. The spatial distances measured between...

  11. Functional heterogeneity within the CD44 high human breast cancer stem cell-like compartment reveals a gene signature predictive of distant metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Terp, Mikkel Green; Christensen, Anne G

    2012-01-01

    The CD44(hi) compartment in human breast cancer is enriched in tumor-initiating cells; however the functional heterogeneity within this subpopulation remains poorly defined. We used a triple-negative breast cancer cell line with a known bi-lineage phenotype to isolate and clone CD44(hi) single...... features such as tumor-initiating capacity in vivo, mammosphere formation and resistance to standard chemotherapy. This complements previous findings using oncogene-transformed normal mammary cells showing that only cell clones with a mesenchymal phenotype exhibit cancer stem cell features. Further, we...... performed comparative quantitative proteomic and gene array analyses of these cells and identified potential novel markers of breast cancer cells with tumor-initiating features, such as LSR, RAB25, S100A14 and MUC1, as well as a novel 31-gene signature capable of predicting distant metastasis in cohorts...

  12. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  13. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  14. Reconstructing Solvent Density of Myoglobin Unit Cell from Proximal Radial Distribution Functions of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Madeline; Lynch, Gc; Pettitt, Bm

    Understanding the solvent density around a protein crystal structure is an important step for refining accurate crystal structures for use in dynamics simulations or in free energy calculations. The free energy of solvation has typically been approximated using an implicit continuum solvent model or an all atom MD simulation, with a trade-off between accuracy and computation time. For proteins, using precomputed proximal radial distribution functions (pRDFs) of the solvent to reconstruct solvent density on a grid is much faster than all atom MD simulations and more accurate than using implicit solvent models. MD simulations were run for the 20 common amino acids and pRDFs were calculated for several atom type data sets with and without hydrogens, using atom types representative of amino acid side chain atoms. Preliminary results from reconstructions suggest using a data set with 15 heavy atoms and 3 hydrogen yields results with the lowest error without a tradeoff on time. The results of using precomputed pRDFs to reconstruct the solvent density of water for the myoglobin (pdb ID 2mgk) unit cell quantifies the accuracy of the method in comparison with the crystallographic data. Funding Acknowledgement: This research was funded by the CPRIT Summer Undergraduate Program in Computational Cancer Biology, training Grant award RP 140113 from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).

  15. High power-density single-chamber fuel cells operated on methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zongping; Mederos, Jennifer; Chueh, William C.; Haile, Sossina. M.

    Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) incorporating thin-film Sm 0.15Ce 0.85O 1.925 (SDC) as the electrolyte, thick Ni + SDC as the (supporting) anode and SDC + BSCF (Ba 0.5Sr 0.5Co 0.8Fe 0.2O 3- δ) as the cathode were operated in a mixture of methane, oxygen and helium at furnace temperatures of 500-650 °C. Because of the exothermic nature of the oxidation reactions that occur at the anode, the cell temperature was as much as 150 °C greater than the furnace temperature. Overall, the open circuit voltage was only slightly sensitive to temperature and gas composition, varying from ∼0.70 to ∼0.78 V over the range of conditions explored. In contrast, the power density strongly increased with temperature and broadly peaked at a methane to oxygen ratio of ∼1:1. At a furnace temperature of 650 °C (cell temperature ∼790 °C), a peak power density of 760 mW cm -2 was attained using a mixed gas with methane, oxygen and helium flow rates of 87, 80 and 320 mL min -1 [STP], respectively. This level of power output is the highest reported in the literature for single chamber fuel cells and reflects the exceptionally high activity of the BSCF cathode for oxygen electro-reduction and its low activity for methane oxidation.

  16. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27Kip Cdk-complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells...... and Cdk2 complexes, as these kinases were inactivated. Ras-transformed cells failed to arrest at normal saturation density and showed no significant alterations in cell control complexes at this point. Yet, at an elevated density the Ras-transformed cells ceased to proliferate and entered a quiescent...... response to contact inhibition, a separate back-up mechanism enforced cell cycle arrest at higher cell density....

  17. Durability of Low Platinum Fuel Cells Operating at High Power Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polevaya, Olga [Nuvera Fuel Cells Inc.; Blanchet, Scott [Nuvera Fuel Cells Inc.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab; Borup, Rod [Los-Alamos National Lab; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los-Alamos National Lab

    2014-03-19

    Understanding and improving the durability of cost-competitive fuel cell stacks is imperative to successful deployment of the technology. Stacks will need to operate well beyond today’s state-of-the-art rated power density with very low platinum loading in order to achieve the cost targets set forth by DOE ($15/kW) and ultimately be competitive with incumbent technologies. An accelerated cost-reduction path presented by Nuvera focused on substantially increasing power density to address non-PGM material costs as well as platinum. The study developed a practical understanding of the degradation mechanisms impacting durability of fuel cells with low platinum loading (≤0.2mg/cm2) operating at high power density (≥1.0W/cm2) and worked out approaches for improving the durability of low-loaded, high-power stack designs. Of specific interest is the impact of combining low platinum loading with high power density operation, as this offers the best chance of achieving long-term cost targets. A design-of-experiments approach was utilized to reveal and quantify the sensitivity of durability-critical material properties to high current density at two levels of platinum loading (the more conventional 0.45 mgPt.cm–1 and the much lower 0.2 mgPt.cm–2) across several cell architectures. We studied the relevance of selected component accelerated stress tests (AST) to fuel cell operation in power producing mode. New stress tests (NST) were designed to investigate the sensitivity to the addition of electrical current on the ASTs, along with combined humidity and load cycles and, eventually, relate to the combined city/highway drive cycle. Changes in the cathode electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and average oxygen partial pressure on the catalyst layer with aging under AST and NST protocols were compared based on the number of completed cycles. Studies showed elevated sensitivity of Pt growth to the potential limits and the initial particle size distribution. The ECSA loss

  18. Feeding strategies enhance high cell density cultivation and protein expression in milliliter scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Georg; Janzen, Nils H; Bendig, Christoph; Römer, Lin; Kaufmann, Klaus; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Miniature bioreactors under parallel fed-batch operations are not only useful screening tools for bioprocess development but also provide a suitable basis for eventual scale-up. In this study, three feeding strategies were investigated: besides the established intermittent feeding by a liquid handler, an optimized microfluidic device and a new enzymatic release system were applied for parallel fed-batch cultivation of Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) and BL21(DE3) strains in stirred-tank bioreactors on a 10 mL scale. Lower fluctuation in dissolved oxygen (DO) and higher optical densities were measured in fed-batch processes applying the microfluidic device or the enzymatic glucose/fructose release system (conversion of intermittently added sucrose by an invertase), but no difference in dry cell weights (DCW) were observed. With all three feeding strategies high cell densities were realized on a milliliter scale with final optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600 ) of 114-133 and final DCW concentrations of 69-70 g L(-1) . The effect of feeding strategies on the expression of two heterologous proteins was investigated. Whereas no impact was observed on the expression of the spider silk protein eADF4(C16), the fluorescence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) was reproducibly lower, if an intermittent glucose feed was applied. Thus, the impact of feeding strategy on expression is strongly dependent on the E. coli strain and/or expressed protein. As a completely continuous feed supply is difficult to realize in miniature bioreactors, the enzymatic release approach from this study can be easily applied in all microfluidic system to reduce fluctuations of glucose supply and DO concentrations. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Tailoring the rate-sensitivity of low density polyurea foams through cell wall aperture size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, B. J.; Kingstedt, O. T.; Crum, R.; Gamez, C.; Gupta, V.

    2017-06-01

    The plateau stress and energy absorption of low density (≤300 kg/m3) polyurea (PU) foams and expanded polystyrene (EPS) were measured at deformation rates ranging from 0.004 s-1 to 5000 s-1. Low (≤10-1 s-1) strain rate testing was performed using an Instron load frame, intermediate (101-102 s-1) strain rates using a drop-weight impact tower, and high (≥103 s-1) strain rate conditions using a modified split-Hopkinson pressure bar. The plateau stress and energy absorption of low density PU foams exhibit a strong rate dependence across all deformation rates. This result has been previously unreported for low density polymer foams under low and intermediate strain rates. The strain rate sensitivity of PU foams was found to be strongly dependent on cell size for low strain rates and cell wall aperture size for intermediate and high strain rates. EPS type foam, however, remained nearly insensitive to strain rate. At low and intermediate strain rates, the plastic crushing in the EPS and the high plateau stress yield a much higher energy absorption capability than the viscoelastic dissipation in the PU foams. However, PU foams were found to display similar energy absorption properties as EPS based foams under high strain rates. Thus, controlling the strain rate sensitivity of PU foams through aperture diameter can lead to an increase in energy absorption properties at high strain rates, while simultaneously maintaining the peak stress below certain injury thresholds. Additionally, unlike EPS, which undergo plastic crushing after first impact, flexible polyurea foams will recover fully after each impact and thus will have multiple hit capabilities. This will allow these materials to have a wide range of applications, in advance body armors and protective headgears to use in low-cost protection systems for a wide range of military platforms, civilian, and space applications.

  20. Implementation of a triple Gaussian beam model with subdivision and redefinition against density heterogeneities in treatment planning for scanned carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.; Hara, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Fukahori, M.; Nakao, M.; Shirai, T.

    2014-09-01

    Challenging issues in treatment planning for scanned carbon-ion (C-ion) therapy are (i) accurate calculation of dose distribution, including the contribution of large angle-scattered fragments, (ii) reduction in the memory space required to store the dose kernel of individual pencil beams and (iii) shortening of computation time for dose optimization and calculation. To calculate the dose contribution from fragments, we modeled the transverse dose profile of the scanned C-ion beam with the superposition of three Gaussian distributions. The development of pencil beams belonging to the first Gaussian component was calculated analytically based on the Fermi-Eyges theory, while those belonging to the second and third components were transported empirically using the measured beam widths in a water phantom. To reduce the memory space for the kernels, we stored doses only in the regions of interest considered in the dose optimization. For the final dose calculation within the patient’s whole body, we applied a pencil beam redefinition algorithm. With these techniques, the triple Gaussian beam model can be applied not only to final dose calculation but also to dose optimization in treatment planning for scanned C-ion therapy. To verify the model, we made treatment plans for a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous head phantom. The planned doses agreed with the measurements within ±2% of the target dose in both phantoms, except for the doses at the periphery of the target with a high dose gradient. To estimate the memory space and computation time reduction with these techniques, we made a treatment plan for a bone sarcoma case with a target volume of 1.94 l. The memory space for the kernel and the computation time for final dose calculation were reduced to 1/22 and 1/100 of those without the techniques, respectively. Computation with the triple Gaussian beam model using the proposed techniques is rapid, accurate and applicable to dose optimization and

  1. Mast Cell Density in Oral Lesions using Metachromatic Stains: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Chirappurath Natesan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast Cells (MCs are bone marrow derived granular cells, distributed throughout the body near blood vessels, nerves and subepithelial areas. MC granules stain by basic dyes but are most readily demonstrated by metachromatic dyes such as toluidine blue and azure A. Aim: This study focuses on evaluating and comparing the count of MCs by identification and staining of these cells by azure A with toluidine blue as a control, in normal oral mucosa and in various other oral pathologies. Materials and Methods: Five cases each of Normal Oral Mucosa (NOM, Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia (IFH, Oral Pyogenic Granuloma (OPG, Oral Lichen Planus (OLP and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC were stained with 1% toluidine blue and azure A. Results: Mean MC count was higher in all four lesions when compared to normal oral mucosa with both stains. OLP exhibited the maximum amount of mean MC count when compared to other pathologies under study. With all four lesions, toluidine blue exhibited higher number of MC density (count/high power field compared to azure A. Conclusion: Higher count of MCs was noticed in all four lesions indicating a possible role of MCs in their pathogenesis either directly or indirectly. Also, the number of degranulated MCs was more in OLP followed by OSCC, IFH and OPG.

  2. A dense voltage-mode Josephson memory cell insensitive to systematic variations in critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, P.; Van Duzer, T.

    1985-01-01

    A destructive read-out (DRO) memory cell using three Josephson junctions has been devised whose operation depends only on the ratio of critical currents and application of the proper read/write voltages. The effects of run-to-run and across-thewafer variations in I /SUB c/ are minimized since all three junctions for a given cell are quite close to each other. Additional advantages are: immunity from flux trapping, high circuit density, and fast switching. Since destructive read-out is generally undesirable, a self-rewriting scheme is necessary. Rows and columns of cells with drivers and sense circuits, as well as small memory arrays and decoders have been simulated on SPICE. Power dissipation of cells and bias circuits for a 1K-bit RAM is estimated at about 2 mW. Inclusion of peripheral circuitry raises this by as much as a factor of five depending on the driving scheme and speed desired. Estimated access time is appreciably less than a nanosecond. Preliminary experimental investigations are reported

  3. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-01-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO 2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO 2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices

  4. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian, E-mail: tajbakhshj@cshs.org [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Stefanovski, Darko [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19348 (United States); Tang, George [Chromatin Biology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Wawrowsky, Kolja [Translational Cytomics Group, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H. [Department of Surgery and UF Health Comprehensive Transplant Center, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32608 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  5. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Stefanovski, Darko; Tang, George; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC + /5mC − , 5hmC + /5mC + , and 5hmC − /5mC + cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC + /5mC + cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably delineating chromatin domains in

  6. Variable EBV DNA Load Distributions and Heterogeneous EBV mRNA Expression Patterns in the Circulation of Solid Organ versus Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Greijer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma and cellular blood compartments of stem cell transplant (SCT; n=5, solid organ transplant recipients (SOT; n=15, and SOT having chronic elevated EBV-DNA load (n=12. In SCT, EBV DNA was heterogeneously distributed, either in plasma or leukocytes or both. In SOT, EBV DNA load was always cell associated, predominantly in B cells, but occasionally in T cells (CD4 and CD8 or monocytes. All SCT with cell-associated EBV DNA showed BARTs and EBNA1 expression, while LMP1 and LMP2 mRNA was found in 1 and 3 cases, respectively. In SOT, expression of BARTs was detected in all leukocyte samples. LMP2 and EBNA1 mRNA was found in 5/15 and 2/15, respectively, but LMP1 mRNA in only 1, coinciding with severe PTLD and high EBV DNA. Conclusion: EBV DNA is differently distributed between white cells and plasma in SOT versus SCT. EBV RNA profiling in blood is feasible and may have added value for understanding pathogenic virus activity in patients with elevated EBV-DNA.

  7. Chromogranin A cell density in the large intestine of Asian and European patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Asia show distinctive differences from those in the western world. The gastrointestinal endocrine cells appear to play an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. The present study aimed at studying the density of chromogranin A (CgA) cells in the large intestine of Thai and Norwegian IBS patients. Thirty Thai IBS patients and 20 control subjects, and 47 Norwegian IBS patients and 20 control subjects were included. A standard colonoscopy was performed in both the patients and controls, and biopsy samples were taken from the colon and the rectum. The biopsy samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunostained for CgA. The density of CgA cells was determined by computerized image analysis. In the colon and rectum, the CgA cell densities were far higher in both IBS and healthy Thai subjects than in Norwegians. The colonic CgA cell density was lower in Norwegian IBS patients than in controls, but did not differ between Thai IBS patients and controls. In the rectum, the CgA cell densities in both Thai and Norwegian patients did not differ from those of controls. The higher densities of CgA cells in Thai subjects than Norwegians may be explained by a higher exposure to infections at childhood and the development of a broad immune tolerance, by differences in the intestinal microbiota, and/or differing diet habits. The normal CgA cell density in Thai IBS patients in contrast to that of Norwegians may be due to differences in pathophysiology.

  8. Differential satellite cell density of type I and II fibres with lifelong endurance running in old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Karlsen, A; Couppé, C

    2014-01-01

    between these variables were determined. RESULTS: In O-Un and O-Tr, type II fibres were smaller and contained fewer satellite cells than type I fibres. However, when expressed relative to fibre area, the difference in satellite cell content between fibre types was eliminated in O-Tr, but not O...... the satellite cell pool and (ii) is associated with a similar density of satellite cells in type I and II fibres despite a failure to preserve the equal fibre type distribution of satellite cells observed in young individuals. Taken together, these data reveal a differential regulation of satellite cell content...

  9. Murine bone marrow Lin⁻Sca⁻1⁺CD45⁻ very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells are heterogeneous population lacking Oct-4A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Szade

    Full Text Available Murine very small embryonic-like (VSEL cells, defined by the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- phenotype and small size, were described as pluripotent cells and proposed to be the most primitive hematopoietic precursors in adult bone marrow. Although their isolation and potential application rely entirely on flow cytometry, the immunophenotype of VSELs has not been extensively characterized. Our aim was to analyze the possible heterogeneity of Lin(-Sca(+CD45(- population and investigate the extent to which VSELs characteristics may overlap with that of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. The study evidenced that murine Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(- population was heterogeneous in terms of c-Kit and KDR expression. Accordingly, the c-Kit(+KDR(-, c-Kit(-KDR(+, and c-Kit(-KDR(- subpopulations could be distinguished, while c-Kit(+KDR(+ events were very rare. The c-Kit(+KDR(- subset contained almost solely small cells, meeting the size criterion of VSELs, in contrast to relatively bigger c-Kit(-KDR(+ cells. The c-Kit(-KDR(-FSC(low subset was highly enriched in Annexin V-positive, apoptotic cells, hence omitted from further analysis. Importantly, using qRT-PCR, we evidenced lack of Oct-4A and Oct-4B mRNA expression either in whole adult murine bone marrow or in the sorted of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low population, even by single-cell qRT-PCR. We also found that the Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-c-Kit(+ subset did not exhibit hematopoietic potential in a single cell-derived colony in vitro assay, although it comprised the Sca-1(+c-Kit(+Lin(- (SKL CD34(-CD45(-CD105(+ cells, expressing particular HSC markers. Co-culture of Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low with OP9 cells did not induce hematopoietic potential. Further investigation revealed that SKL CD45(-CD105(+ subset consisted of early apoptotic cells with fragmented chromatin, and could be contaminated with nuclei expelled from erythroblasts. Concluding, murine bone marrow Lin(-Sca-1(+CD45(-FSC(low cells are

  10. Increased bronchial density of CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in occupational asthma: relationship to current smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjåheim, T B; Bjørtuft, Ø; Drabløs, P A; Kongerud, J; Halstensen, T S

    2013-05-01

    To identify activated T cell subset in the asthmatic bronchia, we developed a triple-colour immunohistofluorescence labelling technique on cryo-section to discriminate activated CD4+CD25+ T cells, (effector T cells) from Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Additional coexpression of activation and proliferation markers was also examined in situ. Bronchial biopsies were taken from 20 aluminium potroom workers (12 smokers) with asthma (>12% reversibility), 15 non-asthmatic potroom workers (7 smokers) and 10 non-smoking, non-exposed controls. Non-smoking asthmatics had significantly higher subepithelial density of both Tregs, effector T cells, activated (HLA-DR+) CD8+ and activated CD4+ T cells. Moreover, both Tregs, effector T cells and CD8+ T cells proliferated in the non-smoking asthmatics, only. Although smoking asthmatics had no asthma-associated increase in bronchial T cell, both had a significantly increase in effector T cell to Treg ratios. The significantly increased bronchial density of Tregs, effector T cells, proliferative T cells and activated CD8+ T cells in non-smoking asthmatics clearly showed that both the effector T cells and the inhibitory Treg system were activated in asthma. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Interleukin 21 therapy increases the density of tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells and inhibits the growth of syngeneic tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Thygesen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    infiltrating T cells. We treated mice bearing established subcutaneous B16 melanomas or RenCa renal cell carcinomas with intraperitoneal (i.p.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) IL-21 protein therapy and subsequently scored the densities of tumor infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells by immunohistochemistry. Whereas.......c. administration, which could account for the apparent increase in anti-tumor activity. Specific depletion of CD8(+) T cells with monoclonal antibodies completely abrogated the anti-tumor activity, whereas NK1.1(+) cell depletion did not affect tumor growth. In accordance, both routes of IL-21 administration...... significantly increased the density of tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in both B16 and RenCa tumors; and in the RenCa model s.c. administration of IL-21 led to a significantly higher density of tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T cells compared to i.p. administration. The densities of CD4(+) T cells were unchanged...

  12. Automated computation of arbor densities: a step toward identifying neuronal cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar eSümbül

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The shape and position of a neuron convey information regarding its molecular and functional identity. The identification of cell types from structure, a classic method, relies on the time-consuming step of arbor tracing. However, as genetic tools and imaging methods make data-driven approaches to neuronal circuit analysis feasible, the need for automated processing increases. Here, we first establish that mouse retinal ganglion cell types can be as precise about distributing their arbor volumes across the inner plexiform layer as they are about distributing the skeletons of the arbors. Then, we describe an automated approach to computing the spatial distribution of the dendritic arbors, or arbor density, with respect to a global depth coordinate based on this observation. Our method involves three-dimensional reconstruction of neuronal arbors by a supervised machine learning algorithm, post-processing of the enhanced stacks to remove somata and isolate the neuron of interest, and registration of neurons to each other using automatically detected arbors of the starburst amacrine interneurons as fiducial markers. In principle, this method could be generalizable to other structures of the CNS, provided that they allow sparse labeling of the cells and contain a reliable axis of spatial reference.

  13. Impact of Pancreatic Rat Islet Density on Cell Survival during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Brotons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In bioartificial pancreases (BP, the number of islets needed to restore normoglycaemia in the diabetic patient is critical. However, the confinement of a high quantity of islets in a limited space may impact islet survival, particularly in regard to the low oxygen partial pressure (PO2 in such environments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of islet number in a confined space under hypoxia on cell survival. Rat islets were seeded at three different concentrations (150, 300, and 600 Islet Equivalents (IEQ/cm2 and cultured in normal atmospheric pressure (160 mmHg as well as hypoxic conditions (15 mmHg for 24 hours. Cell viability, function, hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression, and cytokine secretion were then assessed. Notably, hypoxia appeared to induce a decrease in viability and increasing islet density exacerbated the observed increase in cellular apoptosis as well as the loss of function. These changes were also associated with an increase in inflammatory gene transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that when a high number of islets are confined to a small space under hypoxia, cell viability and function are significantly impacted. Thus, in order to improve islet survival in this environment during transplantation, oxygenation is of critical importance.

  14. Exceptional power density and stability at intermediate temperatures in protonic ceramic fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sihyuk; Kucharczyk, Chris J.; Liang, Yangang; Zhang, Xiaohang; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ji, Ho-Il; Haile, Sossina M.

    2018-02-01

    Over the past several years, important strides have been made in demonstrating protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs). Such fuel cells offer the potential of environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electric power generation. However, their power outputs have lagged behind predictions based on their high electrolyte conductivities. Here we overcome PCFC performance and stability challenges by employing a high-activity cathode, PrBa0.5Sr0.5Co1.5Fe0.5O5+δ (PBSCF), in combination with a chemically stable electrolyte, BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.1Yb0.1O3 (BZCYYb4411). We deposit a thin dense interlayer film of the cathode material onto the electrolyte surface to mitigate contact resistance, an approach which is made possible by the proton permeability of PBSCF. The peak power densities of the resulting fuel cells exceed 500 mW cm-2 at 500 °C, while also offering exceptional, long-term stability under CO2.

  15. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity affects the density of mast cells in abdominal fat depots and lymph nodes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Mehmet M; Nayer, Behzad; Walford, Eric C; Johnson, Kevin B; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Reiser, Jochen; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor; Ortega, Luis M; Nayer, Ali

    2012-02-07

    Mast cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we explored the effects of leptin deficiency-induced obesity on the density of mast cells in metabolic (abdominal fat depots, skeletal muscle, and liver) and lymphatic (abdominal lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus) organs. Fourteen-week-old male leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and their controls fed a standard chow were studied. Tissue sections were stained with toluidine blue to determine the density of mast cells. CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis was also carried out. Furthermore, mast cells containing immunoreactive tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance, were identified by immunostaining. ob/ob mice demonstrated adiposity and insulin resistance. In abdominal fat depots, mast cells were distributed differentially. While most prevalent in subcutaneous fat in controls, mast cells were most abundant in epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by a 20-fold increase in the density of mast cells in epididymal fat, but a 13-fold decrease in subcutaneous fat. This finding was confirmed by CD117/c-kit protein expression analysis. Furthermore, we found that a subset of mast cells in epididymal and subcutaneous fat were immunoreactive for TNF-α. The proportion of mast cells immunoreactive for TNF-α was higher in epididymal than in subcutaneous fat in both ob/ob and control mice. Mast cells were also distributed differentially in retroperitoneal, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes. In both ob/ob mice and lean controls, mast cells were more prevalent in retroperitoneal than in mesenteric and inguinal lymph nodes. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity was accompanied by increased mast cell density in all lymph node stations examined. No significant difference in the density of mast cells in skeletal muscle, liver, spleen, and thymus was noted between ob/ob and control mice. This st