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Sample records for cell dendritic spines

  1. Motor learning induces plastic changes in Purkinje cell dendritic spines in the rat cerebellum.

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    González-Tapia, D; González-Ramírez, M M; Vázquez-Hernández, N; González-Burgos, I

    2017-12-14

    The paramedian lobule of the cerebellum is involved in learning to correctly perform motor skills through practice. Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that regulate excitatory synaptic stimulation. We studied plastic changes occurring in the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells from the paramedian lobule of rats during motor learning. Adult male rats were trained over a 6-day period using an acrobatic motor learning paradigm; the density and type of dendritic spines were determined every day during the study period using a modified version of the Golgi method. The learning curve reflected a considerable decrease in the number of errors made by rats as the training period progressed. We observed more dendritic spines on days 2 and 6, particularly more thin spines on days 1, 3, and 6, fewer mushroom spines on day 3, fewer stubby spines on day 1, and more thick spines on days 4 and 6. The initial stage of motor learning may be associated with fast processing of the underlying synaptic information combined with an apparent "silencing" of memory consolidation processes, based on the regulation of the neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines.

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    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  3. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

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    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  4. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

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    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general.

  5. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spine...... formation. Syndecan-2 is tyrosine phosphorylated and forms a complex with EphB2 in mouse brain. Dominant-negative inhibition of endogenous EphB receptor activities blocks clustering of endogenous syndecan-2 and normal spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. This is the first evidence that Eph...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  6. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

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    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  7. FGF21 improves cognition by restored synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine density, brain mitochondrial function and cell apoptosis in obese-insulin resistant male rats.

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    Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Tanajak, Pongpan; Kerdphoo, Sasiwan; Satjaritanun, Pattarapong; Wang, Xiaojie; Liang, Guang; Li, Xiaokun; Jiang, Chao; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone which exerts beneficial effects on metabolic regulation in obese and diabetic models. However, the effect of FGF21 on cognition in obese-insulin resistant rats has not been investigated. We hypothesized that FGF21 prevented cognitive decline in obese-insulin resistant rats by improving hippocampal synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine density, brain mitochondrial function and brain FGF21 signaling as well as decreasing brain cell apoptosis. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into two groups, and received either a normal diet (ND) (n=6) or a high fat diet (HFD) (n=12) for 12weeks. At week 13, the HFD-fed rats were subdivided into two subgroups (n=6/subgroup) to receive either vehicle or recombinant human FGF21 (0.1mg/kg/day) for four weeks. ND-fed rats were given vehicle for four weeks. At the end of the treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, pro-inflammatory markers, brain mitochondrial function, cell apoptosis, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, dendritic spine density and brain FGF21 signaling were determined. The results showed that vehicle-treated HFD-fed rats developed obese-insulin resistance and cognitive decline with impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity, decreased dendritic spine density, brain mitochondrial dysfunction and increased brain cell apoptosis. Impaired brain FGF 21 signaling was found in these obese-insulin resistant rats. FGF21-treated obese-insulin resistant rats had improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, increased hippocampal synaptic plasticity, increased dendritic spine density, restored brain mitochondrial function, attenuated brain cells apoptosis and increased brain FGF21 signaling, leading to a prevention of cognitive decline. These findings suggest that FGF21 treatment exerts neuroprotection in obese-insulin resistant rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions between estradiol, BDNF and dendritic spines in promoting memory.

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    Luine, V; Frankfurt, M

    2013-06-03

    Several lines of evidence have converged to indicate that memory formation involves plasticity of dendritic spines in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the hippocampus. Memory varies with estrogen levels throughout the lifespan of the female. Generally, increased levels of estrogen are related to greater dendritic spine density on pyramidal cells in the PFC and the hippocampus and to improved memory function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a growth factor which increases dendritic spines and enhances memory function. Estrogens increase BDNF levels in the PFC and the hippocampus. In the present review we provide evidence that estradiol and BDNF may work in concert to enhance cognition. In adult females, fluctuations in recognition memory following ovariectomy and estradiol replacement, during the estrous cycle, in pregnancy and with aging are accompanied by similar changes in circulating estradiol, BDNF levels and spine density alterations in the PFC and the hippocampus. In addition, both estradiol and BDNF induce spine plasticity via rapid membrane effects and slower transcriptional regulation via the CREB pathway. Moreover, estradiol increases BDNF levels through action on nuclear receptors. While the exact mechanism(s) for the influence of estrogens and BDNF on memory remain unclear, this combination may provide the basis for new and more effective strategies for treating age-related and neurodegenerative memory loss. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and

  10. Actin Remodeling and Polymerization Forces Control Dendritic Spine Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Miermans, Karsten; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (re)configuration of the neuronal network during early development, learning and memory formation, and has been conjectured to be part of the machinery that encodes these processes at the scale of individual neuronal connections. It is well established that the structural plasticity of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present...

  11. Measuring F-actin properties in dendritic spines

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    Mikko eKoskinen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, numerous studies have demonstrated that the actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the control of dendritic spine shape. Synaptic stimulation rapidly changes the actin dynamics and many actin regulators have been shown to play roles in neuron functionality. Accordingly, defects in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons have been implicated in memory disorders. Due to the small size of spines, it is difficult to detect changes in the actin structures in dendritic spines by conventional light microscopy imaging. Instead, to know how tightly actin filaments are bundled together, and how fast the filaments turnover, we need to use advanced microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PAGFP fluorescence decay and fluorescence anisotropy. Fluorescence anisotropy, which measures the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET between two GFP fluorophores, has been proposed as a method to measure the level of actin polymerization. Here, we propose a novel idea that fluorescence anisotropy could be more suitable to study the level of actin filament bundling instead of actin polymerization. We validate the method in U2OS cell line where the actin structures can be clearly distinguished and apply the method to analyze how actin filament organization in dendritic spines changes during neuronal maturation. In addition to fluorescence anisotropy validation, we take a critical look at the properties and limitations of FRAP and PAGFP fluorescence decay methods and offer our proposals for the analysis methods for these approaches. These three methods complement each other, each providing additional information about actin dynamics and organization in dendritic spines.

  12. Dendritic spine changes associated with normal aging.

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    Dickstein, D L; Weaver, C M; Luebke, J I; Hof, P R

    2013-10-22

    Given the rapid rate of population aging and the increased incidence of cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases with advanced age, it is important to ascertain the determinants that result in cognitive impairment. It is also important to note that much of the aged population exhibit 'successful' cognitive aging, in which cognitive impairment is minimal. One main goal of normal aging studies is to distinguish the neural changes that occur in unsuccessful (functionally impaired) subjects from those of successful (functionally unimpaired) subjects. In this review, we present some of the structural adaptations that neurons and spines undergo throughout normal aging and discuss their likely contributions to electrophysiological properties and cognition. Structural changes of neurons and dendritic spines during aging, and the functional consequences of such changes, remain poorly understood. Elucidating the structural and functional synaptic age-related changes that lead to cognitive impairment may lead to the development of drug treatments that can restore or protect neural circuits and mediate cognition and successful aging. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The polarity protein Angiomotin p130 controls dendritic spine maturation.

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    Wigerius, Michael; Quinn, Dylan; Diab, Antonios; Clattenburg, Leanne; Kolar, Annette; Qi, Jiansong; Krueger, Stefan R; Fawcett, James P

    2018-01-09

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for the structural changes in dendritic spines that lead to the formation of new synapses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying spine formation are well characterized, the events that drive spine maturation during development are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that Angiomotin (AMOT-130) is necessary for spine stabilization. AMOT-130 is enriched in mature dendritic spines and functions to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton by coupling F-actin to postsynaptic protein scaffolds. These functions of AMOT are transiently restricted during postnatal development by phosphorylation imposed by the kinase Lats1. Our study proposes that AMOT-130 is essential for normal spine morphogenesis and identifies Lats1 as an upstream regulator in this process. Moreover, our findings may link AMOT-130 loss and the related spine defects to neurological disorders. © 2018 Wigerius et al.

  14. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Javier eDeFelipe

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it show...

  15. Sodium pump organization in dendritic spines.

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    Blom, Hans; Bernhem, Kristoffer; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in fluorescence imaging with the invention of several super-resolution microscopy modalities (e.g., PALM/STORM and STED) has opened up the possibility of deciphering molecular distributions on the nanoscale. In our quest to better elucidate postsynaptic protein distribution in dendritic spines, we have applied these nanoscopy methods, where generated results could help improve our understanding of neuronal functions. In particular, we have investigated the principal energy transformer in the brain, i.e., the [Formula: see text]-ATPase (or sodium pump), an essential protein responsible for maintaining resting membrane potential and a major controller of intracellular ion homeostasis. In these investigations, we have focused on estimates of protein amount, giving assessments of how variations may depend on labeling strategies, sample analysis, and choice of nanoscopic imaging method, concluding that all can be critical factors for quantification. We present a comparison of these results and discuss the influences this may have for homeostatic sodium regulation in neurons and energy consumption.

  16. MIM-Induced Membrane Bending Promotes Dendritic Spine Initiation.

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    Saarikangas, Juha; Kourdougli, Nazim; Senju, Yosuke; Chazal, Genevieve; Segerstråle, Mikael; Minkeviciene, Rimante; Kuurne, Jaakko; Mattila, Pieta K; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Becker, Lore; Racz, Ildikó; Hans, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; von Ossowski, Lotta; Taira, Tomi; Lappalainen, Pekka; Rivera, Claudio; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2015-06-22

    Proper morphogenesis of neuronal dendritic spines is essential for the formation of functional synaptic networks. However, it is not known how spines are initiated. Here, we identify the inverse-BAR (I-BAR) protein MIM/MTSS1 as a nucleator of dendritic spines. MIM accumulated to future spine initiation sites in a PIP2-dependent manner and deformed the plasma membrane outward into a proto-protrusion via its I-BAR domain. Unexpectedly, the initial protrusion formation did not involve actin polymerization. However, PIP2-dependent activation of Arp2/3-mediated actin assembly was required for protrusion elongation. Overexpression of MIM increased the density of dendritic protrusions and suppressed spine maturation. In contrast, MIM deficiency led to decreased density of dendritic protrusions and larger spine heads. Moreover, MIM-deficient mice displayed altered glutamatergic synaptic transmission and compatible behavioral defects. Collectively, our data identify an important morphogenetic pathway, which initiates spine protrusions by coupling phosphoinositide signaling, direct membrane bending, and actin assembly to ensure proper synaptogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dendritic spines provide cognitive resilience against Alzheimer's disease.

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    Boros, Benjamin D; Greathouse, Kelsey M; Gentry, Erik G; Curtis, Kendall A; Birchall, Elizabeth L; Gearing, Marla; Herskowitz, Jeremy H

    2017-10-01

    Neuroimaging and other biomarker assays suggest that the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) begin years prior to clinical dementia onset. However, some 30 to 50% of older individuals who harbor AD pathology do not become symptomatic in their lifetime. It is hypothesized that such individuals exhibit cognitive resilience that protects against AD dementia. We hypothesized that in cases with AD pathology, structural changes in dendritic spines would distinguish individuals who had or did not have clinical dementia. We compared dendritic spines within layer II and III pyramidal neuron dendrites in Brodmann area 46 dorsolateral prefrontal cortex using the Golgi-Cox technique in 12 age-matched pathology-free controls, 8 controls with AD pathology (CAD), and 21 AD cases. We used highly optimized methods to trace impregnated dendrites from bright-field microscopy images that enabled accurate 3-dimensional digital reconstruction of dendritic structure for morphologic analyses. Spine density was similar among control and CAD cases but was reduced significantly in AD. Thin and mushroom spines were reduced significantly in AD compared to CAD brains, whereas stubby spine density was decreased significantly in CAD and AD compared to controls. Increased spine extent distinguished CAD cases from controls and AD. Linear regression analysis of all cases indicated that spine density was not associated with neuritic plaque score but did display negative correlation with Braak staging. These observations provide cellular evidence to support the hypothesis that dendritic spine plasticity is a mechanism of cognitive resilience that protects older individuals with AD pathology from developing dementia. Ann Neurol 2017;82:602-614. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  18. Dendritic spine dysgenesis contributes to hyperreflexia after spinal cord injury

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    Bandaru, Samira P.; Liu, Shujun; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperreflexia and spasticity are chronic complications in spinal cord injury (SCI), with limited options for safe and effective treatment. A central mechanism in spasticity is hyperexcitability of the spinal stretch reflex, which presents symptomatically as a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes and exaggerated tendon jerks. In this study we tested the hypothesis that dendritic spine remodeling within motor reflex pathways in the spinal cord contributes to H-reflex dysfunction indicative of spasticity after contusion SCI. Six weeks after SCI in adult Sprague-Dawley rats, we observed changes in dendritic spine morphology on α-motor neurons below the level of injury, including increased density, altered spine shape, and redistribution along dendritic branches. These abnormal spine morphologies accompanied the loss of H-reflex rate-dependent depression (RDD) and increased ratio of H-reflex to M-wave responses (H/M ratio). Above the level of injury, spine density decreased compared with below-injury spine profiles and spine distributions were similar to those for uninjured controls. As expected, there was no H-reflex hyperexcitability above the level of injury in forelimb H-reflex testing. Treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-specific inhibitor, decreased the presence of abnormal dendritic spine profiles below the level of injury, restored RDD of the H-reflex, and decreased H/M ratios in SCI animals. These findings provide evidence for a novel mechanistic relationship between abnormal dendritic spine remodeling in the spinal cord motor system and reflex dysfunction in SCI. PMID:25505110

  19. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

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    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home

  20. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

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    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  1. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

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    Nuria Domínguez-Iturza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  2. Incorrect dosage of IQSEC2, a known intellectual disability and epilepsy gene, disrupts dendritic spine morphogenesis

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    Hinze, S J; Jackson, M R; Lie, S; Jolly, L; Field, M; Barry, S C; Harvey, R J; Shoubridge, C

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity associated with intellectual disability (ID), specific learning disabilities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism and epilepsy. The intelligence quotient (IQ) motif and SEC7 domain containing protein 2 gene (IQSEC2) is located on the X-chromosome and harbors mutations that contribute to non-syndromic ID with and without early-onset seizure phenotypes in both sexes. Although IQ and Sec7 domain mutations lead to partial loss of IQSEC2 enzymatic activity, the in vivo pathogenesis resulting from these mutations is not known. Here we reveal that IQSEC2 has a key role in dendritic spine morphology. Partial loss-of-function mutations were modeled using a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach, which achieved a 57% knockdown of Iqsec2 expression in primary hippocampal cell cultures from mice. Investigating gross morphological parameters after 8 days of in vitro culture (8DIV) identified a 32% reduction in primary axon length, in contrast to a 27% and 31% increase in the number and complexity of dendrites protruding from the cell body, respectively. This increase in dendritic complexity and spread was carried through dendritic spine development, with a 34% increase in the number of protrusions per dendritic segment compared with controls at 15DIV. Although the number of dendritic spines had normalized by 21DIV, a reduction was noted in the number of immature spines. In contrast, when modeling increased dosage, overexpression of wild-type IQSEC2 led to neurons with shorter axons that were more compact and displayed simpler dendritic branching. Disturbances to dendritic morphology due to knockdown of Iqsec2 were recapitulated in neurons from Iqsec2 knockout mice generated in our laboratory using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. These observations provide evidence of dosage sensitivity for IQSEC2, which normally escapes X-inactivation in females, and links these disturbances in expression to alterations in

  3. Spatial distribution of Na+-K+-ATPase in dendritic spines dissected by nanoscale superresolution STED microscopy

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    Bondar Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Na+,K+-ATPase plays an important role for ion homeostasis in virtually all mammalian cells, including neurons. Despite this, there is as yet little known about the isoform specific distribution in neurons. Results With help of superresolving stimulated emission depletion microscopy the spatial distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase in dendritic spines of cultured striatum neurons have been dissected. The found compartmentalized distribution provides a strong evidence for the confinement of neuronal Na+,K+-ATPase (α3 isoform in the postsynaptic region of the spine. Conclusions A compartmentalized distribution may have implications for the generation of local sodium gradients within the spine and for the structural and functional interaction between the sodium pump and other synaptic proteins. Superresolution microscopy has thus opened up a new perspective to elucidate the nature of the physiological function, regulation and signaling role of Na+,K+-ATPase from its topological distribution in dendritic spines.

  4. In Vivo Study of Dynamics and Stability of Dendritic Spines on Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.

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    Yu-Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines undergo continuous remodeling during development of the nervous system. Their stability is essential for maintaining a functional neuronal circuit. Spine dynamics and stability of cortical excitatory pyramidal neurons have been explored extensively in mammalian animal models. However, little is known about spiny interneurons in non-mammalian vertebrate models. In the present study, neuronal morphology was visualized by single-cell electroporation. Spiny neurons were surveyed in the Xenopus tadpole brain and observed to be widely distributed in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon. DsRed- or PSD95-GFP-expressing spiny interneurons in the olfactory bulb were selected for in vivo time-lapse imaging. Dendritic protrusions were classified as filopodia, thin, stubby, or mushroom spines based on morphology. Dendritic spines on the interneurons were highly dynamic, especially the filopodia and thin spines. The stubby and mushroom spines were relatively more stable, although their stability significantly decreased with longer observation intervals. The 4 spine types exhibited diverse preferences during morphological transitions from one spine type to others. Sensory deprivation induced by severing the olfactory nerve to block the input of mitral/tufted cells had no significant effects on interneuron spine stability. Hence, a new model was established in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to explore dendritic spine dynamics in vivo.

  5. Mechanical coupling between transsynaptic N-cadherin adhesions and actin flow stabilizes dendritic spines.

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    Chazeau, Anaël; Garcia, Mikael; Czöndör, Katalin; Perrais, David; Tessier, Béatrice; Giannone, Grégory; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The morphology of neuronal dendritic spines is a critical indicator of synaptic function. It is regulated by several factors, including the intracellular actin/myosin cytoskeleton and transcellular N-cadherin adhesions. To examine the mechanical relationship between these molecular components, we performed quantitative live-imaging experiments in primary hippocampal neurons. We found that actin turnover and structural motility were lower in dendritic spines than in immature filopodia and increased upon expression of a nonadhesive N-cadherin mutant, resulting in an inverse relationship between spine motility and actin enrichment. Furthermore, the pharmacological stimulation of myosin II induced the rearward motion of actin structures in spines, showing that myosin II exerts tension on the actin network. Strikingly, the formation of stable, spine-like structures enriched in actin was induced at contacts between dendritic filopodia and N-cadherin-coated beads or micropatterns. Finally, computer simulations of actin dynamics mimicked various experimental conditions, pointing to the actin flow rate as an important parameter controlling actin enrichment in dendritic spines. Together these data demonstrate that a clutch-like mechanism between N-cadherin adhesions and the actin flow underlies the stabilization of dendritic filopodia into mature spines, a mechanism that may have important implications in synapse initiation, maturation, and plasticity in the developing brain. © 2015 Chazeau, Garcia, Czöndör, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Npas4 regulates Mdm2 and thus Dcx in experience-dependent dendritic spine development of newborn olfactory bulb interneurons.

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    Yoshihara, Sei-Ichi; Takahashi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Nobushiro; Kinoshita, Masahito; Asahina, Ryo; Kitsuki, Michiko; Tatsumi, Kana; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Hirai, Hirokazu; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Tsuboi, Akio

    2014-08-07

    Sensory experience regulates the development of various brain structures, including the cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB). Little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic spine development of OB interneurons, such as granule cells (GCs), although it is well studied in mitral/tufted cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor, Npas4, which is expressed in OB GCs immediately after sensory input and is required for dendritic spine formation. Npas4 overexpression in OB GCs increases dendritic spine density, even under sensory deprivation, and rescues reduction of dendrite spine density in the Npas4 knockout OB. Furthermore, loss of Npas4 upregulates expression of the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates a microtubule-associated protein Dcx. This leads to reduction in the dendritic spine density of OB GCs. Together, these findings suggest that Npas4 regulates Mdm2 expression to ubiquitinate and degrade Dcx during dendritic spine development in newborn OB GCs after sensory experience. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Npas4 Regulates Mdm2 and thus Dcx in Experience-Dependent Dendritic Spine Development of Newborn Olfactory Bulb Interneurons

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    Sei-ichi Yoshihara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience regulates the development of various brain structures, including the cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB. Little is known about how sensory experience regulates the dendritic spine development of OB interneurons, such as granule cells (GCs, although it is well studied in mitral/tufted cells. Here, we identify a transcription factor, Npas4, which is expressed in OB GCs immediately after sensory input and is required for dendritic spine formation. Npas4 overexpression in OB GCs increases dendritic spine density, even under sensory deprivation, and rescues reduction of dendrite spine density in the Npas4 knockout OB. Furthermore, loss of Npas4 upregulates expression of the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates a microtubule-associated protein Dcx. This leads to reduction in the dendritic spine density of OB GCs. Together, these findings suggest that Npas4 regulates Mdm2 expression to ubiquitinate and degrade Dcx during dendritic spine development in newborn OB GCs after sensory experience.

  8. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

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    Javier eDeFelipe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it show us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images.

  9. Morphological analysis of dendrites and spines by hybridization of ridge detection with twin support vector machine.

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    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Yudong; Du, Sidan; Wu, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are described as neuronal protrusions. The morphology of dendritic spines and dendrites has a strong relationship to its function, as well as playing an important role in understanding brain function. Quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines is essential to an understanding of the formation and function of the nervous system. However, highly efficient tools for the quantitative analysis of dendrites and dendritic spines are currently undeveloped. In this paper we propose a novel three-step cascaded algorithm-RTSVM- which is composed of ridge detection as the curvature structure identifier for backbone extraction, boundary location based on differences in density, the Hu moment as features and Twin Support Vector Machine (TSVM) classifiers for spine classification. Our data demonstrates that this newly developed algorithm has performed better than other available techniques used to detect accuracy and false alarm rates. This algorithm will be used effectively in neuroscience research.

  10. The influence of phospho-tau on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

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    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles. PMID:23715095

  11. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

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    Valerie T. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7, an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  12. Interaction of Cupidin/Homer2 with two actin cytoskeletal regulators, Cdc42 small GTPase and Drebrin, in dendritic spines

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    Mori Nozomu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer is a postsynaptic scaffold protein that links various synaptic signaling proteins, including the type I metabotropic glutamate receptor subunits 1α and 5, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, Shank and Cdc42 small GTPase. Overexpression of Homer induces changes in dendritic spine morphology in cultured hippocampal neurons. However, the molecular basis underpinning Homer-mediated spine morphogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the structural and functional properties of the interaction between Cupidin/Homer2 and two actin-cytoskeletal regulators, Cdc42 small GTPase and Drebrin. Results Cupidin/Homer2 interacted with activated Cdc42 small GTPase via the Cdc42-binding domain that resides around amino acid residues 191–283, within the C-terminal coiled-coil domain. We generated a Cupidin deletion mutant lacking amino acids 191–230 (CPDΔ191–230, which showed decrease Cdc42-binding ability but maintained self-multimerization ability. Cupidin suppressed Cdc42-induced filopodia-like protrusion formation in HeLa cells, whereas CPDΔ191–230 failed to do so. In cultured hippocampal neurons, Cupidin was targeted to dendritic spines, whereas CPDΔ191–230 was distributed in dendritic shafts as well as spines. Overexpression of CPDΔ191–230 decreased the number of synapses and reduced the amplitudes of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in hippocampal neurons. Cupidin interacted with a dendritic spine F-actin-binding protein, Drebrin, which possesses two Homer ligand motifs, via the N-terminal EVH-1 domain. CPDΔ191–230 overexpression decreased Drebrin clustering in the dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons. Conclusion These results indicate that Cupidin/Homer2 interacts with the dendritic spine actin regulators Cdc42 and Drebrin via its C-terminal and N-terminal domains, respectively, and that it may be involved in spine morphology and synaptic properties.

  13. More than a mere supply of monomers: G-Actin pools regulate actin dynamics in dendritic spines.

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    Schlett, Katalin

    2017-08-07

    Synaptic activity reshapes the morphology of dendritic spines via regulating F-actin arborization. In this issue, Lei et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201612042) reports a novel, G-actin-dependent regulation of actin polymerization within spine heads. They show that actin monomer levels are elevated in spines upon activity, with G-actin immobilized by the local enrichment of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3) within the spine plasma membrane. © 2017 Schlett.

  14. Impact of Dendritic Spine Preservation in Medium Spiny Neurons on Dopamine Graft Efficacy and the Expression of Dyskinesias in Parkinsonian Rats

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    Soderstrom, Katherine E.; O’Malley, Jennifer A.; Levine, Nathan D.; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Collier, Timothy J.; Steece-Collier, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine deficiency associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) results in numerous changes in striatal transmitter function and neuron morphology. Specifically, there is marked atrophy of dendrites and dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN), primary targets of inputs from nigral dopamine and cortical glutamate neurons, in advanced PD and rodent models of severe dopamine depletion. Dendritic spine loss occurs via dysregulation of intraspine Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels and can be prevented, in animal models, by administration of the calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine. The impact of MSN dendritic spine loss in the parkinsonian striatum on dopamine neuron graft therapy remains unexamined. Using unilaterally parkinsonian Sprague Dawley rats, we tested the hypothesis that MSN dendritic spine preservation through administration of nimodipine would result in improved therapeutic benefit and diminished graft-induced behavioral abnormalities in rats grafted with embryonic ventral midbrain cells. Analysis of rotational asymmetry and spontaneous forelimb use in the cylinder task found no significant effect of dendritic spine preservation in grafted rats. However, analyses of vibrissae-induced forelimb use, levodopa-induced dyskinesias, and graft-induced dyskinesias showed significant improvement in rats with dopamine grafts associated with preserved striatal dendritic spine density. Nimodipine treatment in this model did not impact dopamine graft survival but allowed for increased graft reinnervation of striatum. Taken together, these results demonstrate that even with grafting suboptimal numbers of cells, maintaining normal spine density on target MSNs results in overall superior behavioral efficacy of dopamine grafts. PMID:20105237

  15. Cdk5 Is Essential for Amphetamine to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

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    Soledad Ferreras

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant drugs of abuse increase dendritic spine density in reward centers of the brain. However, little is known about their effects in the hippocampus, where activity-dependent changes in the density of dendritic spine are associated with learning and memory. Recent reports suggest that Cdk5 plays an important role in drug addiction, but its role in psychostimulant’s effects on dendritic spines in hippocampus remain unknown. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that amphetamine increases dendritic spine density in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Primary cultures and organotypic slice cultures were used for cellular, molecular, pharmacological and biochemical analyses of the role of Cdk5/p25 in amphetamine-induced dendritic spine formation. Amphetamine (two-injection protocol increased dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons of thy1-green fluorescent protein (GFP mice, as well as in hippocampal cultured neurons and organotypic slice cultures. Either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 activity prevented the amphetamine–induced increase in dendritic spine density. Amphetamine also increased spine density in neurons overexpressing the strong Cdk5 activator p25. Finally, inhibition of calpain, the protease necessary for the conversion of p35 to p25, prevented amphetamine’s effect on dendritic spine density. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amphetamine increases the density of dendritic spine in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, we show that the Cdk5/p25 signaling and calpain activity are both necessary for the effect of amphetamine on dendritic spine density. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying psychostimulant effects provides novel and promising therapeutic approaches for the treatment of drug addiction.

  16. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

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    L Niels Cornelisse

    Full Text Available Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR, we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  17. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelisse, L Niels; van Elburg, Ronald A J; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Yuste, Rafael; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2007-10-24

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP) are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR), we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  18. Changes of dendritic spine density and morphology in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex induced by extremely low-frequency magnetic field exposure.

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    Jiaxiang Xiong

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic exposure (14 and 28 days to a 0.5 mT 50 Hz extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELM on the dendritic spine density and shape in the superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC. We performed Golgi staining to reveal the dendritic spines of the principal neurons in rats. The results showed that ELM exposure induced a decrease in the spine density in the dendrites of stellate neurons and the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons at both 14 days and 28 days, which was largely due to the loss of the thin and branched spines. The alteration in the density of mushroom and stubby spines post ELM exposure was cell-type specific. For the stellate neurons, ELM exposure slightly increased the density of stubby spines at 28 days, while it did not affect the density of mushroom spines at the same time. In the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, we observed a significant decrease in the mushroom spine density only at the later time point post ELM exposure, while the stubby spine density was reduced at 14 days and partially restored at 28 days post ELM exposure. ELM exposure-induced reduction in the spine density in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons was only observed at 28 days, reflecting the distinct vulnerability of spines in the apical and basal dendrites. Considering the changes in spine number and shape are involved in synaptic plasticity and the MEC is a part of neural network that is closely related to learning and memory, these findings may be helpful for explaining the ELM exposure-induced impairment in cognitive functions.

  19. Chronic Ethanol During Adolescence Impacts Corticolimbic Dendritic Spines and Behavior.

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    Jury, Nicholas J; Pollack, Gabrielle A; Ward, Meredith J; Bezek, Jessica L; Ng, Alexandra J; Pinard, Courtney R; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Holmes, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood is linked to alcohol drinking during adolescence, but understanding of the neural and behavioral consequences of alcohol exposure during adolescence remains incomplete. Here, we examined the neurobehavioral impact of adolescent chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) vapor exposure in mice. C57BL/6J-background Thy1-EGFP mice were CIE-exposed during adolescence or adulthood and examined, as adults, for alterations in the density and morphology of dendritic spines in infralimbic (IL) cortex, prelimbic (PL) cortex, and basolateral amygdala (BLA). In parallel, adolescent- and adult-exposed C57BL/6J mice were tested as adults for 2-bottle EtOH drinking, sensitivity to EtOH intoxication (loss of righting reflex [LORR]), blood EtOH clearance, and measures of operant responding for food reward. CIE during adolescence decreased IL neuronal spine density and increased the head width of relatively wide-head IL and BLA spines, whereas CIE decreased head width of relatively narrow-head BLA spines. Adolescents had higher EtOH consumption prior to CIE than adults, while CIE during adulthood, but not adolescence, increased EtOH consumption relative to pre-CIE baseline. CIE produced a tolerance-like decrease in LORR sensitivity to EtOH challenge, irrespective of the age at which mice received CIE exposure. Mice exposed to CIE during adolescence, but not adulthood, required more sessions than AIR controls to reliably respond for food reward on a fixed-ratio (FR) 1, but not subsequent FR3, reinforcement schedule. On a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, break point responding was higher in the adolescent- than the adult-exposed mice, regardless of CIE. Finally, footshock punishment markedly suppressed responding for reward in all groups. Exposure to CIE during adolescence altered dendritic spine density and morphology in IL and BLA neurons, in parallel with a limited set of behavioral alterations. Together, these data add to growing

  20. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

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    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  1. Biophysical model of the role of actin remodeling on dendritic spine morphology

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    Miermans, C. A.; Kusters, R. P. T.; Hoogenraad, C. C.; Storm, C.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. It is well established that the remodeling of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present a quantitative, model-based scenario for spine plasticity validated using realistic and physiologically relevant parameters. Our model points to a crucial role for the actin cytoskeleton. In the early stages of spine formation, the interplay between the elastic properties of the spine membrane and the protrusive forces generated in the actin cytoskeleton propels the incipient spine. In the maturation stage, actin remodeling in the form of the combined dynamics of branched and bundled actin is required to form mature, mushroom-like spines. Importantly, our model shows that constricting the spine-neck aids in the stabilization of mature spines, thus pointing to a role in stabilization and maintenance for additional factors such as ring-like F-actin structures. Taken together, our model provides unique insights into the fundamental role of actin remodeling and polymerization forces during spine formation and maturation. PMID:28158194

  2. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Modifications Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia

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    G. E. Saraceno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia (PA affects the synaptic function and morphological organization. In previous works, we have shown neuronal and synaptic changes in rat neostriatum subjected to hypoxia leading to long-term ubi-protein accumulation. Since F-actin is highly concentrated in dendritic spines, modifications in its organization could be related with alterations induced by hypoxia in the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study, we investigate the effects of PA on the actin cytoskeleton of hippocampal postsynaptic densities (PSD in 4-month-old rats. PSD showed an increment in their thickness and in the level of ubiquitination. Correlative fluorescence-electron microscopy photooxidation showed a decrease in the number of F-actin-stained spines in hippocampal excitatory synapses subjected to PA. Although Western Blot analysis also showed a slight decrease in β-actin in PSD in PA animals, the difference was not significant. Taken together, this data suggests that long-term actin cytoskeleton might have role in PSD alterations which would be a spread phenomenon induced by PA.

  3. Cranial irradiation alters dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus.

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    Ayanabha Chakraborti

    Full Text Available Therapeutic irradiation of the brain is a common treatment modality for brain tumors, but can lead to impairment of cognitive function. Dendritic spines are sites of excitatory synaptic transmission and changes in spine structure and number are thought to represent a morphological correlate of altered brain functions associated with hippocampal dependent learning and memory. To gain some insight into the temporal and sub region specific cellular changes in the hippocampus following brain irradiation, we investigated the effects of 10 Gy cranial irradiation on dendritic spines in young adult mice. One week or 1 month post irradiation, changes in spine density and morphology in dentate gyrus (DG granule and CA1 pyramidal neurons were quantified using Golgi staining. Our results showed that in the DG, there were significant reductions in spine density at both 1 week (11.9% and 1 month (26.9% after irradiation. In contrast, in the basal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, irradiation resulted in a significant reduction (18.7% in spine density only at 1 week post irradiation. Analysis of spine morphology showed that irradiation led to significant decreases in the proportion of mushroom spines at both time points in the DG as well as CA1 basal dendrites. The proportions of stubby spines were significantly increased in both the areas at 1 month post irradiation. Irradiation did not alter spine density in the CA1 apical dendrites, but there were significant changes in the proportion of thin and mushroom spines at both time points post irradiation. Although the mechanisms involved are not clear, these findings are the first to show that brain irradiation of young adult animals leads to alterations in dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus in a time dependent and region specific manner.

  4. Isoflurane reversibly destabilizes hippocampal dendritic spines by an actin-dependent mechanism.

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    Jimcy Platholi

    Full Text Available General anesthetics produce a reversible coma-like state through modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetic exposure can also lead to sustained cognitive dysfunction. However, the subcellular effects of anesthetics on the structure of established synapses are not known. We investigated effects of the widely used volatile anesthetic isoflurane on the structural stability of hippocampal dendritic spines, a postsynaptic structure critical to excitatory synaptic transmission in learning and memory. Exposure to clinical concentrations of isoflurane induced rapid and non-uniform shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines in mature cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage was associated with a reduction in spine F-actin concentration. Spine loss was prevented by either jasplakinolide or cytochalasin D, drugs that prevent F-actin disassembly. Isoflurane-induced spine shrinkage and loss were reversible upon isoflurane elimination. Thus, isoflurane destabilizes spine F-actin, resulting in changes to dendritic spine morphology and number. These findings support an actin-based mechanism for isoflurane-induced alterations of synaptic structure in the hippocampus. These reversible alterations in dendritic spine structure have important implications for acute anesthetic effects on excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic stability in the hippocampus, a locus for anesthetic-induced amnesia, and have important implications for anesthetic effects on synaptic plasticity.

  5. Mechanical coupling between transsynaptic N-cadherin adhesions and actin flow stabilizes dendritic spines

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    Chazeau, Ana?l; Garcia, Mikael; Cz?nd?r, Katalin; Perrais, David; Tessier, B?atrice; Giannone, Gr?gory; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of neuronal dendritic spines is a critical indicator of synaptic function. It is regulated by several factors, including the intracellular actin/myosin cytoskeleton and transcellular N-cadherin adhesions. To examine the mechanical relationship between these molecular components, we performed quantitative live-imaging experiments in primary hippocampal neurons. We found that actin turnover and structural motility were lower in dendritic spines than in immature filopodia and incr...

  6. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in superficial dorsal horn sensory neurons after spinal cord injury.

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    Cao, Xiaoyu C; Pappalardo, Laura W; Waxman, Stephen G; Tan, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a major complication of spinal cord injury, and despite aggressive efforts, this type of pain is refractory to available clinical treatment. Our previous work has demonstrated a structure-function link between dendritic spine dysgenesis on nociceptive sensory neurons in the intermediate zone, laminae IV/V, and chronic pain in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system injury models of neuropathic pain. To extend these findings, we performed a follow-up structural analysis to assess whether dendritic spine remodeling occurs on superficial dorsal horn neurons located in lamina II after spinal cord injury. Lamina II neurons are responsible for relaying deep, delocalized, often thermally associated pain commonly experienced in spinal cord injury pathologies. We analyzed dendritic spine morphometry and localization in tissue obtained from adult rats exhibiting neuropathic pain one-month following spinal cord injury. Although the total density of dendritic spines on lamina II neurons did not change after spinal cord injury, we observed an inverse relationship between the densities of thin- and mushroom-shaped spines: thin-spine density decreased while mushroom-spine density increased. These structural changes were specifically noted along dendritic branches within 150 µm from the soma, suggesting a possible adverse contribution to nociceptive circuit function. Intrathecal treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-GTPase inhibitor, significantly reduced spinal cord injury-induced changes in both thin- and mushroom-shaped dendritic spines. Overall, these observations demonstrate that dendritic spine remodeling occurs in lamina II, regulated in part by the Rac1-signaling pathway, and suggests that structural abnormalities in this spinal cord region may also contribute to abnormal nociception after spinal cord injury.

  7. Immune System in the Brain: A Modulatory Role on Dendritic Spine Morphophysiology?

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    Oscar Kurt Bitzer-Quintero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is closely linked to the immune system at several levels. The brain parenchyma is separated from the periphery by the blood brain barrier, which under normal conditions prevents the entry of mediators such as activated leukocytes, antibodies, complement factors, and cytokines. The myeloid cell lineage plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses at the central level, and it comprises two main subtypes: (1 resident microglia, distributed throughout the brain parenchyma; (2 perivascular macrophages located in the brain capillaries of the basal lamina and the choroid plexus. In addition, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, endothelial cells, and, to a lesser extent, neurons are implicated in the immune response in the central nervous system. By modulating synaptogenesis, microglia are most specifically involved in restoring neuronal connectivity following injury. These cells release immune mediators, such as cytokines, that modulate synaptic transmission and that alter the morphology of dendritic spines during the inflammatory process following injury. Thus, the expression and release of immune mediators in the brain parenchyma are closely linked to plastic morphophysiological changes in neuronal dendritic spines. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that these immune mediators are also implicated in learning and memory processes.

  8. Dendritic Spine Injury Induced by the 8-Hydroxy Metabolite of Efavirenz

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    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Pomerantz, Daniel; Avery, Lindsay B.; Sacktor, Ned; McArthur, Justin C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs), a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Ongoing viral replication in the central nervous system (CNS) caused by poor brain penetration of cART may contribute to HAND. However, it has also been proposed that the toxic effects of long-term cART may contribute to HAND. A better understanding of the neurotoxic potential of cART is critically needed in light of the use of CNS-penetrating cARTs to contend with the virus reservoir in the brain. The efavirenz (EFV) metabolites 7-hydroxyefavirenz (7-OH-EFV) and 8-hydroxyefavirenz (8-OH-EFV) were synthesized and purified, and their chemical structures were confirmed by mass spectrometry and NMR. The effects of EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV on calcium, dendritic spine morphology, and survival were determined in primary neurons. EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV each induced neuronal damage in a dose-dependent manner. However, 8-OH-EFV was at least an order of magnitude more toxic than EFV or 7-OH-EFV, inducing considerable damage to dendritic spines at a 10 nM concentration. The 8-OH-EFV metabolite evoked calcium flux in neurons, which was mediated primarily by L-type voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). Blockade of L-type VOCCs protected dendritic spines from 8-OH-EFV-induced damage. Concentrations of EFV and 8-OH-EFV in the cerebral spinal fluid of HIV-infected subjects taking EFV were within the range that damaged neurons in culture. These findings demonstrate that the 8-OH metabolite of EFV is a potent neurotoxin and highlight the importance of directly determining the effects of antiretroviral drugs and drug metabolites on neurons and other brain cells. PMID:22984227

  9. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

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    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  10. Pyramidal Neurons in Different Cortical Layers Exhibit Distinct Dynamics and Plasticity of Apical Dendritic Spines

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    Michelle Tjia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian cerebral cortex is typically organized in six layers containing multiple types of neurons, with pyramidal neurons (PNs being the most abundant. PNs in different cortical layers have distinct morphology, physiology and functional roles in neural circuits. Therefore, their development and synaptic plasticity may also differ. Using in vivo transcranial two-photon microscopy, we followed the structural dynamics of dendritic spines on apical dendrites of layer (L 2/3 and L5 PNs at different developmental stages. We show that the density and dynamics of spines are significantly higher in L2/3 PNs than L5 PNs in both adolescent (1 month old and adult (4 months old mice. While spine density of L5 PNs decreases during adolescent development due to a higher rate of spine elimination than formation, there is no net change in the spine density along apical dendrites of L2/3 PNs over this period. In addition, experiences exert differential impact on the dynamics of apical dendritic spines of PNs resided in different cortical layers. While motor skill learning promotes spine turnover on L5 PNs in the motor cortex, it does not change the spine dynamics on L2/3 PNs. In addition, neonatal sensory deprivation decreases the spine density of both L2/3 and L5 PNs, but leads to opposite changes in spine dynamics among these two populations of neurons in adolescence. In summary, our data reveal distinct dynamics and plasticity of apical dendritic spines on PNs in different layers in the living mouse cortex, which may arise from their distinct functional roles in cortical circuits.

  11. Vortioxetine promotes maturation of dendritic spines in vitro: A comparative study in hippocampal cultures.

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    Waller, Jessica A; Chen, Fenghua; Sánchez, Connie

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is prevalent in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and cognitive impairments can persist after relief of depressive symptoms. The multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine is an antagonist at 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptors, a partial agonist at 5-HT1B receptors, an agonist at 5-HT1A receptors, and an inhibitor of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) and has pro-cognitive properties. In preclinical studies, vortioxetine enhances long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of neuroplasticity, and enhances memory in various cognitive tasks. However, the molecular mechanisms by which vortioxetine augments LTP and memory remain unknown. Dendritic spines are specialized, actin-rich microdomains on dendritic shafts and are major sites of most excitatory synapses. Since dendritic spine remodeling is implicated in synaptic plasticity and spine size dictates the strength of synaptic transmission, we assessed if vortioxetine, relative to other antidepressants including ketamine, duloxetine, and fluoxetine, plays a role in the maintenance of dendritic spine architecture in vitro. We show that vortioxetine, ketamine, and duloxetine induce spine enlargement. However, only vortioxetine treatment increased the number of spines in contact with presynaptic terminals. In contrast, fluoxetine had no effect on spine remodeling. These findings imply that the various 5-HT receptor mechanisms of vortioxetine may play a role in its effect on spine dynamics and in increasing the proportion of potentially functional synaptic contacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid regulation of endoplasmic reticulum dynamics in dendritic spines by NMDA receptor activation.

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    Ng, Ai Na; Doherty, Andrew J; Lombroso, Paul J; Emptage, Nigel J; Collingridge, Graham L

    2014-08-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is motile within dendritic spines, but the mechanisms underlying its regulation are poorly understood. To address this issue, we have simultaneously imaged morphology and ER content of dendritic spines in cultured dissociated mouse hippocampal neurons. Over a 10 min period, spines were highly dynamic, with spines both increasing and decreasing in volume. ER was present in approximately 50% of spines and was also highly dynamic, with a net increase over this period of time. Inhibition of the endogenous activation of NMDA receptors resulted in a reduction in ER growth. Conversely, augmentation of the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors, by elimination of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), resulted in enhanced ER growth. Therefore, NMDA receptors rapidly regulate spine ER dynamics.

  13. A cell adhesion molecule mimetic, FGL peptide, induces alterations in synapse and dendritic spine structure in the dentate gyrus of aged rats: a three-dimensional ultrastructural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popov, Victor I; Medvedev, Nikolay I; Kraev, Igor V

    2008-01-01

    100 serial ultrathin sections. FGL affected neither hippocampal volume nor spine or synaptic density in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, it increased the ratio of mushroom to thin spines, number of multivesicular bodies and also increased the frequency of appearance of coated...... pits. Three-dimensional analysis showed a significant decrease in both post-synaptic density and apposition zone curvature of mushroom spines following FGL treatment, whereas for thin spines the convexity of the apposition zone increased. These data indicate that FGL induces large changes in the fine...

  14. Automated 3-D Detection of Dendritic Spines from In Vivo Two-Photon Image Stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P K; Hernandez-Herrera, P; Labate, D; Papadakis, M

    2017-10-01

    Despite the significant advances in the development of automated image analysis algorithms for the detection and extraction of neuronal structures, current software tools still have numerous limitations when it comes to the detection and analysis of dendritic spines. The problem is especially challenging in in vivo imaging, where the difficulty of extracting morphometric properties of spines is compounded by lower image resolution and contrast levels native to two-photon laser microscopy. To address this challenge, we introduce a new computational framework for the automated detection and quantitative analysis of dendritic spines in vivo multi-photon imaging. This framework includes: (i) a novel preprocessing algorithm enhancing spines in a way that they are included in the binarized volume produced during the segmentation of foreground from background; (ii) the mathematical foundation of this algorithm, and (iii) an algorithm for the detection of spine locations in reference to centerline trace and separating them from the branches to whom spines are attached to. This framework enables the computation of a wide range of geometric features such as spine length, spatial distribution and spine volume in a high-throughput fashion. We illustrate our approach for the automated extraction of dendritic spine features in time-series multi-photon images of layer 5 cortical excitatory neurons from the mouse visual cortex.

  15. mGluR5 knockout mice display increased dendritic spine densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Lu, Hui-Chen; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2012-08-22

    Alterations in dendritic spine densities and morphologies have been correlated with the abnormal functioning of the synapse. Specifically the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in dendrogenesis and spineogenesis, since its activation triggers various signaling cascades that have been demonstrated to play roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. Here we used the Golgi impregnation technique to analyze the dendritic spines of mGluR5(-/-) knockout mice in comparison to their heterozygote mGluR5(+/-) littermates. mGluR5(-/-) mice had elevated spine densities irrespective of spine type or location along their dendritic trees in comparison to mGluR5(+/-) animals. Such anatomical changes may underlie the hyperexcitability observed in mGluR5 total knockout mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Regulate Dendritic Spine Plasticity in the Hippocampus of Male Rats

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    Ignacio González-Burgos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are neuroprotective and reduce brain inflammation in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. In addition, raloxifene and tamoxifen counteract cognitive deficits caused by gonadal hormone deprivation in male rats. In this study, we have explored whether raloxifene and tamoxifen may regulate the number and geometry of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Young adult male rats were injected with raloxifene (1 mg/kg, tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, or vehicle and killed 24 h after the injection. Animals treated with raloxifene or tamoxifen showed an increased numerical density of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to animals treated with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen had also specific effects in the morphology of spines. These findings suggest that raloxifene and tamoxifen may influence the processing of information by hippocampal pyramidal neurons by affecting the number and shape of dendritic spines.

  17. Letrozole Potentiates Mitochondrial and Dendritic Spine Impairments Induced by β Amyloid

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    P. K.-Y. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced estrogens, either through aging or postsurgery breast cancer treatment with the oral nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole, are linked with declined cognitive abilities. However, a direct link between letrozole and neuronal deficits induced by pathogenic insults associated with aging such as beta amyloid (Aβ1–42 has not been established. The objective of this study was to determine if letrozole aggravates synaptic deficits concurrent with Aβ1–42 insult. We examined the effects of letrozole and oligomeric Aβ1–42 treatment in dissociated and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Changes in glial cell morphology, neuronal mitochondria, and synaptic structures upon letrozole treatment were monitored by confocal microscopy, as they were shown to be affected by Aβ1–42 oligomers. Oligomeric Aβ1–42 or letrozole alone caused decreases in mitochondrial volume, dendritic spine density, synaptophysin (synaptic marker, and the postsynaptic protein, synaptopodin. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial and synaptic structural deficits were exacerbated when letrozole therapy was combined with Aβ1–42 treatment. Our novel findings suggest that letrozole may increase neuronal susceptibility to pathological insults, such as oligomeric Aβ1–42 in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These changes in dendritic spine number, synaptic protein expression, and mitochondrial morphology may, in part, explain the increased prevalence of cognitive decline associated with aromatase inhibitor use.

  18. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

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    Miranda Arnold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3 and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1. Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD and schizophrenia (SZ; yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines, and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse orthologue of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function.

  19. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-photon and visible-light photoactivation of neurons and dendritic spines

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    Elodie Fino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photo-activation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single spine, or single cell, precision.

  20. Photoaffinity Labeling Studies on a Promoter of Dendritic Spine Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibucao, Kevin Carlo Abril

    The small molecule BTA-EG4 has been shown to be a promoter of dendritic spine formation. The mechanism behind this phenomenon, however, is not well understood. The work in this dissertation is motivated by this gap in knowledge. The first part of this dissertation focuses on photoaffinity labeling studies to identify the cellular targets of BTA-EG4. Chapter 1 provides a summary of Alzheimer's disease, the rational design of BTA-EG 4, and methods to determine targets of small molecules. In Chapter 2, the synthesis of a BTA-EG4-based photoaffinity labeling probe and photodegradation studies are presented. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the probe photolyzes rapidly under UV light. In Chapter 3, photoaffinity labeling studies and subsequent protein identification experiments are reported. Competition experiments with the photoaffinity labeling probe and BTA-EG4 demonstrate that the probe labels a 55-kDa protein specifically. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that the 55-kDa protein is the actin binding protein fascin 1. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the major protein identified from photoaffinity labeling studies, fascin 1. Chapter 4 provides a brief survey of the structure and function of fascin 1. In Chapter 5, characterizations of the interaction between BTA-EG4 and fascin 1 are reported. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the physical binding between fascin 1 and BTA-EG6, a BTA-EG4 analog. Slow speed sedimentation assays reveal that BTA-EG4 does not affect the actin-bundling activity of fascin 1. However, GST pull-down experiments show that BTA-EG4 inhibits the binding of fascin 1 with the GTPase Rab35. In addition, this work demonstrates that BTA-EG4 may be mechanistically distinct from the known fascin inhibitor G2.

  1. Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines Requires GSK3α and GSK3β.

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    Iwona A Cymerman

    Full Text Available Although memories appear to be elusive phenomena, they are stored in the network of physical connections between neurons. Dendritic spines, which are actin-rich dendritic protrusions, serve as the contact points between networked neurons. The spines' shape contributes to the strength of signal transmission. To acquire and store information, dendritic spines must remain plastic, i.e., able to respond to signals, by changing their shape. We asked whether glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3α and GSK3β, which are implicated in diseases with neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disease and schizophrenia, play a role in a spine structural plasticity. We used Latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor, and chemically induced Long-Term Depression to trigger fast spine shape remodeling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage induced by either stimulus required GSK3α activity. GSK3β activity was only important for spine structural changes after treatment with Latrunculin B. Our results indicate that GSK3α is an essential component for short-term spine structural plasticity. This specific function should be considered in future studies of neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric conditions that originate from suboptimal levels of GSK3α/β activity.

  2. Automated 4D analysis of dendritic spine morphology: applications to stimulus-induced spine remodeling and pharmacological rescue in a disease model

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    Swanger Sharon A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Uncovering the mechanisms that regulate dendritic spine morphology has been limited, in part, by the lack of efficient and unbiased methods for analyzing spines. Here, we describe an automated 3D spine morphometry method and its application to spine remodeling in live neurons and spine abnormalities in a disease model. We anticipate that this approach will advance studies of synapse structure and function in brain development, plasticity, and disease.

  3. Sexual experience enhances cognitive flexibility and dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Erica R; LaMarca, Elizabeth A; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Fasolino, Maria; Opendak, Maya; Gould, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex is important for cognitive flexibility, a capability that is affected by environmental conditions and specific experiences. Aversive experience, such as chronic restraint stress, is known to impair performance on a task of cognitive flexibility, specifically attentional set-shifting, in rats. Concomitant with this performance decrement, chronic stress reduces the number of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. No previous studies have examined whether a rewarding experience, namely mating, affects cognitive flexibility and dendritic spines in the medial prefrontal cortex of male rats. To test this possibility, we exposed adult male rats to sexual receptive females once daily for one week, assessed attentional set-shifting performance, and then analyzed their brains for changes in dendritic spines. We found that sexual experience improved performance on extradimensional set-shifting, which is known to require the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, we observed increased dendritic spine density on apical and basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, but not the orbitofrontal cortex, after sexual experience. We also found that sexual experience enhanced dendritic spine density on granule neurons of the dentate gyrus. The ventral hippocampus sends a direct projection to the medial prefrontal cortex, raising the possibility that experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus are necessary for alterations in medial prefrontal cortex structure and function. As a first attempt at investigating this, we inactivated the ventral hippocampus with the GABA agonist muscimol, after each daily bout of sexual experience to observe whether the beneficial effects on cognitive flexibility were abolished. Contrary to our hypothesis, blocking hippocampal activity after sexual experience had no impact on enhanced cognitive flexibility. Taken together, these findings indicate that sexual

  4. Chronic alcohol alters dendritic spine development in neurons in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana M; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Pilar Marin, M; Timoneda, Joaquin; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel; Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic spines are specialised membrane protrusions of neuronal dendrites that receive the majority of excitatory synaptic inputs. Abnormal changes in their density, size and morphology have been associated with various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including those deriving from drug addiction. Dendritic spine formation, morphology and synaptic functions are governed by the actin cytoskeleton. Previous in vivo studies have shown that ethanol alters the number and morphology of spines, although the mechanisms underlying these alterations remain unknown. It has also been described how chronic ethanol exposure affects the levels, assembly and cellular organisation of the actin cytoskeleton in hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Therefore, we hypothesised that the ethanol-induced alterations in the number and shape of dendritic spines are due to alterations in the mechanisms regulating actin cytoskeleton integrity. The results presented herein show that chronic exposure to moderate levels of alcohol (30 mM) during the first 2 weeks of culture reduces dendritic spine density and alters the proportion of the different morphologies of these structures in hippocampal neurons, which affects the formation of mature spines. Apparently, these effects are associated with an increase in the G-actin/F-actin ratio due to a reduction of the F-actin fraction, leading to changes in the levels of the different factors regulating the organisation of this cytoskeletal component. The data presented herein indicate that these effects occur between weeks 1 and 2 of culture, an important period in dendritic spines development. These changes may be related to the dysfunction in the memory and learning processes present in children prenatally exposed to ethanol.

  5. The therapeutic effect of memantine through the stimulation of synapse formation and dendritic spine maturation in autism and fragile X syndrome.

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    Hongen Wei

    Full Text Available Although the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autism are not well understood, there is evidence showing that metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are hyper-stimulated and the GABAergic system is hypo-stimulated in autism. Memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and is widely prescribed for treatment of Alzheimer's disease treatment. Recently, it has been shown to improve language function, social behavior, and self-stimulatory behaviors of some autistic subjects. However the mechanism by which memantine exerts its effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs from Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, a mouse model for fragile X syndrome (FXS and syndromic autism, to examine the effects of memantine on dendritic spine development and synapse formation. Our results show that the maturation of dendritic spines is delayed in Fmr1-KO CGCs. We also detected reduced excitatory synapse formation in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Memantine treatment of Fmr1-KO CGCs promoted cell adhesion properties. Memantine also stimulated the development of mushroom-shaped mature dendritic spines and restored dendritic spine to normal levels in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that memantine treatment promoted synapse formation and restored the excitatory synapses to a normal range in Fmr1-KO CGCs. These findings suggest that memantine may exert its therapeutic capacity through a stimulatory effect on dendritic spine maturation and excitatory synapse formation, as well as promoting adhesion of CGCs.

  6. The therapeutic effect of memantine through the stimulation of synapse formation and dendritic spine maturation in autism and fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Dobkin, Carl; Sheikh, Ashfaq M; Malik, Mazhar; Brown, W Ted; Li, Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Although the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autism are not well understood, there is evidence showing that metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors are hyper-stimulated and the GABAergic system is hypo-stimulated in autism. Memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and is widely prescribed for treatment of Alzheimer's disease treatment. Recently, it has been shown to improve language function, social behavior, and self-stimulatory behaviors of some autistic subjects. However the mechanism by which memantine exerts its effect remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used cultured cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, a mouse model for fragile X syndrome (FXS) and syndromic autism, to examine the effects of memantine on dendritic spine development and synapse formation. Our results show that the maturation of dendritic spines is delayed in Fmr1-KO CGCs. We also detected reduced excitatory synapse formation in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Memantine treatment of Fmr1-KO CGCs promoted cell adhesion properties. Memantine also stimulated the development of mushroom-shaped mature dendritic spines and restored dendritic spine to normal levels in Fmr1-KO CGCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that memantine treatment promoted synapse formation and restored the excitatory synapses to a normal range in Fmr1-KO CGCs. These findings suggest that memantine may exert its therapeutic capacity through a stimulatory effect on dendritic spine maturation and excitatory synapse formation, as well as promoting adhesion of CGCs.

  7. Dietary cholesterol concentration affects synaptic plasticity and dendrite spine morphology of rabbit hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Desheng; Zheng, Wen

    2015-10-05

    Previous studies have shown dietary cholesterol can enhance learning but retard memory which may be partly due to increased cholesterol levels in hippocampus and reduced afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude of hippocampal CA1 neurons. This study explored the dose-dependent effect of dietary cholesterol on synaptic plasticity of rabbit hippocampal CA1 neurons and spine morphology, the postsynaptic structures responsible for synaptic plasticity. Field potential recordings revealed a low concentration of dietary cholesterol increased long-term potentiation (LTP) expression while high concentrations produced a pronounced reduction in LTP expression. Dietary cholesterol facilitated basal synaptic transmission but did not influence presynaptic function. DiI staining showed dietary cholesterol induced alterations in dendrite spine morphology characterized by increased mushroom spine density and decreased thin spine density, two kinds of dendritic spines that may be linked to memory consolidation and learning acquisition. Dietary cholesterol also modulated the geometric measures of mushroom spines. Therefore, dietary cholesterol dose-dependently modulated both synaptic plasticity and dendrite spine morphologies of hippocampal CA1 neurons that could mediate learning and memory changes previously seen to result from feeding a cholesterol diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3–4 and 8–9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  9. Fluorescence imaging of dendritic spines of Golgi-Cox-stained neurons using brightening background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Min; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Tao; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Muqing; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel fluorescence imaging approach to imaging nonfluorescence-labeled biological tissue samples. The method was demonstrated by imaging neurons in Golgi-Cox-stained and epoxy-resin-embedded samples through the excitation of the background fluorescence of the specimens. The dark neurons stood out clearly against background fluorescence in the images, enabling the tracing of a single dendritic spine using both confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that the reported fluorescence imaging method would provide an effective alternative solution to image nonfluorescence-labeled samples, and it allows tracing the dendritic spine structure of neurons.

  10. The Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Controls Dendritic Spines and Synapses via Modification of Filamin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Segura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal function is highly sensitive to changes in oxygen levels, but how hypoxia affects dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis is unknown. Here we report that hypoxia, chemical inhibition of the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs, and silencing of Phd2 induce immature filopodium-like dendritic protrusions, promote spine regression, reduce synaptic density, and decrease the frequency of spontaneous action potentials independently of HIF signaling. We identified the actin cross-linker filamin A (FLNA as a target of PHD2 mediating these effects. In normoxia, PHD2 hydroxylates the proline residues P2309 and P2316 in FLNA, leading to von Hippel-Lindau (VHL-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In hypoxia, PHD2 inactivation rapidly upregulates FLNA protein levels because of blockage of its proteasomal degradation. FLNA upregulation induces more immature spines, whereas Flna silencing rescues the immature spine phenotype induced by PHD2 inhibition.

  11. The Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Controls Dendritic Spines and Synapses via Modification of Filamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Inmaculada; Lange, Christian; Knevels, Ellen; Moskalyuk, Anastasiya; Pulizzi, Rocco; Eelen, Guy; Chaze, Thibault; Tudor, Cicerone; Boulegue, Cyril; Holt, Matthew; Daelemans, Dirk; Matondo, Mariette; Ghesquière, Bart; Giugliano, Michele; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neuronal function is highly sensitive to changes in oxygen levels, but how hypoxia affects dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis is unknown. Here we report that hypoxia, chemical inhibition of the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs), and silencing of Phd2 induce immature filopodium-like dendritic protrusions, promote spine regression, reduce synaptic density, and decrease the frequency of spontaneous action potentials independently of HIF signaling. We identified the actin cross-linker filamin A (FLNA) as a target of PHD2 mediating these effects. In normoxia, PHD2 hydroxylates the proline residues P2309 and P2316 in FLNA, leading to von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In hypoxia, PHD2 inactivation rapidly upregulates FLNA protein levels because of blockage of its proteasomal degradation. FLNA upregulation induces more immature spines, whereas Flna silencing rescues the immature spine phenotype induced by PHD2 inhibition. PMID:26972007

  12. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik Kanjhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn’s synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15 and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby, coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout, hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions.

  13. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjhan, Refik; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn's synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15) and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby), coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A) gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout), hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions. PMID:26843990

  14. Sleep contributes to dendritic spine formation and elimination in the developing mouse somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2012-11-01

    Sleep is maximal during early postnatal life when rapid and extensive synapse remodeling occurs. It remains unknown whether and how sleep affects synapse development and plasticity. Using transcranial two-photon microscopy, we examined the formation and elimination of fluorescently labeled dendritic spines and filopodia of Layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the barrel cortex of 3-week-old mice during wakefulness and sleep. We observed high turnover of dendritic protrusions over 2 h in both wake and sleep states. The formation rate of dendritic spines or filopodia over 2 h was comparable between the two states. The elimination rate of dendritic spines or filopodia was lower during 2-h wakefulness than during 2-h sleep. Similar results were observed on dendritic protrusion dynamics over 12-h light/dark cycle when mice spent more time asleep or awake. The substantial remodeling of dendritic protrusions during the sleep state supports the notion that sleep plays an important role in the development and plasticity of synaptic connections in the mouse cortex. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Extinction procedure induces pruning of dendritic spines in CA1 hippocampal field depending on strength of training in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garín-Aguilar, María E.; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Quirarte, Gina L.; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena; Medina, Andrea C.; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous reports indicate that learning and memory of conditioned responses are accompanied by genesis of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, although there is a conspicuous lack of information regarding spine modifications after behavioral extinction. There is ample evidence that treatments that typically produce amnesia become innocuous when animals are submitted to a procedure of enhanced training. We now report that extinction of inhibitory avoidance (IA), trained with relatively low foot-shock intensities, induces pruning of dendritic spines along the length of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 neurons. When animals are trained with a relatively high foot-shock there is a high resistance to extinction, and pruning in the proximal and medial segments of the apical dendrite are seen, while spine count in the distal dendrite remains normal. These results indicate that pruning is involved in behavioral extinction, while maintenance of spines is a probable mechanism that mediates the protecting effect against amnesic treatments produced by enhanced training. PMID:22438840

  16. Extinction procedure induces pruning of dendritic spines in CA1 hippocampal field depending on strength of training in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Garín-Aguilar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous reports indicate that learning and memory of conditioned responses are accompanied by genesis of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, although there is a conspicuous lack of information regarding spine modifications after behavioral extinction. There is ample evidence that treatments that typically produce amnesia become innocuous when animals are submitted to a procedure of enhanced training. We now report that extinction of inhibitory avoidance, trained with relatively low foot-shock intensities, induces pruning of dendritic spines along the length of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 neurons. When animals are trained with a relatively high foot-shock there is a high resistance to extinction, and pruning in the proximal and medial segments of the apical dendrite are seen, while spine count in the distal dendrite remains normal. These results indicate that pruning is involved in behavioral extinction, while maintenance of spines is a probable mechanism that mediates the protecting effect against amnesic treatments produced by enhanced training.

  17. Dendritic spine dynamics regulate the long-term stability of synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Cian; Nolan, Matthew F; van Rossum, Mark C W

    2011-11-09

    Long-term synaptic plasticity requires postsynaptic influx of Ca²⁺ and is accompanied by changes in dendritic spine size. Unless Ca²⁺ influx mechanisms and spine volume scale proportionally, changes in spine size will modify spine Ca²⁺ concentrations during subsequent synaptic activation. We show that the relationship between Ca²⁺ influx and spine volume is a fundamental determinant of synaptic stability. If Ca²⁺ influx is undercompensated for increases in spine size, then strong synapses are stabilized and synaptic strength distributions have a single peak. In contrast, overcompensation of Ca²⁺ influx leads to binary, persistent synaptic strengths with double-peaked distributions. Biophysical simulations predict that CA1 pyramidal neuron spines are undercompensating. This unifies experimental findings that weak synapses are more plastic than strong synapses, that synaptic strengths are unimodally distributed, and that potentiation saturates for a given stimulus strength. We conclude that structural plasticity provides a simple, local, and general mechanism that allows dendritic spines to foster both rapid memory formation and persistent memory storage.

  18. Phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Development of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper density and morphology of dendritic spines are important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. However, our knowledge about molecular mechanisms that regulate the development and maintenance of dendritic spines is limited. We recently reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is required for the development and maintenance of dendritic spines of cortical neurons in the mouse brain. Previous in vitro studies have suggested the involvement of Cdk5 substrates in the formation of dendritic spines; however, their role in spine development has not been tested in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2 in the dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and in vivo in the mouse brain. When we eliminated CRMP2 phosphorylation in CRMP2KI/KI mice, the densities of dendritic spines significantly decreased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse brain. These results indicate that phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 is important for dendritic spine development in cortical neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

  19. Conditional self-discrimination enhances dendritic spine number and dendritic length at prefrontal cortex and hippocampal neurons of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penagos-Corzo, Julio C; Bonilla, Andrea; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Flores, Gonzalo; Negrete-Díaz, José V

    2015-11-01

    We studied conditional self-discrimination (CSD) in rats and compared the neuronal cytoarchitecture of untrained animals and rats that were trained in self-discrimination. For this purpose, we used thirty 10-week-old male rats were randomized into three groups: one control group and two conditioning groups: a comparison group (associative learning) and an experimental group (self-discrimination). At the end of the conditioning process, the experimental group managed to discriminate their own state of thirst. After the conditioning process, dendritic morphological changes in the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus were evaluated using Golgi-Cox stain method and then analyzed by the Sholl method. Differences were found in total dendritic length and spine density. Animals trained in self-discrimination showed an increase in the dendritic length and the number of dendritic spines of neurons of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Our data suggest that conditional self-discrimination improves the connectivity of the prefrontal cortex and dorsal CA1, which has implications for memory and learning processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Enhanced dendritic spine number of neurons of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in old rats after chronic donepezil administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Gonzalez, Faviola; Juarez, Ismael; Solis, Oscar; Martinez-Tellez, Isaura; Camacho-Abrego, Israel; Masliah, Eliezer; Mena, Raul; Flores, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease brains morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been observed. These changes are particularly reflected in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine number. Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of oral administration of this drug on the morphology of neuronal cells from the brain of aged rats. We examined dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal or ventral hippocampus and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Donepezil (1 mg/Kg, vo) was administrated every day for 60 days to rats aged 10 and 18 months. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 12 and 20 months ages, respectively. In all Donepezil treated-rats a significant increment of the dendritic spines number in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal hippocampus was observed. However, pyramidal neurons of the ventral hippocampus and medium spiny cells of the NAcc only showed an increase in the number of their spines in 12 months old-rats. Our results suggest that Donepezil prevents the alterations of the neuronal dendrite morphology caused by aging. PMID:20336627

  1. Targeted intracellular voltage recordings from dendritic spines using quantum-dot-coated nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Krishna; Hirtz, Jan J.; Plante, Ilan Jen-La; Tsai, David M.; de Boer, Wieteke D. A. M.; Semonche, Alexa; Peterka, Darcy S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Sahin, Ozgur; Shepard, Kenneth L.; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic spines are the primary site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons, and are biochemically isolated from the parent dendritic shaft by their thin neck. However, due to the lack of direct electrical recordings from spines, the influence that the neck resistance has on synaptic transmission, and the extent to which spines compartmentalize voltage, specifically excitatory postsynaptic potentials, albeit critical, remains controversial. Here, we use quantum-dot-coated nanopipette electrodes (tip diameters ∼15-30 nm) to establish the first intracellular recordings from targeted spine heads under two-photon visualization. Using simultaneous somato-spine electrical recordings, we find that back propagating action potentials fully invade spines, that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are large in the spine head (mean 26 mV) but are strongly attenuated at the soma (0.5-1 mV) and that the estimated neck resistance (mean 420 MΩ) is large enough to generate significant voltage compartmentalization. Nanopipettes can thus be used to electrically probe biological nanostructures.

  2. Targeted intracellular voltage recordings from dendritic spines using quantum-dot-coated nanopipettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Krishna; Hirtz, Jan J; Plante, Ilan Jen-La; Tsai, David M; De Boer, Wieteke D A M; Semonche, Alexa; Peterka, Darcy S; Owen, Jonathan S; Sahin, Ozgur; Shepard, Kenneth L; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Dendritic spines are the primary site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons, and are biochemically isolated from the parent dendritic shaft by their thin neck. However, due to the lack of direct electrical recordings from spines, the influence that the neck resistance has on synaptic transmission, and the extent to which spines compartmentalize voltage, specifically excitatory postsynaptic potentials, albeit critical, remains controversial. Here, we use quantum-dot-coated nanopipette electrodes (tip diameters ∼15-30 nm) to establish the first intracellular recordings from targeted spine heads under two-photon visualization. Using simultaneous somato-spine electrical recordings, we find that back propagating action potentials fully invade spines, that excitatory postsynaptic potentials are large in the spine head (mean 26 mV) but are strongly attenuated at the soma (0.5-1 mV) and that the estimated neck resistance (mean 420 MΩ) is large enough to generate significant voltage compartmentalization. Nanopipettes can thus be used to electrically probe biological nanostructures.

  3. Stress and trauma: BDNF control of dendritic-spine formation and regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M R; Lagopoulos, J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress leads to increases in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in some regions of the brain, e.g. the basal lateral amygdala (BLA) but decreases in other regions such as the CA3 region of the hippocampus and dendritic spine density increases or decreases in line with these changes in BDNF. Given the powerful influence that BDNF has on dendritic spine growth, these observations suggest that the fundamental reason for the direction and extent of changes in dendritic spine density in a particular region of the brain under stress is due to the changes in BDNF there. The most likely cause of these changes is provided by the stress initiated release of steroids, which readily enter neurons and alter gene expression, for example that of BDNF. Of particular interest is how glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids tend to have opposite effects on BDNF gene expression offering the possibility that differences in the distribution of their receptors and of their downstream effects might provide a basis for the differential transcription of the BDNF genes. Alternatively, differences in the extent of methylation and acetylation in the epigenetic control of BDNF transcription are possible in different parts of the brain following stress. Although present evidence points to changes in BDNF transcription being the major causal agent for the changes in spine density in different parts of the brain following stress, steroids have significant effects on downstream pathways from the TrkB receptor once it is acted upon by BDNF, including those that modulate the density of dendritic spines. Finally, although glucocorticoids play a canonical role in determining BDNF modulation of dendritic spines, recent studies have shown a role for corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) in this regard. There is considerable improvement in the extent of changes in spine size and density in rodents with forebrain specific knockout of CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1) even when

  4. Dendritic spine remodeling following early and late Rac1 inhibition after spinal cord injury: evidence for a pain biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Hill, Myriam; Liu, Shujun; Chen, Lubin; Bangalore, Lakshmi; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a significant complication following spinal cord injury (SCI) with few effective treatments. Drug development for neuropathic pain often fails because preclinical studies do not always translate well to clinical conditions. Identification of biological characteristics predictive of disease state or drug responsiveness could facilitate more effective clinical translation. Emerging evidence indicates a strong correlation between dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain. Because dendritic spines are located on dorsal horn neurons within the spinal cord nociceptive system, dendritic spine remodeling provides a unique opportunity to understand sensory dysfunction after SCI. In this study, we provide support for the postulate that dendritic spine profiles can serve as biomarkers for neuropathic pain. We show that dendritic spine profiles after SCI change to a dysgenic state that is characteristic of neuropathic pain in a Rac1-dependent manner. Suppression of the dysgenic state through inhibition of Rac1 activity is accompanied by attenuation of neuropathic pain. Both dendritic spine dysgenesis and neuropathic pain return when inhibition of Rac1 activity is lifted. These findings suggest the utility of dendritic spines as structural biomarkers for neuropathic pain. PMID:26936986

  5. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells capable of inducing immune responses. DC are widely used as vaccine adjuvant in experimental clinical settings. DC-based vaccines are normally generated using a standard 8day DC protocol (SDDC). In attempts to shorten the vaccine production...... SDDC to the IL-10 inducing stimulus of TLR ligands (R848 and LPS). Thus to determine the clinical relevance of fast DC protocols in cancer settings, small phase I trials should be conducted monitoring regulatory T cells carefully....

  6. Correlative microscopy of Purkinje dendritic spines: a field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Castellano, A; Arismendi, G; Apkarian, R

    2004-01-01

    Purkinje dendritic spines (Pds) of mouse cerebellar cortex were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using ultrathin sections and freeze-etching replicas, to study their three-dimensional features and intramembrane morphology. FESEM showed unattached mushroom-type, elongated and lanceolate Pds separated by 100-500 nm on the dendritic shaft surface. High resolution FESEM showed 25-50 nm globular subunits at the spine postsynaptic density corresponding to the localization of postsynaptic proteins and/or postsynaptic receptors. TEM images of ultrathin sections showed gem-like, mushroom-shaped, lanceolate and neckless or stubby spines. Freeze etching replicas exposed postsynaptic intramembrane particles that can be correlated with the globular subunits observed at high resolution FESEM. Parallel and climbing fiber endings were observed making asymmetric synaptic contacts with the Pds heads. Simultaneous contacts with the necks and heads were also found. The variety of Pds shapes were interpreted as spine conformational changes related with spine dynamic, and spine plasticity.

  7. The Role of Synaptopodin in Membrane Protein Diffusion in the Dendritic Spine Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Dumoulin, Andréa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic exchange of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses relies on their lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane. At synapses located on dendritic spines this process is limited by the geometry of the spine neck that restricts the passage of membrane proteins. Biochemical compartmentalisation of the spine is believed to underlie the input-specificity of excitatory synapses and to set the scale on which functional changes can occur. Synaptopodin is located predominantly in the neck of dendritic spines, and is thus ideally placed to regulate the exchange of synaptic membrane proteins. The central aim of our study was to assess whether the presence of synaptopodin influences the mobility of membrane proteins in the spine neck and to characterise whether this was due to direct molecular interactions or to spatial constraints that are related to the structural organisation of the neck. Using single particle tracking we have identified a specific effect of synaptopodin on the diffusion of metabotropic mGluR5 receptors in the spine neck. However, super-resolution STORM/PALM imaging showed that this was not due to direct interactions between the two proteins, but that the presence of synaptopodin is associated with an altered local organisation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, that in turn could restrict the diffusion of membrane proteins with large intracellular domains through the spine neck. This study contributes new data on the way in which the spine neck compartmentalises excitatory synapses. Our data complement models that consider the impact of the spine neck as a function of its shape, by showing that the internal organisation of the neck imposes additional physical barriers to membrane protein diffusion. PMID:26840625

  8. The actin-binding protein Abp1 controls dendritic spine morphology and is important for spine head and synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, Akvile; Ahuja, Rashmi; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Qualmann, Britta; Kessels, Michael M

    2008-10-01

    Polymerization and organization of actin into complex superstructures, including those found in dendritic spines, is indispensable for structure and function of neuronal networks. Here we show that the filamentous actin (F-actin)-binding protein 1 (Abp1), which controls Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin nucleation and binds to postsynaptic scaffold proteins of the ProSAP (proline-rich synapse-associated protein 1)/Shank family, has a profound impact on synaptic organization. Overexpression of the two Abp1 F-actin-binding domains increases the length of thin, filopodia-like and mushroom-type spines but dramatically reduces mushroom spine density, attributable to lack of the Abp1 Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. In contrast, overexpression of full-length Abp1 increases mushroom spine and synapse density. The SH3 domain alone has a dominant-negative effect on mushroom spines, whereas the density of filopodia and thin, immature spines remains unchanged. This suggests that both actin-binding and SH3 domain interactions are crucial for the role of Abp1 in spine maturation. Indeed, Abp1 knockdown significantly reduces mushroom spine and synapse density. Abp1 hereby works in close conjunction with ProSAP1/Shank2 and ProSAP2/Shank3, because Abp1 effects were suppressed by ProSAP2 RNA interference and the ProSAP/Shank-induced increase of spine head width is further promoted by Abp1 cooverexpression and reduced on Abp1 knockdown. Also, interfering with the formation of functional Abp1-ProSAP protein complexes prevents ProSAP-mediated spine head extension. Spine head extension furthermore depends on local Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization, which is controlled by Abp1 via the Arp2/3 complex activator N-WASP (neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein). Abp1 thus plays an important role in the formation and morphology control of synapses by making a required functional connection between postsynaptic density components and postsynaptic actin dynamics.

  9. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  10. Autometallographic (AMG) technique used for enhancement of the Golgi-Cox staining gives good contrast andhigh resolution of dendrites and spines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, Dariusz

    Despite the existence of many newer staining methods, Golgi staining still remains the primary method forvisualization of the dendrites and spines. The black deposit in the Golgi-Cox impregnated cells is a Mercuricsulphide, therefore autometallographic (AMG) technique which is used for visualizat......Despite the existence of many newer staining methods, Golgi staining still remains the primary method forvisualization of the dendrites and spines. The black deposit in the Golgi-Cox impregnated cells is a Mercuricsulphide, therefore autometallographic (AMG) technique which is used...... for visualization of the metals and metalsulphides/selenides in tissue may be used to enhance the Golgi-Cox staining. We demonstrated accordingly thatuse of AMG enhancement method on the Golgi-Cox staining gives good contrast and high resolution of dendritesand spines. Moreover, this method is cheaper and more...

  11. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet-Based Conditional Symmetric Analysis and Regularized Morphological Shared-Weight Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification and detection of dendritic spines in neuron images are of high interest in diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s diseases, and autism. In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic approach using wavelet-based conditional symmetric analysis and regularized morphological shared-weight neural networks (RMSNN for dendritic spine identification involving the following steps: backbone extraction, localization of dendritic spines, and classification. First, a new algorithm based on wavelet transform and conditional symmetric analysis has been developed to extract backbone and locate the dendrite boundary. Then, the RMSNN has been proposed to classify the spines into three predefined categories (mushroom, thin, and stubby. We have compared our proposed approach against the existing methods. The experimental result demonstrates that the proposed approach can accurately locate the dendrite and accurately classify the spines into three categories with the accuracy of 99.1% for “mushroom” spines, 97.6% for “stubby” spines, and 98.6% for “thin” spines.

  12. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Bonni, Azad

    2013-12-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders.

  13. Methylphenidate-induced dendritic spine formation and ΔFosB expression in nucleus accumbens

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong; Teylan, Merilee A.; Baron, Matthew; Sands, Adam; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Methylphenidate is the psychostimulant medication most commonly prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent trends in the high usage of methylphenidate for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic purposes prompted us to investigate the long-term effects of exposure to the drug on neuronal adaptation. We compared the effects of chronic methylphenidate or cocaine (15 mg/kg, 14 days for both) exposure in mice on dendritic spine morphology and ΔFosB expression in mediu...

  14. News from dendritic cells in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäkel, Knut; Hänsel, Anja

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cells are essential for the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, which makes them stay on center stage when studying the immuno pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This review will discuss recent findings on the role of dendritic cells subsets in atopic dermatitis and will report novel findings on how the microenvironment conditions dendritic cells to fuel atopic dermatitis. Several microenvironmental factors characteristic for atopic dermatitis and with direct relevance for the disease have been defined. We now increasingly understand how thymic stromal lymphopoietin and histamine contribute to the disease by modulating the function of dendritic cells. We have learned much about the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis by the studies on inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells. However, the current analysis on the functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of dendritic cells in eczematous skin lesions may lead to the definition of additional dendritic cell types relevant in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In this respect, it appears interesting to further discuss the parallels and differences in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Understanding the heterogeneity of dendritic cells and their functional alteration by local factors in the inflamed skin will provide essential clues to the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  15. A functional screen implicates microRNA-138-dependent regulation of the depalmitoylation enzyme APT1 in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegel, Gabriele; Obernosterer, Gregor; Fiore, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    of acyl protein thioesterase 1 (APT1), an enzyme regulating the palmitoylation status of proteins that are known to function at the synapse, including the alpha(13) subunits of G proteins (Galpha(13)). RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of APT1 and the expression of membrane-localized Galpha(13) both......The microRNA pathway has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic protein synthesis and ultimately in dendritic spine morphogenesis, a phenomenon associated with long-lasting forms of memory. However, the particular microRNAs (miRNAs) involved are largely unknown. Here we identify specific miRNAs...... that function at synapses to control dendritic spine structure by performing a functional screen. One of the identified miRNAs, miR-138, is highly enriched in the brain, localized within dendrites and negatively regulates the size of dendritic spines in rat hippocampal neurons. miR-138 controls the expression...

  16. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. LTP promotes a selective long-term stabilization and clustering of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias De Roo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic site of excitatory contacts between neurons in the central nervous system. On cortical neurons, spines undergo a continuous turnover regulated by development and sensory activity. However, the functional implications of this synaptic remodeling for network properties remain currently unknown. Using repetitive confocal imaging on hippocampal organotypic cultures, we find that learning-related patterns of activity that induce long-term potentiation act as a selection mechanism for the stabilization and localization of spines. Through a lasting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and protein synthesis-dependent increase in protrusion growth and turnover, induction of plasticity promotes a pruning and replacement of nonactivated spines by new ones together with a selective stabilization of activated synapses. Furthermore, most newly formed spines preferentially grow in close proximity to activated synapses and become functional within 24 h, leading to a clustering of functional synapses. Our results indicate that synaptic remodeling associated with induction of long-term potentiation favors the selection of inputs showing spatiotemporal interactions on a given neuron.

  18. Resolving lubrication layers in immersed boundary method simulations of vesicular transport in dendritic spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Thomas; Kusters, Remy; Rycroft, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of how neuronal connections in the brain are maintained and reorganized is being revolutionized by new experimental and computational techniques. Existing high-resolution 3D images show that neuronal axons often terminate onto micron-sized structures known as dendritic spines, which are characterized by their thin necks and bulbous heads. Vesicles containing membrane receptors must deform significantly to squeeze into the bulbous heads of the spines, but more quantitative estimates of the force and energy required are still lacking. We have used three-dimensional immersed boundary method simulations to capture the fluid dynamics of vesicle transport into spines. We vary the applied force and neck geometry to identify the region in phase space in which the vesicle can squeeze into the spine. These results are compared to pass-stuck diagrams computed previously in the case of vesicles squeezing through open channels with rigid walls. The resulting force estimates are found to be consistent with the physiological density of motor proteins. Resolving the thin lubricating layers between the vesicles and spine poses significant numerical challenges, and we have used elements from lubrication theory to help resolve these boundary layers.

  19. Methylphenidate-induced dendritic spine formation and DeltaFosB expression in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong; Teylan, Merilee A; Baron, Matthew; Sands, Adam; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul

    2009-02-24

    Methylphenidate is the psychostimulant medication most commonly prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent trends in the high usage of methylphenidate for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic purposes prompted us to investigate the long-term effects of exposure to the drug on neuronal adaptation. We compared the effects of chronic methylphenidate or cocaine (15 mg/kg, 14 days for both) exposure in mice on dendritic spine morphology and DeltaFosB expression in medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) from ventral and dorsal striatum. Chronic methylphenidate increased the density of dendritic spines in MSN-D1 (MSN-expressing dopamine D1 receptors) from the core and shell of nucleus accumbens (NAcc) as well as MSN-D2 (MSN-expressing dopamine D2 receptors) from the shell of NAcc. In contrast, cocaine increased the density of spines in both populations of MSN from all regions of striatum. In general, the effect of methylphenidate on the increase of shorter spines (class 2) was less than that of cocaine. Interestingly, the methylphenidate-induced increase in the density of relatively longer spines (class 3) in the shell of NAcc was bigger than that induced by cocaine. Furthermore, methylphenidate exposure increased expression of DeltaFosB only in MSN-D1 from all areas of striatum, and surprisingly, the increase was greater than that induced by cocaine. Thus, our results show differential effects of methylphenidate and cocaine on neuronal adaptation in specific types of MSN in reward-related brain regions.

  20. Increased dendritic spine density and tau expression are associated with individual differences in steroidal regulation of male sexual behavior.

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    Pranay Bharadwaj

    Full Text Available Male sexual behavior (MSB is modulated by gonadal steroids, yet this relationship is highly variable across species and between individuals. A significant percentage (~30% of B6D2F1 hybrid male mice demonstrate MSB after long-term orchidectomy (herein after referred to as "maters", providing an opportunity to examine the mechanisms that underlie individual differences in steroidal regulation of MSB. Use of gene expression arrays comparing maters and non-maters has provided a first pass look at the genetic underpinnings of steroid-independent MSB. Surprisingly, of the ~500 genes in the medial preoptic area (MPOA that differed between maters and non-maters, no steroid hormone or receptor genes were differentially expressed between the two groups. Interestingly, best known for their association with Alzheimer's disease, amyloid precursor protein (APP and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT were elevated in maters. Increased levels of their protein products (APP and tau in their non-pathological states have been implicated in cell survival, neuroprotection, and supporting synaptic integrity. Here we tested transgenic mice that overexpress tau and found facilitated mounting and intromission behavior after long-term orchidectomy relative to littermate controls. In addition, levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, proteins generally enriched in synapses and dendritic spines respectively, were elevated in the MPOA of maters. Dendritic morphology was also assessed in Golgi-impregnated brains of orchidectomized B6D2F1 males, and hybrid maters exhibited greater dendritic spine density in MPOA neurons. In sum, we show for the first time that retention of MSB in the absence of steroids is correlated with morphological differences in neurons.

  1. Centella asiatica attenuates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative spine loss and dendritic simplification.

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    Gray, Nora E; Zweig, Jonathan A; Murchison, Charles; Caruso, Maya; Matthews, Donald G; Kawamoto, Colleen; Harris, Christopher J; Quinn, Joseph F; Soumyanath, Amala

    2017-04-12

    The medicinal plant Centella asiatica has long been used to improve memory and cognitive function. We have previously shown that a water extract from the plant (CAW) is neuroprotective against the deleterious cognitive effects of amyloid-β (Aβ) exposure in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, and improves learning and memory in healthy aged mice as well. This study explores the physiological underpinnings of those effects by examining how CAW, as well as chemical compounds found within the extract, modulate synaptic health in Aβ-exposed neurons. Hippocampal neurons from amyloid precursor protein over-expressing Tg2576 mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were used to investigate the effect of CAW and various compounds found within the extract on Aβ-induced dendritic simplification and synaptic loss. CAW enhanced arborization and spine densities in WT neurons and prevented the diminished outgrowth of dendrites and loss of spines caused by Aβ exposure in Tg2576 neurons. Triterpene compounds present in CAW were found to similarly improve arborization although they did not affect spine density. In contrast caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) compounds from CAW were able to modulate both of these endpoints, although there was specificity as to which CQAs mediated which effect. These data suggest that CAW, and several of the compounds found therein, can improve dendritic arborization and synaptic differentiation in the context of Aβ exposure which may underlie the cognitive improvement observed in response to the extract in vivo. Additionally, since CAW, and its constituent compounds, also improved these endpoints in WT neurons, these results may point to a broader therapeutic utility of the extract beyond Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Alterations to dendritic spine morphology, but not dendrite patterning, of cortical projection neurons in Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mouse models of Down syndrome.

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    Matilda A Haas

    Full Text Available Down Syndrome (DS is a highly prevalent developmental disorder, affecting 1/700 births. Intellectual disability, which affects learning and memory, is present in all cases and is reflected by below average IQ. We sought to determine whether defective morphology and connectivity in neurons of the cerebral cortex may underlie the cognitive deficits that have been described in two mouse models of DS, the Tc1 and Ts1Rhr mouse lines. We utilised in utero electroporation to label a cohort of future upper layer projection neurons in the cerebral cortex of developing mouse embryos with GFP, and then examined neuronal positioning and morphology in early adulthood, which revealed no alterations in cortical layer position or morphology in either Tc1 or Ts1Rhr mouse cortex. The number of dendrites, as well as dendrite length and branching was normal in both DS models, compared with wildtype controls. The sites of projection neuron synaptic inputs, dendritic spines, were analysed in Tc1 and Ts1Rhr cortex at three weeks and three months after birth, and significant changes in spine morphology were observed in both mouse lines. Ts1Rhr mice had significantly fewer thin spines at three weeks of age. At three months of age Tc1 mice had significantly fewer mushroom spines--the morphology associated with established synaptic inputs and learning and memory. The decrease in mushroom spines was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of stubby spines. This data suggests that dendritic spine abnormalities may be a more important contributor to cognitive deficits in DS models, rather than overall neuronal architecture defects.

  3. MeCP2 mutation results in compartment-specific reductions in dendritic branching and spine density in layer 5 motor cortical neurons of YFP-H mice.

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    David P Stuss

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. A primary feature of the syndrome is the impaired maturation and maintenance of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS. Different RTT mouse models have shown that particular Mecp2 mutations have highly variable effects on neuronal architecture. Distinguishing MeCP2 mutant cellular phenotypes therefore demands analysis of specific mutations in well-defined neuronal subpopulations. We examined a transgenically labeled subset of cortical neurons in YFP-H mice crossed with the Mecp2(tm1.1Jae mutant line. YFP(+ Layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex of wildtype and hemizygous mutant male mice were examined for differences in dendrite morphology and spine density. Total basal dendritic length was decreased by 18.6% due to both shorter dendrites and reduced branching proximal to the soma. Tangential dendrite lengths in the apical tuft were reduced by up to 26.6%. Spine density was reduced by 47.4% in the apical tuft and 54.5% in secondary apical dendrites, but remained unaffected in primary apical and proximal basal dendrites. We also found that MeCP2 mutation reduced the number of YFP(+ cells in YFP-H mice by up to 72% in various cortical regions without affecting the intensity of YFP expression in individual cells. Our results support the view that the effects of MeCP2 mutation are highly context-dependent and cannot be generalized across mutation types and cell populations.

  4. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

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    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  5. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular......, the role of DCs in the generation of regulatory T cells is highlighted....

  6. Cux1 and Cux2 regulate dendritic branching, spine morphology and synapses of the upper layer neurons of the cortex

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    Cubelos, Beatriz; Sebastián-Serrano, Alvaro; Beccari, Leonardo; Calcagnotto, Maria Elisa; Cisneros, Elsa; Kim, Seonhee; Dopazo, Ana; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola; Walsh, Christopher A.; Nieto, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendrite branching and spine formation determines the function of morphologically distinct and specialized neuronal subclasses. However, little is known about the programs instructing specific branching patterns in vertebrate neurons and whether such programs influence dendritic spines and synapses. Using knockout and knockdown studies combined with morphological, molecular and electrophysiological analysis we show that the homeobox Cux1 and Cux2 are intrinsic and complementary regulators of dendrite branching, spine development and synapse formation in layer II–III neurons of the cerebral cortex. Cux genes control the number and maturation of dendritic spines partly through direct regulation of the expression of Xlr3b and Xlr4b, chromatin remodeling genes previously implicated in cognitive defects. Accordingly, abnormal dendrites and synapses in Cux2−/− mice correlate with reduced synaptic function and defects in working memory. These demonstrate critical roles of Cux in dendritogenesis and highlight novel subclass-specific mechanisms of synapse regulation that contribute to the establishment of cognitive circuits. PMID:20510857

  7. SUSTAINED EXPRESSION OF BDNF IS REQUIRED FOR MAINTENANCE OF DENDRITIC SPINES AND NORMAL BEHAVIOR

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    VIGERS, ALISON J.; AMIN, DIPESH S.; TALLEY-FARNHAM, TIFFANY; GORSKI, JESSICA A.; XU, BAOJI; JONES, KEVIN R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in the development, maintenance, and plasticity of the mammalian forebrain. These functions include regulation of neuronal maturation and survival, axonal and dendritic arborization, synaptic efficacy, and modulation of complex behaviors including depression and spatial learning. Although analysis of mutant mice has helped establish essential developmental functions for BDNF, its requirement in the adult is less well documented. We have studied late-onset forebrain-specific BDNF knockout (CaMK-BDNFKO) mice, in which BDNF is lost primarily from the cortex and hippocampus in early adulthood, well after BDNF expression has begun in these structures. We found that although CaMK-BDNFKO mice grew at a normal rate and can survive more than a year, they had smaller brains than wild type siblings. The CaMK-BDNFKO mice had generally normal behavior in tests for ataxia and anxiety, but displayed reduced spatial learning ability in the Morris water task and increased depression in the Porsolt swim test. These behavioral deficits were very similar to those we previously described in an early-onset forebrain-specific BDNF knockout. To identify an anatomical correlate of the abnormal behavior, we quantified dendritic spines in cortical neurons. The spine density of CaMK-BDNFKO mice was normal at P35, but by P84, there was a 30% reduction in spine density. The strong similarities we find between early- and late-onset BDNF knockouts suggests that BDNF signaling is required continuously in the CNS for the maintenance of some forebrain circuitry also affected by developmental BDNF depletion. PMID:22542678

  8. Cortical Regulation of Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Dendritic Remodeling in Parkinsonism: Modulation of Glutamate Release Reverses Dopamine Depletion–Induced Dendritic Spine Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Bonnie G.; Neely, M. Diana

    2010-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion–induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20118184

  9. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

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    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  10. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  11. Remodeling the Dendritic Spines in the Hindlimb Representation of the Sensory Cortex after Spinal Cord Hemisection in Mice.

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    Kexue Zhang

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI can induce remodeling of multiple levels of the cerebral cortex system especially in the sensory cortex. The aim of this study was to assess, in vivo and bilaterally, the remodeling of dendritic spines in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection. Thy1-YFP transgenic mice were randomly divided into the control group and the SCI group, and the spinal vertebral plates (T11-T12 of all mice were excised. Next, the left hemisphere of the spinal cord (T12 was hemisected in the SCI group. The hindlimb representations of the sensory cortex in both groups were imaged bilaterally on the day before (0d, and three days (3d, two weeks (2w, and one month (1m after the SCI. The rates of stable, newly formed, and eliminated spines were calculated by comparing images of individual dendritic spine in the same areas at different time points. In comparison to the control group, the rate of newly formed spines in the contralateral sensory cortex of the SCI group increased at three days and two weeks after injury. The rates of eliminated spines in the bilateral sensory cortices increased and the rate of stable spines in the bilateral cortices declined at two weeks and one month. From three days to two weeks, the stable rates of bilaterally stable spines in the SCI group decreased. In comparison to the control group and contralateral cortex in the SCI group, the re-emerging rate of eliminated spines in ipsilateral cortex of the SCI group decreased significantly. The stable rates of newly formed spines in bilateral cortices of the SCI group decreased from two weeks to one month. We found that the remodeling in the hindlimb representation of the sensory cortex after spinal cord hemisection occurred bilaterally. This remodeling included eliminating spines and forming new spines, as well as changing the reorganized regions of the brain cortex after the SCI over time. Soon after the SCI, the cortex was remodeled

  12. Cd1d is expressed on dermal dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

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    Gerlini, G; Hefti, H P; Kleinhans, M; Nickoloff, B J; Burg, G; Nestle, F O

    2001-09-01

    CD1 proteins are a family of cell surface molecules that present lipid antigens to T cells. We investigated skin dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells for expression of CD1 molecules using a panel of 10 different monoclonal antibodies focusing on the recently described CD1d molecule. By immunohistochemical analysis, CD1d expression in normal human skin was restricted to dendritic appearing cells in the papillary dermis mainly located in a perivascular localization. Langerhans cells did not show detectable CD1d expression in situ. Epidermal/dermal cell suspensions analyzed by flow cytometry demonstrated distinct subpopulations of HLA-DR positive dermal dendritic cells expressing CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. CD1d was expressed on HLA-DRbright dermal antigen-presenting cells in dermal suspensions (16% +/- 3.6%), as well as on highly enriched dermal dendritic cells migrating out of skin explants (60.5% +/- 8.0%). Migrated mature dermal dendritic cells coexpressed CD83 and CD1d. Western blot analysis on microdissected skin sections revealed the presence of a 50-55 kDa CD1d molecule in dermis, suggesting that CD1d is highly glycosylated in skin. Both immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells cultured in autologous plasma expressed CD1d molecules. In contrast, culture in fetal bovine serum downregulated CD1d expression. In conclusion, antigen-presenting cells in skin express different sets of CD1 molecules including CD1d and might play a role in lipid antigen presentation in various skin diseases. Differential expression of CD1 molecules depending on culture conditions might have an impact on clinical applications of dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

  13. Sodium Dynamics in Pyramidal Neuron Dendritic Spines: Synaptically Evoked Entry Predominantly through AMPA Receptors and Removal by Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Ross, William N

    2017-10-11

    Dendritic spines are key elements underlying synaptic integration and cellular plasticity, but many features of these important structures are not known or are controversial. We examined these properties using newly developed simultaneous sodium and calcium imaging with single-spine resolution in pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices from either sex. Indicators for both ions were loaded through the somatic patch pipette, which also recorded electrical responses. Fluorescence changes were detected with a high-speed, low-noise CCD camera. Following subthreshold electrical stimulation, postsynaptic sodium entry is almost entirely through AMPA receptors with little contribution from entry through NMDA receptors or voltage-gated sodium channels. Sodium removal from the spine head is through rapid diffusion out to the dendrite through the spine neck with a half-removal time of ∼16 ms, which suggests the neck has low resistance. Peak [Na(+)]i changes during single EPSPs are ∼5 mm Stronger electrical stimulation evoked small plateau potentials that had significant longer-lasting localized [Na(+)]i increases mediated through NMDA receptors.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spines, small structures that are difficult to investigate, are important elements in the fundamental processes of synaptic integration and plasticity. The main tool for examining these structures has been calcium imaging. However, the kinds of information that calcium imaging reveals is limited. We used newly developed, high-speed, simultaneous sodium and calcium imaging to examine ion dynamics in spines in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We found that following single subthreshold synaptic activation most sodium entry was through AMPA receptors and not through NMDA receptors or through voltage-gated sodium channels and that the spine neck is not a significant resistance barrier. Most spine mechanisms are linear. However, regenerative NMDA conductances can be activated with stronger stimulation

  14. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

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    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  15. New waves in dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton: From branches and bundles to rings, from actin binding proteins to post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2017-10-01

    Dendritic spines are small actin-rich protrusions from neuronal dendrites that form the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses. Changes in the number or strength of synapses are physiological mechanisms behind learning. The growth and maturation of dendritic spines and the activity-induced changes to their morphology are all based on changes to the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we will discuss the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spine formation and maturation, as well as in synaptic strengthening. Concerning spine formation, we will focus on spine initiation, which has received less attention in the literature. We will also examine the recently revealed regulation of the actin cytoskeleton through post-translational modifications of actin monomers, in addition to the conventional regulation of actin via actin-binding proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Asymptotic analysis of the narrow escape problem in dendritic spine shaped domain: three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Lee, Hyundae; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the three-dimensional narrow escape problem in a dendritic spine shaped domain, which is composed of a relatively big head and a thin neck. The narrow escape problem is to compute the mean first passage time of Brownian particles traveling from inside the head to the end of the neck. The original model is to solve a mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary value problem for the Poisson equation in the composite domain, and is computationally challenging. In this paper we seek to transfer the original problem to a mixed Robin-Neumann boundary value problem by dropping the thin neck part, and rigorously derive the asymptotic expansion of the mean first passage time with high order terms. This study is a nontrivial three-dimensional generalization of the work in Li (2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 505202), where a two-dimensional analogue domain is considered.

  17. Metal ionophore treatment restores dendritic spine density and synaptic protein levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Paul A Adlard

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that brief treatment of APP transgenic mice with metal ionophores (PBT2, Prana Biotechnology rapidly and markedly improves learning and memory. To understand the potential mechanisms of action underlying this phenomenon we examined hippocampal dendritic spine density, and the levels of key proteins involved in learning and memory, in young (4 months and old (14 months female Tg2576 mice following brief (11 days oral treatment with PBT2 (30 mg/kg/d. Transgenic mice exhibited deficits in spine density compared to littermate controls that were significantly rescued by PBT2 treatment in both the young (+17%, p<0.001 and old (+32%, p<0.001 animals. There was no effect of PBT2 on spine density in the control animals. In the transgenic animals, PBT2 treatment also resulted in significant increases in brain levels of CamKII (+57%, p = 0.005, spinophilin (+37%, p = 0.04, NMDAR1A (+126%, p = 0.02, NMDAR2A (+70%, p = 0.05, pro-BDNF (+19%, p = 0.02 and BDNF (+19%, p = 0.04. While PBT2-treatment did not significantly alter neurite-length in vivo, it did increase neurite outgrowth (+200%, p = 0.006 in cultured cells, and this was abolished by co-incubation with the transition metal chelator, diamsar. These data suggest that PBT2 may affect multiple aspects of snaptic health/efficacy. In Alzheimer's disease therefore, PBT2 may restore the uptake of physiological metal ions trapped within extracellular β-amyloid aggregates that then induce biochemical and anatomical changes to improve cognitive function.

  18. Hippocampal neuro-networks and dendritic spine perturbations in epileptogenesis are attenuated by neuroprotectin d1.

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    Alberto E Musto

    Full Text Available Limbic epileptogenesis triggers molecular and cellular events that foster the establishment of aberrant neuronal networks that, in turn, contribute to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Here we have examined hippocampal neuronal network activities in the pilocarpine post-status epilepticus model of limbic epileptogenesis and asked whether or not the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-derived lipid mediator, neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1, modulates epileptogenesis.Status epilepticus (SE was induced by intraperitoneal administration of pilocarpine in adult male C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate simultaneous hippocampal neuronal networks, local field potentials were recorded from multi-microelectrode arrays (silicon probe chronically implanted in the dorsal hippocampus. NPD1 (570 μg/kg or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally daily for five consecutive days 24 hours after termination of SE. Seizures and epileptiform activity were analyzed in freely-moving control and treated mice during epileptogenesis and epileptic periods. Then hippocampal dendritic spines were evaluated using Golgi-staining.We found brief spontaneous microepileptiform activity with high amplitudes in the CA1 pyramidal and stratum radiatum in epileptogenesis. These aberrant activities were attenuated following systemic NPD1 administration, with concomitant hippocampal dendritic spine protection. Moreover, NPD1 treatment led to a reduction in spontaneous recurrent seizures.Our results indicate that NPD1 displays neuroprotective bioactivity on the hippocampal neuronal network ensemble that mediates aberrant circuit activity during epileptogenesis. Insight into the molecular signaling mediated by neuroprotective bioactivity of NPD1 on neuronal network dysfunction may contribute to the development of anti-epileptogenic therapeutic strategies.

  19. Calmodulin activation by calcium transients in the postsynaptic density of dendritic spines.

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    Daniel X Keller

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The entry of calcium into dendritic spines can trigger a sequence of biochemical reactions that begins with the activation of calmodulin (CaM and ends with long-term changes to synaptic strengths. The degree of activation of CaM can depend on highly local elevations in the concentration of calcium and the duration of transient increases in calcium concentration. Accurate measurement of these local changes in calcium is difficult because the spaces are so small and the numbers of molecules are so low. We have therefore developed a Monte Carlo model of intracellular calcium dynamics within the spine that included calcium binding proteins, calcium transporters and ion channels activated by voltage and glutamate binding. The model reproduced optical recordings using calcium indicator dyes and showed that without the dye the free intracellular calcium concentration transient was much higher than predicted from the fluorescent signal. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced large, long-lasting calcium gradients across the postsynaptic density, which activated CaM. When glutamate was released at the synapse 10 ms before an action potential occurred, simulating activity patterns that strengthen hippocampal synapses, the calcium gradient and activation of CaM in the postsynaptic density were much greater than when the order was reversed, a condition that decreases synaptic strengths, suggesting a possible mechanism underlying the induction of long-term changes in synaptic strength. The spatial and temporal mechanisms for selectivity in CaM activation demonstrated here could be used in other signaling pathways.

  20. Integration of multiscale dendritic spine structure and function data into systems biology models

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    James J Mancuso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Comprising 1011 neurons with 1014 synaptic connections the human brain is the ultimate systems biology puzzle. An increasing body of evidence highlights the observation that changes in brain function, both normal and pathological, consistently correlate with dynamic changes in neuronal anatomy. Anatomical changes occur on a full range of scales from the trafficking of individual proteins, to alterations in synaptic morphology both individually and on a systems level, to reductions in long distance connectivity and brain volume. The major sites of contact for synapsing neurons are dendritic spines, which provide an excellent metric for the number and strength of signaling connections between elements of functional neuronal circuits. A comprehensive model of anatomical changes and their functional consequences would be a holy grail for the field of systems neuroscience but its realization appears far on the horizon. Various imaging technologies have advanced to allow for multi-scale visualization of brain plasticity and pathology, but computational analysis of the massive big data sets involved forms the bottleneck toward the creation of multiscale models of brain structure and function. While a full accounting of techniques and progress toward a comprehensive model of brain anatomy and function is beyond the scope of this or any other single paper, this review serves to highlight the opportunities for analysis of neuronal spine anatomy and function provided by new imaging technologies and the high-throughput application of older technologies while surveying the strengths and weaknesses of currently available computational analytical tools and room for future improvement.

  1. Integration of multiscale dendritic spine structure and function data into systems biology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, James J; Cheng, Jie; Yin, Zheng; Gilliam, Jared C; Xia, Xiaofeng; Li, Xuping; Wong, Stephen T C

    2014-01-01

    Comprising 10(11) neurons with 10(14) synaptic connections the human brain is the ultimate systems biology puzzle. An increasing body of evidence highlights the observation that changes in brain function, both normal and pathological, consistently correlate with dynamic changes in neuronal anatomy. Anatomical changes occur on a full range of scales from the trafficking of individual proteins, to alterations in synaptic morphology both individually and on a systems level, to reductions in long distance connectivity and brain volume. The major sites of contact for synapsing neurons are dendritic spines, which provide an excellent metric for the number and strength of signaling connections between elements of functional neuronal circuits. A comprehensive model of anatomical changes and their functional consequences would be a holy grail for the field of systems neuroscience but its realization appears far on the horizon. Various imaging technologies have advanced to allow for multi-scale visualization of brain plasticity and pathology, but computational analysis of the big data sets involved forms the bottleneck toward the creation of multiscale models of brain structure and function. While a full accounting of techniques and progress toward a comprehensive model of brain anatomy and function is beyond the scope of this or any other single paper, this review serves to highlight the opportunities for analysis of neuronal spine anatomy and function provided by new imaging technologies and the high-throughput application of older technologies while surveying the strengths and weaknesses of currently available computational analytical tools and room for future improvement.

  2. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles eBosch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs in mice. 3D reconstruction of spines in GCs aged 3–4 and 8–9 weeks revealed two different stages of spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner.

  3. The Role of the Neurofibromin-Syndecan-CASK Complex in the Regulation of Synaptic Ras-MAPK Signaling and Dendritic Spine Plasticity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Gang-Yi

    2006-01-01

    ... and dendritic spine maturation. Using several siRNAs and dominant negative constructs for NF1 GAP activity to specifically knockdown or inhibit NF1, we have obtained compelling evidence showing that NF1 deficiency indeed leads...

  4. Two-Photon Correlation Spectroscopy in Single Dendritic Spines Reveals Fast Actin Filament Reorganization during Activity-Dependent Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hua Chen

    Full Text Available Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2P-FCS within single dendritic spines of living hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to resolve various subpopulations of mobile F-actin during activity-dependent structural changes such as potentiation induced spine head growth. Two major classes of mobile F-actin were discovered: very dynamic and about a hundred times less dynamic F-actin. Spine head enlargement upon application of Tetraethylammonium (TEA, a protocol previously used for the chemical induction of long-term potentiation (cLTP strictly correlated to changes in the dynamics and filament numbers in the different actin filament fractions. Our observations suggest that spine enlargement is governed by a mechanism in which longer filaments are first cut into smaller filaments that cooperate with the second, increasingly dynamic shorter actin filament population to quickly reorganize and expand the actin cytoskeleton within the spine head. This process would allow a fast and efficient spine head enlargement using a major fraction of the actin filament population that was already present before spine head growth.

  5. Amyloid precursor protein maintains constitutive and adaptive plasticity of dendritic spines in adult brain by regulating D-serine homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chengyu; Crux, Sophie; Marinesco, Stephane; Montagna, Elena; Sgobio, Carmelo; Shi, Yuan; Shi, Song; Zhu, Kaichuan; Dorostkar, Mario M; Müller, Ulrike C; Herms, Jochen

    2016-10-17

    Dynamic synapses facilitate activity-dependent remodeling of neural circuits, thereby providing the structural substrate for adaptive behaviors. However, the mechanisms governing dynamic synapses in adult brain are still largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that in the cortex of adult amyloid precursor protein knockout (APP-KO) mice, spine formation and elimination were both reduced while overall spine density remained unaltered. When housed under environmental enrichment, APP-KO mice failed to respond with an increase in spine density. Spine morphology was also altered in the absence of APP The underlying mechanism of these spine abnormalities in APP-KO mice was ascribed to an impairment in D-serine homeostasis. Extracellular D-serine concentration was significantly reduced in APP-KO mice, coupled with an increase of total D-serine. Strikingly, chronic treatment with exogenous D-serine normalized D-serine homeostasis and restored the deficits of spine dynamics, adaptive plasticity, and morphology in APP-KO mice. The cognitive deficit observed in APP-KO mice was also rescued by D-serine treatment. These data suggest that APP regulates homeostasis of D-serine, thereby maintaining the constitutive and adaptive plasticity of dendritic spines in adult brain. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  6. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  7. Dendritic spines and pre-synaptic boutons are stable despite local deep hypothermic challenge and re-warming in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicheng Xie

    Full Text Available Deep hypothermia to 20°C is used clinically for major pediatric and adult surgical procedures. In particular, it is used in the "standstill operation" where blood flow is stopped for up to 30 min. Patients recovering from these procedures can exhibit neurological deficits. Such deficits could arise from changes to dendritic spines and plasticity-induced changes in network function as a result of cooling and/or re-warming. In the brain, each dendritic spine represents a single excitatory synapse and their number can be reflective of injury or plasticity-induced changes in network function. This research sought to determine whether deep hypothermia and re-warming have detrimental effects on synaptic stability and network function.In vivo 2-photon (2-P imaging in green/yellow fluorescent protein (GFP/YFP-expressing transgenic mice was performed to determine whether 4 hours of deep hypothermia and 2 hours of re-warming can have relatively covert effects on dendritic spine and presynaptic bouton stability. At the same time, electroencephalographic (EEG activity was recorded to evaluate network function during deep hypothermia and re-warming.We report that deep hypothermia and subsequent re-warming did not change the stability of dendritic spines or presynaptic boutons in mouse somatosensory cortex measured over 8 hours. As expected, deep hypothermia attenuated ongoing EEG activity over 0.1-80 Hz frequencies. The effects on EEG activity were fully reversible following re-warming.These results are consistent with deep hypothermia being a safe treatment which could be applied clinically to those undergoing major elective surgical procedures.

  8. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  9. Constellation of HCN channels and cAMP regulating proteins in dendritic spines of the primate prefrontal cortex: potential substrate for working memory deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspalas, Constantinos D; Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2013-07-01

    Schizophrenia associates with impaired prefrontal cortical (PFC) function and alterations in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. These include genetic insults to disrupted-in-schizophrenia (DISC1) and phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) regulating cAMP hydrolysis, and increased dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) expression that elevates cAMP. We used immunoelectron microscopy to localize DISC1, PDE4A, PDE4B, and D1R in monkey PFC and to view spatial interactions with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that gate network inputs when opened by cAMP. Physiological interactions between PDE4s and HCN channels were tested in recordings of PFC neurons in monkeys performing a spatial working memory task. The study reveals a constellation of cAMP-related proteins (DISC1, PDE4A, and D1R) and HCN channels next to excitatory synapses and the spine neck in thin spines of superficial PFC, where working memory microcircuits interconnect and spine loss is most evident in schizophrenia. In contrast, channels in dendrites were distant from synapses and cAMP-related proteins, and were associated with endosomal trafficking. The data suggest that a cAMP signalplex is selectively positioned in the spines to gate PFC pyramidal cell microcircuits. Single-unit recordings confirmed physiological interactions between cAMP and HCN channels, consistent with gating actions. These data may explain why PFC networks are especially vulnerable to genetic insults that dysregulate cAMP signaling.

  10. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylation deficient female mice (T286A and 12 wild type littermates were used in the study. T286A strain was created by Giese et al. (1998. Mice were housed and tested in two IntelliCages from NewBehavior (www.newbehavior.com. IntelliCage is an automated learning system. After 95 days of alcohol drinking interrupted by tests for motivation, persistence in alcohol seeking and probability of relapse, mice were ascribed to ‘high’ or ‘low’ drinkers group according to their performance in the tests. Additional criterion was the amount of alcohol consumed during the whole experiment. Result of each test was evaluated separately. 1/3 of the mice that scored highest in each criterion were considered ‘positive’ for this trait. ‘Positive’ animals were given 1 point, negative 0 points. Mice that were positive in at least 2 criteria were ascribed to ‘high’ drinkers (‘+’ group. Remaining mice – to ‘low’ drinkers (‘–‘. This method of behavioral phenotyping, developed by Radwanska and Kaczmarek (2012, is inspired by DSM-IV. Since the results of this evaluation are discrete (i.e. by definition all the animals score between 0 to +4, we developed also a continuous method of addiction rating, which we call ‘addiction index’. The result of the second method is a sum of the standardized (z-score results of the above mentioned tests. We use it to examine the correlations between addiction-like behavior and spine parameters. Control group (12 WT, 8

  11. Protracted dendritic growth in the typically developing human amygdala and increased spine density in young ASD brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R K; Bauman, M D; Jacobs, B; Schumann, C M

    2018-02-01

    The amygdala is a medial temporal lobe structure implicated in social and emotional regulation. In typical development (TD), the amygdala continues to increase volumetrically throughout childhood and into adulthood, while other brain structures are stable or decreasing in volume. In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the amygdala undergoes rapid early growth, making it volumetrically larger in children with ASD compared to TD children. Here we explore: (a) if dendritic arborization in the amygdala follows the pattern of protracted growth in TD and early overgrowth in ASD and (b), if spine density in the amygdala in ASD cases differs from TD from youth to adulthood. The amygdala from 32 postmortem human brains (7-46 years of age) were stained using a Golgi-Kopsch impregnation. Ten principal neurons per case were selected in the lateral nucleus and traced using Neurolucida software in their entirety. We found that both ASD and TD individuals show a similar pattern of increasing dendritic length with age well into adulthood. However, spine density is (a) greater in young ASD cases compared to age-matched TD controls (ASD age into adulthood, a phenomenon not found in TD. Therefore, by adulthood, there is no observable difference in spine density in the amygdala between ASD and TD age-matched adults (≥18 years old). Our findings highlight the unique growth trajectory of the amygdala and suggest that spine density may contribute to aberrant development and function of the amygdala in children with ASD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  13. Killer dendritic cells: IKDC and the others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmort, Mathieu; Dalod, Marc; Mignot, Grégoire; Ullrich, Evelyn; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2008-10-01

    Tumors can regress as a result of invading myeloid and lymphoid cells that act in concert. Although the myeloid cells are widely recognized as antigen presenters and lymphoid cells as classical effectors, recent evidence revealed the capacity of dendritic cells (DC) to kill tumor cells. The functional concept of 'natural killer (NK) myeloid DC' is supported by mouse and human in vitro data that may be clinically relevant because human killer DC can contribute to tumor shrinking during topical therapy with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Whether tumor killing by DC is a 'catalyzing' step for efficient crosspresentation and/or a promoting step for an immunogenic cell death pathway remains an open question. We also discuss how interferon-producing killer DC (IKDC) may participate in the control of tumor progression.

  14. The ROCK Inhibitor Fasudil Prevents Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors and Dendritic Spine Loss in Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rojo, Gonzalo; Fresno, Cristóbal; Vilches, Natalia; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Mora, Sergio; Aguayo, Felipe; Pacheco, Aníbal; Parra-Fiedler, Nicolás; Parra, Claudio S; Rojas, Paulina S; Tejos, Macarena; Aliaga, Esteban; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2017-04-01

    Dendritic arbor simplification and dendritic spine loss in the hippocampus, a limbic structure implicated in mood disorders, are assumed to contribute to symptoms of depression. These morphological changes imply modifications in dendritic cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are regulators of actin dynamics through their effector Rho kinase. We have reported that chronic stress promotes depressive-like behaviors in rats along with dendritic spine loss in apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, changes associated with Rho kinase activation. The present study proposes that the Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil may prevent the stress-induced behavior and dendritic spine loss. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with saline or Fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg) starting 4 days prior to and maintained during the restraint stress procedure (2.5 h/d for 14 days). Nonstressed control animals were injected with saline or Fasudil for 18 days. At 24 hours after treatment, forced swimming test, Golgi-staining, and immuno-western blot were performed. Fasudil prevented stress-induced immobility observed in the forced swimming test. On the other hand, Fasudil-treated control animals showed behavioral patterns similar to those of saline-treated controls. Furthermore, we observed that stress induced an increase in the phosphorylation of MYPT1 in the hippocampus, an exclusive target of Rho kinase. This change was accompanied by dendritic spine loss of apical dendrites of pyramidal hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, increased pMYPT1 levels and spine loss were both prevented by Fasudil administration. Our findings suggest that Fasudil may prevent the development of abnormal behavior and spine loss induced by chronic stress by blocking Rho kinase activity.

  15. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  16. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC...... are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  17. Targeting dendritic cells--why bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Martin; Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2013-04-11

    Vaccination is among the most efficient forms of immunotherapy. Although sometimes inducing lifelong protective B-cell responses, T-cell-mediated immunity remains challenging. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is an extensively explored concept aimed at improving cellular immunity. The identification of various DC subsets with distinct functional characteristics now allows for the fine-tuning of targeting strategies. Although some of these DC subsets are regarded as superior for (cross-) priming of naive T cells, controversies still remain about which subset represents the best target for immunotherapy. Because targeting the antigen alone may not be sufficient to obtain effective T-cell responses, delivery systems have been developed to target multiple vaccine components to DCs. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of targeting DCs: if targeting is beneficial at all and which vaccine vehicles and immunization routes represent promising strategies to reach and activate DCs.

  18. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    still require optimization. An alternative technique for providing antigens to DC consists of the direct fusion of dendritic cells with tumor cells. These resulting hybrid cells may express both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules associated with tumor antigens...... to inducing hybrid formation by expression of viral fusogenic membrane glycoproteins....

  19. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... adhesion molecule 1) by blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms. JAMA Dermatology 2014;150:73‑6. 11. Goren Sahin D, Akay OM, Uskudar Teke H, Andic N, Gunduz E. Gulbas Z. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia successfully treated by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ...

  20. Chronic Lead Exposure and Mixed Factors of Gender×Age×Brain Regions Interactions on Dendrite Growth, Spine Maturity and NDR Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Weizhen; Yang, Qian-Qian; Wang, Shuang; Xu, Yi; Wang, Hui-Li

    2015-01-01

    NDR1/2 kinase is essential in dendrite morphology and spine formation, which is regulated by cellular Ca2+. Lead (Pb) is a potent blocker of L-type calcium channel and our recent work showed Pb exposure impairs dendritic spine outgrowth in hippocampal neurons in rats. But the sensitivity of Pb-induced spine maturity with mixed factors (gender×age×brain regions) remains unknown. This study aimed to systematically investigate the effect of Pb exposure on spine maturity in rat brain with three factors (gender×age×brain regions), as well as the NDR1/2 kinase expression. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to Pb from parturition to postnatal day 30, 60, 90, respectively. Golgi-Cox staining was used to examine spine maturity. Western blot assay was applied to measure protein expression and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR assay was used to examine mRNA levels. The results showed chronic Pb exposure significantly decreased dendritic length and impaired spine maturity in both rat hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex. The impairment of dendritic length induced by Pb exposure tended to adolescence > adulthood, hippocampus > medial prefrontal cortex and female > male. Pb exposure induced significant damage in spine maturity during adolescence and early adult while little damage during adult in male rat brain and female medial prefrontal cortex. Besides, there was sustained impairment from adolescence to adulthood in female hippocampus. Interestingly, impairment of spine maturity followed by Pb exposure was correlated with NDR1/2 kinase. The reduction of NDR1/2 kinase protein expression after Pb exposure was similar to the result of spine maturity. In addition, NDR2 and their substrate Rabin3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased by Pb exposure in developmental rat brain. Taken together, Pb exposure impaired dendrite growth and maturity which was subject to gender×age×brain regions effects and related to NDR1/2 signal expression. PMID:26368815

  1. Fatigue reversibly reduced cortical and hippocampal dendritic spines concurrent with compromise of motor endurance and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-R; Wang, T-J; Huang, H-Y; Chen, L-J; Huang, Y-S; Wang, Y-J; Tseng, G-F

    2009-07-21

    Fatigue could be induced following forced exercise, sickness, heat stroke or sleep disturbance and impaired brain-related functions such as concentration, attention and memory. Here we investigated whether fatigue altered the dendrites of central neurons. Central fatigue was induced by housing rats in cage with 1.5-cm deep water for 1-5 days. Three days of sleep deprivation seriously compromised rats' performance in weight-loaded forced swimming and spatial learning tests, and 5 days of treatment worsened it further. Combinations of intracellular dye injection and three-dimensional analysis revealed that dendritic spines on retrograde tracer-identified corticospinal neurons and Cornu Ammonis (CA)1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons were significantly reduced while the shape or length of the dendritic arbors was not altered. Three days of rest restored the spine loss and the degraded spatial learning and weight-loaded forced swimming performances to control levels. In conclusion, although we could not rule out additional non-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress, the apparent fatigue induced following a few days of sleep deprivation could change brain structurally and functionally and the effects were reversible with a few days of rest.

  2. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  3. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  4. Super-resolution 2-photon microscopy reveals that the morphology of each dendritic spine correlates with diffusive but not synaptic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eTakasaki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of dendritic spines suggests a specialized function in compartmentalizing synaptic signals near active synapses. Indeed, theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that the diffusive resistance of the spine neck is sufficient to effectively compartmentalize some signaling molecules in a spine for the duration of their activated lifetime. Here we describe the application of 2-photon microscopy combined with stimulated emission depletion (STED-2P to the biophysical study of the relationship between synaptic signals and spine morphology, demonstrating the utility of combining STED-2P with modern optical and electrophysiological techniques. Morphological determinants of fluorescence recovery time were identified and evaluated within the context of a simple compartmental model describing diffusive transfer between spine and dendrite. Correlations between the neck geometry and the amplitude of synapse potentials and calcium transients evoked by 2-photon glutamate uncaging were also investigated.

  5. Infant cognitive training preshapes learning-relevant prefrontal circuits for adult learning: learning-induced tagging of dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Joerg; Poeggel, Gerd; Gruss, Michael; Wingenfeld, Katharina; Braun, Katharina

    2014-11-01

    Work in various animal models has demonstrated that cognitive training in infancy has a greater effect on adult cognitive performance than pretraining in adulthood. Since the underlying synaptic mechanisms are unclear, the aim of this study was to test the working hypothesis that associative training "preshapes" synaptic circuits in the developing infant brain and thereby improves learning in adulthood. Using a two-way active avoidance (TWA) paradigm, we found that avoidance training during infancy, even though the infant rats were not capable to learn a successful avoidance strategy, improves avoidance learning in adulthood. On the neuroanatomical level we show here for the first time that infant TWA training in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex suppresses developmental spine formation. In contrast in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, developmental spine pruning is suppressed, possibly by "tagging" activated synapses, which thereby are protected from being eliminated. Moreover, we demonstrate that infant TWA training alters learning-induced synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. The synaptic and dendritic changes correlate with specific behavioral parameters. Taken together, these results support the working hypothesis that infant cognitive training interferes with developmental reorganization and maturation of dendritic spines and thereby "optimizes" prefrontal neuronal circuits for adult learning. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Increased signaling by the autism-related Engrailed-2 protein enhances dendritic branching and spine density, alters synaptic structural matching, and exaggerates protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Soltani

    Full Text Available Engrailed 1 (En1 and 2 (En2 code for closely related homeoproteins acting as transcription factors and as signaling molecules that contribute to midbrain and hindbrain patterning, to development and maintenance of monoaminergic pathways, and to retinotectal wiring. En2 has been suggested to be an autism susceptibility gene and individuals with autism display an overexpression of this homeogene but the mechanisms remain unclear. We addressed in the present study the effect of exogenously added En2 on the morphology of hippocampal cells that normally express only low levels of Engrailed proteins. By means of RT-qPCR, we confirmed that En1 and En2 were expressed at low levels in hippocampus and hippocampal neurons, and observed a pronounced decrease in En2 expression at birth and during the first postnatal week, a period characterized by intense synaptogenesis. To address a putative effect of Engrailed in dendritogenesis or synaptogenesis, we added recombinant En1 or En2 proteins to hippocampal cell cultures. Both En1 and En2 treatment increased the complexity of the dendritic tree of glutamatergic neurons, but only En2 increased that of GABAergic cells. En1 increased the density of dendritic spines both in vitro and in vivo. En2 had similar but less pronounced effect on spine density. The number of mature synapses remained unchanged upon En1 treatment but was reduced by En2 treatment, as well as the area of post-synaptic densities. Finally, both En1 and En2 elevated mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in hippocampal cells, suggesting that some effects of Engrailed proteins may require mRNA translation. Our results indicate that Engrailed proteins can play, even at low concentrations, an active role in the morphogenesis of hippocampal cells. Further, they emphasize the over-regulation of GABA cell morphology and the vulnerability of excitatory synapses in a pathological context of En2 overexpression.

  7. Human dendritic cell culture and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah E; Klein, Nigel; Dixon, Garth L J

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in the development of natural immunity to microbes. The DC form a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune system by providing key instructions particularly to antigen naïve T-cells. The interaction of DC with T lymphocytes involves three signals: (1) antigen processing and presentation in context of MHC Class I and/or II, (2) expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules, and (3) cytokine production. Studying the interactions of DCs with specific pathogens allows for better understanding of how protective immunity is generated, and may be particularly useful for assessing vaccine components. In this chapter, we describe methods to generate human monocyte-derived DCs and assess their maturation, activation, and function, using interaction with the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as a model.

  8. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella

    2009-07-01

    Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  9. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  10. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Mizui

    Full Text Available The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1 chemical long-term potentiation (LTP stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2 Ca(2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3 the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  11. K-Cl Cotransporter 2–mediated Cl− Extrusion Determines Developmental Stage–dependent Impact of Propofol Anesthesia on Dendritic Spines

    KAUST Repository

    Puskarjov, Martin

    2017-03-16

    Background: General anesthetics potentiating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated signaling are known to induce a persistent decrement in excitatory synapse number in the cerebral cortex when applied during early postnatal development, while an opposite action is produced at later stages. Here, the authors test the hypothesis that the effect of general anesthetics on synaptogenesis depends upon the efficacy of GABA receptor type A (GABA A)-mediated inhibition controlled by the developmental up-regulation of the potassium-chloride (K-Cl) cotransporter 2 (KCC2). Methods: In utero electroporation of KCC2 was used to prematurely increase the efficacy of (GABA A)-mediated inhibition in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the immature rat somatosensory cortex. Parallel experiments with expression of the inward-rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 were done to reduce intrinsic neuronal excitability. The effects of these genetic manipulations (n = 3 to 4 animals per experimental group) were evaluated using iontophoretic injection of Lucifer Yellow (n = 8 to 12 cells per animal). The total number of spines analyzed per group ranged between 907 and 3,371. Results: The authors found a robust effect of the developmental up-regulation of KCC2-mediated Cl - transport on the age-dependent action of propofol on dendritic spines. Premature expression of KCC2, unlike expression of a transport-inactive KCC2 variant, prevented a propofol-induced decrease in spine density. In line with a reduction in neuronal excitability, the above result was qualitatively replicated by overexpression of Kir2.1. Conclusions: The KCC2-dependent developmental increase in the efficacy of GABA A -mediated inhibition is a major determinant of the age-dependent actions of propofol on dendritic spinogenesis.

  12. Modulations of NeuroD activity contribute to the differential effects of morphine and fentanyl on dendritic spine stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zheng; Zeng, Yan; Chu, Ji; Kam, Angel YuetFang; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2010-01-01

    The cellular level of neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD) is modulated differentially by μ-opioid receptor agonists: fentanyl increases NeuroD level by reducing the amount of miR-190, an inhibitor of NeuroD expression, whereas morphine does not alter NeuroD level. In the current study, NeuroD activity was demonstrated to be also under agonist-dependent regulation. After three-day treatment, morphine and fentanyl decreased the activity of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), which phosphorylates and activates NeuroD. Because NeuroD activity is determined by both the CaMKIIα activity and the cellular NeuroD level, the overall NeuroD activity was reduced by morphine, but maintained during fentanyl treatment. The differential effects of agonists on NeuroD activity were further confirmed by measuring the mRNA levels of four NeuroD downstream targets: doublecortin, Notch1, NeuroD4 and Roundabout 1. Decreased dendritic spine stability and μ-opioid receptor signaling capability were also observed when NeuroD activity was attenuated by miR-190 overexpression or treatment with KN93, a CaMKIIα inhibitor. The decrease could be rescued by NeuroD overexpression which restored NeuroD activity to the basal level. Furthermore, elevating NeuroD activity attenuated the morphine-induced decrease in dendritic spine stability. Therefore, by regulating NeuroD activity, μ-opioid receptor agonists modulate the stability of dendritic spines. PMID:20554861

  13. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); K. Worah (Kuntal); A. Van Der Schaaf (Alie); S.I. Buschow (Sonja I.); A.B. Spriel (Annemiek )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the

  14. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidscherwoude, M.C.; Worah, K.; Schaaf, A. van der; Buschow, S.I.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete

  15. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coosemans, An; Vergote, Ignace; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, 80% of patients with ovarian cancer die of the disease. New treatments for this aggressive disease are therefore being intensively searched. Although dendritic cell-based vaccines against gynecological malignancies are in their infancy, this immunotherapeutic approach holds much promise. Here, we present our view on an optimal dendritic cell-based immunotherapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer.

  16. Dendritic cells recognize tumor-specific glycosylation of carcinoembryonic antigen on colorectal cancer cells through dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Aarnoudse, Corlien A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Immature dendritic cells are located intratumorally within colorectal cancer and intimately interact with tumor cells, whereas mature dendritic cells are present peripheral to the tumor. The majority of colorectal

  17. Regional differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and dendritic spine density confer resilience to inescapable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-07

    In the learned helplessness (LH) paradigm, approximately 35% of rats are resilient to inescapable stress. The roles of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dendritic spine density in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilient) were examined. Western blot analysis and Golgi staining were performed. BDNF levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) were significantly lower in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups, whereas BDNF levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the LH group but not the non-LH group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, spine density in the prelimbic cortex, CA3, and DG was significantly lower in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups, although spine density in the NAc was significantly higher in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups. The results suggest that regional differences in BDNF levels and spine density in rat brain may contribute to resilience to inescapable stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  18. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state of tolerance. By contrast, foreign antigens result in DC maturation and DC-induced T-cell activation. Inappropriate maturation of DCs due to infections or tissue injury may cause alterations in the balance between the tolerogenic and immunogenic functions of DCs and instigate the development of autoimmune diseases. This article provides an overview of the effects of advancing age on DC functions and their implications in autoimmunity.

  19. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelisse, L.N.; van Elburg, R.A.J.; Meredith, R.M.; Yuste, R.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  20. High Speed Two-Photon Imaging of Calcium Dynamics in Dendritic Spines: : Consequences for Spine Calcium Kinetics and Buffer Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R.A.J.; Cornelisse, L.N; Meredith, R.M; Yuste, R; Mansvelder, H.D

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  1. Mechanistic target of rapamycin is necessary for changes in dendritic spine morphology associated with long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Fredrick E; Hockeimer, William; Chen, Alex; Mysore, Shreesh P; Sutton, Michael A

    2017-10-30

    Alterations in the strength of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus is believed to serve a vital function in the storage and recall of new information in the mammalian brain. These alterations involve the regulation of both functional and morphological features of dendritic spines, the principal sites of excitatory synaptic contact. New protein synthesis has been implicated extensively in the functional changes observed following long-term potentiation (LTP), and changes to spine morphology have similarly been documented extensively following synaptic potentiation. However, mechanistic links between de novo translation and the structural changes of potentiated spines are less clear. Here, we assess explicitly the potential contribution of new protein translation under control of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) to LTP-associated changes in spine morphology. Utilizing genetic and pharmacological manipulations of mTORC1 function in combination with confocal microscopy in live dissociated hippocampal cultures, we demonstrate that chemically-induced LTP (cLTP) requires do novo protein synthesis and intact mTORC1 signaling. We observed a striking diversity in response properties across morphological classes, with mushroom spines displaying a particular sensitivity to altered mTORC1 signaling across varied levels of synaptic activity. Notably, while pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 signaling significantly diminished glycine-induced changes in spine morphology, transient genetic upregulation of mTORC1 signaling was insufficient to produce spine enlargements on its own. In contrast, genetic upregulation of mTORC1 signaling promoted rapid expansion in spine head diameter when combined with otherwise sub-threshold synaptic stimulation. These results suggest that synaptic activity-derived signaling pathways act in combination with mTORC1-dependent translational control mechanisms to ultimately regulate changes in spine morphology. As several monogenic

  2. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...... transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of glucocorticoid and phorbol ester stimulation on monocyte and dendritic cell CD163 and CD91 expression was investigated in cell culture of mononuclear cells using multicolor flow cytometry. We identified two CD163+ subsets in human blood with dendritic cell...

  3. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  4. A tetra(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline ameliorates dendritic spine density and cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Min; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Sung, You Me; Ahn, Joo Myung; Turner, R Scott; Yang, Jerry; Pak, Daniel T. S.; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the tetra(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline, BTA-EG4, acts as an amyloid-binding small molecule that promotes dendritic spine density and cognitive function in wild-type mice. This raised the possibility that BTA-EG4 may benefit the functional decline seen in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the present study, we directly tested whether BTA-EG4 improves dendritic spine density and cognitive function in a well-established mouse model of ADcarrying mutations in APP, PS1 and tau (APPswe;PS1M146V;tauP301L, 3xTg AD mice). We found that daily injections of BTA-EG4 for 2 weeks improved dendritic spine density and cognitive function of 3xTg AD mice in an age-dependent manner. Specifically, BTA-EG4 promoted both dendritic spine density and morphology alterations in cortical layers II/III and in the hippocampus at 6–10 months of age compared to vehicle-injected mice. However, at 13–16 months of age, only cortical spine density was improved without changes in spine morphology. The changes in dendritic spine density correlated with Ras activity, such that 6–10 month old BTA-EG4 injected 3xTg AD mice had increased Ras activity in the cortex and hippocampus, while 13–16 month old mice only trended toward an increase in Ras activity in the cortex. Finally, BTA-EG4 injected 3xTg AD mice at 6–10 months of age showed improved learning and memory; however, only minimal improvement was observed at 13–16 months of age. This behavioral improvement corresponds to a decrease in Aβ levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTA-EG4 may be beneficial in ameliorating the synaptic loss seen in early AD. PMID:24316432

  5. A tetra(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline ameliorates dendritic spine density and cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Min; DiBattista, Amanda Marie; Sung, You Me; Ahn, Joo Myung; Turner, R Scott; Yang, Jerry; Pak, Daniel T S; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Hoe, Hyang-Sook

    2014-02-01

    We recently reported that the tetra(ethylene glycol) derivative of benzothiazole aniline, BTA-EG4, acts as an amyloid-binding small molecule that promotes dendritic spine density and cognitive function in wild-type mice. This raised the possibility that BTA-EG4 may benefit the functional decline seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we directly tested whether BTA-EG4 improves dendritic spine density and cognitive function in a well-established mouse model of AD carrying mutations in APP, PS1 and tau (APPswe;PS1M146V;tauP301L, 3xTg AD mice). We found that daily injections of BTA-EG4 for 2 weeks improved dendritic spine density and cognitive function of 3xTg AD mice in an age-dependent manner. Specifically, BTA-EG4 promoted both dendritic spine density and morphology alterations in cortical layers II/III and in the hippocampus at 6-10 months of age compared to vehicle-injected mice. However, at 13-16 months of age, only cortical spine density was improved without changes in spine morphology. The changes in dendritic spine density correlated with Ras activity, such that 6-10 month old BTA-EG4 injected 3xTg AD mice had increased Ras activity in the cortex and hippocampus, while 13-16 month old mice only trended toward an increase in Ras activity in the cortex. Finally, BTA-EG4 injected 3xTg AD mice at 6-10 months of age showed improved learning and memory; however, only minimal improvement was observed at 13-16 months of age. This behavioral improvement corresponds to a decrease in soluble Aβ 40 levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTA-EG4 may be beneficial in ameliorating the synaptic loss seen in early AD. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Granulocytes as modulators of dendritic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Annelot; Groot Kormelink, Tom; van Egmond, Marjolein; de Jong, Esther C

    2017-10-01

    Effector T cell development is directly driven by APCs, in particular, by antigen-primed dendritic cells (DCs). Depending on the pathogenic stimulus and the microenvironment, DCs induce proliferation and polarization of naive CD4+ T cells into different effector subsets, such as Th1, Th2, Th17, or regulatory T cells (Tregs). During inflammation, DCs are found in close proximity to other innate immune cells, including all granulocyte subtypes, which potentially influence the immunomodulatory capacities of DCs. Neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils are rapidly recruited into infected tissues where their main function is to eliminate invading pathogens. Mast cells are tissue-resident granulocytes that also contribute to host defense against pathogens but have, thus far, primarily been associated with their detrimental roles in allergic diseases. Although granulocytes have always been considered essential in innate immunity, their ability to influence the development of adaptive immunity has long been overlooked. This view is now changing, as multiple studies showed significant modulating effects of granulocytes on key players of adaptive immunity, including DCs and lymphocytes. Neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells regulate recruitment and activation of DCs through the release of mediators or via direct cell-cell contact, thereby influencing antigen-specific T cell responses. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the impact of granulocytes on DC functioning and the subsequent putative consequences of this cross-talk on T cell proliferation and polarization. Together, this overview underscores the importance of granulocyte-DC communication to establish optimal immune responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. Induction of RNA interference in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Qian, Hua; Ichim, Thomas E; Ge, Wei-Wen; Popov, Igor A; Rycerz, Katarzyna; Neu, John; White, David; Zhong, Robert; Min, Wei-Ping

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) reside at the center of the immunological universe, possessing the ability both to stimulate and inhibit various types of responses. Tolerogenic/regulatory DC with therapeutic properties can be generated through various means of manipulations in vitro and in vivo. Here we describe several attractive strategies for manipulation of DC using the novel technique of RNA interference (RNAi). Additionally, we overview some of our data regarding yet undescribed characteristics of RNAi in DC such as specific transfection strategies, persistence of gene silencing, and multi-gene silencing. The advantages of using RNAi for DC genetic manipulation gives rise to the promise of generating tailor-made DC that can be used effectively to treat a variety of immunologically mediated diseases.

  8. Maturation of dendritic cells by bacterial immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisek, Radek; Brazova, Jitka; Rozkova, Daniela; Zapletalova, Katerina; Sediva, Anna; Bartunkova, Jirina

    2004-07-29

    Dendritic cells (DC) become fully functional upon maturation by various stimuli. We tested whether an immunostimulatory effect of clinically used immunomodulators (Luivac, Biostim, Ribomunyl, Imudon, Bronchovaxom) is caused by direct DC activation. We found that Luivac, Biostim and Ribomunyl have a very high DC stimulatory potential in vitro. The level of DC activation was comparable or higher than DC maturation induced by standard maturation stimuli, Poly (I:C) or lipopolysaccharide. Treated DC had activated phenotype, reduced phagocytic activity and they induced the proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes. These results are important for understanding the physiology of action of these widely prescribed agents. Administration of bacterial immunomodulators should be considered with care to avoid the potential risk of inducing an autoimmune disease. They could also be used as well-defined maturating agents in the protocols used for the ex vivo production of DC-based vaccines for clinical trials.

  9. Dendritic cell immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coosemans, An; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Vanderstraeten, Anke; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frédéric; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2014-01-01

    Uterine cancer is the most common pelvic gynecological malignancy. Uterine sarcomas and relapsed uterine carcinomas have limited treatment options. The search for new therapies is urgent. Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy holds much promise, though has been poorly explored in uterine cancer. This commentary gives an insight in existing DC immunotherapy studies in uterine cancer and summarizes the possibilities and the importance of the loading of tumor antigens onto DC and their subsequent maturation. However, the sole application of DC immunotherapy to target uterine cancer will be insufficient because of tumor-induced immunosuppression, which will hamper the establishment of an effective anti-tumor immune response. The authors give an overview on the limited existing immunosuppressive data and propose a novel approach on DC immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

  10. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  11. Adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alun Brown, K

    2001-01-01

    Many of the interdigitating dendritic cells (DC) that reside in lymph nodes arise from the migration of tissue interstitial DC such as Langerhans cells in the skin (1). Although this migration appears to be stimulated by cytokines (2), relatively little is known of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance and expansion of DC in the skin. Langerhans cells are bone-marrow derived (3), and their replacement in the epidermis following transportation of antigen to lymphoid tissue is likely to depend upon the tissue extravasation of circulating DC. Moreover, the continuous passage of DC across blood vessel walls could be responsible for the increase in DC numbers in tumors (4) and sites of chronic inflammation (5,6). Thus, germane to both homeostasis and pathological disturbance would be the interaction of circulating DC with blood vessel walls, and their subsequent entry into the surrounding tissue. The first stage in leukocyte migration across blood vessel walls is binding to vascular endothelium, and for lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils this event is governed by adhesion molecules on their surface recognizing corresponding endothelial ligands commonly referred to as vascular adhesion molecules (7). Despite the plethora of information concerning the molecular nature of the attachment of the major leukocyte subpopulations to endothelium, relatively few studies have been undertaken with DC. Understanding the controlling features of DC-endo-thelial cell interaction would be relevant to the clinical application of DC in immunodeficient disorders and malignancies (8,9) and to antagonizing their entry into sites of chronic inflammatory lesions.

  12. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  13. The dendritic cell niche in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Haczku, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The pulmonary innate immune system is heavily implicated in the perpetual airway inflammation and impaired host defense characterizing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The airways of patients suffering from COPD are infiltrated by various immune and inflammatory cells including macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. While the role of macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes is well characterized, the contribution of dendritic cells to COPD pathog...

  14. Dendritic Cell Interactions with Lymphatic Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Erica; Nitschké, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Afferent lymphatic vessels fulfill essential immune functions by transporting leukocytes and lymph-borne antigen to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). An important cell type migrating through lymphatic vessels are dendritic cells (DCs). DCs reside in peripheral tissues like the skin, where they take up antigen and transport it via the lymphatic vascular network to dLNs for subsequent presentation to T cells. As such, DCs play a key role in the induction of adaptive immune responses during infection and vaccination, but also for the maintenance of tolerance. Although the migratory pattern of DCs has been known for long time, interactions between DCs and lymphatic vessels are only now starting to be unraveled at the cellular level. In particular, new tools for visualizing lymphatic vessels in combination with time-lapse microscopy have recently generated valuable insights into the process of DC migration to dLNs. In this review we summarize and discuss current approaches for visualizing DCs and lymphatic vessels in tissues for imaging applications. Furthermore, we review the current state of knowledge about DC migration towards, into and within lymphatic vessels, particularly focusing on the cellular interactions that take place between DCs and the lymphatic endothelium. PMID:24044757

  15. The CD8+ dendritic cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R

    2010-03-01

    Mouse lymphoid tissues contain a subset of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing CD8 alpha together with a pattern of other surface molecules that distinguishes them from other DCs. These molecules include particular Toll-like receptor and C-type lectin pattern recognition receptors. A similar DC subset, although lacking CD8 expression, exists in humans. The mouse CD8(+) DCs are non-migrating resident DCs derived from a precursor, distinct from monocytes, that continuously seeds the lymphoid organs from bone marrow. They differ in several key functions from their CD8(-) DC neighbors. They efficiently cross-present exogenous cell-bound and soluble antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I. On activation, they are major producers of interleukin-12 and stimulate inflammatory responses. In steady state, they have immune regulatory properties and help maintain tolerance to self-tissues. During infection with intracellular pathogens, they become major presenters of pathogen antigens, promoting CD8(+) T-cell responses to the invading pathogens. Targeting vaccine antigens to the CD8(+) DCs has proved an effective way to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes and antibody responses.

  16. Histamine regulates murine primary dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Heiko; Neumann, Detlef; Kloth, Christina

    2016-10-01

    The modulation of antigen uptake and activation of dendritic cells (DCs) by histamine may function as a regulator of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of histamine on antigen uptake by and activation of murine DCs. DCs from spleen and lung were either identified by flow cytometry or were immunomagnetically enriched. Cells were stimulated with histamine, and the regulation of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and ICOS-L) and antigen uptake were quantified by flow cytometry. Individual contributions of the histamine receptor subtypes were determined by using the antagonists mepyramine (histamine H1-receptor: H1R), famotidine (H2R), and JNJ 7777120 (H4R). Histamine accelerated the uptake of soluble antigen via the H1R, H2R, and H4R in splenic DCs. Co-stimulatory molecule expression was enhanced already by enrichment procedures, thus, the analyses were performed in unseparated cell populations. Histamine enhanced the expression of CD86 and ICOS-L while expression of CD80 was unaffected. Antagonism at H1R, H2R, and H4R and at H1R and H4R reduced the histamine-induced enhanced expression of CD86 and ICOS-L, respectively. Histamine contributes to the regulation of the immunological synapse by stimulation of antigen uptake and activation of DCs via H1R, H2R, and H4R.

  17. Brain dendritic cells: biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Bulloch, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In their quiescent and mature form, the presentation of self-antigens by DC leads to tolerance; whereas, antigen presentation by mature DC, after stimulation by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leads to the onset of antigen-specific immunity. DC have been found in many of the major organs in mammals (e.g. skin, heart, lungs, intestines and spleen); while the brain has long been considered devoid of DC in the absence of neuroinflammation. Consequently, microglia, the resident immune cell of the brain, have been charged with many functional attributes commonly ascribed to DC. Recent evidence has challenged the notion that DC are either absent or minimal players in brain immune surveillance. This review will discuss the recent literature examining DC involvement within both the young and aged steady-state brain. We will also examine DC contributions during various forms of neuroinflammation resulting from neurodegenerative autoimmune disease, injury, and CNS infections. This review also touches upon DC trafficking between the central nervous system and peripheral immune compartments during viral infections, the new molecular technologies that could be employed to enhance our current understanding of brain DC ontogeny, and some potential therapeutic uses of DC within the CNS.

  18. Use and abuse of dendritic cells by Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanecka, Anna; Frickel, Eva-Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii stimulates its host’s immune response to achieve quiescent chronic infection. Central to this goal are host dendritic cells. The parasite exploits dendritic cells to disseminate through the body, produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, present its antigens to the immune system and yet at the same time subvert their signaling pathways in order to evade detection. This carefully struck balance by Toxoplasma makes it the most successful parasite on this planet. Recent progress has highlighted specific parasite and host molecules that mediate some of these processes particularly in dendritic cells and in other cells of the innate immune system. Critically, there are several important factors that need to be taken into consideration when concluding how the dendritic cells and the immune system deal with a Toxoplasma infection, including the route of administration, parasite strain and host genotype. PMID:23221473

  19. Glutaminase and MMP-9 Downregulation in Cortex and Hippocampus of LPA1 Receptor Null Mice Correlate with Altered Dendritic Spine Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peñalver

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is an extracellular lipid mediator that regulates nervous system development and functions acting through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Here we explore the crosstalk between LPA1 receptor and glutamatergic transmission by examining expression of glutaminase (GA isoforms in different brain areas isolated from wild-type (WT and KOLPA1 mice. Silencing of LPA1 receptor induced a severe down-regulation of Gls-encoded long glutaminase protein variant (KGA (glutaminase gene encoding the kidney-type isoforms, GLS protein expression in several brain regions, particularly in brain cortex and hippocampus. Immunohistochemical assessment of protein levels for the second type of glutaminase (GA isoform, glutaminase gene encoding the liver-type isoforms (GLS2, did not detect substantial differences with regard to WT animals. The regional mRNA levels of GLS were determined by real time RT-PCR and did not show significant variations, except for prefrontal and motor cortex values which clearly diminished in KO mice. Total GA activity was also significantly reduced in prefrontal and motor cortex, but remained essentially unchanged in the hippocampus and rest of brain regions examined, suggesting activation of genetic compensatory mechanisms and/or post-translational modifications to compensate for KGA protein deficit. Remarkably, Golgi staining of hippocampal regions showed an altered morphology of glutamatergic pyramidal cells dendritic spines towards a less mature filopodia-like phenotype, as compared with WT littermates. This structural change correlated with a strong decrease of active matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP 9 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of KOLPA1 mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LPA signaling through LPA1 influence expression of the main isoenzyme of glutamate biosynthesis with strong repercussions on dendritic spines maturation, which may partially explain the cognitive and learning defects

  20. Differential protection of injured retinal ganglion cell dendrites by brimonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, James D; Duong-Polk, Karen X; Hammond, Dustin; Chindasub, Panida; Leung, Christopher Kai-Shun; Weinreb, Robert N

    2015-01-29

    To determine whether brimonidine protects against the retraction and loss of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendrites after optic nerve crush (ONC). Fluorescent RGCs of mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under the control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-YFP mice) were imaged in vivo and assigned to one of six groups according to dendrite structure. The mice then received brimonidine every other day starting 2 days before, or 2 or 6 days after, unilateral ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Total dendrite length, dendrite branching complexity, and the time until complete loss of dendrites were assessed weekly for 4 weeks. Overall, brimonidine treatment significantly slowed the complete loss of RGC dendrites and significantly slowed the reduction of total dendrite length and branching complexity. Separate analysis of each RGC group showed brimonidine significantly delayed the time until complete loss of dendrites in four of the RGC groups. These delays generally were similar when treatment started either 2 days before or 2 days after ONC, but were smaller or absent when treatment started 6 days after ONC Protection against loss of total dendrite length and loss of branching complexity was observed in three of the RGC groups. In two of these RGC groups, protective effects persisted until the end of the study. Brimonidine protects many RGC types against dendrite retraction, loss of branching complexity, and complete loss of dendrites following ONC. However, the pattern and magnitude of this protection differs substantially among different RGC types. These results indicate that requirements for RGC-protective therapies following optic nerve injury may differ among RGC types. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. Stabilization of dendritic spine clusters and hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling predict enhanced motor learning in an autistic savant mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Ash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available That both prominent behavioral inflexibility and exceptional learning abilities are seen occasionally in autistic patients is a mystery. We hypothesize that these altered patterns of learning and memory can arise from a pathological imbalance between the stability and plasticity of internal neural representations. We evaluated this hypothesis in the mouse model of MECP2 duplication syndrome, which demonstrates enhanced motor learning, stereotyped behaviors, and social avoidance. Learning-associated structural plasticity was measured in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice by 2-photon imaging (Fig. 1A. An increased stabilization rate of learning-associated dendritic spines was observed in mutants, and this correlated with rotarod performance. Analysis of the spatial distribution of stabilized spines revealed that the mutant’s increased spine stabilization was due to a specific increase in the stability of spines jointly formed in ~9-micron clusters. Clustered spine stabilization but not isolated spine stabilization predicted enhanced motor performance in MECP2 duplication mice (Fig. 1B. Biochemical assays of Ras-MAPK and mTOR pathway activation demonstrated profound hyperphosphorylation of MAPK in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice with motor training (Fig. 1C. Taken together these data suggest that a pathological bias towards hyperstability of learning-associated dendritic spine clusters driven by hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling could contribute to neurobehavioral phenotypes in this form of syndromic autism.

  2. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis synovium contains plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Lois L; Boyce, Amanda; Smith, Louise; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Filgueira, Luis; Pietschmann, Peter; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2005-01-01

    We have previously described enrichment of antigen-presenting HLA-DR+ nuclear RelB+ dendritic cells (DCs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium. CD123+HLA-DR+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and their precursors have been identified in human peripheral blood (PB), lymphoid tissue, and some inflamed tissues. We hypothesized recruitment of pDCs into the inflamed RA synovial environment and their contribution as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and inflammatory cells in RA. CD11c+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ pDCs were compared in normal and RA PB, synovial fluid (SF), and synovial tissue by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy and were sorted for functional studies. Nuclear RelB-CD123+ DCs were located in perivascular regions of RA, in a similar frequency to nuclear RelB+CD123- DCs, but not normal synovial tissue sublining. Apart from higher expression of HLA-DR, the numbers and phenotypes of SF pDCs were similar to those of normal PB pDCs. While the APC function of PB pDCs was less efficient than that of PB myeloid DCs, RA SF pDCs efficiently activated resting allogeneic PB T cells, and high levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α were produced in response to incubation of allogeneic T cells with either type of SF DCs. Thus, pDCs are recruited to RA synovial tissue and comprise an APC population distinct from the previously described nuclear RelB+ synovial DCs. pDCs may contribute significantly to the local inflammatory environment. PMID:15743469

  4. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  5. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  6. SHANK3 mutations identified in autism lead to modification of dendritic spine morphology via an actin-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, C M; Perroy, J; Loll, F; Perrais, D; Fagni, L; Bourgeron, T; Montcouquiol, M; Sans, N

    2012-01-01

    Genetic mutations of SHANK3 have been reported in patients with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. At the synapse, Shank3/ProSAP2 is a scaffolding protein that connects glutamate receptors to the actin cytoskeleton via a chain of intermediary elements. Although genetic studies have repeatedly confirmed the association of SHANK3 mutations with susceptibility to psychiatric disorders, very little is known about the neuronal consequences of these mutations. Here, we report the functional effects of two de novo mutations (STOP and Q321R) and two inherited variations (R12C and R300C) identified in patients with ASD. We show that Shank3 is located at the tip of actin filaments and enhances its polymerization. Shank3 also participates in growth cone motility in developing neurons. The truncating mutation (STOP) strongly affects the development and morphology of dendritic spines, reduces synaptic transmission in mature neurons and also inhibits the effect of Shank3 on growth cone motility. The de novo mutation in the ankyrin domain (Q321R) modifies the roles of Shank3 in spine induction and morphology, and actin accumulation in spines and affects growth cone motility. Finally, the two inherited mutations (R12C and R300C) have intermediate effects on spine density and synaptic transmission. Therefore, although inherited by healthy parents, the functional effects of these mutations strongly suggest that they could represent risk factors for ASD. Altogether, these data provide new insights into the synaptic alterations caused by SHANK3 mutations in humans and provide a robust cellular readout for the development of knowledge-based therapies.

  7. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    and the lysis of relevant in vivo targets. However, the CTLA-4 blockage dependent expansion of CTLs also affect DC survival during booster DC injections and our data suggest that during a booster DC vaccine, the largest increase in CTL levels is already obtained during the first vaccination.......Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...... are emerging that combine vaccination with CTL expanding strategies, such as e.g. blockade of CTLA-4 signalling. On the other hand, the lifespan and in vivo survival of therapeutic DCs have only been addressed in a few studies, although this is of importance for the kinetics of CTL induction during vaccination...

  8. Dendritic polymers: Universal glue for cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Holger

    2012-05-01

    A dendritic polymer consisting of inversely oriented lipid head groups on a polyvalent polyglycerol scaffold makes an effective reversible biomembrane adhesive that may find use as a tissue sealant and a drug-delivery vehicle.

  9. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septo-temporal axis in adulthood and middle age

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septo-temporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septo-temporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  10. Fluoxetine induces input-specific hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling along the septotemporal axis in adulthood and middle age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Kathleen; Russo, Craig; Kim, Shannen; Rankin, Genelle; Sahay, Amar

    2015-11-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is known to induce structural rearrangements and changes in synaptic transmission in hippocampal circuitry. In the adult hippocampus, structural changes include neurogenesis, dendritic, and axonal plasticity of pyramidal and dentate granule neurons, and dedifferentiation of dentate granule neurons. However, much less is known about how chronic fluoxetine affects these processes along the septotemporal axis and during the aging process. Importantly, studies documenting the effects of fluoxetine on density and distribution of spines along different dendritic segments of dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons along the septotemporal axis of hippocampus in adulthood and during aging are conspicuously absent. Here, we use a transgenic mouse line in which mature dentate granule neurons and CA1 pyramidal neurons are genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) to investigate the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day) on input-specific spine remodeling and mossy fiber structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in adulthood and middle age. In addition, we examine levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, maturation state of dentate granule neurons, neuronal activity, and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in response to chronic fluoxetine in adulthood and middle age. Our studies reveal that while chronic fluoxetine fails to augment adult hippocampal neurogenesis in middle age, the middle-aged hippocampus retains high sensitivity to changes in the dentate gyrus (DG) such as dematuration, hypoactivation, and increased glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression. Interestingly, the middle-aged hippocampus shows greater sensitivity to fluoxetine-induced input-specific synaptic remodeling than the hippocampus in adulthood with the stratum-oriens of CA1 exhibiting heightened structural plasticity. The input-specific changes and circuit

  11. Dim light at night provokes depression-like behaviors and reduces CA1 dendritic spine density in female hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Walton, James C; Haim, Abraham; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades; however, the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain unspecified. One environmental change that has coincided with elevated rates of depression is increased exposure to artificial light at night. Shift workers and others chronically exposed to light at night are at increased risk of mood disorders, suggesting that nighttime illumination may influence brain mechanisms mediating affect. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night may impact affective responses and alter morphology of hippocampal neurons. Ovariectomized adult female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were housed for 8 weeks in either a light/dark cycle (LD) or a light/dim light cycle (DM), and then behavior was assayed. DM-hamsters displayed more depression-like responses in the forced swim and the sucrose anhedonia tests compared with LD-hamsters. Conversely, in the elevated plus maze DM-hamsters reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Brains from the same animals were processed using the Golgi-Cox method and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus were analyzed for morphological characteristics. In CA1, DM-hamsters significantly reduced dendritic spine density on both apical and basilar dendrites, an effect which was not mediated by baseline cortisol, as concentrations were equivalent between groups. These results demonstrate dim light at night is sufficient to reduce synaptic spine connections to CA1. Importantly, the present results suggest that night-time low level illumination, comparable to levels that are pervasive in North America and Europe, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of mood disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The ‘addicted’ spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino eSpiga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of ‘spinous’ nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in ‘structural plasticity.’Medium Spiny Neurons of the Nucleus Accumbens show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized ‘strictly’ to second order dendritic branches where, dopamine-containing terminals impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  13. The dendritic cell side of the immunological synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboogen, D.R.J.; Dingjan, I.; Revelo, N.H.; Visser, L.J.; Beest, M.B.A. ter; Bogaart, G. van den

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses are initiated by the interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), with responder cells, such as T cells, via a tight cellular contact interface called the immunological synapse. The immunological synapse is a highly organized subcellular

  14. Nomenclature of monocytes and dendritic cells in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ziegler-Heitbrock (Loems); P. Ancuta (Petronela); S. Crowe (Suzanne); M. Dalod (Marc); V. Grau (Veronika); D.N. Hart (Derek); P.J. Leenen (Pieter); Y.J. Liu; G. MacPherson (Gordon); G.J. Randolph (Gwendalyn); J. Scherberich (Juergen); J. Schmitz (Juergen); K. Shortman (Ken); S. Sozzani (Silvano); H. Strobl (Herbert); M. Zembala (Marek); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan); M.B. Lutz (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonocytes and cells of the dendritic cell lineage circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue where they further mature and serve various functions, most notably in immune defense. Over recent years these cells have been characterized in detail with the use of cell surface

  15. Immune roles of dendritic cells in stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liao, Wenwei; Liu, Furong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; He, Xiaoshun; Hu, Anbin

    2017-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells and initial stimulators for immune response. DCs can shape their functions based on their immune states, which are crucial for the balance of immunity and tolerance to preserve homeostasis. In the immune response involved in stem cell transplantation, DCs also play important roles in inducing immune tolerance and antitumor immunity. After the rapid development of stem cell transplantation technology in recent years, the risks of graft rejection, tumor recurrence, and tumorigenicity are still present after stem cell transplantation. It is important to understand the mechanisms of DC-mediated immune tolerance and stimulation during stem cell transplantation. In this review, we will summarize and analyze the regulatory mechanisms of DCs in stem cell transplantation and their application in clinical settings. It may help to promote the innovation in basic theories and therapeutic approaches of stem cell transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reelin Supplementation Enhances Cognitive Ability, Synaptic Plasticity, and Dendritic Spine Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Justin T.; Rusiana, Ian; Trotter, Justin; Zhao, Lisa; Donaldson, Erika; Pak, Daniel T.S.; Babus, Lenard W.; Peters, Melinda; Banko, Jessica L.; Chavis, Pascale; Rebeck, G. William; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein receptors belong to an evolutionarily conserved surface receptor family that has intimate roles in the modulation of synaptic plasticity and is necessary for proper hippocampal-dependent memory formation. The known lipoprotein receptor ligand Reelin is important for normal synaptic plasticity, dendritic morphology, and cognitive…

  17. Assisted morphogenesis: glial control of dendrite shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procko, Carl; Shaham, Shai

    2010-10-01

    Neurons display a myriad of dendritic architectures, reflecting their diverse roles in information processing and transduction in the nervous system. Recent findings suggest that neuronal signals may not account for all aspects of dendrite morphogenesis. Observations from C. elegans and other organisms suggest that glial cells can affect dendrite length and guidance, as well as localization and shapes of dendritic receptive structures, such as dendritic spines and sensory cilia. Thus, besides direct roles in controlling neuronal activity, glia contribute to neuron function by ensuring that neurons attain their proper shapes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Homer2 deletion alters dendritic spine morphology but not alcohol-associated adaptations in GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S McGuier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to ethanol followed by withdrawal leads to the alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in both clinical and preclinical models of ethanol exposure. Homer2 is a member of a family of postsynaptic density (PSD scaffolding proteins that functions in part to cluster NMDA signaling complexes in the PSD, and has been shown to be critically important for plasticity in multiple models of drug and alcohol abuse. Here we used Homer2 KO mice and a chronic intermittent intraperitoneal (IP ethanol injection model to investigate a potential role for the protein in ethanol-induced adaptations in dendritic spine morphology and PSD protein expression. While deletion of Homer2 was associated with increased density of long spines on medium spiny neurons of the NAc core of saline treated mice, ethanol exposure had no effect on dendritic spine morphology in either wild-type (WT or Homer2 KO mice. Western blot analysis of tissue samples from the NAc enriched for PSD proteins revealed a main effect of ethanol treatment on the expression of GluN2B, but there was no effect of genotype or treatment on the expression other glutamate receptor subunits or PSD95. These data indicate that the global deletion of Homer2 leads to aberrant regulation of dendritic spine morphology in the NAc core that is associated with an increased density of long, thin spines. Unexpectedly, intermittent IP ethanol did not affect spine morphology in either WT or KO mice. Together these data implicate Homer2 in the formation of long, thin spines and further supports its role in neuronal structure.

  19. The dendritic cell niche in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haczku Angela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pulmonary innate immune system is heavily implicated in the perpetual airway inflammation and impaired host defense characterizing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. The airways of patients suffering from COPD are infiltrated by various immune and inflammatory cells including macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. While the role of macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes is well characterized, the contribution of dendritic cells to COPD pathogenesis is still the subject of emerging research. A paper by Botelho and colleagues in the current issue of Respiratory Research investigates the importance of dendritic cell recruitment in cigarette-smoke induced acute and chronic inflammation in mice. Dendritic cells of the healthy lung parenchyma and airways perform an important sentinel function and regulate immune homeostasis. During inflammatory responses the function and migration pattern of these cells is dramatically altered but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Botelho and colleagues demonstrate here the importance of IL-1R1/IL-1α related mechanisms including CCL20 production in cigarette-smoke induced recruitment of dendritic cells and T cell activation in the mouse lung.

  20. Complete response of metastatic renal cancer with dendritic cell vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Oglio Marcos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that presented involution following therapy with dendritic cells. CASE REPORT: Male, 51-year old patient underwent left radical nephrectomy in September 1999 due to renal cell carcinoma, evolved with recurrence of the neoplasia in January 2002, confirmed by resection of the lesion. A vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells was then performed during 5 months (4 applications. After this period, there was occurrence of new lesions, whose resection revealed areas of necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate. DISCUSSION: The outcome of renal cell carcinoma is influenced by prognostic factors that confer more aggressive tumor characteristics. However, in cases of recurrence, the systemic therapy with dendritic cells-based vaccine can be associated with a better outcome with regression of disease.

  1. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  2. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  3. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Actin' on HIV: How Dendritic Cells Spread Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Daniel A; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-03-09

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture HIV particles and transmit them to CD4 T cells. In a recent article published in Cell, Ménager and Littman (2016) perform an shRNA screen in DCs and find that actin nucleation and stabilization regulate HIV uptake and maintain the virus on membrane protrusions for efficient transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  6. Chronic stimulation of alpha-2A-adrenoceptors with guanfacine protects rodent prefrontal cortex dendritic spines and cognition from the effects of chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avis Brennan Hains

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex (PFC provides top-down regulation of behavior, cognition, and emotion, including spatial working memory. However, these PFC abilities are greatly impaired by exposure to acute or chronic stress. Chronic stress exposure in rats induces atrophy of PFC dendrites and spines that correlates with working memory impairment. As similar PFC grey matter loss appears to occur in mental illness, the mechanisms underlying these changes need to be better understood. Acute stress exposure impairs PFC cognition by activating feedforward cAMP-calcium- K+ channel signaling, which weakens synaptic inputs and reduces PFC neuronal firing. Spine loss with chronic stress has been shown to involve calcium-protein kinase C signaling, but it is not known if inhibiting cAMP signaling would similarly prevent the atrophy induced by repeated stress. The current study examined whether inhibiting cAMP signaling through alpha-2A-adrenoceptor stimulation with chronic guanfacine treatment would protect PFC spines and working memory performance during chronic stress exposure. Guanfacine was selected due to 1 its established effects on cAMP signaling at post-synaptic alpha-2A receptors on spines in PFC, and 2 its increasing clinical use for the treatment of pediatric stress disorders. Daily guanfacine treatment compared to vehicle control was found to prevent dendritic spine loss in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of prelimbic PFC in rats exposed to chronic restraint stress. Guanfacine also protected working memory performance; cognitive performance correlated with dendritic spine density. These findings suggest that chronic guanfacine use may have clinical utility by protecting PFC gray matter from the detrimental effects of stress.

  7. Treadmill exercise suppressed stress-induced dendritic spine elimination in mouse barrel cortex and improved working memory via BDNF/TrkB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Zhang, L; Tan, M; Lai, C S W; Li, A; Ren, C; So, K-F

    2017-03-21

    Stress-related memory deficit is correlated with dendritic spine loss. Physical exercise improves memory function and promotes spinogenesis. However, no studies have been performed to directly observe exercise-related effects on spine dynamics, in association with memory function. This study utilized transcranial two-photon in vivo microscopy to investigate dendritic spine formation and elimination in barrel cortex of mice under physical constrain or naive conditions, followed by memory performance in a whisker-dependent novel texture discrimination task. We found that stressed mice had elevated spine elimination rate in mouse barrel cortex plus deficits in memory retrieval, both of which can be rescued by chronic exercise on treadmill. Exercise also elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in barrel cortex. The above-mentioned rescuing effects for both spinognesis and memory function were abolished after inhibiting BDNF/tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) pathway. In summary, this study demonstrated the improvement of stress-associated memory function by exercise via facilitating spine retention in a BDNF/TrkB-dependent manner.

  8. Synaptic activity prompts ?-secretase?mediated cleavage of EphA4 and dendritic spine formation

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Eiji; Deguchi-Tawarada, Maki; Togawa, Aki; Matsui, Chiyuki; Arita, Kohei; Katahira-Tayama, Sayaka; Sato, Toshitaka; Yamauchi, Emiko; Oda, Yoshiya; Takai, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function. ?-secretase dysfunction is evident in many cases of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanism by which ?-secretase dysfunction results in memory loss and neurodegeneration is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that ?-secretase is localized at synapses and regulates spine formation. We identify EphA4, one of the Ephrin receptor ...

  9. Defining dendritic cells by conditional and constitutive cell ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    Recent years have seen a major advance in our understanding of the organization of the dendritic cell (DC) compartment. Particularly rewarding in this respect have been studies investigating DC origins, based on the identification of transcription factor and growth factor requirements, as well as direct demonstrations of precursor/progeny relationships by adoptive cell transfers. However, to fully understand the organization of the DC compartment, functional definitions of DC subsets must be provided and potential task divisions revealed that distinguish DC from other immune cells, including the closely related mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages. In fact, functional definitions might eventually replace the current distinction between DC and macrophages, which is in part based on arbitrary historic considerations, i.e. mononuclear phagocytes identified before the advent of DC in the mid 1970s generally termed macrophages. In this article, we review recent insight in the functions of classical DC in the mouse, focusing on our own work involving conditional and constitutive cell ablation.

  10. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma: A Questionable Association with Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benharroch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly woman presented with generalized lymphadenopathy, several systemic symptoms, and splenomegaly. An inguinal lymph node excision revealed a compound picture. One aspect of the lymph node morphology, including cells with follicular T-helper cell phenotype, was most consistent with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The other component, revealing spindle cells forming whorls with immunostaining for CD21, CD23, and fascin, might be an integral part of this T-cell lymphoma. However, due to the often massive involvement of the nodal tissue by these follicular dendritic cells, these areas were questionably suggestive of involvement by follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. We raise herein the issue of the borderline area between advanced follicular dendritic cell expansion in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and a massive follicular dendritic cell proliferation consistent with follicular dendritic cells sarcoma, in the absence of a genomic analysis.

  11. Tumor-Mediated Suppression of Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akporiaye, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    .... One of these factors is Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta). TGF-beta is produced in large quantities by different types of cancer including breast cancer and inhibits the actions of several immune cells including dendritic cells (DC...

  12. Investigating Human Dendritic Cell Immune Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Lauren M. K.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2018-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that recognize and phagocytose pathogens, and help to orchestrate adaptive immune responses to combat them. DCs are abundant in the skin where Borrelia burgdorferi first enters the body during a tick bite, and are thus critical in

  13. Phenotypical and functional characterization of clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, I.J.M. de; Adema, G.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and form a promising new treatment modality. Fully activated DC loaded with antigen are very useful in stimulating immune responses, in particular those to combat cancer. Immature DC can either cause immunological tolerance or induce

  14. IL-10 control of dendritic cells in the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent immunomodulatory cytokine, whose cellular targets have not yet been precisely identified. Mice bearing a dendritic cell (DC)-specific defect in the IL-10 receptor mice exhibit exaggerated T-cell reactivation in the skin, highlighting a key function of

  15. Dendritic cell maturation results in pronounced changes in glycan expression affecting recognition by siglecs and galectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Marieke; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Jang-Lee, Jihye; North, Simon J.; Gilmartin, Tim J.; Hernandez, Gilberto; Crocker, Paul R.; Leffler, Hakon; Head, Steven R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent APC in the organism. Immature dendritic cells (iDC) reside in the tissue where they capture pathogens whereas mature dendritic cells (mDC) are able to activate T cells in the lymph node. This dramatic functional change is mediated by an important genetic

  16. DIXDC1 contributes to psychiatric susceptibility by regulating dendritic spine and glutamatergic synapse density via GSK3 and Wnt/?-catenin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Pierre-Marie; Stanley, Robert E.; Ross, Adam P.; Freitas, Andiara E.; Moyer, Caitlin E.; Brumback, Audrey C.; Iafrati, Jillian; Stapornwongkul, Kristina S.; Dominguez, Sky; Kivimäe, Saul; Mulligan, Kimberly A.; Pirooznia, Mehdi; McCombie, W. Richard; Potash, James B.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Mice lacking DIX domain containing-1 (DIXDC1), an intracellular Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway protein, have abnormal measures of anxiety, depression and social behavior. Pyramidal neurons in these animals’ brains have reduced dendritic spines and glutamatergic synapses. Treatment with lithium or a Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor corrects behavioral and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in these animals. Analysis of DIXDC1 in over 9,000 cases of autism, bipolar disorder and schizophreni...

  17. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  18. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-11-15

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. Currently, the gold standard protocol for generating dendritic cells from monocytes across various species relies upon a combination of GM-CSF and IL-4 added to cell culture medium which is supplemented with FBS. The aim of this study was to substitute FBS with heterologous horse serum. For this purpose, equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (eqMoDC) were generated in the presence of horse serum or FBS and analysed for the effect on morphology, phenotype and immunological properties. Changes in the expression of phenotypic markers (CD14, CD86, CD206) were assessed during dendritic cell maturation by flow cytometry. To obtain a more complete picture of the eqMoDC differentiation and assess possible differences between FBS- and horse serum-driven cultures, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed. Lastly, immature eqMoDC were primed with a primary antigen (ovalbumin) or a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) and, after maturation, were co-cultured with freshly isolated autologous CD5 + T lymphocytes to assess their T cell stimulatory capacity. The microarray analysis demonstrated that eqMoDC generated with horse serum were indistinguishable from those generated with FBS. However, eqMoDC incubated with horse serum-supplemented medium exhibited a more characteristic dendritic cell morphology during differentiation from monocytes. A significant increase in cell viability was also observed in eqMoDC cultured with horse serum. Furthermore, eqMoDC generated in the presence of horse serum

  19. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin on dendritic cells that unveils many aspects of dendritic cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Engering, Anneke; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are present in essentially every tissue where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity by recognizing pathogens and presenting pathogen-derived peptides to T cells. It is becoming clear that not all C-type lectins on DC serve as antigen receptors recognizing

  20. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic atrophy in DBA/2J glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete A Williams

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a complex disease affecting an estimated 70 million people worldwide, characterised by the progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and accompanying visual field loss. The common site of damage to retinal ganglion cells is thought to be at the optic nerve head, however evidence from other optic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders suggests that dendritic structures undergo a prolonged period of atrophy that may accompany or even precede soma loss and neuronal cell death. Using the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma this investigation aims to elucidate the impact of increasing intraocular pressure on retinal ganglion cell dendrites using DBA/2J mice that express YFP throughout the retinal ganglion cells driven by Thy1 (DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP and DiOlistically labelled retinal ganglion cells in DBA/2J mice. Here we show retinal ganglion cell dendritic degeneration in DiOlistically labelled DBA/2J retinal ganglion cells but not in the DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP retinal ganglion cells suggesting that a potential downregulation of Thy1 allows only 'healthy' retinal ganglion cells to express YFP. These data may highlight alternative pathways to retinal ganglion cell loss in DBA/2J glaucoma.

  13. Construction and evaluation of rats' tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Construction and evaluation of rats' tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) induced by NF-κB ... Department of Clinical Laboratory Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guiyang Medical College, Guiyang Medical ... through detection of specific markers OX-62; 4) Evaluation of mature state of DC via the determination of the expression.

  14. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia in a black Malian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, clinically aggressive hematologic malignancy, that most commonly manifests as cutaneous lesions. A 19-year-old Malian female was admitted to the Unit of Medicine of Hopital du Mali with anemia, fever, weakness, and weight loss. On physical examination ...

  15. Processing of MHC class II in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past years we performed studies to gain more insight into the processing of major histocompatibility class II (MHC class II) in dendritic cells. We focused on the sorting mechanisms of MHC class II, the degradation of its associated Ii and peptide loading at the endosomal system. In addition,

  16. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  17. Comparative analysis of nasal and oral mucosa dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allam, J.P.; Niederhagen, B.; Bucheler, M.; Appel, T.; Betten, H.; Bieber, T.; Bergé, S.J.; Novak, N.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in tolerance induction as seen in mucosal immunotherapy of atopic diseases. Nevertheless little is known about the phenotypical differences of oral and nasal mucosal DC (nmDC). Recently, we could show that oral mucosal myeloid CD1a(+) DC

  18. Menage a trois: Borrelia, dendritic cells, and tick saliva interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Lauren M. K.; Veerman, Christiaan C.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, is inoculated into the skin during an lxodes tick bite where it is recognised and captured by dendritic cells (DCs). However, considering the propensity of Borrelia to disseminate, it would appear that DCs fall short in

  19. Loss of CD47 Makes Dendritic Cells See Red

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Whereas dendritic cells (DCs) can be activated in many ways to trigger immunity, hardly anything is known about the mechanisms that counterbalance DC activation. Cyster and colleagues now demonstrate that the "self" molecule CD47 on erythrocytes critically restricts splenic DC activation

  20. Modulation of cytokine production profiles in splenic dendritic cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the role of splenic dendritic cells in immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection in SAG1 (P30+) transgenic mice by investigating the kinetics of intracellular cytokines expression of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) using flow cytometry, and compared the results to those of ...

  1. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic. KIR and KAs channels in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons: A computational study. JESSY JOHN* and ROHIT MANCHANDA. Biomedical Engineering group, Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology. Bombay ...

  2. Steady-state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer 4/5a pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Miquelajauregui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer (L 2/3 and L5B cortical pyramidal neurons have recently been assessed using in vivo two-photon microscopy (Trachtenberg et al., 2002; Zuo et al., 2005; Holtmaat et al., 2006. In contrast, not much is known about spine dynamics in L4/5a neurons, regarded as direct recipients of thalamocortical input (Constantinople and Bruno, 2013. In the adult mouse somatosensory cortex (SCx, the transcription factor Ebf2 is enriched in excitatory neurons of L4/5a, including pyramidal neurons. We assessed the molecular and electrophysiological properties of these neurons as well as the morphology of their apical tufts (Scholl analysis and cortical outputs (optogenetics within the SCx. To test the hypothesis that L4/5a pyramidal neurons play an important role in sensory processing (given their key laminar position; soma depth ~450-480 µm, we successfully labeled them in Ebf2-Cre mice with EGFP by expressing recombinant rAAV vectors in utero. Using longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy through a craniotomy (Mostany and Portera-Cailliau, 2008, we repeatedly imaged spines in apical dendritic tufts of L4/5a neurons under basal conditions and after sensory deprivation. Under steady-state conditions in adults, the morphology of the apical tufts and the mean spine density were stable at 0.39 ± 0.05 spines/μm (comparable to L5B, Mostany et al., 2011. Interestingly, spine elimination increases 4-8 days after sensory deprivation, probably due to input loss. This suggests that Ebf2+ L4/5a neurons could be involved in early steps of processing of thalamocortical information.

  3. Fashioning regulatory dendritic cells: what is currently in vogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Timuçin; Thomson, Angus W

    2004-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are uniquely well-equipped antigen-presenting cells with remarkable plasticity, whose differentiation and function can be manipulated in vitro and in vivo. With increased understanding of their immunoregulatory properties, strategies to enhance DC tolerogenicity have emerged. Carefully fashioned DCs, the result of biological, pharmacological or genetic modification, hold promise as new cell-based therapies of organ allograft rejection and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Phenotype and function of CD209+ bovine blood dendritic cells, monocyte-derived-dendritic cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC) subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny a...

  5. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  6. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate extracellular catabolism of aggregated LDL upon maturation, leading to foam cell formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Singh, Rajesh K.; Grosheva, Inna; Hoffner, Haley; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Chin, Harvey F.; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although dendritic cells are known to play a role in atherosclerosis, few studies have examined the contribution of the wide variety of dendritic cell subsets. Accordingly, their roles in atherogenesis remain largely unknown. We investigated the ability of different dendritic cell subsets to become foam cells following contact with aggregated LDL (the predominant form of LDL found in atherosclerotic plaques). Approach and Results We demonstrate that both murine and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL, leading to foam cell formation, while monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL aggregates by this mechanism. Exophagy is a catabolic process in which objects that cannot be internalized by phagocytosis (due to their size or association with extracellular structures) are initially digested in an extracellular acidic lytic compartment. Surprisingly, we found that monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate exophagy upon maturation. This contrasts various forms of endocytic internalization in dendritic cells, which decrease upon maturation. Finally, we show that our in vitro results are consistent with dendritic cell lipid accumulation in plaques of an ApoE−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL and become foam cells, while monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL deposits. Further, we find that exophagy is upregulated upon dendritic cell maturation. Thus, exophagy-mediated foam cell formation in monocyte-derived dendritic cells could play a significant role in atherogenesis. PMID:26293468

  7. Dendritic cells and isolevuglandins in immunity, inflammation, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Kala B; Davies, Sean S; Kirabo, Annet

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension is the major risk factor for morbidity and mortality from myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Despite its importance, the pathogenesis of essential hypertension is poorly understood. During the past several years, it has become evident that T cells contribute to hypertension. Activated T cells accumulate in the perivascular space and the kidney and release cytokines that promote vascular dysfunction and end-organ damage. Although dendritic cells play a pivotal role in initiating adaptive immune responses, T cells have taken center stage in studies implicating the immune system in the genesis of hypertension. The mechanisms by which T cells are activated and the antigens involved are poorly understood. We recently showed that hypertension is associated with increased dendritic cell production of the TH17 polarizing cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23. This occurs in part by increased superoxide production via NADPH oxidase and protein modification by highly reactive isolevuglandins (IsoLGs). IsoLGs are produced via the isoprostane pathway of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and, when adducted to proteins, have the potential to act as neoantigens. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of antigen-presenting dendritic cells in the pathophysiology of hypertension and highlight potential neoantigens that may contribute to this disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  9. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  10. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed.

  11. A mouse model of visual perceptual learning reveals alterations in neuronal coding and dendritic spine density in the visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Visual perceptual learning (VPL can improve spatial vision in normally sighted and visually impaired individuals. Although previous studies of humans and large animals have explored the neural basis of VPL, elucidation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remains a challenge. Owing to the advantages of molecular genetic and optogenetic manipulations, the mouse is a promising model for providing a mechanistic understanding of VPL. Here, we thoroughly evaluated the effects and properties of VPL on spatial vision in C57BL/6J mice using a two-alternative, forced-choice visual water task. Briefly, the mice underwent prolonged training at near the individual threshold of contrast or spatial frequency (SF for pattern discrimination or visual detection for 35 consecutive days. Following training, the contrast-threshold trained mice showed an 87% improvement in contrast sensitivity (CS and a 55% gain in visual acuity (VA. Similarly, the SF-threshold trained mice exhibited comparable and long-lasting improvements in VA and significant gains in CS over a wide range of SFs. Furthermore, learning largely transferred across eyes and stimulus orientations. Interestingly, learning could transfer from a pattern discrimination task to a visual detection task, but not vice versa. We validated that this VPL fully restored VA in adult amblyopic mice and old mice. Taken together, these data indicate that mice, as a species, exhibit reliable VPL. Intrinsic signal optical imaging revealed that mice with perceptual training had higher cut-off SFs in primary visual cortex (V1 than those without perceptual training. Moreover, perceptual training induced an increase in the dendritic spine density in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of V1. These results indicated functional and structural alterations in V1 during VPL. Overall, our VPL mouse model will provide a platform for investigating the neurobiological basis of VPL.

  12. Klotho sensitive regulation of dendritic cell functions by vitamin E

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Trang, Phi Thi Thu; Van Phong, Nguyen; Toan, Nguyen Linh; Trung, Do Minh; Bac, Nguyen Duy; Nguyen, Viet Linh; Hoang, Nguyen Huy; Van Hai, Nong

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells for naive T cells to link innate and acquired immunity. Klotho, an anti-aging protein, participates in the regulation of Ca2+ dependent migration in DCs. Vitamin E (VitE) is an essential antioxidant to protect cells from damage and elicits its inhibitory effects on NF-?B-mediated inflammatory response. However, the roles of VitE on mouse DC functions and the contribution of klotho to those effects both ...

  13. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  14. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  15. Multiple modes of action potential initiation and propagation in mitral cell primary dendrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei R; Shen, Gongyu Y; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2002-01-01

    The mitral cell primary dendrite plays an important role in transmitting distal olfactory nerve input from olfactory glomerulus to the soma-axon initial segment. To understand how dendritic active properties are involved in this transmission, we have combined dual soma and dendritic patch recordi...

  16. Human Melanoma-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Regulate Dendritic Cell Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Maus, Rachel L. G.; Jakub, James W.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Trace A. Christensen; Noble-Orcutt, Klara; Sachs, Zohar; Hieken, Tina J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of melanoma from a primary tumor to widespread metastasis is crucially dependent on lymphatic spread. The mechanisms regulating the initial step in metastatic dissemination via regional lymph nodes remain largely unknown; however, evidence supporting the establishment of a pre-metastatic niche is evolving. We have previously described a dysfunctional immune profile including reduced expression of dendritic cell (DC) maturation markers in the first node draining from the primary tumo...

  17. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  18. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  19. Dendritic and spinal pathology in the acoustic cortex in Alzheimer's disease: morphological estimation in Golgi technique and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloyannis, Stavros J; Manolides, Spyros L; Manolides, Leonidas S

    2011-06-01

    The morphological and morphometric estimation of the dendrites and the dendritic spines in the acoustic cortex in Alzheimer's disease revealed substantial alterations of the dendritic arborization and marked loss of the dendritic spines, which may be related to communication impairment even in early cases of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive loss of memory, impairment of judgment, and decline in communication and speech eloquence. In the present study we attempted to describe the morphological and morphometric alterations of the dendrites and the dendritic spines in the acoustic cortex in early cases of Alzheimer's disease, in order to approach the communication impairment of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease from a neuropathological point of view. We studied the acoustic cortex in 22 cases of Alzheimer's disease by Golgi technique and electron microscopy. The morphological and morphometric estimation of the acoustic cortex revealed loss of Cajal-Retzius cells in layer I, as well as an impressive abbreviation of the dendritic fields associated with loss of dendritic spines in all the layers of the cortex. Numerous distorted, dystrophic, and degenerated dendritic spines were also seen, which were intermixed with a considerable number of giant spines. The dendritic and spinal alterations were closely associated with mitochondrial alterations.

  20. Dendritic Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1 Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Yu, Xu G

    2017-02-01

    Robust HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses are currently regarded as the main correlate of immune defense in rare individuals who achieve natural, drug-free control of HIV-1; however, the mechanisms that support evolution of such powerful immune responses are not well understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized innate immune cells critical for immune recognition, immune regulation, and immune induction, but their possible contribution to HIV-1 immune defense in controllers remains ill-defined. Recent studies suggest that myeloid DCs from controllers have improved abilities to recognize HIV-1 through cytoplasmic immune sensors, resulting in more potent, cell-intrinsic type I interferon secretion in response to viral infection. This innate immune response may facilitate DC-mediated induction of highly potent antiviral HIV-1-specific T cells. Moreover, protective HLA class I isotypes restricting HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells may influence DC function through specific interactions with innate myelomonocytic MHC class I receptors from the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor family. Bi-directional interactions between dendritic cells and HIV-1-specific T cells may contribute to natural HIV-1 immune control, highlighting the importance of a fine-tuned interplay between innate and adaptive immune activities for effective antiviral immune defense.

  1. Defining in vivo dendritic cell functions using CD11c-DTR transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The study of dendritic cell involvement in complex phenomena that rely on multi-cellular interactions, such as immune homeostasis, stimulation, and tolerization, called for the investigation of dendritic cell functions within physiological context. To this end we have developed a conditional cell ablation strategy that is based on dendritic cell-restricted expression of a Diphtheria Toxin receptor (DTR) using the CD11c/Itgax promoter. Here, we provide basic protocols that describe the use of this prototypic dendritic cell ablation model and highlight pitfalls and strengths of the approach.

  2. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  3. Classing it up to get noticed : MHC class 1 antigen display in dendritic cells and neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the process of MHC-1-mediated antigen presentation in two distinctive cell types: dendritic cells and neuroblastoma tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal players that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are able to engulf tumor-derived material and

  4. Dendritic cell based vaccines for HIV infection: The way ahead

    OpenAIRE

    García, Felipe; Plana, Montserrat; Climent, Nuria; León, Agathe; Gatell, Jose M.; Gallart, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells have a central role in HIV infection. On one hand, they are essential to induce strong HIV-specific CD4+ helper T-cell responses that are crucial to achieve a sustained and effective HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte able to control HIV replication. On the other hand, DCs contribute to virus dissemination and HIV itself could avoid a correct antigen presentation. As the efficacy of immune therapy and therapeutic vaccines against HIV infection has been modest in the best...

  5. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    infiltrating human tumors, but less information is known about how these T-cells gain access to the tumor or how they are primed to become tumor-specific. Here, we highlight recent findings that demonstrate a vital role of CD103+ DCs, which have been shown to be experts in cross-priming and the induction...

  6. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    T cells, VD3-modulated DCs are safe and potentially more effective alternatives to currently available immunoregulatory therapies. While a number of considerations remain, including the establishment of a reliable quality control measure to ensure the safety and efficacy of VD3-DCs in vivo...... and the optimal frequency, dose, and route of DC administration to achieve therapeutic effects in humans, adoptive VD3-DC transfer represents one of the most promising approaches to future treatment of autoimmune diseases....

  7. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of cytokines and chemokines - We showed that DC do not induce PSC expression of ECM proteins - We showed that DC induce PSC expression of cytokines... hepatocellular carcinoma by the intestinal microbiota and TLR4. Cancer Cell. 21:504–516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2012.02.007 De Monte, L., M...nearly 15% of intrapancreatic leukocytes. Intrapancreatic DCs acquired a distinct immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed

  8. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc. is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination.

  9. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer: Modulation by CpG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baar, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    ... in the United States in 2004. Thus, patients with MBC who fail conventional therapies are candidates for clinical trials using novel therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC...

  10. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSalazar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. Dendritic cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors dendritic cells are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence dendritic cells behaviour through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarise current understanding of how allergens are recognised by dendritic cells and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitisation and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signalling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitisation hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases.

  11. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  12. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  13. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  14. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Svensson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC. Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  15. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Our main objective was to analyze the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Valpha-14(-) and Valpha-14(+) T hybridomas by dendritic cells. We showed that activation of Valpha-14(+) hybridomas by dendritic cells or other CD1d-expressing cells was altered by disruption of lipid rafts...

  16. IL-4 orchestrates STAT6-mediated DNA demethylation leading to dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento-Tormo, Roser; Company, Carlos; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; de la Rica, Lorenzo; Urquiza, José M; Javierre, Biola M; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Luque, Ana; Esteller, Manel; Aran, Josep M; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Ballestar, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    The role of cytokines in establishing specific transcriptional programmes in innate immune cells has long been recognized. However, little is known about how these extracellular factors instruct innate immune cell epigenomes to engage specific differentiation states. Human monocytes differentiate under inflammatory conditions into effector cells with non-redundant functions, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. In this context, interleukin 4 (IL-4) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) drive dendritic cell differentiation, whereas GM-CSF alone leads to macrophage differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of IL-4 in directing functionally relevant dendritic-cell-specific DNA methylation changes. A comparison of DNA methylome dynamics during differentiation from human monocytes to dendritic cells and macrophages identified gene sets undergoing dendritic-cell-specific or macrophage-specific demethylation. Demethylation is TET2-dependent and is essential for acquiring proper dendritic cell and macrophage identity. Most importantly, activation of the JAK3-STAT6 pathway, downstream of IL-4, is required for the acquisition of the dendritic-cell-specific demethylation and expression signature, following STAT6 binding. A constitutively activated form of STAT6 is able to bypass IL-4 upstream signalling and instruct dendritic-cell-specific functional DNA methylation changes. Our study is the first description of a cytokine-mediated sequence of events leading to direct gene-specific demethylation in innate immune cell differentiation.

  17. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  18. A multiscale fluidic device for the study of dendrite-mediated cell to cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Sean; Majeska, Robert; Schaffler, Mitchell; Vazquez, Maribel

    2017-08-08

    Many cell types communicate by means of dendritic extensions via a multi-tiered set of geometric and chemical cues. Until recently, mimicking the compartmentalized in vivo cellular environment of dendrite-expressing cells such as osteocytes and motor neurons in a spatially and temporally controllable manner was limited by the challenges of in vitro device fabrication at submicron scales. Utilizing the improved resolution of current fabrication technology, we have designed a multiscale device, the Macro-micro-nano system, or Mμn, composed of two distinct cell-seeding and interrogation compartments separated by a nanochannel array. The array enables dendrite ingrowth, while providing a mechanism for fluidic sequestration and/or temporally-mediated diffusible signaling between cell populations. Modeling of the Mμn system predicted the ability to isolate diffusible signals, namely ATP. Empirical diffusion studies verified computational modeling. In addition, cell viability, dendrite interaction with the nanoarray, and cellular purinergic response to heat shock were experimentally evaluated within the device for both osteocytes and motor neurons. Our results describe a novel in vitro system in which dendrite-expressing cell types can be studied within nano-environments that mimic in vivo conditions. In particular, the Mμn system enables real-time observation of cell to cell communication between cell populations in distinct, but fluidically coupled regions.

  19. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...... endpoints, including toxicity and response evaluation. This paper aims to review the technical aspects and clinical impact of vaccination trials, focusing on the generation of DC-based vaccines, evaluation of immunologic parameters and design of clinical trials necessary to meet the need for good laboratory...

  20. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma Mediastinum - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushan, Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Follicular dendritic cell tumor (FDCT) are extremely rare difficult to diagnose category tumors.There has been a considerable controversy in medical community regarding precise classification and optimal management of this tumor with some treating it as a form of non Hodgkins lymphoma and some as soft tissue sarcomas.The number of published cases are still low and documentation too heterogenous to give statistically ified therapeutic recommendation of these tumors.This case report aims to highlight various aspects of diagnosing and treating this rare entity.

  1. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  2. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  3. Virus interactions with endocytic pathways in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jason; Greber, Urs F

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are at the front line of defence against fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Together with physical barriers, such as mucus and a range of antimicrobial compounds, they constitute a major part of the intrinsic and innate immune systems. They have elaborate features, including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and specialized endocytic mechanisms, cytokines and chemokines, and the ability to call on reserves. As masters of manipulation and counter-attack, viruses shunt intrinsic and innate recognition, enter immune cells, and spread from these cells throughout an organism. Here, we review mechanisms by which viruses subvert endocytic and pathogen-sensing functions of macrophages and DCs, while highlighting possible strategic advantages of infecting cells normally tuned into pathogen destruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Suppresses Dendritic Cell-Induced, Antigen-Dependent CD4 T Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiyan; Ventevogel, Melissa S.; Knilans, Kayla J.; Anderson, James E.; Oldach, Laurel M.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the second most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Diseases associated with N. gonorrhoeae cause localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix. Despite this inflammatory response, infected individuals do not develop protective adaptive immune responses to N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is a highly adapted pathogen that has acquired multiple mechanisms to evade its host's immune system, including the ability to manipulate multiple immune signaling pathways. N. gonorrhoeae has previously been shown to engage immunosuppressive signaling pathways in B and T lymphocytes. We have now found that N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses adaptive immune responses through effects on antigen presenting cells. Using primary, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes, we show that N. gonorrhoeae-exposed dendritic cells fail to elicit antigen-induced CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation. N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a number of secreted and dendritic cell surface proteins with immunosuppressive properties, particularly Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1). We also show that N. gonorrhoeae is able to inhibit dendritic cell- induced proliferation of human T-cells and that human dendritic cells upregulate similar immunosuppressive molecules. Our data suggest that, in addition to being able to directly influence host lymphocytes, N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses development of adaptive immune responses through interactions with host antigen presenting cells. These findings suggest that gonococcal factors involved in host immune suppression may be useful targets in developing vaccines that induce protective adaptive immune responses to this pathogen. PMID:22844448

  5. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  6. Alterations of dendritic protrusions over the first postnatal year of a mouse: an analysis in layer VI of the barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orner, David A; Chen, Chia-Chien; Orner, Daniella E; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2014-09-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions that serve as the principal recipients of excitatory inputs onto cortical pyramidal cells. Alterations in spine and filopodia density and morphology correlate with both developmental maturity and changes in synaptic strength. In order to better understand the developmental profile of dendritic protrusion (dendritic spines + filopodia) morphology and density over the animal's first postnatal year, we used the Golgi staining technique to label neurons and their dendritic protrusions in mice. We focused on quantifying the density per length of dendrite and categorizing the morphology of dendritic protrusions of layer VI pyramidal neurons residing in barrel cortex using the computer assisted reconstruction program Neurolucida. We classified dendritic protrusion densities at seven developmental time points: postnatal day (PND) 15, 30, 60, 90, 180, 270, and 360. Our findings suggest that the dendritic protrusions in layer VI barrel cortex pyramidal neurons are not static, and their density as well as relative morphological distribution change over time. We observed a significant increase in mushroom spines and a decrease in filopodia as the animals matured. Further analyses show that as the animal mature there was a reduction in pyramidal cell dendritic lengths overall, as well as a decrease in overall protrusion densities. The ratio of apical to basilar density decreased as well. Characterizing the profile of cortical layer VI dendritic protrusions within the first postnatal year will enable us to better understand the relationship between the overall developmental maturation profile and dendritic spine functioning.

  7. Ragweed Subpollen Particles of Respirable Size Activate Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  8. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitti Pazmandi

    Full Text Available Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(PH oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(PH oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs in the airways and SPPs' NAD(PH oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  9. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-10-01

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Follicular Dendritic Cells Retain Infectious HIV in Cycling Endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balthasar A Heesters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART, it does not cure Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and discontinuation results in viral rebound. Follicular dendritic cells (FDC are in direct contact with CD4+ T cells and they retain intact antigen for prolonged periods. We found that human FDC isolated from patients on ART retain infectious HIV within a non-degradative cycling compartment and transmit infectious virus to uninfected CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, treatment of the HIV+ FDC with a soluble complement receptor 2 purges the FDC of HIV virions and prevents viral transmission in vitro. Our results provide an explanation for how FDC can retain infectious HIV for extended periods and suggest a therapeutic strategy to achieve cure in HIV-infected humans.

  11. Nanocarriers targeting dendritic cells for pulmonary vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Gordon, Stephen B; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary vaccine delivery has gained significant attention as an alternate route for vaccination without the use of needles. Immunization through the pulmonary route induces both mucosal and systemic immunity, and the delivery of antigens in a dry powder state can overcome some challenges such as cold-chain and availability of medical personnel compared to traditional liquid-based vaccines. Antigens formulated as nanoparticles (NPs) reach the respiratory airways of the lungs providing greater chance of uptake by relevant immune cells. In addition, effective targeting of antigens to the most 'professional' antigen presenting cells (APCs), the dendritic cells (DCs) yields an enhanced immune response and the use of an adjuvant further augments the generated immune response thus requiring less antigen/dosage to achieve vaccination. This review discusses the pulmonary delivery of vaccines, methods of preparing NPs for antigen delivery and targeting, the importance of targeting DCs and different techniques involved in formulating dry powders suitable for inhalation.

  12. Breaking T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens by merocytic dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan D.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), a break in central and peripheral tolerance results in antigen-specific T cells destroying insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells. Herein, we discuss the critical sub-population of dendritic cells responsible for mediating both the cross-presentation of islet antigen to CD8+ T cells and the direct presentation of beta cell antigen to CD4+ T cells. These cells, termed merocytic dendritic cells (mcDC), are more numerous in nonobese diabetic (NOD), and antigen-loaded mcDC rescue CD8+ T cells from peripheral anergy and deletion, and stimulate islet-reactive CD4+ T cells. When purified from the pancreatic lymph nodes of overtly diabetic NOD mice, mcDC can break peripheral T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens in vivo and induce rapid onset T cell-mediated T1D in young NOD mouse. Thus, the mcDC subset appears to represent the long-sought critical antigen presenting cell responsible for breaking peripheral tolerance to beta cell antigen in vivo. PMID:21626409

  13. Dentate granule cells form hilar basal dendrites in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cintra, Sofia; Xue, Baogang; Spigelman, Igor; Van, K; Wong, Alan M; Obenaus, Andre; Ribak, Charles E

    2009-08-18

    Hilar basal dendrites form on dentate granule cells following seizures. To determine whether other brain insults cause the formation of hilar basal dendrites, a model of global cerebral hypoxia/ischemia was used. Rats underwent a transient induction of ischemia by occlusion of both common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion. Hippocampal slices were prepared from these animals 1 month after the ischemic insult, and granule cells were labeled with a retrograde tracing technique after biocytin injections into stratum lucidum of CA3b. Ischemic rats had numerous biocytin-labeled granule cells with hilar basal dendrites located at the hilar border of the granule cell layer. Quantitative analysis of ischemic rats compared to controls showed a significant increase in the percentage of biocytin-labeled granule cells with hilar basal dendrites. These data demonstrate that other brain insults in addition to epilepsy may result in the formation of hilar basal dendrites on granule cells.

  14. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Worah, Kuntal; van der Schaaf, Alie; Buschow, Sonja I; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete tetraspanin superfamily in primary murine (CD4+, CD8+, pDC) and human DC subsets (CD1c+, CD141+, pDC) at the transcriptome and proteome level. Different RNA and protein expression profiles for the tetraspanin genes across human and murine DC subsets were identified. Although RNA expression levels of CD37 and CD82 were not significantly different between human DC subsets, CD9 RNA was highly expressed in pDCs, while CD9 protein expression was lower. This indicates that relative RNA and protein expression levels are not always in agreement. Both murine CD8α+ DCs and its regarded human counterpart, CD141+ DCs, displayed relatively high protein levels of CD81. CD53 protein was highly expressed on human pDCs in contrast to the relatively low protein expression of most other tetraspanins. This study demonstrates that tetraspanins are differentially expressed by human and murine DC subsets which provides a valuable resource that will aid the understanding of tetraspanin function in DC biology.

  15. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malou Zuidscherwoude

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs, which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete tetraspanin superfamily in primary murine (CD4+, CD8+, pDC and human DC subsets (CD1c+, CD141+, pDC at the transcriptome and proteome level. Different RNA and protein expression profiles for the tetraspanin genes across human and murine DC subsets were identified. Although RNA expression levels of CD37 and CD82 were not significantly different between human DC subsets, CD9 RNA was highly expressed in pDCs, while CD9 protein expression was lower. This indicates that relative RNA and protein expression levels are not always in agreement. Both murine CD8α+ DCs and its regarded human counterpart, CD141+ DCs, displayed relatively high protein levels of CD81. CD53 protein was highly expressed on human pDCs in contrast to the relatively low protein expression of most other tetraspanins. This study demonstrates that tetraspanins are differentially expressed by human and murine DC subsets which provides a valuable resource that will aid the understanding of tetraspanin function in DC biology.

  16. Estrogen Alters Hippocampal Dendritic Spine Shape and Enhances Synaptic Protein Immunoreactivity and Spatial Memory in Female Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chenjian Li; Wayne G. Brake; Russell D. Romeo; John C. Dunlop; Marisa Gordon; Rodica Buzescu; Ana Maria Magarinos; Patrick B. Allen; Paul Greengard; Victoria Luine; Bruce S. McEwen

    2004-01-01

    ... spine morphology, radioimmunocytochemistry (RICC) and silver-enhanced immunocytochemistry to examine expression levels of synaptic protein markers, and hippocampal-dependent object-placement memory as a behavioral readout for the actions of E...

  17. CD1 and major histocompatibility complex II molecules follow a different course during dendritic cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Nicole N.; Sugita, Masahiko; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Cao, Xaiochun; Schreibelt, Gerty; Brenner, Michael B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells is accompanied by the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules from the lysosomal MHC class IT compartment to the plasma membrane to mediate presentation of peptide antigens. Besides MHC molecules, dendritic cells also express CD1

  18. Long overall survival after dendritic cell vaccination in metastatic uveal melanoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Kalijn F.; Mensink, Hanneke W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Keunen, Jan E. E.; Coulie, Pierre G.; de Klein, Annelies; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Paridaens, Dion; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of dendritic cell vaccination in metastatic uveal melanoma. Interventional case series. We analyzed 14 patients with metastatic uveal melanoma treated with dendritic cell vaccination. Patients with metastatic uveal melanoma received at least 3 vaccinations with

  19. Development of Type 1 Diabetes: Monocytes and dendritic cells in the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.C. Welzen-Coppens (Jojanneke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the presence of precursors for dendritic cells and the characterization of dendritic cell subsets in the normal pancreas in mice and humans as well as in the pancreas of the NOD mouse, a type 1 diabetes mouse model. Therefore, we give a short introduction to

  20. Follicular dendritic cell tumour of tonsil - is it an under-diagnosed entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothra, R; Pai, P S; Chaturvedi, P; Majeed, T A; Singh, C; Gujral, S; Kane, S V

    2005-01-01

    Neoplasms of follicular dendritic cells are uncommon and while majority of them occur in lymph nodes, they are increasingly recognized at varied sites such as abdominal viscera. Tonsil is the most common extra nodal site for occurrence of FDCT in the head and neck region. We describe three cases of follicular dendritic cell tumour occurring in the tonsil.

  1. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  2. Track structure model of microscopic energy deposition by protons and heavy ions in segments of neuronal cell dendrites represented by cylinders or spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Murat; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2017-05-01

    Changes to cognition, including memory, following radiation exposure are a concern for cosmic ray exposures to astronauts and in Hadron therapy with proton and heavy ion beams. The purpose of the present work is to develop computational methods to evaluate microscopic energy deposition (ED) in volumes representative of neuron cell structures, including segments of dendrites and spines, using a stochastic track structure model. A challenge for biophysical models of neuronal damage is the large sizes (> 100 μm) and variability in volumes of possible dendritic segments and pre-synaptic elements (spines and filopodia). We consider cylindrical and spherical microscopic volumes of varying geometric parameters and aspect ratios from 0.5 to 5 irradiated by protons, and 3He and 12C particles at energies corresponding to a distance of 1 cm to the Bragg peak, which represent particles of interest in Hadron therapy as well as space radiation exposure. We investigate the optimal axis length of dendritic segments to evaluate microscopic ED and hit probabilities along the dendritic branches at a given macroscopic dose. Because of large computation times to analyze ED in volumes of varying sizes, we developed an analytical method to find the mean primary dose in spheres that can guide numerical methods to find the primary dose distribution for cylinders. Considering cylindrical segments of varying aspect ratio at constant volume, we assess the chord length distribution, mean number of hits and ED profiles by primary particles and secondary electrons (δ-rays). For biophysical modeling applications, segments on dendritic branches are proposed to have equal diameters and axes lengths along the varying diameter of a dendritic branch.

  3. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes...

  4. Democracy-Independence Trade-Off in Oscillating Dendrites and Its Implications for Grid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remme, Michiel W.H.; Lengyel, Máté; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic democracy and independence have been characterized for near-instantaneous processing of synaptic inputs. However, a wide class of neuronal computations requires input integration on long timescales. As a paradigmatic example, entorhinal grid fields have been thought to be generated by the democratic summation of independent dendritic oscillations performing direction-selective path integration. We analyzed how multiple dendritic oscillators embedded in the same neuron integrate inputs separately and determine somatic membrane voltage jointly. We found that the interaction of dendritic oscillations leads to phase locking, which sets an upper limit on the timescale for independent input integration. Factors that increase this timescale also decrease the influence that the dendritic oscillations exert on somatic voltage. In entorhinal stellate cells, interdendritic coupling dominates and causes these cells to act as single oscillators. Our results suggest a fundamental trade-off between local and global processing in dendritic trees integrating ongoing signals. PMID:20471355

  5. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  6. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Activation and Subsequent Th1 Cell Polarization by Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play an essential role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing cellular stress including pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns and by shaping the types of antigen-specific T cell immunity. Although lidocaine is widely used in clinical settings that trigger cellular stress, it remains unclear whether such treatment impacts the activation of innate immune cells and subsequent differentiation of T cells. Here we showed that lidocaine inhibited the production of IL–6, TNFα and IL–12 from dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor ligands including lipopolysaccharide, poly(I:C) and R837 in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the differentiation of Th1 cells was significantly suppressed by the addition of lidocaine while the same treatment had little effect on the differentiation of Th17, Th2 and regulatory T cells in vitro. Moreover, lidocaine suppressed the ovalbumin-specific Th1 cell responses in vivo induced by the adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. These results demonstrate that lidocaine inhibits the activation of dendritic cells in response to toll-like receptor signals and subsequently suppresses the differentiation of Th1 cell responses. PMID:26445366

  7. Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N. S. Amorim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation.

  8. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Function by Leishmania Parasites1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between Leishmania parasites and dendritic cells (DCs) are complex and involve paradoxical functions that can stimulate or halt T cell responses, leading to the control of infection or progression of disease. The magnitude and profile of DC activation vary greatly, depending upon the Leishmania species/strains, developmental stages, DC subsets, serum opsonization, and exogenous DC stimuli involved in the study. In general, the uptake of Leishmania parasites alone can trigger relatively weak and transient DC activation; however, the intracellular parasites (amastigotes) are capable of down-modulating LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated DC activation via multiple mechanisms. This review will highlight current data regarding the initial interaction of DC subsets with invading parasites, the alterations of DC signaling pathways and function by amastigotes, and the impact of DC functions on protective immunity and disease pathogenesis. Available information provides insight into the mechanisms by which DCs discriminate between the types of pathogens and regulate appropriate immune responses. PMID:18354154

  10. Modulation of dendritic cell function by Leishmania parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Lynn

    2008-04-01

    The interactions between Leishmania parasites and dendritic cells (DCs) are complex and involve paradoxical functions that can stimulate or halt T cell responses, leading to the control of infection or progression of disease. The magnitude and profile of DC activation vary greatly, depending upon the Leishmania species/strains, developmental stages, DC subsets, serum opsonization, and exogenous DC stimuli involved in the study. In general, the uptake of Leishmania parasites alone can trigger relatively weak and transient DC activation; however, the intracellular parasites (amastigotes) are capable of down-modulating LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated DC activation via multiple mechanisms. This review will highlight current data regarding the initial interaction of DC subsets with invading parasites, the alterations of DC signaling pathways and function by amastigotes, and the impact of DC functions on protective immunity and disease pathogenesis. Available information provides insight into the mechanisms by which DCs discriminate between the types of pathogens and regulate appropriate immune responses.

  11. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only recently beginning to emerge. Here, we review the available literature, characterizing the origin and function of known vascular DC subsets and their important role contributing to the balance of immune activation and immune tolerance governing vascular homeostasis under healthy conditions. We then discuss how homeostatic DC functions are disrupted during atherogenesis, leading to atherosclerosis. The effectiveness of DC-based “atherosclerosis vaccine” therapies in the treatment of atherosclerosis is also reviewed. We further provide suggestions for distinguishing DCs from macrophages and discuss important future directions for the field. PMID:23552284

  12. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Imamura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells.With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells.In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  13. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  14. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana J Michielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  15. Giant cell ependymoma of the thoracic spine: pathology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Benoit, Brien G; Perry, Arie; Jansen, Gerard H

    2009-03-01

    INTRODUCTION AND IMPORTANCE: Spinal ependymomas are slow-growing lesions that comprise the majority of primary spinal cord neoplasms. When surgery is indicated, the extent of tumor removal is most prognostic for long-term survival. Unusual histological subtypes can make intraoperative diagnosis spurious, possibly altering the surgical approach from gross total resection for ependymomas to debulking for high-grade astrocytomas. We describe a 67-year-old woman with a thoracic spine intramedullary giant cell ependymoma. She presented with decreased lower extremity sensation leading to unsteadiness and an eventual fall. A physical examination revealed lower extremity hyperreflexia and ankle clonus, but no clear sensory level. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intramedullary T1 and T2 hypointense, homogenously enhancing lesion at T8 with extensive cephalad and caudal edema. A laminectomy at T8 to T9 afforded gross total resection of the lesion that had a clear cleavage plane with normal spinal cord. Intraoperative pathology suggested a high-grade glioblastoma, but final section showed sporadic giant cells with marked pleomorphism, uniform immunofluorescence staining with both glial fibrillary acidic protein and cluster of differentiation 99, and high MIB-1 index. Electron microscopy showed "zipper-like" junctions. There were no detected genomic abnormalities consistent with glioblastoma. We present this first reported case of thoracic spine giant cell ependymoma alongside scant literature yielding 1 case in the cervical spine and 2 cases at the filum terminale. Those cases had benign courses, whereas ours demonstrates a high degree of proliferation, making the malignant potential difficult to assess.

  16. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases.... PubmedID 18641647 Title Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimm...une diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  17. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  18. Epigallocatechin gallate affects human dendritic cell differentiation and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Satomi; Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Okaji, Yurai; Asakage, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamada, Jun; Sunami, Eiji; Osada, Takuya; Kitayama, Joji; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2008-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a component of green tea catechin with the strongest biological activity, has been focused in recent years because of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells, capable of priming naive T cells, and play the key roles in the activation of T-cell-mediated immune responses. We aimed to investigate the effect of EGCG on human monocyte-derived DCs (MODCs) and, consequently, on the T-cell-mediated immune response. The induction of apoptosis, and the detailed phenotypic and functional changes of MODCs, generated by culture of peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4, induced by EGCG was investigated and compared with the effects of dexamethasone. Epigallocatechin gallate induced apoptosis and affected the phenotype of the developing DCs. The expressions of CD83, CD80, CD11c, and MHC class II, which are molecules essential for antigen presentation by DCs, were downregulated by EGCG. EGCG also suppressed the endocytotic ability of immature DCs, whereas dexamethasone-treated DCs had higher endocytotic ability than control DCs. Most importantly, mature DCs treated with EGCG inhibited stimulatory activity toward allogeneic T cells while secreting high amounts of IL-10. Epigallocatechin gallate induces immunosuppressive alterations on human MODCs, both by induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell surface molecules and antigen presentation.

  19. On human dendritic cell subsets harnessing cytotoxic T-cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we explore the function of different dendritic cell (DC)-derived molecules in the induction of CTL responses. In chapter two we compare the capacity of two major human skin DC subsets to induce CTL responses, and we study which T-cell differentiating molecules are critical. In chapter

  20. C-type lectin receptors on dendritic cells and Langerhans cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figdor, C.G.; Kooyk, Y. van; Adema, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells and Langerhans cells are specialized for the recognition of pathogens and have a pivotal role in the control of immunity. As guardians of the immune system, they are present in essentially every organ and tissue, where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity.

  1. Activated T cells recruit exosomes secreted by dendritic cells via LFA-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.; Buschow, S.I.; Anderton, S.M.; Stoorvogel, W.; Wauben, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to secrete exosomes that transfer membrane proteins, like major histocompatibility complex class II, to other DCs. Intercellular transfer of membrane proteins is also observed during cognate interactions between DCs and CD4(+) T cells. The acquired proteins are

  2. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cells and T cell responses in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Wells, J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade it has become clear that probiotic and commensal interactions with mucosal dendritic cells in the lamina propria or epithelial cells lining the mucosa can modulate specific functions of the mucosal immune system. Innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLRs, NLRs and CLRs

  3. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence...

  4. Burn injury suppresses human dermal dendritic cell and Langerhans cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Linda M.; de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; Witte, Lot de; Ulrich, Magda M. W.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2011-01-01

    Human skin contains epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DCs) that are key players in induction of adaptive immunity upon infection. After major burn injury, suppressed adaptive immunity has been observed in patients. Here we demonstrate that burn injury affects adaptive

  5. Importance of helper T-cell activation in dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreibelt, Gerty; Bol, Kalijn F.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy is feasible, safe and results in the induction of tumor-specific immune responses, at least in a fraction of vaccinated patients. The concomitant activation of cytotoxic and helper T cells, by loading DCs with peptides or electroporating them with the

  6. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Kamali-Ardakani, Razieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG), shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs) gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old) were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks) and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs.

  7. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  8. Hypergravity Effects on Dendritic Cells and Vascular Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellik, L.; Parenti, A.; Ledda, F.; Basile, V.; Romano, G.; Fusi, F.; Monici, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells inducing specific immune responses, are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this inflammatory disease, DCs increase in number, being particularly abundant in the shoulder regions of plaques. Since the exposure to altered gravitational conditions results in a significant impairment of the immune function, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity on both the function of DCs and their interactions with the vascular wall cells. Monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were sorted by CD14+ magnetic beads selection, cultured for 6 days in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by a further maturation stimulus. DC phenotype, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a high expression of the specific DC markers CD80, CD86, HLA-DR and CD83. The DCs obtained were then exposed to hypergravitational stimuli and their phenotype, cytoskeleton, ability to activate lymphocytes and interaction with vascular wall cells were investigated. The findings showed that the exposure to hypergravity conditions resulted in a significant impairment of DC cytoskeletal organization, without affecting the expression of DC markers. Moreover, an increase in DC adhesion to human vascular smooth muscle cells and in their ability to activate lymphocytes was observed.

  9. Membrane dynamics and interactions in measles virus dendritic cell infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avota, Elita; Koethe, Susanne; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2013-02-01

    Viral entry, compartmentalization and transmission depend on the formation of membrane lipid/protein microdomains concentrating receptors and signalosomes. Dendritic cells (DCs) are prime targets for measles virus (MV) infection, and this interaction promotes immune activation and generalized immunosuppression, yet also MV transport to secondary lymphatics where transmission to T cells occurs. In addition to MV trapping, DC-SIGN interaction can enhance MV uptake by activating cellular sphingomyelinases and, thereby, vertical surface transport of its entry receptor CD150. To exploit DCs as Trojan horses for transport, MV promotes DC maturation accompanied by mobilization, and restrictions of viral replication in these cells may support this process. MV-infected DCs are unable to support formation of functional immune synapses with conjugating T cells and signalling via viral glycoproteins or repulsive ligands (such as semaphorins) plays a key role in the induction of T-cell paralysis. In the absence of antigen recognition, MV transmission from infected DCs to T cells most likely involves formation of polyconjugates which concentrate viral structural proteins, viral receptors and with components enhancing either viral uptake or conjugate stability. Because DCs barely support production of infectious MV particles, these organized interfaces are likely to represent virological synapses essential for MV transmission. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Myeloid dendritic cells are potential players in human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eBossù

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance: we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  12. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  13. Efferocytosis promotes suppressive effects on dendritic cells through prostaglandin E2 production in the context of autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Efferocytosis is a crucial process by which apoptotic cells are cleared by phagocytes, maintaining immune tolerance to self in the absence of inflammation. Peripheral tolerance, lost in autoimmune processes, may be restored by the administration of autologous dendritic cells loaded with islet apoptotic cells in experimental type 1 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells induced by the clearance of apoptotic islet cells, thus explaining the re-establishment of tolerance in a context of autoimmunity. METHODS: Bone marrow derived dendritic cells from non-obese diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes, were generated and pulsed with islet apoptotic cells. The ability of these cells to induce autologous T cell proliferation and to suppress mature dendritic cell function was assessed, together with cytokine production. Microarray experiments were performed using dendritic cells to identify differentially expressed genes after efferocytosis. RESULTS: Molecular and functional changes in dendritic cells after the capture of apoptotic cells were observed. 1 Impaired ability of dendritic cells to stimulate autologous T cell proliferation after the capture of apoptotic cells even after proinflammatory stimuli, with a cytokine profile typical for immature dendritic cells. 2 Suppressive ability of mature dendritic cell function. 3 Microarray-based gene expression profiling of dendritic cells showed differential expression of genes involved in antigen processing and presentation after efferocytosis. 4 Prostaglandin E2 increased production was responsible for immunosuppressive mechanism of dendritic cells after the capture of apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: The tolerogenic behaviour of dendritic cells after islet cells efferocytosis points to a mechanism of silencing potential autoreactive T cells in the microenvironment of autoimmunity. Our results suggest that dendritic cells may be programmed to induce

  14. Brilliant Blue G improves cognition in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease and inhibits amyloid-β-induced loss of filopodia and dendrite spines in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Hu, J; Jiang, L; Xu, S; Zheng, B; Wang, C; Zhang, J; Wei, X; Chang, L; Wang, Q

    2014-10-24

    Deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies report that the Aβ peptide, especially in the oligomeric form, causes memory decline and other cognitive deficits. However, there have been very few effective interventions for termination or even delay of AD progression. Brilliant Blue G (BBG), a safe triphenylmethane dye and P2X7 antagonist, has been reported to have protective effects on neuroinflammation, ischemia, spinal injury and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report that systematic administration of BBG diminishes spatial memory impairment and cognitive deficits in a mouse AD model produced by injecting soluble Aβ peptide into the hippocampal CA1 region. In addition, we show that Aβ-induced loss of filopodia and spine density in cultured hippocampal neurons was prevented by administration of BBG. We conclude that BBG prevents the learning and memory impairment and cognitive deficits induced by the toxicity of soluble Aβ, and improves the development of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons in an AD model mouse. Considering the safety and blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of BBG, our data suggest a potential for BBG as a new therapy for AD. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  16. DIXDC1 contributes to psychiatric susceptibility by regulating dendritic spine and glutamatergic synapse density via GSK3 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P-M; Stanley, R E; Ross, A P; Freitas, A E; Moyer, C E; Brumback, A C; Iafrati, J; Stapornwongkul, K S; Dominguez, S; Kivimäe, S; Mulligan, K A; Pirooznia, M; McCombie, W R; Potash, J B; Zandi, P P; Purcell, S M; Sanders, S J; Zuo, Y; Sohal, V S; Cheyette, B N R

    2016-10-18

    Mice lacking DIX domain containing-1 (DIXDC1), an intracellular Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway protein, have abnormal measures of anxiety, depression and social behavior. Pyramidal neurons in these animals' brains have reduced dendritic spines and glutamatergic synapses. Treatment with lithium or a glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitor corrects behavioral and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in these animals. Analysis of DIXDC1 in over 9000 cases of autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia reveals higher rates of rare inherited sequence-disrupting single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in these individuals compared with psychiatrically unaffected controls. Many of these SNVs alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity of the neurally predominant DIXDC1 isoform; a subset that hyperactivate this pathway cause dominant neurodevelopmental effects. We propose that rare missense SNVs in DIXDC1 contribute to psychiatric pathogenesis by reducing spine and glutamatergic synapse density downstream of GSK3 in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 18 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.184.

  17. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The chemokine receptor CCR2 maintains plasmacytoid dendritic cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, Oriane; Østerby Jørgensen, Line; Frank, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Thymic dendritic cells (DC) play a role in central tolerance. Three thymic DC subtypes have been described: plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two conventional DC (cDC), CD8α+ Sirpα- DC and Sirpα+ CD8α- cDC. Both pDC and Sirpα+ cDC can take up antigen in periphery and migrate into the thymus in response t...... by CCL2 or CCR2 deficiency. Although some thymic progenitors expressed CCR2, this did not include those that give rise to pDC. Based on these results, we propose that CCR2 is involved in pDC homeostasis but its ligand CCL2 does not play a major role....

  19. DIFFERENTIAL FUNCTIONAL EFFECTS OF BIOMATERIALS ON DENDRITIC CELL MATURATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Babensee, Julia E.

    2012-01-01

    The immunological outcome of dendritic cell (DC) treatment with different biomaterials was assessed to demonstrate the range of DC phenotypes induced by biomaterials commonly used in combination products. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes, and treated with different biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA), or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a comprehensive cadre of phenotypic functional outcomes were assessed. Differential levels of functional changes of DC phenotype were observed depending on the type of biomaterial films used to treat DCs. Treatment of DCs with PLGA or chitosan films supported DC maturation with higher levels of DC allostimulatory capacity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, HLA-DQ and CD44 expression as compared to iDCs, and endocytic ability at a level lower compared to iDCs. Alginate film induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from DCs at levels higher than iDCs,. Dendritic cells treated with HA film expressed lower levels of CD40, CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR as compared to iDCs. They also exhibited endocytic ability and CD44 expression at levels lower than iDCs, possibly due to an insolublized (cross-linked) form with high molecular weight HA. Interestingly, treatment of DCs with agarose film maintained a DC functional phenotype at levels similar to iDCs except for CD44 expression which was lower than expression levels for iDCs. Taken together, these results can provide selection criteria for biomaterials to be used in immunomodulating applications and can inform potential outcomes of biomaterials within combination products on associated immune responses as desired by the application. PMID:22705044

  20. Dendritic cell vaccination in glioblastoma after fluorescence-guided resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Ricardo Diez; de Cerio, Ascension Lopez-Diaz; Inoges, Susana; Tejada, Sonia; Pastor, Fernando; Villanueva, Helena; Gallego, Jaime; Espinos, Jaime; Aristu, Javier; Idoate, Miguel Angel; Andreu, Enrique; Bendandi, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether the addition of a customized, active immunotherapy to standard of care including fluorescence-guided surgery, may provide hints of an improved survival for patients with poor-prognosis, incurable glioblastoma multiform. METHODS: Preliminary to our ongoing, phase-II clinical trial, we conducted a small pilot study enrolling five consecutive patients with resectable glioblastoma. In terms of Recursive Partitioning Analysis, four patients were class V and one was class IV. In all five cases, fluorescence-guided surgery was employed, followed by rapid steroid discontinuation. Patients were then treated with a combination of standard radio-chemotherapy with temozolomide and tumor lysate-pulsed, mature dendritic cell-based vaccinations. RESULTS: Though all five patients ultimately progressed, with any further treatment left to the sole decision of the treating oncologist, active immunotherapy was very well tolerated and induced specific immune responses in all three patients for whom enough material was available for such an assessment. Median progression-free survival was 16.1 mo. Even more important, median and mean overall survival were 27 mo and 26 mo, respectively. Three patients have died with an overall survival of 9 mo, 27 mo and 27.4 mo, while the other two are still alive at 32 mo and 36 mo, the former receiving treatment with bevacizumab, while the latter has now been off therapy for 12 mo. Four of five patients were alive at two years. CONCLUSION: Active immunotherapy with tumor lysate-pulsed, autologous dendritic cells is feasible, safe, well tolerated and biologically efficacious. A phase-II study is ongoing to possibly improve further on our very encouraging clinical results. PMID:23293753

  1. Dendritic cells therapy confers a protective microenvironment in murine pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, S; Litwin, S; Barrientos, G; Szereday, L; Chuluyan, E; Bartho, J S; Arck, P C; Blois, S M

    2006-11-01

    The fetal-placental unit is a semi-allograft and immunological recognition of pregnancy, together with the subsequent response of the maternal immune system, is necessary for a successful pregnancy. Dendritic cells (DC) show a biological plasticity that confers them special characteristics regulating both immunity and tolerance. Therapy employing DC proved to diminish the abortion in the DBA/2J-mated CBA/J females; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we evaluated whether DC therapy influences the presence of immunoregulatory populations of cells at the fetal-maternal interface. To address this hypothesis, we analysed the pregnancy-protective CD8, gammadelta cell populations as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) expression at the fetal-maternal interface from abortion-prone female mice that had previously received adoptive transfer of syngeneic DC. Syngeneic DC therapy induced an increase in the number of CD8 and gammadelta cells. Additionally, an upregulation of TGF-beta1 and PIBF expression could be detected after DC transfer. We suggest that DC therapy differentially upregulates a regulatory/protective population of cells at the fetal-maternal interface. It is reasonable to assure that this mechanism would be responsible for the lower abortion rate.

  2. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hoss, Mareike [Institute of Pathology, Electron Microscopy Facility, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Wong, John Erik, E-mail: John.Wong@avt.rwth-aachen.de [Chemical Process Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Turmstrasse 46, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials Research, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, Aachen (Germany); Hieronymus, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.hieronymus@rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3{sup +} DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  3. Characterization of Interleukin-15-Transpresenting Dendritic Cells for Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. J. Van den Bergh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalized dendritic cell- (DC- based vaccination has proven to be safe and effective as second-line therapy against various cancer types. In terms of overall survival, there is still room for improvement of DC-based therapies, including the development of more immunostimulatory DC vaccines. In this context, we redesigned our currently clinically used DC vaccine generation protocol to enable transpresentation of interleukin- (IL- 15 to IL-15Rβγ-expressing cells aiming at boosting the antitumor immune response. In this study, we demonstrate that upon electroporation with both IL-15 and IL-15Rα-encoding messenger RNA, mature DC become highly positive for surface IL-15, without influencing the expression of prototypic mature DC markers and with preservation of their cytokine-producing capacity and their migratory profile. Functionally, we show that IL-15-transpresenting DC are equal if not better inducers of T-cell proliferation and are superior in tumor antigen-specific T-cell activation compared with DC without IL-15 conditioning. In view of the clinical use of DC vaccines, we evidence with a time- and cost-effective manner that clinical grade DC can be safely engineered to transpresent IL-15, hereby gaining the ability to transfer the immune-stimulating IL-15 signal towards antitumor immune effector cells.

  4. Ginseng Berry Extract Promotes Maturation of Mouse Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Ginseng extract has been shown to possess certain anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune-activating effects. However, the immunostimulatory effect of ginseng berry extract (GB has been less well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of GB on the activation of mouse dendritic cells (DCs in vitro and in vivo. GB treatment induced up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs. Interestingly, GB induced a higher degree of co-stimulatory molecule up-regulation than ginseng root extract (GR at the same concentrations. Moreover, in vivo administration of GB promoted up-regulation of CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen DCs. GB also promoted the generation of Th1 and Tc1 cells. Furthermore, Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88 signaling pathway were essential for DC activation induced by GB. In addition, GB strongly prompted the proliferation of ovalbumin (OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, GB induced DC activation in tumor-bearing mice and the combination of OVA and GB treatment inhibited B16-OVA tumor cell growth in C57BL/6 mice. These results demonstrate that GB is a novel tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC and T cell activation.

  5. Dendritic cell-based vaccine efficacy: aiming for hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Andrea Pizzurro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many approaches for cancer immunotherapy have targeted dendritic cells (DC, directly or indirectly, for the induction of antitumor immune responses. DC-based vaccines have been developed using a wide variety of ex vivo DC culture conditions, antigen source and loading strategies, maturation agents and routes of vaccination. Adjuvants are used to activate innate immune cells at the vaccine injection site, to promote antigen transport to the draining lymph nodes (LNs and to model adaptive immune responses. Despite years of effort, the effective induction of strong and durable antitumor T cell responses in vaccinated patients remains a challenge. The study of vaccine interactions with other immune cells in the LNs and, more recently, in the injection site has opened new doors for understanding antitumor effector T cell licensing and function. In this review, we will briefly discuss the relevant sites and up-to-date facts regarding possible targets for antitumor vaccine refinement. We will focus on the processes taking place at the injection site, adjuvant combinations and their role in DC-based vaccines LN homing and modeling vaccine-induced immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth and generating immune memory.

  6. Production of functional dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, immune cell-based therapies, particularly those that utilize dendritic cells (DCs, are a promising therapy approach for cancer treatment. Therefore, DC therapy is the focus of many studies in many laboratories worldwide that are developing novel cancer therapies. This study aimed to develop a reproducible procedure to produce functional DCs from mouse bone marrow for DC therapy research. Bone marrow was collected from mouse femur bones by flushing with buffered saline. These cells were used to isolate mononuclear cells (MNCs by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. MNCs were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL of IL-4 and 20 ng/mL of GMCSF to induce maturation of immature DCs. The results showed that this procedure induced cells exhibiting the DC phenotypes, such as the expression of CD40, CD80, and CD86, high phagocytic capacity, strong production of IL-12, and efficient stimulation of T-CD4 lymphocytes. These results suggest that this procedure can be used to produce functional DCs in future studies that use DCs for immune therapy. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(4.000: 126-132

  7. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watt...) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. PubmedID... 17142025 Title Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic ce

  8. Contribution of dendritic cells to measles virus induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) remains an important pathogen in children worldwide. The morbidity and mortality of MV is associated with severe immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) were identified as initial target cells in vivo, and DCs were efficiently infected by MV in vitro. MV infection of DCs likely contributes to functional deficiency in these cells; therefore playing a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. DCs appeared to mature phenotypically; however, the ability of infected cells to stimulate T cells was compromised. Phenotypic maturation of infected immature DCs was partially controlled by IFN production; however, infected DCs also maintained markers of an immature phenotype such as the continued uptake of antigen and lack of expression of chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, mature DCs did not appear to maintain phenotypic maturation following infection demonstrated by decreased MHC and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Several mechanisms of MV-induced DC dysfunction have been suggested, each likely contributing to the immunosuppressive effect of MV-infected DCs. Infected DCs responded aberrantly to secondary maturation stimuli such as CD40L or TLR4 stimulation. MV infection resulted in apoptosis in DC/T-cell cocultures, which may contribute to a reduced T-cell response. Additionally, the immunological synapse between infected DCs and T cells was compromised resulting in reduced T-cell interaction times and activation signaling. The mechanisms of MV contribution to DC dysfunction appear multifaceted and central to MV-induced immunosuppression. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebriel, Rob; Hoefnagel, Marcel M N

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which are isolated from human blood. There is a strong need to monitor in a high-throughput fashion the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines during the process of vaccine development. Furthermore, regulators require efficacy and safety testing for batch release. For some vaccines, these tests require animal testing, causing pain and discomfort, which cannot be contested because it would interfere with the test results. With the aims of promoting vaccine development and reducing the number of animals for batch release testing, we propose to use more broadly human DC for vaccine immunogenicity testing. In this commentary, this proposition is illustrated by several examples in which the maturation of human DC was successfully used to test for vaccine and adjuvant immunogenicity.

  10. Regulatory multitasking of tolerogenic dendritic cells – lessons taken from Vitamin D3-treated tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana eNikolic

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs work through silencing of differentiated antigen-specific T cells, activation and expansion of naturally occurring T regulatory cells (Tregs, transfer of regulatory properties to T cells and the differentiation of naïve T cells into Tregs. Due to an operational definition based on T cell activation assays, the identity of tolerogenic DCs has been a matter of debate and it need not represent a specialized DC subset. Human tolerogenic DCs generated in vitro using inhibitory cytokines, growth factors, natural immunomodulators or genetic manipulation have been effective and several of these tolerogenic DCs are currently being tested for clinical use. Ex vivo generated tolerogenic DCs reduce activation of naïve T cells using various means, promote a variety of regulatory T cells and most importantly, frequently show stable inhibitory phenotypes upon repetitive maturation with inflammatory factors. Yet, tolerogenic DCs differ with respect to the phenotype or the number of regulatory mechanisms they employ to modulate the immune system. In our experience, tolerogenic DCs generated using the biologically active form of vitamin D (VD3-DCs, alone or combined with dexamethasone are proficient in their immunoregulatory functions. These tolerogenic DCs show a stable maturation-resistant semi-mature phenotype with low expression of activating co-stimulatory molecules, no production of the IL-12 family of cytokines and high expression of inhibitory molecules and IL-10. VD3-DCs induce increased apoptosis of effector T cells and induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which work through linked suppression ensuring infectious tolerance. Lessons learned on VD3-DCs help understanding the contribution of different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and secondary signals to the tolerogenic function and how a cross-talk between DCs and T cells translates into immune regulation.

  11. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  12. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Responses by Parasites: A Common Strategy to Survive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Terrazas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in our planet and the immune responses triggered by these organisms are critical to determine their outcome. Dendritic cells are key elements for the development of immunity against parasites; they control the responses required to eliminate these pathogens while maintaining host homeostasis. However, there is evidence showing that parasites can influence and regulate dendritic cell function in order to promote a more permissive environment for their survival. In this review we will focus on the strategies protozoan and helminth parasites have developed to interfere with dendritic cell activities as well as in the possible mechanisms involved.

  13. Overview of dendritic cell-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagirova, M; Allahverdiyev, A M; Abamor, E S; Ullah, I; Cosar, G; Aydogdu, M; Senturk, H; Ergenoglu, B

    2016-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most serious vector-borne diseases in the world and is distributed over 98 countries. It is estimated that 350 million people are at risk for leishmaniasis. There are three different generation of vaccines that have been developed to provide immunity and protection against leishmaniasis. However, their use has been limited due to undesired side effects. These vaccines have also failed to provide effective and reliable protection and, as such, currently, there is no safe and effective vaccine for leishmaniasis. Dendritic cells (DCs) are a unique population of cells that come from bone marrow and become specialized to take up, process and present antigens to helper T cells in a mechanism similar to macrophages. By considering these significant features, DCs stimulated with different kinds of Leishmania antigens have been used in recent vaccine studies for leishmaniasis with promising results so far. In this review, we aim to review and combine the latest studies about this issue after defining potential problems in vaccine development for leishmaniasis and considering the importance of DCs in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Loss of Gadkin Affects Dendritic Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Schachtner

    Full Text Available Migration is crucial for the function of dendritic cells (DCs, which act as outposts of the immune system. Upon detection of pathogens, skin- and mucosa-resident DCs migrate to secondary lymphoid organs where they activate T cells. DC motility relies critically on the actin cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3 complex, a nucleator of branched actin networks. Consequently, loss of ARP2/3 stimulators and upstream Rho family GTPases dramatically impairs DC migration. However, nothing is known yet about the relevance of ARP2/3 inhibitors for DC migration. We previously demonstrated that the AP-1-associated adaptor protein Gadkin inhibits ARP2/3 by sequestering it on intracellular vesicles. Consistent with a role of Gadkin in DC physiology, we here report Gadkin expression in bone marrow-derived DCs and show that its protein level and posttranslational modification are regulated upon LPS-induced DC maturation. DCs derived from Gadkin-deficient mice were normal with regards to differentiation and maturation, but displayed increased actin polymerization. While the actin-dependent processes of macropinocytosis and cell spreading were not affected, loss of Gadkin significantly impaired DC migration in vitro, however, in vivo DC migration was unperturbed suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms.

  15. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  16. Extracellular transport of cell-size particles and tumor cells by dendritic cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Robert I; Retzinger, Andrew C; Cash, James G; Dentler, Michael D; Retzinger, Gregory S

    2013-12-01

    Many particulate materials of sizes approximating that of a cell disseminate after being introduced into the body. While some move about within phagocytic inflammatory cells, others appear to move about outside of, but in contact with, such cells. In this report, we provide unequivocal photomicroscopic evidence that cultured, mature, human dendritic cells can transport in extracellular fashion over significant distances both polymeric beads and tumor cells. At least in the case of polymeric beads, both fibrinogen and the β2-integrin subunit, CD18, appear to play important roles in the transport process. These discoveries may yield insight into a host of disease-related phenomena, including and especially tumor cell invasion and metastasis. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting of 111In-Labeled Dendritic Cell Human Vaccines Improved by Reducing Number of Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Srinivas, Mangala; Bonetto, Fernando; Cruz, Luis J.; Verdijk, Pauline; Schreibelt, Gerty; van de Rakt, Mandy; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; van Riel, Maichel; Punt, Cornelius J. A.; Adema, Gosse J.; Heerschap, Arend; Figdor, Carl G.; Oyen, Wim J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticancer dendritic cell (DC) vaccines require the DCs to relocate to lymph nodes (LN) to trigger immune responses. However, these migration rates are typically very poor. Improving the targeting of ex vivo generated DCs to LNs might increase vaccine efficacy and reduce costs. We

  18. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Upregulate Extracellular Catabolism of Aggregated Low-Density Lipoprotein on Maturation, Leading to Foam Cell Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Singh, Rajesh K; Grosheva, Inna; Hoffner, Haley; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Chin, Harvey F; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2015-10-01

    Although dendritic cells are known to play a role in atherosclerosis, few studies have examined the contribution of the wide variety of dendritic cell subsets. Accordingly, their roles in atherogenesis remain largely unknown. We investigated the ability of different dendritic cell subsets to become foam cells after contact with aggregated low-density lipoprotein (LDL; the predominant form of LDL found in atherosclerotic plaques). We demonstrate that both murine and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL, leading to foam cell formation, whereas monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL aggregates by this mechanism. Exophagy is a catabolic process in which objects that cannot be internalized by phagocytosis (because of their size or association with extracellular structures) are initially digested in an extracellular acidic lytic compartment. Surprisingly, we found that monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate exophagy on maturation. This contrasts various forms of endocytic internalization in dendritic cells, which decrease on maturation. Finally, we show that our in vitro results are consistent with dendritic cell lipid accumulation in plaques of an ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis. Our results show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL and become foam cells, whereas monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL deposits. Furthermore, we find that exophagy is upregulated on dendritic cell maturation. Thus, exophagy-mediated foam cell formation in monocyte-derived dendritic cells could play a significant role in atherogenesis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Neuromelanin is an immune stimulator for dendritic cells in vitro

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    Oberländer Uwe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized at the cellular level by a destruction of neuromelanin (NM-containing dopaminergic cells and a profound reduction in striatal dopamine. It has been shown recently that anti-melanin antibodies are increased in sera of Parkinson patients, suggesting that NM may act as an autoantigen. In this study we tested whether NM is being recognized by dendritic cells (DCs, the major cell type for inducing T- and B-cell responses in vivo. This recognition of NM by DCs is a prerequisite to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response directed against NM-associated structures. Results Murine DCs were treated with NM of substantia nigra (SN from human subjects or with synthetic dopamine melanin (DAM. DCs effectively phagocytized NM and subsequently developed a mature phenotype (CD86high/MHCIIhigh. NM-activated DCs secreted the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. In addition, they potently triggered T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction, showing that DC activation was functional to induce a primary T cell response. In contrast, DAM, which lacks the protein and lipid components of NM but mimics the dopamine-melanin backbone of NM, had only very little effect on DC phenotype and function. Conclusions NM is recognized by DCs in vitro and triggers their maturation. If operative in vivo, this would allow the DC-mediated transport and presentation of SN antigens to the adaptive immune system, leading to autoimmmunity in susceptible individuals. Our data provide a rationale for an autoimmune-based pathomechanism of PD with NM as the initial trigger.

  20. Enhanced immunological response by dendritic cells in male hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Juan J; Almeida, María; Cordero, Mar; Martín-Martín, Lourdes; Méndez, Cristina; Miralles, José M; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    The effect of male hypogonadism on the immune response is poorly understood, even though testosterone has both immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects in men. In this study, we compared the distribution and functional status of peripheral blood (PB) monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) [CD16(+) (monocytoid), CD33(+) (myeloid) and CD33(-) (plasmacytoid)] and CD4(+) CD25(+)CD127(-/lo) regulatory T cells from hypogonadic men and control subjects. Immunophenotypic studies were performed both on resting and in vitro-stimulated cells. Overall, no significant differences were detected on the number of monocytes, DCs and CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-/lo) regulatory T cells between both groups of subjects. However, hypogonadic men showed slightly higher numbers of circulating CD16(+) cells expressing the CD107b activation/degranulation-associated marker than controls, such differences reaching statistical significance after in vitro stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Interestingly, antigen-stimulated expression of CD107b on CD16(+) cells inversely correlated with the serum concentrations of total testosterone (r(2)=-0.45; P=0.01), free testosterone (r(2)=-0.48; P=0.005), calculated free testosterone (r(2)=-0.44; P=0.01) and bioavailable testosterone (r(2)=-0.46; P=0.008) among all cases studied, as well as with both the LH (r(2)=-0.53, P=0.04) and FSH (r(2)=-0.54, P=0.04) serum levels among hypogonadic men. These findings show an enhanced immunological response of circulating (activated) CD16(+) DCs to antigen stimulation, which was inversely related to testosterone and gonadotropin serum levels. Such findings suggest a modulation by the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis of the immune response and may have clinical implications for hypogonadic men, as regards susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and increased responses to antigenic stimuli. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2012 Stichting European Society for Clinical

  1. Dendritic Cell Lineage Potential in Human Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

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    Julie Helft

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs are thought to descend from a DC precursor downstream of the common myeloid progenitor (CMP. However, a mouse lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor has been shown to generate cDCs following a DC-specific developmental pathway independent of monocyte and granulocyte poiesis. Similarly, here we show that, in humans, a large fraction of multipotent lymphoid early progenitors (MLPs gives rise to cDCs, in particular the subset known as cDC1, identified by co-expression of DNGR-1 (CLEC9A and CD141 (BDCA-3. Single-cell analysis indicates that over one-third of MLPs have the potential to efficiently generate cDCs. cDC1s generated from CMPs or MLPs do not exhibit differences in transcriptome or phenotype. These results demonstrate an early imprinting of the cDC lineage in human hematopoiesis and highlight the plasticity of developmental pathways giving rise to human DCs.

  2. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  3. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  4. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

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    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  5. Quantitative Determination of Ceramide Molecular Species in Dendritic Cells

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    Samar Al Makdessi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The activation of acid sphingomyelinase by cellular stress or receptors or the de novo synthesis lead to the formation of ceramide (N-acylsphingosine, which in turn modifies the biophysical properties of cellular membrane and greatly amplifies the intensity of the initial signal. Ceramide, which acts by re-organizing a given signalosome rather than being a second messenger, has many functions in infection biology, cancer, cardiovascular syndromes, and immune regulation. Experimental studies on the infection of human cells with different bacterial agents demonstrated the activation of the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system. Moreover, the release of ceramide was found to be a requisite for the uptake of the pathogen. Considering the particular importance of the cellular role of ceramide, it was necessary to develop sensitive and accurate methods for its quantification. Methods: Here, we describe a method quantifying ceramide in dendritic cells and defining the different fatty acids (FA bound to sphingosine. The main steps of the method include extraction of total lipids, separation of the ceramide by thin-layer chromatography, derivatization of ceramide-fatty acids (Cer-FA, and quantitation of these acids in their methyl form by gas chromatography on polar capillary columns. The identification of FA was achieved by means of known standards and confirmed by mass spectrometry. Results: FA ranging between C10 and C24 could be detected and quantified. The concentration of the sum of Cer-FA amounted to 14.88 ± 8.98 nmol/106 cells (n=10. Oleic acid, which accounted for approximately half of Cer-FA (7.73 ± 6.52 nmol/106 cells was the predominant fatty acid followed by palmitic acid (3.47 ± 1.54 nmol/106 cells. Conclusion: This highly sensitive method allows the quantification of different molecular species of ceramides.

  6. Dissecting thyroid hormone transport and metabolism in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigena, Nicolás; Alamino, Vanina A; Montesinos, María Del Mar; Nazar, Magalí; Louzada, Ruy A; Wajner, Simone M; Maia, Ana L; Masini-Repiso, Ana M; Carvalho, Denise P; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Pellizas, Claudia G

    2017-02-01

    We reported thyroid hormone (TH) receptor expression in murine dendritic cells (DCs) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3)-dependent stimulation of DC maturation and ability to develop a Th1-type adaptive response. Moreover, an increased DC capacity to promote antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell activity, exploited in a DC-based antitumor vaccination protocol, was revealed. However, putative effects of the main circulating TH, l-thyroxine (T4) and the mechanisms of TH transport and metabolism at DC level, crucial events for TH action at target cell level, were not known. Herein, we show that T4 did not reproduce those registered T3-dependent effects, finding that may reflect a homoeostatic control to prevent unspecific systemic activation of DCs. Besides, DCs express MCT10 and LAT2 TH transporters, and these cells mainly transport T3 with a favored involvement of MCT10 as its inhibition almost prevented T3 saturable uptake mechanism and reduced T3-induced IL-12 production. In turn, DCs express iodothyronine deiodonases type 2 and 3 (D2, D3) and exhibit both enzymatic activities with a prevalence towards TH inactivation. Moreover, T3 increased MCT10 and LAT2 expression and T3 efflux from DCs but not T3 uptake, whereas it induced a robust induction of D3 with a parallel slight reduction in D2. These findings disclose pivotal events involved in the mechanism of action of THs on DCs, providing valuable tools for manipulating the immunogenic potential of these cells. Furthermore, they broaden the knowledge of the TH mechanism of action at the immune system network. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  8. Favorable overall survival in stage III melanoma patients after adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, K.F.; Aarntzen, E.H.; Hout, F.E. In 't; Schreibelt, G.; Creemers, J.H.; Lesterhuis, W.J.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Grunhagen, D.J.; Verhoef, C.; Punt, C.J.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Wilt, J.H. de; Figdor, C.G.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma patients with regional metastatic disease are at high risk for recurrence and metastatic disease, despite radical lymph node dissection (RLND). We investigated the immunologic response and clinical outcome to adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in melanoma patients with regional

  9. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus Encoding Tyrosinase/MART-1/MAGEA6-transduced Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus encoding tyrosinase/mart-1/magea6-transduced autologous dendritic cell vaccine.

  10. Opposing effects of dehydroepiandrosterone and dexamethasone on the generation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Canning (Martha); K. Grotenhuis; H.J. de Wit (Harm); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been suggested as an immunostimulating steroid hormone, of which the effects on the development of dendritic cells (DC) are unknown. The effects of DHEA often oppose those of the other adrenal glucocorticoid,

  11. Commitment to glycolysis sustains survival of NO-producing inflammatory dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Bart; Amiel, Eyal; van der Windt, Gerritje J. W.; Freitas, Tori C.; Chott, Robert; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Pearce, Erika L.; Pearce, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    TLR agonists initiate a rapid activation program in dendritic cells (DCs) that requires support from metabolic and bioenergetic resources. We found previously that TLR signaling promotes aerobic glycolysis and a decline in oxidative phosphorylation (OXHPOS) and that glucose restriction prevents

  12. Primary Human Blood Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy—Tailoring the Immune Response by Dendritic Cell Maturation

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    Simone P. Sittig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC-based cancer vaccines hold the great promise of tipping the balance from tolerance of the tumor to rejection. In the last two decades, we have gained tremendous knowledge about DC-based cancer vaccines. The maturation of DCs has proven indispensable to induce immunogenic T cell responses. We review the insights gained from the development of maturation cocktails in monocyte derived DC-based trials. More recently, we have also gained insights into the functional specialization of primary human blood DC subsets. In peripheral human blood, we can distinguish at least three primary DC subsets, namely CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. We reflect the current knowledge on maturation and T helper polarization by these blood DC subsets in the context of DC-based cancer vaccines. The maturation stimulus in combination with the DC subset will determine the type of T cell response that is induced. First trials with these natural DCs underline their excellent in vivo functioning and mark them as promising tools for future vaccination strategies.

  13. Dendritic Properties Control Energy Efficiency of Action Potentials in Cortical Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile; Deng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Neural computation is performed by transforming input signals into sequences of action potentials (APs), which is metabolically expensive and limited by the energy available to the brain. The metabolic efficiency of single AP has important consequences for the computational power of the cell, which is determined by its biophysical properties and morphologies. Here we adopt biophysically-based two-compartment models to investigate how dendrites affect energy efficiency of APs in cortical pyramidal neurons. We measure the Na + entry during the spike and examine how it is efficiently used for generating AP depolarization. We show that increasing the proportion of dendritic area or coupling conductance between two chambers decreases Na + entry efficiency of somatic AP. Activating inward Ca 2+ current in dendrites results in dendritic spike, which increases AP efficiency. Activating Ca 2+ -activated outward K + current in dendrites, however, decreases Na + entry efficiency. We demonstrate that the active and passive dendrites take effects by altering the overlap between Na + influx and internal current flowing from soma to dendrite. We explain a fundamental link between dendritic properties and AP efficiency, which is essential to interpret how neural computation consumes metabolic energy and how biophysics and morphologies contribute to such consumption.

  14. Dendritic Properties Control Energy Efficiency of Action Potentials in Cortical Pyramidal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosheng Yi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural computation is performed by transforming input signals into sequences of action potentials (APs, which is metabolically expensive and limited by the energy available to the brain. The metabolic efficiency of single AP has important consequences for the computational power of the cell, which is determined by its biophysical properties and morphologies. Here we adopt biophysically-based two-compartment models to investigate how dendrites affect energy efficiency of APs in cortical pyramidal neurons. We measure the Na+ entry during the spike and examine how it is efficiently used for generating AP depolarization. We show that increasing the proportion of dendritic area or coupling conductance between two chambers decreases Na+ entry efficiency of somatic AP. Activating inward Ca2+ current in dendrites results in dendritic spike, which increases AP efficiency. Activating Ca2+-activated outward K+ current in dendrites, however, decreases Na+ entry efficiency. We demonstrate that the active and passive dendrites take effects by altering the overlap between Na+ influx and internal current flowing from soma to dendrite. We explain a fundamental link between dendritic properties and AP efficiency, which is essential to interpret how neural computation consumes metabolic energy and how biophysics and morphologies contribute to such consumption.

  15. Dentate granule cells form hilar basal dendrites in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Cintra, Sofia; Xue, Baogang; Spigelman, Igor; K.; Wong, Alan M.; Obenaus, Andre; Ribak, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Hilar basal dendrites form on dentate granule cells following seizures. To determine whether other brain insults cause the formation of hilar basal dendrites, a model of global cerebral hypoxia/ischemia was used. Rats underwent a transient induction of ischemia by occlusion of both common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion. Hippocampal slices were prepared from these animals 1 month after the ischemic insult, and granule cells were labeled with a retrograde tracing technique after biocy...

  16. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin.

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    Rachael J Borg

    Full Text Available Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells - a critical cell that links the innate and adaptive immune systems. We find that plasmin generated on the surface of necrotic cells enhances their phagocytic removal by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Plasmin also promoted phagocytosis of protease-resistant microparticles by diverse mouse dendritic cell sub-types both in vitro and in vivo. Together with an increased phagocytic capacity, plasmin-treated dendritic cells maintain an immature phenotype, exhibit reduced migration to lymph nodes, increase their expression/release of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β, and lose their capacity to mount an allogeneic response. Collectively, our findings support a novel role for plasmin formed on dead cells and other phagocytic targets in maintaining tissue homeostasis by increasing the phagocytic function of dendritic cells while simultaneously decreasing their immunostimulatory capacity consistent with producing an immunosuppressive state.

  17. Both conventional and interferon killer dendritic cells have antigen-presenting capacity during influenza virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); F. Muskens (Femke); L. Boon (Louis); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer cells are innate effector cells known for their potential to produce interferon-γ and kill tumour and virus-infected cells. Recently, B220+CD11cintNK1.1+ NK cells were found to also have antigen-presenting capacity like dendritic cells (DC), hence their name

  18. Reciprocal Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Christian W; Stefan Freigang; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T cells carrying a highly conserved, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) [invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells] are a subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d molecules. Although CD1d is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are key presenters of glycolipid antigen in vivo. When stimulated through their TCR, iNKT cells rapidly secrete copious amounts of cytokines and induce matur...

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-pretreated plasmacytoid dendritic cells ameliorate experimental chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Cao, Qi; Lee, Vincent W S; Wang, Ya; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, YuanMin; Tan, Thian Kui; Wang, Changqi; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H; Wang, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells play important roles in inducing immune tolerance, preventing allograft rejection, and regulating immune responses in both autoimmune disease and graft-versus-host disease. In order to evaluate a possible protective effect of plasmacytoid dendritic cells against renal inflammation and injury, we purified these cells from mouse spleens and adoptively transferred lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated cells, modified ex vivo, into mice with adriamycin nephropathy. These LPS-treated cells localized to the kidney cortex and the lymph nodes draining the kidney, and protected the kidney from injury during adriamycin nephropathy. Glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial expansion, proteinuria, and creatinine clearance were significantly reduced in mice with adriamycin nephropathy subsequently treated with LPS-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells as compared to the kidney injury in mice given naive plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In addition, LPS-pretreated cells, but not naive plasmacytoid dendritic cells, convert CD4+CD25- T cells into Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and suppress the proinflammatory cytokine production of endogenous renal macrophages. This may explain their ability to protect against renal injury in adriamycin nephropathy.

  20. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Results Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. Conclusion These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair

  1. In-vivo administration of clozapine affects behaviour but does not reverse dendritic spine deficits in the 14-3-3ζ KO mouse model of schizophrenia-like disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaehne, Emily J; Ramshaw, Hayley; Xu, Xiangjun; Saleh, Eiman; Clark, Scott R; Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Lopez, Angel; Schwarz, Quenten; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-11-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug used in the treatment of schizophrenia, which has been shown to reverse behavioural and dendritic spine deficits in mice. It has recently been shown that deficiency of 14-3-3ζ has an association with schizophrenia, and that a mouse model lacking this protein displays several schizophrenia-like behavioural deficits. To test the effect of clozapine in this mouse model, 14-3-3ζ KO mice were administered clozapine (5mg/kg) for two weeks prior to being analysed in a test battery of cognition, anxiety, and despair (depression-like) behaviours. Following behavioural testing brain samples were collected for analysis of specific anatomical defects and dendritic spine formation. We found that clozapine reduced despair behaviour of 14-3-3ζ KO mice in the forced swim test (FST) and altered the behaviour of wild types and 14-3-3ζ KO mice in the Y-maze task. In contrast, clozapine had no effects on hippocampal laminar defects or decreased dendritic spine density observed in 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Our results suggest that clozapine may have beneficial effects on clinical behaviours associated with deficiencies in the 14-3-3ζ molecular pathway, despite having no effects on morphological defects. These findings may provide mechanistic insight to the action of this drug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immune receptors involved in Streptococcus suis recognition by dendritic cells.

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    Marie-Pier Lecours

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of septicemia and meningitis. Knowledge on host immune responses towards S. suis, and strategies used by this pathogen for subversion of these responses is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify the immune receptors involved in S. suis recognition by dendritic cells (DCs. Production of cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs were shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize S. suis and become activated mostly through Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling. Supporting this fact, TLR2(-/- DCs were severely impaired in the release of several cytokines and the surface expression of CD86 and MHC-II. The release of IL-12p70 and CXC10, and the expression of CD40 were found to depend on signaling by both TLR2 and TLR9. The release of IL-23 and CXCL1 were partially dependent on NOD2. Finally, despite the fact that MyD88 signaling was crucial for DC activation and maturation, MyD88-dependent pathways were not implicated in S. suis internalization by DCs. This first study on receptors involved in DC activation by S. suis suggests a major involvement of MyD88 signaling pathways, mainly (but not exclusively through TLR2. A multimodal recognition involving a combination of different receptors seems essential for DC effective response to S. suis.

  3. The Influence of Ouabain on Human Dendritic Cells Maturation

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    C. R. Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although known as a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, several other cellular and systemic actions have been ascribed to the steroid Ouabain (Oua. Particularly in the immune system, our group showed that Ouabain acts on decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, synergizing with glucocorticoids in spontaneous thymocyte apoptosis, and also lessening CD14 expression and blocking CD16 upregulation on human monocytes. However, Ouabain effects on dendritic cells (DCs were not explored so far. Considering the peculiar plasticity and the importance of DCs in immune responses, the aim of our study was to investigate DC maturation under Ouabain influence. To generate immature DCs, human monocytes were cultured with IL-4 and GM-CSF (5 days. To investigate Ouabain role on DC activation, DCs were stimulated with TNF-α for 48 h in the presence or absence of Ouabain. TNF-induced CD83 expression and IL-12 production were abolished in DCs incubated with 100 nM Ouabain, though DC functional capacity concerning lymphocyte activation remained unaltered. Nevertheless, TNF-α-induced antigen capture downregulation, another maturation marker, occurred even in the presence of Ouabain. Besides, Ouabain increased HLA-DR and CD86 expression, whereas CD80 expression was maintained. Collectively, our results suggest that DCs respond to Ouabain maturating into a distinct category, possibly contributing to the balance between immunity and tolerance.

  4. Human Melanoma-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Regulate Dendritic Cell Maturation.

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    Maus, Rachel L G; Jakub, James W; Nevala, Wendy K; Christensen, Trace A; Noble-Orcutt, Klara; Sachs, Zohar; Hieken, Tina J; Markovic, Svetomir N

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of melanoma from a primary tumor to widespread metastasis is crucially dependent on lymphatic spread. The mechanisms regulating the initial step in metastatic dissemination via regional lymph nodes remain largely unknown; however, evidence supporting the establishment of a pre-metastatic niche is evolving. We have previously described a dysfunctional immune profile including reduced expression of dendritic cell (DC) maturation markers in the first node draining from the primary tumor, the sentinel lymph node (SLN). Importantly, this phenotype is present prior to evidence of nodal metastasis. Herein, we evaluate melanoma-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) as potential mediators of the premetastatic niche through cargo-specific polarization of DCs. DCs matured in vitro in the presence of melanoma EVs demonstrated significantly impaired expression of CD83 and CD86 as well as decreased expression of Th1 polarizing chemokines Flt3L and IL15 and migration chemokines MIP-1α and MIP-1β compared to liposome-treated DCs. Profiling of melanoma EV cargo identified shared proteomic and RNA signatures including S100A8 and S100A9 protein cargo, which in vitro compromised DC maturation similar to melanoma EVs. Early evidence demonstrates that similar EVs can be isolated from human afferent lymphatic fluid ex vivo. Taken together, here, we propose melanoma EV cargo as a mechanism by which DC maturation is compromised warranting further study to consider this as a potential mechanism enabled by the primary tumor to establish the premetastatic niche in tumor-draining SLNs of patients.

  5. Activation of granulocytes by direct interaction with dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, M; Inaba, M; Sakaguchi, Y; Fukui, J; Ueda, Y; Omae, M; Ando, Y; Mukaide, H; Guo, K; Yabuki, T; Nakatani, T; Ikehara, S

    2007-01-01

    Granulocytes from human peripheral blood were co-cultured with conventional dendritic cells (cDC) or plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) to examine the effects of DCs on the activation or function of granulocytes. After co-culture of granulocytes with DCs, expression of the activation markers of granulocytes (CD63 and CD64) was up-regulated, and increased expression of CD50, the activation marker and ligand for CD209 (DC-SIGN) was also observed. The interaction of granulocytes with DCs was visualized as the cluster where DCs, especially cDCs, were surrounded by granulocytes to form a ‘rosette’. After co-culture of granulocytes with cDCs, the secretion of elastase from granulocytes was enhanced significantly when examined cytohistochemically and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An increase in myeloperoxidase (another activation index of granulocytes) was also observed after co-culture with DCs. These findings suggest the functional and phenotypical activation of granulocytes by interaction with DCs. Furthermore, we examined the involvement of adhesion molecules in the granulocyte–DC interaction, and found that CD209 participates to some extent in this interaction. PMID:17937679

  6. Characterization of porcine dendritic cell response to Streptococcus suis

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    Lecours Marie-Pier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and important zoonotic agent causing mainly septicemia and meningitis. However, the mechanisms involved in host innate and adaptive immune responses toward S. suis as well as the mechanisms used by S. suis to subvert these responses are unknown. Here, and for the first time, the ability of S. suis to interact with bone marrow-derived swine dendritic cells (DCs was evaluated. In addition, the role of S. suis capsular polysaccharide in modulation of DC functions was also assessed. Well encapsulated S. suis was relatively resistant to phagocytosis, but it increased the relative expression of Toll-like receptors 2 and 6 and triggered the release of several cytokines by DCs, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40 and TNF-α. The capsular polysaccharide was shown to interfere with DC phagocytosis; however, once internalized, S. suis was readily destroyed by DCs independently of the presence of the capsular polysaccharide. Cell wall components were mainly responsible for DC activation, since the capsular polysaccharide-negative mutant induced higher cytokine levels than the wild-type strain. The capsular polysaccharide also interfered with the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80/86 and MHC-II on DCs. To conclude, our results show for the first time that S. suis interacts with swine origin DCs and suggest that these cells might play a role in the development of host innate and adaptive immunity during an infection with S. suis serotype 2.

  7. Denervation-induced homeostatic dendritic plasticity in morphological granule cell models

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    Hermann Cuntz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal death and subsequent denervation of target areas are major consequences of several neurological conditions such asischemia or neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease. The denervation-induced axonal loss results in reorganization of the dendritic tree of denervated neurons. The dendritic reorganization has been previously studied using entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL. ECL leads to shortening and loss of dendritic segments in the denervated outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, the functional importance of these long-term dendritic alterations is not yet understood and their impact on neuronal electrical properties remains unclear. Here we analyzed what happens to the electrotonic structure and excitability of dentate granule cells after lesion-induced alterations of their dendritic morphology, assuming all other parameters remain equal. We performed comparative electrotonic analysis in anatomically and biophysically realistic compartmental models of 3D-reconstructed healthy and denervated granule cells. Using the method of morphological modeling based on optimization principles minimizing the amount of wiring and maximizing synaptic democracy, we built artificial granule cells which replicate morphological features of their real counterparts. Our results show that somatofugal and somatopetal voltage attenuation in the passive cable model are strongly reduced in denervated granule cells. In line with these predictions, the attenuation both of simulated backpropagating action potentials and forward propagating EPSPs was significantly reduced in dendrites of denervated neurons. Intriguingly, the enhancement of action potential backpropagation occurred specifically in the denervated dendritic layers. Furthermore, simulations of synaptic f-I curves revealed a homeostatic increase of excitability in denervated granule cells. In summary, our morphological and compartmental modeling indicates that unless modified by changes of

  8. An investigation of dendritic delay in octopus cells of the mammalian cochlear nucleus

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    Spencer, Martin J.; Grayden, David B.; Bruce, Ian C.; Meffin, Hamish; Burkitt, Anthony N.

    2012-01-01

    Octopus cells, located in the mammalian auditory brainstem, receive their excitatory synaptic input exclusively from auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). They respond with accurately timed spikes but are broadly tuned for sound frequency. Since the representation of information in the auditory nerve is well understood, it is possible to pose a number of questions about the relationship between the intrinsic electrophysiology, dendritic morphology, synaptic connectivity, and the ultimate functional role of octopus cells in the brainstem. This study employed a multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley model to determine whether dendritic delay in octopus cells improves synaptic input coincidence detection in octopus cells by compensating for the cochlear traveling wave delay. The propagation time of post-synaptic potentials from synapse to soma was investigated. We found that the total dendritic delay was approximately 0.275 ms. It was observed that low-threshold potassium channels in the dendrites reduce the amplitude dependence of the dendritic delay of post-synaptic potentials. As our hypothesis predicted, the model was most sensitive to acoustic onset events, such as the glottal pulses in speech when the synaptic inputs were arranged such that the model's dendritic delay compensated for the cochlear traveling wave delay across the ANFs. The range of sound frequency input from ANFs was also investigated. The results suggested that input to octopus cells is dominated by high frequency ANFs. PMID:23125831

  9. Distinct progenitor origin distinguishes a lineage of dendritic-like cells in spleen.

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    Petvises, Sawang; O'Neill, Helen Christine

    2014-01-01

    The dendritic cell (DC) compartment comprises subsets of cells with distinct phenotypes. Previously this lab reported methodology for hematopoiesis of dendritic-like cells in vitro dependent on a murine splenic stromal cell line (5G3). Co-cultures of lineage-depleted bone marrow (Lin(-) BM) over 5G3 continuously produced a distinct population of dendritic-like "L-DC" for up to 35 days. Here the progenitor of L-DC is investigated in relation to known BM-derived hematopoietic progenitors. It is shown here that L-DC-like cells also derive from the CD150(+)Flt3(-) long-term reconstituting-hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and also from the Flt3(+) multipotential progenitor subset in BM. Lin(-) BM co-cultures also produce a transient population of cells resembling conventional (c) DC. Production of cDC-like cells is shown here to be transient and M-CSF dependent, and also appears following co-culture of described common dendritic progenitors or monocyte dendritic progenitors over 5G3. BM cells from C57BL/6-flt3L(tm1lmx) and C57BL/6-Csf2(tm1Ard) mice which lack cDC precursors and monocytes, are shown here to contain L-DC progenitors which can seed 5G3 co-cultures. L-DC are functionally distinct cells, in that they arise independently of M-CSF, and by direct differentiation from HSC.

  10. Distinct progenitor origin distinguishes a lineage of dendritic-like cells in spleen

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    Sawang ePetvises

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dendritic cell (DC compartment comprises subsets of cells with distinct phenotypes. Previously this lab reported methodology for hematopoiesis of dendritic-like cells in vitro dependent on a murine splenic stromal cell line (5G3. Co-cultures of lineage-depleted bone marrow (Lin- BM over 5G3 continuously produced a distinct population of dendritic-like ‘L-DC’ for up to 35 days. Here the progenitor of L-DC is investigated in relation to known BM-derived hematopoietic progenitors. It is shown here that L-DC-like cells also derive from the CD150+Flt3- longterm reconstituting-hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, and also from the Flt3+ multipotential progenitor subset in BM. Lin- BM co-cultures also produce a transient population of cells resembling conventional (c DC. Production of cDC-like cells is shown here to be transient and M-CSF dependent, and also appears following co-culture of described common dendritic progenitors or monocyte dendritic progenitors over 5G3. BM cells from C57BL/6-flt3Ltm1lmx and C57BL/6-Csf2tm1Ard mice which lack cDC precursors and monocytes, are shown here to contain L-DC progenitors which can seed 5G3 co-cultures. L-DC are functionally distinct cells, in that they arise independently of M-CSF, and by direct differentiation from HSC.

  11. Investigations of the functional states of dendritic cells under different conditioned microenvironments by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy.

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    Dong, Rong; Long, Jinhua; Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Wen, Zongyao; Li, Long; Yao, Weijuan; Zeng, Zhu

    2014-01-10

    Dendritic cells are potent and specialized antigen presenting cells, which play a crucial role in initiating and amplifying both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The dendritic cell-based vaccination against cancer has been clinically achieved promising successes. But there are still many challenges in its clinical application, especially for how to identify the functional states. The CD14+ monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood after plastic adherence and purified to approximately 98% with cocktail immunomagnetic beads. The immature dendritic cells and mature dendritic cells were induced by traditional protocols. The resulting dendritic cells were cocultured with normal cells and cancer cells. The functional state of dendritic cells including immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and mature dendritic cells (mDCs) under different conditioned microenvironments were investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular biological methods. The results of Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy showed that the gene transcription activity and energy states of dendritic cells were specifically suppressed by tumor cells (P Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy at given wave numbers were closely correlated with the expression levels of NF-κB (R2:0.69 and R2:0.81, respectively). Our results confirmed that the ratios of absorption intensities of Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy at given wave numbers were positively correlated with the expression levels of NF-κB, suggesting that Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy technology could be clinically applied to identify the functional states of dendritic cell when performing dendritic cell-based vaccination. It's significant for the simplification and standardization of dendritic cell-based vaccination clinical preparation protocols.

  12. BAFF and APRIL from Activin A-Treated Dendritic Cells Upregulate the Antitumor Efficacy of Dendritic Cells In Vivo.

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    Shurin, Michael R; Ma, Yang; Keskinov, Anton A; Zhao, Ruijing; Lokshin, Anna; Agassandian, Marianna; Shurin, Galina V

    2016-09-01

    The members of the TGFβ superfamily play a key role in regulating developmental and homeostasis programs by controlling differentiation, proliferation, polarization, and survival of different cell types. Although the role of TGFβ1 in inflammation and immunity is well evident, the contribution of other TGFβ family cytokines in the modulation of the antitumor immune response remains less documented. Here we show that activin A triggers SMAD2 and ERK1/2 pathways in dendritic cells (DC) expressing type I and II activin receptors, and upregulates production of the TNFα family cytokines BAFF (TALL-1, TNFSF13B) and APRIL (TALL-2, TNFSF13A), which is blocked by SMAD2 and ERK1/2 inhibitors, respectively. BAFF and APRIL derived from activin A-treated DCs upregulate proliferation and survival of T cells expressing the corresponding receptors, BAFF-R and TACI. In vivo, activin A-stimulated DCs demonstrate a significantly increased ability to induce tumor-specific CTLs and inhibit the growth of melanoma and lung carcinoma, which relies on DC-derived BAFF and APRIL, as knockdown of the BAFF and APRIL gene expression in activin A-treated DCs blocks augmentation of their antitumor potential. Although systemic administration of activin A, BAFF, or APRIL for the therapeutic purposes is not likely due to the pluripotent effects on malignant and nonmalignant cells, our data open a novel opportunity for improving the efficacy of DC vaccines. In fact, a significant augmentation of the antitumor activity of DC pretreated with activin A and the proven role of DC-derived BAFF and APRIL in the induction of antitumor immunity in vivo support this direction. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4959-69. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. [Dendritic cells and coronary collateral circulation in coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanchang; Liu, Wei; Yi, Jun; Li, Zhenyu; Pu, Xiaoqun; Yang, Tianlun; Xie, Qiying; Mo, Long; Chen, Xiaobin

    2010-05-01

    To determine the relationship between the number,phenotype and functional status of dendritic cells (DCs) and coronary collateral circulation (CCC) in coronary heart disease (CHD). Forty patients with severe coronary stenosis were recruited and divided into a CCC formation group (Group A, n=22) and a non-CCC formation group (Group B, n=18). Density gradient centrifugation was applied to separate the mononuclear cells (MNCs) from coronary artery blood samples, and MNCs were cultured and proliferated in vitro. The morphology of DCs was observed under converted microscope. The number of harvested cells and DCs was counted by hematocytometer. Flow cytometry was applied to investigate the phenotype and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Mixed lymphocyte reaction was used to test the function of DCs to stimulate the proliferation of T lymphocytes. Stimulation index (SI) was calculated and compared. (1) After in vitro proliferation, DCs were cultured successfully from the mononuclear cells from coronary artery blood samples and the morphology of DCs was not different in the 2 groups. (2) The number of mononuclear cells (MNC no) was (3.95+/-1.41)*10(6), in the CCC group and (2.76+/-0.92)*10(6) in the non-CCC group. The MNC number was significantly increased in the CCC group (P=0.003). (3) The number of DCs was (1.54+/-0.96)*10(6) in the CCC group, and (0.99+/-0.46)*10(6) in the non-CCC group (P=0.033). (4)There was no statistical significance in the percent of CD1a+, CD1a+CD80+, CD1a+CD83+, CD1a+CD86+ cells, and MFI in the 2 groups (P>0.05). (5) SI was 4.96+/-2.30 in the CCC group, whereas 2.66+/-1.04 in the non-CCC group. The SI in the CCC group increased significantly(P=0.0003). In CHD patients with severe coronary stenosis, patients with CCC formation have higher number of DCs and stronger potential of T lymphocyte stimulation.

  14. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

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    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  15. Cigarette smoke differentially modulates dendritic cell maturation and function in time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Givi, Masoumeh Ezzati; Folkerts, Gert; Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Redegeld, Frank A; Mortaz, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs) as professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) play a critical role in the regulation of host immune responses. DCs evolve from immature, antigen-capturing cells, to mature antigen-presenting cells. The relative contribution of DCs to cigarette smoke-induced

  16. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune

  17. Glutamatergic postsynaptic density protein dysfunctions in synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines morphology: relevance to schizophrenia and other behavioral disorders pathophysiology, and implications for novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice

    2014-02-01

    Emerging researches point to a relevant role of postsynaptic density (PSD) proteins, such as PSD-95, Homer, Shank, and DISC-1, in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. The PSD is a thickness, detectable at electronic microscopy, localized at the postsynaptic membrane of glutamatergic synapses, and made by scaffolding proteins, receptors, and effector proteins; it is considered a structural and functional crossroad where multiple neurotransmitter systems converge, including the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and glutamatergic ones, which are all implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Decreased PSD-95 protein levels have been reported in postmortem brains of schizophrenia patients. Variants of Homer1, a key PSD protein for glutamate signaling, have been associated with schizophrenia symptoms severity and therapeutic response. Mutations in Shank gene have been recognized in autism spectrum disorder patients, as well as reported to be associated to behaviors reminiscent of schizophrenia symptoms when expressed in genetically engineered mice. Here, we provide a critical appraisal of PSD proteins role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. Then, we discuss how antipsychotics may affect PSD proteins in brain regions relevant to psychosis pathophysiology, possibly by controlling synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine rearrangements through the modulation of glutamate-related targets. We finally provide a framework that may explain how PSD proteins might be useful candidates to develop new therapeutic approaches for schizophrenia and related disorders in which there is a need for new biological treatments, especially against some symptom domains, such as negative symptoms, that are poorly affected by current antipsychotics.

  18. Choroidal dendritic cells require activation to present antigen and resident choroidal macrophages potentiate this response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, J V; Lumsden, L; Duncan, L; Dick, A D

    2005-03-01

    The uveal compartment of the eye contains extensive networks of resident macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells are now recognised to have a role in many ocular pathologies. The aim of this study was to isolate, characterise, and compare the function of ciliary body/choroid dendritic cells and macrophages from the normal eye. Explants of rat and human ciliary body/choroid were cultured in vitro for various periods of time and cells harvested either from the supernatant fluid or from enzyme digested and washed explants. The cells were then phenotyped by microscopy and flow cytometry, examined by video time lapse photomicroscopy, and analysed functionally in a series of immunoassays. Two main types of dendritic cell were identified: large veil-like MHC class II(mid) motile but relatively non-translocatory cells and small MHC class II(hi) motile and rapidly translocating cells. Tissue macrophages mainly remained associated with the explants in culture but gradually lost their resident tissue marker (ED2) and detached from the explants as clusters of low density, large, CR3 (ED7)(+) cells, some of which underwent apoptosis. Video time lapse studies showed dendritic cells constantly interacting with large single cells and cell clusters by traversing the interstices of the cell clusters. In functional studies, freshly isolated dendritic cells were poor presenters of antigen and required activation by short term culture for acquisition of antigen presenting function. In contrast, dendritic cell depleted choroidal cell preparations containing macrophages and other cells failed to present antigen even after short term culture but augmented the antigen presenting function of dendritic cells when tested in co-culture. At least two types of dendritic cells are present in the normal ciliary body/choroid layer of the eye. It is likely that these cells have different functions based on their motility and potential to migrate to secondary lymphoid tissue either during normal

  19. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Activation-induced cell death of dendritic cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase 1

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    Anja eSchwiebs

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P is an immune modulatory lipid mediator and has been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes. S1P is produced by sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1 and Sphk2. Dendritic cells (DCs are central for the direction of immune responses and crucially involved in autoimmunity and cancerogenesis. In this study we examined the function and survival of bone marrow-derived DCs under long-term inflammatory stimulation. We observed that differentiated cells undergo activation-induced cell death upon LPS stimulation with an increased metabolic activity shortly after stimulation, followed by a rapid activation of caspase 3 and subsequent augmented apoptosis. Importantly, we highlight a profound role of Sphk1 in secretion of inflammatory cytokines and survival of dendritic cells that might be mediated by a change in sphingolipid levels as well as by a change in STAT3 expression. Cell growth during differentiation of Sphk1-deficient cells treated with the functional S1P receptor antagonist FTYP was reduced. Importantly, in dendritic cells we did not observe a compensatory regulation of Sphk2 mRNA in Sphk1-deficient cells. Instead, we discovered a massive increase in Sphk1 mRNA concentration upon long-term stimulation with LPS in wild type cells that might function as an attempt to rescue from inflammation-caused cell death. Taken together, in this investigation we describe details of a crucial involvement of sphingolipids and Sphk1 in activation-induced cell death during long-term immunogenic activity of DCs that might play an important role in autoimmunity and might explain the differences in immune response observed in in vivo studies of Sphk1 modulation.

  1. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

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    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  2. Human monocytes differentiate into dendritic cells subsets that induce anergic and regulatory T cells in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Faivre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a multifactorial pathology with high susceptibility to secondary infections. Innate and adaptive immunity are affected in sepsis, including monocyte deactivation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the effects of alterations in monocytes on the regulation of immune responses during sepsis, we analyzed their differentiation in dendritic cell (DC. Cells from septic patients differentiated overwhelmingly into CD1a-negative DC, a population that was only a minor subset in controls and that is so far poorly characterized. Analysis of T cell responses induced with purified CD1a-negative and CD1a+ DC indicated that (i CD1a-negative DC from both healthy individuals and septic patients fail to induce T cell proliferation, (ii TGFβ and IL-4 were strongly produced in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR with control CD1a-negative DC; reduced levels were produced with patients DC together with a slight induction of IFNγ, (iii compared to controls, CD1a+ DC derived from septic patients induced 3-fold more Foxp3+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate a strong shift in DC populations derived from septic patients' monocytes with expanded cell subsets that induce either T cell anergy or proliferation of T cells with regulatory potential. Lower regulatory cytokines induction on a per cell basis by CD1a-negative dendritic cells from patients points however to a down regulation of immune suppressive abilities in these cells.

  3. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are crucial in Bifidobacterium adolescentis-mediated inhibition of Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    In industrialized countries bacterial intestinal infections are commonly caused by enteropathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The interaction of the microbiota with the host immune system determines the adequacy of an appropriate response against pathogens. In this study we addressed whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium adolescentis is protective during intestinal Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed with B. adolescentis, infected with Yersinia enterocolitica, or B. adolescentis fed and subsequently infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. B. adolescentis fed and Yersinia infected mice were protected from Yersinia infection as indicated by a significantly reduced weight loss and splenic Yersinia load when compared to Yersinia infected mice. Moreover, protection from infection was associated with increased intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell function was investigated using depletion experiments by injecting B. adolescentis fed, Yersinia infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-mouse PDCA-1 antibody, to deplete plasmacytoid dendritic cells, or respective isotype control. The B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia dissemination to the spleen was abrogated after plasmacytoid dendritic cell depletion indicating a crucial function for pDC in control of intestinal Yersinia infection. We suggest that feeding of B. adolescentis modulates the intestinal immune system in terms of increased plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies, which might account for the B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

  4. Reciprocal Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christian W; Freigang, Stefan; Lünemann, Jan D

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T cells carrying a highly conserved, semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) [invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells] are a subset of unconventional T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipids presented by CD1d molecules. Although CD1d is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are key presenters of glycolipid antigen in vivo. When stimulated through their TCR, iNKT cells rapidly secrete copious amounts of cytokines and induce maturation of DCs, thereby facilitating coordinated stimulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The bidirectional crosstalk between DCs and iNKT cells determines the functional outcome of iNKT cell-targeted responses and iNKT cell agonists are used and currently being evaluated as adjuvants to enhance the efficacy of antitumor immunotherapy. This review illustrates mechanistic underpinnings of reciprocal DCs and iNKT cell interactions and discusses how those can be harnessed for cancer therapy.

  5. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns Induced Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells, T Helper Cells, and Natural Killer Helper Cells Can Improve Dendritic Cell Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coordinated cellular interplay is of crucial importance in both host defense against pathogens and malignantly transformed cells. The various interactions of Dendritic Cells (DC, Natural Killer (NK cells, and T helper (Th cells can be influenced by a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and will lead to enhanced CD8+ effector T cell responses. Specific Pattern Recognition Receptor (PRR triggering during maturation enables DC to enhance Th1 as well as NK helper cell responses. This effect is correlated with the amount of IL-12p70 released by DC. Activated NK cells are able to amplify the proinflammatory cytokine profile of DC via the release of IFN-γ. The knowledge on how PAMP recognition can modulate the DC is of importance for the design and definition of appropriate therapeutic cancer vaccines. In this review we will discuss the potential role of specific PAMP-matured DC in optimizing therapeutic DC-based vaccines, as some of these DC are efficiently activating Th1, NK cells, and cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, to optimize these vaccines, also the inhibitory effects of tumor-derived suppressive factors, for example, on the NK-DC crosstalk, should be taken into account. Finally, the suppressive role of the tumor microenvironment in vaccination efficacy and some proposals to overcome this by using combination therapies will be described.

  6. Activation-Induced Cell Death of Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on Sphingosine Kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiebs, Anja; Friesen, Olga; Katzy, Elisabeth; Ferreirós, Nerea; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Radeke, Heinfried H

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an immune modulatory lipid mediator and has been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes. S1P is produced by sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) and Sphk2. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central for the direction of immune responses and crucially involved in autoimmunity and cancerogenesis. In this study we examined the function and survival of bone marrow-derived DCs under long-term inflammatory stimulation. We observed that differentiated cells undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) upon LPS stimulation with an increased metabolic activity shortly after stimulation, followed by a rapid activation of caspase 3 and subsequent augmented apoptosis. Importantly, we highlight a profound role of Sphk1 in secretion of inflammatory cytokines and survival of dendritic cells that might be mediated by a change in sphingolipid levels as well as by a change in STAT3 expression. Cell growth during differentiation of Sphk1-deficient cells treated with the functional S1P receptor antagonist FTYP was reduced. Importantly, in dendritic cells we did not observe a compensatory regulation of Sphk2 mRNA in Sphk1-deficient cells. Instead, we discovered a massive increase in Sphk1 mRNA concentration upon long-term stimulation with LPS in wild type cells that might function as an attempt to rescue from inflammation-caused cell death. Taken together, in this investigation we describe details of a crucial involvement of sphingolipids and Sphk1 in AICD during long-term immunogenic activity of DCs that might play an important role in autoimmunity and might explain the differences in immune response observed in in vivo studies of Sphk1 modulation.

  7. CX3CR1+ CD8α+ dendritic cells are a steady-state population related to plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Birnberg, Tal; Lewis, Kanako L.; Edelson, Brian T.; Bruder, Dunja; Hildner, Kai; Buer, Jan; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Reizis, Boris; Jung, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid organs are characterized by a complex network of phenotypically distinct dendritic cells (DC) with potentially unique roles in pathogen recognition and immunostimulation. Classical DC (cDC) include two major subsets distinguished in the mouse by the expression of CD8α. Here we describe a subset of CD8α+ DC in lymphoid organs of naïve mice characterized by expression of the CX3CR1 chemokine receptor. CX3CR1+ CD8α+ DC lack hallmarks of classical CD8α+ DC, including IL-12 secretion, the capacity to cross-present antigen, and their developmental dependence on the transcriptional factor BatF3. Gene-expression profiling showed that CX3CR1+ CD8α+ DC resemble CD8α− cDC. The microarray analysis further revealed a unique plasmacytoid DC (PDC) gene signature of CX3CR1+ CD8α+ DC. A PDC relationship of the cells is supported further by the fact that they harbor characteristic D–J Ig gene rearrangements and that development of CX3CR1+ CD8α+ DC requires E2-2, the critical transcriptional regulator of PDC. Thus, CX3CR1+ CD8α+ DC represent a unique DC subset, related to but distinct from PDC. Collectively, the expression-profiling data of this study refine the resolution of previous DC definitions, sharpen the border of classical CD8α+ and CD8α− DC, and should assist the identification of human counterparts of murine DC subsets. PMID:20679228

  8. CX3CR1+ CD8alpha+ dendritic cells are a steady-state population related to plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Birnberg, Tal; Lewis, Kanako L; Edelson, Brian T; Bruder, Dunja; Hildner, Kai; Buer, Jan; Murphy, Kenneth M; Reizis, Boris; Jung, Steffen

    2010-08-17

    Lymphoid organs are characterized by a complex network of phenotypically distinct dendritic cells (DC) with potentially unique roles in pathogen recognition and immunostimulation. Classical DC (cDC) include two major subsets distinguished in the mouse by the expression of CD8alpha. Here we describe a subset of CD8alpha(+) DC in lymphoid organs of naïve mice characterized by expression of the CX(3)CR1 chemokine receptor. CX(3)CR1(+) CD8alpha(+) DC lack hallmarks of classical CD8alpha(+) DC, including IL-12 secretion, the capacity to cross-present antigen, and their developmental dependence on the transcriptional factor BatF3. Gene-expression profiling showed that CX(3)CR1(+) CD8alpha(+) DC resemble CD8alpha(-) cDC. The microarray analysis further revealed a unique plasmacytoid DC (PDC) gene signature of CX(3)CR1(+) CD8alpha(+) DC. A PDC relationship of the cells is supported further by the fact that they harbor characteristic D-J Ig gene rearrangements and that development of CX(3)CR1(+) CD8alpha(+) DC requires E2-2, the critical transcriptional regulator of PDC. Thus, CX(3)CR1(+) CD8alpha(+) DC represent a unique DC subset, related to but distinct from PDC. Collectively, the expression-profiling data of this study refine the resolution of previous DC definitions, sharpen the border of classical CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) DC, and should assist the identification of human counterparts of murine DC subsets.

  9. Identification and characterization of polyclonal αβ-T cells with dendritic cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuka, Mirela; Munitic, Ivana; Ashwell, Jonathan D

    2012-01-01

    An efficient immune response requires coordination between innate and adaptive immunity, which act through cells different in origin and function. Here we report the identification of thymus-derived αβ-T-cell receptor+ cells that express CD11c and major histocompatibility complex class II, and require FLT3 ligand for development (T(DC)). T(DC) express genes heretofore found uniquely in T cells or dendritic cells, as well as a distinctive signature of cytotoxicity-related genes. Unlike other innate T-cell subsets, T(DC) have a polyclonal T-cell receptor repertoire and respond to cognate antigens. However, they differ from conventional T cells in that they do not require help from antigen-presenting cells, respond to Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation by producing interleukin-12 and process and present antigen. The physiological relevance of T(DC), found in mice and humans, is still under investigation, but the fact that they combine key features of T and dendritic cells suggests that they provide a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems.

  10. Generation and transcriptional programming of intestinal dendritic cells: essential role of retinoic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, R.; Bscheider, M; Lahl, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    he vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) regulates adaptive immunity in the intestines, with well-characterized effects on IgA responses, Treg induction, and gut trafficking of T- and B-effector cells. It also controls the generation of conventional dendritic cell (cDC) precursors in the bone...... marrow and regulates cDC subset representation, but its roles in the specialization of intestinal cDC subsets are understudied. Here we show that RA acts cell intrinsically in developing gut-tropic pre-mucosal dendritic cell (pre-μDC) to effect the differentiation and drive the specialization...

  11. Role of Natural Killer and Dendritic Cell Crosstalk in Immunomodulation by Commensal Bacteria Probiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzello, Valeria; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Dongarra, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    A cooperative dialogue between natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) has been elucidated in the last years. They help each other to acquire their complete functions, both in the periphery and in the secondary lymphoid organs. Thus, NK cells' activation by dendritic cells allows the ......-dependent immunomodulatory effects. We particularly aim to highlight the ability of distinct species of commensal bacterial probiotics to differently affect the outcome of DC/NK cross-talk and consequently to differently influence the polarization of the adaptive immune response....

  12. Induction of regulatory dendritic cells by dexamethasone and 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Gad, Monika; Walter, Mark R

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) modulated to induce T cell hyporesponsiveness have promising potential in immunotherapy of autoimmune disorders and for the prevention of allograft rejection. While studying the effect of immunosuppressive agents on the maturation of DC we found that 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitami...... immunosuppressive drug combination for the induction of DCs capable of inducing T cell hyporesponsiveness....

  13. Acquisition of antigens by airway dendritic cells. Do we know enough?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... between dendritic cell and particles from in vitro experiments, there is little information on how the particles breach the barrier to reach the immunocompetent cells. An understanding of how these particles pass the epithelial barrier to reach the immunocompetent cells is important in the development of mucosal vaccines.

  14. Therapeutic dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines: the state of art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Felzmann, T.; Powell, D.J.; Ostapenko, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Matuskova, M.; Michalek, J.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, capable of initiating proper adaptive immune responses. Although tumor-infiltrating DCs are able to recognize cancer cells and uptake tumor antigens, they often have impaired functions because of the immunosuppressive

  15. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna M; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42 defici...

  16. The effects of Candida albicans cell wall protein fraction on dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudbary, Maryam; Roudbar Mohammadi, Shahla; Bozorgmehr, Mahmood; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2009-06-01

    Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microflora. C. albicans cell wall is composed of several protein and carbohydrate components which have been shown to play a crucial role in C. albicans interaction with the host immune system. Major components of C. albican cell wall are carbohydrates such as mannans, beta glucans and chitins, and proteins that partially modulate the host immune responses. Dendritic cells (DC), as the most important antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, play a critical role in inducing immune responses against different pathogens. We investigated the effect of the cell wall protein fraction (CPF) of C. albicans on DC maturation. The CPF of C. albicans cells was extracted by a lysis buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol and phosphate-buffered saline. The extract was dialyzed and its protein pattern was evaluated by electrophoresis. Dendritic cells were purified from Balb/c mice spleens through a three-step method including mononuclear cell separation, as well as 2-h and overnight cultures. The purified CPF was added at different concentrations to DC. The purity and maturation status of DC were determined by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies against CD11c, MHC-II, CD40 and CD86. Treatment of DC with 10 microg/ml of CPF increased the expression of maturation markers including MHC-II, CD86 and CD40 on DC compared to the control group. In this study we used C. albicans CPF with the molecular weight of 40-45 kDa for pulsing and maturation of dendritic cells. Since according to our results CPF significantly increased the expression of maturation markers on DC, we suggest that CPF may act as an efficient immunomodulator, or may be used as a potential adjuvant to boost the host immune system against infections.

  17. Biocytin filling of adult gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in situ reveals extensive, spiny, dendritic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca E; Han, Seong-Kyu; Herbison, Allan E

    2005-03-01

    Ultrastructural studies suggest that GnRH neurons receive relatively few synaptic inputs. However, these techniques are biased toward the analysis of portions of the neuron containing GnRH peptide. Using acute brain slices prepared from transgenic GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice, individual fluorescing GnRH neurons were identified, patched, and filled with the small-molecular-weight dye biocytin. Cells were subsequently visualized with an avidin-conjugated fluorophore, and their morphological characteristics were analyzed by confocal microscopy. In total, 45 GnRH neurons from seven adult male and eight diestrus female mice were examined. Unexpectedly, we found that GnRH neurons possess remarkably long dendritic processes, in some cases extending over 1000 microm distal to the cell body. The somata and dendrites of all GnRH neurons were decorated with an assortment of spine-like protrusions, including filopodia, in an heterogeneous manner. Overall, GnRH neurons had a mean dendritic spine density of 0.4 spines/microm, with the highest densities found in the first 50 microm of the dendrite. GnRH neurons with dendrites running in a horizontal orientation had significantly (P < 0.05) more spines than dendrites with a vertical orientation. The comparison of male and female GnRH neurons revealed no sexually differentiated characteristics of somal or dendritic spine density. Using a technique in which the full extent of the GnRH neuron can be visualized, we demonstrate here a previously unrecognized GnRH neuron morphology of long dendrites covered in spines. These observations suggest that GnRH neurons are not poorly innervated and that they receive abundant excitatory synaptic inputs.

  18. Functional activation of T cells by dendritic cells and macrophages exposed to the intracellular parasite Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Sarah; Germon, Stéphanie; Guiton, Rachel; Ducournau, Céline; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle

    2011-05-01

    Neospora caninum is an intracellular protozoan pathogen that causes abortion in cattle. We studied how the interaction between murine conventional dendritic cells or macrophages and N. caninum influences the generation of cell-mediated immunity against the parasite. We first explored the invasion and survival ability of N. caninum in dendritic cells and macrophages. We observed that protozoa rapidly invaded and proliferated into these two cell populations. We then investigated how Neospora-exposed macrophages or dendritic cells distinguish between viable and non-viable (heat-killed tachyzoites and antigenic extract) parasites. Viable tachyzoites and antigenic extract, but not killed parasites, altered the phenotype of immature dendritic cells. Dendritic cells infected with viable parasites down-regulated the expression of MHC-II, CD40, CD80 and CD86 whereas dendritic cells exposed to N. caninum antigenic extract up-regulated the expression of MHC-II and CD40 and down-regulated CD80 and CD86 expression. Moreover, only viable tachyzoites and antigenic extract induced IL-12 synthesis by dendritic cells. MHC-II expression was up-regulated and CD86 expression was down-regulated at the surface of macrophages, regardless of the parasitic form was encountered. However, IL-12 secretion by macrophages was only observed under conditions using viable and heat-killed parasite. We then analysed how macrophages and dendritic cells were involved in inducing T-cell responses. T lymphocyte IFN-γ-secretion in correlation with IL-12 production occurred after interactions between T cells and dendritic cells exposed to viable tachyzoites or antigenic extract. By contrast, for macrophages IFN-γ production was IL-12-independent and only occurred after interactions between T cells and macrophages exposed to antigenic extract. Thus, N. caninum-induced activation of murine dendritic cells, but not that of macrophages, was associated with T cell IFN-γ production after IL-12 secretion

  19. Supralinear dendritic Ca2+ signalling in young developing CA1 pyramidal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Jörg; Bischofberger, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Although Ca2+ is critically important in activity-dependent neuronal development, not much is known about the regulation of dendritic Ca2+ signals in developing neurons. Here, we used ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to investigate dendritic Ca2+ signalling in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells during the first 1–4 weeks of postnatal development. We show that active dendritic backpropagation of Nav channel-dependent action potentials (APs) evoked already large dendritic Ca2+ transients in animals aged 1 week with amplitudes of ∼150 nm, similar to the amplitudes of ∼160 nM seen in animals aged 4 weeks. Although the AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ load increased about four times during the first 4 weeks, the peak amplitude of free Ca2+ concentration was balanced by a four-fold increase in Ca2+ buffer capacity κs (∼70 vs. ∼280). Furthermore, Ca2+ extrusion rates increased with postnatal development, leading to a slower decay time course (∼0.2 s vs. ∼0.1 s) and more effective temporal summation of Ca2+ signals in young cells. Most importantly, during prolonged theta-burst stimulation dendritic Ca2+ signals were up to three times larger in cells at 1 week than at 4 weeks of age and much larger than predicted by linear summation, which is attributable to an activity-dependent slow-down of Ca2+ extrusion. As Ca2+ influx is four-fold smaller in young cells, the larger Ca2+ signals are generated using four times less ATP consumption. Taken together, the data suggest that active backpropagations regulate dendritic Ca2+ signals during early postnatal development. Remarkably, during prolonged AP firing, Ca2+ signals are several times larger in young than in mature cells as a result of activity-dependent regulation of Ca2+ extrusion rates. PMID:25239458

  20. Vitamin E can improve behavioral tests impairment, cell loss, and dendrite changes in rats' medial prefrontal cortex induced by acceptable daily dose of aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Ali; Noorafshan, Ali; Jahangir, Mahboubeh; Hosseini, Leila; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2018-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener used in about 6000 sugar-free products. Aspartame consumption could be associated with various neurological disorders. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of aspartame onmedial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC) as well as neuroprotective effects of vitamin E. The rats were divided into seven groups, including distilled water, corn oil, vitamin E (100mg/kg/day), and low (acceptable daily dose) and high doses of aspartame (40 and 200mg/kg/day) respectively, with or without vitamin E consumption, for 8 weeks. Behavioral tests were recorded and the brain was prepared for stereological assessments. Novel objects test and eight-arm radial maze showed impairmentoflong- and short-termmemoriesin aspartame groups. Besides, mPFC volume, infralimbic volume, neurons number, glial cells number, dendrites length per neuron,and number of spines per dendrite length were decreased by 7-61% in the rats treated with aspartame. However, neurons' number, glial cells number, and rats' performance in eight-arm radial mazes were improved by concomitant consumption of vitamin E and aspartame. Yet, the mPFC volume and infralimbic cortex were protected only in the rats receiving the low dose of aspartame+vitamin E. On the other hand, dendrites length, spines number,and novel object recognition were not protected by treatment with vitamin E+aspartame. The acceptable daily dose or higher doses of aspartame could induce memory impairments and cortical cells loss in mPFC. However, vitamin E could ameliorate some of these changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in normal goal-directed behaviour and learning as well as pathological conditions like schizophrenia and addiction. Its major cellular substrates, the medium spiny (MS) neurons, possess a wide variety of dendritic active conductances ...

  2. The scavenger receptor MARCO modulates TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydn T Kissick

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor MARCO mediates macrophage recognition and clearance of pathogens and their polyanionic ligands. However, recent studies demonstrate MARCO expression and function in dendritic cells, suggesting MARCO might serve to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. To gain additional insight into the role of MARCO in dendritic cell activation and function, we profiled transcriptomes of mouse splenic dendritic cells obtained from MARCO deficient mice and their wild type counterparts under resting and activating conditions. In silico analysis uncovered major alterations in gene expression in MARCO deficient dendritic cells resulting in dramatic alterations in key dendritic cell-specific pathways and functions. Specifically, changes in CD209, FCGR4 and Complement factors can have major consequences on DC-mediated innate responses. Notably, these perturbations were magnified following activation with the TLR-4 agonist lipopolysaccharide. To validate our in silico data, we challenged DC's with various agonists that recognize all mouse TLRs and assessed expression of a set of immune and inflammatory marker genes. This approach identified a differential contribution of MARCO to TLR activation and validated a major role for MARCO in mounting an inflammatory response. Together, our data demonstrate that MARCO differentially affects TLR-induced DC activation and suggest targeting of MARCO could lead to different outcomes that depend on the inflammatory context encountered by DC.

  3. Full restoration of Brucella-infected dendritic cell functionality through Vγ9Vδ2 T helper type 1 crosstalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ni

    Full Text Available Vγ9Vδ2 T cells play an important role in the immune response to infectious agents but the mechanisms contributing to this immune process remain to be better characterized. Following their activation, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells develop cytotoxic activity against infected cells, secrete large amounts of cytokines and influence the function of other effectors of immunity, notably cells playing a key role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response such as dendritic cells. Brucella infection dramatically impairs dendritic cell maturation and their capacity to present antigens to T cells. Herein, we investigated whether V T cells have the ability to restore the full functional capacities of Brucella-infected dendritic cells. Using an in vitro multicellular infection model, we showed that: 1/Brucella-infected dendritic cells activate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells through contact-dependent mechanisms, 2/activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells induce full differentiation into IL-12 producing cells of Brucella-infected dendritic cells with functional antigen presentation activity. Furthermore, phosphoantigen-activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells also play a role in triggering the maturation process of dendritic cells already infected for 24 h. This suggests that activated Vγ9Vδ2 T cells could be used to modulate the outcome of infectious diseases by promoting an adjuvant effect in dendritic cell-based cellular therapies.

  4. Th17 Cells and Activated Dendritic Cells Are Increased in Vitiligo Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Moussai, Dariush; Gulati, Nicholas; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Cohen, Jules A.; Krueger, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, characterized by progressive skin de-pigmentation due to the loss of cutaneous melanocytes. The exact cause of melanocyte loss remains unclear, but a large number of observations have pointed to the important role of cellular immunity in vitiligo pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we characterized T cell and inflammation-related dermal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in pigmented non-lesional, leading edge and depigmented lesional vitiligo skin. By immunohistochemistry staining, we observed enhanced populations of CD11c+ myeloid dermal DCs and CD207+ Langerhans cells in leading edge vitiligo biopsies. DC-LAMP+ and CD1c+ sub-populations of dermal DCs expanded significantly in leading edge and lesional vitiligo skin. We also detected elevated tissue mRNA levels of IL-17A in leading edge skin biopsies of vitiligo patients, as well as IL-17A positive T cells by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Langerhans cells with activated inflammasomes were also noted in lesional vitiligo skin, along with increased IL-1ß mRNA, which suggest the potential of Langerhans cells to drive Th17 activation in vitiligo. Conclusions/Significance These studies provided direct tissue evidence that implicates active Th17 cells in vitiligo skin lesions. We characterized new cellular immune elements, in the active margins of vitiligo lesions (e.g. populations of epidermal and dermal dendritic cells subsets), which could potentially drive the inflammatory responses. PMID:21541348

  5. High Gain Patch Antenna with Composite Right-Left Handed Structure and Dendritic Cell Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-04-01

    We present a novel high-gain patch antenna utilizing composite right-left handed (CRLH) structure and dendritic cell metamaterials. The proposed CRLH antenna, composed of modified Sievenpiper mushroom unit-cells, is based on the positive first-order resonance mode for high gain. In addition, the dendritic cell metamaterials are used to surround the proposed antenna to further increase the antenna directivity and gain due to suppressing the surface waves. The experimental results show that the gain and the directivity of the proposed antenna with CRLH and dendritic cells can be improved by 3.88 dB and 8.82, respectively, in comparison with a conventional patch antenna. Moreover, a 10-dB bandwidth with 9.55% is achieved. The measured results are in good agreement with the simulated ones.

  6. A macrophage phenotype for a constitutive, class II antigen-expressing, human dermal perivascular dendritic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontheimer, R D; Matsubara, T; Seelig, L L

    1989-07-01

    A previously uncharacterized population of class II antigen-bearing dendritic cells that are intimately associated with the dermal microvasculature was identified in normal human skin using a double-label, indirect immunofluorescence technique. The only other major HLA-DR positive dermal cell type noted in these studies, the dermal microvascular endothelial cell (DMVEC), appeared to express lesser amounts of HLA-DR region gene product than did this dermal perivascular dendritic cell (DPDC). These DPDC were particularly common around small vessels in the superficial vascular plexus of the papillary dermis and were distinct from the mast cell, another cell type normally seen in a similar location. Phenotypic and ultrastructural studies have determined that the DPDC is more closely related to the monocyte/macrophage lineage than the dendritic cell lineage. The perivascular location and phenotype of this cell distinguishes it from other previously described constitutive dermal cell types such as the classic "histiocyte," veiled cell, and dendrocyte. The relatively rich expression of all three major HLA-D region gene products by this dermal perivascular dendritic macrophage would suggest that it could play a significant role in the immunobiology of the dermal microvascular unit.

  7. Active Dendrites and Differential Distribution of Calcium Channels Enable Functional Compartmentalization of Golgi Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Stephanie; Hull, Court; Regehr, Wade G

    2015-11-25

    Interneurons are essential to controlling excitability, timing, and synaptic integration in neuronal networks. Golgi cells (GoCs) serve these roles at the input layer of the cerebellar cortex by releasing GABA to inhibit granule cells (grcs). GoCs are excited by mossy fibers (MFs) and grcs and provide feedforward and feedback inhibition to grcs. Here we investigate two important aspects of GoC physiology: the properties of GoC dendrites and the role of calcium signaling in regulating GoC spontaneous activity. Although GoC dendrites are extensive, previous studies concluded they are devoid of voltage-gated ion channels. Hence, the current view holds that somatic voltage signals decay passively within GoC dendrites, and grc synapses onto distal dendrites are not amplified and are therefore ineffective at firing GoCs because of strong passive attenuation. Using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging in rat slices, we find that dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels allow somatic action potentials to activate voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) along the entire dendritic length, with R-type and T-type VGCCs preferentially located distally. We show that R- and T-type VGCCs located in the dendrites can boost distal synaptic inputs and promote burst firing. Active dendrites are thus critical to the regulation of GoC activity, and consequently, to the processing of input to the cerebellar cortex. In contrast, we find that N-type channels are preferentially located near the soma, and control the frequency and pattern of spontaneous firing through their close association with calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels. Thus, VGCC types are differentially distributed and serve specialized functions within GoCs. Interneurons are essential to neural processing because they modulate excitability, timing, and synaptic integration within circuits. At the input layer of the cerebellar cortex, a single type of interneuron, the Golgi cell (GoC), carries these functions. The

  8. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosseini-Sharifabad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG, shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs.

  9. Impact of tobacco smoke on upper airway dendritic cell accumulation and regulation by sinonasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jennifer K; O'Connell, Brendan P; Pasquini, Whitney; Mulligan, Ryan M; Smith, Sarah; Soler, Zachary M; Atkinson, Carl; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2017-08-01

    In these studies we examined the impact of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and active smoking on sinonasal dendritic cell (DC) subsets in controls or patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). In subsequent in-vitro investigations, we examined the influence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human sinonasal epithelial cells' (HSNECs) ability to regulate DC functions. Sinonasal tissue, blood, and hair were collected from patients undergoing sinus surgery. Smoking status and ETS exposure were determined by hair nicotine. DC subsets were examined by flow cytometric analysis. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) were treated with conditioned medium from non-smoked-exposed HSNECs (NS-HSNECs) or cigarette-smoke-extract-exposed HSNECs (CSE-HSNECs) to assess the impact of CSE exposure on HSNEC regulation of moDC functions. Control subjects who were active smokers displayed increased sinonasal moDC and myeloid dendritic 1 (mDC1) cells and reduced mDC2 cells, whereas, in CRSwNP patients, only moDC and mDC2 cells were altered. ETS was found to increase only moDCs in the CRSwNP patients. In vitro, CSE stimulated HSNEC secretion of the moDC regulatory products chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20, prostaglandin E2 , and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. CSE exposure also promoted HSNECs to stimulate monocyte and moDC migration. moDCs treated with CSE-HSNEC media stimulated an increase in antigen uptake and expression of CD80 and CD86. Last, CSE-HSNEC-treated moDCs secreted increased levels of interleukin-10, interferon-γ, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Active smoking, and to a lesser degree ETS, alters the sinonasal composition of DCs. A potential mechanism to account for this is that cigarette smoke stimulates HSNECs to induce moDC migration, maturation, and activation. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Increased plasma d-2-hydroxyglutarate in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2-mutated blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Fuda, Franklin; Vandergriff, Travis; Boriack, Richard; Medeiros, Bruno C; Frankel, Arthur E; Chen, Weina

    2015-02-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an exceedingly rare hematologic malignancy derived from the precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 genes have been discovered in a range of neoplasms including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia, chondrosarcoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Mutant IDH acquires neomorphic enzymatic activity to generate the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Here, we describe the first case of an IDH2 R140Q-mutated blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm in a patient with markedly elevated plasma d-2HG. This finding expands the spectrum of neoplasms with increased d-2HG in association with IDH mutation. The roles of IDH mutation and d-2HG in disease pathogenesis and assessment of clinical response are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of streptococcus suis capsule type on human dendritic cell responses, phagocytosis and intracellular survival.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Ferrando, M.L.; Lammers, G.; Taverne, N.; Smith, H.E.; Wells, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major porcine pathogen of significant commercial importance worldwide and an emerging zoonotic pathogen of humans. Given the important sentinel role of mucosal dendritic cells and their importance in induction of T cell responses we investigated the effect of different S.

  13. Another Armament in Gut Immunity: Lymphotoxin-Mediated Crosstalk between Innate Lymphoid and Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced apoptotic dendritic cells as a novel therapy for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Puijvelde, Gijs H M; Wierts, Laura; Lagraauw, H Maxime; Foks, Amanda C; van Santbrink, Peter J; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C A

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of immune responses may form a powerful approach to treat atherosclerosis. It was shown that clearance of apoptotic cells results in tolerance induction to cleared Ags by dendritic cells (DCs); however, this seems impaired in atherosclerosis because Ag-specific tolerance is lacking. This

  15. Differential regulation of C-type lectin expression on tolerogenic dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Sandra J.; van Liempt, Ellis; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2006-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APC) express high levels of C-type lectins, which play a major role in cellular interactions as well as pathogen recognition and antigen presentation. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), expressed by dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages, mediates

  16. Dendritic cells inversely regulate airway inflammation in cigarette smoke-exposed mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezzati Givi, Masoumeh; Akbari, Peyman; Boon, Louis; Puzovic, Vladimir S; Bezemer, Gillina F G; Ricciardolo, Fabio L M; Folkerts, Gert; Redegeld, Frank A; Mortaz, Esmaeil

    The recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells into the respiratory system is considered a crucial feature in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in the onset and regulation of immune responses, we investigated

  17. Genetically modified lactococcus lactis for delivery of human interleukin-10 to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Braat (Henri); I.L. Huibregtse (Inge ); S.A.J. Zaat (Sebastiaan); M.L. Kapsenberg (Martien ); M.A. Sartori da Silva; M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); S. van Deventer (Sander)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L.lacti s IL-10) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated

  18. Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge L.; Zaat, Sebatian A.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Sartori da Silva, Maria A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Braat, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs) to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L. lactis(IL-10)) on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L.

  19. Effect of denosumab on recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Matsumine, Akihiko; Takegami, Norihiko; Yamada, Junichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2015-05-15

    A case of recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the lumbar spine successfully treated with denosumab is reported; a fully human monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand (RANKL). To report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab. GCRG is a non-neoplastic osteofibrous lesion usually found in the maxilla and mandible but rarely in the spine. It is clinically distinct from giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), although common histological characteristics such as the proliferation of spindle-shaped stromal cells and multinucleated giant cells are shared. Denosumab has recently been reported to be effective for unresectable GCTB; however, there is only one report of its effect on GCRG. Moreover, the effect of denosumab on GCRG of the spine is unknown. The clinical course, radiological features, pathology, and treatment outcome of a patient with recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab are documented. Denosumab treatment was used for this patient with unresectable recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine. Follow-up lumbar radiography showed significant bone formations in the tumor lesion after 3 months of treatment. On follow-up computerized tomography scans of the L2 and L3 vertebral lesions, the replacement of osoteolytic lesions by the formation of cortical-like bone tissue was clearly identified. We report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the spine successfully treated with denosumab. Treatment with denosumab induced significant bone formation in the unresectable lumbar lesion with stable clinical improvement during the 12-month follow-up period without apparent complications. Denosumab shows promise as a new alternative treatment option for osteoclastic giant cell-rich tumors, such as GCRG, especially for unresectable lesions of the spine. 4.

  20. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  1. Active dendritic integration as a mechanism for robust and precise grid cell firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hieber, Christoph; Toleikyte, Gabija; Aitchison, Laurence; Roth, Arnd; Clark, Beverley A; Branco, Tiago; Häusser, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Understanding how active dendrites are exploited for behaviorally relevant computations is a fundamental challenge in neuroscience. Grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex are an attractive model system for addressing this question, as the computation they perform is clear: they convert synaptic inputs into spatially modulated, periodic firing. Whether active dendrites contribute to the generation of the dual temporal and rate codes characteristic of grid cell output is unknown. We show that dendrites of medial entorhinal cortex neurons are highly excitable and exhibit a supralinear input-output function in vitro, while in vivo recordings reveal membrane potential signatures consistent with recruitment of active dendritic conductances. By incorporating these nonlinear dynamics into grid cell models, we show that they can sharpen the precision of the temporal code and enhance the robustness of the rate code, thereby supporting a stable, accurate representation of space under varying environmental conditions. Our results suggest that active dendrites may therefore constitute a key cellular mechanism for ensuring reliable spatial navigation.

  2. Skin dendritic cell and T cell activation associated with dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyen, Huynh Thi Le; Cerny, Daniela; Trung, Dinh The; Pang, Jassia; Velumani, Sumathy; Toh, Ying Xiu; Qui, Phan Tu; Hao, Nguyen Van; Simmons, Cameron; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Wills, Bridget; Fink, Katja

    2017-10-27

    The pathogenesis of severe dengue remains unclear, particularly the mechanisms underlying the plasma leakage that results in hypovolaemic shock in a small proportion of individuals. Maximal leakage occurs several days after peak viraemia implicating immunological pathways. Skin is a highly vascular organ and also an important site of immune reactions with a high density of dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages and T cells. We obtained skin biopsies and contemporaneous blood samples from patients within 24 hours of onset of dengue shock syndrome (DSS), and from healthy controls. We analyzed cell subsets by flow cytometry, and soluble mediators and antibodies by ELISA; the percentage of migratory CD1a+ dermal DCs was significantly decreased in the DSS patients, and skin CD8+ T cells were activated, but there was no accumulation of dengue-specific antibodies. Inflammatory monocytic cells were not observed infiltrating the skin of DSS cases on whole-mount histology, although CD14dim cells disappeared from blood.

  3. CD103+ Dendritic Cells Control Th17 Cell Function in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Zelante

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells express diverse functional programs while retaining their Th17 identity, in some cases exhibiting a stem-cell-like phenotype. Whereas the importance of Th17 cell regulation in autoimmune and infectious diseases is firmly established, the signaling pathways controlling their plasticity are undefined. Using a mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, we found that lung CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs would produce IL-2, dependent on NFAT signaling, leading to an optimally protective Th17 response. The absence of IL-2 in DCs caused unrestrained production of IL-23 and fatal hyperinflammation, which was characterized by strong Th17 polarization and the emergence of a Th17 stem-cell-like population. Although several cell types may be affected by deficient IL-2 production in DCs, our findings identify the balance between IL-2 and IL-23 productions by lung DCs as an important regulator of the local inflammatory response to infection.

  4. DMPD: Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediators. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16978535 Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory media...l) (.csml) Show Pivotal role of PGE2 and IL-10 in the cross-regulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory media...egulation of dendritic cell-derivedinflammatory mediators. Authors Harizi H, Gualde N. Publication Cell Mol

  5. Identification of TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells reveals TTP as a critical regulator of dendritic cell maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Jillian; Townley-Tilson, W.H. Davin; Deleault, Kristen M.; Skinner, Stephen J.; Gross, Robert H.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Brooks, Seth A.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells provide a critical link between innate and adaptive immunity and are essential to prime a naive T-cell response. The transition from immature dendritic cells to mature dendritic cells involves numerous changes in gene expression; however, the role of post-transcriptional changes in this process has been largely ignored. Tristetraprolin is an AU-rich element mRNA-binding protein that has been shown to regulate the stability of a number of cytokines and chemokines of mRNAs. Using TTP immunoprecipitations and Affymetrix GeneChips, we identified 393 messages as putative TTP mRNA targets in human dendritic cells. Gene ontology analysis revealed that ∼25% of the identified mRNAs are associated with protein synthesis. We also identified six MHC Class I alleles, five MHC Class II alleles, seven chemokine and chemokine receptor genes, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, and CD86 as putative TTP ligands. Real-time PCR was used to validate the GeneChip data for 15 putative target genes and functional studies performed for six target genes. These data establish that TTP regulates the expression of DUSP1, IDO, SOD2, CD86, and MHC Class I-B and F via the 3′-untranslated region of each gene. A novel finding is the demonstration that TTP can interact with and regulate the expression of non-AU-rich element-containing messages. The data implicate TTP as having a broader role in regulating and limiting the immune response than previously suspected. PMID:18367721

  6. Regulation of IgA production by naturally occurring TNF/iNOS-producing dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Iwata, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hajime; Ishikawa, Hiromichi; Matsushita, Masayuki; Shiohara, Tetsuo; Akira, Shizuo; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2007-08-23

    Immunoglobulin-A has an irreplaceable role in the mucosal defence against infectious microbes. In human and mouse, IgA-producing plasma cells comprise approximately 20% of total plasma cells of peripheral lymphoid tissues, whereas more than 80% of plasma cells produce IgA in mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT). One of the most biologically important and long-standing questions in immunology is why this 'biased' IgA synthesis takes place in the MALT but not other lymphoid organs. Here we show that IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) is impaired in inducible-nitric-oxide-synthase-deficient (iNOS-/-; gene also called Nos2) mice. iNOS regulates the T-cell-dependent IgA CSR through expression of transforming growth factor-beta receptor, and the T-cell-independent IgA CSR through production of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL, also called Tnfsf13) and a B-cell-activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family (BAFF, also called Tnfsf13b). Notably, iNOS is preferentially expressed in MALT dendritic cells in response to the recognition of commensal bacteria by toll-like receptor. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of iNOS+ dendritic cells rescues IgA production in iNOS-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that the MALT dendritic cells are a TNF-alpha/iNOS-producing dendritic-cell subset, originally identified in mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. The presence of a naturally occurring TNF-alpha/iNOS-producing dendritic-cell subset may explain the predominance of IgA production in the MALT, critical for gut homeostasis.

  7. Adolescent cocaine exposure simplifies orbitofrontal cortical dendritic arbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M DePoy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and amphetamine remodel dendritic spines within discrete cortico-limbic brain structures including the orbitofrontal cortex (oPFC. Whether dendrite structure is similarly affected, and whether pre-existing cellular characteristics influence behavioral vulnerabilities to drugs of abuse, remain unclear. Animal models provide an ideal venue to address these issues because neurobehavioral phenotypes can be defined both before, and following, drug exposure. We exposed mice to cocaine from postnatal days 31-35, corresponding to early adolescence, using a dosing protocol that causes impairments in an instrumental reversal task in adulthood. We then imaged and reconstructed excitatory neurons in deep-layer oPFC. Prior cocaine exposure shortened and simplified arbors, particularly in the basal region. Next, we imaged and reconstructed orbital neurons in a developmental-genetic model of cocaine vulnerability – the p190rhogap+/- mouse. p190RhoGAP is an actin cytoskeleton regulatory protein that stabilizes dendrites and dendritic spines, and p190rhogap+/- mice develop rapid and robust locomotor activation in response to cocaine. Despite this, oPFC dendritic arbors were intact in drug-naïve p190rhogap+/- mice. Together, these findings provide evidence that adolescent cocaine exposure has long-term effects on dendrite structure in the oPFC, and they suggest that cocaine-induced modifications in dendrite structure may contribute to the behavioral effects of cocaine more so than pre-existing structural abnormalities in this cell population.

  8. Imaging findings of inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell tumor of spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Liangjun; Yang, Zhiyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiangsong; Shen, Bingqi

    2014-04-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell tumor (IPT-like FDCT) histology is similar to that of the classical follicular dendritic cell (FDC) tumor, but, in addition, the inflammatory component is quite prominent. We report a case of IPT-like FDCT of the spleen by abdominal CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Abdominal CT showed a low-density, round, well-circumscribed defined mass in spleen, and the mass showed a high metabolism rate on 18F-FDG PET/CT.

  9. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  10. Dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, a novel depression-related protein, upregulates corticotropin-releasing hormone expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Shanshan; Ren, Haigang; Qi, Xin-Rui; Luchetti, Sabina; Kamphuis, Willem; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Wang, Guanghui; Swaab, Dick F.

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered dendritic cell nuclear protein-1 is the product of a novel candidate gene for major depression. The A allele encodes full-length dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, while the T allele encodes a premature termination of translation at codon number 117 on chromosome 5. In the

  11. Microvesicle Cargo of Tumor-Associated MUC1 to Dendritic Cells Allows Cross-presentation and Specific Carbohydrate Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rughetti, Aurelia; Rahimi, Hassan; Belleudi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we show that the form of the MUC1 antigen, i.e., soluble or as microvesicle cargo, influences MUC1 processing in dendritic cells. In fact, MUC1 carried by microvesicles translocates from the endolysosomal/HLA-II to the HLA-I compartment and is presented by dendritic cells to MUC1-specific CD8...

  12. TLR3 is required for survival following Coxsackievirus B3 infection by driving T lymphocyte activation and polarization: The role of dendritic cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renata Sesti-Costa; Marcela Cristina Santiago Françozo; Grace Kelly Silva; José Luiz Proenca-Modena; João Santana Silva

    2017-01-01

    .... In the current study, we found that TLR3 expression in dendritic cells plays a role in their activation upon CVB3 infection in vitro, as TLR3-deficient dendritic cells up-regulate CD80 and CD86...

  13. Tumours of histiocytes and accessory dendritic cells : an immunohistochemical approach to classification from the International Lymphoma Study Group based on 61 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pileri, SA; Grogan, TM; Harris, NL; Banks, P; Campo, E; Chan, JKC; Favera, RD; Delsol, G; De Wolf-Peeters, C; Falini, B; Gascoyne, RD; Gaulard, P; Gatter, KC; Isaacson, PG; Jaffe, ES; Kluin, P; Knowles, DM; Mason, DY; Mori, S; Muller-Hermelink, HK; Piris, MA; Ralfkiaer, E; Stein, H; Su, IJ; Warnke, RA; Weiss, LM

    Neoplasms of histiocytes and dendritic cells are rare, and their phenotypic and biological definition is incomplete. Seeking to identify antigens detectable in paraffin-embedded sections that might allow a more complete, rational immunophenotypic classification of histiocytic/dendritic cell

  14. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...

  15. Depletion of cutaneous macrophages and dendritic cells promotes growth of basal cell carcinoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Nitzki, Frauke; Uhmann, Anja; Dittmann, Kai; Theiss-Suennemann, Jennifer; Herrmann, Markus; Reichardt, Holger M; Schwendener, Reto; Pukrop, Tobias; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Hahn, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) belongs to the group of non-melanoma skin tumors and is the most common tumor in the western world. BCC arises due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene Patched1 (Ptch). Analysis of the conditional Ptch knockout mouse model for BCC reveals that macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) of the skin play an important role in BCC growth restraining processes. This is based on the observation that a clodronate-liposome mediated depletion of these cells in the tumor-bearing skin results in significant BCC enlargement. The depletion of these cells does not modulate Ki67 or K10 expression, but is accompanied by a decrease in collagen-producing cells in the tumor stroma. Together, the data suggest that cutaneous macrophages and DC in the tumor microenvironment exert an antitumor effect on BCC.

  16. Alterations in the secretory pattern of dermal dendritic cells following melanin uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mareike; Elsässer, Hans Peter

    2013-06-01

    Under a variety of circumstances, melanin occurs in the dermal compartment of the skin, being mostly observed in cells that have been termed melanophages, some of which have been identified as dermal dendritic cells. We analysed changes in the expression and secretion pattern of cytokines by dendritic cells after the uptake of melanin from various sources. Dendritic cells were derived from human primary blood monocytes or from the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Melanin uptake increased the secretion of the chemokines MIP-1β (CCL4) and MCP-1 (CCL2). The higher MIP-1β secretion was accompanied by higher MIP-1β gene expression. Elevation of MIP-1β secretion was dependent on the uptake of melanin but could not be induced by the phagocytosis of latex beads, indicating that the phagocytic process itself was not sufficient to increase the secretion of this cytokine. The data thus show that the uptake of melanin changes the cytokine expression and secretion pattern of dendritic-like cells.

  17. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-02

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A role for tolerogenic dendritic cell-induced B-regulatory cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2012-08-01

    To review the important recent findings on the nature, characteristics and function of novel populations of immunosuppressive B-lymphocytes (Bregs) and their possible role as a regulatory cell population, potentially responsive to dendritic cells, in preventing and possibly controlling type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although almost all of the experimental work in immunosuppressive B-lymphocyte biology has focused on their role in arthritis and experimental inflammatory bowel disease, only recently has a role for Bregs in the regulation of type 1 diabetes been looked at more extensively. IL-10-producing Bregs are of significant interest, more so because of their potential modulation by tolerogenic dendritic cells. Additionally, novel populations have been discovered that could also be relevant in the regulation of diabetes autoimmunity. The unexpected discovery of a novel population of Bregs, whose frequency was upregulated in our phase I clinical trial of tolerogenic autologous dendritic cell administration in humans, opens a new frontier for basic and translational research into these novel cell populations. Bregs are a recently rediscovered population of suppressive lymphocytes whose activation, differentiation and function could be sensitive to tolerogenic dendritic cell networks. Modulation of these dendritic cell networks, or the Bregs directly, offers novel options to attenuate and reverse type 1 diabetes autoimmunity as a possible cure for the disease.

  19. Dendritic cells as Achilles? heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sch?nrich, G?nther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZ...

  20. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Günther eSchönrich; Martin J. Raftery

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently estab-lishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing V...

  1. An unusual case of cutaneous blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with concomitant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay L; Shetty, Shashirekha; Salama, Mohamed E

    2011-05-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is a rare hematologic malignancy characterized by aggressive clinical behavior and frequent cutaneous involvement. We describe a case of a 64-year-old man with a rapidly enlarging subcutaneous forearm mass. Histologic examination of the excisional biopsy specimen revealed a diffuse proliferation of atypical hematolymphoid cells in the dermis extending to the deep subcutaneous soft tissues. Occasional aggregates of small lymphocytes were noted to be distributed within the mass. The tumor cells expressed CD4, CD45, CD56, CD123, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) but not CD3, CD20, or CD34. A diagnosis of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm was rendered. Chromosome analysis revealed a 45 X, -Y karyotype. In addition, flow cytometry identified a small population of monoclonal B cells. A staging bone marrow aspirate and biopsy was performed, which showed normal cytogenetics and no evidence of involvement by blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Flow cytometric evaluation of the bone marrow revealed a CD5-negative, CD10-negative monoclonal B-cell population consistent with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. This is a very unusual example of cutaneous blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with a novel cytogenetic finding and concomitant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Although previously not reported, our case shows that blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm may be associated with lymphoid malignancy. The relationship between the 2 neoplasms, however, is unclear. A high degree of suspicion and bone marrow examination in patients with a new diagnosis of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is required to avoid this potential diagnostic pitfall.

  2. Dendritic cell neurofibroma sine pseudorosettes: report of a case with a granulomatous appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Fredrik

    2011-10-01

    An unusual variant of dendritic cell neurofibroma is reported. In contrast to previous cases, the formation of pseudorosettes was lacking. The tumor was located on the anterior aspect of the thigh in a previously healthy 71-year-old woman with no evidence of neurofibromatosis. The tumor was composed of type-1 and type-2 cells, which were immunoreactive for S-100 protein and CD57. The granulomatous appearance was due to the zonal accumulation of CD34-positive dendritic cells and type-1 cells in a serpiginous fashion surrounding large areas with lesser cellularity featuring type-2 cells with scattered type-1 cells arranged in a haphazard fashion. Intralesional small neurites positive for neurofilament and perilesional perineural cells positive for epithelial membrane antigen were documented immunohistochemically.

  3. Characterization of Dendritic Cell Subsets Through Gene Expression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Dalod, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are immune sentinels of the body and play a key role in the orchestration of the communication between the innate and the adaptive immune systems. DCs can polarize innate and adaptive immunity toward a variety of functions, sometimes with opposite roles in the overall control of immune responses (e.g., tolerance or immunosuppression versus immunity) or in the balance between various defense mechanisms promoting the control of different types of pathogens (e.g., antiviral versus antibacterial versus anti-worm immunity). These multiple DC functions result both from the plasticity of individual DC to exert different activities and from the existence of various DC subsets specialized in distinct functions. Functional genomics represents a powerful, unbiased, approach to better characterize these two levels of DC plasticity and to decipher its molecular regulation. Indeed, more and more experimental immunologists are generating high-throughput data in order to better characterize different states of DC based, for example, on their belonging to a specific subpopulation and/or on their exposure to specific stimuli and/or on their ability to exert a specific function. However, the interpretation of this wealth of data is severely hampered by the bottleneck of their bioinformatics analysis. Indeed, most experimental immunologists lack advanced computational or bioinformatics expertise and do not know how to translate raw gene expression data into potential biological meaning. Moreover, subcontracting such analyses is generally disappointing or financially not sustainable, since companies generally propose canonical analysis pipelines that are often unadapted for the structure of the data to analyze or for the precise type of questions asked. Hence, there is an important need of democratization of the bioinformatics analyses of gene expression profiling studies, in order to accelerate interpretation of the results by the researchers at the origin of the

  4. The Effect of Traditional Chinese Formula Danchaiheji on the Differentiation of Regulatory Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs, a newly described dendritic cell subset with potent immunomodulatory function, have attracted increased attention for their utility in treating immune response-related diseases, such as graft-versus-host disease, hypersensitivity, and autoimmune diseases. Danchaiheji (DCHJ is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used for many years in the clinic. However, whether DCHJ can program dendritic cells towards a regulatory phenotype and the underlying mechanism behind this process remain unknown. Herein, we investigate the effects of traditional Chinese DCHJ on DCregs differentiation and a mouse model of skin transplantation. The current study demonstrates that DCHJ can induce dendritic cells to differentiate into DCregs, which are represented by high CD11b and low CD86 and HLA-DR expression as well as the secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β. In addition, DCHJ inhibited DC migration and T cell proliferation, which correlated with increased IDO expression. Furthermore, DCHJ significantly prolonged skin graft survival time in a mouse model of skin transplantation without any liver or kidney toxicity. The traditional Chinese formula DCHJ has the potential to be a potent immunosuppressive agent with high efficiency and nontoxicity.

  5. A look at HIV journey: from dendritic cells to infection spread in CD4⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Fabien; Moris, Arnaud; Mitchell, John Paul; Piguet, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Dendritic cells and their subsets are among the very first immune cells to tackle incoming pathogens and initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. During the past year, some studies investigating the early events occurring at mucosal sites, upon HIV infection, reinforced our view that the virus has evolved subtle strategies to hijack key cellular components in dendritic cells, thus leading to viral acquisition and dissemination while dampening or delaying antiviral responses. In this review, we will detail recent research aimed at investigating the involvement of different dendritic cell subtypes on HIV transmission at mucosal sites, the events and cellular factors in dendritic cell guiding HIV trafficking, and polarization at the virological synapse. Furthermore, we will link some of these basic findings with current and novel therapeutic and prophylactic strategies targeting the early events of mucosal HIV transmission. It is becoming evident that a better characterization of the early events of HIV transmission and the involvement of dendritic cell subtypes in this process would contribute to strengthen our efforts to improve the current therapeutic and prophylactic strategies.

  6. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK) in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire. PMID:26729097

  7. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune regulator (Aire can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs, which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs, remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D. We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire.

  8. IL-6 Production by Dendritic Cells Is Dispensable for CD8+ Memory T-Cell Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Daudelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following activation, naïve CD8+ T cells will differentiate into effectors that differ in their ability to survive: some will persist as memory cells while the majority will die by apoptosis. Signals given by antigen-presenting cells (APCs at the time of priming modulate this differential outcome. We have recently shown that, in opposition to dendritic cell (DC, CD40-activated B-(CD40-B cell vaccination fails to efficiently produce CD8+ memory T cells. Understanding why CD40-B-cell vaccination does not lead to the generation of functional long-lived memory cells is essential to define the signals that should be provided to naïve T cells by APCs. Here we show that CD40-B cells produce very low amount of IL-6 when compared to DCs. However, supplementation with IL-6 during CD40-B-cell vaccination did not improve memory generation. Furthermore, IL-6-deficient DCs maintained the capacity to promote the formation of functional CD8+ effectors and memory cells. Our results suggest that in APC vaccination models, IL-6 provided by the APCs is dispensable for proper CD8+ T-cell memory generation.

  9. The dynamic changes of CD3e(-)CD11c(+) dendritic cells in spleens and bone marrow of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Qingzhou; Hou, Wei; He, Li

    2017-03-01

    Schistosoma japonicum as a pathogeny requires dendritic cells to activate immune response. So, the research is to study the dynamic changes of CD3e(-)CD11c(+) dendritic cells in mice infected with S. japonicum. Zero, 7, 28, 35, and 63 days were selected to study the variation of dendritic cells, and the proportions of CD3e(-)CD11c(+) dendritic cells and CD86(+) mature dendritic cells in spleens and bone marrow were tested by flow cytometry. As a result, the variation trends of dendritic cells in spleen and bone marrow are similar as follows: the proportions of CD3e(-)CD11c(+) dendritic cells increased first and then decreased from day 35, but the percentages of CD86(+) mature dendritic cells decreased from day 28 and increased in day 63. In vitro, cultured dendritic cells treated with SEA and SAWA were tested by flow cytometry, the variation trends of CD86 on dendritic cells are consistent with the results in days 28 and 63. Besides CD86, the expression of MHC-II also hints immune regulation. In conclusion, it is speculated that dendritic cells play a role of immune regulation through MHC-II and CD86 in S. japonicum infection. Immune regulation of dendritic cells is not only in favor of the survival of host and parasite but also can be used in the therapy for immune diseases.

  10. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic non-curable inflammatory disease of the intestine that affects as many as 1.4 million persons in the United States and 2.2 million persons in Europe. IBD results from abnormal immune response to bacterial components of the commensal microflora...... in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...

  11. Replication of Norovirus in cell culture reveals a tropism for dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane E Wobus

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are understudied because these important enteric pathogens have not been cultured to date. We found that the norovirus murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1 infects macrophage-like cells in vivo and replicates in cultured primary dendritic cells and macrophages. MNV-1 growth was inhibited by the interferon-alphabeta receptor and STAT-1, and was associated with extensive rearrangements of intracellular membranes. An amino acid substitution in the capsid protein of serially passaged MNV-1 was associated with virulence attenuation in vivo. This is the first report of replication of a norovirus in cell culture. The capacity of MNV-1 to replicate in a STAT-1-regulated fashion and the unexpected tropism of a norovirus for cells of the hematopoietic lineage provide important insights into norovirus biology.

  12. Critical role of dendritic cells in T cell retention in the interfollicular region of Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Takashi; Shibata, Naoko; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ishikawa, Izumi; Sato, Shintaro; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-07-15

    Peyer's patches (PPs) simultaneously initiate active and quiescent immune responses in the gut. The immunological function is achieved by the rigid regulation of cell distribution and trafficking, but how the cell distribution is maintained remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that binding of stromal cell-derived lymphoid chemokines to conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) is essential for the retention of naive CD4(+) T cells in the interfollicular region (IFR) of PPs. Transitory depletion of CD11c(high) cDCs in mice rapidly impaired the IFR structure in the PPs without affecting B cell follicles or germinal centers, lymphoid chemokine production from stromal cells, or the immigration of naive T cells into the IFRs of PPs. The cDC-orchestrated retention of naive T cells was mediated by heparinase-sensitive molecules that were expressed on cDCs and bound the lymphoid chemokine CCL21 produced from stromal cells. These data collectively reveal that interactions among cDCs, stromal cells, and naive T cells are necessary for the formation of IFRs in the PPs.

  13. The dynamic lives of macrophage and dendritic cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Paresa L.; Butcher, Matthew J.; Galkina, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major pathological process through which arterial plaques are formed, is a dynamic chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium sized arteries in which the vasculature, lipid metabolism, and the immune system all play integral roles. Both the innate and adaptive immune systems are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis but myeloid cells represent the major component of the burgeoning atherosclerotic plaque. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells can be found within the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial wall, where they can contribute to or regulate inflammation. However, the precise behaviors and functions of these cells in situ are still active areas of investigation that continue to yield exciting and surprising new data. Here, we review recent progress in understanding of the complex biology of macrophages and dendritic cells, focusing particularly on the dynamic regulation of these subsets in the arterial wall and novel, emerging functions of these cells during atherogenesis. PMID:24628328

  14. The SNARE VAMP7 Regulates Exocytic Trafficking of Interleukin-12 in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiaruttini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12, produced by dendritic cells in response to activation, is central to pathogen eradication and tumor rejection. The trafficking pathways controlling spatial distribution and intracellular transport of IL-12 vesicles to the cell surface are still unknown. Here, we show that intracellular IL-12 localizes in late endocytic vesicles marked by the SNARE VAMP7. Dendritic cells (DCs from VAMP7-deficient mice are partially impaired in the multidirectional release of IL-12. Upon encounter with antigen-specific T cells, IL-12-containing vesicles rapidly redistribute at the immune synapse and release IL-12 in a process entirely dependent on VAMP7 expression. Consistently, acquisition of effector functions is reduced in T cells stimulated by VAMP7-null DCs. These results provide insights into IL-12 intracellular trafficking pathways and show that VAMP7-mediated release of IL-12 at the immune synapse is a mechanism to transmit innate signals to T cells.

  15. Hyaluronic acid graft polymers displaying peptide antigen modulate dendritic cell response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Sestak, Joshua; Shannon, Laura; Siahaan, Teruna J.; Vines, Charlotte M.; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    A novel oxime grafting scheme was utilized to conjugate an ICAM