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Sample records for cell cycle-specific transcription

  1. Cell cycle-specific UNG2 phosphorylations regulate protein turnover, activity and association with RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Lars; Kavli, Bodil; Sousa, Mirta M L; Torseth, Kathrin; Liabakk, Nina B; Sundheim, Ottar; Pena Diaz, Javier; Otterlei, Marit; Hørning, Ole; Jensen, Ole N; Krokan, Hans E; Slupphaug, Geir

    2008-01-01

    Human UNG2 is a multifunctional glycosylase that removes uracil near replication forks and in non-replicating DNA, and is important for affinity maturation of antibodies in B cells. How these diverse functions are regulated remains obscure. Here, we report three new phosphoforms of the non-cataly...

  2. Cell-cycle specific expression of a small proline-rich protein in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous metaplasia of the bronchial epithelium is generally believed to be involved in the neoplastic progression toward squamous cell carcinomas. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms controlling this type of differentiation. The induction of two families of cDNAs encoding a small proline-rich protein (sPRP), sprI and sprII, was first identified in human keratinocytes exhibiting squamous differentiation. cDNAs similar to sprI have also been identified in cultured tracheal epithelial cells undergoing squamous differentiation. The first step during the squamous differentiation process is the inhibition of cell growth; it has also been noted that a sPRP mRNA in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is induced 10-fold just before the cultures reach confluence. Thus, sPRP may stop cell division in cells undergoing squamous differentation. In support of this possibility are the recent investigations correlating expression of sPRP with cell morphology. Specific immunoreactivity to sPRP, using affinity-purified antibodies, showed a strong immunostaining in cells with a round configuration, while less staining was observed in other cells. The major part of the CHO population showed no immunoreactivity. One interpretation of this observation is that the expression of sPRP may be cell-cyle regulated. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the phase of the cell cycle where induced synthesis of sPRP mRNA occurs

  3. Involvement of SRSF11 in cell cycle-specific recruitment of telomerase to telomeres at nuclear speckles

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Jeong, Sun Ah; Khadka, Prabhat; Hong, Juyeong; Chung, In Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase, a unique ribonucleoprotein complex that contains the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the telomerase RNA component (TERC) and the TERC-binding protein dyskerin, is required for continued cell proliferation in stem cells and cancer cells. Here we identify SRSF11 as a novel TERC-binding protein that localizes to nuclear speckles, subnuclear structures that are enriched in pre-messenger RNA splicing factors. SRSF11 associates with active telomerase enzyme through an interacti...

  4. Cell-cycle-specific interaction of nuclear DNA-binding proteins with a CCAAT sequence from the human thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of thymidine kinase parallels the onset of DNA synthesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the thymidine kinase gene, the authors have examined whether specific nuclear factors interact in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with sequences upstream of this gene. Two inverted CCAAT boxes near the transcriptional initiation sites were observed to form complexes with nuclear DNA-binding proteins. The nature of the complexes changes dramatically as the cells approach DNA synthesis and correlates well with the previously reported transcriptional increase of the thymidine kinase gene

  5. The approaches in detecting cell cycle specificity of Fas-mediated apoptosis in leukemia cell lines and activated PBLs in vitro%体外Fas介导细胞凋亡的细胞周期特异性的检测方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小军; 胡静; 李小兰

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish a system in detecting the cell cycle specificity induced by recombinant human Fas ligand in vitro,so as to provide a reliable platform for further exploring the mechanism of cell cycle control and regulation in Fas-mediated apoptosis.Methods: The target cells-leukaemia cell lines and activated peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin were incubated with recombinant human Fas ligand for 6 to 36 h,apoptosis was detected by sub-G1,common annexin-V/PI and modified annexin V and propidium iodide (API) methods and analysed by flow cytometry.Results: The modified API method demonstrated that Fas-mediated apoptosis was cell cycle specific and initiated at G1 phase.The common annexinV/PI method showed the most appropriate condition for the detection of typical cell cycle-specific apoptosis.The sub-G1 method could only illuminate late apoptosis and DNA histogram.Conclusion: Fas-mediated apoptosis was cell cycle-specific and initiated at G1 phase.Based on the modified APl and common AnnexinV/PI methods,the establishment of stable and typical cell cycle-specific model in Fas-mediated apoptosis in vitro was feasible.

  6. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H F; Fousteri, Maria I

    2007-07-20

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIalpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Lig3 and DNA polymerase delta colocalize and interact with NER components in a UV- and incision-dependent manner throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase epsilon are recruited to UV-damage sites only in proliferating cells. This study reveals an unexpected and key role for XRCC1-Lig3 in maintenance of genomic integrity by NER in both dividing and nondividing cells and provides evidence for cell-cycle regulation of NER-mediated repair synthesis in vivo. PMID:17643379

  7. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIa (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Li...

  8. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single-cell

  9. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  10. Integrating transcriptional controls for plant cell expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Mockaitis, Keithanne; Estelle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The plant hormones auxin and brassinosteroid promote cell expansion by regulating gene expression. In addition to independent transcriptional responses generated by the two signals, recent microarray analyses indicate that auxin and brassinosteroid also coordinate the expression of a set of shared target genes.

  11. Cytarabine and paclitaxel exhibit different cell-cycle specificities in different cell growing status%阿糖胞苷和泰素在不同靶细胞生长状态下具有不同细胞周期特异性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 周毅; 陶德定

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cell-cycle specificities of cytarabine and paclitaxel in different growing status of target cell. Methods: Using flow cytometry, we tested the cell-cycle specificities of cytarabine and paclitaxel on acute lymphocyte leukemia cell line Molt-4 in different growing status and on clinical acute lymphocyte leukemia specimens in vitro as well as in leukemia patients in vivo. Results: Cytarabine induced S phase specific cell-cycle blockage and apoptosis in exponentially growing Molt-4, but showed G0/G1 phase specificity in high-density cultured Molt-4 and in clinical specimens. Paclitaxel induced G2/M phase specific cell-cycle blockage and apoptosis in exponential Molt-4, but showed G0/G1 phase specificity in high-density cultured Molt-4 and S phase specificity in clinical specimens. In the first day of clinical chemotherapy, cytarabine induced G0/G1 with a little S phase apoptosis in leukemia cells of acute lymphocyte leukemia patient in vivo. Cytarabine plus paclitaxel together had almost the same effect in the second day. Conclusion: The cell-cycle effects of cytarabine and paclitaxel were different in different target cell growing status. It should be noted that the in vivo effect of these agents may be different from people usually anticipated during clinical chemotherapy. So the combined chemotherapeutic regimens may need to be redesigned.

  12. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, Sina A; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Takamoto Ohse; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs ...

  13. Transcriptional Landscape of Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sina A.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Ohse, Takamoto; Pickering, Scott G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire. PMID:25127402

  14. Transcriptional landscape of glomerular parietal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs. In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire.

  15. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda E. Kippner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription

  16. Downregulation of rRNA Transcription Triggers Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Yuki Hayashi; Takao Kuroda; Hiroyuki Kishimoto; Changshan Wang; Atsushi Iwama; Keiji Kimura

    2014-01-01

    Responding to various stimuli is indispensable for the maintenance of homeostasis. The downregulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in the response to stimuli by various cellular processes, such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell differentiation is caused by intra- and extracellular stimuli and is associated with the downregulation of rRNA transcription as well as reduced cell growth. The downregulation of rRNA transcription during differentiati...

  17. Downregulation of rRNA transcription triggers cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Responding to various stimuli is indispensable for the maintenance of homeostasis. The downregulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in the response to stimuli by various cellular processes, such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell differentiation is caused by intra- and extracellular stimuli and is associated with the downregulation of rRNA transcription as well as reduced cell growth. The downregulation of rRNA transcription during differentiation is considered to contribute to reduced cell growth. However, the downregulation of rRNA transcription can induce various cellular processes; therefore, it may positively regulate cell differentiation. To test this possibility, we specifically downregulated rRNA transcription using actinomycin D or a siRNA for Pol I-specific transcription factor IA (TIF-IA in HL-60 and THP-1 cells, both of which have differentiation potential. The inhibition of rRNA transcription induced cell differentiation in both cell lines, which was demonstrated by the expression of the common differentiation marker CD11b. Furthermore, TIF-IA knockdown in an ex vivo culture of mouse hematopoietic stem cells increased the percentage of myeloid cells and reduced the percentage of immature cells. We also evaluated whether differentiation was induced via the inhibition of cell cycle progression because rRNA transcription is tightly coupled to cell growth. We found that cell cycle arrest without affecting rRNA transcription did not induce differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results demonstrate the first time that the downregulation of rRNA levels could be a trigger for the induction of differentiation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this phenomenon was not simply a reflection of cell cycle arrest. Our results provide a novel insight into the relationship between rRNA transcription and cell differentiation.

  18. Parallel single-cell sequencing links transcriptional and epigenetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermueller, Christof; Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Macaulay, Iain C; Teng, Mabel J; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry; Kelsey, Gavin; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf

    2016-03-01

    We report scM&T-seq, a method for parallel single-cell genome-wide methylome and transcriptome sequencing that allows for the discovery of associations between transcriptional and epigenetic variation. Profiling of 61 mouse embryonic stem cells confirmed known links between DNA methylation and transcription. Notably, the method revealed previously unrecognized associations between heterogeneously methylated distal regulatory elements and transcription of key pluripotency genes. PMID:26752769

  19. Transcription factors in the development of inner ear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuna; Qian, Wei; Jiang, Guochang; Ma, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells are the sensory receptors that detect and convert sound vibrations and head movements into neural signals. However, in humans, these cells are unable to regenerate if they are damaged or lost. Over thepast decade,there has been an exponential increase in interest and progress in understanding of the development of the inner ear and of hair cells, aiming to gain insights into hair cell repair or even regeneration. In hair cell development, various transcription factors have been found to be involved in the processes of hair cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Among these transcription factors, Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1 have been highlighted for their crucial role in the fate of hair cells. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the role of transcription factors in hair cell development, focusing on the role and possible mechanisms of Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1. PMID:27100495

  20. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 activates transcription of thyroid transcription factor 1 in respiratory epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, K.; Shaw-White, J R; Wert, S E; Whitsett, J A

    1996-01-01

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), hepatocyte nuclear factor 3alpha (HNF-3alpha), and HNF-3beta regulate the transcription of genes expressed in the respiratory epithelium. To test whether members of the HNF-3/forkhead family influence TTF-1 gene expression, deletion constructs containing the 5' region of the human TTF-1 gene were transfected into immortalized mouse lung epithelial (MLE) cells. DNase I protection and electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified elements in the 5' reg...

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  2. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death

  3. Transcriptional Analysis of T Cells Resident in Human Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Li; Moshe Olshansky; Carbone, Francis R.; Ma, Joel Z.

    2016-01-01

    Human skin contains various populations of memory T cells in permanent residence and in transit. Arguably, the best characterized of the skin subsets are the CD8(+) permanently resident memory T cells (TRM) expressing the integrin subunit, CD103. In order to investigate the remaining skin T cells, we isolated skin-tropic (CLA(+)) helper T cells, regulatory T cells, and CD8(+) CD103(-) T cells from skin and blood for RNA microarray analysis to compare the transcriptional profiles of these grou...

  4. Epigenetic distortion to VDR transcriptional regulation in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Prashant K.; Doig, Craig L.; Dhiman, Vineet K; Turner, Bryan M.; Smiraglia, Dominic J; Campbell, Moray J.

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the gene specific mechanisms by which the actions of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) are distorted in prostate cancer. Transcriptional responses toward the VDR ligand, 1α,25(OH)2D3, were examined in non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and compared to the 1α,25(OH)2D3-recalcitrant prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Time resolved transcriptional studies for two VDR target genes revealed selective attenuation and repression of VDR transcriptional responses...

  5. Microphthalmia transcription factor regulates pancreatic β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Magdalena A; Winkler, Marcus; Ganic, Elvira; Colberg, Jesper K; Johansson, Jenny K; Bennet, Hedvig; Fex, Malin; Nuber, Ulrike A; Artner, Isabella

    2013-08-01

    Precise regulation of β-cell function is crucial for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Pax6 is an essential regulator of β-cell-specific factors like insulin and Glut2. Studies in the developing eye suggest that Pax6 interacts with Mitf to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Here, we show that Mitf, like Pax6, is expressed in all pancreatic endocrine cells during mouse postnatal development and in the adult islet. A Mitf loss-of-function mutation results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion but no increase in β-cell mass in adult mice. Mutant β-cells secrete more insulin in response to glucose than wild-type cells, suggesting that Mitf is involved in regulating β-cell function. In fact, the transcription of genes critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis (insulin and Glut2) and β-cell formation and function (Pax4 and Pax6) is significantly upregulated in Mitf mutant islets. The increased Pax6 expression may cause the improved β-cell function observed in Mitf mutant animals, as it activates insulin and Glut2 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that Mitf binds to Pax4 and Pax6 regulatory regions, suggesting that Mitf represses their transcription in wild-type β-cells. We demonstrate that Mitf directly regulates Pax6 transcription and controls β-cell function. PMID:23610061

  6. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçer Salih S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Results Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-κB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells

  7. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct', we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. Γ rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that γ-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture

  8. Novel Sexual-Cycle-Specific Gene Silencing in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Czaja, Wioletta; Miller, Karen Y.; Bruce L. Miller

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel sexual-cycle-specific gene-silencing system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans. Duplication of the mating type matAHMG gene in this haploid organism triggers Mat-induced silencing (MatIS) of both endogenous and transgenic matA genes, eliminates function of the encoded SRY structural ortholog, and results in formation of barren fruiting bodies. MatIS is spatiotemporally restricted to the prezygotic stage of the sexual cycle and does not interfere with vegetative growth...

  9. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  10. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Bardin, Allison J.; Perdigoto, Carolina N.; Southall, Tony D.; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhan...

  11. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have revealed the functional similarity between helper-like ILCs and Th cells, some aspects of ILCs including the development of this lineage remain elusive. It is intriguing that the majority of transcription factors involved in multiple stages of T cell development, differentiation, and function also play critical roles during ILC development. Regulators such as Id2, GATA-3, Nfil3, TOX, and TCF-1 are expressed and function at various stages of ILC development. In this review, we will summarize the expression and functions of these transcription factors shared by ILCs and Th cells. We will also propose a complex transcriptional regulatory network for the lineage commitment of ILCs.

  12. Transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern embryonic stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satyabrata; Levasseur, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are defined by their simultaneous capacity for limitless self-renewal and the ability to specify cells borne of all germ layers. The regulation of ESC pluripotency is governed by a set of core transcription factors that regulate transcription by interfacing with nuclear proteins that include the RNA polymerase II core transcriptional machinery, histone modification enzymes, and chromatin remodeling protein complexes. The growing adoption of systems biological approaches used in stem cell biology over last few years has contributed significantly to our understanding of pluripotency. Multilayered approaches coupling transcriptome profiling and proteomics (Nanog-, Oct4-, and Sox2-centered protein interaction networks or "interactomes") with transcription factor chromatin occupancy and epigenetic footprint measurements have enabled a more comprehensive understanding of ESC pluripotency and self-renewal. Together with the genetic and biochemical characterization of promising pluripotency modifying proteins, these systems biological approaches will continue to clarify the molecular underpinnings of the ESC state. This will most certainly contribute to the improvement of current methodologies for the derivation of pluripotent cells from adult tissues. PMID:23756950

  13. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%-3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3-2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%-58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  14. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  15. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer

  16. The transcriptional diversity of 25 Drosophila cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherbas, L.; Willingham, A.; Zhang, D.; Yang, L.; Zou, Y.; Eads, B. D.; Carlson, J. W.; Landolin, J. M.; Kapranov, P.; Dumais, J.; Samsonova, A.; Choi, J. -H.; Roberts, J.; Davis, C. A.; Tang, H.; van Baren, M. J.; Ghosh, S.; Dobin, A.; Bell, K.; Lin, W.; Langton, L.; Duff, M. O.; Tenney, A. E.; Zaleski, C.; Brent, M. R.; Hoskins, R. A.; Kaufman, T. C.; Andrews, J.; Graveley, B. R.; Perrimon, N.; Celniker, S. E.; Gingeras, T. R.; Cherbas, P.

    2010-12-22

    Drosophila melanogaster cell lines are important resources for cell biologists. Here, we catalog the expression of exons, genes, and unannotated transcriptional signals for 25 lines. Unannotated transcription is substantial (typically 19% of euchromatic signal). Conservatively, we identify 1405 novel transcribed regions; 684 of these appear to be new exons of neighboring, often distant, genes. Sixty-four percent of genes are expressed detectably in at least one line, but only 21% are detected in all lines. Each cell line expresses, on average, 5885 genes, including a common set of 3109. Expression levels vary over several orders of magnitude. Major signaling pathways are well represented: most differentiation pathways are ‘‘off’’ and survival/growth pathways ‘‘on.’’ Roughly 50% of the genes expressed by each line are not part of the common set, and these show considerable individuality. Thirty-one percent are expressed at a higher level in at least one cell line than in any single developmental stage, suggesting that each line is enriched for genes characteristic of small sets of cells. Most remarkable is that imaginal discderived lines can generally be assigned, on the basis of expression, to small territories within developing discs. These mappings reveal unexpected stability of even fine-grained spatial determination. No two cell lines show identical transcription factor expression. We conclude that each line has retained features of an individual founder cell superimposed on a common ‘‘cell line‘‘ gene expression pattern. Wereport the transcriptional profiles of 25 Drosophila melanogaster cell lines, principally by whole-genome tiling microarray analysis of total RNA, carried out as part of the modENCODE project. The data produced in this study add to our knowledge of the cell lines and of the Drosophila transcriptome in several ways. We summarize the expression of previously annotated genes in each of the 25 lines with emphasis on what

  17. Transcriptional dynamics of the embryonic stem cell switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickarmane, Vijay; Troein, Carl; Nuber, Ulrike A; Sauro, Herbert M; Peterson, Carsten

    2006-09-15

    Recent ChIP experiments of human and mouse embryonic stem cells have elucidated the architecture of the transcriptional regulatory circuitry responsible for cell determination, which involves the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. In addition to regulating each other through feedback loops, these genes also regulate downstream target genes involved in the maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. A search for the OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network motif in other species reveals that it is unique to mammals. With a kinetic modeling approach, we ascribe function to the observed OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network by making plausible assumptions about the interactions between the transcription factors at the gene promoter binding sites and RNA polymerase (RNAP), at each of the three genes as well as at the target genes. We identify a bistable switch in the network, which arises due to several positive feedback loops, and is switched on/off by input environmental signals. The switch stabilizes the expression levels of the three genes, and through their regulatory roles on the downstream target genes, leads to a binary decision: when OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG are expressed and the switch is on, the self-renewal genes are on and the differentiation genes are off. The opposite holds when the switch is off. The model is extremely robust to parameter changes. In addition to providing a self-consistent picture of the transcriptional circuit, the model generates several predictions. Increasing the binding strength of NANOG to OCT4 and SOX2, or increasing its basal transcriptional rate, leads to an irreversible bistable switch: the switch remains on even when the activating signal is removed. Hence, the stem cell can be manipulated to be self-renewing without the requirement of input signals. We also suggest tests that could discriminate between a variety of feedforward regulation architectures of the target genes by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. PMID:16978048

  18. Transcriptional dynamics of the embryonic stem cell switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chickarmane

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent ChIP experiments of human and mouse embryonic stem cells have elucidated the architecture of the transcriptional regulatory circuitry responsible for cell determination, which involves the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. In addition to regulating each other through feedback loops, these genes also regulate downstream target genes involved in the maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. A search for the OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network motif in other species reveals that it is unique to mammals. With a kinetic modeling approach, we ascribe function to the observed OCT4-SOX2-NANOG network by making plausible assumptions about the interactions between the transcription factors at the gene promoter binding sites and RNA polymerase (RNAP, at each of the three genes as well as at the target genes. We identify a bistable switch in the network, which arises due to several positive feedback loops, and is switched on/off by input environmental signals. The switch stabilizes the expression levels of the three genes, and through their regulatory roles on the downstream target genes, leads to a binary decision: when OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG are expressed and the switch is on, the self-renewal genes are on and the differentiation genes are off. The opposite holds when the switch is off. The model is extremely robust to parameter changes. In addition to providing a self-consistent picture of the transcriptional circuit, the model generates several predictions. Increasing the binding strength of NANOG to OCT4 and SOX2, or increasing its basal transcriptional rate, leads to an irreversible bistable switch: the switch remains on even when the activating signal is removed. Hence, the stem cell can be manipulated to be self-renewing without the requirement of input signals. We also suggest tests that could discriminate between a variety of feedforward regulation architectures of the target genes by OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG.

  19. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Allison J; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Southall, Tony D; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-03-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] as the major targets of this repression. In addition, we find that the bHLH transcription factor Daughterless is essential to maintain ISC identity and that bHLH binding sites promote ISC-specific enhancer activity. We propose that Daughterless-dependent bHLH activity is important for the ISC fate and that E(spl)-C factors inhibit this activity to promote differentiation. PMID:20147375

  20. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of c-myc expression during the differentiation of murine erythroleukemia Friend cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mechti, N; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J. M.; Marty, L.; Bonnieu, A; Jeanteur, P; Lebleu, B

    1986-01-01

    c-myc RNA rapidly decreases to barely detectable levels in Friend erythroleukemia cells induced to differentiate upon the addition of dimethylsulfoxide. We show here that c-myc gene is down-regulated both at the transcriptional level presumably by a block in the elongation of primary transcripts and at the post-transcriptional level by an increase in the degradation of its mRNA.

  2. Evidence that Transcript Cleavage Is Essential for RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurdsson, Stefan; Dirac-Svejstrup, A. Barbara; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During transcript elongation in vitro, backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a frequent occurrence that can lead to transcriptional arrest. The polymerase active site can cleave the transcript during such backtracking, allowing transcription to resume. Transcript cleavage is either stimulated by elongation factor TFIIS or occurs much more slowly in its absence. However, whether backtracking actually occurs in vivo, and whether transcript cleavage is important to escape it, has...

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula meristematic root cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Peta; Goffard, Nicolas; Weiller, Georg F; Rolfe, Barry G.; Imin, Nijat

    2008-01-01

    Background The root apical meristem of crop and model legume Medicago truncatula is a significantly different stem cell system to that of the widely studied model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we used the Affymetrix Medicago GeneChip® to compare the transcriptomes of meristem and non-meristematic root to identify root meristem specific candidate genes. Results Using mRNA from root meristem and non-meristem we were able to identify 324 and 363 transcripts differentially exp...

  4. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Kreilmeier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA, a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM, in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1 promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%–3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3–2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%–58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase.

  5. Making a tooth: growth factors, transcription factors, and stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yah Ding ZHANG; Zhi CHEN; Yi Qiang SONG; Chao LIU; Yi Ping CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian tooth development is largely dependent on sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.These processes involve a series of inductive and permissive interactions that result in the determination, differentiation,and organization of odontogenic tissues. Multiple signaling molecules, including BMPs, FGFs, Shh, and Wnt proteins,have been implicated in mediating these tissue interactions. Transcription factors participate in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions via linking the signaling loops between tissue layers by responding to inductive signals and regulating the expression of other signaling molecules. Adult stem cells are highly plastic and multipotent. These cells including dental pulp stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells could be reprogrammed into odontogenic fate and participated in tooth formation. Recent progress in the studies of molecular basis of tooth development, adult stem cell biology, and regeneration will provide fundamental knowledge for the realization of human tooth regeneration in the near future.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of macrophage and tumor cell interactions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudnicky, Filip; Hollmén, Maija

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages are important mediators of tumor progression and their function is broadly influenced by different microenvironmental stimuli. To understand the molecular basis of the tumor-supporting role of macrophages in aggressive breast cancer we co-cultured human peripheral monocytes with two breast cancer cell lines representing distinct aggressive cellular phenotype and transcriptionally profiled the changes occurring in both cells during in vitro activated crosstalk. Here we provide a detailed description of the experimental design, sample identity and analysis of the Illumina RNA-Seq data, which have been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE75130. PMID:27081631

  7. Mouse Incisor Stem Cell Niche and Myb Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svandova, E; Vesela, B; Smarda, J; Hampl, A; Radlanski, R J; Matalova, E

    2015-10-01

    Dental hard tissues are formed particularly by odontoblasts (dentin) and ameloblasts (enamel). Whereas the reparation of dentin is often observed, enamel does not regenerate in most species. However, in mouse incisor, a population of somatic stem cells in the cervical loop is responsible for the incisor regeneration. Understanding of the specificities of these cells is therefore of an interest in basic research as well as regenerative therapies. The Myb transcription factors are involved in essential cellular processes. B-Myb is often linked to the stem cell phenotype, and c-Myb expression marks undifferentiated and proliferating cells such as the stem cells. In the presented study, temporo-spatial expression of B-Myb and c-Myb proteins was correlated with localisation of putative somatic stem cells in the mouse incisor cervical loop by immunohistochemistry. B-Myb expression was localised mostly in the zone of transit-amplifying cells, and c-Myb was found in the inner enamel epithelium, the surrounding mesenchyme and in differentiated cells. Taken together, neither B-Myb nor c-Myb was exclusively present or abundant in the area of the incisor stem cell niche. Their distribution, however, supports recently reported novel functions of c-Myb in differentiation of hard tissue cells. PMID:25182175

  8. Patterns of cell division revealed by transcriptional regulation of genes during the cell cycle in plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Fobert, P R; Coen, E S; Murphy, G. J.; Doonan, J H

    1994-01-01

    Transcripts from five cell cycle related genes accumulate in isolated cells dispersed throughout the actively dividing regions of plant meristems. We propose that this pattern reflects gene expression during particular phases of the cell division cycle. The high proportion of isolated cells suggests that synchrony between daughter cells is rapidly lost following mitosis. This is the first time that such a cell specific expression pattern has been described in a higher organism. Counterstainin...

  9. Transcriptional dysregulation in NIPBL and cohesin mutant human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglan Liu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cohesin regulates sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle with Nipped-B-Like (NIPBL facilitating its loading and unloading. In addition to this canonical role, cohesin has also been demonstrated to play a critical role in regulation of gene expression in nondividing cells. Heterozygous mutations in the cohesin regulator NIPBL or cohesin structural components SMC1A and SMC3 result in the multisystem developmental disorder Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS. Genome-wide assessment of transcription in 16 mutant cell lines from severely affected CdLS probands has identified a unique profile of dysregulated gene expression that was validated in an additional 101 samples and correlates with phenotypic severity. This profile could serve as a diagnostic and classification tool. Cohesin binding analysis demonstrates a preference for intergenic regions suggesting a cis-regulatory function mimicking that of a boundary/insulator interacting protein. However, the binding sites are enriched within the promoter regions of the dysregulated genes and are significantly decreased in CdLS proband, indicating an alternative role of cohesin as a transcription factor.

  10. Simultaneous transcriptional profiling of bacteria and their host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Humphrys

    Full Text Available We developed an RNA-Seq-based method to simultaneously capture prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression profiles of cells infected with intracellular bacteria. As proof of principle, this method was applied to Chlamydia trachomatis-infected epithelial cell monolayers in vitro, successfully obtaining transcriptomes of both C. trachomatis and the host cells at 1 and 24 hours post-infection. Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause a range of mammalian diseases. In humans chlamydiae are responsible for the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections and trachoma (infectious blindness. Disease arises by adverse host inflammatory reactions that induce tissue damage & scarring. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these outcomes. Chlamydia are genetically intractable as replication outside of the host cell is not yet possible and there are no practical tools for routine genetic manipulation, making genome-scale approaches critical. The early timeframe of infection is poorly understood and the host transcriptional response to chlamydial infection is not well defined. Our simultaneous RNA-Seq method was applied to a simplified in vitro model of chlamydial infection. We discovered a possible chlamydial strategy for early iron acquisition, putative immune dampening effects of chlamydial infection on the host cell, and present a hypothesis for Chlamydia-induced fibrotic scarring through runaway positive feedback loops. In general, simultaneous RNA-Seq helps to reveal the complex interplay between invading bacterial pathogens and their host mammalian cells and is immediately applicable to any bacteria/host cell interaction.

  11. Thiazolidinediones inhibit REG Iα gene transcription in gastrointestinal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REG (Regenerating gene) Iα protein functions as a growth factor for gastrointestinal cancer cells, and its mRNA expression is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer patients. We here demonstrated that PPARγ-agonist thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibited cell proliferation and REG Iα protein/mRNA expression in gastrointestinal cancer cells. TZDs inhibited the REG Iα gene promoter activity, via its cis-acting element which lacked PPAR response element and could not bind to PPARγ, in PPARγ-expressing gastrointestinal cancer cells. The inhibition was reversed by co-treatment with a specific PPARγ-antagonist GW9662. Although TZDs did not inhibit the REG Iα gene promoter activity in PPARγ-non-expressing cells, PPARγ overexpression in the cells recovered their inhibitory effect. Taken together, TZDs inhibit REG Iα gene transcription through a PPARγ-dependent pathway. The TZD-induced REG Iα mRNA reduction was abolished by cycloheximide, indicating the necessity of novel protein(s) synthesis. TZDs may therefore be a candidate for novel anti-cancer drugs for patients with gastrointestinal cancer expressing both REG Iα and PPARγ.

  12. A monoallelic-to-biallelic T-cell transcriptional switch regulates GATA3 abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Lim, Kim-Chew; Kalantry, Sundeep; Maillard, Ivan; Engel, James Douglas; Hosoya, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Ku et al. show that loss of one Gata3 allele leads to diminished expansion of immature T cells as well as aberrant induction of myeloid transcription factor PU.1. Gata3 is monoallelically expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and early T-cell progenitors. Half of the developing cells switch to biallelic Gata3 transcription abruptly at midthymopoiesis.

  13. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Juan-juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicel...

  14. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dawn X.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcript...

  15. Circadian Transcription from Beta Cell Function to Diabetes Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelis, Mark; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian circadian clock plays a central role in the temporal coordination of physiology across the 24-h light-dark cycle. A major function of the clock is to maintain energy constancy in anticipation of alternating periods of fasting and feeding that correspond with sleep and wakefulness. While it has long been recognized that humans exhibit robust variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity across the sleep-wake cycle, experimental genetic analysis has now revealed that the clock transcription cycle plays an essential role in insulin secretion and metabolic function within pancreatic beta cells. This review addresses how studies of the beta cell clock may elucidate the etiology of subtypes of diabetes associated with circadian and sleep cycle disruption, in addition to more general forms of the disease. PMID:27440914

  16. Transcriptional profiling of foam cells in response to hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Young-Hwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Paul, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a main risk factor for atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophages, or foam cells, take-up and process lipoprotein particles deposited in arteries, and store much of the cholesterol carried by these particles in their cytoplasm. However, the effects of exposure to different cholesterol levels on foam cells remain poorly understood. Given the remarkable plasticity of macrophages in response to environmental variables, studies on macrophage biology should ideally be performed in the environment where they exert their physiological functions, namely atherosclerotic lesions in the case of foam cells. We used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse, to study in vivo the transcriptional response of foam cells to short- and long-term elevations in plasma cholesterol, induced by feeding mice a western type diet. The microarray data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE70619. Here we provide detailed information on the experimental set-up, on the isolation of RNA by laser capture microdissection, and on the methodology used for RNA amplification and analysis by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:27408807

  17. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B.; Melo-Gonzalez, F.; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A.; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William Winston

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of......-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8...

  18. Transcriptional and phenotypical heterogeneity of Trypanosoma cruzi cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco-Hidalgo, Víctor; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Osuna, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex life cycle comprising pools of cell populations which circulate among humans, vectors, sylvatic reservoirs and domestic animals. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated the importance of clonal variations for parasite population dynamics, survival and evolution. By limiting dilution assays, we have isolated seven isogenic clonal cell lines derived from the Pan4 strain of T. cruzi. Applying different molecular techniques, we have been able to provide a comprehensive characterization of the expression heterogeneity in the mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) gene family, where all the clonal isogenic populations were transcriptionally different. Hierarchical cluster analysis and sequence comparison among different MASP cDNA libraries showed that, despite the great variability in MASP expression, some members of the transcriptome (including MASP pseudogenes) are conserved, not only in the life-cycle stages but also among different strains of T. cruzi. Finally, other important aspects for the parasite, such as growth, spontaneous metacyclogenesis or excretion of different catabolites, were also compared among the clones, demonstrating that T. cruzi populations of cells are also phenotypically heterogeneous. Although the evolutionary strategy that sustains the MASP expression polymorphism remains unknown, we suggest that MASP clonal variability and phenotypic heterogeneities found in this study might provide an advantage, allowing a rapid response to environmental pressure or changes during the life cycle of T. cruzi. PMID:26674416

  19. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuren Frank H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific transcripts or membrane integrity-would overcome bias introduced by cultivation and reduces the time span of analysis from initiation to read out. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between transcriptional activity, membrane integrity and cultivation-based viability in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Results We present microbiological, cytological and molecular analyses of the physiological response to lethal heat stress under accurately defined conditions through systematic sampling of bacteria from a single culture exposed to gradually increasing temperatures. We identified a coherent transcriptional program including known heat shock responses as well as the rapid expression of a small number of sporulation and competence genes, the latter only known to be active in the stationary growth phase. Conclusion The observed coordinated gene expression continued even after cell death, in other words after all bacteria permanently lost their ability to reproduce. Transcription of a very limited number of genes correlated with cell viability under the applied killing regime. The transcripts of the expressed genes in living bacteria – but silent in dead bacteria-include those of essential genes encoding chaperones of the protein folding machinery and can serve as molecular biomarkers for bacterial cell viability.

  20. Single-Cell Analysis of Ribonucleotide Reductase Transcriptional and Translational Response to DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumder, Aprotim; Tummler, Katja; Bathe, Mark; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    The ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) enzyme catalyzes an essential step in the production of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) in cells. Bulk biochemical measurements in synchronized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells suggest that RNR mRNA production is maximal in late G1 and S phases; however, damaged DNA induces RNR transcription throughout the cell cycle. But such en masse measurements reveal neither cell-to-cell heterogeneity in responses nor direct correlations between transcript and p...

  1. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  2. The transcription factor GATA3 controls cell fate and maintenance of type 2 innate lymphoid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyler, Thomas; Klose, Christoph S.N.; Souabni, Abdallah; Turqueti-Neves, Adriana; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Rawlins, Emma L.; Voehringer, David; Busslinger, Meinrad; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) reside at mucosal surfaces and control immunity to intestinal infections. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) produce cytokines such as IL-5 and IL-13 and are required for immune defense against helminth infections and are involved in the pathogenesis of airway hyperreactivity. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor GATA3 for ILC2 differentiation and maintenance. We showed that ILC2 and their lineage-specified bone marrow precursor (ILC2P)...

  3. Identification of uniquely expressed transcription factors in highly purified B-cell lymphoma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andréasson, Ulrika; Edén, Patrik; Peterson, Carsten; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Jerkeman, Mats; Andersen, Niels Smedegaard; Berglund, Mattias; Sundström, Christer; Rosenquist, Richard; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are critical for B-cell differentiation, affecting gene expression both by repression and transcriptional activation. Still, this information is not used for classification of B-cell lymphomas (BCLs). Traditionally, BCLs are diagnosed based on a phenotypic resemblance ...

  4. Human Transcription Factor hTAFII150 (CIF150) Is Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jay; Halenbeck, Robert; Kaufmann, Jörg

    1999-01-01

    Here we present evidence that CIF150 (hTAFII150), the human homolog of Drosophila TAFII150, plays an important and selective role in establishing gene expression patterns necessary for progression through the cell cycle. Gel filtration experiments demonstrate that CIF150 (hTAFII150) seems to be less tightly associated with human transcription factor IID than hTAFII130 is associated with hTAFII250. The transient functional knockout of CIF150 (hTAFII150) protein led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition in mammalian cell lines. PCR display analysis with the RNA derived from CIF150-depleted cells indicated that CIF150 (hTAFII150) is required for the transcription of only a subset of RNA polymerase II genes. CIF150 (hTAFII150) directly stimulated cyclin B1 and cyclin A transcription in cotransfection assays and in vitro assays, suggesting that the expression of these genes is dependent on CIF150 (hTAFII150) function. We defined a CIF150 (hTAFII150) consensus binding site and demonstrated that a CIF150-responsive cis element is present in the cyclin B1 core promoter. These results suggest that one function of CIF150 (hTAFII150) is to select specific RNA polymerase II core promoter elements involved in cell cycle progression. PMID:10409744

  5. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina [Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Tilghman, Syreeta L. [Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Williams, LaKeisha G. [Division of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA (United States); Winfield, Leyte L., E-mail: lwinfield@spelman.edu [Department of Chemistry, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  6. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/− ) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by func...

  7. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  8. Transcription factor 3 controls cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma multiforme cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiting; Li, Yinghui; Hu, Xin; Lian, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factor 3 (TCF3) is a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor family. Recent studies have demonstrated its potential carcinogenic properties. Here we show that TCF3 was upregulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. This upregulation of the TCF3 gene probably has functional significance in brain-tumor progression. Our studies on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines show that knock-down of TCF3 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration. Further analysis revealed that down-regulation of TCF3 gene expression inhibits Akt and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that the carcinogenic properties of TCF3 in GBM are partially mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and MAPK-Erk signaling pathways. Considered together, the results of this study demonstrate that high levels of TCF3 in gliomas potentially promote glioma development through the Akt and Erk pathways. PMID:27105323

  9. Transfection of mouse ribosomal DNA into rat cells: faithful transcription and processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, V B; Thompson, E A; Bowman, L H

    1985-01-01

    Truncated mouse ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were stably incorporated into rat HTC-5 cells by DNA-mediated cell transfection techniques. The mouse rDNA genes were accurately transcribed in these rat cells indicating that there is no absolute species specificity of rDNA transcription between mouse and rat. No more than 170 nucleotides of the 5' nontranscribed spacer was required for the accurate initiation of mouse rDNA transcription in rat cells. Further, the mouse transcripts were accurately c...

  10. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of retrotransposons IAP and MuERV-L affect pluripotency of mice ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintado Belen

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse, culture of embryonic stem (ES cells may decrease their pluripotency and give rise to foetal abnormalities in recipient embryos. These abnormalities are frequently associated with both, chromosome abnormalities or epigenetic alteration of imprinting genes; however, little is known about the epigenetic stability of endogenous retrotransposable elements (REs. In our laboratory, we came across a R1 ES cell line, which at passage 27, lost the ability of germline transmission and started inducing the kinky tail phenotype in all chimeric animals produced with it. Methods In order to investigate whether this phenotype was associated with chromosome alteration, inadvertent differentiation, or epigenetic modification, we characterized and compared this R1 ES cell line at passage 27 with an early passage and with a second ES cell line C57/CBAF1 generated in our laboratory. We assessed: i karyotype; ii expression of pluripotent and differentiation markers, iii mRNA transcription by qRT-PCR of two REs, intracisternal-A particle (IAP and murine endogenous-retrovirus-L (MuERV-L, and iv methylation of IAP and MuERV-L. Results The R1 ES cell at passage 27, presented normal morphology, karyotype, and expression of genetic markers characteristic of pluripotent; however, it was detected an altered mRNA transcription of sense and antisense RNA strands of both REs, concomitantly with an altered methylation pattern for the IAP element but not for MuERV-L. These results indicate that besides methylation, other post-transcriptional processes are involved in gene silencing of some REs; and that culture of ES cells may decrease their pluripotency by producing inadvertent alterations in the expression of REs without significantly affecting the morphology, chromosome structure, and expression of pluripotent or differentiation markers. Conclusion Inadvertent REs instability may have important consequences for the use of ES cells in

  11. CacyBP/SIP as a regulator of transcriptional responses in brain cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Anna; Hetman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The Calcyclin-Binding Protein/Siah-1-Interacting Protein (CacyBP/SIP) is highly expressed in the brain and was shown to regulate the β-catenin-driven transcription in thymocytes. Therefore, it was investigated whether in brain cells CacyBP/SIP might play a role as a transcriptional regulator. In BDNF- or forskolin-stimulated rat primary cortical neurons, overexpression of CacyBP/SIP enhanced transcriptional activity of the cAMP-response element (CRE). In addition, overexpressed...

  12. Deciphering the transcriptional switches of innate lymphoid cell programming: the right factors at the right time

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Alfred W.Y.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly recognised as an innate immune counterpart of adaptive TH cells. In addition to their similar effector cytokine production, there is a strong parallel between the transcription factors that control the differentiation of TH1, TH2 and TH17 cells and ILC Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Here, we review the transcriptional circuit that specifies the development of a common ILC progenitor and its subsequent programming into distinct ILC groups. Notch,...

  13. T cell transcriptional factors in allergic rhinitis and its association with clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Ji-Hun; Chung, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells are crucially important in allergic disease and the possible involvement of Treg and Th17 cells has not been clearly identified. Objective To identify the mRNA expression of T cell transcription factors in nasal mucosa in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and to reveal their correlations with clinical features. Methods Eighteen patients with AR and 12 controls with turbinate hypertrophy were included. mRNA expression of the following transcriptional factors in nasal mu...

  14. Transcriptional Repression of Gata3 Is Essential for Early B Cell Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Anupam; Northrup, Daniel; Boukarabila, Hanane; Jacobsen, Sten Erik W.; Allman, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms underlying the silencing of alternative fate potentials in very early B cell precursors remain unclear. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches together with a synthetic Zinc-finger polypeptide (6ZFP) engineered to prevent transcription factor binding to a defined cis element, we show that the transcription factor EBF1 promotes B cell lineage commitment by directly repressing expression of the T-cell-lineage-requisite Gata3 gene. Ebf1-deficient lymphoid progenitors ...

  15. A Systematic Approach to Identify Candidate Transcription Factors that Control Cell Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. D’Alessio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of transcription factors (TFs are expressed in each cell type, but cell identity can be induced through the activity of just a small number of core TFs. Systematic identification of these core TFs for a wide variety of cell types is currently lacking and would establish a foundation for understanding the transcriptional control of cell identity in development, disease, and cell-based therapy. Here, we describe a computational approach that generates an atlas of candidate core TFs for a broad spectrum of human cells. The potential impact of the atlas was demonstrated via cellular reprogramming efforts where candidate core TFs proved capable of converting human fibroblasts to retinal pigment epithelial-like cells. These results suggest that candidate core TFs from the atlas will prove a useful starting point for studying transcriptional control of cell identity and reprogramming in many human cell types.

  16. Dynamic competition between transcription initiation and repression: Role of nonequilibrium steps in cell-to-cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Semsey, Szabolcs; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Transcriptional repression may cause transcriptional noise by a competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. Although promoter activity is often governed by a single limiting step, we argue here that the size of the noise strongly depends on whether this step is the initial equilibrium binding or one of the subsequent unidirectional steps. Overall, we show that nonequilibrium steps of transcription initiation systematically increase the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in bacterial populations. In particular, this allows also weak promoters to give substantial transcriptional noise. PMID:26382435

  17. Human Transcription Factor hTAFII150 (CIF150) Is Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jay; Halenbeck, Robert; Kaufmann, Jörg

    1999-01-01

    Here we present evidence that CIF150 (hTAFII150), the human homolog of Drosophila TAFII150, plays an important and selective role in establishing gene expression patterns necessary for progression through the cell cycle. Gel filtration experiments demonstrate that CIF150 (hTAFII150) seems to be less tightly associated with human transcription factor IID than hTAFII130 is associated with hTAFII250. The transient functional knockout of CIF150 (hTAFII150) protein led to cell cycle arrest at the ...

  18. Rapid transcriptional pulsing dynamics of high expressing retroviral transgenes in embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Y M Lo

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells.

  19. Dissecting the interface between signaling and transcriptional regulation in human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Alvarez, Mariano J; Bisikirska, Brygida C;

    2009-01-01

    manuscript we extend the MINDy algorithm for the identification of posttranslational modulators of transcription factor activity, to produce a first genome-wide map of the interface between signaling and transcriptional regulatory programs in human B cells. We show that the serine-threonine kinase STK38...

  20. High-resolution transcription atlas of the mitotic cell cycle in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granovskaia, Marina V; Jensen, Lars J; Ritchie, Matthew E;

    2010-01-01

    Extensive transcription of non-coding RNAs has been detected in eukaryotic genomes and is thought to constitute an additional layer in the regulation of gene expression. Despite this role, their transcription through the cell cycle has not been studied; genome-wide approaches have only focused on...

  1. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  2. Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Bartolomeo; Mailand, Erik; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-08-30

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to develop programmable artificial gene networks that can transduce multiple endogenous molecular cues to precisely control cell behavior. Realizing this vision requires interfacing natural molecular inputs with synthetic components that generate functional molecular outputs. Interfacing synthetic circuits with endogenous mammalian transcription factors has been particularly difficult. Here, we describe a systematic approach that enables integration and transduction of multiple mammalian transcription factor inputs by a synthetic network. The approach is facilitated by a proportional amplifier sensor based on synergistic positive autoregulation. The circuits efficiently transduce endogenous transcription factor levels into RNAi, transcriptional transactivation, and site-specific recombination. They also enable AND logic between pairs of arbitrary transcription factors. The results establish a framework for developing synthetic gene networks that interface with cellular processes through transcriptional regulators. PMID:27545896

  3. Epigenetic inactivation and aberrant transcription of CSMD1 in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholnick Steven B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p23.2 region of human chromosome 8 is frequently deleted in several types of epithelial cancer and those deletions appear to be associated with poor prognosis. Cub and Sushi Multiple Domains 1 (CSMD1 was positionally cloned as a candidate for the 8p23 suppressor but point mutations in this gene are rare relative to the frequency of allelic loss. In an effort to identify alternative mechanisms of inactivation, we have characterized CSMD1 expression and epigenetic modifications in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Results Only one of the 20 cell lines examined appears to express a structurally normal CSMD1 transcript. The rest express transcripts which either lack internal exons, terminate abnormally or initiate at cryptic promoters. None of these truncated transcripts is predicted to encode a functional CSMD1 protein. Cell lines that express little or no CSMD1 RNA exhibit DNA methylation of a specific region of the CpG island surrounding CSMD1's first exon. Conclusion Correlating methylation patterns and expression suggests that it is modification of the genomic DNA preceding the first exon that is associated with gene silencing and that methylation of CpG dinucleotides further 3' does not contribute to inactivation of the gene. Taken together, the cell line data suggest that epigenetic silencing and aberrant splicing rather than point mutations may be contributing to the reduction in CSMD1 expression in squamous cancers. These mechanisms can now serve as a focus for further analysis of primary squamous cancers.

  4. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dennis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-valueFOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation.

  5. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  6. Mechanism of estrogen receptor-dependent transcription in a cell-free system.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliston, J F; Fawell, S E; Klein-Hitpass, L; Tsai, S. Y.; Tsai, M J; Parker, M G; O'Malley, B W

    1990-01-01

    RNA synthesis was stimulated directly in a cell-free expression system by crude preparations of recombinant mouse estrogen receptor (ER). Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of estrogen response elements (EREs) in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by addition of competitor oligonucleotides containing EREs. Moreover, polyclonal antibodies directed against the DNA-binding region of ER inhibited ER-dependent transcription. In our cell-free expression syste...

  7. Characterizing the function of transcription factor 15 (Tcf15) in pluripotent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells are heterogeneous mixtures of naïve and lineage-primed states defined by distinct transcription factor expression profiles. However, the events that prime pluripotent cells for differentiation are not well understood. Id proteins, which are inhibitors of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, contribute to pluripotency by blocking differentiation. Using Yeast-Two-Hybrid screening, our lab identified Tcf15 as an Id-regulated...

  8. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luda, Katarzyna M; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K; Rivollier, Aymeric; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna M; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B; Melo-Gonzalez, Felipe; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William W

    2016-04-19

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of SI CD8αβ(+) and CD4(+)CD8αα(+) T cells; the latter requiring β8 integrin expression by migratory IRF8 dependent CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs. SI homing receptor induction was impaired during T cell priming in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), which correlated with a reduction in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by SI-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8 dependent DCs in the maintenance of intestinal T cell homeostasis. PMID:27067057

  9. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D. PMID:23250745

  10. The volumes and transcript counts of single cells reveal concentration homeostasis and capture biological noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kempe; A. Schwabe; F. Crémazy; P.J. Verschure; F.J. Bruggeman

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional stochasticity can be measured by counting the number of mRNA molecules per cell. Cell-to-cell variability is best captured in terms of concentration rather than molecule counts, because reaction rates depend on concentrations. We combined single-molecule mRNA counting with single-cel

  11. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be modulated by forskolin. One of the strongest differentially regulated gene transcripts was the transcription factor Olig1 (oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1, whose mRNA expression levels were reduced in treated Schwann cells. Olig1 protein was localized in myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells within the sciatic nerve as well as in primary Schwann cells, proposing it as a novel transcription factor of the Schwann cell lineage. Data analysis further revealed that a number of differentially expressed genes in forskolin-treated Schwann cells were associated with the ECM (extracellular matrix, underlining its importance during Schwann cell differentiation in vitro. Comparison of samples derived from postnatal sciatic nerves and from both treated and untreated Schwann cell cultures showed considerable differences in gene expression between in vivo and in vitro, allowing us to separate Schwann cell autonomous from tissue-related changes. The whole data set of the cell culture microarray study is provided to offer an interactive search tool for genes of interest.

  12. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

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    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  13. Special characteristics of the transcription and splicing machinery in photoreceptor cells of the mammalian retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlig, Kristin; Giessl, Andreas; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Enz, Ralf; Dahlhaus, Regina

    2015-11-01

    Chromatin organization and the management of transcription and splicing are fundamental to the correct functioning of every cell but, in particular, for highly active cells such as photoreceptors, the sensory neurons of the retina. Rod photoreceptor cells of nocturnal animals have recently been shown to have an inverted chromatin architecture compared with rod photoreceptor cells of diurnal animals. The heterochromatin is concentrated in the center of the nucleus, whereas the genetically active euchromatin is positioned close to the nuclear membrane. This unique chromatin architecture suggests that the transcription and splicing machinery is also subject to specific adaptations in these cells. Recently, we described the protein Simiate, which is enriched in nuclear speckles and seems to be involved in transcription and splicing processes. Here, we examine the distribution of Simiate and nuclear speckles in neurons of mouse retinae. In retinal neurons of the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layer, Simiate is concentrated in a clustered pattern in the nuclear interior, whereas in rod and cone photoreceptor cells, Simiate is present at the nuclear periphery. Further staining with markers for the transcription and splicing machinery has confirmed the localization of nuclear speckle components at the periphery. Comparing the distribution of nuclear speckles in retinae of the nocturnal mouse with the diurnal degu, we found no differences in the arrangement of the transcription and splicing machinery in their photoreceptor cells, thus suggesting that the organization of these machineries is not related to the animal's lifestyle but rather represents a general characteristic of photoreceptor organization and function. PMID:26013685

  14. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As2O3 affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As2O3 to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As2O3 exposure in leukemia cells.

  15. Aiolos Promotes Anchorage Independence by Silencing p66Shc Transcription in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xichuan; Xu, Zhao; Du, Wei; Zhang, Zhenfa; Wei, Yiliang; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Zhiyan; Qin, Litao; Wang, Lin; Niu, Qing; Zhao, Xiulan; Girard, Luc; Gong, Yimei; Ma, Zhenyi; Sun, Baocun

    2014-01-01

    Anchorage of tissue cells to their physical environment is an obligate requirement for survival which is lost in mature hematopoietic and in transformed epithelial cells. Here we find that a lymphocyte lineage-restricted transcription factor, Aiolos, is frequently expressed in lung cancers and predicts markedly reduced patient survival. Aiolos decreases expression of a large set of adhesion-related genes, disrupting cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Aiolos also reconfigures chromatin st...

  16. An Essential Role of the Transcription Factor GATA-3 for the Function of Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunqi; Su, Maureen A.; Wan, Yisong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Forkhead Box P3 (Foxp3)-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are central to maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. How Treg cell function and Foxp3 expression are regulated is an important question under intensive investigation. Here, we have demonstrated an essential role for the transcription factor GATA-3, a previously recognized Th2 cell master regulator, in controlling Treg cell function. Treg cell-specific GATA-3 deletion led to a spontaneous inflammatory disorder in mice. G...

  17. Transcription factor Oct1 is a somatic and cancer stem cell determinant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Maddox

    Full Text Available Defining master transcription factors governing somatic and cancer stem cell identity is an important goal. Here we show that the Oct4 paralog Oct1, a transcription factor implicated in stress responses, metabolic control, and poised transcription states, regulates normal and pathologic stem cell function. Oct1(HI cells in the colon and small intestine co-express known stem cell markers. In primary malignant tissue, high Oct1 protein but not mRNA levels strongly correlate with the frequency of CD24(LOCD44(HI cancer-initiating cells. Reducing Oct1 expression via RNAi reduces the proportion of ALDH(HI and dye efflux(HI cells, and increasing Oct1 increases the proportion of ALDH(HI cells. Normal ALDH(HI cells harbor elevated Oct1 protein but not mRNA levels. Functionally, we show that Oct1 promotes tumor engraftment frequency and promotes hematopoietic stem cell engraftment potential in competitive and serial transplants. In addition to previously described Oct1 transcriptional targets, we identify four Oct1 targets associated with the stem cell phenotype. Cumulatively, the data indicate that Oct1 regulates normal and cancer stem cell function.

  18. Transcription regulates HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Gies, Sydney; Feldhoff, Lea; Solbach, Werner; Rupp, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates the metabolic adaptation of cells to hypoxia and T-helper cell fate. However, HIF-1α regulation in CD4(+) T cells (T cells) remains elusive. Here we observed that depletion of oxygen (O2⩽2%) alone was not sufficient to induce HIF-1α expression in T cells. However, when hypoxic T cells were stimulated, HIF-1α was expressed and this was dependent on nuclear factor-κB- and nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT)-mediated transcriptional upregulation of Hif-1α mRNA. HIF-1α upregulation could be blocked by drugs inhibiting NF-κB, NFAT or mammalian target of rapamycin precluding CD4(+) T-cell stimulation or translation in T cells, as well as by blocking transcription. CD3, CD28, phorbol-12-myristat-13-acetat (PMA) or ionomycin-stimulated T cells did not express HIF-1α under normoxic conditions. In conclusion, regulation of HIF-1α expression in CD4(+) T cells in hypoxia gravely relies on its transcriptional upregulation and subsequent enhanced protein stabilization. PMID:26150319

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Taniuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The α1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1 enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS. Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region −91 to −81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5′-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  20. Common transcriptional mechanisms for visual photoreceptor cell differentiation among Pancrustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpla Mahato

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of visual rhabdomeric photoreceptors is the expression of a rhabdomeric opsin and uniquely associated phototransduction molecules, which are incorporated into a specialized expanded apical membrane, the rhabdomere. Given the extensive utilization of rhabdomeric photoreceptors in the eyes of protostomes, here we address whether a common transcriptional mechanism exists for the differentiation of rhabdomeric photoreceptors. In Drosophila, the transcription factors Pph13 and Orthodenticle (Otd direct both aspects of differentiation: rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the orthologs of both proteins are expressed in the visual systems of the distantly related arthropod species Tribolium castaneum and Daphnia magna and that their functional roles are similar in these species. In particular, we establish that the Pph13 homologs have the ability to bind a subset of Rhodopsin core sequence I sites and that these sites are present in key phototransduction genes of both Tribolium and Daphnia. Furthermore, Pph13 and Otd orthologs are capable of executing deeply conserved functions of photoreceptor differentiation as evidenced by the ability to rescue their respective Drosophila mutant phenotypes. Pph13 homologs are equivalent in their ability to direct both rhabdomere morphogenesis and opsin expression within Drosophila, whereas Otd paralogs demonstrate differential abilities to regulate photoreceptor differentiation. Finally, loss-of-function analyses in Tribolium confirm the conserved requirement of Pph13 and Otd in regulating both rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Taken together, our data identify components of a regulatory framework for rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation in Pancrustaceans, providing a foundation for defining ancestral regulatory modules of rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation.

  1. Regulation of MCP-1 gene transcription by Smads and HIV-1 Tat in human glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression of several cytokines involved in signal transduction such as TGFβ-1 and the inflammatory chemokines including MCP-1 is elevated during the course of AIDS progression. The enhancement of these cellular proteins in astrocytic cells is mediated, at least in part, by HIV-1 Tat protein. Here, we investigate the possible regulation of MCP-1 transcription by Tat and the Smad family of transcription factors whose activities are induced by the TGFβ-1 pathway. Results from transfection studies revealed that Smad-3 stimulates basal and Tat-mediated transcription of MCP-1 in human astrocytic cells. Smad-4, on the other hand, had no effect on the basal activity of the MCP-1 promoter, but showed the ability to decrease both Smad-3 and Tat-induced transcription of the MCP promoter. Results from protein-binding studies revealed the ability of both Smad-3 and Smad-4 to associate with the region of Tat spanning residues 1-40. Examination of the transcriptional activity of the various domains of Smad including MH1, at the N-terminus, and MH2, at the C-terminus of the protein indicated that neither MH1 or MH2 alone positively cooperate with Tat in modulating MCP-1 transcription. However, ectopic expression of MH1 and, more notably, MH2 severely suppressed transcriptional activation of MCP-1 by Tat in astrocytic cells. Binding studies revealed that similar to the full-length Smad protein, both MH1 and MH2 associate with Tat protein and that the residues between 1 and 40 of Tat are important for their interaction. These observations reveal a novel mechanism for Tat-mediated transcriptional activation via TGFβ signaling pathway and provide evidence for regulation of MCP-1 gene transcription by this signaling pathway in human astrocytic cells

  2. TRANSCRIPTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF NEURONAL and CANCER STEM CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Miele, Evelina

    2013-01-01

    Tumor mass is composed by heterogeneous cell population including a subset of “cancer stem cells” (CSC). Oncogenic signals foster CSC by transforming tissue stem cells or by reprogramming progenitor/differentiated cells towards stemness. Thus, CSC share features with cancer and stem cells (e.g. self-renewal, hierarchical developmental program leading to differentiated cells, epithelial/mesenchimal transition) and these latter are maintained by the constitutive activation of stemne...

  3. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  4. A novel E2 box-GATA element modulates Cdc6 transcription during human cells polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaboa, Nuria; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Martinez, Pilar; Bornstein, Rafael; Calés, Carmela

    2004-01-01

    Cdc6 is a key regulator of the strict alternation of S and M phases during the mitotic cell cycle. In mammalian and plant cells that physiologically become polyploid, cdc6 is transcriptionally and post-translationally regulated. We have recently reported that Cdc6 levels are maintained in megakaryoblastic HEL cells, but severely downregulated by ectopic expression of transcriptional repressor Drosophila melanogaster escargot. Here, we show that cdc6 promoter activity is upregulated during megakaryocytic differentiation of HEL endoreplicating cells, and that Escargot interferes with such activation. Transactivation experiments showed that a 1.7 kb region located at 2800 upstream cdc6 transcription initiation site behaved as a potent enhancer in endoreplicating cells only. This activity was mainly dependent on a novel cis-regulatory element composed by an E2 box overlapping a GATA motif. Ectopic Escargot could bind this regulatory element in vitro and endogenous GATA-1 and E2A formed specific complexes in megakaryoblastic cells as well as in primary megakaryocytes. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that both transcription factors were occupying the E2 box/GATA site in vivo. Altogether, these data suggest that cdc6 expression could be actively maintained during megakaryocytic differentiation through transcriptional mechanisms involving specific cis- and trans-regulatory elements. PMID:15590906

  5. Controlling transcription in human pluripotent stem cells using CRISPR-effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genga, Ryan M; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-05-15

    The ability to manipulate transcription in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is fundamental for the discovery of key genes and mechanisms governing cellular state and differentiation. Recently developed CRISPR-effector systems provide a systematic approach to rapidly test gene function in mammalian cells, including hPSCs. In this review, we discuss recent advances in CRISPR-effector technologies that have been employed to control transcription through gene activation, gene repression, and epigenome engineering. We describe an application of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs by targeting a synthetic promoter driving a GFP transgene, demonstrating the ease and effectiveness of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs. PMID:26525193

  6. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  7. Estimating the Energetic State of Malignant Cells from RNA Transcription and Protein Interaction Network Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rietman, Edward A.; Sachs, Rainer; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression data, or transcription data, are surrogates for actual protein concentrations in the cells. In addition protein-protein interactions are static diagrams of all the protein-protein interactions in the cell. These interactions may consist of covalent bonding or maybe just secondary bonding such as hydrogen bonding. Given these two surrogate data types we show a technique to compute the Gibbs free energy of a cell. We apply this to yeast cell cycle and to cancer.

  8. Control of plant stem cell function by conserved interacting transcriptional regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yun; Liu, Xing; Engstrom, Eric M.; Nimchuk, Zachary L.; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L.; Tarr, Paul T.; An YAN; Kay, Steve A.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Plant stem cells in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and root apical meristem (RAM) provide for postembryonic development of above-ground tissues and roots, respectively, while secondary vascular stem cells sustain vascular development 1–4 . WUSCHEL (WUS), a homeodomain transcription factor expressed in the rib meristem of the SAM, is a key regulatory factor controlling stem cell populations in the Arabidopsis SAM 5–6 and is thought to establish the shoot stem cell niche via a feedback...

  9. Mitogen plus interleukin 4 induction of C epsilon transcripts in B lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, P; Lutzker, S; Cook, W; Coffman, R; Alt, F W

    1988-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of IL-4-induced enhancement of IgE and IgG1 production, murine splenic B cells and A-MuLV-transformed cells were cultured with LPS and IL-4 and assayed for epsilon and gamma 1 transcripts. Concomitant treatment with IL-4 and LPS induced expression of C epsilon transcripts in both normal and transformed cells. Expression of these truncated C epsilon transcripts preceded accumulation of normal epsilon mRNA in treated cells. Consistent data were obtained with respect to gamma 1 RNA expression. These results suggest that IL-4 can direct class switching in the context of a mechanism associated with differential expression of germline constant region genes. PMID:3264328

  10. Moult cycle specific differential gene expression profiling of the crab Portunus pelagicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paterson Brian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crustacean moulting is a complex process involving many regulatory pathways. A holistic approach to examine differential gene expression profiles of transcripts relevant to the moulting process, across all moult cycle stages, was used in this study. Custom cDNA microarrays were constructed for Portunus pelagicus. The printed arrays contained 5000 transcripts derived from both the whole organism, and from individual organs such as the brain, eyestalk, mandibular organ and Y-organ from all moult cycle stages. Results A total of 556 clones were sequenced from the cDNA libraries used to construct the arrays. These cDNAs represented 175 singletons and 62 contigs, resulting in 237 unique putative genes. The gene sequences were classified into the following biological functions: cuticular proteins associated with arthropod exoskeletons, farnesoic acid O-methyltransferase (FaMeT, proteins belonging to the hemocyanin gene family, lectins, proteins relevant to lipid metabolism, mitochondrial proteins, muscle related proteins, phenoloxidase activators and ribosomal proteins. Moult cycle-related differential expression patterns were observed for many transcripts. Of particular interest were those relating to the formation and hardening of the exoskeleton, and genes associated with cell respiration and energy metabolism. Conclusions The expression data presented here provide a chronological depiction of the molecular events associated with the biological changes that occur during the crustacean moult cycle. Tracing the temporal expression patterns of a large variety of transcripts involved in the moult cycle of P. pelagicus can provide a greater understanding of gene function, interaction, and regulation of both known and new genes with respect to the moulting process.

  11. Transcription profiles of non-immortalized breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searches for differentially expressed genes in tumours have made extensive use of array technology. Most samples have been obtained from tumour biopsies or from established tumour-derived cell lines. Here we compare cultures of non-immortalized breast cancer cells, normal non-immortalized breast cells and immortalized normal and breast cancer cells to identify which elements of a defined set of well-known cancer-related genes are differentially expressed. Cultures of cells from pleural effusions or ascitic fluids from breast cancer patients (MSSMs) were used in addition to commercially-available normal breast epithelial cells (HMECs), established breast cancer cell lines (T-est) and established normal breast cells (N-est). The Atlas Human Cancer 1.2 cDNA expression array was employed. The data obtained were analysed using widely-available statistical and clustering software and further validated through real-time PCR. According to Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) and AtlasImage software, 48 genes differed at least 2-fold in adjusted intensities between HMECs and MSSMs (p < 0.01). Some of these genes have already been directly linked with breast cancer, metastasis and malignant progression, whilst others encode receptors linked to signal transduction pathways or are otherwise related to cell proliferation. Fifty genes showed at least a 2.5-fold difference between MSSMs and T-est cells according to AtlasImage, 2-fold according to SAM. Most of these classified as genes related to metabolism and cell communication. The expression profiles of 1176 genes were determined in finite life-span cultures of metastatic breast cancer cells and of normal breast cells. Significant differences were detected between the finite life-span breast cancer cell cultures and the established breast cancer cell lines. These data suggest caution in extrapolating information from established lines for application to clinical cancer research

  12. Drosophila homologs of transcriptional mediator complex subunits are required for adult cell and segment identity specification

    OpenAIRE

    Boube, Muriel; Faucher, Christian; Joulia, Laurent; Cribbs, David L.; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2000-01-01

    The origins of specificity in gene expression are a central concern in understanding developmental control. Mediator protein complexes regulate transcriptional initiation, acting as modular adaptors linking specific transcription factors to core RNA polymerase II. Here, we identified the Drosophila homologs of 23 human mediator genes and mutations of two, dTRAP240 and of dTRAP80 (the putative fly homolog of yeast SRB4). Clonal analysis indicates a general role for dTRAP80 necessary for cell v...

  13. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J; Carretero, Julian; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription fact...

  14. GATA3 protein as a MUC1 transcriptional regulator in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abba, Martín C; Nunez, María I.; Colussi, Andrea G; Croce, María V; Segal-Eiras, Amada; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the GATA-binding protein (GATA) family (GATA4 and GATA5) might have pivotal roles in the transcriptional upregulation of mucin genes (MUC2, MUC3 and MUC4) in gastrointestinal epithelium. The zinc-finger GATA3 transcription factor has been reported to be involved in the growth control and differentiation of breast epithelial cells. In SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) studies we observed an intriguing significant correlation...

  15. Deep Sequencing of HIV-Infected Cells: Insights into Nascent Transcription and Host-Directed Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Xinxia; Sova, Pavel; Green, Richard R.; Thomas, Matthew J.; Korth, Marcus J.; Proll, Sean; Xu, Jiabao; Cheng, Yanbing; Yi, Kang; Chen, Li; Peng, Zhiyu; Wang, Jun; Palermo, Robert E.; Katze, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylated mature mRNAs are the focus of standard transcriptome analyses. However, the profiling of nascent transcripts, which often include nonpolyadenylated RNAs, can unveil novel insights into transcriptional regulation. Here, we separately sequenced total RNAs (Total RNAseq) and mRNAs (mRNAseq) from the same HIV-1-infected human CD4+ T cells. We found that many nonpolyadenylated RNAs were differentially expressed upon HIV-1 infection, and we identified 8 times more differentially expr...

  16. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Zhong; Jinfang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have reveale...

  17. Single-molecule transcript counting of stem-cell markers in the mouse intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itzkovitz, S.; Lyubimova, A.; Blat, I.C.; Maynard, M.; van Es, J.H.; Lees, J.; Jacks, T.; Clevers, H.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the molecular identities of adult stem cells requires technologies for sensitive transcript detection in tissues. In mouse intestinal crypts, lineage-tracing studies indicated that different genes uniquely mark spatially distinct stem-cell populations, residing either at crypt bases or a

  18. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Qing; Plath Kathrin; Fan Guoping; Mason Mike J; Horvath Steve

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs) regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we...

  19. TCPs, WUSs, and WINDs: Families of transcription factors that regulate shoot meristem formation, stem cell maintenance, and somatic cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eIkeda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to somatic mammalian cells, which cannot alter their fate, plant cells can dedifferentiate to form totipotent callus cells and regenerate a whole plant, following treatment with specific phytohormones. However, the regulatory mechanisms and key factors that control differentiation-dedifferentiation and cell totipotency have not been completely clarified in plants. Recently, several plant transcription factors that regulate meristem formation and dedifferentiation have been identified and include members of the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR (TCP, WUSCHEL (WUS, and WOUND INDUCED DEDIFFERENTIATION (WIND1 families. WUS and WIND positively control plant cell totipotency, while TCP negatively controls it. Interestingly, TCP is a transcriptional activator that acts as a negative regulator of shoot meristem formation, and WUS is a transcriptional repressor that positively maintains totipotency of the stem cells of the shoot meristem. We describe here the functions of TCP, WUS and WIND transcription factors in the regulation of differentiation-dedifferentiation by positive and negative transcriptional regulators.

  20. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed. PMID:26254918

  1. The role of NANOG transcriptional factor in the development of malignant phenotype of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik-Rzemieniewska, Natalia; Bednarek, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    NANOG is a transcription factor that is involved in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ES) and is a critical factor for the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of pluripotent cells. Extensive data in the literature show that the NANOG gene is aberrantly expressed during the development of malignancy in cancer cells. ES and cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells within the tumor, are thought to share common phenotypic properties. This review describes the role of NANOG in cancer cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis and metastasis. In addition, this paper illustrates a correlation between NANOG and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the maintenance of cancer stem cell properties and multidrug resistance. Together, the available data demonstrate that NANOG is strictly involved in the process of carcinogenesis and is a potential prognostic marker of malignant tumors. PMID:26618281

  2. A microfluidic approach to parallelized transcriptional profiling of single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hao; Olsen, Timothy; Zhu, Jing; Tao, Jianguo; Ponnaiya, Brian; Amundson, Sally A; Brenner, David J.; Lin, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information with cellular phenotypes is of great importance to biology and medicine, as it holds the potential to gain insight into disease pathways that is unavailable from ensemble measurements. We present a microfluidic approach to parallelized, rapid, quantitative analysis of messenger RNA from single cells via RT-qPCR. The approach leverages an array of single-cell RT-qPCR analysis units formed by a set of parallel microchannels concurrently c...

  3. Intricate Transcriptional Networks of Classical Brown and Beige Fat Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun Hong; Hur, Wonhee; Lee, Sean Bong

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipocytes are a specialized cell type that is critical for adaptive thermogenesis, energy homeostasis, and metabolism. In response to cold, both classical brown fat and the newly identified “beige” or “brite” cells are activated by β-adrenergic signaling and catabolize stored lipids and carbohydrates to produce heat via UCP1. Once thought to be non-existent in adults, recent studies have discovered active classical brown and beige fat cells in humans, thus reinvigorating interest in br...

  4. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  5. Mouse Incisor Stem Cell Niche and Myb Transcription Factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švandová, Eva; Veselá, Barbora; Šmarda, J.; Hampl, A.; Radlanski, R.J.; Matalová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 5 (2015), s. 338-344. ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/1418; GA ČR GCP302/12/J059 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : c-Myb * stem cell niches Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.672, year: 2014

  6. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  7. The transcriptional landscape of alpha beta T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingueneau, Michael; Kreslavsky, Taras; Gray, Daniel; Heng, Tracy; Cruse, Richard; Ericson, Jeffrey; Bendall, Sean; Spitzer, Matt; Nolan, Garry; Kobayashi, Koichi; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Best, Adam J.; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Jojic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Bezman, Natalie A.; Sun, Joseph C.; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shinton, Susan A.; Hardy, Richard R.; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J.; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of abT cells from thymic precursors is a complex process essential for adaptive immunity. Here we exploited the breadth of expression data sets from the Immunological Genome Project to analyze how the differentiation of thymic precursors gives rise to mature T cell transcriptomes

  8. Microfluidic single-cell transcriptional analysis rationally identifies novel surface marker profiles to enhance cell-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Robert C; Januszyk, Michael; Sorkin, Michael; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Duscher, Dominik; Whittam, Alexander J; Kosaraju, Revanth; Chung, Michael T; Paik, Kevin; Li, Alexander Y; Findlay, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Butte, Atul J; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Current progenitor cell therapies have only modest efficacy, which has limited their clinical adoption. This may be the result of a cellular heterogeneity that decreases the number of functional progenitors delivered to diseased tissue, and prevents correction of underlying pathologic cell population disruptions. Here, we develop a high-resolution method of identifying phenotypically distinct progenitor cell subpopulations via single-cell transcriptional analysis and advanced bioinformatics. When combined with high-throughput cell surface marker screening, this approach facilitates the rational selection of surface markers for prospective isolation of cell subpopulations with desired transcriptional profiles. We establish the usefulness of this platform in costly and highly morbid diabetic wounds by identifying a subpopulation of progenitor cells that is dysfunctional in the diabetic state, and normalizes diabetic wound healing rates following allogeneic application. We believe this work presents a logical framework for the development of targeted cell therapies that can be customized to any clinical application. PMID:27324848

  9. Systematic identification of yeast cell cycle transcription factors using multiple data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cell cycle is a complex process and is precisely regulated at many levels. Many genes specific to the cell cycle are regulated transcriptionally and are expressed just before they are needed. To understand the cell cycle process, it is important to identify the cell cycle transcription factors (TFs that regulate the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. Results We developed a method to identify cell cycle TFs in yeast by integrating current ChIP-chip, mutant, transcription factor binding site (TFBS, and cell cycle gene expression data. We identified 17 cell cycle TFs, 12 of which are known cell cycle TFs, while the remaining five (Ash1, Rlm1, Ste12, Stp1, Tec1 are putative novel cell cycle TFs. For each cell cycle TF, we assigned specific cell cycle phases in which the TF functions and identified the time lag for the TF to exert regulatory effects on its target genes. We also identified 178 novel cell cycle-regulated genes, among which 59 have unknown functions, but they may now be annotated as cell cycle-regulated genes. Most of our predictions are supported by previous experimental or computational studies. Furthermore, a high confidence TF-gene regulatory matrix is derived as a byproduct of our method. Each TF-gene regulatory relationship in this matrix is supported by at least three data sources: gene expression, TFBS, and ChIP-chip or/and mutant data. We show that our method performs better than four existing methods for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs. Finally, an application of our method to different cell cycle gene expression datasets suggests that our method is robust. Conclusion Our method is effective for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs and cell cycle-regulated genes. Many of our predictions are validated by the literature. Our study shows that integrating multiple data sources is a powerful approach to studying complex biological systems.

  10. In Silico Identification of Co-transcribed Core Cell Cycle Regulators and Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory networks involving transcription factors and core cell cycle regulators are expected to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this report, we describe the identification of two groups of co-transcribed core cell cycle regulators and transcription factors via a two-step in silico screening. The core cell cycle regulators include TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (CYCA1;2), CYCB1;1, CYCB2;1, CDKB1;2, and CDKB2;2 while the transcription factors include CURLY LEAF, AINTEGUMENTA, a MYB protein, two Forkhead-associated domain proteins, and a SCARECROW family protein. Promoter analysis revealed a potential web of cross- and self-regulations among the identified proteins. Because one criterion for screening for these genes is that they are predominantly transcribed in young organs but not in mature organs, these genes are likely to be particularly involved in Arabidopsis organ growth.

  11. Transcriptional Activity of rRNA Genes in Barley Cells after Mutagenic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Jaskowiak, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combination of the micronucleus test with analysis of the activity of the rRNA genes in mutagen-treated Hordeum vulgare (barley) by maleic hydrazide (MH) cells was performed. Simultaneously fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 25S rDNA as probes and an analysis of the transcriptional activity of 35S rRNA genes with silver staining were performed. The results showed that transcriptional activity is always maintained in the micronuclei although they are eliminated during the next cell cycle. The analysis of the transcriptional activity was extended to barley nuclei. MH influenced the fusion of the nucleoli in barley nuclei. The silver staining enabled detection of the nuclear bodies which arose after MH treatment. The results confirmed the usefulness of cytogenetic techniques in the characterization of micronuclei. Similar analyses can be now extended to other abiotic stresses to study the response of plant cells to the environment. PMID:27257817

  12. Telomere-surrounding regions are transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positioning of genes relative to nuclear heterochromatic compartments is thought to help regulate their transcriptional activity. Given that human subtelomeric regions are rich in highly expressed genes, we asked whether human telomeres are related to transcription-permissive nuclear compartments. To address this question, we investigated in the nuclei of normal human lymphocytes the spatial relations of two constitutively expressed genes (ACTB and RARA) and three nuclear transcripts (ACTB, IL2RA and TCRB) to telomeres and centromeres, as a function of gene activity and transcription levels. We observed that genes and gene transcripts locate close to telomere clusters and away from chromocenters upon activation of transcription. These findings, together with the observation that SC35 domains, which are enriched in pre-mRNA processing factors, are in close proximity to telomeres, indicate that telomere-neighboring regions are permissive to gene expression in human cells. Therefore, the associations of telomeres observed in the interphase nucleus might contribute, as opposed to chromocenters, for the establishment of transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments

  13. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  14. Mechanisms of triplex DNA-mediated inhibition of transcription initiation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aklank; Magistri, Marco; Napoli, Sara; Carbone, Giuseppina M; Catapano, Carlo V

    2010-03-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are attractive tools to control gene expression at the transcriptional level. This anti-gene approach has proven to be successful in various experimental settings. However, the mechanisms leading to transcriptional repression in cells have not been fully investigated yet. Here, we examined the consequence of triplex DNA formation on the binding of transcriptional activators, co-activators and RNA Polymerase II to the ets2 gene promoter using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The triplex target sequence was located approximately 40-bp upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) and overlapped an Sp1 binding site relevant for ets2 transcription. We found that the ets2-TFO prevented binding of Sp1, TAF(II)130 and TAF(II)250 to the ets2 promoter, while binding of RNA polymerase II and TBP were not affected. The effects were both sequence and target specific, since the TFO had no effect on the c-myc promoter and a mutated ets2 promoter construct. Thus, triplex DNA formation near a TSS leads to formation of a non-functional pre-initiation complex (PIC) by blocking binding of transcriptional activators and co-activator molecules. This is the first direct demonstration of interference with PIC assembly at the TSS by oligonucleotide-triplex DNA formation in cells. PMID:20045441

  15. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Ribeiro-Varandas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC. Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis.

  16. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawn X; Glass, Christopher K

    2013-12-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors (SDTFs), including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcriptional responses at a genome-wide level. Here, focusing on recent studies in macrophages, we review the evidence suggesting a model in which cell-specific actions of SDTFs are the consequence of priming functions of lineage determining transcription factors. We also discuss recent findings relating lineage-determining and SDTF activity to alterations in the epigenetic landscape as well as the production and function of enhancer RNAs. These findings have implications for the understanding of how natural genetic variation impacts cell-specific programs of gene expression and suggest new approaches for altering gene expression in vivo. PMID:24130129

  17. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  18. Precision control of recombinant gene transcription for CHO cell synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam J; James, David C

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production will be genetically engineered to possess both generic and product-specific manufacturing capabilities that may not exist naturally. Introduction of entirely new combinations of synthetic functions (e.g. novel metabolic or stress-response pathways), and retro-engineering of existing functional cell modules will drive disruptive change in cellular manufacturing performance. However, before we can apply the core concepts underpinning synthetic biology (design, build, test) to CHO cell engineering we must first develop practical and robust enabling technologies. Fundamentally, we will require the ability to precisely control the relative stoichiometry of numerous functional components we simultaneously introduce into the host cell factory. In this review we discuss how this can be achieved by design of engineered promoters that enable concerted control of recombinant gene transcription. We describe the specific mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that affect promoter function during bioproduction processes, and detail the highly-specific promoter design criteria that are required in the context of CHO cell engineering. The relative applicability of diverse promoter development strategies are discussed, including re-engineering of natural sequences, design of synthetic transcription factor-based systems, and construction of synthetic promoters. This review highlights the potential of promoter engineering to achieve precision transcriptional control for CHO cell synthetic biology. PMID:26721629

  19. A transcriptional regulatory role of the THAP11-HCF-1 complex in colon cancer cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J Brandon; Palchaudhuri, Santanu; Yin, Hanwei; Wei, Jianjun; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2012-05-01

    The recently identified Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) domain is an atypical zinc finger motif with sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Emerging data suggest that THAP proteins may function in chromatin-dependent processes, including transcriptional regulation, but the roles of most THAP proteins in normal and aberrant cellular processes remain largely unknown. In this work, we identify THAP11 as a transcriptional regulator differentially expressed in human colon cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of human colon cancers revealed increased THAP11 expression in both primary tumors and metastases. Knockdown of THAP11 in SW620 colon cancer cells resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation, and profiling of gene expression in these cells identified a novel gene set composed of 80 differentially expressed genes, 70% of which were derepressed by THAP11 knockdown. THAP11 was found to associate physically with the transcriptional coregulator HCF-1 (host cell factor 1) and recruit HCF-1 to target promoters. Importantly, THAP11-mediated gene regulation and its chromatin association require HCF-1, while HCF-1 recruitment at these genes requires THAP11. Collectively, these data provide the first characterization of THAP11-dependent gene expression in human colon cancer cells and suggest that the THAP11-HCF-1 complex may be an important transcriptional and cell growth regulator in human colon cancer. PMID:22371484

  20. Cell-type specific light-mediated transcript regulation in the multicellular alga Volvox carteri

    OpenAIRE

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri makes use of none less than 13 photoreceptors, which are mostly expressed in a cell-type specific manner. This gives reason to believe that trasncriptome pattern of each cell type could change differentially in response to environmental light. Here, the cell-type specific changes of various transcripts from different pathways in response to blue, red and far-red light were analyzed. Results In response to different light qualities, distin...

  1. A Transcriptional Mechanism Integrating Inputs from Extracellular Signals to Activate Hippocampal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Jimena; Urbán, Noelia; Achimastou, Angeliki; Ito, Ayako; Simic, Milesa; Ullom, Kristy; Martynoga, Ben; Lebel, Mélanie; Göritz, Christian; Frisén, Jonas; Nakafuku, Masato; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    Summary The activity of adult stem cells is regulated by signals emanating from the surrounding tissue. Many niche signals have been identified, but it is unclear how they influence the choice of stem cells to remain quiescent or divide. Here we show that when stem cells of the adult hippocampus receive activating signals, they first induce the expression of the transcription factor Ascl1 and only subsequently exit quiescence. Moreover, lowering Ascl1 expression reduces the proliferation rate...

  2. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-Suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approa...

  3. Sox17 Dependence Distinguishes the Transcriptional Regulation of Fetal from Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Injune; Saunders, Thomas L.; Morrison, Sean J

    2007-01-01

    Fetal stem cells differ phenotypically and functionally from adult stem cells in diverse tissues. However, little is known about how these differences are regulated. To address this we compared the gene expression profiles of fetal versus adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and discovered that the Sox17 transcriptional regulator is specifically expressed in fetal and neonatal but not adult HSCs. Germline deletion of Sox17 led to severe fetal hematopoietic defects, including a lack of detect...

  4. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A. J.; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of g...

  5. Targeting transcriptional addictions in small cell lung cancer with a covalent CDK7 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J; Carretero, Julian; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R; Poulsen, Hans S; Aref, Amir R; Barbie, David A; Bradner, James E; George, Rani E; Gray, Nathanael S; Young, Richard A; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-12-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, in particular to THZ1, a recently identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7. We find that expression of super-enhancer-associated transcription factor genes, including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors, is highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  6. A cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hethke, C; Geerling, A C; Hausner, W.; de Vos, W.M.; Thomm, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe here the establishment of a cell-free transcription system for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using the cloned glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) gene as template. The in vitro system that operated up to a temperature of 85 degrees C initiated transcription 23 bp downstream of a TATA box located 45 bp upstream of the translational start codon of gdh mRNA, at the same site as in Pyrococcus cells. Mutational analyses revealed that this TATA box is essential for in vit...

  7. Computational identification of a p38SAPK regulated transcription factor network required for tumor cell quiescence

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Alejandro P.; George, Ajish; Schewe, Denis; Bragado, Paloma; Iglesias, Bibiana V.; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Kourtidis, Antonis; Conklin, Douglas S.; Julio A Aguirre-Ghiso

    2009-01-01

    The stress activated kinase p38 plays key roles in tumor suppression and induction of tumor cell dormancy. However, the mechanisms behind these functions remain poorly understood. Using computational tools we identified a transcription factor (TF) network regulated by p38α/β and required for human squamous carcinoma cell quiescence in vivo. We found that p38 transcriptionally regulates a core network of 46 genes that includes 16 TFs. Activation of p38 induced the expression of the TFs p53 and...

  8. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the ...

  9. Global irradiation effects, stem cell genes and rare transcripts in the planarian transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloni, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are the closest relatives of the totipotent primordial cell, which is able to spawn millions of daughter cells and hundreds of cell types in multicellular organisms. Stem cells are involved in tissue homeostasis and regeneration, and may play a major role in cancer development. Among animals, planarians host a model stem cell type, called the neoblast, which essentially confers immortality. Gaining insights into the global transcriptional landscape of these exceptional cells takes an unprecedented turn with the advent of Next Generation Sequencing methods. Two Digital Gene Expression transcriptomes of Schmidtea mediterranea planarians, with or without neoblasts lost through irradiation, were produced and analyzed. Twenty one bp NlaIII tags were mapped to transcripts in the Schmidtea and Dugesia taxids. Differential representation of tags in normal versus irradiated animals reflects differential gene expression. Canonical and non-canonical tags were included in the analysis, and comparative studies with human orthologs were conducted. Transcripts fell into 3 categories: invariant (including housekeeping genes), absent in irradiated animals (potential neoblast-specific genes, IRDOWN) and induced in irradiated animals (potential cellular stress response, IRUP). Different mRNA variants and gene family members were recovered. In the IR-DOWN class, almost all of the neoblast-specific genes previously described were found. In irradiated animals, a larger number of genes were induced rather than lost. A significant fraction of IRUP genes behaved as if transcript versions of different lengths were produced. Several novel potential neoblast-specific genes have been identified that varied in relative abundance, including highly conserved as well as novel proteins without predicted orthologs. Evidence for a large body of antisense transcripts, for example regulated antisense for the Smed-piwil1 gene, and evidence for RNA shortening in irradiated animals is presented

  10. Function of GATA transcription factors in hydroxyurea-induced HEL cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    HEL cells, a human erythroleukemia cell line, mainly express the fetal (γ)globin gene and trace amount of the embryonic (ε)globin gene, but not adult (β) globin gene. Here we show that hydroxyurea (HU) can induce HEL cells to express adult (β) globin gene and lead these cells to terminal differentiation. Results showed in Gel mobility shift assays that GATA factors could specifically bind to the regulatory elements of humanβ- globin gene, including the proximal regulatory element (theβ- promoter) and the distal regulatory elements (the DNase I hypersensitive sites in the LCR, HS2-HS4 core sequences). However, the DNA binding patterns of GATA factors were quite different between HU-induced and uninduced HEL cells. Western-blot analysis of nuclear extracts from both the uninduced and HU- induced HEL cells revealed that the level of GATA-2 transcription factor decreased, whereas the level of GATA-1 transcription factor increased following the time of hydroxyurea induction. Furthermore, using RT-PCR analysis the expression of human β-globin gene in HU-induced HEL cells could be blocked again when HEL cells were incubated in the presence of antisense oligonucleotides for hGATA-1, suggesting that the upregulation of hGATA-1 transcription factor might be critical for the expression of humanβ- globin gene in HU-induced HEL cells.

  11. An NAC transcription factor controls ethylene-regulated cell expansion in flower petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan; Tian, Ji; Luo, Jing; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping

    2013-10-01

    Cell expansion is crucial for plant growth. It is well known that the phytohormone ethylene functions in plant development as a key modulator of cell expansion. However, the role of ethylene in the regulation of this process remains unclear. In this study, 2,189 ethylene-responsive transcripts were identified in rose (Rosa hybrida) petals using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis. Among these transcripts, an NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor gene, RhNAC100, was rapidly and dramatically induced by ethylene in the petals. Interestingly, accumulation of the RhNAC100 transcript was modulated by ethylene via microRNA164-dependent posttranscriptional regulation. Overexpression of RhNAC100 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) substantially reduced the petal size by repressing petal cell expansion. By contrast, silencing of RhNAC100 in rose petals using virus-induced gene silencing significantly increased petal size and promoted cell expansion in the petal abaxial subepidermis (P genes tested exhibited changes in expression in RhNAC100-silenced rose petals. Moreover, of those genes, one cellulose synthase and two aquaporin genes (Rosa hybrida Cellulose Synthase2 and R. hybrida Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein1;1/2;1) were identified as targets of RhNAC100. Our results suggest that ethylene regulates cell expansion by fine-tuning the microRNA164/RhNAC100 module and also provide new insights into the function of NAC transcription factors. PMID:23933991

  12. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single Base Substitutions (SBS) that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE) and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing), and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT), i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP), catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST), i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC), healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic

  13. Increased frequency of single base substitutions in a population of transcripts expressed in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchetti Laurent

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Base Substitutions (SBS that alter transcripts expressed in cancer originate from somatic mutations. However, recent studies report SBS in transcripts that are not supported by the genomic DNA of tumor cells. Methods We used sequence based whole genome expression profiling, namely Long-SAGE (L-SAGE and Tag-seq (a combination of L-SAGE and deep sequencing, and computational methods to identify transcripts with greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Millions of tags produced by 40 healthy and 47 cancer L-SAGE experiments were compared to 1,959 Reference Tags (RT, i.e. tags matching the human genome exactly once. Similarly, tens of millions of tags produced by 7 healthy and 8 cancer Tag-seq experiments were compared to 8,572 RT. For each transcript, SBS frequencies in healthy and cancer cells were statistically tested for equality. Results In the L-SAGE and Tag-seq experiments, 372 and 4,289 transcripts respectively, showed greater SBS frequencies in cancer. Increased SBS frequencies could not be attributed to known Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP, catalogued somatic mutations or RNA-editing enzymes. Hypothesizing that Single Tags (ST, i.e. tags sequenced only once, were indicators of SBS, we observed that ST proportions were heterogeneously distributed across Embryonic Stem Cells (ESC, healthy differentiated and cancer cells. ESC had the lowest ST proportions, whereas cancer cells had the greatest. Finally, in a series of experiments carried out on a single patient at 1 healthy and 3 consecutive tumor stages, we could show that SBS frequencies increased during cancer progression. Conclusion If the mechanisms generating the base substitutions could be known, increased SBS frequency in transcripts would be a new useful biomarker of cancer. With the reduction of sequencing cost, sequence based whole genome expression profiling could be used to characterize increased SBS frequency in patient’s tumor and aid diagnostic.

  14. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the transcription of cellular reference genes remains unaffected. Down-regulation of HPV 18 mRNA correlates directly with cessation of cellular growth and can be abolished using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore human keratinocytes immortalized by HPV 16 but still retaining the non-tumorigenic phenotype reveal the same inhibitory effect on viral transcription after treatment with 5-azacytidine. These results support a model of a postulated intracellular control mechanism, directed against papillomavirus transcription, which can be induced by 5-azacytidine and appears to correlate with the presence of specific chromosomes in non-tumorigenic cells. Images PMID:2457495

  15. Understanding Transcriptional Enhancement in Monoclonal Antibody-Producing Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Sarah E.

    With the demand for monoclonal antibody (mAB) therapeutics continually increasing, the need to better understand what makes a high productivity clone has gained substantial interest. Monoclonal antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with different productivities were provided by a biopharmaceutical company for investigation. Gene copy numbers, mRNA levels, and mAb productivities were previously determined for two low producing clones and their amplified progeny. These results showed an increase in mRNA copy number in amplified clones, which correlated to the observed increases in specific productivity of these clones. The presence of multiple copies of mRNA per one copy of DNA in the higher productivity clones has been coined as transcriptional enhancement. The methylation status of the CMV promoter as well as transcription factor/promoter interactions were evaluated to determine the cause of transcriptional enhancement. Methylation analysis via bisulfite sequencing revealed no significant difference in overall methylation status of the CMV promoter. These data did, however, reveal the possibility of differential interactions of transcription factors between the high and low productivity cell clones. This finding was further supported by chromatin immunoprecipitations previously performed in the lab, as well as literature studies. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) binding proteins were constructed and utilized to selectively immunoprecipitate the CMV promoter along with its associated transcription factors in the different CHO cell clones. Cells were transfected with the TALE proteins, harvested and subjected to a ChIP-like procedure. Results obtained from the TALE ChIP demonstrated the lack of binding of the protein to the promoter and the need to redesign the TALE. Overall, results obtained from this study were unable to give a clear indication as to the causes of transcriptional enhancement in the amplified CHO cell clones. Further

  16. Quantitative profiling of housekeeping and Epstein-Barr virus gene transcription in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines using an oligonucleotide microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niggli Felix K

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with lymphoid malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, and can transform human B cells in vitro. EBV-harboring cell lines are widely used to investigate lymphocyte transformation and oncogenesis. Qualitative EBV gene expression has been extensively described, but knowledge of quantitative transcription is lacking. We hypothesized that transcription levels of EBNA1, the gene essential for EBV persistence within an infected cell, are similar in BL cell lines. Results To compare quantitative gene transcription in the BL cell lines Namalwa, Raji, Akata, Jijoye, and P3HR1, we developed an oligonucleotide microarray chip, including 17 housekeeping genes, six latent EBV genes (EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, LMP1, LMP2, and four lytic EBV genes (BZLF1, BXLF2, BKRF2, BZLF2, and used the cell line B95.8 as a reference for EBV gene transcription. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were used to validate microarray results. We found that transcription levels of housekeeping genes differed considerably among BL cell lines. Using a selection of housekeeping genes with similar quantitative transcription in the tested cell lines to normalize EBV gene transcription data, we showed that transcription levels of EBNA1 were quite similar in very different BL cell lines, in contrast to transcription levels of other EBV genes. As demonstrated with Akata cells, the chip allowed us to accurately measure EBV gene transcription changes triggered by treatment interventions. Conclusion Our results suggest uniform EBNA1 transcription levels in BL and that microarray profiling can reveal novel insights on quantitative EBV gene transcription and its impact on lymphocyte biology.

  17. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  18. Chicken globin gene transcription is cell lineage specific during the time of the switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posttranscriptional silencing of embryonic globin gene expression occurs during hemoglobin switching in chickens. Here the authors use Percoll density gradients to fractionate the red blood cells of 5-9 day embryos in order to determine the cellular source and the timing of this posttranscriptional process. By means of nuclear run-on transcription in vitro they show that it is within mature primitive cells that production of embryonic globin mRNA is terminated posttranscriptionally. In contrast, young definitive cells produce little (or no) embryonic globin mRNA because of regulation at the transcriptional level. Thus the lineage specificity of embryonic and adult globin gene expression is determined transcriptionally, and the posttranscriptional process described by Landes et al. is a property of the senescing primitive cells, not a mechanism operative in the hemoglobin switch. This conclusion is supported by [3H]leucine incorporation experiments on Percoll-fractionated cells which reveal no posttranscriptional silencing of the embryonic genes during the early stages of the switch. In the course of these studies they have noticed a strong transcriptional pause near the second exon of the globin genes which is induced by 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) and which resembles a natural pause near that position

  19. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  20. Enhanced transcription rates in membrane-free protocells formed by coacervation of cell lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Spruijt, Evan; Hansen, Maike M K; Dubuc, Emilien; Groen, Joost; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Piruska, Aigars; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2013-07-16

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions in complex mixtures of proteins and other molecules produce crowded compartments supporting in vitro transcription and translation. We developed a method based on picoliter water-in-oil droplets to induce coacervation in Escherichia coli cell lysate and follow gene expression under crowded and noncrowded conditions. Coacervation creates an artificial cell-like environment in which the rate of mRNA production is increased significantly. Fits to the measured transcription rates show a two orders of magnitude larger binding constant between DNA and T7 RNA polymerase, and five to six times larger rate constant for transcription in crowded environments, strikingly similar to in vivo rates. The effect of crowding on interactions and kinetics of the fundamental machinery of gene expression has a direct impact on our understanding of biochemical networks in vivo. Moreover, our results show the intrinsic potential of cellular components to facilitate macromolecular organization into membrane-free compartments by phase separation. PMID:23818642

  1. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase I transcription: The nucleolar transcription factor UBF is inactive in mitosis and early G1

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Joachim; Grummt, Ingrid

    1999-01-01

    Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes by RNA polymerase (pol) I oscillates during the cell cycle, being maximal in S and G2 phase, repressed during mitosis, and gradually recovering during G1 progression. We have shown that transcription initiation factor (TIF)-IB/SL1 is inactivated during mitosis by cdc2/cyclin B-directed phosphorylation of TAFI110. In this study, we have monitored reactivation of transcription after exit from mitosis. We demonstrate that the pol I factor UBF is also inactiva...

  2. An Epigenetic Mechanism of High Gdnf Transcription in Glioma Cells Revealed by Specific Sequence Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Le; Liu, Jie; Lei, Yu; Xiong, Ye; Li, Heng; Lin, Xiaoqian; Yao, Rui-Qin; Gao, Dian-Shuai

    2016-09-01

    Glioma cells express high levels of GDNF. When investigating its transcriptional regulation mechanism, we observed increased or decreased methylation of different cis-acting elements in the gdnf promoter II. However, it is difficult to determine the contributions of methylation changes of each cis-acting element to the abnormally high transcription of gdnf gene. To elucidate the contributions of methylation changes of specific cis-acting elements to the regulation of gdnf transcription, we combined gene site-directed mutation, molecular cloning, and dual luciferase assay to develop the "specific sequence methylation followed by plasmid recircularization" method to alter methylation levels of specific cis-acting elements in the gdnf promoter in living cells and assess gene transcriptional activity. This method successfully introduced artificial changes in the methylation of different cis-acting elements in the gdnf promoter II. Moreover, compared with unmethylated gdnf promoter II, both silencer II hypermethylation plus enhancer II unmethylation and hypermethylation of the entire promoter II (containing enhancer II and silencer II) significantly enhanced gdnf transcriptional activity (P  0.05). Enhancer II hypermethylation plus silencer II unmethylation did not significantly affect gene transcription (P > 0.05). Furthermore, we found significantly increased DNA methylation in the silencer II of the gdnf gene in high-grade astroglioma cells with abnormally high gdnf gene expression (P < 0.01). The absence of silencer II significantly increased gdnf promoter II activity in U251 cells (P < 0.01). In conclusion, our specific sequence methylation followed by plasmid recircularization method successfully altered the methylation levels of a specific cis-acting element in a gene promoter in living cells. This method allows in-depth investigation of the impact of methylation changes of different cis-acting elements in the same promoter on gene transcriptional

  3. Cell Cycle-dependent Regulation of the Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 by CDK·Cyclin Complexes*

    OpenAIRE

    Marais, Anett; Ji, Zongling; Child, Emma S.; Krause, Eberhard; Mann, David J.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Several mammalian forkhead transcription factors have been shown to impact on cell cycle regulation and are themselves linked to cell cycle control systems. Here we have investigated the little studied mammalian forkhead transcription factor FOXK2 and demonstrate that it is subject to control by cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. FOXK2 exhibits a periodic rise in its phosphorylation levels during the cell cycle, with hyperphosphorylation occurring in mitotic cells. Hyperphosphorylation occ...

  4. Expression of The Embryonic Stem Cell Transcription Factor SOX2 in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laga, Alvaro C.; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Susan J.; Velazquez, Elsa F.; Yang, Qinghong; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F.

    2010-01-01

    SOX2 is a gene located on chromosome 3q26.33 that encodes a transcription factor important to maintenance of embryonic neural crest stem cell pluripotency. We have identified rare SOX2-immunoreactive cells in normal human skin at or near the established stem cell niches. Three subsets of SOX2-positive cells were defined in these regions: those expressing only SOX2 and those that co-expressed SOX2 and either CK20 or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, which are consistent with dichotomous differentiation of SOX2-expressing precursors along neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) or melanocytic lines, respectively. Examination of Merkel cell carcinomas confirmed nuclear SOX2 expression in this tumor type. In human patient melanoma, strong nuclear expression of SOX2 was noted in a subset of tumors, and the ability to detect SOX2 in lesional cells significantly correlated with primary tumor thickness in a survey cohort. To assess the potential role of SOX2 in melanoma growth, an in vivo tumorigenesis assay was used. Whereas SOX2 knockdown failed to influence proliferation of cultured melanoma cells in vitro, tumor xenografts generated with the SOX2-knockdown cell line showed significant decrease in mean tumor volume as compared with controls. In aggregate, these findings suggest that SOX2 is a novel biomarker for subpopulations of normal skin cells that reside in established stem cell niches and that might relate to Merkel cell and melanocyte ontogeny and tumorigenesis. PMID:20042675

  5. PEA3activates CXCL12transcription in MCF-7breast cancer cells%PEA3 activates CXCL12 transcription in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li; CHEN Bo-bin; LI Jun-jie; JIN Wei; SHAO Zhi-min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the activity of PEA3 ( polyomavirus enhancer activator 3 ) on CXCL12 (Chemokine CXC motif ligand 12) transcription and to reveal the role of PEA3 involved in CXCL12-mediated metastasis and angiogenesis in breast cancer. Methods Methods such as cell transfection, ChIP assay (chromatin immunoprecipitation ), and siRNA (small interfering RNA) were applied to demonstrate and confirm the interaction between PEA3 and CXCL12. Results Over-expression of PEA3 could increase the CXCL12 mRNA level and the CXCL12 promoter activity in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ChIP assay demonstrated that PEA3 could bind to the CXCL12 promoter in the cells transfected with PEA3 expression vector. PEA3 siRNA decreased CXCL12 promoter activity and the binding of PEA3 to the CXCL12 promoter in MCF-7 cells. Conclusions PEA3 could activate CXCL12 promoter transcription. It may be a potential mechanism of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis regarding of PEA3 and CXCL12.

  6. p55PIK Transcriptionally Activated by MZF1 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available p55PIK, regulatory subunit of class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression by interaction with tumor repressor retinoblastoma (Rb protein. A recent study showed that Rb protein can localize to the mitochondria in proliferative cells. Aberrant p55PIK expression may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. To reveal the mechanisms of p55PIK transcriptional regulation, the p55PIK promoter characteristics were analyzed. The data show that myeloid zinc finger 1, MZF1, is necessary for p55PIK gene transcription activation. ChIP (Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay shows that MZF1 binds to the cis-element “TGGGGA” in p55PIK promoter. In MZF1 overexpressed cells, the promoter activity, expression of p55PIK, and cell proliferation rate were observed to be significantly enhanced. Whereas in MZF1-silenced cells, the promoter activity and expression of p55PIK and cell proliferation level was statistically decreased. In CRC tissues, MZF1 and p55PIK mRNA expression were increased (P=0.046, P=0.047, resp.. A strong positive correlation (Rs=0.94 between MZF1 and p55PIK mRNA expression was observed. Taken together, we concluded that p55PIK is transcriptionally activated by MZF1, resulting in increased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells.

  7. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  8. Protein Evolution in Cell and Tissue Development: Going Beyond Sequence and Transcriptional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Daniel J.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, W. James

    2011-01-01

    Studies of animal evolution often focus on sequence and transcriptional analysis, based on an assumption that the evolution of development is driven by changes in gene expression. We argue that biochemical and cell biological approaches are also required, because sequence-conserved proteins can have different biochemical, cellular and developmental properties.

  9. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  10. Transcription of gD and gI genes in BHV1-infected cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Chowdhury; Bhaskar Sharma

    2012-12-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein I (gI) genes of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV1) are contiguous genes with 141 bp region between the two open reading frames (ORFs). Expression of gD and gI from a bicistronic construct containing complete gD and gI gene has been reported either through internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-like element or through the scanning and leakage model (Mukhopadhyay 2000). We here show by computational and experimental means that gD is expressed solely as bicistronic transcript comprising gD and gI coding region in BHV1-infected cells. gI ORF was also shown to express separately. An IRES-like element was also predicted by IRES predicting software in the middle of the gD coding region; within that region a putative promoter was also identified by promoterscan. The intergenic region between the two ORF showed extensive secondary structure which brings the stop codon of gD very close to start codon of gI gene. gD gene transcript in BHV1-infected cells was solely bicistronic. gI transcript was also present in the BHV1-infected cells but in low copy number. The results indicate that gI is probably transcribed from its own transcript in BHV1-infected cells.

  11. N-Myc and GCN5 regulate significantly overlapping transcriptional programs in neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Martínez-Cerdeño

    Full Text Available Here we examine the functions of the Myc cofactor and histone acetyltransferase, GCN5/KAT2A, in neural stem and precursor cells (NSC using a conditional knockout approach driven by nestin-cre. Mice with GCN5-deficient NSC exhibit a 25% reduction in brain mass with a microcephaly phenotype similar to that observed in nestin-cre driven knockouts of c- or N-myc. In addition, the loss of GCN5 inhibits precursor cell proliferation and reduces their populations in vivo, as does loss of N-myc. Gene expression analysis indicates that about one-sixth of genes whose expression is affected by loss of GCN5 are also affected in the same manner by loss of N-myc. These findings strongly support the notion that GCN5 protein is a key N-Myc transcriptional cofactor in NSC, but are also consistent with recruitment of GCN5 by other transcription factors and the use by N-Myc of other histone acetyltransferases. Putative N-Myc/GCN5 coregulated transcriptional pathways include cell metabolism, cell cycle, chromatin, and neuron projection morphogenesis genes. GCN5 is also required for maintenance of histone acetylation both at its putative specific target genes and at Myc targets. Thus, we have defined an important role for GCN5 in NSC and provided evidence that GCN5 is an important Myc transcriptional cofactor in vivo.

  12. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Tarlinton, David M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L

    2014-10-20

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell-promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1-IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation. PMID:25288399

  13. INHIBITORY ROLE OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR COUP-TFⅡ IN EXPRESSION OF HTERT IN HELA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Zeng-liang Bai; Li Xuan; Lin Hou; Bo Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Objective To clone and identify the proteins involved in regulating the transcription of hTERT and study the role of genes in both hTERT transcription and telomerase activity.Methods The full cDNA of COUP-TFⅡ was cloned from HeLa cDNA library by hTERT promoter-based yeast one-hybrid assay and then in-frame inserted into His-tag fusion expression vector pEK318. The His-tag COUP-TFⅡ fusion proteins were purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. The interaction of COUP-TFⅡ with hTERT promoter in vitro was identified by lectrophoretic mobility shift assay and Footprint. The role of COUP-TFⅡ in both hTERT transcription and telomerase activity were probed through Luciferase reporter assay, Northern blot, and TRAP-PCR ELISA.Results COUP-TFⅡ could firmly bind to the downstream E-box and the other two binding sites in hTERT promoter.Luciferase reporter assay indicated COUP-TFⅡ could suppress hTERT promoter activity and stable introduction of COUP TFⅡ into HeLa cells also decreased both endogenous hTERT transcription and telomerase activity.Conclusion The human COUP-TFⅡ can firmly bind to hTERT promoter, and inhibit telomerase activity through decreasing hTERT transcription. It will greatly facilitate understanding of telomerase regulation in normal and cancer cells.

  14. Recombinant NFAT1 (NFATp) is regulated by calcineurin in T cells and mediates transcription of several cytokine genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, C.; Burgeon, E; Carew, J A; McCaffrey, P G; Badalian, T M; Lane, W S; Hogan, P G; Rao, A

    1996-01-01

    Transcription factors of the NFAT family play a key role in the transcription of cytokine genes and other genes during the immune response. We have identified two new isoforms of the transcription factor NFAT1 (previously termed NFATp) that are the predominant isoforms expressed in murine and human T cells. When expressed in Jurkat T cells, recombinant NFAT1 is regulated, as expected, by the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, and its function is inhibited by the immunosuppressive a...

  15. A Role for RE-1-Silencing Transcription Factor in Embryonic Stem Cells Cardiac Lineage Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Irene; Marcy, Guillaume; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Kumar, Vibhor; John-Sanchez, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehran; Buckley, Noel J; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2016-04-01

    During development, lineage specification is controlled by several signaling pathways involving various transcription factors (TFs). Here, we studied the RE-1-silencing transcription factor (REST) and identified an important role of this TF in cardiac differentiation. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) to model development, we found that REST knockout cells lost the ability to differentiate into the cardiac lineage. Detailed analysis of specific lineage markers expression showed selective downregulation of endoderm markers in REST-null cells, thus contributing to a loss of cardiogenic signals. REST regulates cardiac differentiation of ESCs by negatively regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and positively regulating the cardiogenic TF Gata4. We propose here a new role for REST in cell fate specification besides its well-known repressive role of neuronal differentiation. PMID:26864965

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation of connexin43 in H-Ras-transformed cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Kandouz

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 expression is lost in cancer cells and many studies have reported that Cx43 is a tumor suppressor gene. Paradoxically, in a cellular NIH3T3 model, we have previously shown that Ha-Ras-mediated oncogenic transformation results in increased Cx43 expression. Although the examination of transcriptional regulation revealed essential regulatory elements, it could not solve this paradox. Here we studied post-transcriptional regulation of Cx43 expression in cancer using the same model in search of novel gene regulatory elements. Upon Ras transformation, both Cx43 mRNA stability and translation efficiency were increased. We investigated the role of Cx43 mRNA 3' and 5'Untranslated regions (UTRs and found an opposing effect; a 5'UTR-driven positive regulation is observed in Ras-transformed cells (NIH-3T3(Ras, while the 3'UTR is active only in normal NIH-3T3(Neo cells and completely silenced in NIH-3T3(Ras cells. Most importantly, we identified a previously unknown regulatory element within the 3'UTR, named S1516, which accounts for this 3'UTR-mediated regulation. We also examined the effect of other oncogenes and found that Ras- and Src-transformed cells show a different Cx43 UTRs post-transcriptional regulation than ErbB2-transformed cells, suggesting distinct regulatory pathways. Next, we detected different patterns of S1516 RNA-protein complexes in NIH-3T3(Neo compared to NIH-3T3(Ras cells. A proteomic approach identified most of the S1516-binding proteins as factors involved in post-transcriptional regulation. Building on our new findings, we propose a model to explain the discrepancy between the Cx43 expression in Ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells and the data in clinical specimens.

  17. Cumulus-specific genes are transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer in a mouse model*

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Guo-qing; Heng, Boon-chin; Ng, Soon-chye

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether four cumulus-specific genes: follicular stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), prostaglandin synthase 2 (Ptgs2) and steroidogenic acute regulator protein (Star), were correctly reprogrammed to be transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a murine model. Cumulus cells of C57×CBA F1 female mouse were injected into enucleated oocytes, followed by activation in 10 µmol/L strontium chloride for 5 h and sub...

  18. Enhanced transcription rates in membrane-free protocells formed by coacervation of cell lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolova, Ekaterina; Spruijt, Evan; Hansen, Maike M. K.; Dubuc, Emilien; Groen, Joost; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Piruska, Aigars; Heus, Hans A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid–liquid phase transitions in complex mixtures of proteins and other molecules produce crowded compartments supporting in vitro transcription and translation. We developed a method based on picoliter water-in-oil droplets to induce coacervation in Escherichia coli cell lysate and follow gene expression under crowded and noncrowded conditions. Coacervation creates an artificial cell-like environment in which the rate of mRNA production is increased significantly. Fits to the measured tran...

  19. A global transcriptional view of apoptosis in human T-cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windgassen Dirk

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cell activation is an essential step of immune response. The process of proper T-cell activation is strictly monitored and regulated by apoptosis signaling. Yet, regulation of apoptosis, an integral and crucial facet during the process of T-cell activation, is not well understood. Methods In this study, a Gene-Ontology driven global gene expression analysis coupled with protein abundance and activity assays identified genes and pathways associated with regulation of apoptosis in primary human CD3+ T cells and separately CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Results We identified significantly regulated apoptotic genes in several protein families, such as BCL2 proteins, CASPASE proteins, and TNF receptors, and detailed their transcriptional kinetics during the T-cell activation process. Transcriptional patterns of a few select genes (BCL2A1, BBC3 and CASP3 were validated at the protein level. Many of these apoptotic genes are involved in NF-κB signaling pathway, including TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF10B, TRAF4, TRAF1, TRAF3, and TRAF6. Upregulation of NF-κB and IκB family genes (REL, RELA, and RELB, NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKB1 at 48 to 96 hours, supported by the increase of phosphorylated RELA (p65, suggests that the involvement of the NF-κB complex in the process of T-cell proliferation is not only regulated at the protein level but also at the transcriptional level. Examination of genes involved in MAP kinase signalling pathway, important in apoptosis, suggests an induction of p38 and ERK1 cascades in T-cell proliferation (at 48 to 96 hours, which was explored using phosphorylation assays for p38 (MAPK14 and ERK1 (MAPK3. An immediate and short-lived increase of AP-1 activity measured by DNA-binding activity suggests a rapid and transient activation of p38 and/or JNK cascades upon T-cell activation. Conclusion This comparative genome-scale, transcriptional analysis of T-cell activation in the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets and the mixed CD3+ population

  20. Direct induction of haematoendothelial programs in human pluripotent stem cells by transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcheva, Irina; Brok-Volchanskaya, Vera; Kumar, Akhilesh; Liu, Patricia; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Tong, Lilian; Vodyanik, Maxim; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Kyba, Michael; Yakubov, Eduard; Cooke, John; Thomson, James A; Slukvin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Advancing pluripotent stem cell technologies for modelling haematopoietic stem cell development and blood therapies requires identifying key regulators of haematopoietic commitment from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). Here, by screening the effect of 27 candidate factors, we reveal two groups of transcriptional regulators capable of inducing distinct haematopoietic programs from hPSCs: pan-myeloid (ETV2 and GATA2) and erythro-megakaryocytic (GATA2 and TAL1). In both cases, these transcription factors directly convert hPSCs to endothelium, which subsequently transform into blood cells with pan-myeloid or erythro-megakaryocytic potential. These data demonstrate that two distinct genetic programs regulate the haematopoietic development from hPSCs and that both of these programs specify hPSCs directly to haemogenic endothelial cells. In addition, this study provides a novel method for the efficient induction of blood and endothelial cells from hPSCs via the overexpression of modified mRNA for the selected transcription factors. PMID:25019369

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Fucosyltransferase 1 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fumiko Taniuchi; Koji Higai; Tomomi Tanaka; Yutaro Azuma; Kojiro Matsumoto

    2013-01-01

    The α 1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α 1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site −10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in...

  2. One enhancer mediates mafK transcriptional activation in both hematopoietic and cardiac muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuoka, Fumiki; Motohashi, Hozumi; Onodera, Ko; Suwabe, Naruyoshi; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    Members of the small Maf family of transcription factors play important roles in hematopoiesis. Using transgenic assays, we discovered a tissue-specific enhancer 3′ to the mafK gene. This enhancer directs mafK transcription in hematopoietic as well as in developing cardiac muscle cells, and was thus designated the hematopoietic and cardiac enhancer of mafK (HCEK). Only two of four GATA consensus motifs identified within HCEK contributed to enhancer activity, and both of these sites were requi...

  3. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells continuously require the transcription factor GATA3 after commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Chao; Cui, Kairong; Wilhelm, Christoph; Hu, Gangqing; Mao, Kairui; Belkaid, Yasmine; Zhao, Keji; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is indispensable for the development of all interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα)-expressing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). However, the functional role of low GATA3 expression in committed ILC3s has not been identified. We report that GATA3 regulates homeostasis of ILC3s by controlling IL-7Rα expression. In addition, GATA3 is critical for the development of the NKp46+ ILC3 subset by regulating the balance between the transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. Alhough GA...

  4. Computational prediction of strain-dependent diffusion of transcription factors through the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Michele M; Fedele, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear spreading plays a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. In previous works, we reported evidence of multipotency maintenance for mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on three-dimensional engineered niche substrates, fabricated via two-photon laser polymerization. We correlated maintenance of multipotency to a more roundish morphology of these cells with respect to those cultured on conventional flat substrates. To interpret these findings, here we present a multiphysics model coupling nuclear strains induced by cell adhesion to passive diffusion across the cell nucleus. Fully three-dimensional reconstructions of cultured cells were developed on the basis of confocal images: in particular, the level of nuclear spreading resulted significantly dependent on the cell localization within the niche architecture. We assumed that the cell diffusivity varies as a function of the local volumetric strain. The model predictions indicate that the higher the level of spreading of the cell, the higher the flux across the nucleus of small solutes such as transcription factors. Our results point toward nuclear spreading as a primary mechanism by which the stem cell translates its shape into a fate decision, i.e., by amplifying the diffusive flow of transcriptional activators into the nucleus. PMID:26476736

  5. The B-cell identity factor Pax5 regulates distinct transcriptional programmes in early and late B lymphopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Revilla-i-Domingo, Roger; Bilic, Ivan; Vilagos, Bojan; Tagoh, Hiromi; Ebert, Anja; Tamir, Ido M.; Smeenk, Leonie; Trupke, Johanna; Sommer, Andreas; Jaritz, Markus; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide sequencing approaches reveal that the transcription factor Pax5 controls the identity and function of B cells by regulating the expression of distinct target genes in pro-B and mature B cells.

  6. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription. PMID:24915132

  7. Molecular signatures of cell cycle transcripts in the pathogenesis of Glial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Rabindra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytic brain tumors are among the most lethal and morbid tumors of adults, often occurring during the prime of life. These tumors form an interesting group of cancer to understand the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis. Histological grading of Astrocytoma based on WHO classification does not provide complete information on the proliferation potential and biological behavior of the tumors. It is known that cancer results from the disruption of the orderly regulated cycle of replication and division. In the present study, we made an attempt to identify the cell cycle signatures and their involvement in the clinical aggressiveness of gliomas. Methods The variation in expression of various cell cycle genes was studied in different stages of glial tumor progression (low and high grades, and the results were compared with their corresponding expression levels in the normal brain tissue. Macroarray analysis was used for the purpose. Results Macroarray analysis of 114 cell cycle genes in different grades of glioma indicated differential expression pattern in 34% of the gene transcripts, when compared to the normal tissue. Majority of the transcripts belong to the intracellular kinase networks, cell cycle regulating kinases, transcription factors and transcription activators. Conclusion Based on the observation in the expression pattern in low grade and high grade gliomas, it can be suggested that the upregulation of cell cycle activators are seen as an early event in glioma; however, in malignancy it is not the cell cycle activators alone, which are involved in tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular details of cell cycle regulation and checkpoint abnormalities in cancer could offer an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  8. Data integration for identification of important transcription factors of STAT6-mediated cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargosch, M; Kröger, S; Gralinska, E; Klotz, U; Fang, Z; Chen, W; Leser, U; Selbig, J; Groth, D; Baumgrass, R

    2016-01-01

    Data integration has become a useful strategy for uncovering new insights into complex biological networks. We studied whether this approach can help to delineate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6)-mediated transcriptional network driving T helper (Th) 2 cell fate decisions. To this end, we performed an integrative analysis of publicly available RNA-seq data of Stat6-knockout mouse studies together with STAT6 ChIP-seq data and our own gene expression time series data during Th2 cell differentiation. We focused on transcription factors (TFs), cytokines, and cytokine receptors and delineated 59 positively and 41 negatively STAT6-regulated genes, which were used to construct a transcriptional network around STAT6. The network illustrates that important and well-known TFs for Th2 cell differentiation are positively regulated by STAT6 and act either as activators for Th2 cells (e.g., Gata3, Atf3, Satb1, Nfil3, Maf, and Pparg) or as suppressors for other Th cell subpopulations such as Th1 (e.g., Ar), Th17 (e.g., Etv6), or iTreg (e.g., Stat3 and Hif1a) cells. Moreover, our approach reveals 11 TFs (e.g., Atf5, Creb3l2, and Asb2) with unknown functions in Th cell differentiation. This fact together with the observed enrichment of asthma risk genes among those regulated by STAT6 underlines the potential value of the data integration strategy used here. Thus, our results clearly support the opinion that data integration is a useful tool to delineate complex physiological processes. PMID:27420972

  9. MicroRNA-126–mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2013-01-01

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstra...

  10. Interleukin 2 gene transcription is regulated by Ikaros-induced changes in histone acetylation in anergic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanmay; Duré, Myrianne; Paroder, Monika; Soto-Nieves, Noemí; Puga, Irene; Macián, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    In T cells anergy may be evoked by an unbalanced stimulation of the T-cell receptor in the absence of costimulation. Anergic T cells are unresponsive to new antigen receptor engagement and do not produce interleukin 2. We present evidence that anergizing stimuli induce changes in histone acetylation, which mediates transcriptional repression of interleukin 2 expression. In response to calcium signaling, anergic T cells up-regulate the expression of Ikaros, a zinc finger transcription factor e...

  11. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  12. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  13. Molecular cloning of transcripts induced by UV-radiation in rodent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several inducible DNA repair genes have been well characterized in bacteria. In eukaryotes including mammalian cells, there is increasing evidence that similar events may occur. Recently, the authors have shown that hybridization subtraction can be used to enrich for sequences induced only several fold by a particular cell treatment such as heat shock. Chinese hamster V79 cells were UV-irradiated with 17 Jm/sup -2/ and cDNA was synthesized from the polyadenylated (poly A) RNA. This ''UV'' cDNA was hybridized with a 3 fold excess of polyA RNA from unirradiated cells and the nonhybridizing cDNA was isolated. With this approach, UV-induced sequences were enriched over 20 fold. This enriched cDNA was cloned into a high copy number plasmid and a cDNA library was constructed. By RNA dot blot and northern analysis, 42 clones from this library were found to represent transcripts induced 3 to 25 fold by UV. The most common isolates were found to be metallothionein transcripts by DNA sequencing. The metallothionein transcripts were found to be induced 10 to 25 fold by UV with maximum induction at 4-8 h after 10 Jm/sup -2/. A similar approach was also used with a Chinese hamster ovary line which does not express metallothionein and multiple clones were isolated which represented transcripts induced 3-15 fold by UV. Except for the metallothionein clones, the other Chinese hamster cDNA clones have not been identified, but it is probable that the protein products of at least some of these transcripts play a role in the cellular response to UV damage

  14. A putative transcriptional elongation factor hIws1 is essential for mammalian cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iws1 has been implicated in transcriptional elongation by interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and elongation factor Spt6 in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and association with transcription factor TFIIS in mammalian cells, but its role in controlling cell growth and proliferation remains unknown. Here we report that the human homolog of Iws1, hIws1, physically interacts with protein arginine methyltransferases PRMT5 which methylates elongation factor Spt5 and regulates its interaction with RNA polymerase II. Gene-specific silencing of hIws1 by RNA interference reveals that hIws1 is essential for cell viability. GFP fusion protein expression approaches demonstrate that the hIws1 protein is located in the nucleus, subsequently, two regions harbored within the hIws1 protein are demonstrated to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In addition, mouse homolog of hiws1 is found to express ubiquitously in various tissues

  15. n-Butyrate inhibits Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and cytokine transcription in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cells are well known to contribute to type I allergic conditions but only recently have been brought in association with chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease and ulcerative colitis. Since the bacterial metabolite n-butyrate is considered to counteract intestinal inflammation we investigated the effects of this short chain fatty acid on mast cell activation. Using RNAse protection assays and reporter gene technology we show that n-butyrate downregulates TNF-α transcription. This correlates with an impaired activation of the Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) but not other MAP kinases such as ERK and p38 that are largely unaffected by n-butyrate. As a consequence, we observed a decreased nuclear activity of AP-1 and NF-AT transcription factors. These results indicate that n-butyrate inhibits critical inflammatory mediators in mast cells by relatively selectively targeting the JNK signalling

  16. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L., E-mail: kominsc@jhmi.edu

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co

  17. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co

  18. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  19. Mycobacterium leprae induces NF-κB-dependent transcription repression in human Schwann cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, invades peripheral nerve Schwann cells, resulting in deformities associated with this disease. NF-κB is an important transcription factor involved in the regulation of host immune antimicrobial responses. We aimed in this work to investigate NF-κB signaling pathways in the human ST88-14 Schwannoma cell line infected with M. leprae. Gel shift and supershift assays indicate that two NF-κB dimers, p65/p50 and p50/p50, translocate to the nucleus in Schwann cells treated with lethally irradiated M. leprae. Consistent with p65/p50 and p50/p50 activation, we observed IκB-α degradation and reduction of p105 levels. The nuclear translocation of p50/p50 complex due to M. leprae treatment correlated with repression of NF-κB-driven transcription induced by TNF-α. Moreover, thalidomide inhibited p50 homodimer nuclear translocation induced by M. leprae and consequently rescues Schwann cells from NF-κB-dependent transcriptional repression. Here, we report for the first time that M. leprae induces NF-κB activation in Schwann cells and thalidomide is able to modulate this activation

  20. A regulatory transcriptional loop controls proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Yasugi

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis is initiated by a set of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH transcription factors that specify neural progenitors and allow them to generate neurons in multiple rounds of asymmetric cell division. The Drosophila Daughterless (Da protein and its mammalian counterparts (E12/E47 act as heterodimerization factors for proneural genes and are therefore critically required for neurogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that Da can also be an inhibitor of the neural progenitor fate whose absence leads to stem cell overproliferation and tumor formation. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that Da induces the differentiation factor Prospero (Pros whose asymmetric segregation is essential for differentiation in one of the two daughter cells. Da co-operates with the bHLH transcription factor Asense, whereas the other proneural genes are dispensible. After mitosis, Pros terminates Asense expression in one of the two daughter cells. In da mutants, pros is not expressed, leading to the formation of lethal transplantable brain tumors. Our results define a transcriptional feedback loop that regulates the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in Drosophila optic lobe neuroblasts. They indicate that initiation of a neural differentiation program in stem cells is essential to prevent tumorigenesis.

  1. Diesel exhaust particulate extracts inhibit transcription of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and cell viability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Klinge, Carolyn M. [University of Louisville School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we tested the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particulate extracts (DEPEs), prepared from a truck run at different speeds and engine loads, would inhibit genomic estrogen receptor activation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, we examined how DEPEs affect NRF-1-regulated TFAM expression and, in turn, Tfam-regulated mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI, MTCO1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI) expression as well as cell proliferation and viability. We report that 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), and raloxifene increased NRF-1 transcription in HUVECs in an ER-dependent manner. DEPEs inhibited NRF-1 transcription, and this suppression was not ablated by concomitant treatment with E{sub 2}, 4-OHT, or raloxifene, indicating that the effect was not due to inhibition of ER activity. While E{sub 2} increased HUVEC proliferation and viability, DEPEs inhibited viability but not proliferation. Resveratrol increased NRF-1 transcription in an ER-dependent manner in HUVECs, and ablated DEPE inhibition of basal NRF-1 expression. Given that NRF-1 is a key nuclear transcription factor regulating genes involved in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, these data suggest that DEPEs may adversely affect mitochondrial function leading to endothelial dysfunction and resveratrol may block these effects. (orig.)

  2. Derivation and transcriptional profiling analysis of pluripotent stem cell lines from rat blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunliang Li; Ying Yang; Junjie Gu; Yu Ma; Ying Jin

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst-stage embryos. Their unique properties of self-renewal and pluripotency make them an attractive tool for basic research and a potential cell resource for therapy. ES cells of mouse and human have been successfully generated and applied in a wide range of research. However, no genuine ES cell lines have been obtained from rat to date. In this study, we identified pluripotent cells in early rat embryos using specific antibodies against markers of pluripotent stem cells. Subsequently, by modifying the culture medium for rat blastocysts, we derived pluripotent rat ES-llke cell lines, which expressed pluripotency markers and formed embryoid bodies (EBs) in vitro. Importantly, these rat ES-like cells were able to produce teratomas. Both EBs and teratomas contained tissues from all three embryonic germ layers, in addition, from the rat ES-like cells, we derived a rat primitive endoderm (PrE) cell line. Furthermore, we conducted transcriptional profiling of the rat ES-like cells and identified the unique molecular signature of the rat pluripotent stem cells. Our analysis demonstrates that multiple signaling pathways, including the BMP, Activin and roTOR pathways, may be involved in keeping the rat ES-like cells in an undifferentiated state. The cell lines and information obtained in this study will accelerate our understanding of the molecular regulation underlying pluripotency and guide us in the appropriate manipulation of ES cells from a particular species.

  3. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Qing

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we investigated the use of unsigned and signed network analysis to identify pluripotency and differentiation related genes. Results We show that signed networks provide a better systems level understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of ES cells than unsigned networks, using two independent murine ES cell expression data sets. Specifically, using signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA, we found a pluripotency module and a differentiation module, which are not identified in unsigned networks. We confirmed the importance of these modules by incorporating genome-wide TF binding data for key ES cell regulators. Interestingly, we find that the pluripotency module is enriched with genes related to DNA damage repair and mitochondrial function in addition to transcriptional regulation. Using a connectivity measure of module membership, we not only identify known regulators of ES cells but also show that Mrpl15, Msh6, Nrf1, Nup133, Ppif, Rbpj, Sh3gl2, and Zfp39, among other genes, have important roles in maintaining ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We also report highly significant relationships between module membership and epigenetic modifications (histone modifications and promoter CpG methylation status, which are known to play a role in controlling gene expression during ES cell self-renewal and differentiation. Conclusion Our systems biologic re-analysis of gene expression, transcription factor binding, epigenetic and gene ontology data provides a novel integrative view of ES cell biology.

  4. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  5. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  6. Transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is required for the hormone-sensing cell lineage in mammary epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Kunasegaran

    Full Text Available The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production. Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells.

  7. A multi-gene transcriptional profiling approach to the discovery of cell signature markers

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Youichiro; Li, Dan; Merley, Anne; Zukauskas, Andrew; Aird, William C.; Dvorak, Harold F.; Shih, Shou-Ching

    2010-01-01

    A profile of transcript abundances from multiple genes constitutes a molecular signature if the expression pattern is unique to one cell type. Here we measure mRNA copy numbers per cell by normalizing per million copies of 18S rRNA and identify 6 genes (TIE1, KDR, CDH5, TIE2, EFNA1 and MYO5C) out of 79 genes tested as excellent molecular signature markers for endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. The selected genes are uniformly expressed in ECs of 4 different origins but weakly or not expressed ...

  8. Notch-1 activates estrogen receptor-α-dependent transcription via IKKα in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L; Rizzo, P; Osipo, C; Pannuti, A; Wyatt, D; Cheung, LW-K; Sonenshein, G; Osborne, BA; Miele, L

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and are treated with anti-estrogens. Resistance to these agents is a major cause of mortality. We have shown that estrogen inhibits Notch, whereas anti-estrogens or estrogen withdrawal activate Notch signaling. Combined inhibition of Notch and estrogen signaling has synergistic effects in ERα-positive breast cancer models. However, the mechanisms whereby Notch-1 promotes the growth of ERα-positive breast cancer cells are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Notch-1 increases the transcription of ERα-responsive genes in the presence or absence of estrogen via a novel chromatin crosstalk mechanism. Our data support a model in which Notch-1 can activate the transcription of ERα-target genes via IKKα-dependent cooperative chromatin recruitment of Notch–CSL–MAML1 transcriptional complexes (NTC) and ERα, which promotes the recruitment of p300. CSL binding elements frequently occur in close proximity to estrogen-responsive elements (EREs) in the human and mouse genomes. Our observations suggest that a hitherto unknown Notch-1/ERα chromatin crosstalk mediates Notch signaling effects in ERα-positive breast cancer cells and contributes to regulate the transcriptional functions of ERα itself. PMID:19838210

  9. UV-B induced transcript accumulation of DAHP synthase in suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase (EC 4.1.2.15) catalyzes the first committed step in the shikimate pathway of tryptophan synthesis, an important precursor for the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). A full-length cDNA encoding nuclear coded chloroplast-specific DAHP synthase transcript was isolated from a Catharanthus roseus cDNA library. This had high sequence similarity with other members of plant DAHP synthase family. This transcript accumulated in suspension cultured C. roseus cells on ultraviolet (UV-B) irradiation. Pretreatment of C.roseus cells with variety of agents such as suramin, N-acetyl cysteine, and inhibitors of calcium fluxes and protein kinases and MAP kinase prevented this effect of UV-B irriadiation. These data further show that the essential components of the signaling pathway involved in accumulation DAHP synthase transcript in C. roseus cells include suramin-sensitive cell surface receptor, staurosporine-sensitive protein kinase and MAP kinase. PMID:20704760

  10. Metabolism and expression of RNA polymerase II transcripts in Influenza virus-infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katze, M.G.; Krug, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Influenza virus infection has adverse effects on the metabolism of two representative RNA polymerase II transcripts in chicken embryo fibroblasts, those coding for BETA-actin and for avian leukosis virus (ALV) proteins. Proviral ALV DNA was integrated into host cell DNA by prior infection with ALV. By S1 endonuclease assay, it was confirmed that nuclear ALV transcripts disappeared very early after infection, already decreasing ca. 80% by 1 h postinfection. A plausible explanation for this nuclear degradation is that the viral cap-dependent endonuclease in the nucleas cleaves the 5' ends of new polymerase II transcripts, rendering the resulting decapped RNAs susceptible to hydrolysis by cellular nucleases. Similar stability of cytoplasmic host cell mRNAs was observed in infected HeLa cells, in which the levels of actin mRNA and two HeLa cell mRNAs (pHe 7 and pHe 28) remained at undiminished levels for 3 h of infection and decreased only slightly by 4.5 h postinfection. The cytoplamic actin and pHe 7 mRNAs isolated from infected HeLa cells were shown to be translated in reticulocyte extracts in biro, indicating that host mRNAs were not inactivated by a virus-induced modification. Despite the continued presence of high levels of functional host cell mRNAs, host cell protein synthesis was effectively shut off by about 3 h postinfection in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and HeLa cells. These results are consistent with the establishment of an influenza virus-specific translational system that selectively translates viral and not host mRNAs.

  11. Sequence analysis and functional study of the Han Nationality glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor transcript

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe-yu; HUANG Ai-jun; LU Chang-lin; WU Xiang-fu; HE Cheng

    2001-01-01

    To study the sequence and function of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) transcript in subjects of Han nationality. Methods: The Han nationality GDNF transcript was amplified by RT-PCR and expressed by baculovirus expression system. Biological activity of the expressed product was measured by the primary culture of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Results: There only existed the shorter GDNF transcript of 555 bp in the Han nationality. The secretory expression product of the shorter transcript in insect cells promoted the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion: It is found that there is a 78 bp deletion in the Han nationality GDNF transcript compared with the reported 633 bp GDNF transcript. The 78 bp deletion does not affect the secretory expression and biological activity of GDNF mature protein.

  12. A multi-gene transcriptional profiling approach to the discovery of cell signature markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Youichiro; Li, Dan; Merley, Anne; Zukauskas, Andrew; Aird, William C; Dvorak, Harold F; Shih, Shou-Ching

    2011-01-01

    A profile of transcript abundances from multiple genes constitutes a molecular signature if the expression pattern is unique to one cell type. Here we measure mRNA copy numbers per cell by normalizing per million copies of 18S rRNA and identify 6 genes (TIE1, KDR, CDH5, TIE2, EFNA1 and MYO5C) out of 79 genes tested as excellent molecular signature markers for endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. The selected genes are uniformly expressed in ECs of 4 different origins but weakly or not expressed in 4 non-EC cell lines. A multi-gene transcriptional profile of these 6 genes clearly distinguishes ECs from non-ECs in vitro. We conclude that (i) a profile of mRNA copy numbers per cell from a well-chosen multi-gene panel can act as a sensitive and accurate cell type signature marker, and (ii) the method described here can be applied to in vivo cell fingerprinting and molecular diagnosis. PMID:20972619

  13. Sequence and chromatin determinants of cell-type-specific transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Aaron; Agius, Phaedra; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory programs in distinct cell types are maintained in large part through the cell-type-specific binding of transcription factors (TFs). The determinants of TF binding include direct DNA sequence preferences, DNA sequence preferences of cofactors, and the local cell-dependent chromatin context. To explore the contribution of DNA sequence signal, histone modifications, and DNase accessibility to cell-type-specific binding, we analyzed 286 ChIP-seq experiments performed by the ENCODE Consortium. This analysis included experiments for 67 transcriptional regulators, 15 of which were profiled in both the GM12878 (lymphoblastoid) and K562 (erythroleukemic) human hematopoietic cell lines. To model TF-bound regions, we trained support vector machines (SVMs) that use flexible k-mer patterns to capture DNA sequence signals more accurately than traditional motif approaches. In addition, we trained SVM spatial chromatin signatures to model local histone modifications and DNase accessibility, obtaining significantly more accurate TF occupancy predictions than simpler approaches. Consistent with previous studies, we find that DNase accessibility can explain cell-line-specific binding for many factors. However, we also find that of the 10 factors with prominent cell-type-specific binding patterns, four display distinct cell-type-specific DNA sequence preferences according to our models. Moreover, for two factors we identify cell-specific binding sites that are accessible in both cell types but bound only in one. For these sites, cell-type-specific sequence models, rather than DNase accessibility, are better able to explain differential binding. Our results suggest that using a single motif for each TF and filtering for chromatin accessible loci is not always sufficient to accurately account for cell-type-specific binding profiles. PMID:22955984

  14. Transcriptional expression profile of cultured human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Marlen; Siegert, Antje; Eckert, Klaus; Gerlach, Jörg; Haider, Wolfram; Fichtner, Iduna

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo and to investigate the influence of in vitro partial differentiation on in vivo teratoma formation in immunodeficient mice. Standardized methods are needed for long-term cultivation of undifferentiated stem cells and the multilineage cells that spontaneously differentiate from them. Accordingly, SA002 human embryonic stem cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells, on irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts, or were cultured feeder-free using matrigel. Expression of marker protein transcripts was analyzed in undifferentiated and differentiated stem cells using real-time PCR, and both types of stem cells were transplanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice to test for teratoma formation. Teratoma histology and expression profiles were subsequently characterized. Cells cultured using different conditions and morphologically undifferentiated cells had comparable marker expression profiles, showing high expression levels of markers for pluripotency and low-to-moderate expression levels of germ layer markers. Cells showing spontaneous differentiation that were cultured in feeder-free conditions in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor demonstrated slight upregulation of sex determining region Y-box 17, connexin 32, and albumin expression at early time points, as well as expression of octamer-binding transcription factor 4, proteoglycan epitopes on podocalyxin (Trafalgar), and alkaline phosphatase. At later time points, expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-3-beta, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4-alpha and alpha fetoprotein was upregulated, whereas beta-3-tubulin, chemokine receptor, nestin, sex-determining region Y-box 17, and connexin 32 were downregulated. Expression of pluripotency markers remained high, and hematopoetic markers were not expressed. SA002 cells that showed

  15. The ETS Transcription Factor ESE-1 Transforms MCF-12A Human Mammary Epithelial Cells via a Novel Cytoplasmic Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Prescott, Jason D.; Koto, Karen S. N.; Singh, Meenakshi; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    Several different transcription factors, including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and ETS family members, have been implicated in human breast cancer, indicating that transcription factor-induced alterations in gene expression underlie mammary cell transformation. ESE-1 is an epithelium-specific ETS transcription factor that contains two distinguishing domains, a serine- and aspartic acid-rich (SAR) domain and an AT hook domain. ESE-1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer ...

  16. Reliability of transcriptional cycles and the yeast cell-cycle oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Sevim

    Full Text Available A recently published transcriptional oscillator associated with the yeast cell cycle provides clues and raises questions about the mechanisms underlying autonomous cyclic processes in cells. Unlike other biological and synthetic oscillatory networks in the literature, this one does not seem to rely on a constitutive signal or positive auto-regulation, but rather to operate through stable transmission of a pulse on a slow positive feedback loop that determines its period. We construct a continuous-time Boolean model of this network, which permits the modeling of noise through small fluctuations in the timing of events, and show that it can sustain stable oscillations. Analysis of simpler network models shows how a few building blocks can be arranged to provide stability against fluctuations. Our findings suggest that the transcriptional oscillator in yeast belongs to a new class of biological oscillators.

  17. Reliability of transcriptional cycles and the yeast cell-cycle oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2010-01-01

    A recently published transcriptional oscillator associated with the yeast cell cycle provides clues and raises questions about the mechanisms underlying autonomous cyclic processes in cells. Unlike other biological and synthetic oscillatory networks in the literature, this one does not seem to rely on a constitutive signal or positive auto-regulation, but rather to operate through stable transmission of a pulse on a slow positive feedback loop that determines its period. We construct a continuous-time Boolean model of this network, which permits the modeling of noise through small fluctuations in the timing of events, and show that it can sustain stable oscillations. Analysis of simpler network models shows how a few building blocks can be arranged to provide stability against fluctuations. Our findings suggest that the transcriptional oscillator in yeast belongs to a new class of biological oscillators. PMID:20628620

  18. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  19. Mechanisms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (mmp-2 transcriptional repression by progesterone in jar choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalev Eliezer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the MMP-2 promoter lacks a canonical progesterone response element (PRE, the hormone inhibits MMP-2 expression and is part of treatment protocols in gynecological invasive pathologies, including endometriosis and endometrial hyperplasia. This study aimed to explore the mechanism by which progesterone inhibits MMP-2 expression. Methods The effect of progesterone on MMP-2 expression in the JAR human choriocarcinoma cell line was analyzed by gelatin zymography. MMP-2 transcript expression was studied using Northern blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Rat promoter deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immuno-precipitation assays were performed in order to locate the DNA binding site and the transcription factors involved in MMP-2 regulation. Results Progesterone significantly decreased secretion of pro-MMP-2 and MMP-2 transcript expression level in a dose-dependent manner. Progesterone (1 microM significantly decreased both human and rat MMP-2 promoter activity (80.1% +/- 0.3 and 81.3% +/- 0.23, respectively. Progesterone acts through the SP1 family transcription factors-binding site, located between -1433 and -1342 bp region from the transcriptional start site of the rat MMP-2 promoter, which are present in the orthologous human MMP-2 promoter. Progesterone receptor (PR, SP2, SP3 and SP4 proteins are constitutively bound to this consensus sequence. Conclusion Progesterone reducesPR and SP4 binding to the MMP-2 promoter, thereby suppressing transcription. Progesterone also promotes SP4 degradation. These novel mechanisms of MMP-2 regulation by progesterone provide the biological rationale for the use of progesterone in clinical settings associated with increased MMP-2 expression.

  20. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  1. Tracking Cell Fate with Synthetic Memory and Pulse Detecting Transcriptional Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Inniss, Mara Christine

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems to meet new challenges and teach us more about natural biological systems. These pursuits range from the building of relatively simple transcriptional circuits, to engineering the metabolism of an organism, to reconstructing entire genomes. While we are still emerging from the foundational stages of this new field, we are already using engineered cells to discover underlying biological mechanisms, develop new therapeutics, and produce natu...

  2. Transcriptional programs activated by exposure of human prostate cancer cells to androgen

    OpenAIRE

    DePrimo, Samuel E; Diehn, Maximilian; Nelson, Joel B.; Reiter, Robert E.; Matese, John; Fero, Mike; Tibshirani, Robert; Brown, Patrick O; James D Brooks

    2002-01-01

    Background Androgens are required for both normal prostate development and prostate carcinogenesis. We used DNA microarrays, representing approximately 18,000 genes, to examine the temporal program of gene expression following treatment of the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP with a synthetic androgen. Results We observed statistically significant changes in levels of transcripts of more than 500 genes. Many of these genes were previously reported androgen targets, but most were not prev...

  3. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation o...

  4. Array Analysis of Simian Varicella Virus Gene Transcription in Productively Infected Cells in Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Deitch, Steven B.; Gilden, Donald H.; Wellish, Mary; Smith, John; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus of monkeys that is a model for varicella pathogenesis and latency. Like human varicella-zoster virus (VZV), SVV causes chicken pox (varicella), becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis, and reactivates to produce shingles (zoster). We developed macroarrays to determine the extent of viral transcription from all 70 predicted SVV open reading frames (ORFs) in infected cells in tissue culture. Cloned fragments (200 to 400 ...

  5. Cell signaling and transcription factor genes expressed during whole body regeneration in a colonial chordate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkevich Baruch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The restoration of adults from fragments of blood vessels in botryllid ascidians (termed whole body regeneration [WBR] represents an inimitable event in the chordates, which is poorly understood on the mechanistic level. Results To elucidate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, a subtracted EST library for early WBR stages was previously assembled, revealing 76 putative genes belonging to major signaling pathways, including Notch/Delta, JAK/STAT, protein kinases, nuclear receptors, Ras oncogene family members, G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling. RT-PCR on selected transcripts documented specific up-regulation in only regenerating fragments, pointing to a broad activation of these signaling pathways at onset of WBR. The followed-up expression pattern of seven representative transcripts from JAK/STAT signaling (Bl-STAT, the Ras oncogene family (Bl-Rap1A, Bl-Rab-33, the protein kinase family (Bl-Mnk, Bl-Cnot, Bl-Slit and Bl-Bax inhibitor, revealed systemic and site specific activations during WBR in a sub-population of circulatory cells. Conclusion WBR in the non-vertebrate chordate Botrylloides leachi is a multifaceted phenomenon, presided by a complex array of cell signaling and transcription factors. Above results, provide a first insight into the whole genome molecular machinery of this unique regeneration process, and reveal the broad participation of cell signaling and transcription factors in the process. While regeneration involves the participation of specific cell populations, WBR signals are systemically expressed at the organism level.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula meristematic root cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfe Barry G; Weiller Georg F; Goffard Nicolas; Holmes Peta; Imin Nijat

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The root apical meristem of crop and model legume Medicago truncatula is a significantly different stem cell system to that of the widely studied model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we used the Affymetrix Medicago GeneChip® to compare the transcriptomes of meristem and non-meristematic root to identify root meristem specific candidate genes. Results Using mRNA from root meristem and non-meristem we were able to identify 324 and 363 transcripts different...

  7. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong Yoon; Song, Joon Jin; Wooming, Ann; Li, Xianyao; Zhou, Huaijun; Bottje, Walter G; Kong, Byung-Whi

    2010-01-01

    Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, an...

  8. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xianyao; Wooming Ann; Song Joon; Lee Jeong; Zhou Huaijun; Bottje Walter G; Kong Byung-Whi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1,...

  9. Transcription impairment and cell migration defects in elongator-depleted cells: Implication for familial dysautonomia

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Pierre; Hawkes, Nicola; Cornez, Isabelle; Creppe, Catherine; Lambert, Charles A.; Rogister, Bernard; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Merville, Marie-Paule; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Bours, Vincent; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.; Chariot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in IKBKAP, encoding a subunit of Elongator, cause familial dysautonomia (FD), a severe neuro-developmental disease with complex clinical characteristics. Elongator was previously linked not only with transcriptional elongation and histone acetylation but also with other cellular processes. Here, we used RNA interference (RNAi) and fibroblasts from FD patients to identify Elongator target genes and study the role of Elongator in transcription. Strikingly, whereas Elongator is recruit...

  10. Transcription factor KLF2 regulates homeostatic NK cell proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabacal, Whitney; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Hoek, Kristen L; Cendron, Delphine; Guo, Yin; Maseda, Damian; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-05-10

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and lyse virally infected or transformed cells. This latter property is being pursued in clinics to treat leukemia with the hope that further breakthroughs in NK cell biology can extend treatments to other cancers. At issue is the ability to expand transferred NK cells and prolong their functionality within the context of a tumor. In terms of NK cell expansion and survival, we now report that Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a key transcription factor that underpins both of these events. Excision of Klf2 using gene-targeted mouse models promotes spontaneous proliferation of immature NK cells in peripheral tissues, a phenotype that is replicated under ex vivo conditions. Moreover, KLF2 imprints a homeostatic migration pattern on mature NK cells that allows these cells to access IL-15-rich microenvironments. KLF2 accomplishes this feat within the mature NK cell lineage via regulation of a subset of homing receptors that respond to homeostatic ligands while leaving constitutively expressed receptors that recognize inflammatory cytokines unperturbed. Under steady-state conditions, KLF2-deficient NK cells alter their expression of homeostatic homing receptors and subsequently undergo apoptosis due to IL-15 starvation. This novel mechanism has implications regarding NK cell contraction following the termination of immune responses including the possibility that retention of an IL-15 transpresenting support system is key to extending NK cell activity in a tumor environment. PMID:27114551

  11. Live Cell Imaging of the Cancer-related Transcription Factor RUNX2 during Mitotic Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockwinse, Shirwin M.; Kota, Krishna P.; Quaresma, Alexandre J.C.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear matrix bound transcription factor RUNX2 is a lineage-specific developmental regulator that is linked to cancer. We have previously shown that RUNX2 controls transcription of both RNA polymerase II genes and RNA polymerase I dependent ribosomal RNA genes. RUNX2 is epigenetically retained through mitosis on both classes of target genes in condensed chromosomes. We have used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the relative binding kinetics of EGFP-RUNX2 at transcription sites in the nucleus and nucleoli during interphase, as well as on mitotic chromosomes. RUNX2 becomes more strongly bound as cells go from interphase through prophase, with a doubling of the most tightly bound “immobile fraction”. RUNX2 exchange then becomes much more facile during metaphase to telophase. During interphase the less tightly bound pool of RUNX2 exchanges more slowly at nucleoli than at subnuclear foci, and the non-exchanging immobile fraction is greater in nucleoli. These results are consistent with a model in which the molecular mechanism of RUNX2 binding is different at protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes. The binding interactions of RUNX2 change as cells go through mitosis, with binding affinity increasing as chromosomes condense and then decreasing through subsequent mitotic phases. The increased residence of RUNX2 at mitotic chromosomes may reflect its epigenetic function in “bookmarking” of target genes in cancer cells. PMID:20945391

  12. PLK1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Cells Cooperates with Estrogen Receptor-Dependent Gene Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wierer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is a key regulator of cell division and is overexpressed in many types of human cancers. Compared to its well-characterized role in mitosis, little is known about PLK1 functions in interphase. Here, we report that PLK1 mediates estrogen receptor (ER-regulated gene transcription in human breast cancer cells. PLK1 interacts with ER and is recruited to ER cis-elements on chromatin. PLK1-coactivated genes included classical ER target genes such as Ps2, Wisp2, and Serpina3 and were enriched in developmental and tumor-suppressive functions. Performing large-scale phosphoproteomics of estradiol-treated MCF7 cells in the presence or absence of the specific PLK1 inhibitor BI2536, we identified several PLK1 end targets involved in transcription, including the histone H3K4 trimethylase MLL2, the function of which on ER target genes was impaired by PLK1 inhibition. Our results propose a mechanism for the tumor-suppressive role of PLK1 in mammals as an interphase transcriptional regulator.

  13. Transcription Activity of Ectogenic Human Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells A549

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Weining; FANG Huijuan; XU Yongjian; XIONG Shendao; CAO Yong; SONG Qingfeng; ZENG Daxiong; ZHANG Huilan

    2006-01-01

    The transcription activity of ectogenic human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter in lung adenocarcinoma cells A549 was investigated for the further gene-targeting therapy. The reporter gene green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by CEA promoter and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were relatively constructed and named plasmid pCEA-EGFP and pCMV-GFP respectively. The intensity of fluorescence was detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry analysis after the pCEA-GFP and pSNAV-GFP plasmids were transfected into A549 cells through liposome respectively. The results showed (4.08±0.63) % of the A549 cells transfected with pCEA-AFP plasmid expressed, significantly lower than that of the A549 cells transfected with pCMV-GFP [(43.27±3.54) %]. It was suggested that ectogenic human CEA promoter in lung adenocarcinoma cells A549 was weakly expressed. The distinct specificity of CEA promoter in CEA high expression cells was regarded as a tool in selective gene therapy, but the transcription activity of ectogenic human CEA promoter was needed to increase in the future.

  14. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid transcription by ultraviolet irradiation in mammalian cells: determination of the transcriptional linkage of the 18S and 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) transcription in mammalian cells by ultraviolet irradiation has been studied. The reduction in the rates and the amounts of total ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis and of 18S, 28S, and 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, in tissue cultured mouse L cells, were examined as functions of ultraviolet dose and time after ultraviolet irradiation. Total RNA synthesis in the ultraviolet irradiated L cell was found to decrease as a function of ultraviolet dose. The rates of synthesis for the 18S and 28S rRNAs and the 45S precursor RNA decreased exponentially with ultraviolet dose; the respective D37 values were 310 erg/mm2, 130 erg/mm2, and 90 erg/mm2. Ultraviolet inactivation kinetics of rRNA synthesis in HeLa cells indicated that, as in L cells, each 45S rRNA transcriptional unit has its own promotor, and that the 18S rRNA cistron is promotor proximal and the 28S rRNA cistron is promotor distal. All of the above findings support the hypothesis that irradiation of mammalian cells with ultraviolet light causes the formation of lesions on the DNA templates which result in premature termination of transcription. (U.S.)

  15. FOXP3 Inhibits HIV-1 Infection of CD4 T-cells via Inhibition of LTR Transcriptional Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Selliah, Nithianandan; Zhang, Mingce; White, Sara; Zoltick, Philip; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Finkel, Terri H.; Cron, Randy Q

    2008-01-01

    FOXP3 is a necessary transcription factor for the development and function of CD4+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs). The role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection remains unclear. Here, we show expression of FOXP3 in primary human CD4 T-cells significantly inhibits HIV-1 infection. Since FOXP3 inhibits NFAT activity, and NFAT proteins contribute to HIV-1 transcription, we explore a transcriptional repressive function of HIV-1 LTR by FOXP3. Over-expression of FOXP3 in primary CD4 T-cells inhibits wild-type H...

  16. Cell-type–specific transcriptional regulation of PIGM underpins the divergent hematologic phenotype in inherited GPl deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Joana R.; Caputo, Valentina S.; Makarona, Kalliopi; Layton, D. Mark; Roberts, Irene A. G.; Almeida, Antonio M.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    B cells but not red cells are GPI deficient in PIGM-associated IGD, caused by a core promoter mutation that abrogates Sp1 binding.In red but not B cells, PIGM transcription is independent of Sp1 binding to the core promoter, hence GPI expression in red cells is near normal.

  17. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Luis A; Farfán, Nancy M; Castellón, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second‑leading cause of cancer‑associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E‑cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki‑67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1‑silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing

  18. Decreased chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II expression in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Krista A; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S; Cochrum, Renate K; Watts, Mary Beth; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2006-10-15

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is successfully used for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. However, many patients that are initially TAM responsive develop tumors that are antiestrogen/TAM resistant (TAM-R). The mechanism behind TAM resistance in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive tumors is not understood. The orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF)-I interacts directly with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)- and estradiol (E(2))-occupied ERalpha, corepressors NCoR and SMRT, and inhibit E(2)-induced gene transcription in breast cancer cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that reduced COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII correlate with TAM resistance. We report for the first time that COUP-TFII, but not COUP-TFI, is reduced in three antiestrogen/TAM-R cell lines derived from TAM-sensitive (TAM-S) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in MDA-MB-231 cells compared with MCF-7. ERalpha and ERbeta protein expression was not different between TAM-S and TAM-R cells, but progesterone receptor (PR) was decreased in TAM-R cells. Further, E(2) increased COUP-TFII transcription in MCF-7, but not TAM-R, cells. Importantly, reexpression of COUP-TFII in TAM-S cells to levels comparable to those in MCF-7 was shown to increase 4-OHT-mediated growth inhibition and increased apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of COUP-TFII in TAM-S MCF-7 cells blocked growth inhibitory activity and increased 4-OHT agonist activity. 4-OHT increased COUP-TFII-ERalpha interaction approximately 2-fold in MCF-7 cells. COUP-TFII expression in TAM-R cells also inhibited 4-OHT-induced endogenous PR and pS2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that reduced COUP-TFII expression correlates with acquired TAM resistance in human breast cancer cell lines and that COUP-TFII plays a role in regulating the growth inhibitory activity of TAM in breast cancer cells. PMID:17047084

  19. Duel of the fates: the role of transcriptional circuits and noise in CD4+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, Daniel; Deonarine, Andrew; Babu, M Madan; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2012-06-01

    CD4+ T cells play key roles in orchestrating adaptive immune responses, and are a popular model for mammalian cell differentiation. While immune regulation would seem to require exactly adjusted mRNA and protein expression levels of key factors, there is little evidence that this is strictly the case. Stochastic gene expression and plasticity of cell types contrast the apparent need for precision. Recent work has provided insight into the magnitude of molecular noise, as well as the relationship between noise, transcriptional circuits and epigenetic modifications in a variety of cell types. These processes and their interplay will also govern gene expression patterns in the different CD4+ cell types, and the determination of their cellular fates. PMID:22498241

  20. Inference of Transcriptional Network for Pluripotency in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In embryonic stem cells, various transcription factors (TFs) maintain pluripotency. To gain insights into the regulatory system controlling pluripotency, I inferred the regulatory relationships between the TFs expressed in ES cells. In this study, I applied a method based on structural equation modeling (SEM), combined with factor analysis, to 649 expression profiles of 19 TF genes measured in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs). The factor analysis identified 19 TF genes that were regulated by several unmeasured factors. Since the known cell reprogramming TF genes (Pou5f1, Sox2 and Nanog) are regulated by different factors, each estimated factor is considered to be an input for signal transduction to control pluripotency in mouse ESCs. In the inferred network model, TF proteins were also arranged as unmeasured factors that control other TFs. The interpretation of the inferred network model revealed the regulatory mechanism for controlling pluripotency in ES cells

  1. Neuroblastoma and pre-B lymphoma cells share expression of key transcription factors but display tissue restricted target gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcription factors are frequently involved in the process of cellular transformation, and many malignancies are characterized by a distinct genetic event affecting a specific transcription factor. This probably reflects a tissue specific ability of transcription factors to contribute to the generation of cancer but very little is known about the precise mechanisms that governs these restricted effects. To investigate this selectivity in target gene activation we compared the overall gene expression patterns by micro-array analysis and expression of target genes for the transcription factor EBF in lymphoma and neuroblastoma cells by RT-PCR. The presence of transcription factors in the different model cell lines was further investigated by EMSA analysis. In pre-B cells mb-1 and CD19 are regulate by EBF-1 in collaboration with Pax-5 and E-proteins. We here show that neuroblastoma cells express these three, for B cell development crucial transcription factors, but nevertheless fail to express detectable levels of their known target genes. Expression of mb-1 could, however, be induced in neuroblastoma cells after disruption of the chromatin structure by treatment with 5-azacytidine and Trichostatin A. These data suggest that transcription factors are able to selectively activate target genes in different tissues and that chromatin structure plays a key role in the regulation of this activity

  2. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Clevers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  3. Evidence for a new form of retroviral env transcript in leukemic and normal mouse lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine leukemia virus-related RNA species were examined in a set of radiation-induced T-cell leukemias from BALB/c mice. No evidence was found for linkage of viral long terminal repeat-derived (U5) sequences to information of host origin. A novel class of 2-kilobase (kb) env-related transcripts, about 1kb shorter than normal viral env messenger, was found in all the leukemias. All of the 2-kb transcripts contained sequences homologous to the xenotropic virus-related env sequences in the Friend spleen focus-forming virus, representing the N-terminal portion of gp70. In two of the leukemias, these transcripts were found to contain both ecotropic p15E and U3 sequences in addition to the xenotropic gp70-related sequence. These two leukemias, but not others in which ecotropic sequences were absent from the 2-kb RNA, harbored several copies of a specific class of env recombinant proviruses. These proviruses possessed full-size env genes and were submethylated, as shown by SmaI and XmaI digests of proviral DNA. Low levels of 2-kb RNA were found in normal thymocytes from strains BALB/c, AKR, and 129 but not from congenic 129 GIX- mice. It is possible that the 2-kb RNA may originate by a novel splicing step that removes portions of the gp70 and p15E sequences from full-length env transcripts

  4. Pro-B-cell-specific transcription and proapoptotic function of protein kinase Ceta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, T A; Muljo, S A; Zhang, J; Hardwick, J M; Schlissel, M S

    1999-08-01

    Using a subtractive cloning scheme on cDNA prepared from primary pro-B and pre-B cells, we identified several genes whose products regulate apoptosis. We further characterized one of these genes, encoding protein kinase Ceta (PKCeta). PKCeta transcripts were readily detected in pro-B cells but were absent in pre-B cells. Although both a full-length and a truncated form of PKCeta were detectable in bone marrow pro-B cells, transition to the pre-B-cell stage was associated with increased relative levels of truncated PKCeta. We found that PKCeta is proteolyzed in apoptotic lymphocytes, generating a kinase-active fragment identical to the truncated form which is capable of inducing apoptosis when expressed in a pro-B cell line. Caspase-3 can generate an identical PKCeta cleavage product in vitro, and caspase inhibitors prevent the generation of this product during apoptosis in transfected cell lines. Inducible overexpression of either the full-length or truncated form of PKCeta results in cell cycle arrest at the G(1)/S transition. These results suggest that the expression and proteolytic activation of PKCeta play an important role in the regulation of cell division and cell death during early B-cell development. PMID:10409750

  5. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, Kyren A. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Environmental and Biotechnology Centre, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Zhao, Zhe; Knower, Kevin C. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); To, Sarah Q. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Chand, Ashwini L. [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Clyne, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.clyne@princehenrys.org [Cancer Drug Discovery Laboratory, Prince Henry’s Institute of Medical Research, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E{sub 2}), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E{sub 2}, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E{sub 2} treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer.

  6. Oestradiol reduces Liver Receptor Homolog-1 mRNA transcript stability in breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •LRH-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that regulates tumor proliferation. •In breast cancer, high mRNA expression is associated with ER+ status. •In ER−ve cells, despite very low mRNA, we found abundant LRH-1 protein. •Our data show distinctly different LRH-1 protein isoforms in ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. •This is due to differences in LRH-1 mRNA and protein stability rates. -- Abstract: The expression of orphan nuclear receptor Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (LRH-1) is elevated in breast cancer and promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. LRH-1 expression is regulated by oestrogen (E2), with LRH-1 mRNA transcript levels higher in oestrogen receptor α (ERα) positive (ER+) breast cancer cells compared to ER− cells. However, the presence of LRH-1 protein in ER− cells suggests discordance between mRNA transcript levels and protein expression. To understand this, we investigated the impact of mRNA and protein stability in determining LRH-1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. LRH-1 transcript levels were significantly higher in ER+ versus ER− breast cancer cells lines; however LRH-1 protein was expressed at similar levels. We found LRH-1 mRNA and protein was more stable in ER− compared to ER+ cell lines. The tumor-specific LRH-1 variant isoform, LRH-1v4, which is highly responsive to E2, showed increased mRNA stability in ER− versus ER+ cells. In addition, in MCF-7 and T47-D cell lines, LRH-1 total mRNA stability was reduced with E2 treatment, this effect mediated by ERα. Our data demonstrates that in ER− cells, increased mRNA and protein stability contribute to the abundant protein expression levels. Expression and immunolocalisation of LRH-1 in ER− cells as well as ER− tumors suggests a possible role in the development of ER− tumors. The modulation of LRH-1 bioactivity may therefore be beneficial as a treatment option in both ER− and ER+ breast cancer

  7. Transcriptional regulation is a major controller of cell cycle transition dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Cardelli, Luca;

    2012-01-01

    in various organisms showed the importance of positive feedbacks in other transitions as well. Here we investigate if a universal control system with transcriptional regulation(s) and post-translational positive feedback(s) can be proposed for the regulation of all cell cycle transitions. Through......DNA replication, mitosis and mitotic exit are critical transitions of the cell cycle which normally occur only once per cycle. A universal control mechanism was proposed for the regulation of mitotic entry in which Cdk helps its own activation through two positive feedback loops. Recent discoveries...

  8. Situational Awareness: Regulation of the Myb Transcription Factor in Differentiation, the Cell Cycle and Oncogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the mechanisms that control the activity of the c-Myb transcription factor in normal cells and tumors, and discusses how c-Myb plays a role in the regulation of the cell cycle. Oncogenic versions of c-Myb contribute to the development of leukemias and solid tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, breast cancer and colon cancer. The activity and specificity of the c-Myb protein seems to be controlled through changes in protein-protein interactions, so understanding how it is regulated could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies

  9. Tissue-specific transcription enhancement of the fibroin gene characterized by cell-free systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Y.; Tsuda, M.; Takiya, S; Hirose, S; Suzuki, E; Kameda, M; Ninaki, O

    1986-01-01

    Six cell-free extracts have been used to characterize the nature of DNA signals and trans-acting factors responsible for the transcription enhancement of the Bombyx mori fibroin gene. The upstream element of the fibroin gene involved in the enhancement can be divided into two regions. The proximal region, -72 to -32, is recognized as a common enhancing signal by all B. mori extracts from the posterior silk gland, the middle silk gland, the ovarian tissue, and an embryonic cell line. It is wea...

  10. Pim1 promotes human prostate cancer cell tumorigenicity and c-MYC transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serine/threonine kinase PIM1 has been implicated as an oncogene in various human cancers including lymphomas, gastric, colorectal and prostate carcinomas. In mouse models, Pim1 is known to cooperate with c-Myc to promote tumorigenicity. However, there has been limited analysis of the tumorigenic potential of Pim1 overexpression in benign and malignant human prostate cancer cells in vivo. We overexpressed Pim1 in three human prostate cell lines representing different disease stages including benign (RWPE1), androgen-dependent cancer (LNCaP) and androgen-independent cancer (DU145). We then analyzed in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity as well as the effect of Pim1 overexpression on c-MYC transcriptional activity by reporter assays and gene expression profiling using an inducible MYC-ER system. To validate that Pim1 induces tumorigenicity and target gene expression by modulating c-MYC transcriptional activity, we inhibited c-MYC using a small molecule inhibitor (10058-F4) or RNA interference. Overexpression of Pim1 alone was not sufficient to convert the benign RWPE1 cell to malignancy although it enhanced their proliferation rates when grown as xenografts in vivo. However, Pim1 expression enhanced the in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials of the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145. Reporter assays revealed increased c-MYC transcriptional activity in Pim1-expressing cells and mRNA expression profiling demonstrated that a large fraction of c-MYC target genes were also regulated by Pim1 expression. The c-MYC inhibitor 10058-F4 suppressed the tumorigenicity of Pim1-expressing prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, 10058-F4 treatment also led to a reduction of Pim1 protein but not mRNA. Knocking-down c-MYC using short hairpin RNA reversed the effects of Pim1 on Pim1/MYC target genes. Our results suggest an in vivo role of Pim1 in promoting prostate tumorigenesis although it displayed distinct oncogenic activities depending on the disease stage of the

  11. Situational Awareness: Regulation of the Myb Transcription Factor in Differentiation, the Cell Cycle and Oncogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Olivia L.; Ness, Scott A., E-mail: sness@salud.unm.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Molecular Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, MSC07 4025-CRF 121, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    This review summarizes the mechanisms that control the activity of the c-Myb transcription factor in normal cells and tumors, and discusses how c-Myb plays a role in the regulation of the cell cycle. Oncogenic versions of c-Myb contribute to the development of leukemias and solid tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, breast cancer and colon cancer. The activity and specificity of the c-Myb protein seems to be controlled through changes in protein-protein interactions, so understanding how it is regulated could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription in cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Sonia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has been shown to replicate productively in cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, although replication occurs to a lesser extent than in infected T cells. As cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage become differentiated and activated and subsequently travel to a variety of end organs, they become a source of infectious virus and secreted viral proteins and cellular products that likely initiate pathological consequences in a number of organ systems. During this process, alterations in a number of signaling pathways, including the level and functional properties of many cellular transcription factors, alter the course of HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR-directed gene expression. This process ultimately results in events that contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. First, increased transcription leads to the upregulation of infectious virus production, and the increased production of viral proteins (gp120, Tat, Nef, and Vpr, which have additional activities as extracellular proteins. Increased viral production and the presence of toxic proteins lead to enhanced deregulation of cellular functions increasing the production of toxic cellular proteins and metabolites and the resulting organ-specific pathologic consequences such as neuroAIDS. This article reviews the structural and functional features of the cis-acting elements upstream and downstream of the transcriptional start site in the retroviral LTR. It also includes a discussion of the regulation of the retroviral LTR in the monocyte-macrophage lineage during virus infection of the bone marrow, the peripheral blood, the lymphoid tissues, and end organs such as the brain. The impact of genetic variation on LTR-directed transcription during the course of retrovirus disease is also reviewed.

  13. Dicer regulates Xist promoter methylation in ES cells indirectly through transcriptional control of Dnmt3a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation is the mechanism used in mammals to achieve dosage compensation of X-linked genes in XX females relative to XY males. Chromosome silencing is triggered in cis by expression of the non-coding RNA Xist. As such, correct regulation of the Xist gene promoter is required to establish appropriate X chromosome activity both in males and females. Studies to date have demonstrated co-transcription of an antisense RNA Tsix and low-level sense transcription prior to onset of X inactivation. The balance of sense and antisense RNA is important in determining the probability that a given Xist allele will be expressed, termed the X inactivation choice, when X inactivation commences. Results Here we investigate further the mechanism of Xist promoter regulation. We demonstrate that both sense and antisense transcription modulate Xist promoter DNA methylation in undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES cells, suggesting a possible mechanistic basis for influencing X chromosome choice. Given the involvement of sense and antisense RNAs in promoter methylation, we investigate a possible role for the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. We show that the Xist promoter is hypomethylated in ES cells deficient for the essential RNAi enzyme Dicer, but that this effect is probably a secondary consequence of reduced levels of de novo DNA methyltransferases in these cells. Consistent with this we find that Dicer-deficient XY and XX embryos show appropriate Xist expression patterns, indicating that Xist gene regulation has not been perturbed. Conclusion We conclude that Xist promoter methylation prior to the onset of random X chromosome inactivation is influenced by relative levels of sense and antisense transcription but that this probably occurs independent of the RNAi pathway. We discuss the implications for this data in terms of understanding Xist gene regulation and X chromosome choice in random X chromosome inactivation.

  14. A dynamic exchange of TCF3 and TCF4 transcription factors controls MYC expression in colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera; Rennoll, Sherri A.; Wesley M. Raup-Konsavage; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) by activating expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). In the nucleus, the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors, and together TCF/β-catenin complexes activate MYC expression through Wnt responsive DNA regulatory elements (WREs). The MYC 3’ WRE maps 1.4-kb downstream from the MYC transcription stop site and binds TCF4/β-catenin transcription complexes to activate MYC. How...

  15. Drosophila homologs of transcriptional mediator complex subunits are required for adult cell and segment identity specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boube, Muriel; Faucher, Christian; Joulia, Laurent; Cribbs, David L.; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2000-01-01

    The origins of specificity in gene expression are a central concern in understanding developmental control. Mediator protein complexes regulate transcriptional initiation, acting as modular adaptors linking specific transcription factors to core RNA polymerase II. Here, we identified the Drosophila homologs of 23 human mediator genes and mutations of two, dTRAP240 and of dTRAP80 (the putative fly homolog of yeast SRB4). Clonal analysis indicates a general role for dTRAP80 necessary for cell viability. The dTRAP240 gene is also essential, but cells lacking its function are viable and proliferate normally. Clones reveal localized developmental activities including a sex comb cell identity function. This contrasts with the ubiquitous nuclear accumulation of dTRAP240 protein in imaginal discs. Synergistic genetic interactions support shared developmental cell and segment identity functions of dTRAP240 and dTRAP80, potentially within a common complex. Further, they identify the homeotic Sex combs reduced product, required for the same cell/tissue identities, as a functional partner of these mediator proteins. PMID:11090137

  16. Hybrid modeling of cell signaling and transcriptional reprogramming and its application in C. elegans development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elana J Fertig

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of signal driven transcriptional reprogramming is critical for understanding of organism development, human disease, and cell biology. Many current modeling techniques discount key features of the biological sub-systems when modeling multi-scale, organism level processes. We present a mechanistic hybrid model, GESSA, which integrates a novel pooled probabilistic Boolean network model of cell signaling and a stochastic simulation of transcription and translation responding to a diffusion model of extra-cellular signals. We apply the model to simulate the well studied cell fate decision process of the vulval precursor cells (VPCs in C. elegans, using experimentally derived rate constants wherever possible and shared parameters to avoid overfitting. We demonstrate that GESSA recovers (1 the effects of varying scaffold protein concentration on signal strength, (2 amplification of signals in expression, (3 the relative external ligand concentration in a known geometry, and (4 feedback in biochemical networks. We demonstrate that setting model parameters based on wild-type and LIN-12 loss-of-function mutants in C. elegans leads to correct prediction of a wide variety of mutants including partial penetrance of phenotypes. Moreover, the model is relatively insensitive to parameters, retaining the wild-type phenotype for a wide range of cell signaling rate parameters.

  17. Laser-assisted Microdissection (LAM) as a Tool for Transcriptional Profiling of Individual Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez Rueda, Ana Marcela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of developmental processes at the molecular level requires insights into transcriptional regulation, and thus the transcriptome, at the level of individual cell types. While the methods described here are generally applicable to a wide range of species and cell types, our research focuses on plant reproduction. Plant cultivation and seed production is of crucial importance for human and animal nutrition. A detailed understanding of the regulatory networks that govern the formation of the reproductive lineage (germline) and ultimately of seeds is a precondition for the targeted manipulation of plant reproduction. In particular, the engineering of apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) into crop plants promises great improvements, as it leads to the formation of clonal seeds that are genetically identical to the mother plant. Consequently, the cell types of the female germline are of major importance for the understanding and engineering of apomixis. However, as the corresponding cells are deeply embedded within the floral tissues, they are very difficult to access for experimental analyses, including cell-type specific transcriptomics. To overcome this limitation, sections of individual cells can be isolated by laser-assisted microdissection (LAM). While LAM in combination with transcriptional profiling allows the identification of genes and pathways active in any cell type with high specificity, establishing a suitable protocol can be challenging. Specifically, the quality of RNA obtained after LAM can be compromised, especially when small, single cells are targeted. To circumvent this problem, we have established a workflow for LAM that reproducibly results in high RNA quality that is well suitable for transcriptomics, as exemplified here by the isolation of cells of the female germline in apomictic Boechera. In this protocol, procedures are described for tissue preparation and LAM, also with regard to RNA extraction and quality control

  18. Effects of Tet-mediated Oxidation Products of 5-Methylcytosine on DNA Transcription in vitro and in Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Changjun; Ji, Debin; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-11-01

    5-methylcytosine (5-mC) is a well-characterized epigenetic regulator in mammals. Recent studies showed that Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze the stepwise oxidation of 5-mC to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-HmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-FoC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-CaC). The exciting discovery of these novel cytosine modifications has stimulated substantial research interests about their roles in epigenetic regulation. Here we systematically examined the effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA transcription using a recently developed competitive transcription and adduct bypass assay. Our results showed that, when located on the transcribed strand, 5-FoC and 5-CaC exhibited marginal mutagenic and modest inhibitory effects on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multi-subunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. 5-HmC displayed relatively milder blocking effects on transcription, and no mutant transcript could be detectable for 5-HmC in vitro or in cells. The lack of considerable mutagenic effects of the oxidized 5-mC derivatives on transcription was in agreement with their functions in epigenetic regulation. The modest blocking effects on transcription suggested that 5-FoC and 5-CaC may function in transcriptional regulation. These findings provided new evidence for the potential functional interplay between cytosine methylation status and transcription.

  19. Interferon-tau activates multiple signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins and has complex effects on interferon-responsive gene transcription in ovine endometrial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M D; Stewart, D M; Johnson, G A; Vyhlidal, C A; Burghardt, R C; Safe, S H; Yu-Lee, L Y; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2001-01-01

    Interferon-tau (IFNtau), a type I IFN produced by sheep conceptus trophectoderm, is the signal for maternal recognition of pregnancy. Although it is clear that IFNtau suppresses transcription of the estrogen receptor alpha and oxytocin receptor genes and induces expression of various IFN-stimulated genes within the endometrial epithelium, little is known of the signal transduction pathway activated by the hormone. This study determined the effects of IFNtau on signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) activation, expression, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation using an ovine endometrial epithelial cell line. IFNtau induced persistent tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and -2 (10 min to 48 h), but transient phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT3, -5a/b, and -6 (10 to gene factor-3 and STAT1 homodimers formed and bound an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and gamma-activated sequence (GAS) element, respectively. IFNtau increased transcription of GAS-driven promoters at 3 h, but suppressed their activity at 24 h. In contrast, the activity of an ISRE-driven promoter was increased at 3 and 24 h. These results indicate that IFNtau activates multiple STATs and has differential effects on ISRE- and GAS-driven gene transcription. PMID:11145571

  20. Isolation of x-ray-inducible transcripts from radioresistant human melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothman, D.A.; Lee, S.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Meyers, M.; Fukunaga, N. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Twelve x-ray-induced transcripts (xips), differentially expressed 8- to 230-fold in x-irradiated versus unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells, were isolated as cDNA clones (xip1 through xip12) after four rounds of differential hybridization. Northern analyses revealed rare, medium, and abundant xips, ranging in size from 1.2 to 10 kb. All transcripts were transiently expressed and induced by low, but not by high (>600 cGy), doses of radiation. Three transcripts (xip4, -7, and -12) were induced only by ionizing radiation, and many (i.e., xip1, -2, -3, -5, -6, -8, -9, -10, and -11) were also induced by UV irradiation or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Heat shock did not induce any of the xips, but it decreased basal levels of xip4, -7, -11, and -12. Three xip cDNA clones were identified as encoding thymidine kinase, DT diaphorase, and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The remaining nine cDNA clones showed little homology to known genes. Three clones contained regions homologous to c-fes/fps protooncongene, recombination activating gene 1, or the human angiogenesis factor gene. X-ray-inducible genes may function in damaged cells to regulate DNA repair, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis.

  1. ETS family transcriptional regulators drive chromatin dynamics and malignancy in squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanseul; Schramek, Daniel; Adam, Rene C; Keyes, Brice E; Wang, Ping; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating stem cells (SCs) exhibit distinct patterns of transcription factors and gene expression compared to healthy counterparts. Here, we show that dramatic shifts in large open-chromatin domain (super-enhancer) landscapes underlie these differences and reflect tumor microenvironment. By in vivo super-enhancer and transcriptional profiling, we uncover a dynamic cancer-specific epigenetic network selectively enriched for binding motifs of a transcription factor cohort expressed in squamous cell carcinoma SCs (SCC-SCs). Many of their genes, including Ets2 and Elk3, are themselves regulated by SCC-SC super-enhancers suggesting a cooperative feed-forward loop. Malignant progression requires these genes, whose knockdown severely impairs tumor growth and prohibits progression from benign papillomas to SCCs. ETS2-deficiency disrupts the SCC-SC super-enhancer landscape and downstream cancer genes while ETS2-overactivation in epidermal-SCs induces hyperproliferation and SCC super-enhancer-associated genes Fos, Junb and Klf5. Together, our findings unearth an essential regulatory network required for the SCC-SC chromatin landscape and unveil its importance in malignant progression. PMID:26590320

  2. Diploidy of Drosophila imaginal cells is maintained by a transcriptional repressor encoded by escargot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, N; Hirose, S; Hayashi, S

    1994-10-01

    The Drosophila escargot (esg) gene encodes a C2-H2-type zinc finger protein that is expressed in the imaginal discs and histoblasts. In some esg mutants, the abdominal histoblasts become polyploid. It has therefore been suggested that the role of esg is to maintain diploidy of the imaginal cells. We show that esg encodes a DNA-binding protein with high affinity for G/ACAGGTG, the consensus-binding sequence for the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors (E2 box). This DNA-binding activity is essential for esg function in vivo as the strong embryonic lethal allele esgVS8 is caused by an amino acid change within the zinc finger region, leading to reduced affinity for DNA. In cultured cells, a heterodimer of the bHLH proteins Scute and Daughterless activates transcription from promoters containing E2 boxes. The esg protein strongly inhibits this activation, suggesting that esg may regulate developmental processes dependent on bHLH proteins. In larvae, esg protein expressed by the heat shock promoter can rescue the polyploid phenotype of abdominal histoblasts, demonstrating that the phenotype is attributable to a loss of esg function. esg must be expressed continuously during the larval period for efficient rescue. Ectopic expression of esg in the salivary glands inhibits endoreplication of DNA. These results suggest that esg is involved in transcriptional inhibition of genes required for endoreplication. PMID:7958894

  3. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  4. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in "DNA damage response", "direct p53 effectors" and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  5. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shucai [Northeast Normal University, Changchun, China; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  6. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia. PMID:26333776

  7. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response

  8. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-B in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Munhoz, Carolina D; Kawamoto, Elisa M; Yshii, Lidia M; Lima, Larissa S; Curi-Boaventura, Maria F; Salgado, Thais M L; Curi, Rui; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-kappaB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-kappaB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM) for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment) activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-kappaB activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) and activates NF-kappaB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells. PMID:19183502

  9. Cocaine induces cell death and activates the transcription nuclear factor kappa-b in pc12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepsch Lucilia B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cocaine is a worldwide used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is very complex and involves several neurotransmitter systems. For example, cocaine increases extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulates several transcription factors. NF-κB is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression involved in cellular death. Our aim was to investigate the toxicity and modulation of NF-κB activity by cocaine in PC 12 cells. Treatment with cocaine (1 mM for 24 hours induced DNA fragmentation, cellular membrane rupture and reduction of mitochondrial activity. A decrease in Bcl-2 protein and mRNA levels, and an increase in caspase 3 activity and cleavage were also observed. In addition, cocaine (after 6 hours treatment activated the p50/p65 subunit of NF-κB complex and the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the NF-κB activation. Inhibition of NF-κB activity by using PDTC and Sodium Salicilate increased cell death caused by cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine induces cell death (apoptosis and necrosis and activates NF-κB in PC12 cells. This activation occurs, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors and seems to have an anti-apoptotic effect on these cells.

  10. Role of PU.1 in MHC Class II Expression via CIITA Transcription in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryosuke; Kasakura, Kazumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Hara, Mutsuko; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Yashiro, Takuya; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    The cofactor CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and several transcription factors regulating the cell type-specific expression of CIITA have been identified. Although the MHC class II expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) is also mediated by CIITA, the transcription factors involved in the CIITA expression in pDCs are largely unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the role of a hematopoietic lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1, in CIITA transcription in pDCs. The introduction of PU.1 siRNA into mouse pDCs and a human pDC cell line, CAL-1, reduced the mRNA levels of MHC class II and CIITA. When the binding of PU.1 to the 3rd promoter of CIITA (pIII) in CAL-1 and mouse pDCs was analyzed by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, a significant amount of PU.1 binding to the pIII was detected, which was definitely decreased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected cells. Reporter assays showed that PU.1 knockdown reduced the pIII promoter activity and that three Ets-motifs in the human pIII promoter were candidates of cis-enhancing elements. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, it was confirmed that two Ets-motifs, GGAA (-181/-178) and AGAA (-114/-111), among three candidates, were directly bound with PU.1. When mouse pDCs and CAL-1 cells were stimulated by GM-CSF, mRNA levels of PU.1, pIII-driven CIITA, total CIITA, MHC class II, and the amount of PU.1 binding to pIII were significantly increased. The GM-CSF-mediated up-regulation of these mRNAs was canceled in PU.1 siRNA-introduced cells. Taking these results together, we conclude that PU.1 transactivates the pIII through direct binding to Ets-motifs in the promoter in pDCs. PMID:27105023

  11. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91%) and tissues (90%). RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Th2 Cells Identifies Pathogenic Features Associated with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seumois, Grégory; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; White, Brandie; Singh, Divya; Schulten, Veronique; Dillon, Myles; Hinz, Denize; Broide, David H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Vijayanand, Pandurangan

    2016-07-15

    Allergic asthma and rhinitis are two common chronic allergic diseases that affect the lungs and nose, respectively. Both diseases share clinical and pathological features characteristic of excessive allergen-induced type 2 inflammation, orchestrated by memory CD4(+) T cells that produce type 2 cytokines (Th2 cells). However, a large majority of subjects with allergic rhinitis do not develop asthma, suggesting divergence in disease mechanisms. Because Th2 cells play a pathogenic role in both these diseases and are also present in healthy nonallergic subjects, we performed global transcriptional profiling to determine whether there are qualitative differences in Th2 cells from subjects with allergic asthma, rhinitis, and healthy controls. Th2 cells from asthmatic subjects expressed higher levels of several genes that promote their survival as well as alter their metabolic pathways to favor persistence at sites of allergic inflammation. In addition, genes that enhanced Th2 polarization and Th2 cytokine production were also upregulated in asthma. Several genes that oppose T cell activation were downregulated in asthma, suggesting enhanced activation potential of Th2 cells from asthmatic subjects. Many novel genes with poorly defined functions were also differentially expressed in asthma. Thus, our transcriptomic analysis of circulating Th2 cells has identified several molecules that are likely to confer pathogenic features to Th2 cells that are either unique or common to both asthma and rhinitis. PMID:27271570

  13. Cumulus-specific genes are transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether four cumulus-specific genes: follicular stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), prostaglandin synthase 2 (Ptgs2) and steroidogenic acute regulator protein (Star), were correctly reprogrammed to be transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a murine model. Cumulus cells of C57×CBA F1 female mouse were injected into enucleated oocytes, followed by activation in 10 μmol/L strontium chloride for 5 h and subsequent in vitro culture up to the blastocyst stage. Expression of cumulus-specific genes in SCNT-derived embryos at 2-cell, 4-cell and day 4.5 blastocyst stages was compared with corresponding in vivo fertilized embryos by real-time PCR. It was demonstrated that immediately after the first cell cycle, SCNT-derived 2-cell stage embryos did not express all four cumulus-specific genes, which continually remained silent at the 4-cell and blastocyst stages. It is therefore concluded that all four cumulus-specific genes were correctly reprogrammed to be silent following nuclear transfer with cumulus donor cells in the mouse model. This would imply that the poor preimplantation developmental competence of SCNT embryos derived from cumulus cells is due to incomplete reprogramming of other embryonic genes, rather than cumulus-specific genes.

  14. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  15. Nitric oxide stimulates insulin gene transcription in pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have identified a positive role for nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of pancreatic β-cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of short-term exposure to NO on β-cell gene expression and the activity of the transcription factor PDX-1. NO stimulated the activity of the insulin gene promoter in Min6 β-cells and endogenous insulin mRNA levels in both Min6 and isolated islets of Langerhans. Addition of wortmannin prior to NO stimulation blocked the observed increases in insulin gene promoter activity. Although NO addition stimulated the phosphorylation of p38, inhibition by SB203580 did not block the effect of NO on the insulin gene promoter. NO addition also stimulated both the nuclear accumulation and the DNA binding activity of PDX-1. This study has shown that over 24 h, NO stimulates insulin gene expression, PI-3-kinase activity and the activity of the critical β-cell transcription factor PDX-1

  16. Transcriptional modulation in a leukocyte-depleted splenic cell population during prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzarewich, Rhiannon L C H; Medina, Sarah; Robertson, Catherine; Parchaliuk, Debra; Booth, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Prion replication in the periphery precedes neuroinvasion in many experimental rodent scrapie models, and in natural sheep scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids. Prions propagate in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs and are strongly associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and possibly circulating dendritic cells and macrophages. Given the importance of lymphoid organs in prion disease transmission and pathogenesis, gene expression studies may reveal host factors or biological pathways related to prion replication and accumulation. A procedure was developed to enrich for FDC, dendritic cells, and macrophages prior to the investigation of transcriptional alterations in murine splenic cells during prion pathogenesis. In total, 1753 transcripts exhibited fold changes greater than three (false discovery rates less than 2%) in this population isolated from spleens of prion-infected versus uninfected mice. The gene for the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin (DCN) was one of the genes most overexpressed in infected mice, and the splenic protein levels mirrored this in mice infected with scrapie as well as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A number of groups of functionally related genes were also significantly decreased in infected spleens. These included genes related to iron metabolism and homeostasis, pathways that have also been implicated in prion pathogenesis in the brain. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as a pool of potential surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of some prion diseases. PMID:22043911

  17. ETS transcription factor ETV2 directly converts human fibroblasts into functional endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Rimpei; Suzuki, Mayu; Kasahara, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nana; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Kimura, Akihiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Yasukawa, Hideo; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of endothelial cells (ECs) is a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic disorders. In addition, the generation of ECs has become increasingly important for providing vascular plexus to regenerated organs, such as the liver. Although many attempts have been made to generate ECs from pluripotent stem cells and nonvascular cells, the minimum number of transcription factors that specialize in directly inducing vascular ECs remains undefined. Here, by screening 18 transcription factors that are important for both endothelial and hematopoietic development, we demonstrate that ets variant 2 (ETV2) alone directly converts primary human adult skin fibroblasts into functional vascular endothelial cells (ETVECs). In coordination with endogenous FOXC2 in fibroblasts, transduced ETV2 elicits expression of multiple key endothelial development factors, including FLI1, ERG, and TAL1, and induces expression of endothelial functional molecules, including EGFL7 and von Willebrand factor. Consequently, ETVECs exhibits EC characteristics in vitro and forms mature functional vasculature in Matrigel plugs transplanted in NOD SCID mice. Furthermore, ETVECs significantly improve blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemic model using BALB/c-nu mice. Our study indicates that the creation of ETVECs provides further understanding of human EC development induced by ETV2. PMID:25540418

  18. Reprogramming of human fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells using mRNA of four transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent cells (iPS) was accomplished in 2006 by expressing four, or less, embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific transcription factors. Due to the possible danger of DNA damage and the potential tumorigenicity associated with such DNA damage, attempts were made to minimize DNA integration by the vectors involved in this process without complete success. Here we present a method of using RNA transfection as a tool for reprogramming human fibroblasts to iPS. We used RNA synthesized in vitro from cDNA of the same reprogramming four transcription factors. After transfection of the RNA, we show intracellular expression and nuclear localization of the respective proteins in at least 70% of the cells. We used five consecutive transfections to support continuous protein expression resulting in the formation of iPS colonies that express alkaline phosphatase and several ESC markers and that can be expanded. This method completely avoids DNA integration and may be developed to replace the use of DNA vectors in the formation of iPS.

  19. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xianyao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1 causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post infection (dpi. Results showed that 789 genes were differentially expressed in response to ILTV infection that include genes involved in the immune system (cytokines, chemokines, MHC, and NF-κB, cell cycle regulation (cyclin B2, CDK1, and CKI3, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and cellular metabolism. Differential expression for 20 out of 789 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR. A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of 789 differentially expressed genes revealed that 21 possible gene networks with intermolecular connections among 275 functionally identified genes. These 275 genes were classified into a number of functional groups that included cancer, genetic disorder, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. Conclusion The results of this study provide comprehensive knowledge on global gene expression, and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in chicken embryo lung cells in response to ILTV infections.

  20. A machine learning approach for identifying novel cell type-specific transcriptional regulators of myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busser, Brian W; Taher, Leila; Kim, Yongsok; Tansey, Terese; Bloom, Molly J; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers integrate the contributions of multiple classes of transcription factors (TFs) to orchestrate the myriad spatio-temporal gene expression programs that occur during development. A molecular understanding of enhancers with similar activities requires the identification of both their unique and their shared sequence features. To address this problem, we combined phylogenetic profiling with a DNA-based enhancer sequence classifier that analyzes the TF binding sites (TFBSs) governing the transcription of a co-expressed gene set. We first assembled a small number of enhancers that are active in Drosophila melanogaster muscle founder cells (FCs) and other mesodermal cell types. Using phylogenetic profiling, we increased the number of enhancers by incorporating orthologous but divergent sequences from other Drosophila species. Functional assays revealed that the diverged enhancer orthologs were active in largely similar patterns as their D. melanogaster counterparts, although there was extensive evolutionary shuffling of known TFBSs. We then built and trained a classifier using this enhancer set and identified additional related enhancers based on the presence or absence of known and putative TFBSs. Predicted FC enhancers were over-represented in proximity to known FC genes; and many of the TFBSs learned by the classifier were found to be critical for enhancer activity, including POU homeodomain, Myb, Ets, Forkhead, and T-box motifs. Empirical testing also revealed that the T-box TF encoded by org-1 is a previously uncharacterized regulator of muscle cell identity. Finally, we found extensive diversity in the composition of TFBSs within known FC enhancers, suggesting that motif combinatorics plays an essential role in the cellular specificity exhibited by such enhancers. In summary, machine learning combined with evolutionary sequence analysis is useful for recognizing novel TFBSs and for facilitating the identification of cognate TFs that

  1. Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in young asthmatic children: RORC and FOXP3 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzaoui A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Agnes Hamzaoui1,2,*, Haïfa Maalmi1,*, Anissa Berraïes1,2, Hanadi Abid1,2, Jamel Ammar1,2, Kamel Hamzaoui11Department of Pediatrics and Respiratory Disease, Homeostasis and Cell Dysfunction Unit Research, Abderrahman Mami Hospital, Ariana, Tunisia; 2Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, Tunisia *These authors contributed to this work equallyBackground: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th2 cells, whereas Th1 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependent on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.Purpose: This study aimed to assess the balance of CD4+ T cell populations in asthmatic children.Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC mRNA expression was assessed in 30 asthmatic children (18 patients with mild asthma and 12 with moderate asthma. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR quantified TBX21, GATA-3, RORC, FOXP3, and EBI3 mRNA expression. Intracellular cytokine expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells in asthmatic children was measured by flow cytometry. IL-6 and IL-17 cytokines were assessed in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.Results: A significant increase was found in the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-producing IL-4, IL-6, and IL-17. A decreased percentage of CD4+ producing IFN-γ in asthmatic children was found. Expression of GATA-3 (Th2, retinoid-related orphan receptor C (RORC (Th17, and EBI3 were increased in asthmatic patients compared to healthy controls. Expression of FOXP3 (Treg and TBX21 (Th1 were decreased (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 in asthmatic children. Analysis of transcription factor ratios revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 (P = 0.0001, and a significant decrease of TBX21/GATA-3 (P = 0.0001 ratios in patients with asthma.Conclusion: Young asthmatics were characterized by increased IL-4 production and low IFN-γ synthesis. The

  2. Detection of E2A-PBX1 fusion transcripts in human non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Min-Li; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; LI Hui; Hirata, Tomomi; Jablons, David M; He, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background E2A-PBX1 fusion gene caused by t(1;19)(q23;p13), has been well characterized in acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). There is no report on E2A-PBX1 fusion transcripts in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect E2A-PBX1 fusion transcripts in human NSCLC tissue specimens and cell lines. We analyzed correlation of E2A-PBX1 fusion transcripts with clinical outcomes in 76 patients with adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and other subgroups. We c...

  3. Bisphenol A alters transcript levels of biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder in vascular endothelial cells and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H Sofia; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is capable of mimicking endogenous hormones with potential consequences for human health and BPA exposure has been associated with several human diseases including neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) results show that BPA at low concentrations (10 ng/mL and 1 μg/mL) induces differential transcript levels of four biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). These results substantiate increasing concerns of BPA exposure in levels currently detected in humans. PMID:27010169

  4. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 → S transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. → TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 → S transition. → Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 → S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 → S arrest is discussed.

  5. WWP2 promotes degradation of transcription factor OCT4 in human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiming Xu; Weicheng Wang; Chunliang Li; Hongyao Yu; Acong Yang; Beibei Wang; Ying Jin

    2009-01-01

    POU transcription factor OCT4 not only plays an essential role in maintaining the pluripotent and self-renewing state of embryonic stem (ES) cells but also acts as a cell fate determinant through a gene dosage effect. However, the molecular mechanisms that control the intracellular OCT4 protein level remain elusive. Here, we report that human WWP2, an E3 ubiquitin (Ub)-protein ligase, interacts with OCT4 specifically through its WW domain and enhances Ub modification of OCT4 both in vitro and in vivo. We first demonstrated that endogenous OCT4 in hu-man ES cells can be post-translationally modified by Ub. Furthermore, we found that WWP2 promoted degradation of OCT4 through the 26S proteasome in a dosage-dependent manner, and the active site cysteine residue of WWP2 was required for both its enzymatic activity and proteolytic effect on OCT4. Remarkably, our data show that the en-dogenous OCT4 protein level was significantly elevated when WWP2 expression was downregulated by specific RNA interference (RNAi), suggesting that WWP2 is an important regulator for maintaining a proper OCT4 protein level in human ES cells. Moreover, northern blot analysis showed that the WWP2 transcript was widely present in diverse human tissues/organs and highly expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. However, its expression level was quickly decreased after human ES cells differentiated, indicating that WWP2 expression might be developmentally regulated. Our findings demonstrate that WWP2 is an important regulator of the OCT4 protein level in human ES cells.

  6. Deubiquitylating Enzyme UBP64 Controls Cell Fate through Stabilization of the Transcriptional Repressor Tramtrack▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpe, Prashanth Kumar; van der Knaap, Jan A.; Demmers, Jeroen A. A.; Bezstarosti, Karel; Bassett, Andrew; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Travers, Andrew A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation plays a central role in multiple signal transduction pathways. However, the substrate specificity and potential developmental roles of deubiquitylating enzymes remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Drosophila ubiquitin protease UBP64 controls cell fate in the developing eye. UBP64 represses neuronal cell fate but promotes the formation of nonneuronal cone cells. Using a proteomics approach, we identified the transcriptional repressor Tramtrack (TTK) as a primary UBP64 substrate. In common with TTK, reduced UBP64 levels lead to a loss of cone cells, supernumerary photoreceptors, and mechanosensory bristle cells. Previously, it was demonstrated that the blockade of neuronal cell fate was relieved by SINA-dependent ubiquitylation and degradation of TTK. We found that UBP64 counteracts SINA function by deubiquitylating TTK, leading to its stabilization and thereby promoting a nonneuronal cell fate. Mass spectrometric mapping revealed that SINA ubiquitylates multiple sites dispersed throughout TTK, which are duly deubiquitylated by UBP64. This observation suggests that both E3 SINA and UBP64 use a scanning mechanism to (de)ubiquitylate TTK. We conclude that the balance of TTK ubiquitylation by SINA and deubiquitylation by UBP64 constitutes a specific posttranslational switch controlling cell fate. PMID:18160715

  7. Regulation of Drosophila intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation by the transcription factor Escargot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Coll, Mariano A; Southall, Tony D; Sandall, Sharsti L; Brand, Andrea H; Jones, D Leanne

    2014-12-17

    Tissue stem cells divide to self-renew and generate differentiated cells to maintain homeostasis. Although influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, the genetic mechanisms coordinating the decision between self-renewal and initiation of differentiation remain poorly understood. The escargot (esg) gene encodes a transcription factor that is expressed in stem cells in multiple tissues in Drosophila melanogaster, including intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Here, we demonstrate that Esg plays a pivotal role in intestinal homeostasis, maintaining the stem cell pool while influencing fate decisions through modulation of Notch activity. Loss of esg induced ISC differentiation, a decline in Notch activity in daughter enteroblasts (EB), and an increase in differentiated enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Amun, an inhibitor of Notch in other systems, was identified as a target of Esg in the intestine. Decreased expression of esg resulted in upregulation of Amun, while downregulation of Amun rescued the ectopic EE cell phenotype resulting from loss of esg. Thus, our findings provide a framework for further comparative studies addressing the conserved roles of Snail factors in coordinating self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells across tissues and species. PMID:25433031

  8. Transcriptional Link between Blood and Bone: the Stem Cell Leukemia Gene and Its +19 Stem Cell Enhancer Are Active in Bone Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pimanda, John E; Silberstein, Lev; Dominici, Massimo; Dekel, Benjamin; Bowen, Mark; Oldham, Scott; Kallianpur, Asha; Brandt, Stephen J.; Tannahill, David; Göttgens, Berthold; Green, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Blood and vascular cells are generated during early embryogenesis from a common precursor, the hemangioblast. The stem cell leukemia gene (SCL/tal 1) encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is essential for the normal development of blood progenitors and blood vessels. We have previously characterized a panel of SCL enhancers including the +19 element, which directs expression to hematopoietic stem cells and endothelium. Here we demonstrate that SCL is expressed in bone pri...

  9. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L;

    2015-01-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have...... characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly...... receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly...

  10. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mafia Fousteri; Leon HF Mullenders

    2008-01-01

    The encounter of elongating RNA polymerase Ⅱ (RNAPIIo) with DNA lesions has severe consequences for the cell as this event provides a strong signal for P53-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. To counteract prolonged blockage of transcription, the cell removes the RNAPllo-hlocking DNA lesions by transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER), a specialized subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Exposure of mice to UVB light or chemicals has elucidated that TC-NER is a critical survival pathway protecting against acute toxic and long-term effects (cancer) of genotoxic exposure. Deficiency in TC-NER is associated with mutations in the CSA and CSB genes giving rise to the rare hu-man disorder Cockayne syndrome (CS). Recent data suggest that CSA and CSB play differential roles in mammalian TC-NER: CSB as a repair coupling factor to attract NER proteins, chromatin remodellers and the CSA- E3-ubiquitin iigase complex to the stalled RNAPI io. CSA is dispensable for attraction of NER proteins, yet in cooperation with CSB is required to recruit XAB2, the nucleosomal binding protein HMGNl and TFIIS. The emerging picture of TC-NER is complex: repair of transcription-blocking lesions occurs without displacement of the DNA damage-stalled RNAPIIo, and requires at least two essential assembly factors (CSA and CSB), the core NER factors (except for XPC-RAD23B), and TC-NER specific factors. These and yet unidentified proteins will accomplish not only efficient repair of transcrip-tion-blocking lesions, but are also likely to contribute to DNA damage signalling events.

  11. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  12. Transcription factor levels enable metabolic diversification of single cells of environmental bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guantes, Raúl; Benedetti, Ilaria; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional noise is a necessary consequence of the molecular events that drive gene expression in prokaryotes. However, some environmental microorganisms that inhabit polluted sites, for example, the m-xylene degrading soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida mt-2 seem to have co-opted evolutionarily such a noise for deploying a metabolic diversification strategy that allows a cautious exploration of new chemical landscapes. We have examined this phenomenon under the light of deterministic and stochastic models for activation of the main promoter of the master m-xylene responsive promoter of the system (Pu) by its cognate transcriptional factor (XylR). These analyses consider the role of co-factors for Pu activation and determinants of xylR mRNA translation. The model traces the onset and eventual disappearance of the bimodal distribution of Pu activity along time to the growth-phase dependent abundance of XylR itself, that is, very low in exponentially growing cells and high in stationary. This tenet was validated by examining the behaviour of a Pu-GFP fusion in a P. putida strain in which xylR expression was engineered under the control of an IPTG-inducible system. This work shows how a relatively simple regulatory scenario (for example, growth-phase dependent expression of a limiting transcription factor) originates a regime of phenotypic diversity likely to be advantageous in competitive environmental settings. PMID:26636554

  13. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  14. H3S10 phosphorylation-mediated transcriptional regulation by Aurora kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Ryeon; Kim, Kee-Beom; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Park, Jin Woo; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3S10 phosphorylation has been known as a cell cycle-specific marker and has a role in transcriptional activation. Various kinases phosphorylate H3S10 in different species, however, the role of the mitotic serine/threonine protein kinase Aurora A (AURKA) is largely unknown. Here we present evidence that AURKA phosphorylates H3S10 and activates target gene transcription. We show that down-regulation of AURKA level during leukemia cell differentiation results in decreased H3S10 phosphorylation level. We further show that AURKA is recruited to target gene promoters and activates transcription via H3S10 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this recruitment can be disrupted by the AURKA inhibitor Alisertib and results in H3K9-me2 recruitment by G9a. PMID:26607113

  15. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche. PMID:24532713

  16. Transcriptional response of chicken embryo cells to Newcastle disease virus (D58 strain) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kirubaharan, J John; Chandran, N Daniel Joy; Gnanapriya, N

    2013-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the causative agent of Newcastle disease (ND) in chicken causes significant economic loss for the poultry industry worldwide. The mechanism involved in host response to NDV infection is not well understood. For better understanding of the virus-host interaction; transcriptional profile of some genes of chicken embryo (CE) cells infected with NDV vaccine strain D58 was established using quantitative RT-PCR SYBR Green method. The relative standard curve method was used to measure the level of transcripts of the cellular genes against an endogenous control (β actin) gene. Among the genes studied, IFN α, IFN γ, MHC I and DDX 1 were up-regulated while IL 6 was down regulated. The expression of viral genes (M and F) in the infected CE cells was also confirmed by relative quantification. The host cellular genes involved in pro-inflammatory response, interferon-regulated proteins and the cellular immune response were affected by NDV infection, indicating involvement of complex signaling pathways of host cell responses to the infection. Thus, this study contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of ND and provides an insight into the virus-host interaction. PMID:24426287

  17. The Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Amplifications, Deletions, and Rearrangements in a Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy F Stead

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer causes more deaths, worldwide, than any other cancer. Several histologic subtypes exist. Currently, there is a dearth of targeted therapies for treating one of the main subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. As for many cancers, lung SCC karyotypes are often highly anomalous owing to large somatic structural variants, some of which are seen repeatedly in lung SCC, indicating a potential causal association for genes therein. We chose to characterize a lung SCC genome to unprecedented detail and integrate our findings with the concurrently characterized transcriptome. We aimed to ascertain how somatic structural changes affected gene expression within the cell in ways that could confer a pathogenic phenotype. We sequenced the genomes of a lung SCC cell line (LUDLU-1 and its matched lymphocyte cell line (AGLCL to more than 50x coverage. We also sequenced the transcriptomes of LUDLU-1 and a normal bronchial epithelium cell line (LIMM-NBE1, resulting in more than 600 million aligned reads per sample, including both coding and non-coding RNA (ncRNA, in a strand-directional manner. We also captured small RNA (<30 bp. We discovered significant, but weak, correlations between copy number and expression for protein-coding genes, antisense transcripts, long intergenic ncRNA, and microRNA (miRNA. We found that miRNA undergo the largest change in overall expression pattern between the normal bronchial epithelium and the tumor cell line. We found evidence of transcription across the novel genomic sequence created from six somatic structural variants. For each part of our integrated analysis, we highlight candidate genes that have undergone the largest expression changes.

  18. Reduced transcription of TCOF1 in adult cells of Treacher Collins syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camargo Anamaria A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant craniofacial disorder caused by frameshift deletions or duplications in the TCOF1 gene. These mutations cause premature termination codons, which are predicted to lead to mRNA degradation by nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD. Haploinsufficiency of the gene product (treacle during embryonic development is the proposed molecular mechanism underlying TCS. However, it is still unknown if TCOF1 expression levels are decreased in post-embryonic human cells. Methods We have estimated TCOF1 transcript levels through real time PCR in mRNA obtained from leucocytes and mesenchymal cells of TCS patients (n = 23 and controls (n = 18. Mutational screening and analysis of NMD were performed by direct sequencing of gDNA and cDNA, respectively. Results All the 23 patients had typical clinical features of the syndrome and pathogenic mutations were detected in 19 of them. We demonstrated that the expression level of TCOF1 is 18-31% lower in patients than in controls (p , even if we exclude the patients in whom we did not detect the pathogenic mutation. We also observed that the mutant allele is usually less abundant than the wild type one in mesenchymal cells. Conclusions This is the first study to report decreased expression levels of TCOF1 in TCS adult human cells, but it is still unknown if this finding is associated to any phenotype in adulthood. In addition, as we demonstrated that alleles harboring the pathogenic mutations have lower expression, we herein corroborate the current hypothesis of NMD of the mutant transcript as the explanation for diminished levels of TCOF1 expression. Further, considering that TCOF1 deficiency in adult cells could be associated to pathologic clinical findings, it will be important to verify if TCS patients have an impairment in adult stem cell properties, as this can reduce the efficiency of plastic surgery results during rehabilitation of these

  19. A new role for plant R2R3-MYB transcription factors in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleonora Cominelli; Chiara Tonelli

    2009-01-01

    @@ MYB proteins are transcription factors present in all eukaryotes,sharing a common DNA-binding domain that consists of one to three imperfect helix-helix-turn-helix repeats of about 50 amino acids,called RI,R2,and R3 respectively [1].In animals and yeast these proteins represent a small gene family [1].Animal R1R2R3-MYB proteins have been described for their role in cell cycle regulation mainly at the G1/S,but also at the G2/M transition,as firstly demonstrated in Drosophila [2].

  20. Structures of nucleolus and transcription sites of rRNA genes in rat liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We observed the ultrastructure of nucleolus in rat liver cells by conventional electronmicroscopy, and employed cytochemistry NAMA-Ur DNA specific stain method to analyze the distributionand position of nucleolar DNA in situ. The results showed that nucleolar DNA of rat livercells comes from nucleolus-associated chromatin, and continuously extends in the dense fibrillarcomponent (DFC) of nucleolus, localizes at the periphery of fibrillar center (FC) and in DFC. Furthermore,by employing anti-DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies, we directly and selectively labeled transcriptionsites of rRNA genes and testified that localization of transcription sites not only to DFC butalso to the periphery of FC.

  1. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino;

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of...... extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be...

  2. Noncoding RNA in the transcriptional landscape of human neural progenitor cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Patrick M.; Ballesteros-Yanez, Inmaculada; Grepo, Nicole; Knowles, James A; Campbell, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play key roles in cellular processes, particularly in the brain. The present study used RNA sequencing to identify the transcriptional landscape of two human neural progenitor cell lines, SK-N-SH and ReNcell CX, as they differentiate into human cortical projection neurons. Protein coding genes were found to account for 54.8 and 57.0% of expressed genes, respectively, and alignment of RNA sequencing reads revealed that only 25.5–28.1% mapped to ...

  3. Noncoding RNA in the Transcriptional Landscape of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick eHecht; Inmaculada eBallesteros-Yanez; Nicole eGrepo; James eKnowles; Daniel eCampbell

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play key roles in cellular processes, particularly in the brain. The present study used RNA sequencing to identify the transcriptional landscape of two human neural progenitor cell lines, SK-N-SH and ReNcell CX, as they differentiate into human cortical projection neurons. Protein coding genes were found to account for 54.8% and 57.0% of expressed genes, respectively, and alignment of RNA sequencing reads revealed that only 25.5-28.1% mapped ...

  4. Transcriptional profiles of chicken embryo cell cultures following infection with infectious bursal disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Handberg, K.J.; Juul-Madsen, H.R.;

    2007-01-01

    -host interaction, we measured steady-state levels of transcripts from 28 cellular genes of chicken embryo (CE) cell cultures infected with IBDV vaccine stain Bursine-2 during a 7-day infection course by use of the quantitative real-time RT-PCR SYBR green method. Of the genes tested, 21 genes (IRF-1, IFN 1...... UB) showed a constant expression or only slight alteration. Apparently, the host genes involved in pro-inflammatory response and apoptosis, interferon-regulated proteins, and the cellular immune response were affected by IBDV infection, indicating involvement in the complex signaling pathways of host...

  5. PU.1 Suppresses Th2 Cytokine Expression via Silencing of GATA3 Transcription in Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yashiro, Takuya; Kubo, Masato; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is predominantly expressed in dendritic cells (DCs) and is essential for DC differentiation. Although there are several reports that PU.1 positively regulates the expression of DC-specific genes, whether PU.1 also has a suppressive effect on DCs is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that PU.1 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines including IL-13 and IL-5 in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), through repression of the expression of GATA3, which is a master re...

  6. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung [Hormone Research Center, School of Biological Sciences and Technology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Romanelli, Maria Grazia [Department of Life and Reproduction Sciences, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy); Lee, Keesook, E-mail: klee@chonnam.ac.kr [Hormone Research Center, School of Biological Sciences and Technology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actions, regulate cell growth and differentiation of a variety of normal tissues and hormone-responsive tumors through interaction with cellular factors. In this study, we show that thyroid transcription factor-2 (TTF-2) is expressed in mammary gland and acts as ER{alpha} co-repressor. TTF-2 inhibited ER{alpha} transactivation in a dose-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, TTF-2 directly bound to and formed a complex with ER{alpha}, colocalizing with ER{alpha} in the nucleus. In MCF-7/TTF-2 stable cell lines, TTF-2 repressed the expression of endogenous ER{alpha} target genes such as pS2 and cyclin D1 by interrupting ER{alpha} binding to target promoters and also significantly decreased cell proliferation. Taken together, these data suggest that TTF-2 may modulate the function of ER{alpha} as a corepressor and play a role in ER-dependent proliferation of mammary cells.

  7. Gene transcriptional profiles in human lymphoblastoid cells with low and high doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the gene expression difference between 0.1 and 5 Gy X-ray irradiated cells,and to explore its possible mechanism. Methods: A cDNA microarray corresponding to 45033 human genes was used to analyze the transcriptional profiles of normal human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells at 4 h after 0.1 or 5 Gy irradiation. The genes with a fold change ≥ 2.0 were identified as the differentially expressed genes. real-lime PCR and Western blot were used to confirm the expression of PERP. Results: The microarray assay showed that there were 760 up-regulated genes and 1222 down-regulated genes in the cells at 0.1 Gy, while there were 744 genes down-regulated and 457 genes up-regulated in the cells at 5 Gy. In addition, 55 genes were commonly up-regulated and 339 genes commonly down-regulated at 0.1 and 5 Gy. The predominant biological processes of the differential genes responding to low-dose radiation include cell-cell signaling transduction and DNA damage response, and the altered genes after 5 Gy irradiation were related to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Moreover, the expression of PERP gene was down regulated, which was consistent with the data of microarray assay. Conclusions: The quantitative and qualitative differences in the gene expressions may contribute to the diverse biological effects induced by low or high doses of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  8. Downregulation of the transcription factor KLF4 is required for the lineage commitment of T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaomin Wen; Haifeng Liu; Gang Xiao; Xiaolong Liu

    2011-01-01

    The roles of the reprogramming factors Oct4,Sox2,c-Myc and Klf4 in early T cell development are incompletely defined.Here,we show that Klf4 is the only reprogramming factor whose expression is downregulated when early thymic progenitors (ETPs) differentiate into T cells.Enforced expression of Klf4 in uncommitted progenitors severely impaired T cell development mainly at the DN2-to-DN3 transition when T cell lineage commitment occurs and affected the transcription of a variety of genes with crucial functions in early T cell development,including genes involved in microenvironmental signaling (IL-7Rα),Notch target genes (Deltexl),and essential T cell lineage regulatory or inhibitory genes (Bcllla,SpiB,and ldl).The survival of thymocytes and the rearrangement at the Tcrb locus were impaired in the presence of enforced Klf4 expression.The defects in the DN1-to-DN2 and DN2-to-DN3 transitions in Klf4 transgenic mice could not be rescued by the introduction of a TCR transgene,but was partially rescued by restoring the expression of IL-7Rα.Thus,our data indicate that the downregulation of Klf4 is a prerequisite for T cell lineage commitment.

  9. Snail transcription factor negatively regulates maspin tumor suppressor in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maspin, a putative tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in breast and prostate cancer, has been associated with decreased cell motility. Snail transcription factor is a zinc finger protein that is increased in breast cancer and is associated with increased tumor motility and invasion by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Snail increases tumor motility and invasion utilizing prostate cancer cells. Expression levels were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Cell motility and invasion assays were performed, while Snail regulation and binding to maspin promoter was analyzed by luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Snail protein expression was higher in different prostate cancer cells lines as compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, which correlated inversely with maspin expression. Snail overexpression in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells inhibited maspin expression and led to increased migration and invasion. Knockdown of Snail in DU145 and C4-2 cancer cells resulted in up-regulation of maspin expression, concomitant with decreased migration. Transfection of Snail into 22Rv1 or LNCaP cells inhibited maspin promoter activity, while stable knockdown of Snail in C4-2 cells increased promoter activity. ChIP analysis showed that Snail is recruited to the maspin promoter in 22Rv1 cells. Overall, this is the first report showing that Snail can negatively regulate maspin expression by directly repressing maspin promoter activity, leading to increased cell migration and invasion. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may be useful to re-induce expression of maspin tumor suppressor and prevent prostate cancer tumor progression

  10. Expressing functional siRNAs in mammalian cells using convergent transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawes Ian W

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs as genetic inhibitors of gene expression has been shown to be an effective way of studying gene function in mammalian cells. Recently, different DNA vectors for expression of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs or co-expression of sense and antisense RNAs have been developed that direct siRNA-mediated gene silencing. One expression cassette design that has been used to express long sense and antisense RNAs in non-mammalian cell types is symmetric transcription using convergent promoters. However, convergent transcription as a way to generate functional siRNAs in mammalian cells has not been reported. This vector design permits the generation of expression constructs containing no repeat sequences, but capable of inducing RNA interference (RNAi-mediated gene silencing. Results With the aim of simplifying the construction of RNAi expression vectors, we report on the production and application of a novel convergent promoter cassette capable of expressing sense and antisense RNAs, that form double-stranded RNA, and mediate gene silencing in mammalian cells. We use this cassette to inhibit the expression of both the EGFP transgene and the endogenous TP53 gene. The gene silencing effect is Dicer-dependent and the level of gene inactivation achieved is comparable to that produced with synthetic siRNA. Furthermore, this expression system can be used for both short and long-term control of specific gene expression in mammalian cells. Conclusion The experiments performed in this study demonstrate that convergent transcription can be used in mammalian cells to invoke gene-specific silencing via RNAi. This method provides an alternative to expression of shRNAs and co-expression of sense and antisense RNAs from independent cassettes or a divergent promoter. The main advantage of the present vector design is the potential to produce a functional siRNA expression cassette with no repeat sequences

  11. Overexpression of octamer transcription factors 1 or 2 alone has no effect on HIV-1 transcription in primary human CD4 T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored the binding of octamer (Oct) transcription factors to the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) by gel shift assays and showed none of the previously identified four potential Oct binding sites bound Oct-1 or Oct-2. Overexpression of Oct-1 or Oct-2 had no effect on HIV-1 LTR activity in transiently transfected primary human CD4 T cells. Next, primary human CD4 T cells were co-transfected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expression vector and an Oct-1 or Oct-2 expression plasmid. The transfected cells were stimulated for 2 days and then infected with the NL4-3 strain of HIV-1. After 3 days of infection, there were no differences in HIV-1 p24 supernatant levels. Apoptosis of infected or bystander cells overexpressing Oct-1 or Oct-2 compared to control was also unaffected. Our studies demonstrate that Oct-1 and Oct-2 fail to bind to the HIV-1 LTR and have no effect on HIV-1 transcription in primary human CD4 T cells

  12. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    Full Text Available Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR. Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx. MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional

  13. Asymptotic limit in a cell differentiation model with consideration of transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Avner; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Shih, Chih-Wen

    T cells of the immune system, upon maturation, differentiate into either Th1 or Th2 cells that have different functions. The decision to which cell type to differentiate depends on the concentrations of transcription factors T-bet (x1) and GATA-3 (x2). These factors are translated by the mRNA whose levels of expression, y1 and y2, depend, respectively, on x1 and x2 in a nonlinear nonlocal way. The population density of T cells, ϕ(t,x1,x2,y1,y2), satisfies a hyperbolic conservation law with coefficients depending nonlinearly and nonlocally on (t,x1,x2,y1,y2), while the xi, yi satisfy a system of ordinary differential equations. We study the long time behavior of ϕ and show, under some conditions on the parameters of the system of differential equations, that the gene expressions in the T-cell population aggregate at one, two or four points, which connect to various cell differentiation scenarios.

  14. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell motility in Drosophila trachea regulated by the transcription factor Escargot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Matakatsu, M; Uemura, T; Oda, H; Takeichi, M; Hayashi, S

    1996-12-01

    Coordination of cell motility and adhesion is essential for concerted movement of tissues during animal morphogenesis. The Drosophila tracheal network is formed by branching, migration and fusion of tubular ectodermal epithelia. Tracheal tip cells, located at the end of each branch that is going to fuse, extend filopodia to search for targets and later change their cell shape to a seamless ring to allow passage of lumen. The cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin accumulates at the site of contact to form a ring that marks the site of lumen entry and is essential for the fusion. DE-cadherin expression in tip cells of a subset of branches is dependent on escargot, a zinc finger gene expressed in all tip cells. Such escargot mutant tip cells failed to adhere to each other and continued to search for alternative targets by extending long filopodia. We present evidence indicating escargot positively regulates transcription of the DE-cadherin gene, shotgun. Overexpression of DE-cadherin rescued the defect in one of the fusion points in escargot mutants, demonstrating an essential role of DE-cadherin in target recognition and identifying escargot as a key regulator of cell adhesion and motility in tracheal morphogenesis. PMID:9012491

  15. Guard Cell Purification and RNA Isolation Suitable for High Throughput Transcriptional Analysis of Cell-Type Responses to Biotic Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulareddy, Nisita; Panchal, Shweta; Melotto, Maeli

    2014-01-01

    Stomata, the micro-pores on leaf surface, are formed by a pair of guard cells. In addition to control water loss and gas exchange between the plant and the environment, these cells act as immunity gates to prevent pathogen invasion of the plant apoplast. Here, we report a brief procedure to obtain highly pure guard cell preparations using conditions that preserve the guard cell transcriptome as much as possible for a robust high-throughput RNA sequence analysis. The advantages of this procedure included: 1) substantial shortening of the time required for obtaining high yield of >97% pure guard cell protoplasts (GCP), 2) extraction of enough amount of high quality RNA for direct sequencing, and 3) limited RNA decay during sample manipulation. Gene expression analysis by RT-qPCR revealed that wound-related genes were not induced during release of guard cells from leaves. To validate our approach, we performed a high throughput deep-sequencing of guard cell transcriptome (RNA-seq). A total of 18,994 nuclear-encoded transcripts was detected, which expanded the transcriptome by 70%. The optimized GCP isolation and RNA extraction protocols are simple, reproducible, and fast allowing the discovery of genes and regulatory networks inherent to the guard cells under various stresses. PMID:23634837

  16. Luteolin modulates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced transcriptional changes of stress response pathways in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, which causes transcriptional changes associated with oxidative and proteotoxic stress, has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. The food-derived compound luteolin has multi-target actions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic activities. The aim of this study is to investigate how luteolin affects 6-OHDA-mediated stress response pathways. The results showed that when PC12 cells were pre-treated with luteolin (20 µM 30 min prior to 6-OHDA (100 µM exposure, 6-OHDA-induced ROS overproduction, cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activation, and mRNA expression of BIM, TRB3 and GADD34 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, 6-OHDA-mediated cell cycle arrest and transcription of p53 target genes, p21, GADD45α and PUMA, were reduced by luteolin. Luteolin also significantly down-regulated 6-OHDA-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR, leading to decreases in phospho-eIF2α, ATF4, GRP78 and CHOP. In addition, luteolin attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Nrf2-mediated HO-1 and GCLC. Taken together, these results suggest that diminishing intracellular ROS formation and down-regulation of p53, UPR and Nrf2-ARE pathways may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of luteolin.

  17. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  18. A compendium of DIS3 mutations and associated transcriptional signatures in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Marta; Barbieri, Marzia; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Fabris, Sonia; Tonon, Giovanni; Segalla, Simona; Cifola, Ingrid; Pinatel, Eva; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-09-22

    DIS3 is a catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) domains, recently found mutated in multiple myeloma (MM), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous form of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasia. We analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) the DIS3 PIN and RNB domains in purified bone marrow PCs from 164 representative patients, including 130 cases with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia and 10 with secondary PC leukemia. DIS3 mutations were found respectively in 18.5%, 25% and 30% of cases. Identified variants were predominantly missense mutations localized in the RNB domain, and were often detected at low allele frequency. DIS3 mutations were preferentially carried by IGH-translocated/nonhyperdiploid patients. Sequential analysis at diagnosis and relapse in a subset of cases highlighted some instances of increasing DIS3 mutation burden during disease progression. NGS also revealed that the majority of DIS3 variants in mutated cases were comparably detectable at transcriptional level. Furthermore, gene expression profiling analysis in DIS3-mutated patients identified a transcriptional signature suggestive for impaired RNA exosome function. In conclusion, these data further support the pathological relevance of DIS3 mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias and suggest that DIS3 may represent a potential tumor suppressor gene in such disorders. PMID:26305418

  19. A compendium of DIS3 mutations and associated transcriptional signatures in plasma cell dyscrasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Fabris, Sonia; Tonon, Giovanni; Segalla, Simona; Cifola, Ingrid; Pinatel, Eva; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    DIS3 is a catalytic subunit of the human exosome complex, containing exonucleolytic (RNB) and endonucleolytic (PIN) domains, recently found mutated in multiple myeloma (MM), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous form of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasia. We analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS) the DIS3 PIN and RNB domains in purified bone marrow PCs from 164 representative patients, including 130 cases with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia and 10 with secondary PC leukemia. DIS3 mutations were found respectively in 18.5%, 25% and 30% of cases. Identified variants were predominantly missense mutations localized in the RNB domain, and were often detected at low allele frequency. DIS3 mutations were preferentially carried by IGH-translocated/nonhyperdiploid patients. Sequential analysis at diagnosis and relapse in a subset of cases highlighted some instances of increasing DIS3 mutation burden during disease progression. NGS also revealed that the majority of DIS3 variants in mutated cases were comparably detectable at transcriptional level. Furthermore, gene expression profiling analysis in DIS3-mutated patients identified a transcriptional signature suggestive for impaired RNA exosome function. In conclusion, these data further support the pathological relevance of DIS3 mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias and suggest that DIS3 may represent a potential tumor suppressor gene in such disorders. PMID:26305418

  20. Isonitrosoacetophenone drives transcriptional reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum cells in support of innate immunity and defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud T Djami-Tchatchou

    Full Text Available Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta.

  1. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan

  2. Cisplatin, doxorubicin and paclitaxel induce mdr1 gene transcription in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöndorf, Thomas; Neumann, Rainer; Benz, Carolin; Becker, Martina; Riffelmann, Marion; Göhring, Uwe-Jochen; Sartorius, Judith; von König, Carl-Heinz Wirsing; Breidenbach, Martina; Valter, Markus M; Hoopmann, Markus; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Kurbacher, Christian M

    2003-01-01

    The clinical observation of the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype is often associated with overexpression of the mdrl gene, in particular with respect to ovarian cancer. However, until now the mdrl-inducing potential of commonly used antineoplastics has been only incompletely explored. We performed short-term cultures of six ovarian cancer cell lines (MZOV4, EF027, SKOV3, OAW42, OTN14, MZOV20) exposed to either blank medium or cisplatin, doxorubicin or paclitaxel at concentrations related to the clinically achievable plasma peak concentration. A highly specific quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the Mdr1 transcripts. Mdrl mRNA contents were calibrated in relation to coamplified GAPDH mRNA. Mdrl mRNA was detectable in each cell line. In 13 out of 18 assays (72%) the specific anticancer drug being tested induced mdr1 transcription. No decrease in mdr1 mRNA concentration was observed. Our data suggest that mdr1 induction by antineoplastics is one of the reasons for failure of ovarian cancer therapy but may vary individually. PMID:12528803

  3. Regulation of shear-induced nuclear translocation of the Nrf2 transcription factor in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Chung-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial cells (ECs constantly experience fluid shear stresses generated by blood flow. Laminar flow is known to produce atheroprotective effects on ECs. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that is essential for the antioxidant response element (ARE-mediated induction of genes such as heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1. We previously showed that fluid shear stress increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in ECs. Moreover, oxidants are known to stimulate Nrf2. We thus examined the regulation of Nrf2 in cultured human ECs by shear stress. Results Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to laminar shear stress (12 dyne/cm2 induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which was inhibited by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor, a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, and an antioxidant agent N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, but not by other protein kinase inhibitors. Therefore, PI3K, PKC, and ROS are involved in the signaling pathway that leads to the shear-induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2. We also found that shear stress increased the ARE-binding activity of Nrf2 and the downstream expression of HO-1. Conclusion Our data suggest that the atheroprotective effect of laminar flow is partially attributed to Nrf2 activation which results in ARE-mediated gene transcriptions, such as HO-1 expression, that are beneficial to the cardiovascular system.

  4. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology.

  5. Cell growth suppression by thanatos-associated protein 11(THAP11) is mediated by transcriptional downregulation of c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C-Y; Li, C-Y; Li, Y; Zhan, Y-Q; Li, Y-H; Xu, C-W; Xu, W-X; Sun, H B; Yang, X-M

    2009-03-01

    Thanatos-associated proteins (THAPs) are zinc-dependent, sequence-specific DNA-binding factors involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation. THAP11 is the most recently described member of this human protein family. In this study, we show that THAP11 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and frequently downregulated in several human tumor tissues. Overexpression of THAP11 markedly inhibits growth of a number of different cells, including cancer cells and non-transformed cells. Silencing of THAP11 by RNA interference in HepG2 cells results in loss of cell growth repression. These results suggest that human THAP11 may be an endogenous physiologic regulator of cell proliferation. We also provide evidence that the function of THAP11 is mediated by its ability to repress transcription of c-Myc. Promoter reporter assays indicate a DNA binding-dependent c-Myc transcriptional repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and EMSA assay suggest that THAP11 directly binds to the c-Myc promoter. The findings that expression of c-Myc rescues significantly cells from THAP11-mediated cell growth suppression and that THAP11 expression only slightly inhibits c-Myc null fibroblasts cells growth reveal that THAP11 inhibits cell growth through downregulation of c-Myc expression. Taken together, these suggest that THAP11 functions as a cell growth suppressor by negatively regulating the expression of c-Myc. PMID:19008924

  6. Deciphering Mineral Homeostasis in Barley Seed Transfer Cells at Transcriptional Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Darbani

    Full Text Available In addition to the micronutrient inadequacy of staple crops for optimal human nutrition, a global downtrend in crop-quality has emerged from intensive breeding for yield. This trend will be aggravated by elevated levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Therefore, crop biofortification is inevitable to ensure a sustainable supply of minerals to the large part of human population who is dietary dependent on staple crops. This requires a thorough understanding of plant-mineral interactions due to the complexity of mineral homeostasis. Employing RNA sequencing, we here communicate transfer cell specific effects of excess iron and zinc during grain filling in our model crop plant barley. Responding to alterations in mineral contents, we found a long range of different genes and transcripts. Among them, it is worth to highlight the auxin and ethylene signaling factors Arfs, Abcbs, Cand1, Hps4, Hac1, Ecr1, and Ctr1, diurnal fluctuation components Sdg2, Imb1, Lip1, and PhyC, retroelements, sulfur homeostasis components Amp1, Hmt3, Eil3, and Vip1, mineral trafficking components Med16, Cnnm4, Aha2, Clpc1, and Pcbps, and vacuole organization factors Ymr155W, RabG3F, Vps4, and Cbl3. Our analysis introduces new interactors and signifies a broad spectrum of regulatory levels from chromatin remodeling to intracellular protein sorting mechanisms active in the plant mineral homeostasis. The results highlight the importance of storage proteins in metal ion toxicity-resistance and chelation. Interestingly, the protein sorting and recycling factors Exoc7, Cdc1, Sec23A, and Rab11A contributed to the response as well as the polar distributors of metal-transporters ensuring the directional flow of minerals. Alternative isoform switching was found important for plant adaptation and occurred among transcripts coding for identical proteins as well as transcripts coding for protein isoforms. We also identified differences in the alternative-isoform preference between

  7. Timing of Tissue-specific Cell Division Requires a Differential Onset of Zygotic Transcription during Metazoan Embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming-Kin; Guan, Daogang; Ng, Kaoru Hon Chun; Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; An, Xiaomeng; Li, Runsheng; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2016-06-10

    Metazoan development demands not only precise cell fate differentiation but also accurate timing of cell division to ensure proper development. How cell divisions are temporally coordinated during development is poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis provides an excellent opportunity to study this coordination due to its invariant development and widespread division asynchronies. One of the most pronounced asynchronies is a significant delay of cell division in two endoderm progenitor cells, Ea and Ep, hereafter referred to as E2, relative to its cousins that mainly develop into mesoderm organs and tissues. To unravel the genetic control over the endoderm-specific E2 division timing, a total of 822 essential and conserved genes were knocked down using RNAi followed by quantification of cell cycle lengths using in toto imaging of C. elegans embryogenesis and automated lineage. Intriguingly, knockdown of numerous genes encoding the components of general transcription pathway or its regulatory factors leads to a significant reduction in the E2 cell cycle length but an increase in cell cycle length of the remaining cells, indicating a differential requirement of transcription for division timing between the two. Analysis of lineage-specific RNA-seq data demonstrates an earlier onset of transcription in endoderm than in other germ layers, the timing of which coincides with the birth of E2, supporting the notion that the endoderm-specific delay in E2 division timing demands robust zygotic transcription. The reduction in E2 cell cycle length is frequently associated with cell migration defect and gastrulation failure. The results suggest that a tissue-specific transcriptional activation is required to coordinate fate differentiation, division timing, and cell migration to ensure proper development. PMID:27056332

  8. Deletion of Forkhead Box M1 transcription factor from respiratory epithelial cells inhibits pulmonary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available The Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1 protein is induced in a majority of human non-small cell lung cancers and its expression is associated with poor prognosis. However, specific requirements for the Foxm1 in each cell type of the cancer lesion remain unknown. The present study provides the first genetic evidence that the Foxm1 expression in respiratory epithelial cells is essential for lung tumorigenesis. Using transgenic mice, we demonstrated that conditional deletion of Foxm1 from lung epithelial cells (epFoxm1(-/- mice prior to tumor initiation caused a striking reduction in the number and size of lung tumors, induced by either urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT. Decreased lung tumorigenesis in epFoxm1(-/- mice was associated with diminished proliferation of tumor cells and reduced expression of Topoisomerase-2alpha (TOPO-2alpha, a critical regulator of tumor cell proliferation. Depletion of Foxm1 mRNA in cultured lung adenocarcinoma cells significantly decreased TOPO-2alpha mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcription of the mouse TOPO-2alpha promoter region, indicating that TOPO-2alpha is a direct target of Foxm1 in lung tumor cells. Finally, we demonstrated that a conditional deletion of Foxm1 in pre-existing lung tumors dramatically reduced tumor growth in the lung. Expression of Foxm1 in respiratory epithelial cells is critical for lung cancer formation and TOPO-2alpha expression in vivo, suggesting that Foxm1 is a promising target for anti-tumor therapy.

  9. High-Throughput siRNA Screening to Reveal GATA-2 Upstream Transcriptional Mechanisms in Hematopoietic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yo; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ohashi, Keiichi; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell types. The transcription factor GATA-2 is expressed in both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and is essential for cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recently, evidence from studies of aplastic anemia, MonoMAC syndrome, and lung cancer has demonstrated a mechanistic link between GATA-2 and human pathophysiology. GATA-2-dependent disease processes have been extensively analyzed; however, the tra...

  10. A Sox Transcription Factor Is a Critical Regulator of Adult Stem Cell Proliferation in the Drosophila Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Fanju W. Meng; Benoît Biteau

    2015-01-01

    Adult organs and their resident stem cells are constantly facing the challenge of adapting cell proliferation to tissue demand, particularly in response to environmental stresses. Whereas most stress-signaling pathways are conserved between progenitors and differentiated cells, stem cells have the specific ability to respond by increasing their proliferative rate, using largely unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that a member of the Sox family of transcription factors in Drosophila, Sox21a, is...

  11. Distinct effects of nuclear membrane localization on gene transcription silencing in Drosophila S2 cells and germ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Sui; Yanhong Yang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelope proteins have important roles in chromatin organization and signal-dependent transcriptional regulation. A previous study reported that the inner nuclear membrane protein, Otefin (Ote), was essential for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance via interaction with Smad complex. The interaction of Otc with the Smad complex recruits the bam locus to the nuclear periphery and subsequently results in bam transcriptional silencing, revealing that nuclear peripheral localization is essential for bam gene regulation. However, it remains unknown whether the nuclear peripheral localization is sufficient for bam silencing. To address this issue, we have established a tethering system, in which the Gal4 DNA binding domain (DBD) of the Flag:Gal4 DBD:Ote △ LEM fusion protein physically interacts with the Gal4 binding sites upstream of bamP-gfp to artificially recruit the reporter gene gfp to the nuclear membrane. Our data demonstrated that the nuclear peripheral localization seemed to affect the expression of the target naked gene in S2 cells. By contrast, in Drosophila germ cells, the nuclear membrane localization was not sufficient for gene silencing.

  12. The CHR Promoter Element Controls Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Transcription and Binds the DREAM and MMB Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Fischer, Martin; Engeland, Kurt; Padi, Megha; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like \\(cyclin B, CDC2\\) and \\(CDC25C\\) are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in \\(G_0/G_1\\). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and...

  13. PRISM/PRDM6, a Transcriptional Repressor That Promotes the Proliferative Gene Program in Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Christopher A.; Haberland, Michael; Arnold, Michael A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; McDonald, Oliver G.; Richardson, James A.; Childs, Geoffrey; Harris, Stephen; Owens, Gary K.; Olson, Eric N.

    2006-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) display remarkable phenotypic diversity and plasticity and can readily switch between proliferative and differentiated states in response to extracellular cues. In an effort to identify novel transcriptional regulators of smooth muscle phenotypes, we compared the gene expression profiles of arterial and venous SMCs by microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Among numerous genes displaying distinct expression patterns in these two SMC types, we discovered an expr...

  14. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  15. D-MEF2: a MADS box transcription factor expressed in differentiating mesoderm and muscle cell lineages during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lilly, B; Galewsky, S; Firulli, A B; Schulz, R A; Olson, E N

    1994-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor (MEF) 2 family of transcription factors has been implicated in the regulation of muscle transcription in vertebrates. We have cloned a protein from Drosophila, termed D-MEF2, that shares extensive amino acid homology with the MADS (MCM1, Agamous, Deficiens, and serum-response factor) domains of the vertebrate MEF2 proteins. D-mef2 gene expression is first detected during Drosophila embryogenesis within mesodermal precursor cells prior to specification of the somati...

  16. Withaferin A inhibits activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in human breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joomin; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Singh, Shivendra V

    2010-01-01

    We have shown previously that withaferin A (WA), a promising anticancer constituent of Ayurvedic medicine plant Withania somnifera, inhibits growth of human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo in association with apoptosis induction. The present study builds on these observations and demonstrates that WA inhibits constitutive as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6)-inducible activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is an oncogenic transcription factor act...

  17. GABP controls a critical transcription regulatory module that is essential for maintenance and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shuyang; Cui, Kairong; Jothi, Raja; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Jing, Xuefang; Zhao, Keji; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining a steady pool of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is critical for sustained production of multiple blood lineages. Many transcription factors and molecules involved in chromatin and epigenetic modifications have been found to be critical for HSC self-renewal and differentiation; however, their interplay is less understood. The transcription factor GA binding protein (GABP), consisting of DNA-binding subunit GABPα and transactivating subunit GABPβ, is essential for lym...

  18. Possible involvement of Helios in controlling the immature B cell functions via transcriptional regulation of protein kinase Cs

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Masami; Takami, Yasunari; Kuribayashi, Futoshi; Nakayama, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor Ikaros family consists of five zinc-finger proteins: Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus; these proteins except Pegasus are essential for development and differentiation of lymphocytes. However, in B lymphocytes, the physiological role of Helios remains to be elucidated yet, because its expression level is very low. Here, we generated the Helios-deficient DT40 cells, Helios−/−, and showed that the Helios-deficiency caused significant increases in transcriptions of...

  19. Tamoxifen represses alcohol-induced transcription of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Qian; Shi, Ganggang; Zhang, Qingsong; Lu, Lei; Levy, Daniel; Zhong, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption in women has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, particular in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases. Deregulation of RNA polymerase III-dependent (Pol III) transcription enhances cellular tRNAs and 5S rRNA production, leading to an increase in translational capacity to promote cell transformation and tumor formation. Our recent studies demonstrated that alcohol induces Brf1 expression and Pol III gene transcription via ER. Here, we report that Tamoxi...

  20. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Motohashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NC cells are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+ cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells.

  1. The B-MYB transcriptional network guides cell cycle progression and fate decisions to sustain self-renewal and the identity of pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs are pluripotent and have unlimited self-renewal capacity. Although pluripotency and differentiation have been examined extensively, the mechanisms responsible for self-renewal are poorly understood and are believed to involve an unusual cell cycle, epigenetic regulators and pluripotency-promoting transcription factors. Here we show that B-MYB, a cell cycle regulated phosphoprotein and transcription factor critical to the formation of inner cell mass, is central to the transcriptional and co-regulatory networks that sustain normal cell cycle progression and self-renewal properties of ESCs. Phenotypically, B-MYB is robustly expressed in ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and it is present predominantly in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Knockdown of B-MYB results in functional cell cycle abnormalities that involve S, G2 and M phases, and reduced expression of critical cell cycle regulators like ccnb1 and plk1. By conducting gene expression profiling on control and B-MYB deficient cells, ChIP-chip experiments, and integrative computational analyses, we unraveled a highly complex B-MYB-mediated transcriptional network that guides ESC self-renewal. The network encompasses critical regulators of all cell cycle phases and epigenetic regulators, pluripotency transcription factors, and differentiation determinants. B-MYB along with E2F1 and c-MYC preferentially co-regulate cell cycle target genes. B-MYB also co-targets genes regulated by OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG that are significantly associated with stem cell differentiation, embryonic development, and epigenetic control. Moreover, loss of B-MYB leads to a breakdown of the transcriptional hierarchy present in ESCs. These results coupled with functional studies demonstrate that B-MYB not only controls and accelerates cell cycle progression in ESCs it contributes to fate decisions and maintenance of pluripotent stem cell identity.

  2. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells. PMID:19236566

  3. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolla V, P Rasad; Aftab Taiyab; D Jyothi; Usha K Srinivas; Amere S Sreedhar

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock response is associated with the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, 60 min). The lack of Hsp synthesis in these cells was due to a failure in HSF1 DNA binding activity. In the present study we report that BC-8 tumor cells when subjected to heat shock at higher temperature (43°C, 60 min) or incubation for longer time at 42°C, exhibited necrosis characteristics; however, under mild heat shock (42°C, 30 min) conditions cells showed activation of autophagy. Mild heat shock treatment induced proteolysis of HSF1, and under similar conditions we observed an increase in HSF2 expression followed by its enhanced DNA binding activity. Inhibiting HSF1 proteolysis by reversible proteasome inhibition failed to inhibit heat shock induced autophagy. Compromising HSF2 expression but not HSF1 resulted in the inhibition of autophagy, suggesting HSF2 dependent activation of autophagy. We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells.

  4. MEF2C and EBF1 Co-regulate B Cell-Specific Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nikki R; Davis, Matthew; Chai, Li; Winoto, Astar; Tjian, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation along three main lineages: myeloid, erythroid, and lymphoid. One of the earliest lineage decisions for blood progenitor cells is whether to adopt the lymphoid or myeloid fate. Previous work had shown that myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) is indispensable for the lymphoid fate decision, yet the specific mechanism of action remained unclear. Here, we have identified early B cell factor-1 (EBF1) as a co-regulator of gene expression with MEF2C. A genome-wide survey of MEF2C and EBF1 binding sites identified a subset of B cell-specific genes that they target. We also determined that the p38 MAPK pathway activates MEF2C to drive B cell differentiation. Mef2c knockout mice showed reduced B lymphoid-specific gene expression as well as increased myeloid gene expression, consistent with MEF2C's role as a lineage fate regulator. This is further supported by interaction between MEF2C and the histone deacetylase, HDAC7, revealing a likely mechanism to repress the myeloid transcription program. This study thus elucidates both activation and repression mechanisms, identifies regulatory partners, and downstream targets by which MEF2C regulates lymphoid-specific differentiation. PMID:26900922

  5. The transcription factor MEF2C negatively controls angiogenic sprouting of endothelial cells depending on oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Sturtzel

    Full Text Available The MADS box transcription factor MEF2C has been detected by us to be upregulated by the angiogenic factors VEGF-A and bFGF in endothelial cells. We have here investigated its potential role for angiogenesis. MEF2C was surprisingly found to strongly inhibit angiogenic sprouting, whereas a dominant negative mutant rather induced sprouting. The factor mainly affected migratory processes of endothelial cells, but not proliferation. In gene profiling experiments we delineated the alpha-2-macroglobulin gene to be highly upregulated by MEF2C. Further data confirmed that MEF2C in endothelial cells indeed induces alpha-2-macroglobulin mRNA as well as the secretion of alpha-2-macroglobulin and that conditioned supernatants of cells overexpressing MEF2C inhibit sprouting. Alpha-2-macroglobulin mediates, at least to a large extent, the inhibitory effects of MEF2C as is shown by knockdown of alpha-2-macroglobulin mRNA by lentiviral shRNA expression which reduces the inhibitory effect. However, under hypoxic conditions the VEGF-A/bFGF-mediated upregulation of MEF2C is reduced and the production of alpha-2-macroglobulin largely abolished. Taken together, this suggests that the MEF2C/alpha-2-macroglobulin axis functions in endothelial cells as a negative feed-back mechanism that adapts sprouting activity to the oxygen concentration thus diminishing inappropriate and excess angiogenesis.

  6. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range - and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this "NIA Mouse ESC Bank," we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  7. Zinc finger protein 521 overexpression increased transcript levels of Fndc5 in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motahere-Sadat Hashemi; Abbas Kiani Esfahani; Maryam Peymani; Alireza Shoaraye Nejati; Kamran Ghaedi; Mohammad Hossein Nasr-Esfahani; Hossein Baharvand

    2016-03-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 is highly expressed in brain, neural stem cells and early progenitors of the human hematopoietic cells. Zfp521 triggers the cascade of neurogenesis inmouse embryonic stemcells through inducing expression of the early neuroectodermal genes Sox1, Sox3 and Pax6. Fndc5, a precursor of Irisin has inducing effects on the expression level of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus. Therefore, it is most likely that Fndc5 may play an important role in neural differentiation. To exhibit whether the expression of this protein is under regulation with Zfp521, we overexpressed Zfp521 in a stable transformants of mESCs expressing EGFP under control of Fndc5 promoter. Increased expression of Zfp521 enhanced transcription levels of both EGFP and endogenous Fndc5. This result was confirmed by overexpression the aforementioned vectors in HEK cells and indicated that Zfp521 functions upstream of Fndc5 expression. It is most likely that Zfp521 may act through the binding to its response element on Fndc5 core promoter. Therefore it is concluding that an enhanced expression of Fndc5 in neural progenitor cells is stimulated by Zfp521 overexpression in these cells.

  8. Benzo (a) pyrene induced tumorigenesity of human immortalized oral epithelial cells: transcription profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-zhong; PAN Hong-ya; ZHENG Jia-wei; ZHOU Xiao-jian; ZHANG Ping; CHEN Wan-tao; ZHANG Zhi-yuan

    2008-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to examine and analyze the global gene expression changes during the tumorigenesis of a human immortalized oral epithelial cell line, and search for the possible genes that may play a role in the carcinogenesis of oral cancer associated with benzo (a) pyrene.Methods The human immortalized oral epithelial cells, which have been established through transfection of E6/E7 genasof human papillomavirus type 16 and proved to be non-tumorigenic in nude mice, were treated with benzo (a) pyrene.Tumorigenesity of the treated cells were examined through nude mice subcutaneous injection. The global gene expression profiles of immortalized cells and the tumorigenic cells were acquired through hybridization of a microarray of Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0. The data were analyzed using Spring 7.0 software and treated statistically using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The differentially expressed genes were classified using a Venn diagram and annotated with gene ontology. Several highlighted genes were validated in cells using a real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results There were 883 differentially expressed genes during the tumorigenesis and most of them changed expression in the early stage of tumorigenesis. These genes mainly involved in macromolecule metabolism and signal transduction,possessed the molecular function of transition metal ion binding, nucleotide binding and kinase activity; their protein products were mainly integral to membranes or localized in the nucleus and cytoskeleton. The expression patterns of IGFBP3, S100A8, MAP2K, KRT6B, GDF15, MET were validated in cells using a real-time polymerase chain reaction; the expression of IGFBP3 was further validated in clinical oral cancer specimens.Concluslona This study provides the global transcription profiling associated with the tumorigenesis of oral epithelial cells exposed to benzo (a) pyrene; IGFBP3 may play a potential role in the initiation of oral cancer related to

  9. The reverse transcription inhibitor abacavir shows anticancer activity in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Carlini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transposable Elements (TEs comprise nearly 45% of the entire genome and are part of sophisticated regulatory network systems that control developmental processes in normal and pathological conditions. The retroviral/retrotransposon gene machinery consists mainly of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs-1 and Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs that code for their own endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT. Interestingly, RT is typically expressed at high levels in cancer cells. Recent studies report that RT inhibition by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs induces growth arrest and cell differentiation in vitro and antagonizes growth of human tumors in animal model. In the present study we analyze the anticancer activity of Abacavir (ABC, a nucleoside reverse transcription inhibitor (NRTI, on PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ABC significantly reduces cell growth, migration and invasion processes, considerably slows S phase progression, induces senescence and cell death in prostate cancer cells. Consistent with these observations, microarray analysis on PC3 cells shows that ABC induces specific and dose-dependent changes in gene expression, involving multiple cellular pathways. Notably, by quantitative Real-Time PCR we found that LINE-1 ORF1 and ORF2 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by ABC treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the potential of ABC as anticancer agent able to induce antiproliferative activity and trigger senescence in prostate cancer cells. Noteworthy, we show that ABC elicits up-regulation of LINE-1 expression, suggesting the involvement of these elements in the observed cellular modifications.

  10. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  11. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals

  12. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  13. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-BETA MEDIATED SUPPRESSION OF ANTI-TUMOR T CELLS REQUIRES FOXP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR EXPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Tom L.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Tesone, Amelia J.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Sarmin, Fahmida; Borowsky, Mark E.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor-reactive T cells become unresponsive in advanced tumors. Here we have characterized a common mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer driven by the up-regulation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (Foxp1), which prevents CD8+ T cells from proliferating and up-regulating Granzyme-B and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to tumor antigens. Accordingly, Foxp1-deficient lymphocytes induced rejection of incurable tumors, and promoted protection against tumor re-challenge. Mechanistically, Foxp1 interacted with the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3 in pre-activated CD8+ T cells in response to microenvironmental transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and was essential for its suppressive activity. Therefore, Smad2 and Smad3-mediated c-Myc repression requires Foxp1 expression in T cells. Furthermore, Foxp1 directly mediated TGF-β-induced c-Jun transcriptional repression, which abrogated T cell activity. Our results unveil a fundamental mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness different from anergy or exhaustion, driven by TGF-β signaling on tumor-associated lymphocytes undergoing Foxp1-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:25238097

  14. The Transcription Factor AHR Prevents the Differentiation of a Stage 3 Innate Lymphoid Cell Subset to Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Hughes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that human natural killer (NK cells develop in secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT through a so-called “stage 3” developmental intermediate minimally characterized by a CD34−CD117+CD94− immunophenotype that lacks mature NK cell function. This stage 3 population is heterogeneous, potentially composed of functionally distinct innate lymphoid cell (ILC types that include interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1-positive, IL-22-producing ILC3s. Whether human ILC3s are developmentally related to NK cells is a subject of ongoing investigation. Here, we show that antagonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR or silencing of AHR gene expression promotes the differentiation of tonsillar IL-22-producing IL-1R1hi human ILC3s to CD56brightCD94+ interferon (IFN-γ-producing cytolytic mature NK cells expressing eomesodermin (EOMES and T-Box Protein 21 (TBX21 or TBET. Hence, we demonstrate the lineage plasticity of human ILCs by identifying AHR as a transcription factor that prevents IL-1R1hi ILC3s from differentiating into NK cells.

  15. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pin, Carmen

    2009-11-16

    Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells) and 16 days (old cells). Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186) than in young cells (467). Relatively, few genes (62) were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young and old cells

  16. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinton Jay CD

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells and 16 days (old cells. Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186 than in young cells (467. Relatively, few genes (62 were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young

  17. Transcriptional regulation of miR-196b by ETS2 in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Lun; Hu, Ling-Yueh; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Wu, Chew-Wun; Chan, Wen-Ching; Li, Sung-Chou; Lai, Chun-Hung; Ho, Meng-Ru; Fang, Wen-Liang; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Lin, Wen-Chang

    2012-04-01

    E26 transformation-specific sequence (ETS)-2 is a transcriptional modulator located on chromosome 21, alterations in its expression have been implicated with a reduced incidence of solid tumors in Down syndrome patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to participate in diverse biological functions; however, the regulation of miRNAs is not well characterized. Recently, we reported that miR-196b is highly expressed in gastric cancers. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-196b expression was significantly repressed by ETS2 during gastric cancer oncogenesis. We demonstrate that knockdown of endogenous ETS2 expression increases miR-196b expression. A genomic region between -751 and -824 bp upstream of the miR-196b transcriptional start site was found to be critical for the repression activity. This putative regulatory promoter region contains three potential ETS2-binding motifs. Mutations within the ETS2 binding sites blocked the repression activity of ETS2. Furthermore, knockdown of ETS2 or overexpression of miR-196b significantly induced migration and invasion in gastric cancer cells. In addition, alterations in ETS2 and miR-196b expression in gastric cancer cell lines affected the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes. The levels of vimentin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP9 were drastically induced, but levels of E-cadherin were decreased in shETS2- or miR-196b-transfected cells. Our data indicate that ETS2 plays a key role in controlling the expression of miR-196b, and miR-196b may mediate the tumor suppressor effects of ETS2. We demonstrated that miR-196b was transcriptionally regulated by ETS2 and there was an inverse expression profile between miR-196b and ETS2 in clinical samples. This finding could be beneficial for the development of effective cancer diagnostic and alternative therapeutic strategies. PMID:22298639

  18. Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, Riina; Mai, Anja; Georgiadou, Maria; Saari, Markku; De Franceschi, Nicola; Betz, Timo; Sihto, Harri; Ventelä, Sami; Elo, Laura; Jokitalo, Eija; Westermarck, Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal-not cancer-stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression. PMID:27488962

  19. Massive transcriptional perturbation in subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Rosolowski

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that molecular mechanisms involved in cancerogenesis are characterized by groups of coordinately expressed genes, we developed and validated a novel method for analyzing transcriptional data called Correlated Gene Set Analysis (CGSA. Using 50 extracted gene sets we identified three different profiles of tumors in a cohort of 364 Diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL and related mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma. The first profile had high level of expression of genes related to proliferation whereas the second profile exhibited a stromal and immune response phenotype. These two profiles were characterized by a large scale gene activation affecting genes which were recently shown to be epigenetically regulated, and which were enriched in oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism and nucleoside biosynthesis. The third and novel profile showed only low global gene activation similar to that found in normal B cells but not cell lines. Our study indicates novel levels of complexity of DLBCL with low or high large scale gene activation related to metabolism and biosynthesis and, within the group of highly activated DLBCLs, differential behavior leading to either a proliferative or a stromal and immune response phenotype.

  20. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Survival and Function Are Regulated by the Transcription Factor Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beury, Daniel W; Carter, Kayla A; Nelson, Cassandra; Sinha, Pratima; Hanson, Erica; Nyandjo, Maeva; Fitzgerald, Phillip J; Majeed, Amry; Wali, Neha; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-04-15

    Tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to immune suppression in tumor-bearing individuals and are a major obstacle to effective immunotherapy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the mechanisms used by MDSC to suppress T cell activation. Although ROS are toxic to most cells, MDSC survive despite their elevated content and release of ROS. NF erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates a battery of genes that attenuate oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that MDSC resistance to ROS may be regulated by Nrf2. To test this hypothesis, we used Nrf2(+/+)and Nrf2(-/-)BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and MC38 colon carcinoma, respectively. Nrf2 enhanced MDSC suppressive activity by increasing MDSC production of H2O2, and it increased the quantity of tumor-infiltrating MDSC by reducing their oxidative stress and rate of apoptosis. Nrf2 did not affect circulating levels of MDSC in tumor-bearing mice because the decreased apoptotic rate of tumor-infiltrating MDSC was balanced by a decreased rate of differentiation from bone marrow progenitor cells. These results demonstrate that Nrf2 regulates the generation, survival, and suppressive potency of MDSC, and that a feedback homeostatic mechanism maintains a steady-state level of circulating MDSC in tumor-bearing individuals. PMID:26936880

  1. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4(+)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), 2) IB4(-)SNS-Cre/TdTomato(+), and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato(+) cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. PMID:25525749

  2. Generation and transcriptional programming of intestinal dendritic cells: essential role of retinoic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, R.; Bscheider, M; Lahl, Katharina;

    2016-01-01

    programs, and suppressing proinflammatory nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene expression. Thus, RA is required for transcriptional programming and maturation of intestinal cDC, and with GM-CSF and Flt3L provides a minimal environment for in vitro generation of intestinal cDC1- and cDC2-like cDC from...... of intestinal CD103+CD11b- (cDC1) and of CD103+CD11b+ (cDC2). Systemic deficiency or DC-restricted antagonism of RA signaling resulted in altered phenotypes of intestinal cDC1 and cDC2, and reduced numbers of cDC2. Effects of dietary deficiency were most apparent in the proximal small intestine and were rapidly...... reversed by reintroducing vitamin A. In cultures of pre-μDC with Flt3L and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), RA induced cDC with characteristic phenotypes of intestinal cDC1 and cDC2 by controlling subset-defining cell surface receptors, regulating subset-specific transcriptional...

  3. Transformation of intestinal stem cells into gastric stem cells on loss of transcription factor Cdx2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmini, Salvatore; Bialecka, Monika; Huch, Meritxell; Kester, Lennart; van de Wetering, Marc; Sato, Toshiro; Beck, Felix; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The endodermal lining of the adult gastro-intestinal tract harbours stem cells that are responsible for the day-to-day regeneration of the epithelium. Stem cells residing in the pyloric glands of the stomach and in the small intestinal crypts differ in their differentiation programme and in the gene

  4. Integrating discrete stochastic models and single-cell experiments to infer predictive models of MAPK-induced transcription dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsky, Brian

    2015-03-01

    MAPK signal-activated transcription plays central roles in myriad biological processes including stress adaptation responses and cell fate decisions. Recent single-cell and single-molecule experiments have advanced our ability to quantify the spatial, temporal, and stochastic fluctuations for such signals and their downstream effects on transcription regulation. This talk explores how integrating such experiments with discrete stochastic computational analyses can yield quantitative and predictive understanding of transcription regulation in both space and time. We use single-molecule mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) experiments to reveal locations and numbers of multiple endogenous mRNA species in 100,000's of individual cells, at different times and under different genetic and environmental perturbations. We use finite state projection methods to precisely and efficiently compute the full joint probability distributions of these mRNA, which capture measured spatial, temporal and correlative fluctuations. By combining these experimental and computational tools with uncertainty quantification, we systematically compare models of varying complexity and select those which give optimally precise and accurate predictions in new situations. We use these tools to explore two MAPK-activated gene regulation pathways. In yeast adaptation to osmotic shock, we analyze Hog1 kinase activation of transcription for three different genes STL1 (osmotic stress), CTT1 (oxidative stress) and HSP12 (heat shock). In human osteosarcoma cells under serum induction, we analyze ERK activation of c-Fos transcription.

  5. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  6. Functional characterization of NAC55 transcription factor from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) as a novel transcriptional activator modulating reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Jingli; Guo, Xiaohua; Wu, Feifei; Yang, Bo; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2016-09-01

    NAC transcription factors (TFs) are plant-specific and play important roles in development, responses to biotic and abiotic cues and hormone signaling. So far, only a few NAC genes have been reported to regulate cell death. In this study, we identified and characterized a NAC55 gene isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). BnaNAC55 responds to multiple stresses, including cold, heat, abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA) and a necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. BnaNAC55 has transactivation activity and is located in the nucleus. BnaNAC55 is able to form homodimers in planta. Unlike ANAC055, full-length BnaNAC55, but not either the N-terminal NAC domain or C-terminal regulatory domain, induces ROS accumulation and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when expressed both in oilseed rape protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, BnaNAC55 expression causes obvious nuclear DNA fragmentation. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis identified that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating ROS production and scavenging, defense response as well as senescence are significantly induced. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we further confirm that BnaNAC55 could activate the expression of a few ROS and defense-related gene expression. Taken together, our work has identified a novel NAC TF from oilseed rape that modulates ROS accumulation and cell death. PMID:27312204

  7. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. → Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. → Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. → Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of the transcription factor Foxa2 directs differential elafin expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Kyung Sook [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Ji Yoon; Kim, Su Jin [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Hwan [NeoPharm Co. Ltd., Daejeon 305-510 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, BK21 Nanofusion Technology Team, Pusan National University, Busan 609-736 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@kribb.re.kr [Therapeutic Antibody Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Elafin expression is epigenetically silenced in human melanoma cells. {yields} Foxa2 expression in melanoma cells is silenced by promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Foxa2 directs activation of the elafin promoter in vivo. {yields} Foxa2 expression induces apoptosis of melanoma cells via elafin re-expression. -- Abstract: Elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, induces the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human melanoma cells, where its expression is transcriptionally silenced. However, it remains unknown how the elafin gene is repressed in melanoma cells. We here demonstrate that elafin expression is modulated via epigenetically regulated expression of the transcription factor Foxa2. Treatment of melanoma cells with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor induced elafin expression, which was specifically responsible for reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. Suppression of Foxa2 transcription, mediated by DNA hypermethylation in its promoter region, was released in melanoma cells upon treatment with the demethylating agent. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the Foxa2 binding site in the elafin promoter was critical for the activation of the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further showed that Foxa2 bound to the elafin promoter in vivo. Analyses of melanoma cells with varied levels of Foxa2 revealed a correlated expression between Foxa2 and elafin and the ability of Foxa2 to induce apoptosis. Our results collectively suggest that, in melanoma cells, Foxa2 expression is silenced and therefore elafin is maintained unexpressed to facilitate cell proliferation in the disease melanoma.

  9. Transcriptional program induced by Wnt protein in human fibroblasts suggests mechanisms for cell cooperativity in defining tissue microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Klapholz-Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Wnt signaling system plays key roles in development, regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, cell polarity, morphogenesis and cancer. Given the multifaceted roles of Wnt signaling in these processes, its transcriptional effects on the stromal cells that make up the scaffold and infrastructure of epithelial tissues are of great interest. METHODS AND RESULTS: To begin to investigate these effects, we used DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional targets of the Wnt pathway in human lung fibroblasts. Cells were treated with active Wnt3a protein in culture, and RNA was harvested at 4 hours and 24 hours. Nuclear accumulation of ss-Catenin, as shown by immunofluorescence, and induction of AXIN2 demonstrate that fibroblasts are programmed to respond to extracellular Wnt signals. In addition to several known Wnt targets, we found many new Wnt induced genes, including many transcripts encoding regulatory proteins. Transcription factors with important developmental roles, including HOX genes, dominated the early transcriptional response. Furthermore, we found differential expression of several genes that play direct roles in the Wnt signaling pathway, as well as genes involved in other cell signaling pathways including fibroblast growth factor (FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling. The gene most highly induced by Wnt3a was GREMLIN2, which encodes a secreted BMP antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated expression of GREMLIN2 suggests a new role for Wnt signals in the maintenance of stem cell niches, whereby Wnt signals induce nearby fibroblasts to produce a BMP antagonist, inhibiting differentiation and promoting expansion of stem cells in their microenvironment. We suggest that Wnt-induced changes in the gene expression program of local stromal cells may play an important role in the establishment of specialized niches hospitable to the self-renewal of normal or malignant epithelial stem cells in vivo.

  10. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C;

    2002-01-01

    Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether t......RNA primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven by...... cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus...

  11. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors establish CD8(+) T cell identity through intrinsic HDAC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shaojun; Li, Fengyin; Zeng, Zhouhao; Zhao, Yunjie; Yu, Shuyang; Shan, Qiang; Li, Yalan; Phillips, Farrah C; Maina, Peterson K; Qi, Hank H; Liu, Chengyu; Zhu, Jun; Pope, R Marshall; Musselman, Catherine A; Zeng, Chen; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-06-01

    The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell dichotomy is essential for effective cellular immunity. How individual T cell identity is established remains poorly understood. Here we show that the high-mobility group (HMG) transcription factors Tcf1 and Lef1 are essential for repressing CD4(+) lineage-associated genes including Cd4, Foxp3 and Rorc in CD8(+) T cells. Tcf1- and Lef1-deficient CD8(+) T cells exhibit histone hyperacetylation, which can be ascribed to intrinsic histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in Tcf1 and Lef1. Mutation of five conserved amino acids in the Tcf1 HDAC domain diminishes HDAC activity and the ability to suppress CD4(+) lineage genes in CD8(+) T cells. These findings reveal that sequence-specific transcription factors can utilize intrinsic HDAC activity to guard cell identity by repressing lineage-inappropriate genes. PMID:27111144

  12. The determination of mother cell-specific mating type of switching in yeast by a specific regulator of HO transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nasmyth, Kim

    1987-01-01

    In haploid homothallic budding yeast, cell division gives rise to a mother cell which proceeds to switch its mating type and a daughter cell (the bud) which does not. Switching is initiated by a specific double strand cleavage of mating type DNA by an endonuclease encoded by the HO gene. Previous data suggest that the pattern of HO transcription is responsible for the mother cell specificity of switching. HO is transcribed transiently, at START, during the cell cycle of mother cells but not a...

  13. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G(0)/G(1). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G(0). Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G(0)/G(1), but also for activation in S, G(2) and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  14. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  15. A Transcriptional Regulatory Role of the THAP11–HCF-1 Complex in Colon Cancer Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. Brandon; Palchaudhuri, Santanu; Yin, Hanwei; Wei, Jianjun

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) domain is an atypical zinc finger motif with sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Emerging data suggest that THAP proteins may function in chromatin-dependent processes, including transcriptional regulation, but the roles of most THAP proteins in normal and aberrant cellular processes remain largely unknown. In this work, we identify THAP11 as a transcriptional regulator differentially expressed in human colon cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of human colon cancers revealed increased THAP11 expression in both primary tumors and metastases. Knockdown of THAP11 in SW620 colon cancer cells resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation, and profiling of gene expression in these cells identified a novel gene set composed of 80 differentially expressed genes, 70% of which were derepressed by THAP11 knockdown. THAP11 was found to associate physically with the transcriptional coregulator HCF-1 (host cell factor 1) and recruit HCF-1 to target promoters. Importantly, THAP11-mediated gene regulation and its chromatin association require HCF-1, while HCF-1 recruitment at these genes requires THAP11. Collectively, these data provide the first characterization of THAP11-dependent gene expression in human colon cancer cells and suggest that the THAP11–HCF-1 complex may be an important transcriptional and cell growth regulator in human colon cancer. PMID:22371484

  16. The lysine deacetylase inhibitor givinostat inhibits ß-cell IL-1ß induced IL-1ß transcription and processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahllöf, Mattias Salling; Christensen, Dan P; Lundh, Morten; Dinarello, Charles A; Mascagni, Paolo; Grunnet, Lars G; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in particular IL-1ß, IFN¿, and CXCL10, contribute to ß-cell failure and loss in DM via IL-1R, IFN¿R, and TLR4 signaling. IL-1 signaling deficiency reduces diabetes incidence, islet IL-1ß secretion, and hyperglycemia in animal models of diabetes...... breaks an autoinflammatory circuit by differentially preventing ß-cell expression of the ß-cell toxic inflammatory molecules IL-1ß and CXCL10 induced by single cytokines. Results: CXCL10 did not induce transcription of IL-1ß mRNA. IL-1ß induced ß-cell IL-1ß mRNA and both IL-1ß and IFN¿ individually...... induced Cxcl10 mRNA transcription. Givinostat inhibited IL-1ß-induced IL-1ß mRNA expression in INS-1 and rat islets and IL-1ß processing in INS-1 cells. Givinostat also reduced IFN¿ induced Cxcl10 transcription in INS-1 cells but not in rat islets, while IL-1ß induced Cxcl10 transcription was unaffected...

  17. Cooperative transcription activation by Nurr1 and Pitx3 induces embryonic stem cell maturation to the midbrain dopamine neuron phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Martinat, Cecile; Bacci, Jean-Jacques; Leete, Thomas; Kim, Jongpil; Vanti, William B.; Newman, Amy H.; Cha, Joo H.; Gether, Ulrik; Wang, Honggang; Abeliovich, Asa

    2006-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons play a central role in the regulation of voluntary movement, and their degeneration is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Cell replacement therapies, and in particular embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived DA neurons, offer a potential therapeutic venue for Parkinson’s disease. We sought to identify genes that can potentiate maturation of ES cell cultures to the midbrain DA neuron phenotype. A number of transcription factors have been implicated in the development ...

  18. Thyroid hormone receptor inhibits hepatoma cell migration through transcriptional activation of Dickkopf 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Liao, Chen-Hsin [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Ya-Hui [Medical Research Central, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Sheng-Ming; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Liao, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chung, I-Hsiao; Wu, Tzu-I [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Wei-Jan [First Cardiovascular Division, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Kwang-Huei, E-mail: khlin@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •T{sub 3} affects DKK4 mRNA and protein expression in HepG2-TR cells. •Regulation of DKK4 by T{sub 3} is at transcriptional level. •DKK4 overexpression suppresses hepatoma cell metastasis. -- Abstract: Triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) is a potent form of thyroid hormone mediates several physiological processes including cellular growth, development, and differentiation via binding to the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor (TR). Recent studies have demonstrated critical roles of T{sub 3}/TR in tumor progression. Moreover, long-term hypothyroidism appears to be associated with the incidence of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of other major HCC risk factors. Dickkopf (DKK) 4, a secreted protein that antagonizes the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is induced by T{sub 3} at both mRNA and protein levels in HCC cell lines. However, the mechanism underlying T{sub 3}-mediated regulation of DKK4 remains unknown. In the present study, the 5′ promoter region of DKK4 was serially deleted, and the reporter assay performed to localize the T{sub 3} response element (TRE). Consequently, we identified an atypical direct repeat TRE between nucleotides −1645 and −1629 conferring T{sub 3} responsiveness to the DKK4 gene. This region was further validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Stable DKK4 overexpression in SK-Hep-1 cells suppressed cell invasion and metastatic potential, both in vivo andin vitro, via reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression. Our findings collectively suggest that DKK4 upregulated by T{sub 3}/TR antagonizes the Wnt signal pathway to suppress tumor cell progression, thus providing new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid hormone activity in HCC.

  19. Noncoding RNA in the Transcriptional Landscape of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eHecht

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play key roles in cellular processes, particularly in the brain. The present study used RNA sequencing to identify the transcriptional landscape of two human neural progenitor cell lines, SK-N-SH and ReNcell CX, as they differentiate into human cortical projection neurons. Protein coding genes were found to account for 54.8% and 57.0% of expressed genes, respectively, and alignment of RNA sequencing reads revealed that only 25.5-28.1% mapped to exonic regions of the genome. Differential expression analysis in the two cell lines identified altered gene expression in both protein coding and noncoding RNAs as they undergo neural differentiation with 222 differentially expressed genes observed in SK-N-SH cells and 19 differentially expressed genes in ReNcell CX. Interestingly, genes showing differential expression in SK-N-SH cells are enriched in genes implicated in autism spectrum disorder, but not in gene sets related to cancer or Alzheimer’s disease. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA was used to detect modules of co-expressed protein coding and noncoding RNAs in SK-N-SH cells and found four modules to be associated with neural differentiation. These modules contain varying levels of noncoding RNAs ranging from 10.7% to 49.7% with gene ontology suggesting roles in numerous cellular processes important for differentiation. These results indicate that noncoding RNAs are highly expressed in human neural progenitor cells and likely hold key regulatory roles in gene networks underlying neural differentiation and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Noncoding RNA in the transcriptional landscape of human neural progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Patrick M; Ballesteros-Yanez, Inmaculada; Grepo, Nicole; Knowles, James A; Campbell, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play key roles in cellular processes, particularly in the brain. The present study used RNA sequencing to identify the transcriptional landscape of two human neural progenitor cell lines, SK-N-SH and ReNcell CX, as they differentiate into human cortical projection neurons. Protein coding genes were found to account for 54.8 and 57.0% of expressed genes, respectively, and alignment of RNA sequencing reads revealed that only 25.5-28.1% mapped to exonic regions of the genome. Differential expression analysis in the two cell lines identified altered gene expression in both protein coding and noncoding RNAs as they undergo neural differentiation with 222 differentially expressed genes observed in SK-N-SH cells and 19 differentially expressed genes in ReNcell CX. Interestingly, genes showing differential expression in SK-N-SH cells are enriched in genes implicated in autism spectrum disorder, but not in gene sets related to cancer or Alzheimer's disease. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was used to detect modules of co-expressed protein coding and noncoding RNAs in SK-N-SH cells and found four modules to be associated with neural differentiation. These modules contain varying levels of noncoding RNAs ranging from 10.7 to 49.7% with gene ontology suggesting roles in numerous cellular processes important for differentiation. These results indicate that noncoding RNAs are highly expressed in human neural progenitor cells and likely hold key regulatory roles in gene networks underlying neural differentiation and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26557050

  1. T-box transcription factor brachyury promotes tumor cell invasion and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer via upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zongmiao; Jiang, Dongjie; Chen, Su; Jiao, Jian; Ji, Lei; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Wei, Haifeng; Yang, Xinghai; Li, Xiaotao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-07-01

    T-box transcription factor brachyury and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell invasion and metastasis. However, the association between Brachyury and the MMP family has not yet been fully investigated. The present study aimed to assess the influence of Brachyury on the expression of 23 MMP members and to further explore the mechanisms involved in the promotion of NSCLC cell invasion by Brachyury and MMPs in the H460 and H1299 stable cell lines. The protein expression levels and correlations between the brachyury transcription factor and the targeted MMPs were also validated in 52 NSCLC patient tissue samples. We observed that brachyury significantly upregulated MMP12 expression to promote NSCLC cell invasion. We also found a potential binding site for the brachyury transcription factor in the MMP12 promoter. PMID:27176766

  2. Angiopoietin-2 Is a Direct Transcriptional Target of TAL1, LYL1 and LMO2 in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deleuze, Virginie; El-Hajj, Rawan; Chalhoub, Elias; Dohet, Christiane; Pinet, Valérie; Couttet, Philippe; Mathieu, Danièle

    2012-01-01

    The two related basic helix–loop-helix, TAL1 and LYL1, and their cofactor LIM-only-2 protein (LMO2) are present in blood and endothelial cells. While their crucial role in early hematopoiesis is well established, their function in endothelial cells and especially in angiogenesis is less understood. Here, we identified ANGIOPOIETIN-2 (ANG-2), which encodes a major regulator of angiogenesis, as a direct transcriptional target of TAL1, LYL1 and LMO2. Knockdown of any of the three transcription f...

  3. Evaluating the Effect of Cell Culture on Gene Expression in Primary Tissue Samples Using Microfluidic-Based Single Cell Transcriptional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Januszyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant transcriptional heterogeneity is an inherent property of complex tissues such as tumors and healing wounds. Traditional methods of high-throughput analysis rely on pooling gene expression data from hundreds of thousands of cells and reporting a population-wide average that is unable to capture differences within distinct cell subsets. Recent advances in microfluidic technology have permitted the development of large-scale single cell analytic methods that overcome this limitation. The increased granularity afforded by such approaches allows us to answer the critical question of whether expansion in cell culture significantly alters the transcriptional characteristics of cells isolated from primary tissue. Here we examine an established population of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs using a novel, microfluidic-based method for high-throughput transcriptional interrogation, coupled with advanced bioinformatic analysis, to evaluate the dynamics of single cell gene expression among primary, passage 0, and passage 1 stem cells. We find significant differences in the transcriptional profiles of cells from each group, as well as a considerable shift in subpopulation dynamics as those subgroups better able to adhere and proliferate under these culture conditions gradually emerge as dominant. Taken together, these findings reinforce the importance of using primary or very early passage cells in future studies.

  4. Transcriptome changes and cAMP oscillations in an archaeal cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soppa Jörg

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell cycle of all organisms includes mass increase by a factor of two, replication of the genetic material, segregation of the genome to different parts of the cell, and cell division into two daughter cells. It is tightly regulated and typically includes cell cycle-specific oscillations of the levels of transcripts, proteins, protein modifications, and signaling molecules. Until now cell cycle-specific transcriptome changes have been described for four eukaryotic species ranging from yeast to human, but only for two prokaryotic species. Similarly, oscillations of small signaling molecules have been identified in very few eukaryotic species, but not in any prokaryote. Results A synchronization procedure for the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum was optimized, so that nearly 100% of all cells divide in a time interval that is 1/4th of the generation time of exponentially growing cells. The method was used to characterize cell cycle-dependent transcriptome changes using a genome-wide DNA microarray. The transcript levels of 87 genes were found to be cell cycle-regulated, corresponding to 3% of all genes. They could be clustered into seven groups with different transcript level profiles. Cluster-specific sequence motifs were detected around the start of the genes that are predicted to be involved in cell cycle-specific transcriptional regulation. Notably, many cell cycle genes that have oscillating transcript levels in eukaryotes are not regulated on the transcriptional level in H. salinarum. Synchronized cultures were also used to identify putative small signaling molecules. H. salinarum was found to contain a basal cAMP concentration of 200 μM, considerably higher than that of yeast. The cAMP concentration is shortly induced directly prior to and after cell division, and thus cAMP probably is an important signal for cell cycle progression. Conclusion The analysis of cell cycle-specific transcriptome changes of H. salinarum

  5. Clone-specific expression, transcriptional regulation, and action of interleukin-6 in human colon carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many cancer cells produce interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine that plays a role in growth stimulation, metastasis, and angiogenesis of secondary tumours in a variety of malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Effectiveness of IL-6 in this respect may depend on the quantity of basal and inducible IL-6 expressed as the tumour progresses through stages of malignancy. We therefore have evaluated the effect of IL-6 modulators, i.e. IL-1β, prostaglandin E2, 17β-estradiol, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, on expression and synthesis of the cytokine at different stages of tumour progression. We utilized cultures of the human colon carcinoma cell clones Caco-2/AQ, COGA-1A and COGA-13, all of which expressed differentiation and proliferation markers typical of distinct stages of tumour progression. IL-6 mRNA and protein levels were assayed by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. DNA sequencing was utilized to detect polymorphisms in the IL-6 gene promoter. IL-6 mRNA and protein concentrations were low in well and moderately differentiated Caco-2/AQ and COGA-1A cells, but were high in poorly differentiated COGA-13 cells. Addition of IL-1β (5 ng/ml) to a COGA-13 culture raised IL-6 production approximately thousandfold via a prostaglandin-independent mechanism. Addition of 17β-estradiol (10-7 M) reduced basal IL-6 production by one-third, but IL-1β-inducible IL-6 was unaffected. Search for polymorphisms in the IL-6 promoter revealed the presence of a single haplotype, i.e., -597A/-572G/-174C, in COGA-13 cells, which is associated with a high degree of transcriptional activity of the IL-6 gene. IL-6 blocked differentiation only in Caco-2/AQ cells and stimulated mitosis through up-regulation of c-myc proto-oncogene expression. These effects were inhibited by 10-8 M 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. In human colon carcinoma cells derived from well and moderately differentiated tumours, IL-6 expression is low and only marginally affected, if at all, by PGE2, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 17

  6. Quantitative spatial analysis of transcripts in multinucleate cells using single-molecule FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChangHwan; Roberts, Samantha E; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-04-01

    mRNA positioning in the cell is important for diverse cellular functions and proper development of multicellular organisms. Single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) enables quantitative investigation of mRNA localization and abundance at the level of individual molecules in the context of cellular features. Details about spatial mRNA patterning at various times, in different genetic backgrounds, at different developmental stages, and under varied environmental conditions provide invaluable insights into the mechanisms and functions of spatial regulation. Here, we describe detailed methods for performing smFISH along with immunofluorescence for two large, multinucleate cell types: the fungus Ashbya gossypii and cultured mouse myotubes. We also put forward a semi-automated image processing tool that systematically detects mRNAs from smFISH data and statistically analyzes the spatial pattern of mRNAs using a customized MATLAB code. These protocols and image analysis tools can be adapted to a wide variety of transcripts and cell types for systematically and quantitatively analyzing mRNA distribution in three-dimensional space. PMID:26690072

  7. FLIM-FRET microscopy to visualize transcription factor interactions in the nucleus of the living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard N.; Demarco, Ignacio A.; Voss, Ty C.; Chen, Ye; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2004-06-01

    Wide-field fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor the co-localization of the homeodomain (HD) transcription factor Pit-1 and the basic-leucine zipper protein CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPa), each labeled with fluorescent proteins (FP) in the living cell nucleus. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was used to resolve the angstrom-scale spatial relationships of these expressed proteins, and the effect of a Pit-1 point mutation on the interaction with C/EBPa was characterized. Two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2p-FLIM) was then used as an independent method to detect these protein interactions. The excited-state lifetime for the cyan FP (CFP) labeling C/EBPa was determined, and the measurements were repeated in cells co-expressing yellow FP (YFP) labeled-proteins. The CFP lifetime was decreased in the presence of the YFP acceptor, which is consistent with donor quenching by FRET. This was verified by acceptor photobleaching, which caused a shift in the donor lifetime to that similar to the donor alone. However, a significant limitation of this technique was demonstrated by the observation that high-energy 2p-excitation resulted in CFP photobleaching and a parallel decrease in its excited-state lifetime. The key question is whether the sensitivity of this imaging approach will be sufficient to acquire significant data from living cells expressing physiological levels of the labeled proteins.

  8. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. PMID:27128150

  9. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  10. Human embryonic stem cells derived from embryos at different stages of development share similar transcription profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanaratnam Giritharan

    Full Text Available We have derived hESC from biopsied blastomeres of cleavage stage embryos under virtually the same conditions we used for the derivation of hESC lines from inner cell mass of blastocyst stage embryos. Blastomere-derived hESC lines exhibited all the standard characteristics of hESC including undifferentiated proliferation, genomic stability, expression of pluripotency markers and the ability to differentiate into the cells of all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. To examine whether hESC lines derived from two developmental stages of the embryo differ in gene expression, we have subjected three blastomere-derived hESC lines and two ICM-derived hESC lines grown under identical culture conditions to transcriptome analysis using gene expression arrays. Unlike previously reported comparisons of hESC lines which demonstrated, apart from core hESC-associated pluripotency signature, significant variations in gene expression profiles of different lines, our data show that hESC lines derived and grown under well-controlled defined culture conditions adopt nearly identical gene expression profiles. Moreover, blastomere-derived and ICM-derived hESC exhibited very similar transcriptional profiles independent of the developmental stage of the embryo from which they originated. Furthermore, this profile was evident in very early passages of the cells and did not appear to be affected by extensive passaging. These results suggest that during derivation process cells which give rise to hESC acquire virtually identical stable phenotype and are not affected by the developmental stage of the starting cell population.

  11. In Vivo Chromatin Targets of the Transcription Factor Yin Yang 2 in Trophoblast Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Macías-Redondo, Sofía; Climent, María; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Muniesa, Pedro; Schoorlemmer, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Yin Yang 2 (YY2) is a zinc finger protein closely related to the well-characterized Yin Yang 1 (YY1). YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor, with defined functions in multiple developmental processes, such as implantation, cell differentiation, X inactivation, imprinting and organogenesis. Yy2 has been treated as a largely immaterial duplication of Yy1, as they share high homology in the Zinc Finger-region and similar if not identical in vitro binding sites. In contrast to these similarities, gene expression alterations in HeLa cells with attenuated levels of either Yy1 or Yy2 were to some extent gene-specific. Moreover, the chromatin binding sites for YY2, except for its association with transposable retroviral elements (RE) and Endogenous Retroviral Elements (ERVs), remain to be identified. As a first step towards defining potential Yy2 functions matching or complementary to Yy1, we considered in vivo DNA binding sites of YY2 in trophoblast stem (TS) cells. Results We report the presence of YY2 protein in mouse-derived embryonic stem (ES) and TS cell lines. Following up on our previous report on ERV binding by YY2 in TS cells, we investigated the tissue-specificity of REX1 and YY2 binding and confirm binding to RE/ERV targets in both ES cells and TS cells. Because of the higher levels of expression, we chose TS cells to understand the role of Yy2 in gene and chromatin regulation. We used in vivo YY2 association as a measure to identify potential target genes. Sequencing of chromatin obtained in chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays carried out with αYY2 serum allowed us to identify a limited number of chromatin targets for YY2. Some putative binding sites were validated in regular ChIP assays and gene expression of genes nearby was altered in the absence of Yy2. Conclusions YY2 binding to ERVs is not confined to TS cells. In vivo binding sites share the presence of a consensus binding motif. Selected sites were uniquely bound by YY2 as

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:26828681

  13. TRPC1 transcript variants, inefficient nonsense-mediated decay and low up-frameshift-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Bhaskar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1 is a widely-expressed mammalian cationic channel with functional effects that include stimulation of cardiovascular remodelling. The initial aim of this study was to investigate variation in TRPC1-encoding gene transcripts. Results Extensive TRPC1 transcript alternative splicing was observed, with exons 2, 3 and 5-9 frequently omitted, leading to variants containing premature termination codons. Consistent with the predicted sensitivity of such variants to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD the variants were increased by cycloheximide. However it was notable that control of the variants by NMD was prominent in human embryonic kidney 293 cells but not human vascular smooth muscle cells. The cellular difference was attributed in part to a critical protein in NMD, up-frameshift-1 (UPF1, which was found to have low abundance in the vascular cells. Rescue of UPF1 by expression of exogenous UPF1 was found to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions The data suggest: (i extensive NMD-sensitive transcripts of TRPC1; (ii inefficient clearance of aberrant transcripts and enhanced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in part because of low UPF1 expression.

  14. Effects of intracellular chelatable iron and oxidative stress on transcription of classical cellular glutathione peroxidase gene in murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of intracellular chelatable iron levels and of oxidative stress on nuclear classical cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) RNA nascent chain elongation (run-on transcription) and on the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA was investigated in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. The amount in the intracellular low molecular mass iron pool was changed by incubation of MEL cells transformed by Friend virus with iron donors or iron chelators. Transcription in vitro in isolated nuclei from treated cells showed that the treatment with chelators (desferrioxamine (DFO), pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone) decrease the rate of nuclear GSHPx-1 RNA nascent chain elongation in both un-induced and with 5 mmol hexamethylenebisacetamide to erythroid differentiation induced MEL cells. Iron donors (diferric transferrin,, Fe-PIH or their combination) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) had the opposite effect on GSHPx-1 gene transcription in run-on experiments. On the other hand, 50 μmol DFO or 2.5 μmol t-BuOOH did not change the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA in both un-induced and induced MEL cells treated with 5 μmol actinomycin D and with or without these agents for 9 h. These findings indicate that iron and oxidative stress play their role at the transcriptional level of GSHPx-1 gene expression. (author)

  15. The transition to endoreduplication in trophoblast giant cells is regulated by the mSNA zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, H; Scott, I C; Cross, J C

    1998-07-01

    Terminal cell differentiation is usually associated with cell cycle exit. In some lineages, however, cells undergo continued rounds of DNA synthesis without intervening mitoses (endoreduplication) resulting in polyploid nuclei. This is striking in rodent trophoblast giant cells which contain up to 1000N of DNA. In Drosophila, the Escargot gene has been implicated in regulating the transition from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles during development. We found that a murine homologue, mSna, was expressed in mouse trophoblast and was downregulated during giant cell differentiation. The mSNA zinc finger protein bound to E-box DNA elements and, in transfected C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts, acted as a transcriptional repressor. The maximal repressive effect was dependent on both the zinc finger DNA-binding domain and the N-terminal, seven-amino-acid SNAG domain. Misexpression experiments in Rcho-1 trophoblast cells revealed that mSna regulates the transition from replicating precursor cells to committed giant cells: overexpression blocked, whereas antisense RNA-mediated underexpression promoted trophoblast giant cell differentiation. Overexpression of mSna in precursor cells had no effect on cell cycle kinetics, but did increase cyclin A and B levels, implying actions during G2. These effects were dependent on both the zinc finger and SNAG domains. Together, these data suggest that mSNA has an ESCARGOT-like function to repress the transcription of genes that promote the transition from mitotic to endoreduplicative cell cycles in rodent trophoblast. PMID:9676199

  16. EWS-FLI1 inhibits TNFα-induced NFκB-dependent transcription in Ewing sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → EWS-FLI1 interferes with TNF-induced activation of NFκB in Ewing sarcoma cells. → EWS-FLI1 knockdown in Ewing sarcoma cells increases TNF-induced NFκB binding to DNA. → EWS-FLI1 reduces TNF-stimulated NFκB-dependent transcriptional activation. → Constitutive NFκB activity is not affected by EWS-FLI1. → EWS-FLI1 physically interacts with NFκB p65 in vivo. -- Abstract: Ewing sarcoma is primarily caused by a t(11;22) chromosomal translocation encoding the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. To exert its oncogenic function, EWS-FLI1 acts as an aberrant transcription factor, broadly altering the gene expression profile of tumor cells. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) is a tightly regulated transcription factor controlling cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as tumorigenesis. NFκB activity is very low in unstimulated Ewing sarcoma cells, but can be induced in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We wondered whether NFκB activity could be modulated by EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma. Using a knockdown approach in Ewing sarcoma cells, we demonstrated that EWS-FLI1 has no influence on NFκB basal activity, but impairs TNF-induced NFκB-driven transcription, at least in part through inhibition of NFκB binding to DNA. We detected an in vivo physical interaction between the fusion protein and NFκB p65, which could mediate these effects. Our findings suggest that, besides directly controlling the activity of its primary target promoters, EWS-FLI1 can also indirectly influence gene expression in tumor cells by modulating the activity of key transcription factors such as NFκB.

  17. High-Throughput siRNA Screening to Reveal GATA-2 Upstream Transcriptional Mechanisms in Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Saito

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell types. The transcription factor GATA-2 is expressed in both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and is essential for cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recently, evidence from studies of aplastic anemia, MonoMAC syndrome, and lung cancer has demonstrated a mechanistic link between GATA-2 and human pathophysiology. GATA-2-dependent disease processes have been extensively analyzed; however, the transcriptional mechanisms upstream of GATA-2 remain less understood. Here, we conducted high-throughput small-interfering-RNA (siRNA library screening and showed that YN-1, a human erythroleukemia cell line, expressed high levels of GATA-2 following the activation of the hematopoietic-specific 1S promoter. As transient luciferase reporter assay in YN-1 cells revealed the highest promoter activity in the 1S promoter fused with GATA-2 intronic enhancer (+9.9 kb/1S; therefore, we established a cell line capable of stably expressing +9.9 kb/1S-Luciferase. Subsequently, we screened 995 transcription factor genes and revealed that CITED2 acts as a GATA-2 activator in human hematopoietic cells. These results provide novel insights into and further identify the regulatory mechanism of GATA-2.

  18. Transcripts for genes encoding soluble acid invertase and sucrose synthase accumulate in root tip and cortical cells containing mycorrhizal arbuscules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Kristopher A; Anderson, Anne J

    2002-09-01

    Arbuscule formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices (Schenck & Smith) was limited to cortical cells immediately adjacent to the endodermis. Because these cortical cells are the first to intercept photosynthate exiting the vascular cylinder, transcript levels for sucrose metabolizing-enzymes were compared between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots. The probes corresponded to genes encoding a soluble acid invertase with potential vacuolar targeting, which we generated from Phaseolus vulgaris roots, a Rhizobium-responsive sucrose synthase of soybean and a cell wall acid invertase of carrot. Transcripts in non-mycorrhizal roots were developmentally regulated and abundant in the root tips for all three probes but in differentiated roots of P. vulgaris they were predominantly located in phloem tissues for sucrose synthase or the endodermis and phloem for soluble acid invertase. In mycorrhizal roots increased accumulations of transcripts for sucrose synthase and vacuolar invertase were both observed in the same cortical cells bearing arbuscules that fluoresce. There was no effect on the expression of the cell wall invertase gene in fluorescent carrot cells containing arbuscules. Thus, it appears that presence of the fungal hyphae in the fluorescent arbusculated cell stimulates discrete alterations in expression of sucrose metabolizing enzymes to increase the sink potential of the cell. PMID:12175013

  19. Blimp-1/PRDM1 regulates the transcription of human CS1 (SLAMF7) gene in NK and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong R; Mathew, Stephen O; Mathew, Porunelloor A

    2016-01-01

    CS1 (CRACC/CD319/SLAMF7) is a member of SLAM (Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule) family receptors and is expressed on NK cells, a subset of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, activated monocytes, mature dendritic cells and activated B cells. In NK cells, CS1 signaling induces cytolytic function of NK cells against targets whereas in B cells CS1 induces proliferation and autocrine cytokine production. CS1 is upregulated in multiple myeloma cells and contributes to clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity. However, the mechanism of CS1 upregulation is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of human CS1 gene in NK and B cells. The promoter region of CS1 contains a Blimp-1/PRDM1 binding site and relative luciferase activities of successive deletion mutants of CS1 promoter were different between Blimp-1/PRDM1-positive and Blimp-1/PRDM1-negative cells. Proximal region of CS1 promoter contains a CAAT box and atypical TATA-box that might result in common transcription initiation at -29 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translation start codon. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed Blimp-1/PRDM1 binds to the CS1 promoter region. Mutating the Blimp-1/PRDM1 site at -750 to -746 decreased the transcriptional activity of CS1 promoter implicating a trans-activating function of Blimp-1/PRDM1 in human CS1 gene regulation. The finding that Blimp-1/PRDM1 enhances transcription of CS1 gene in multiple myeloma cells may help in developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention in multiple myeloma. PMID:26310579

  20. T-bet, a Th1 transcription factor, is up-regulated in T cells from patients with aplastic anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Solomou, Elena E.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Young, Neal S.

    2006-01-01

    In aplastic anemia, immune destruction of hematopoietic cells results in bone marrow failure. Type 1 cytokines, especially IFN-γ, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of T-cell–mediated, Fas-mediated stem cell apoptosis of hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that the transcription factor T-bet (T-box expressed in T cells) is increased in T cells from patients with aplastic anemia. Patients' T-bet bound directly to the proximal site of the IFN-γ promoter without any prior stimulation, in...

  1. Genome-wide analyses of transcription factor GATA3-mediated gene regulation in distinct T cell types

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Gang; Abraham, Brian J.; Yagi, Ryoji; Jothi, Raja; Cui, Kairong; Sharma, Suveena; Narlikar, Leelavati; Northrup, Daniel L.; Tang, Qingsong; Paul, William E.; Zhu, Jinfang; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 plays an essential role during T cell development and T helper 2 (Th2) cell differentiation. To understand GATA3-mediated gene regulation, we identified genome-wide GATA3 binding sites in ten well-defined developmental and effector T lymphocyte lineages. In the thymus, GATA3 directly regulated many critical factors, including Th-POK, Notch1 and T cell receptor subunits. In the periphery, GATA3 induced a large number of Th2 cell-specific as well as Th2 cell non-s...

  2. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Velpula

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation

  3. Aberrant expression and biological significance of Sox2, an embryonic stem cell transcriptional factor, in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sox2 (sex-determining region Y-Box) is one of the master transcriptional factors that are important in maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In line with this function, Sox2 expression is largely restricted to ESCs and somatic stem cells. We report that Sox2 is expressed in cell lines and tumor samples derived from ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ALCL), for which the normal cellular counterpart is believed to be mature T-cells. The expression of Sox2 in ALK+ALCL can be attributed to nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), the oncogenic fusion protein carrying a central pathogenetic role in these tumors. By confocal microscopy, Sox2 protein was detectable in virtually all cells in ALK+ALCL cell lines. However, the transcriptional activity of Sox2, as assessed using a Sox2-responsive reporter construct, was detectable only in a small proportion of cells. Importantly, downregulation of Sox2 using short interfering RNA in isolated Sox2active cells, but not Sox2inactive cells, resulted in a significant decrease in cell growth, invasiveness and tumorigenicity. To conclude, ALK+ALCL represents the first example of a hematologic malignancy that aberrantly expresses Sox2, which represents a novel mechanism by which NPM-ALK mediates tumorigenesis. We also found that the transcriptional activity and oncogenic effects of Sox2 can be heterogeneous in cancer cells

  4. Transcriptional reprogramming of gene expression in bovine somatic cell chromatin transfer embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Grier P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful reprogramming of a somatic genome to produce a healthy clone by somatic cells nuclear transfer (SCNT is a rare event and the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly defined. When serial or successive rounds of cloning are performed, blastocyst and full term development rates decline even further with the increasing rounds of cloning. Identifying the "cumulative errors" could reveal the epigenetic reprogramming blocks in animal cloning. Results Bovine clones from up to four generations of successive cloning were produced by chromatin transfer (CT. Using Affymetrix bovine microarrays we determined that the transcriptomes of blastocysts derived from the first and the fourth rounds of cloning (CT1 and CT4 respectively have undergone an extensive reprogramming and were more similar to blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF than to the donor cells used for the first and the fourth rounds of chromatin transfer (DC1 and DC4 respectively. However a set of transcripts in the cloned embryos showed a misregulated pattern when compared to IVF embryos. Among the genes consistently upregulated in both CT groups compared to the IVF embryos were genes involved in regulation of cytoskeleton and cell shape. Among the genes consistently upregulated in IVF embryos compared to both CT groups were genes involved in chromatin remodelling and stress coping. Conclusion The present study provides a data set that could contribute in our understanding of epigenetic errors in somatic cell chromatin transfer. Identifying "cumulative errors" after serial cloning could reveal some of the epigenetic reprogramming blocks shedding light on the reprogramming process, important for both basic and applied research.

  5. PU.1 Suppresses Th2 Cytokine Expression via Silencing of GATA3 Transcription in Dendritic Cells.

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    Takuya Yashiro

    Full Text Available The transcription factor PU.1 is predominantly expressed in dendritic cells (DCs and is essential for DC differentiation. Although there are several reports that PU.1 positively regulates the expression of DC-specific genes, whether PU.1 also has a suppressive effect on DCs is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that PU.1 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines including IL-13 and IL-5 in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs, through repression of the expression of GATA3, which is a master regulator of Th2 differentiations. When PU.1 siRNA was introduced into BMDCs, LPS-induced expression of IL-13 and IL-5 was increased along with upregulation of the constitutive expression of GATA2 and GATA3. The additional introduction of GATA3 siRNA but not of GATA2 siRNA abrogated PU.1 siRNA-mediated upregulation of IL-13 and IL-5. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that PU.1 bound to Gata3 proximal promoter region, which is more dominant than the distal promoter in driving GATA3 transcription in DCs. The degree of histone acetylation at the Gata3 promoter was decreased in PU.1 siRNA-introduced DCs, suggesting the involvement of PU.1 in chromatin modification of the Gata3 promoter. Treatment with a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, increased the degree of histone H3 acetylation at the Gata3 promoter and induced the subsequent expression of GATA3. Experiments using HDAC inhibitors and siRNAs showed that HDAC3 suppressed GATA3 expression. The recruitment of HDAC3 to the Gata3 promoter was decreased by PU.1 knockdown. LPS-induced IL-13 expression was dramatically reduced in BMDCs generated from mice lacking the conserved GATA3 response element, termed CGRE, which is an essential site for the binding of GATA3 on the Il-13 promoter. The degree of H3K4me3 at CGRE was significantly increased in PU.1 siRNA-transfected stimulated DCs. Our results indicate that PU.1 plays pivotal roles in DC development and function, serving not only as a

  6. Silymarin Induces Expression of Pancreatic Nkx6.1 Transcription Factor and β-Cells Neogenesis in a Pancreatectomy Model

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    Claudia Soto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A physio-pathological feature of diabetes mellitus is a significant reduction of β-pancreatic cells. The growth, differentiation and function maintenance of these cells is directed by transcription factors. Nkx6.1 is a key transcription factor for the differentiation, neogenesis and maintenance of β-pancreatic cells. We reported that silymarin restores normal morphology and endocrine function of damaged pancreatic tissue after alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in rats. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of silymarin on Nkx6.1 transcription factor expression and its consequence in β cells neogenesis. Sixty male Wistar rats were partially pancreatectomized and divided into twelve groups. Six groups were treated with silymarin (200 mg/Kg p.o for periods of 3, 7, 14, 21, 42 and 63 days. Additionally, an unpancreatectomized control group was used. Nkx6.1 and insulin gene expression were assessed by RT-PCR assay in total pancreatic RNA. β-Cell neogenesis was determined by immunoperoxidase assay. Silymarin treated group showed an increase of Nkx6.1 and insulin genic expression. In this group, there was an increment of β-cell neogenesis in comparison to pancreatectomized untreated group. Silymarin treatment produced a rise in serum insulin and serum glucose normalization. These results suggest that silymarin may improve the reduction of β pancreatic cells observed in diabetes mellitus.

  7. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  8. Canonical pathways, networks and transcriptional factor regulation by clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvubu, Nontobeko E; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-03-01

    Limited knowledge exists on pathways, networks and transcriptional factors regulated within epithelial cells by diverse Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes. This study aimed to elucidate these mechanisms induced in A549 epithelial cells by dominant clinical strains in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. RNA for sequencing was extracted from epithelial cells at 48 h post-infection with 5 strains at a multiplicity of infection of approximately 10:1. Bioinformatics analysis performed with the RNA-Seq Tuxedo pipeline identified differentially expressed genes. Changes in pathways, networks and transcriptional factors were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). The interferon signalling and hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation pathways were among the top 5 canonical pathways in all strains. Hierarchical clustering for enrichment of cholesterol biosynthesis and immune associated pathways revealed similar patterns for Beijing and Unique; F15/LAM4/KZN and F11; and, F28 and H37Rv strains, respectively. However, the induction of top scoring networks varied among the strains. Among the transcriptional factors, only EHL, IRF7, PML, STAT1, STAT2 and VDR were induced by all clinical strains. Activation of the different pathways, networks and transcriptional factors revealed in the current study may be an underlying mechanism that results in the differential host response by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26980499

  9. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Lmo2 is a T cell leukemia-related proto-oncogene, which belongs to the LIM protein family. Previous work has established its key role in yolk sac erythropoiesis and adult hematopoiesis, and it is also necessary for regulating angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that this gene encodes a protein of 158 amino acids, consisting of two tandem cysteine-rich LIM domains, but the detailed mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. To further investigate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of Lmo2, we combined SMART PCR technology with 5′RACE and found a novel post-transcriptional splicing form of Lmo2 in adult human kidney. This alternative transcript contains only two exons, encoding a smaller protein of 151 amino acids. Interestingly, it shares the same reading frame as the original Lmo2, but differs in 7 amino acids at the N-terminus. A genomic DNA fragment (from ?294 nts to +180 nts) containing the putative promoter region has been inserted into the luciferase reporter gene vector pGL3-basic and showed stable promoter activity when transfected into COS7. RT-PCR analysis revealed that this variant transcript was expressed widely in human tissues and cell lines, suggesting its potential basic functional importance.

  10. Epidermal growth factor-mediated T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcriptional activity is essential but not sufficient for cell cycle progression in nontransformed mammary epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Nicholas A.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2004-01-01

    Because beta-catenin target genes such as cyclin D1 are involved in cell cycle progression, we examined whether beta-catenin has a more pervasive role in normal cell proliferation, even upon stimulation by non-Wnt ligands. Here, we demonstrate that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (Tcf/Lef) transcriptional activity in nontransformed mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and that its transcriptional activity is essential for EGF-mediated progression ...

  11. Sorafenib Inhibits Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 Signaling in Cholangiocarcinoma Cells by Activating the Phosphatase Shatterproof 2

    OpenAIRE

    Blechacz, Boris R. A.; Smoot, Rory L.; Bronk, Steven F; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Sirica, Alphonse E.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2009-01-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of the key signaling cascades in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells, mediating their resistance to apoptosis. Our aim was to ascertain if sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, may also inhibit JAK/STAT signaling and, therefore, be efficacious for CCA. Sorafenib treatment of three human CCA cell lines resulted in Tyr705 phospho-STAT3 dephosphorylation. Similar results were obtained with the Raf-kinase inhibit...

  12. The Snail Transcription Factor Regulates the Numbers of Neural Precursor Cells and Newborn Neurons throughout Mammalian Life

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Mark A.; Cancino, Gonzalo I.; Gridley, Thomas; Kaplan, David R.; Miller, Freda D.

    2014-01-01

    The Snail transcription factor regulates diverse aspects of stem cell biology in organisms ranging from Drosophila to mammals. Here we have asked whether it regulates the biology of neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the forebrain of postnatal and adult mice, taking advantage of a mouse containing a floxed Snail allele (Snailfl/fl mice). We show that when Snail is inducibly ablated in the embryonic cortex, this has long-term consequences for cortical organization. In particular, when Snailfl/fl...

  13. Heavy Water Reduces GFP Expression in Prokaryotic Cell-Free Assays at the Translation Level While Stimulating Its Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hohlefelder, Luisa S.; Tobias Stögbauer; Madeleine Opitz; Bayerl, Thomas M.; Joachim O. Rädler

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro proliferation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is remarkably hampered in the presence of heavy water (D2O). Impairment of gene expression at the transcription or translation level can be the base for this effect. However, insights into the underlying mechanisms are lacking. Here, we employ a cell-free expression system for the quantitative analysis of the effect of increasing percentages of D2O on the kinetics of in-vitro GFP expression. Experiments are designed to discriminat...

  14. Hypoxia increases rate of transcription and stability of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Furnari, B A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1994-01-01

    Reduced arterial oxygen tension (i.e. hypoxia) is a powerful physiological stimulus that induces synthesis and release of dopamine from O2-sensitive (type I) cells in the mammalian carotid bodies. We reported recently that hypoxia stimulates gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis in type I cells of the carotid body. Efforts to identify the mechanisms regulating TH gene expression in O2-sensitive cells during hypoxia have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model cell culture system. Here we report that TH gene expression in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) is regulated during hypoxia in a manner similar to that measured in carotid body type I cells. PC12 cells might therefore be useful as an experimental model for identifying the molecular mechanisms that regulate TH gene expression during hypoxia. Nuclear runoff assays revealed that transcription of the wild type TH gene was enhanced during exposures to hypoxia lasting 12 h. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays with constructs that contained different fragments of TH promoter revealed that the regulatory sequences that mediate the hypoxia-induced increase in transcription are located between bases -272 and +27 of the TH gene. Findings from experiments in which transcription was inhibited either with actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, as well as pulse-chase experiments using 4-thiouridine showed that the half-life of TH mRNA was substantially increased during hypoxia. Thus, in the present paper we show that TH gene expression in PC12 cells during hypoxia is regulated by increases in both the rate of TH gene transcription and TH mRNA stability. PMID:7903970

  15. Upregulation of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factor Expression in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL

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    Müge Sayitoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is associated with recurrent chromosomal aberrations and abnormal ectopic gene expression during T-cell development. In order to gain insight into the pathogenesis of T-ALL this study aimed to measure the level of expression of 7 T-cell oncogenes (LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, and CALM-AF10 in pediatric T-ALL patients. METHODS: LMO2, LYL1, TLX1, TLX3, BMI1, TAL1, and CALM-AF10 expression was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in 43 pediatric T-ALL patients. RESULTS: A high level of expression of LMO2, LYL1, TAL1, and BMI1 genes was observed in a large group of T-ALL. Several gene expression signatures indicative of leukemic arrest at specific stages of normal thymocyte development (LYL1 and LMO2 were highly expressed during the cortical and mature stages of T-cell development. Furthermore, upregulated TAL1 and BMI1 expression was observed in all phenotypic subgroups. In all, 6 of the patients had TLX1 and TLX3 proto-oncogene expression, which does not occur in normal cells, and none of the patients had CALM-AF10 fusion gene transcription. Expression of LYL1 alone and LMO2-LYL1 co-expression were associated with mediastinal involvement; however, high-level oncogene expression was not predictive of outcome in the present pediatric T-ALL patient group, but there was a trend towards a poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 protooncogene expression. CONCLUSION: Poor prognostic impact of TAL1 and/or LMO2 and/or LYL1 proto-oncogene expression indicate the need for extensive study on oncogenic rearrangement and immunophenotypic markers in T-ALL, and their relationship to treatment outcome.

  16. PARP-1 and YY1 are important novel regulators of CXCL12 gene transcription in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Marković

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12 transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1 in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the

  17. Transcriptional cofactors exhibit differential preference toward peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and delta in uterine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyunjung J; Moon, Irene; Han, Kyuyong

    2004-06-01

    We previously showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta) is crucial for embryo implantation as a receptor for cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostacyclin in mice. PPARs belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. They form heterodimer with a retinoid X receptor, recruit transcriptional cofactors, and bind to a specific recognition element for regulation of target genes. Although cofactors are generally shared by various nuclear receptors, some are involved in cell-specific events. The objective of this investigation was to examine interactions of transcriptional cofactors with PPARdelta in uterine cells for its effectiveness in regulating gene expression. We chose two uterine cellular systems: periimplantation mouse uterus and AN(3)CA human uterine cell line. As examined by in situ hybridization, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-2, SRC-3, PPAR-interacting protein, receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140), nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR), and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) exhibit overlapping expression with that of PPARdelta in the periimplantation mouse uterus. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays show that PPARdelta physically interacts with SRC 1-3, RIP140, PPAR-binding protein, N-CoR, and SMRT in the absence of ligands, suggesting their potent interactions with PPARdelta. Transient transfection assays in AN(3)CA cells show that among members of the SRC family, only SRC-2 serves as a true coactivator for PPARdelta, whereas all SRC members could enhance PPARalpha-induced transcriptional activation. Interestingly, N-CoR and SMRT potently repress PPARdelta-induced transcriptional activation but fail to repress PPARalpha activity. RIP140 is effective in repressing basal and PPAR-induced transcriptional activation. Collectively, the results suggest that gene regulation by PPARdelta in the uterine cells uniquely responds to SRC-2, N-CoR, SMRT, or RIP140, and these interactions may be

  18. Transcription profiles of endothelial cells in the rat ductus arteriosus during a perinatal period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norika Mengchia Liu

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs lining the blood vessels serve a variety of functions and play a central role in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. Since the ductus arteriosus (DA has different arterial characteristics from its connecting vessels, we hypothesized that ECs of the DA exhibited a unique gene profile involved in the regulation of DA-specific morphology and function. Using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, we isolated ECs from pooled tissues from the DA or the descending aorta of Wistar rat fetuses at full-term of gestation (F group or neonates 30 minutes after birth (N group. Using anti-CD31 and anti-CD45 antibodies as cell surface markers for ECs and hematopoietic derived cells, respectively, cDNAs from the CD31-positive and CD45-negative cells were hybridized to the Affymetrix GeneChip® Rat Gene 1.0 ST Array. Among 26,469 gene-level probe sets, 82 genes in the F group and 81 genes in the N group were expressed at higher levels in DA ECs than in aortic ECs (p2.0. In addition to well-known endothelium-enriched genes such as Tgfb2 and Vegfa, novel DA endothelium-dominant genes including Slc38a1, Capn6, and Lrat were discovered. Enrichment analysis using GeneGo MetaCore software showed that DA endothelium-related biological processes were involved in morphogenesis and development. We identified many overlapping genes in each process including neural crest-related genes (Hoxa1, Hoxa4, and Hand2, etc and the second heart field-related genes (Tbx1, Isl1, and Fgf10, etc. Moreover, we found that regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell adhesion, and retinol metabolism are the active pathways involved in the network via potential interactions with many of the identified genes to form DA-specific endothelia. In conclusion, the present study uncovered several significant differences of the transcriptional profile between the DA and aortic ECs. Newly identified DA endothelium-dominant genes may play an important role in DA

  19. Human GATA-3: a lineage-restricted transcription factor that regulates the expression of the T cell receptor alpha gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, I C; Vorhees, P; Marin, N; Oakley, B K; Tsai, S F; Orkin, S H; Leiden, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    In addition to its role in the recognition of foreign antigens, the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha gene serves as a model system for studies of developmentally-regulated, lineage-specific gene expression in T cells. TCR alpha gene expression is restricted to cells of the TCR alpha/beta+ lineage, and is controlled by a T cell-specific transcriptional enhancer located 4.5 kb 3' to the C alpha gene segment. The TCR alpha enhancer contains four nuclear protein binding sites called T alpha 1-T alpha ...

  20. Dynamic regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription during mouse brown fat cell differentiation and recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2009-01-01

    ) and a remarkably higher mitochondrial abundance in brown adipocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a comprehensive characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial DNA replication, transcription and function during white and brown fat cell differentiation in vitro as well...... in brown adipocyte precursor cells promotes mitochondrial DNA replication, and that silencing of PRDM16 expression during brown fat cell differentiation blunts mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of brown fat cell markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using both in vitro and in vivo model systems of...

  1. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  2. Transcription factor Ets1, but not the closely related factor Ets2, inhibits antibody-secreting cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Shinu; Russell, Lisa; Chin, Shu Shien; Luo, Wei; Oshima, Robert; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-02-01

    B cell differentiation into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) is a tightly regulated process under the control of multiple transcription factors. One such transcription factor, Ets1, blocks the transition of B cells to ASCs via two separate activities: (i) stimulating the expression of target genes that promote B cell identity and (ii) interfering with the functional activity of the transcription factor Blimp1. Ets1 is a member of a multigene family, several members of which are expressed within the B cell lineage, including the closely related protein Ets2. In this report, we demonstrate that Ets1, but not Ets2, can block ASC formation despite the fact that Ets1 and Ets2 bind to apparently identical DNA sequence motifs and are thought to regulate overlapping sets of target genes. The DNA binding domain of Ets1 is required, but not sufficient by itself, to block ASC formation. In addition, less conserved regions within the N terminus of Ets1 play an important role in inhibiting B cell differentiation. Differences between the N termini of Ets1 and Ets2, rather than differences in the DNA binding domains, determine whether the proteins are capable of blocking ASC formation or not. PMID:24277931

  3. Effects of Argentilactone on the Transcriptional Profile, Cell Wall and Oxidative Stress of Paracoccidioides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Felipe Souto; Coelho, Luciene Melo; Silva, Lívia do Carmo; da Silva Neto, Benedito Rodrigues; Parente-Rocha, Juliana Alves; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Hernández, Orville; Ochoa, Juan Guillermo McEwen; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides spp., a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). PCM is an endemic disease that affects at least 10 million people in Latin America, causing severe public health problems. The drugs used against pathogenic fungi have various side effects and limited efficacy; therefore, there is an inevitable and urgent medical need for the development of new antifungal drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii exposed to argentilactone, a constituent of the essential oil of Hyptis ovalifolia. A total of 1,058 genes were identified, of which 208 were up-regulated and 850 were down-regulated. Cell rescue, defense and virulence, with a total of 26 genes, was a functional category with a large number of genes induced, including heat shock protein 90 (hsp90), cytochrome c peroxidase (ccp), the hemoglobin ligand RBT5 (rbt5) and superoxide dismutase (sod). Quantitative real-time PCR revealed an increase in the expression level of all of those genes. An enzymatic assay showed a significant increase in SOD activity. The reduced growth of Pbhsp90-aRNA, Pbccp-aRNA, Pbsod-aRNA and Pbrbt5-aRNA isolates in the presence of argentilactone indicates the importance of these genes in the response of Paracoccidioides spp. to argentilactone. The response of the P. lutzii cell wall to argentilactone treatment was also evaluated. The results showed that argentilactone caused a decrease in the levels of polymers in the cell wall. These results suggest that argentilactone is a potential candidate for antifungal therapy. PMID:26734764

  4. Connectivity in the yeast cell cycle transcription network: inferences from neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Hart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A current challenge is to develop computational approaches to infer gene network regulatory relationships based on multiple types of large-scale functional genomic data. We find that single-layer feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN models can effectively discover gene network structure by integrating global in vivo protein:DNA interaction data (ChIP/Array with genome-wide microarray RNA data. We test this on the yeast cell cycle transcription network, which is composed of several hundred genes with phase-specific RNA outputs. These ANNs were robust to noise in data and to a variety of perturbations. They reliably identified and ranked 10 of 12 known major cell cycle factors at the top of a set of 204, based on a sum-of-squared weights metric. Comparative analysis of motif occurrences among multiple yeast species independently confirmed relationships inferred from ANN weights analysis. ANN models can capitalize on properties of biological gene networks that other kinds of models do not. ANNs naturally take advantage of patterns of absence, as well as presence, of factor binding associated with specific expression output; they are easily subjected to in silico "mutation" to uncover biological redundancies; and they can use the full range of factor binding values. A prominent feature of cell cycle ANNs suggested an analogous property might exist in the biological network. This postulated that "network-local discrimination" occurs when regulatory connections (here between MBF and target genes are explicitly disfavored in one network module (G2, relative to others and to the class of genes outside the mitotic network. If correct, this predicts that MBF motifs will be significantly depleted from the discriminated class and that the discrimination will persist through evolution. Analysis of distantly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe confirmed this, suggesting that network-local discrimination is real and complements well-known enrichment of

  5. Cell type-specific termination of transcription by transposable element sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Conley Andrew B; Jordan I

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs) encode sequences necessary for their own transposition, including signals required for the termination of transcription. TE sequences within the introns of human genes show an antisense orientation bias, which has been proposed to reflect selection against TE sequences in the sense orientation owing to their ability to terminate the transcription of host gene transcripts. While there is evidence in support of this model for some elements, the ex...

  6. Expression of transcription factor Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-hong; WANG Sheng-fa; YU Liang; WANG Ju; CHANG Hao; YAN Wei-li; FU Kai; ZHANG Jian

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factor Pokemon,a central regulation gene of the important tumor suppressor ARF gene,exerted its activity by acting upstream of many tumor-suppressing genes and proto-oncogenes.Its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)and its clinical significance remains unclear.The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in NSCLC and to explore its correlation with the clinical pathological characteristics and its influence on patients'prognosis.Methods Fifty-five cases of NSCLC were involved in this study.The expression of Pokemon in the tumor tissue,the corresponding tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue was detected via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and Western blotting,with the aim of investigating the correlation between the expression of Pokemon in tumor tissue of NSCLC and its clinicaI pathological characteristics.Moreover,a prognostic analysis was carried out based upon the immunohistochemical(IHC)detection of the expression of Pokemon gene in archival tumor specimens (5 years ago) of 62 cases of NSCLC.Results Statistical significance of the expression of Pokemon mRNA and protein was determined in the tumor tissue,the tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue (P<0.05).The expression of Pokemon was determined not to be associated with the patients'sex,age,smoking condition,tumor differentiation degree,histology and lymph node metastasis condition.However,its relationship with TNM staging was established(P<0.05).Furthermore,it was shown that the suwival rate of patients with negative Pokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression(P=0.004),therefore,the expression of Pokemon is believed to be an independent factor affectinq prognosis (P=0.034).Concluaion Pokemon was over-expressed in NSCLC tissue and the expression of Pokemon might be of clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer prognostic evaluation.

  7. KLF4 and SOX9 Transcription Factors Antagonize β-Catenin and Inhibit TCF-Activity In Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sellak, Hassan; Wu, Songwei; Lincoln, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional activator β-catenin is a key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. β-catenin itself does not bind DNA but functions via interaction with T-cell factor (TCF)/ lymphoid-enhancing factor (LEF) transcription factors. Thus, in the case of active Wnt signaling, β-catenin, in cooperation with TCF/LEF proteins family, activates the expression of a wide variety of genes. To date, the list of established β-catenin interacting targets is far from complete. In this study, w...

  8. mSin3A Regulates Murine Erythroleukemia Cell Differentiation through Association with the TAL1 (or SCL) Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Suming; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Activation of the TAL1 (or SCL) gene is the most frequent gain-of-function mutation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). TAL1 belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors that bind as heterodimers with the E2A and HEB/HTF4 gene products to a nucleotide sequence motif termed the E-box. Reported to act both as an activator and as a repressor of transcription, the mechanisms underlying TAL1-regulated gene expression are poorly understood. We report here ...

  9. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  10. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals cell type-specific transcriptional signatures at the maternal–foetal interface during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Mould, Arne W.; Bikoff, Elizabeth K.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Growth and survival of the mammalian embryo within the uterine environment depends on the placenta, a highly complex vascularized organ comprised of both maternal and foetal tissues. Recent experiments demonstrate that the zinc finger transcriptional repressor Prdm1/Blimp1 is essential for specification of spiral artery trophoblast giant cells (SpA-TGCs) that invade and remodel maternal blood vessels. To learn more about functional contributions made by Blimp1+ cell lineages here we perform the first single-cell RNA-seq analysis of the placenta. Cell types of both foetal and maternal origin are profiled. Comparisons with microarray datasets from mutant placenta and in vitro differentiated trophoblast stem cells allow us to identify Blimp1-dependent transcripts enriched in SpA-TGCs. Our experiments provide new insights into the functionally distinct cell types present at the maternal–foetal interface and advance our knowledge of dynamic gene expression patterns controlling placental morphogenesis and vascular mimicry. PMID:27108815

  11. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the Bax gene promoter affects transcription and influences retinal ganglion cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila J Semaan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pro-apoptotic Bax is essential for RGC (retinal ganglion cell death. Gene dosage experiments in mice, yielding a single wild-type Bax allele, indicated that genetic background was able to influence the cell death phenotype. DBA/2JBax+/− mice exhibited complete resistance to nerve damage after 2 weeks (similar to Bax−/− mice, but 129B6Bax+/− mice exhibited significant cell loss (similar to wild-type mice. The different cell death phenotype was associated with the level of Bax expression, where 129B6 neurons had twice the level of endogenous Bax mRNA and protein as DBA/2J neurons. Sequence analysis of the Bax promoters between these strains revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (T129B6 to CDBA/2J at position −515. A 1.5- to 2.5-fold increase in transcriptional activity was observed from the 129B6 promoter in transient transfection assays in a variety of cell types, including RGC5 cells derived from rat RGCs. Since this polymorphism occurred in a p53 half-site, we investigated the requirement of p53 for the differential transcriptional activity. Differential transcriptional activity from either 129B6 or DBA/2J Bax promoters were unaffected in p53−/− cells, and addition of exogenous p53 had no further effect on this difference, thus a role for p53 was excluded. Competitive electrophoretic mobility-shift assays identified two DNA–protein complexes that interacted with the polymorphic region. Those forming Complex 1 bound with higher affinity to the 129B6 polymorphic site, suggesting that these proteins probably comprised a transcriptional activator complex. These studies implicated quantitative expression of the Bax gene as playing a possible role in neuronal susceptibility to damaging stimuli.

  12. Characterization of a spliced exon product of herpes simplex type-1 latency-associated transcript in productively infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latency-associated transcripts (LATs) of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) are the only viral RNAs accumulating during latent infections in the sensory ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. The major form of LAT that accumulates in latently infected neurons is a 2 kb intron, spliced from a much less abundant 8.3 primary transcript. The spliced exon mRNA has been hard to detect. However, in this study, we have examined the spliced exon RNA in productively infected cells using ribonuclease protection (RPA), and quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays. We were able to detect the LAT exon RNA in productively infected SY5Y cells (a human neuronal cell line). The level of the LAT exon RNA was found to be approximately 5% that of the 2 kb intron RNA and thus is likely to be relatively unstable. Quantitative RT-PCR (q-PCR) assays were used to examine the LAT exon RNA and its properties. They confirmed that the LAT exon mRNA is present at a very low level in productively infected cells, compared to the levels of other viral transcripts. Furthermore, experiments showed that the LAT exon mRNA is expressed as a true late gene, and appears to be polyadenylated. In SY5Y cells, in contrast to most late viral transcripts, the LAT exon RNA was found to be mainly nuclear localized during the late stage of a productive infection. Interestingly, more LAT exon RNA was found in the cytoplasm in differentiated compared to undifferentiated SY5Y cells, suggesting the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of the LAT exon RNA and its related function may be influenced by the differentiation state of cells

  13. The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an epithelial–mesenchymal transition in MDCK cells independent of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Wakako; Ozawa, Masayuki, E-mail: mozawa@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •The transcription factor LEF-1 induces an EMT in MDCK cells. •A mutant LEF-1 that cannot interact with β-catenin retained the ability. •The nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the LEF-1-induced EMT. •The mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 increased significantly in these cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell–cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. LEF-1 is a member of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) family of DNA-binding transcription factors, which interact with nuclear β-catenin and act as central transcriptional mediators of Wnt signaling. To investigate the role of LEF-1 in EMT, we generated stable LEF-1 transfectants using MDCK cells. The transfectants had a spindle-shaped mesenchymal morphology, and enhanced migration and invasiveness relative to control cells. These EMT changes were accompanied by the downregulation of an epithelial marker protein, E-cadherin, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, vimentin and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the mRNA levels of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2—EMT-related transcription factors—increased significantly. Although the N-terminally deleted mutant LEF-1 cannot interact with β-catenin, it retained the ability to induce EMT. Consistent with these observations, neither the expression of a dominant negative β-catenin/engrailed chimera, nor the expression of a cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin that sequesters β-catenin from binding to LEF/TCF, reversed LEF-1-induced EMT. Together, these data indicated that the nuclear function of β-catenin was not necessary for the induction of Slug, ZEB1, and ZEB2 expression leading to EMT.

  14. Inhibition of SIRT1 Transcription inResveratrol-differentiated Medulloblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Xin Ma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackgrounds: Medulloblastoma(MB is the commonestbrain malignancyin childhood with poor prognosis, because of itsrapid aggressive growth and frequent occurrence. The current chemotherapeutic regimens for medulloblastoma patients involve a combination of lomustine, cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine or cyclophosphamide, which have distinct short-and long-term side-effects. It is therefore in urgent need to explore safer and more effective adjuvant approach(s.Resveratrol, a polyphenol rich in numerous plants, has multiple biological activities including anticancer effects. Our previous data confirmed that resveratrolinhibited proliferation and induced differentiation and apoptosis of medulloblastoma cells. SIRT1 is a deacetylase of class III HDACs and the supposed molecular effecter of resveratrol. SIRT1 involves in aging prevention and cancer formation in a cell-context specific manner.Nevertheless, the datum concerningthe role(s ofSIRT1 in formation and prognosis of medulloblastomais still missing.Objective:The present study aimed to address the expression patterna of SIRT1 in medulloblastoma tissuesand non-cancerous counterpartsand to explorewhether resveratrol exerts its anti-medulloblastoma effects via regulating SIRT1 expression and bioactivity.Methods:The expression of SIRT1 in medulloblastoma and non-cancerous counterparts was elucidatedby immunohistochemical ataining (IHC.To clarify the function of SIRT1 in medulloblastomas, SIRT1 expression in UW228-3 medulloblastoma cells were suppressed by RNA interference(RNAi. The influence of resveratrol in SIRT1 expressionsin UW228-3 cellswas analyzedby reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR,immunocytochemistry (ICCand Western blotting(WB. The catalytic activity of deacetylase SIRT1was examined by measuring the acetylation ofthe main substrate p53.Results: IHC staining revealedthat SIRT1 was expressed in 64.17% of MB tissues,which was higher than that in

  15. MECHANISMS OF CELL RESISTANCE TO CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ARE CONNECTED WITH CELL PROLIFERATION STATE AND TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVITY OF LEUKOCYTE AND IMMUNE INTERFERON GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection in diploid human fibroblasts (HF and levels of cell resistance to this virus were shown to be in direct correlation with high α-interferon (IFNα gene activity and induction of IFNγ gene transcription. Regulation of IFNα mRNA transcription was revealed to be positively associated with cellular DNA synthesis. At the same time, activities of IFNβ and IFNγ genes were at the constantly low level and were not induced in DNA-synthetic phase (S-phase of the cells. Levels of IFNα mRNA synthesis are quite different for G0- vs S-phase-synchronized HF110044 cell cultures: appropriate values for dividing cells (S-phase proved to be 100-fold higher than in resting state (G0. The mode of CMV infection in resting HF-cell could be considered either as acute, or a productive one. On the contrary, proliferating cells exhibited lagging viral syntheses and delayed cell death. Arrest of CMV replication may be, to some extent, comparable with latent infectious state, being associated with high production of IFNα. Both basal and induced levels of IFNα mRNA in CMV-resistant adult human skin fibroblast cells (HSF-1608 were 10-fold higher than in human embryo lung cell line (HELF-977, which is highly sensitive to CMV. Moreover, a short-time induction of IFNγ genes was observed in resistant cells, whereas no such effect was noticed in highly sensitive cells. CMV reproduction in sensitive cell lines (HELF-977 and HELF-110044 partially inhibits IFNα mRNA transcription at the later stages of infection (24 to 48 hours. Thus, cellular resistance and control of CMV infection in diploid fibroblasts are associated predominantly with high transcription of IFNα gene, and with temporal induction of IFNγ gene. We did not reveal any participation of IFNβ genes in protection of human diploid fibroblasts from CMV.

  16. Low dose radiation effects on the transcription of consensus radiation response genes in primary and immortalized human fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. OBJECTIVE: The linear non-threshold model suggests that tumors might be induced even by low radiation doses. Still, most of the conventional methods are unable to detect damages below 100 mGy. We have studied whether transcriptional responses of consensus radiation response genes can be detected after low dose radiation exposure in directly exposed or bystander primary human fibroblast cells. The short term proliferation capacity of primary fibroblast cells in culture limits their long term application. Therefore we tried to immortalize the cells by the introduction of the human telomerase gene using retroviral vectors. METHODS: Primary human fibroblast cell lines were established from skin biopsies of cancer patients and foreskin samples of young children. To create immortalized cell lines the human telomerase gene was cloned into a retroviral vector. Primary fibroblast cells were transduced and their proliferation capacity studied. To investigate radiation induced transcriptional alterations, cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.01; 0,04; 0,1; 2 and 8 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated both from directly exposed and bystander cells. Transcriptional alterations were followed in consensus radiation response genes (CDKN1, GADD45, GDF15, IER5, PLK3, TP53INP1) with quantitative real time PCR (Corbett/ SybrGreen). RESULTS: There is an elevated expression of CDKN1, GADD45, GDF15, PLK3, TP53INP1 in the exposed cells. We see only for the PLK3 a dose-dependent increase which manifested also at low doses. It seems this gene is the most sensitive to radiation at low doses. The hTERT-immortalized cells were morphologically identical to the primary cells. the radiation-induced transcriptional profile of immortalized cells were very similar to the primary ones. CONCLUSIONS: hTERT immortalized cells can be used to mimic alterations in primary cells. Low dose irradiation doesn't influence the expression of most of

  17. Comparison of human and monkey cells for the ability to attenuate transcripts that begin at the adenovirus major late promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiberg, M.; Aloni, Y. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Levine, A.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Late transcription from the adenovirus major late promoter can terminate prematurely at a site 182 to 188 nucleotides downstream. Experiments have been designed, with run-on transcription in nuclei in vitro or riboprobe protection of RNA obtained both in vivo and in vitro, that demonstrate that the ratio of attenuator RNA to readthrough RNA is greater in monkey cells (CV-1) than in human cells (HeLa). This may explain, in part, why the human adenoviruses replicate more poorly in CV-1 cells than in HeLa cells. A mutant adenovirus that replicates better than wild-type virus in monkey cells produces less of the attenuator RNA than wild-type adenovirus does in monkey cells. Monkey cell extracts have been shown to contain a factor that, when added to human cell extracts transcribing adenovirus DNA in vitro, increases the production of attenuator RNA in these reactions. These observations help to explain a portion of the block to the production of infectious adenoviruses in monkey cells.

  18. Increased transcription of the c-myc oncogene in two methylcholanthrene-induced quail fibroblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saule, S.; Martin, P.; Gegonne, A.; Begue, A.; Lagrou, C.; Stehelin, D.

    1984-12-01

    The expression of three c-onc genes (c-erb, c-myc, c-myb) was investigated in five cell lines established from fibrosarcomas induced with 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA) of Japanese quails. These cell lines showed low levels of the three c-onc genes, with the exception of two cell lines that accumulated moderate (MCAQ 1-4) and large amounts (MCAQ 3-5) of c-myc RNA. Molecular cloning and restriction endonuclease analyses indicated that expression of c-myc in these two cell lines were not associated with detectable rearrangements in the c-myc locus, that the size of the c-myc transcript (2.7 kb) in MCAQ 3-5 was similar to that of the normal c-myc messenger RNAs (mRNA) and that the transcriptional activatin observed in MCAQ 3-5 was not mediated by the LTR (long terminal repeat) of a proximate ALV (avian leukosis virus) provirus. Finally, when analyzed with the restriction enzymes Msp I and Hpa II, the c-myc locus of MCAQ 3-5 and MCAQ 1-4 was found hypomethylated as compared with that of the other cell lines tested that show low levels of c-myc transcripts. Results suggest that one of the ways methylcholanthrene could mediate transformation is by inducing an abnormal regulation of the c-myc gene.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1C2 by Vitamin D Receptor in LS180 Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kathleen G; Fang, Hailin; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2016-08-01

    The factors that regulate expression of genes in the 1C family of human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULT1C) are not well understood. In a recent study evaluating the effects of a panel of transcription factor activators on SULT1C family member expression in LS180 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, we found that SULT1C2 expression was significantly increased by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3) treatment. The objective of our current study was to identify the mechanism responsible for VitD3-mediated activation of SULT1C2 transcription. VitD3 treatment of LS180 cells activated transcription of a transfected luciferase reporter plasmid that contained ∼5 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the SULT1C2 gene, which included 402 nucleotides (nt) of the noncoding exon 1, all of intron 1, and 21 nt of exon 2. Although computational analysis of the VitD3-responsive region of the SULT1C2 gene identified a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-binding site within exon 1, the transfected 5 kbp SULT1C2 reporter was not activated by treatment with rifampicin, a prototypical PXR agonist. However, deletion or mutation of the predicted PXR-binding site abolished VitD3-mediated SULT1C2 transcriptional activation, identifying the site as a functional vitamin D response element (VDRE). We further demonstrated that vitamin D receptor (VDR) can interact directly with the SULT1C2 VDRE sequence using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based transcription factor binding assay. In conclusion, VitD3-inducible SULT1C2 transcription is mediated through a VDRE in exon 1. These results suggest a role for SULT1C2 in VitD3-regulated physiologic processes in human intestine. PMID:27130351

  20. Expression of Serum Amyloid A Transcripts in Human Bone Tissues, Differentiated Osteoblast-Like Stem Cells and Human Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Alenka; Hammer, Astrid; Stadelmeyer, Elke; Windischhofer, Werner; Sundl, Monika; Ray, Alpana; Schweighofer, Natascha; Friedl, Gerald; Windhager, Reinhard; Sattler, Wolfgang; Malle, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Although the liver is the primary site of cytokine-mediated expression of acute-phase serum amyloid A (SAA) protein, extrahepatic production has also been reported. Besides its role in amyloidosis and lipid homeostasis during the acute-phase, SAA has recently been assumed to contribute to bone and cartilage destruction. However, expression of SAA in human osteogenic tissue has not been studied. Therefore, we first show that SAA1 (coding for the major SAA isoform) but not SAA2 transcripts are expressed in human trabecular and cortical bone fractions and bone marrow. Next, we show expression of (i) IL-1, IL-6, and TNF receptor transcripts; (ii) the human homolog of SAA-activating factor-1 (SAF-1, a transcription factor involved in cytokine-mediated induction of SAA genes); and (iii) SAA1/2 transcripts in non-differentiated and, to a higher extent, in osteoblast-like differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells. Third, we provide evidence that human osteoblast-like cells of tumor origin (MG-63 and SAOS-2) express SAF-1 under basal conditions. SAA1/2 transcripts are expressed under basal conditions (SAOS-2) and cytokine-mediated conditions (MG-63 and SAOS-2). RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence technique confirmed cytokine-mediated expression of SAA on RNA and protein level in osteosarcoma cell lines while SAA4, a protein of unknown function, is constitutively expressed in all osteogenic tissues investigated. PMID:17849429

  1. Transcription Factors and Medium Suitable for Initiating the Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Hepatocyte Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors and culture media were investigated to determine the condition to initiate the differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells most efficiently. The expression of genes in human adult liver was compared with that in 201B7 cells (iPS cells) using cDNA microarray analysis. Episomal plasmids expressing transcription factors were constructed. 201B7 cells were transfected with the episomal plasmids and cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free media maintaining pluripotency), Leibovitz-15 (L15), William's E (WE), or Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12) for 7 days. RNA was isolated and subjected to real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the expression of alpha-feto protein (AFP) and albumin. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 16 transcription factors that were upregulated in human adult liver relative to that in 201B7 cells. Episomal plasmids expressing these 16 genes were transfected into 201B7 cells. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), forkhead box A1 (FOXA1), and forkhead box A3 (FOXA3) up-regulated AFP and down-regulated Nanog. These four genes were further analyzed. The expression of AFP and albumin was the highest in 201B7 cells transfected with the combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 and cultured in WE. The combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 was suitable for 201B7 cells to initiate differentiation to the hepatocyte lineage and WE was the most suitable medium for culture after transfection. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2001-2009, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773721

  2. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  3. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  4. [Analysis of the transcriptional profiling of cell cycle regulatory networks of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells in batch and fed-batch cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmao; Ye, Lingling; Liu, Hong; Li, Shichong; Wang, Qiwei; Wu, Benchuan; Chen, Zhaolie

    2011-08-01

    In the light of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line 11G-S expressing human recombinant pro-urokinase, the differences of gene expression levels of the cells in different growth phases in both batch and fed-batch cultures were revealed by using gene chip technology. Then, based on the known cell cycle regulatory networks, the transcriptional profiling of the cell cycle regulatory networks of the cells in batch and fed-batch cultures was analyzed by using Genmapp software. Among the approximate 19 191 target genes in gene chip, the number of down-regulated genes was more than those of up-regulated genes of the cells in both batch and fed-batch cultures. The number of down-regulated genes of the cells in the recession phase in fed-batch culture was much more than that of the cells in batch culture. Comparative transcriptional analysis of the key cell cycle regulatory genes of the cells in both culture modes indicated that the cell proliferation and cell viability of the cells in both batch and fed-batch cultures were mainly regulated through down-regulating Cdk6, Cdk2, Cdc2a, Ccne1, Ccne2 genes of CDKs, Cyclin and CKI family and up-regulating Smad4 gene. PMID:22097809

  5. [Two vital transcriptional factors Oct-4 and Nanog to keep the pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells and related regulation network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-Ye; Zeng, Fan-Yi

    2008-05-01

    Oct-4 and Nanog are two critical transcriptional factors to keep pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells in vivo and in vitro, and they usually express only in pluripotent cells and not in differentiated cells. They bind to the regulatory regions of targeted gene and often interact with other transcriptional factors and extracellular signal path components, such as Sox-2, FoxD3, LIF and BMP in specific tissues or developmental stages. So that all of these constitute a transcriptional crosstalk, and finally determine the cells destiny: keeping pluripotency or turning to differentiation. PMID:18487140

  6. Transcriptional regulation of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase gene expression by cyclic AMP in C6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, M; Gao, E; Hervouet-Zeiber, C; Parsons, V; Braun, P E

    2000-11-01

    It was recently shown that the two transcripts encoding the isoforms of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP1 and CNP2) are differentially regulated during the process of oligodendrocyte maturation. In oligodendrocyte precursors, only CNP2 mRNA is present, whereas in differentiating oligodendrocytes, both CNP1 and CNP2 mRNAs are expressed. This pattern of CNP expression is likely due to stage-specific transcriptional regulation of the two CNP promoters during the process of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here, we report the influence of increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels on the transcription of both CNP1 and CNP2 mRNAs in rat C6 glioma cells. We found that the transcription of CNP1 mRNA was significantly increased in comparison with that of CNP2 mRNA in cells treated with cAMP analogues to elevate intracellular cAMP levels. This up-regulation of CNP1 expression (a) is due to an increase of transcription, (b) requires de novo protein synthesis, and (c) requires the activity of protein kinase A. These results are physiologically significant and support the idea that a cAMP-mediated pathway is part of the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of CNP1 in oligodendrocytes. The regulation of CNP1 promoter activity by cAMP was then investigated in stably transfected C6 cell lines containing various deletions of the CNP promoter directing the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. We showed that the sequence between nucleotides -126 and -102 was essential for the cAMP-dependent induction of CNP1 expression. Gel retardation analysis showed that two protein-DNA complexes are formed between this sequence and nuclear factors from C6 cells treated or not treated with cAMP. This suggests that the induction of CNP1 mRNA transcription is not mediated by changes in binding of nuclear factors that interact directly with the -126/-102 sequence. Sequence analysis of this region revealed the presence of a putative activator protein-2 (AP

  7. Cell-Specific mRNA Profiling of the Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Gonadal Precursor Cells Identifies Suites of Sex-Biased and Gonad-Enriched Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Mary B; Zarkower, David

    2015-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad differs greatly between the two sexes in its pattern of cell divisions, migration, and differentiation. Despite decades of study, the genetic pathways directing early gonadal development and establishing sexual dimorphism in the gonad remain largely unknown. To help define the genetic networks that regulate gonadal development, we employed cell-specific RNA-seq. We identified transcripts present in the somatic gonadal precursor cells and their daughter cells of each sex at the onset of sexual differentiation. We identified several hundred gonad-enriched transcripts, including the majority of known regulators of early gonadal development, and transgenic reporter analysis confirmed the effectiveness of this approach. Before the division of the somatic gonad precursors, few sex-biased gonadal transcripts were detectable; less than 6 hr later, after their division, we identified more than 250 sex-biased transcripts, of which about a third were enriched in the somatic gonad compared to the whole animal. This indicates that a robust sex-biased developmental program, some of it gonad-specific, initiates in the somatic gonadal precursor cells around the time of their first division. About 10% of male-biased transcripts had orthologs with male-biased expression in the early mouse gonad, suggesting possible conservation of gonad sex differentiation. Cell-specific analysis also identified approximately 70 previously unannotated mRNA isoforms that are enriched in the somatic gonad. Our data illustrate the power of cell-specific transcriptome analysis and suggest that early sex differentiation in the gonad is controlled by a relatively small suite of differentially expressed genes, even after dimorphism has become apparent. PMID:26497144

  8. Integrated genome-scale analysis of the transcriptional regulatory landscape in a blood stem/progenitor cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nicola K; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Hannah, Rebecca; Sánchez Castillo, Manuel; Schütte, Judith; Ladopoulos, Vasileios; Mitchelmore, Joanna; Goode, Debbie K; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Moignard, Victoria; Wilkinson, Adam C; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Kinston, Sarah; Spivakov, Mikhail; Fraser, Peter; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-03-31

    Comprehensive study of transcriptional control processes will be required to enhance our understanding of both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Modern sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to generate genome-scale expression and histone modification profiles, transcription factor (TF)-binding maps, and also comprehensive chromatin-looping information. Many of these technologies, however, require large numbers of cells, and therefore cannot be applied to rare hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. The stem cell factor-dependent multipotent progenitor cell line HPC-7 represents a well-recognized cell line model for HSPCs. Here we report genome-wide maps for 17 TFs, 3 histone modifications, DNase I hypersensitive sites, and high-resolution promoter-enhancer interactomes in HPC-7 cells. Integrated analysis of these complementary data sets revealed TF occupancy patterns of genomic regions involved in promoter-anchored loops. Moreover, preferential associations between pairs of TFs bound at either ends of chromatin loops led to the identification of 4 previously unrecognized protein-protein interactions between key blood stem cell regulators. All HPC-7 data sets are freely available both through standard repositories and a user-friendly Web interface. Together with previously generated genome-wide data sets, this study integrates HPC-7 data into a genomic resource on par with ENCODE tier 1 cell lines and, importantly, is the only current model with comprehensive genome-scale data that is relevant to HSPC biology. PMID:26809507

  9. MicroRNA-17 Modulates Regulatory T Cell Function by Targeting Co-regulators of the Foxp3 Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huang-Yu; Barbi, Joseph; Wu, Chao-Yi; Zheng, Ying; Vignali, Paolo D A; Wu, Xingmei; Tao, Jin-Hui; Park, Benjamin V; Bandara, Shashika; Novack, Lewis; Ni, Xuhao; Yang, Xiaoping; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Zhang, Junran; Yang, Chih-Wei; Pardoll, Drew M; Li, Huabin; Pan, Fan

    2016-07-19

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 works in concert with other co-regulatory molecules, including Eos, to determine the transcriptional signature and characteristic suppressive phenotype of Treg cells. Here, we report that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) actively repressed Eos expression through microRNA-17 (miR-17). miR-17 expression increased in Treg cells in the presence of IL-6, and its expression negatively correlated with that of Eos. Treg cell suppressive activity was diminished upon overexpression of miR-17 in vitro and in vivo, which was mitigated upon co-expression of an Eos mutant lacking miR-17 target sites. Also, RNAi of miR-17 resulted in enhanced suppressive activity. Ectopic expression of miR-17 imparted effector-T-cell-like characteristics to Treg cells via the de-repression of genes encoding effector cytokines. Thus, miR-17 provides a potent layer of Treg cell control through targeting Eos and additional Foxp3 co-regulators. PMID:27438767

  10. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  11. The TCF-1 and LEF-1 transcription factors have cooperative and opposing roles in T-cell development and malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shuyang; Zhou, Xinyuan; Steinke, Farrah C.; Liu, Chengyu; Chen, Shann-Ching; Zagorodna, Oksana; Jing, Xuefang; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Meyerholz, David K.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Knudson, C. Michael; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The TCF-1 and LEF-1 transcription factors are known to play critical roles in normal thymocyte development. Unexpectedly, we found that TCF-1-deficient (Tcf7−/−) mice developed aggressive T-cell malignancy, resembling human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Surprisingly, LEF-1 was aberrantly upregulated in pre-malignant Tcf7−/− early thymocytes and lymphoma cells. We further demonstrated that TCF-1 directly repressed LEF-1 expression in early thymocytes and that conditional inactiv...

  12. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J;

    2010-01-01

    comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...... regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore...

  13. Efficient biotinylation and single-step purification of tagged transcription factors in mammalian cells and transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ernie; Rodriguez, Patrick; Bonte, Edgar; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katsantoni, Eleni; Heck, Albert; Grosveld, Frank; Strouboulis, John

    2003-06-01

    Proteomic approaches require simple and efficient protein purification methodologies that are amenable to high throughput. Biotinylation is an attractive approach for protein complex purification due to the very high affinity of avidin/streptavidin for biotinylated templates. Here, we describe an approach for the single-step purification of transcription factor complex(es) based on specific in vivo biotinylation. We expressed the bacterial BirA biotin ligase in mammalian cells and demonstrated very efficient biotinylation of a hematopoietic transcription factor bearing a small (23-aa) artificial peptide tag. Biotinylation of the tagged transcription factor altered neither the factor's protein interactions or DNA binding properties in vivo nor its subnuclear distribution. Using this approach, we isolated the biotin-tagged transcription factor and at least one other known interacting protein from crude nuclear extracts by direct binding to streptavidin beads. Finally, this method works efficiently in transgenic mice, thus raising the prospect of using biotinylation tagging in protein complex purification directly from animal tissues. Therefore, BirA-mediated biotinylation of tagged proteins provides the basis for the single-step purification of proteins from mammalian cells.

  14. Hypoxia-induced transcription of dopamine D3 and D4 receptors in human neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasvari-Szekely Maria

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopaminergic pathways that influence mood and behaviour are severely affected in cerebral hypoxia. In contrast, hypoxia promotes the differentiation of dopaminergic neurons. In order to clarify the hypoxic sensitivity of key dopaminergic genes, we aimed to study their transcriptional regulation in the context of neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cell lines exposed to 1% hypoxia. Results Quantitative RT-PCR assays revealed that the transcription of both type D3 and D4 postsynaptic dopamine receptors (DRD3 and DRD4 was induced several fold upon 2-day hypoxia in a cell-specific manner, while the vascular endothelial growth factor gene was activated after 3-hr incubation in hypoxia. On the other hand, mRNA levels of type 2 dopamine receptor, dopamine transporter, monoamino oxidase and catechol-O-methyltransferase were unaltered, while those of the dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF were decreased by hypoxia. Notably, 2-day hypoxia did not result in elevation of protein levels of DRD3 and DRD4. Conclusion In light of the relatively delayed transcriptional activation of the DRD3 and DRD4 genes, we propose that slow-reacting hypoxia sensitive transcription factors might be involved in the transactivation of DRD3 and DRD4 promoters in hypoxia.

  15. A Resource for the Transcriptional Signature of Bona Fide Trophoblast Stem Cells and Analysis of Their Embryonic Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Kuales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trophoblast stem cells (TSCs represent the multipotent progenitors that give rise to the different cells of the embryonic portion of the placenta. Here, we analysed the expression of key TSC transcription factors Cdx2, Eomes, and Elf5 in the early developing placenta of mouse embryos and in cultured TSCs and reveal surprising heterogeneity in protein levels. We analysed persistence of TSCs in the early placenta and find that TSCs remain in the chorionic hinge until E9.5 and are lost shortly afterwards. To define the transcriptional signature of bona fide TSCs, we used inducible gain- and loss-of-function alleles of Eomes or Cdx2, and EomesGFP, to manipulate and monitor the core maintenance factors of TSCs, followed by genome-wide expression profiling. Combinatorial analysis of resulting expression profiles allowed for defining novel TSC marker genes that might functionally contribute to the maintenance of the TSC state. Analyses by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridisation validated novel TSC- and chorion-specific marker genes, such as Bok/Mtd, Cldn26, Duox2, Duoxa2, Nr0b1, and Sox21. Thus, these expression data provide a valuable resource for the transcriptional signature of bona fide and early differentiating TSCs and may contribute to an increased understanding of the transcriptional circuitries that maintain and/or establish stemness of TSCs.

  16. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  17. Reprogramming of Pancreatic Exocrine Cells AR42J Into Insulin-producing Cells Using mRNAs for Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblas, Tomas; Leontovyc, Ivan; Loukotova, Sarka; Kosinova, Lucie; Saudek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of pancreatic nonendocrine cells into insulin-producing β-cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. However, its clinical application is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis associated with the viral vectors currently used for cell reprogramming. With the aim of developing a nonintegrative reprogramming strategy for derivation of insulin-producing cells, here, we evaluated a new approach utilizing synthetic messenger RNAs encoding reprogramming transcription factors. Administration of synthetic mRNAs encoding three key transcription regulators of β-cell differentiation-Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and MafA-efficiently reprogrammed the pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. In addition to the insulin genes expression, the synthetic mRNAs also induced the expressions of genes important for proper pancreatic β-cell function, including Sur1, Kir6.2, Pcsk1, and Pcsk2. Pretreating cells with the chromatin-modifying agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further enhanced reprogramming efficiency, increasing the proportion of insulin-producing cells from 3.5 ± 0.9 to 14.3 ± 1.9% (n = 4). Moreover, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine pretreatment enabled the reprogrammed cells to respond to glucose challenge with increased insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support that the reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, induced by synthetic mRNAs encoding pancreatic transcription factors, represents a promising approach for cell-based diabetes therapy. PMID:27187823

  18. Stem cell-dependent formation of a functional anterior regeneration pole in planarians requires Zic and Forkhead transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogg, Matthias C; Owlarn, Suthira; Pérez Rico, Yuvia A; Xie, Jianlei; Suzuki, Yoko; Gentile, Luca; Wu, Wei; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2014-06-15

    Planarians can regenerate their head within days. This process depends on the direction of adult stem cells to wound sites and the orchestration of their progenitors to commit to appropriate lineages and to arrange into patterned tissues. We identified a zinc finger transcription factor, Smed-ZicA, as a downstream target of Smed-FoxD, a Forkhead transcription factor required for head regeneration. Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD are co-expressed with the Wnt inhibitor notum and the Activin inhibitor follistatin in a cluster of cells at the anterior-most tip of the regenerating head - the anterior regeneration pole - and in surrounding stem cell progeny. Depletion of Smed-zicA and Smed-FoxD by RNAi abolishes notum and follistatin expression at the pole and inhibits head formation downstream of initial polarity decisions. We suggest a model in which ZicA and FoxD transcription factors synergize to control the formation of Notum- and Follistatin-producing anterior pole cells. Pole formation might constitute an early step in regeneration, resulting in a signaling center that orchestrates cellular events in the growing tissue. PMID:24704339

  19. CAR-mediated repression of Foxo1 transcriptional activity regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21 in mouse livers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CAR activation decreased the level of Foxo1 in mouse livers. • CAR activation decreased the level of p21 in mouse livers. • CAR activation inhibited Foxo1 transcriptional activity in mouse livers. - Abstract: 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP), an agonist of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), is a well-known strong primary chemical mitogen for the mouse liver. Despite extensive investigation of the role of CAR in the regulation of cell proliferation, our knowledge of the intricate mediating mechanism is incomplete. In this study, we demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increased liver-to-body weight ratio and decreased tumour suppressor Foxo1 expression and transcriptional activity, which were correlated with reduced expression of genes regulated by Foxo1, including the cell-cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a(p21), and upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator Cyclin D1. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on the association of Foxo1 with the target Foxo1 itself and Cdkn1a(p21) promoters. Thus, we identified CAR-mediated repression of cell cycle inhibitor p21, as mediated by repression of FOXO1 expression and transcriptional activity. CAR-FOXO1 cross-talk may provide new opportunities for understanding liver diseases and developing more effective therapeutic approaches to better drug treatments

  20. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner. PMID:10828075

  1. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  2. Nuclear IL-33 is a transcriptional regulator of NF-{kappa}B p65 and induces endothelial cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeon-Sook; Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Jihye; Rho, Seung-Sik; Park, Hyojin [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Myeong [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Guen, E-mail: ygkwon@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-33 as nuclear factor regulated expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear IL-33 increased the transcription of NF-{kappa}B p65 by binding to the p65 promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear IL-33 controls NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses. -- Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-33, an IL-1 family member, acts as an extracellular cytokine by binding its cognate receptor, ST2. IL-33 is also a chromatin-binding transcriptional regulator highly expressed in the nuclei of endothelial cells. However, the function of IL-33 as a nuclear factor is poorly defined. Here, we show that IL-33 is a novel transcriptional regulator of the p65 subunit of the NF-{kappa}B complex and is involved in endothelial cell activation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses indicated that IL-33 mediates the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in endothelial cells basally and in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-treatment. IL-33-induced ICAM-1/VCAM-1 expression was dependent on the regulatory effect of IL-33 on the nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B pathway; NF-{kappa}B p65 expression was enhanced by IL-33 overexpression and, conversely, reduced by IL-33 knockdown. Moreover, NF-{kappa}B p65 promoter activity and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that IL-33 binds to the p65 promoter region in the nucleus. Our data provide the first evidence that IL-33 in the nucleus of endothelial cells participates in inflammatory reactions as a transcriptional regulator of NF-{kappa}B p65.

  3. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki, E-mail: yoshi1224@gmail.com [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Akagi, Ichiro [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Kikuchi, Kunio [Department of Molecular Anatomy and Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Takizawa, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-takizawa@nms.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Anatomy and Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  4. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  5. Transcription factor AP-2gamma is a developmentally regulated marker of testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian;

    2004-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: AP-2gamma is developmentally regulated and associated with the undifferentiated phenotype in germ cells. This transcription factor may be involved in self-renewal and survival of immature germ cells and tissue-specific stem cells. AP-2gamma is a novel marker of testicular CIS and CIS-derived...... protein level in normal human tissues and a panel of tumors and tumor-derived cell lines. In the gonads, we established the ontogeny of expression of AP-2gamma in normal and dysgenetic samples. We also investigated the regulation of AP-2gamma by steroids and retinoic acid. RESULTS: We detected abundant AP......-2gamma in testicular CIS and in testicular germ cell tumors of young adults and confirmed differential expression of AP-2gamma in somatic tumors. We found that AP-2gamma expression was regulated by retinoic acid in an embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2). The investigation of ontogeny of AP-2gamma...

  6. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo;

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101 was...... persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter in...... Tax activation. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the 35 bp region suggested that both the consensus CRE motif and its upstream G+C-rich sequence were critical for Tax transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA) using the 35 bp sequence as probe showed the formation of a...

  7. Transcriptional regulation of miR-146b by C/EBPβ LAP2 in esophageal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MiR-146b promotes esophageal cancer cell proliferation. • MiR-146b inhibits esophageal cancer cell apoptosis. • C/EBPβ directly binds to miR-146b promoter conserved region. • MiR-146b is up-regulated by C/EBPβ LAP2 transcriptional activation. - Abstract: Recent clinical study indicated that up-regulation of miR-146b was associated with poor overall survival of patients in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-146b dysregulation remains to be explored. Here we report that miR-146b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in esophageal cancer cell lines. Mechanismly, two C/EBPβ binding motifs are located in the miR-146b promoter conserved region. Among the three isoforms of C/EBPβ, C/EBPβ LAP2 positively regulated miR-146b expression and increases miR-146b levels in a dose-dependent manner through transcription activation of miR-146b gene. Together, these results suggest a miR-146b regulatory mechanism involving C/EBPβ, which may contribute to the up-regulation of miR-146b in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

  8. Effect of trans-acting factor on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene transcription regulation in tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘东远; 廖名湘; 左瑾; 方福德

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of trans-acting factor(s) on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (rGSTP1) transcription regulation in tumor cells. Methods The binding of trans-acting factor(s) to two enhancers of the rGSTP1 gene, glutathione S-transferase P enhancer Ⅰ (GPEI) and glutathione S-transferase P enhancer Ⅱ-1 (GPEⅡ-1), was identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The molecular weight of trans-acting factor was measured in a UV cross-linking experiment. Results Trans-acting factor interacting with the core sequence of GPEI (cGPEI) were found in human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line (HeLa) and rat hepatoma cell line (CBRH7919). These proteins were not expressed in normal rat liver. Although specific binding proteins that bound to GPEⅡ-1 were detected in all three cell types, a 64 kDa binding protein that exists in HeLa and CBRH7919 cells was absent in normal rat liver. Conclusion cGPEI, GPEII specific binding proteins expressed in HeLa and CBRH7919 cells may play an important role in the high transcriptional level of the rGSTP1 gene in tumor cells.

  9. Spirulina non-protein components induce BDNF gene transcription via HO-1 activity in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kyoji; Itoh, Mari; Nishibori, Naoyoshi; Her, Song; Lee, Mi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green algae are known to contain biologically active proteins and non-protein substances and considered as useful materials for manufacturing the nutritional supplements. Particularly, Spirulina has been reported to contain a variety of antioxidants, such as flavonoids, carotenoids, and vitamin C, thereby exerting their protective effects against the oxidative damage to the cells. In addition to their antioxidant actions, polyphenolic compounds have been speculated to cause the protection of neuronal cells and the recovery of neurologic function in the brain through the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in glial cells. Then, the protein-deprived extract was prepared by removing the most part of protein components from aqueous extract of Spirulina platensis, and the effect of this extract on BDNF gene transcription was examined in C6 glioma cells. Consequently, the protein-deprived extract was shown to cause the elevation of BDNF mRNA levels following the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the glioma cells. Therefore, the non-protein components of S. platensis are considered to stimulate BDNF gene transcription through the HO-1 induction in glial cells, thus proposing a potential ability of the algae to indirectly modulate the brain function through the glial cell activity. PMID:25349086

  10. A synthetic interaction screen identifies factors selectively required for proliferation and TERT transcription in p53-deficient human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi-based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53- human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+ human cancer cell lines, diverse p53- human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53- cells, RNAi-mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53- but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53- cancer cells.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of miR-146b by C/EBPβ LAP2 in esophageal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junxia [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Shan, Fabo [Department of Pathophysiology and High Altitude Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xiong, Gang [Department of Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, Ju-Ming; Wang, Wen-Lin [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Xu, Xueqing, E-mail: buyi.chu@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn, and Combined Injury, Research Institute of Surgery and Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyungene@gmail.com [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • MiR-146b promotes esophageal cancer cell proliferation. • MiR-146b inhibits esophageal cancer cell apoptosis. • C/EBPβ directly binds to miR-146b promoter conserved region. • MiR-146b is up-regulated by C/EBPβ LAP2 transcriptional activation. - Abstract: Recent clinical study indicated that up-regulation of miR-146b was associated with poor overall survival of patients in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-146b dysregulation remains to be explored. Here we report that miR-146b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in esophageal cancer cell lines. Mechanismly, two C/EBPβ binding motifs are located in the miR-146b promoter conserved region. Among the three isoforms of C/EBPβ, C/EBPβ LAP2 positively regulated miR-146b expression and increases miR-146b levels in a dose-dependent manner through transcription activation of miR-146b gene. Together, these results suggest a miR-146b regulatory mechanism involving C/EBPβ, which may contribute to the up-regulation of miR-146b in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Probing host pathogen cross-talk by transcriptional profiling of both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and infected human dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Tailleux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcriptional profiling using microarrays provides a unique opportunity to decipher host pathogen cross-talk on the global level. Here, for the first time, we have been able to investigate gene expression changes in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major human pathogen, and its human host cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In addition to common responses, we could identify eukaryotic and microbial transcriptional signatures that are specific to the cell type involved in the infection process. In particular M. tuberculosis shows a marked stress response when inside dendritic cells, which is in accordance with the low permissivity of these specialized phagocytes to the tubercle bacillus and to other pathogens. In contrast, the mycobacterial transcriptome inside macrophages reflects that of replicating bacteria. On the host cell side, differential responses to infection in macrophages and dendritic cells were identified in genes involved in oxidative stress, intracellular vesicle trafficking and phagosome acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the proof of principle that probing the host and the microbe transcriptomes simultaneously is a valuable means to accessing unique information on host pathogen interactions. Our results also underline the extraordinary plasticity of host cell and pathogen responses to infection, and provide a solid framework to further understand the complex mechanisms involved in immunity to M. tuberculosis and in mycobacterial adaptation to different intracellular environments.

  13. Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate cellular fitness and functionality of T cell lineages through distinct gene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioli, Peter D; Whiteside, Sarah K; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes are essential contributors to the adaptive immune system and consist of multiple lineages that serve various effector and regulatory roles. As such, precise control of gene expression is essential to the proper development and function of these cells. Previously, we identified Snai2 and Snai3 as being essential regulators of immune tolerance partly due to the impaired function of CD4(+) regulatory T cells in Snai2/3 conditional double knockout mice. Here we extend those previous findings using a bone marrow transplantation model to provide an environmentally unbiased view of the molecular changes imparted onto various T lymphocyte populations once Snai2 and Snai3 are deleted. The data presented here demonstrate that Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate the cellular fitness and functionality of not only CD4(+) regulatory T cells but effector CD8(α+) and CD4(+) conventional T cells as well. This is achieved through the modulation of gene sets unique to each cell type and includes transcriptional targets relevant to the survival and function of each T cell lineage. As such, Snai2 and Snai3 are essential regulators of T cell immunobiology. PMID:26831822

  14. Comprehensive analysis of single-repeat R3 MYB proteins in epidermal cell patterning and their transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiefelbein John

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors are critical components of the lateral inhibition machinery that mediates epidermal cell patterning in plants. Sequence analysis of the Arabidopsis genome using the BLAST program reveals that there are a total of six genes, including TRIPTYCHON (TRY, CAPRICE (CPC, TRICHOMELESS1 (TCL1, and ENHANCER of TRY and CPC 1, 2, and 3 (ETC1, ETC2 and ETC3 encoding single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors that are approximately 50% identical to one another at the amino acid level. Previous studies indicate that these single-repeat R3 MYBs regulate epidermal cell patterning. However, each of the previous studies of these single-repeat R3 MYBs has been limited to an analysis of only a subset of these six genes, and furthermore, they have limited their attention to epidermal development in only one or two of the organs. In addition, the transcriptional regulation of these single-repeat R3 MYB genes remains largely unknown. Results By analyzing multiple mutant lines, we report here that TCL1 functions redundantly with other single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors to control both leaf trichome and root hair formation. On the other hand, ETC1 and ETC3 participate in controlling trichome formation on inflorescence stems and pedicles. Further, we discovered that single-repeat R3 MYBs suppress trichome formation on cotyledons and siliques, organs that normally do not bear any trichomes. By using Arabidopsis protoplast transfection assays, we found that all single-repeat R3 MYBs examined interact with GL3, and that GL1 or WER and GL3 or EGL3 are required and sufficient to activate the transcription of TRY, CPC, ETC1 and ETC3, but not TCL1 and ETC2. Furthermore, only ETC1's transcription was greatly reduced in the gl3 egl3 double mutants. Conclusion Our comprehensive analysis enables us to draw broader conclusions about the role of single-repeat R3 MYB gene family than were possible in the earlier

  15. The hematopoietic stem cell in chronic phase CML is characterized by a transcriptional profile resembling normal myeloid progenitor cells and reflecting loss of quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, I; Czibere, A; Fischer, J C; Roels, F; Cadeddu, R-P; Buest, S; Bruennert, D; Huenerlituerkoglu, A N; Stoecklein, N H; Singh, R; Zerbini, L F; Jäger, M; Kobbe, G; Gattermann, N; Kronenwett, R; Brors, B; Haas, R

    2009-05-01

    We found that composition of cell subsets within the CD34+ cell population is markedly altered in chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Specifically, proportions and absolute cell counts of common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors (MEP) are significantly greater in comparison to normal bone marrow whereas absolute numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are equal. To understand the basis for this, we performed gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HU-133A 2.0) of the distinct CD34+ cell subsets from six patients with CP CML and five healthy donors. Euclidean distance analysis revealed a remarkable transcriptional similarity between the CML patients' HSC and normal progenitors, especially CMP. CP CML HSC were transcriptionally more similar to their progeny than normal HSC to theirs, suggesting a more mature phenotype. Hence, the greatest differences between CP CML patients and normal donors were apparent in HSC including downregulation of genes encoding adhesion molecules, transcription factors, regulators of stem-cell fate and inhibitors of cell proliferation in CP CML. Impaired adhesive and migratory capacities were functionally corroborated by fibronectin detachment analysis and transwell assays, respectively. Based on our findings we propose a loss of quiescence of the CML HSC on detachment from the niche leading to expansion of myeloid progenitors. PMID:19158832

  16. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath, E-mail: csab@bio.psgtech.ac.in [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India); Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar [Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne (Germany); Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan [Department of Biotechnology, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004 (India)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  17. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  18. Role of transcription factor KLF11 and its diabetes-associated gene variants in pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neve, Bernadette; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Ashkenazi-Katalan, Vered; Dina, Christian; Hamid, Yasmin H; Joly, Erik; Vaillant, Emmanuel; Benmezroua, Yamina; Durand, Emmanuelle; Bakaher, Nicolas; Delannoy, Valerie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Cook, Tiffany; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Jansen, Hans; Charles, Marie-Aline; Clément, Karine; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Helbecque, Nicole; Charpentier, Guillaume; Prentki, Marc; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Urrutia, Raul; Melloul, Danielle; Froguel, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    KLF11 (TIEG2) is a pancreas-enriched transcription factor that has elicited significant attention because of its role as negative regulator of exocrine cell growth in vitro and in vivo. However, its functional role in the endocrine pancreas remains to be established. Here, we report, for the first...... time, to our knowledge, the characterization of KLF11 as a glucose-inducible regulator of the insulin gene. A combination of random oligonucleotide binding, EMSA, luciferase reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays shows that KLF11 binds to the insulin promoter and regulates its activity in...... beta cells. Genetic analysis of the KLF11 gene revealed two rare variants (Ala347Ser and Thr220Met) that segregate with diabetes in families with early-onset type 2 diabetes, and significantly impair its transcriptional activity. In addition, analysis of 1,696 type 2 diabetes mellitus and 1...

  19. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process. PMID:26982978

  20. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 regulates pokemon gene transcription through p53 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengnan; Liu, Feng; Xie, Zhenhua; Zu, Xuyu; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2010-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:20957096

  1. P-Glycoprotein/MDR1 Regulates Pokemon Gene Transcription Through p53 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp, encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 gene, is an efflux transporter and plays an important role in pharmacokinetics. In this study, we demonstrated that the pokemon promoter activity, the pokemon mRNA and protein expression can be significantly inhibited by Pgp. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that Pgp can bind the pokemon prompter to repress pokemon transcription activity. Furthermore, Pgp regulated pokemon transcription activity through expression of p53 as seen by use of p53 siRNA transfected MCF-7 cells or p53 mutated MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, p53 was detected to bind with Pgp in vivo using immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, we conclude that Pgp can regulate the expression of pokemon through the presence of p53, suggesting that Pgp is a potent regulator and may offer an effective novel target for cancer therapy.

  2. Leptin upregulates telomerase activity and transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, He, E-mail: herenrh@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China); Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Wang, Jian; Yu, Ming [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China); Hao, Jihui, E-mail: jihuihao@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2010-03-26

    The aim was to analyze the mechanism of leptin-induced activity of telomerase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that leptin activated telomerase in a dose-dependent manner; leptin upregulated the expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) at mRNA and protein levels; blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation significantly counteracted leptin-induced hTERT transcription and protein expression; chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed tha