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Sample records for cell cycle-related regulatory

  1. Cell cycle related /sup 125/IUDR-induced-division delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments were run to determine if /sup 125/I-decays, in /sup 125/IUdR labeled DNA, specifically accumulated at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 hours after plating labeled mitotic cells caused a change in the rate or time of cell entry into mitosis. To accomplish this, a pool of labeled mitotic cells was selected in mitosis and plated in replicate flasks. /sup 125/I decays were accumulated in groups of cells by cooling (40C) for 2 hours starting at the designated times. After rewarding, colcemid was added to arrest cells in mitosis. The rate of cell progression into mitosis for each cell cycle time of accumulation was determined by scoring the mitotic index of cells sampled as a function of time after addition of the colcemid. The results are summarized: (1) Decays from /sup 125/I in /sup 125/I(UdR) labeled DNA reduced the rate of cell progression into mitosis and delayed the time of initiation of mitosis. (2) The reduced rate of progression and the delayed time of initiation of mitosis were independent of the cell cycle time that /sup 125/I-decays were accumulated. (3) The reduced rate of progression after cell cycle accumulation of /sup 125/I decay was statistically indistinguishable from the corresponding controls. (4) The delayed initiation of mitosis after specific cell cycle accumulation of /sup 125/I- decays was greater than the corresponding control. The relationship of these data to DNA and non-DNA division delay target(s) is emphasized

  2. Expression of cell cycle related genes in HL60 cells undergoing apoptosis by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [College of Medicine, Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Kyu [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate changes in expression of cell cycle related genes during apoptosis induced in HL60 cells by X-irradiation to understand molecular biologic aspects in mechanism of radiation therapy. HL-60 cell line (promyelocytic leukemia cell line was grown in culture media and irradiated with 8 Gy by linear accelerator (6 MV X-ray). At various times after irradiation, ranging from 3 to 48 hours were analyzed apoptotic DNA fragmentation assay for apoptosis and by western blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR for expression of cell cycle related genes (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin C, cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdc2, CDK2, CDK4, p16{sup INK4a}, p21{sup WAF1}, p27K{sup IP1}, E2F, PCNA and Rb). X-irradiation (8 Gy) induced apoptosis in HL-60 cell line. Cycline A protein increased after reaching its peak 48 h after radiation delivery and cyclin E, E2F, CDK2 and RB protein increased then decreased after radiation. Radiation induced up-regulation of the expression of E2F is due to mostly increase of phosphorylated retinoblastoma proteins (ppRb). Cyclin D1, PCNA, CDC1, CDK4 and p16{sup INK4a} protein underwent no significant change at any times after irradiation. There was not detected p21{sup WAF1} and p27{sup KIP1} protein. Cyclin A, B, C, mRNA decreased immediately after radiation and then increased at 12 h after radiation. Cyclin D1 mRNA increased immediately and then decreased with the lapse of time. CDK2 mRNA decreased at 3 h and increased at 6 h after radiation. CDK4 mRNA rapidly increased at 6 to 12 h after radiation. There was no change of expression of p16{sup INK4a} and not detected in expressin of p21{sup WAF1} and p27{sup KIP1} mRNA. We suggest that entry into S phaso may contribute to apoptosis of HL60 cells induced by irradiation. Increase of ppRb and decrease of pRb protein are related with radiation induced apoptosis of HL60 cells and tosis of HL60 cells induced by irradiation. Increase of ppRb and decrease of pRb protein are related with radiation induced

  3. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  4. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  5. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression

  6. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ya-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan (China); Yang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: yangwm@nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  7. Cell cycle-related transformation of the E2F4-p130 repressor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During G0 phase the p130, member of the pRb tumor suppressor protein family, forms a repressor complex with E2F4 which is inactivated in G1/S by hyperphosphorylation of the p130. The role of p130 after G1/S remains poorly investigated. We found that in nuclear extracts of T98G cells, the p130-E2F4-DNA (pp-E2F4) complex does not dissociate at G1/S transition, but instead reverts to the p130-E2F4-cyclin E/A-cdk2 (cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4) complex, which is detected in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Hyperphosphorylation of the p130 at G1/S transition is associated with a decrease of its total amount; however, this protein is still detected during the rest of the cell cycle, and it is increasingly hyperphosphorylated in the cytosol, but continuously dephosphorylated in the nucleus. Both nuclear and cytosol cell fractions in T98G cells contain a hyperphosphorylated form of p130 in complex with E2F4 at S and G2/M cell cycle phases. In contrast to T98G cells, transformation of the p130 containing cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4 complex into the p130-pp-E2F4 repressor does not occur in HeLa cells under growth restriction conditions

  8. Coptis japonica Makino extract suppresses angiogenesis through regulation of cell cycle-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Ho; Kim, Eok-Cheon; Kim, Wan-Joong; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-06-01

    Angiogenesis, neovascularization from pre-existing vessels, is a key step in tumor growth and metastasis, and anti-angiogenic agents that can interfere with these essential steps of cancer development are a promising strategy for human cancer treatment. In this study, we characterized the anti-angiogenic effects of Coptis japonica Makino extract (CJME) and its mechanism of action. CJME significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated HUVECs. Furthermore, CJME suppressed VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting ex vivo. According to our study, CJME blocked VEGF-induced cell cycle transition in G1. CJME decreased expression of cell cycle-regulated proteins, including Cyclin D, Cyclin E, Cdk2, and Cdk4 in response to VEGF. Taken together, the results of our study indicate that CJME suppresses VEGF-induced angiogenic events such as proliferation, migration, and tube formation via cell cycle arrest in G1. PMID:26924430

  9. Reversible regulation of cell cycle-related genes by epigallocatechin gallate for hibernation of neonatal human tarsal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Yoon; Kanamune, Jun; Han, Dong-Wook; Matsumura, Kazuaki; Hyon, Suong-Hyu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the hibernation effect of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) on neonatal human tarsal fibroblasts (nHTFs) by analyzing the expression of cell cycle-related genes. EGCG application to culture media moderately inhibited the growth of nHTFs, and the removal of EGCG from culture media led to complete recovery of cell growth. EGCG resulted in a slight decrease in the cell population of the S and G(2)/M phases of cell cycle with concomitant increase in that of the G(0)/G(1) phase, but this cell cycle profile was restored to the initial level after EGCG removal. The expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), CCNE2, CCN-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6), and CDK2 was restored, whereas that of CCNA, CCNB1, and CDK1 was irreversibly attenuated. The expression of a substantial number of genes analyzed by cDNA microarray was affected by EGCG application, and these affected expression levels were restored to the normal levels after EGCG removal. We also found the incorporation of FITC-EGCG into the cytosol of nHTFs and its further nuclear translocation, which might lead to the regulation of the exogenous signals directed to genes for cellular responses including proliferation and cell cycle progression. These results suggest that EGCG temporarily affects not only genes related to the cell cycle but also various other cellular functions. PMID:19622233

  10. Effects of HIV-1 Tat protein on expression of cell cycle-related genes and radiation-induced cell cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore effects of HIV-1 Tat protein on the expression of cell cycle-related genes and cell cycle arrest induced by ionizing radiation. Methods: A human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line TE671 and TT2 cells generated from TE671 cells by transfecting with tat gene of the HIV-1 strain were employed. Microarray, which contained the oligonucleotide probes corresponding to 102 human DNA damage response related genes, was used to analyze transcriptional changes. Cell cycle changes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Microarray assay demonstrated that cell cycle-related genes Cdc20, Cdc25C, KIF2C, CTS1 and Wee1 were down-regulated in Tat-expressing TT2 cells. Tat-expressing cells exhibited a noticeable delay of the initiation and elimination of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and a prolonged S phase arrest as compared with parental cells. Moreover, overexpression of cyclinB1 was also observed in Tat-expressing TT2 cells. Conclusion: Dysregulated cell cycle checkpoint in Tat-expressing cells can provide new information for understanding the radiation responsiveness of AIDS patients with cancer to radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. T follicular regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Peter T; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-01

    Pathogen exposure elicits production of high-affinity antibodies stimulated by T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in the germinal center reaction. Tfh cells provide both costimulation and stimulatory cytokines to B cells to facilitate affinity maturation, class switch recombination, and plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center. Under normal circumstances, the germinal center reaction results in antibodies that precisely target foreign pathogens while limiting autoimmunity and excessive inflammation. In order to have this degree of control, the immune system ensures Tfh-mediated B-cell help is regulated locally in the germinal center. The recently identified T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cell subset can migrate to the germinal center and inhibit Tfh-mediated B-cell activation and antibody production. Although many aspects of Tfr cell biology are still unclear, recent data have begun to delineate the specialized roles of Tfr cells in controlling the germinal center reaction. Here we discuss the current understanding of Tfr-cell differentiation and function and how this knowledge is providing new insights into the dynamic regulation of germinal centers, and suggesting more efficacious vaccine strategies and ways to treat antibody-mediated diseases. PMID:27088919

  12. AB109. Downregulation of tNASP inhibits proliferation through regulating cell cycle-related proteins and inactive ERK/MAPK signal pathway in renal cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianzheng; Wang, Hainan; Cheng, Gong; Wang, Shangqian; Deng, Yunfei; Song, Zhen; Xu, Aiming; Liu, Bianjiang; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nuclear auto-antigenic sperm protein (NASP), initially described as a highly auto-immunogenic testis and sperm-specific protein, is a histone chaperone that is proved to present in all dividing cells. NASP has two splice variants: testicular NASP (tNASP) and somatic form of NASP (sNASP). Only cancer, germ, transformed, and embryonic cells have a high level of expression of the tNASP. Up to now, little has been known about tNASP in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, the molecular mechanism of tNASP in RCC was explored. Methods The expression level of tNASP in 16 paired human RCC specimens was determined. Downregulation of tNASP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected in RCC cell lines. The effect of downregulation of tNASP by siRNA on cell colony formation and proliferation was examined by colony formation assay and CCK-8 assay, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and the expression of cyclin D1 and P21 were detected by Western blotting. ERK/MAPK signaling was also analyzed. Results tNASP has a relative high expression level in human RCC tissues. Via upregulation of P21 and downregulation of cyclinD1, silence of tNASP can inhibit cell proliferation, which induces cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, ERK signaling pathway is confirmed to mediate the regulation of cell cycle-related proteins caused by silence of tNASP. Conclusions Our research demonstrates that knockdown of tNASP effectively inhibits the proliferation and causes G1 phase arrest through ERK/MAPK signal pathway.

  13. Gene activation by UV light, fungal elicitor or fungal infection in Petroselinum crispum is correlated with repression of cell cycle-related genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of UV light or fungal elicitors on plant cells have so far been studied mostly with respect to defense-related gene activation. Here, an inverse correlation of these stimulatory effects with the activities of several cell cycle-related genes is demonstrated. Concomitant with the induction of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes in UV-irradiated cell suspension cultures of parsley (Petroselinum crispum), total histone synthesis declined to about half the initial rate. A subclass of the histone H3 gene family was selected to demonstrate the close correlation of its expression with cell division, both in intact plants and cultured cells. Using RNA-blot and run-on transcription assays, it was shown that one arbitrarily selected subclass of each of the histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 gene families and of the genes encoding a p34cdc2 protein kinase and a mitotic cyclin were transcriptionally repressed in UV-irradiated as well as fungal elicitor-treated parsley cells. The timing and extent of repression differed between the two stimuli; the response to light was more transient and smaller in magnitude. These differential responses to light and elicitor were inversely correlated with the induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Essentially the same result was obtained with a defined oligopeptide elicitor, indicating that the same signaling pathway is responsible for defense-related gene activation and cell cycle-related gene repression. A temporary (UV light) or long-lasting (fungal elicitor) cessation of cell culture growth is most likely due to an arrest of cell division which may be a prerequisite for full commitment of the cells to transcriptional activation of full commitment of the cells to transcriptional activation of pathways involved in UV protection or pathogen defense. This conclusion is corroborated by the observation that the histone H3 mRNA level greatly declined around fungal infection sites in young parsley

  14. Characterization of a Novel Cardiac Isoform of the Cell Cycle-related Kinase That Is Regulated during Heart Failure*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Hongyu; Dai, Huacheng; Jain, Komal; Shah, Rina; Hong, Chull; Pain, Jayashree; Tian, Bin; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Depre, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is often followed by heart failure (HF), but the mechanisms precipitating the transition to HF remain largely unknown. A genomic profile was performed in a monkey model of MI, from the myocardium adjacent to chronic (2-month) MI followed by 3 weeks of pacing to develop HF. The transcript of the gene encoding the cell cycle-related kinase (CCRK) was down-regulated by 50% in HF heart compared with control (p < 0.05), which was confirmed by quan...

  15. Immunometabolism of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Ryan; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-05-19

    The bidirectional interaction between the immune system and whole-body metabolism has been well recognized for many years. Via effects on adipocytes and hepatocytes, immune cells can modulate whole-body metabolism (in metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) and, reciprocally, host nutrition and commensal-microbiota-derived metabolites modulate immunological homeostasis. Studies demonstrating the metabolic similarities of proliferating immune cells and cancer cells have helped give birth to the new field of immunometabolism, which focuses on how the cell-intrinsic metabolic properties of lymphocytes and macrophages can themselves dictate the fate and function of the cells and eventually shape an immune response. We focus on this aspect here, particularly as it relates to regulatory T cells. PMID:27196520

  16. T regulatory cells in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, M; Quecchia, C; Cavallucci, E; Di Giampaolo, L; Schiavone, C; Petrarca, C; Di Gioacchino, M

    2011-01-01

    The progressive understanding of the nature and mechanisms of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the last decade has changed the concept of immune tolerance, that is no longer considered as a mere lack of immune reactivity but as a finely regulated process that requires specific activity of cells, adhesion and secreted molecules. Tregs play a key role in maintenance of self-tolerance and induction of tolerance against ubiquitous innocuous non-self antigens, so preventing the onset of autoimmune diseases and allergies. This review will focus on the Treg response in allergy that is characterized by a down-regulation of allergen specific T cell proliferation and inhibition of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines production. Hence, Treg cells suppress allergen-specific Th1 and Th2 cell responses playing an important role in the physiological immune response to allergens. Further, Treg cells are able to suppress IgE production by B lymphocytes and directly or indirectly inhibit the activity of allergic inflammation effector cells, namely eosinophils, basophils and mastcells. Finally, increasing evidence suggests that Treg cells are also implicated in chronicity development of inflammatory diseases. This appears to happen through a fine interaction they entertain with resident tissue cells and has been particularly highlighted in the study of airways remodeling in asthma. The understanding of the mechanisms underlying allergen tolerance has brought new interest in the development of new allergy treatment, able to target Treg cells, both in allergy prevention and in the therapy of established allergy. PMID:21329567

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) agonists affect cell viability, apoptosis and expression of cell cycle related proteins in cell lines of glial brain tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straková, N.; Ehrmann, J.; Bartoš, Jan; Malíková, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kolář, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2005), s. 126-136. ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : PPAR * glioplasma * cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.731, year: 2005

  18. CD4-regulatory cells in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, Lucy J C; Starkey, Cerys; Vestbo, Jørgen; Singh, Dave

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The numbers of airway CD8 and B lymphocytes are increased in COPD patients, suggesting an autoimmune process. CD4-regulatory T cells control autoimmunity but have not been studied in patients with COPD. OBJECTIVE: To compare T-regulatory cell numbers in the BAL from COPD patients, smo...

  19. How do Regulatory T Cells Work?

    OpenAIRE

    Corthay, A

    2009-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are commonly divided into regulatory T (Treg) cells and conventional T helper (Th) cells. Th cells control adaptive immunity against pathogens and cancer by activating other effector immune cells. Treg cells are defined as CD4+ T cells in charge of suppressing potentially deleterious activities of Th cells. This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge in the Treg field and defines some key questions that remain to be answered. Suggested functions for Treg cells include: p...

  20. Regulatory T-cell compartmentalization and trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shuang; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (CD4+ Treg cells) are thought to differentiate in the thymus and immigrate from the thymus to the periphery. Treg cells can regulate both acquired and innate immunity through multiple modes of suppression. The cross-talk between Treg cells and targeted cells, such as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T cells, is crucial for ensuring suppression by Treg cells in the appropriate microenvironment. Emerging evidence suggests that Treg compartmentalization and ...

  1. Lewis y Regulate Cell Cycle Related Factors in Ovarian Carcinoma Cell RMG-I in Vitro via ERK and Akt Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Shulan Zhang; Qing Liu; Yingying Hao; Rui Hou; Bei Lin; Shuice Liu; Juanjuan Liu; Masao Iwamori; Dawo Liu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Lewis y overexpression on the expression of proliferation-related factors in ovarian cancer cells. Methods: mRNA levels of cyclins, CDKs, and CKIs were measured in cells before and after transfection with the α1,2-fucosyltransferase gene by real-time PCR, and protein levels of cyclins, CDKs and CKIs were determined in cells before and after gene transfection by Western blot. Results: Lewis y overexpression led to an increase in both mRNA and protein exp...

  2. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  3. Regulatory T cell identity: formation and maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xudong; Zheng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are central to the maintenance of immune homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 is essential for specifying the Treg cell lineage during development, and continued expression of Foxp3 in mature Treg cells is necessary for suppressive function. Treg cells can lose Foxp3 expression under certain conditions, and this is associated with autoimmune pathology. Here we review recent insights into the mechanisms that maintain Treg cell stability and function, and place ...

  4. CD4-regulatory cells in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, Lucy J C; Starkey, Cerys; Vestbo, Jørgen;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The numbers of airway CD8 and B lymphocytes are increased in COPD patients, suggesting an autoimmune process. CD4-regulatory T cells control autoimmunity but have not been studied in patients with COPD. OBJECTIVE: To compare T-regulatory cell numbers in the BAL from COPD patients......, smokers with normal lung function, and healthy nonsmokers (HNS). METHODS: BAL and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were obtained from 26 COPD patients, 19 smokers, and 8 HNS. Flow cytometry was performed for regulatory phenotypic markers. RESULTS: COPD patients had increased BAL CD8...... numbers compared to smokers and HNS. CD4 numbers were similar between groups. There was increased BAL CD4CD25(bright) expression in smokers (median 28.8%) and COPD patients (median 23.1%) compared to HNS (median 0%). Increased FoxP3 expression was confirmed in BAL CD4CD25(bright) cells. BAL CD4CD25 cells...

  5. Dysfunctional T regulatory cells in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhala, Rao H.; Neri, Paola; Bae, Jooeun E.; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Shammas, Masood A.; Allam, Charles K.; Daley, John F.; Chauhan, Dharminder; Blanchard, Elizabeth; Thatte, Hemant S.; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin and is associated with suppressed uninvolved immunoglobulins and dysfunctional T-cell responses. The biologic basis of this dysfunction remains ill defined. Because T regulatory (Treg) cells play an important role in suppressing normal immune responses, we evaluated the potential role of Treg cells in immune dysfunction in MM. We observed a significant increase in CD4+CD25+ T cells in patients with monoclona...

  6. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  7. Regulatory T Cells and Foxp3

    OpenAIRE

    Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play central role in regulation of immune responses to self antigens, allergens, and commensal microbiota as well as immune responses to infectious agents and tumors. Transcriptional factor Foxp3 serves as a lineage specification factor of Treg cells. Paucity of Treg cells due to loss-of-function mutations of the Foxp3 gene is responsible for highly aggressive, fatal systemic immune mediated inflammatory lesions in mice and men. Recent studies of Foxp3 expression and...

  8. Regulatory T cells in cutaneous immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Tetsuya; MIYACHI, YOSHIKI; Kabashima, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T cells with strong immunosuppressive activity. In the skin, it has recently been revealed that Treg play important roles not only in the maintenance of skin homeostasis but also in the regulation of the immune responses, such as contact hypersensitivity and atopic dermatitis. Furthermore, the skin plays important roles in the induction of Treg in the periphery. In this review, we will provide an overview of the mechanism of Treg-mediated immunosuppre...

  9. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  10. Neuropilin-1 distinguishes natural and inducible regulatory T cells among regulatory T cell subsets in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Mahesh; Louvet, Cedric; Davini, Dan; Gardner, James M.; Martinez-Llordella, Marc; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha; Anthony, Bryan A.; Sverdrup, Francis M; Head, Richard; Kuster, Daniel J.; Ruminski, Peter; Weiss, David; von Schack, David; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ CD4+ T helper cells called regulatory T (T reg) cells play a key role in controlling reactivity to self-antigens and onset of autoimmunity. T reg cells either arise in thymus and are called natural T reg (nT reg) cells or are generated in the periphery through induction of Foxp3 and are called inducible T reg (iT reg) cells. The relative contributions of iT reg cells and nT reg cells in peripheral tolerance remain unclear as a result of an inability to separate these two subsets of T r...

  11. Analysis of cell cycle-related proteins in gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers based on mucin phenotypes: a novel hypothesis of early gastric carcinogenesis based on mucin phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsushita Hiroo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities of cell cycle regulators are common features in human cancers, and several of these factors are associated with the early development of gastric cancers. However, recent studies have shown that gastric cancer tumorigenesis was characterized by mucin expression. Thus, expression patterns of cell cycle-related proteins were investigated in the early phase of differentiated-type gastric cancers to ascertain any mechanistic relationships with mucin phenotypes. Methods Immunostaining for Cyclins D1, A, E, and p21, p27, p53 and β-catenin was used to examine impairments of the cell cycle in 190 gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers. Mucin phenotypes were determined by the expressions of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2 and CD10. A Ki-67 positive rate (PR was also examined. Results Overexpressions of p53, cyclin D1 and cyclin A were significantly more frequent in a gastric phenotype than an intestinal phenotype. Cyclin A was overexpressed in a mixed phenotype compared with an intestinal phenotype, while p27 overexpression was more frequent in an intestinal phenotype than in a mixed phenotype. Reduction of p21 was a common feature of the gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that the levels of some cell cycle regulators appear to be associated with mucin phenotypes of early gastric differentiated-type cancers.

  12. Impaired regulatory B cells in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Rezania, Kourosh; Soliven, Betty

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory B cells (Bregs) attenuate the severity of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) in an interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent manner. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of human Bregs in MG focusing on CD19(+)CD1d(hi) CD5(+) and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) subsets. We found that MG patients exhibited a decrease in the frequency of both Breg subsets and IL-10 producing B cells within each subset, which correlated with disease severity. In addition, there was impaired suppression of Th1 polarization in MG. These findings, taken together with EAMG data, indicate that Bregs play an important role in regulating the severity of MG. PMID:27397074

  13. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  14. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Economou, James S. [Department of Surgical Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schaue, Doerthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  15. Regulatory mechanism of radiation-induced cancer cell death by the change of cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Ho; Jang, Ji Yeon [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    In our previous study, we have shown the main cell death pattern induced by irradiation or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors in K562 human myelogenous leukemic cell line. Death of the cells treated with irradiation alone was characterized by mitotic catastrophe and typical radiation-induced apoptosis was accelerated by herbimycin A (HMA). Both types of cell death were inhibited by genistein. In this study, we investigated the effects of HMA and genistein on cell cycle regulation and its correlation with the alterations of radiation-induced cell death. K562 cells in exponential growth phase were used for this study. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy using 6 MeV Linac (200-300 cGy/min). Immediately after irradiation, cells were treated with 250 nM of HMA or 25{mu}M of genistein. The distributions of cell cycle, the expressions of cell cycle-related protein, the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase, and the yield of senescence and differentiation were analyzed. X-irradiated cells were arrested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle but unlike the p53-positive cells, they were not able to sustain the cell cycle arrest. An accumulation of cells in G2 phase of first cell-cycle post-treatment and an increase of cyclin B1 were correlated with spontaneous, premature, chromosome condensation and mitotic catastrophe. HMA induced rapid G2 checkpoint abrogation and concomitant p53-independent G1 accumulation HMA-induced cell cycle modifications correlated with the increase of cdc2 kinase activity, the decrease of the expressions of cyclins E and A and of CDK2 kinase activity, and the enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis. Genistein maintained cells that were arrested in the G2-phase, decreased the expressions of cyclin B1 and cdc25C and cdc2 kinase activity, increased the expression of p16, and sustained senescence and megakaryocytic differentiation. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiation-induced cell death of K562 cells were closely related to the cell

  16. Alterations in regulatory T-cells: rediscovered pathways in immunotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, E; Oukka, M; Pieters, R; Kerkvliet, N.I.; Ponce, R.; Germolec, D R

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the effector T-cells subsets, T-cells can also differentiate into cells that play a suppressive or regulatory role in adaptive immune responses. The cell types currently identified as regulatory T-cells (Tregs) include natural or thymic-derived Tregs, T-cells which express Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ and can suppress immune responses to autoreactive T-cells, as well as inducible Tregs, that are generated from naïve T-cells in the periphery after interaction with antigens presented by dendr...

  17. Dendritic cellregulatory T-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Wojas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The one of the main modes of homeostasis protection is maintaining the balance between antimicrobial immunological reactions and mechanisms involved in immune response suppression. The interaction between dendritic and T cells plays a crucial role in inducing both an immune response and immunological tolerance. Dendritic cells are also able to affect the differentiation, migration, and activation of CD4 T cells using cell-to-cell contact and/or cytokine production. The proper cytokine microenvironment can influence the induction of FoxP3 transcription factor in T cells, determining the regulatory properties of these cells. However, it is still unclear what is more substantial for Treg induction: th e cytokines in the microenvironment, stimulation by a specific DC population, or the type of antigens presented by DC. Activated natural Treg as well as induced Treg cells use similar mechanisms to generate tolerance, for example by the production of such anti-inflammatory cytokines as TGF-β or IL-10 and by direct contact with target cells. Recently, some reports have described the possibility that Treg cells lose FoxP3 expression followed by loss of suppressive function directed against proliferating T lymphocytes.

  18. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. PMID:26945003

  19. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag(-/-) mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  20. Human regulatory T cells suppress proliferation of B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Biernacka, Marzena; Bujko, Mateusz; Nowak, Eliza; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Borycka, Ilona Sara; Bystydzienski, Zbigniew; Walewski, Jan; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-08-01

    Activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress proliferation and differentiation of normal B cells. In our study, allogeneic polyclonal CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs and CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded in vitro in the presence of rapamycin and low dose IL-2 suppressed proliferation of 11 out of 12 established lymphoma B-cell lines. The effect of expanded CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs on survival of freshly isolated lymphoma B cells maintained in culture with soluble multimeric CD40L and IL-4 was variable across lymphoma entities. The survival of freshly isolated follicular lymphoma cells usually decreased in cocultures with CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs. Treg effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma cells ranged from suppression to help in individual patients. CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs or CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded ex vivo with rapamycin could be used to suppress regrowth of residual lymphoma after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and to counteract both graft-versus-host disease and lymphoma re-growth after allogeneic HCT in select patients with lymphoma susceptible to the regulation by Tregs. PMID:26758248

  1. Role of dendritic cells in the induction of regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwah Rahul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in initiating immune responses and maintaining immune tolerance. In addition to playing a role in thymic selection, DCs play an active role in tolerance under steady state conditions through several mechanisms which are dependent on IL-10, TGF-β, retinoic acid, indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase along with vitamin D. Several of these mechanisms are employed by DCs in induction of regulatory T cells which are comprised of Tr1 regulatory T cells, natural and inducible foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 regulatory T cells and double negative regulatory T cells. It appears that certain DC subsets are highly specialized in inducing regulatory T cell differentiation and in some tissues the local microenvironment plays a role in driving DCs towards a tolerogenic response. In this review we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DC driven regulatory T cell induction.

  2. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance in the Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Powrie, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the mammalian immune system is to eradicate pathogens while minimizing immunopathology. Instigating and maintaining immunological tolerance within the intestine represents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system. Regulatory T cells are critical for continued immune tolerance in the intestine through active control of innate and adaptive immune responses. Dynamic adaptation of regulatory T-cell populations to the intestinal tissue microenvironment is key in this p...

  3. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indi...

  4. The Architectural Organization of Human Stem Cell Cycle Regulatory Machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Montecino, Martin; Medina, Ricardo(Instituto de Matemática e Computação, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, Minas Gerais, Brazil); Kapinas, Kristie; Ghule, Prachi; Grandy, Rodrigo; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Becker, Klaus A.

    2012-01-01

    Two striking features of human embryonic stem cells that support biological activity are an abbreviated cell cycle and reduced complexity to nuclear organization. The potential implications for rapid proliferation of human embryonic stem cells within the context of sustaining pluripotency, suppressing phenotypic gene expression and linkage to simplicity in the architectural compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is explored. Characterization of the molecular...

  5. Genomic definition of multiple ex vivo regulatory T cell subphenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Feuerer, Markus; Hill, Jonathan A.; Kretschmer, Karsten; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the Foxp3 transcription factor are essential for lymphoid homeostasis and immune tolerance to self. Other nonimmunological functions of Treg cells, such as controlling metabolic function in adipose tissue, are also emerging. Treg cells originate primarily in the thymus, but can also be elicited from conventional T cells by in vivo exposure to low-dose antigen or homeostatic expansion or by activation in the presence of TGFβ in vitro. Treg cells are chara...

  6. IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kui; Bi, Yutian; Sun, Kun; Wang, Changzheng

    2007-08-01

    As an important subset of regulatory T (Treg) cells, IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1), have some different features to thymic-derived naturally occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells(nTreg cells). Similar to nTreg cells, Tr1 also play important roles in the control of allergic inflammation in several ways. There is a fine balance between Tr1 and Th2 responses in healthy subjects. Skewing of allergic-specific effector T cells to a Tr1 phenotype appears to be a critical event in successful allergen-specific immunotherapy and glucocorticoids and beta2-agonists treatment. Tr1 suppress Th2 cells and effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, through producing IL-10, and perhaps TGF-beta. Understanding of Tr1 may be helpful in developing new strategies for treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:17764617

  7. IL-10-Producing Type 1 Regulatory T Cells and Allergy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui Wu; Yutian Bi; Kun Sun; Changzheng Wang

    2007-01-01

    As an important subset of regulatory T (Treg) cells, IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1), have some different features to thymic-derived naturally occurring CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells(nTreg cells). Similar to nTreg cells, Tr1 also play important roles in the control of allergic inflammation in several ways. There is a fine balance between Tr1 and Th2 responses in healthy subjects. Skewing of allergic-specific effctor T cells to a Tr1 phenotype appears to be a critical event in successful allergen-specific immunotherapy and glucocorticoids and β2-agonists treatment. Tr1 suppress Th2 cells and effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, through producing IL-10, and perhaps TGF-β. Understanding of Tr1 may be helpful in developing new strategies for treatment of allergic diseases.

  8. Regulatory T cells subsets in filarial infection and their function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eMetenou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Filarial infections in humans are chronic infections that cause significant morbidity. The chronic nature of these infections with continuous antigen release is associated with a parasite-specific T cell hypo-responsiveness that may over time also affect the immune responses to bystander antigens. Previous studies have shown the filarial parasite antigen-specific T cells hypo-responsiveness is mediated by regulatory cytokines -- IL-10 and TGF-β in particular. Recent studies have suggested that the modulated/regulated T cell responses associated with patent filarial infection may reflect an expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs that include both Tregs induced in peripheral circulation or pTregs and the thymus-derived Tregs or tTregs. Although much is known about the phenotype of these regulatory populations, the mechanisms underlying their expansion and their mode of action in filarial and other infections remain unclear. Nevertheless there are data to suggest that while many of these regulatory cells are activated in an antigen-specific manner the ensuing effectors of this activation are relatively non-specific and may affect a broad range of immune cells. This review will focus on the subsets and function of regulatory T cells in filarial infection.

  9. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders. PMID:25457963

  10. Generation and Function of Induced Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. There are two major subsets of Treg cells, “natural” Treg (nTreg) cells that develop in the thymus, and “induced” Treg (iTreg) cells that arise in the periphery from CD4+ Foxp3− conventional T cells and can be generated in vitro. Previous work has established that both subsets are required for immunological tolerance. Additionally, in vitro-derived iTreg cells can reestablish...

  11. Generation and function of induced regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. There are two major subsets of Treg cells, natural Treg (nTreg) cells that develop in the thymus, and induced Treg (iTreg) cells that arise in the periphery from CD4+ Foxp3– conventional T (Tconv) cells and can be generated in vitro. Previous work has established that both subsets are required for immunological tolerance. Additionally, in vitro-derived iTreg cells can rees...

  12. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in specific immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jutel, M; Akdis, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment which leads to a lifelong tolerance against previously disease-causing allergens due to restoration of normal immunity against allergens. The description of T-regulatory (Treg) cells being involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens has led to great interest whether they represent a major target for allergen-SIT and whether it would be possible to manipulate Treg cells to increase its efficacy. Activationinduced cell death, ...

  13. Extrathymically generated regulatory T cells control mucosal Th2 inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Josefowicz, Steven Z.; Niec, Rachel E.; Kim, Hye Young; Treuting, Piper; Chinen, Takatoshi; Zheng, Ye; Umetsu, Dale T.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2012-01-01

    A balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mechanisms at mucosal interfaces, sites of constitutive exposure to microbes and non-microbial foreign substances, allows for efficient protection against pathogens yet prevents adverse inflammatory responses associated with allergy, asthma, and intestinal inflammation1. Regulatory T (Treg) cells prevent systemic and tissue-specific autoimmunity and inflammatory lesions at mucosal interfaces. These cells are generated in the thymus (tTreg cells) an...

  14. Natural and Induced T Regulatory Cells in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Adeegbe, Dennis O.; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg) cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg) cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cel...

  15. Generation and Regulation of CD8+ Regulatory T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linrong Lu; Harvey Cantor

    2008-01-01

    Research into the suppressive activity of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) has defined a sublineage of CD4+ cells that contribute to self-tolerance and resistance to autoimmune disease. Much less attention has been given to the potential contribution of regulatory sublineages of CD8+ cells. Analysis of a small fraction of CD8+ cells that target autoreactive CD4+ cells through recognition of the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 in mouse and HLA-E in human has revitalized interest in CD8+ Treg. Here we summarize recent progress and future directions of research into the role of this CD8+ sublineage in resistance to autoimmune disease. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):401-406.

  16. Metabolic control of regulatory T cell development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance and play an important role in immunological diseases and cancers. Recent studies have revealed an intricate relationship between Treg biology and host and microbial metabolism. Various metabolites or nutrients produced by host and commensal microbes, such as vitamins and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), regulate Treg generation, trafficking and function. Furthermore, cell-intrinsic metabolic programs, orchestrated by mTOR and other m...

  17. Control of Th2-Mediated Inflammation by Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poojary, K. Venuprasad; Kong, Yi-chi M.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are caused by dysregulated Th2-type immune responses, which drive disease development in susceptible individuals. Immune tolerance to allergens prevents inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa and provides protection against inflammation in the airways. Increasing evidence indicates that Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in immune tolerance and control Th2-biased responses. Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ T cells (natural Tregs) ...

  18. The impact of aging on regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes eFessler; Anja eFelber; Christina eDuftner; Christian eDejaco

    2013-01-01

    Age related deviations of the immune system contribute to a higher likelihood of infections, cancer and autoimmunity in the elderly. Senescence of T-lymphocytes is characterized by phenotypical and functional changes including the loss of characteristic T-cell surface markers, while an increase of stimulatory receptors, cytotoxicity as well as resistance against apoptosis is observed. One of the key mediators of immune regulation are naturally occurring regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Tregs expre...

  19. Regulatory T cells inhibit stable contacts between CD4+ T cells and dendritic cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tadokoro, Carlos E.; Shakhar, Guy; Shen, Shiqian; Ding, Yi; Lino, Andreia C.; Maraver, Antonio; Lafaille, Juan J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cells exert powerful down-modulatory effects on immune responses, but it is not known how they act in vivo. Using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy we determined that, in the absence of T reg cells, the locomotion of autoantigen-specific T cells inside lymph nodes is decreased, and the contacts between T cells and antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) are of longer duration. Thus, T reg cells can exert an early effect on immune responses by attenuating the es...

  20. T Regulatory Cell Biology in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroqi, Fayhan J; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) play an essential role in enforcing immune tolerance to self tissues, regulating host-commensal flora interaction, and facilitating tissue repair. Their deficiency and/or dysfunction trigger unbridled autoimmunity and inflammation. A growing number of monogenic defects have been recognized that adversely impact Treg cell development, differentiation, and/or function, leading to heritable diseases of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. In this article, we review recent insights into Treg cell biology and function, with particular attention to lessons learned from newly recognized clinical disorders of Treg cell deficiency. PMID:26922942

  1. PD-1 regulates extrathymic regulatory T-cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiufen; Fosco, Dominick; Kline, Douglas E.; Meng, Liping; Nishi, Saki; Savage, Peter A.; Kline, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells and the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) pathway are both critical for maintaining peripheral tolerance to self antigens. A significant subset of Treg cells constitutively expresses PD-1, which prompted an investigation into the role of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions in Treg-cell development, function and induction in vivo. The phenotype and abundance of Treg cells was not significantly altered in PD-1-deficient mice. The thymic development of polyc...

  2. Regulatory T cells diminish transmission of HIV from Dendritic cells to conventional CD4+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Eugenia Moreno-Fernandez; Joedicke, Jara J; Claire Anne Chougnet

    2014-01-01

    Formation of immunological synapses between dendritic cells (DC) and conventional CD4+ T cells (Tcon) is critical for productive immune responses. However, when DCs are HIV-infected such synapses are critical to establish HIV infection. As regulatory T cells (Treg) control DC-Tcon interactions, we inquired whether Treg might interfere with DC to Tcon HIV transmission. We developed a model, using monocyte-derived DC infected with R5-HIV, and cultured with Tcon in the presence or absence of a...

  3. A Population Dynamics Analysis of the Interaction between Adaptive Regulatory T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fouchet, David; Regoes, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks t...

  4. REGULATORY T CELLS IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Donetskova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Percentage of CD4+CD25hi is increased in children with allergy, and it is independent on their nosology, severity, sensitization and IgE level in blood. FOXP3 expression virtually was not altered. Inhalation of corticosteroids in asthma causes increase of FOXP3 expression that may represent some mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. The amount of Treg’s gradually decrease with age in non-atopic children; they also decrease in atopic ones until 6 years, followed by their subsequent stabilization. Thus, a hypothesis is proposed, that the initial changes of Treg’s in case of allergy comprise a reduction in their functions, and, upon complete or partial compensation of this defect by increasing of cell amounts, a remission is initiated. However, in absence of compensation, acute attacks of allergic disorders are developed. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 159-166.

  5. A Regulatory Feedback between Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Regulatory B Cells Is Aberrant in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Madhvi; Blair, Paul A; Isenberg, David A; Mauri, Claudia

    2016-03-15

    Signals controlling the generation of regulatory B (Breg) cells remain ill-defined. Here we report an "auto"-regulatory feedback mechanism between plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and Breg cells. In healthy individuals, pDCs drive the differentiation of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) (immature) B cells into IL-10-producing CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cells and plasmablasts, via the release of IFN-α and CD40 engagement. CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cells conversely restrained IFN-α production by pDCs via IL-10 release. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), this cross-talk was compromised; pDCs promoted plasmablast differentiation but failed to induce Breg cells. This defect was recapitulated in healthy B cells upon exposure to a high concentration of IFN-α. Defective pDC-mediated expansion of CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell numbers in SLE was associated with altered STAT1 and STAT3 activation. Both altered pDC-CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell interactions and STAT1-STAT3 activation were normalized in SLE patients responding to rituximab. We propose that alteration in pDC-CD24(+)CD38(hi) Breg cell interaction contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:26968426

  6. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indicated that transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage specification act as pioneer transcription factors (TFs) that generate regions of open chromatin that enable the recruitment of TFs activated in response to external inputs. Therefore, competence for responses to a specific stimulus is programmed at an early stage of differentiation by factors involved in lineage commitment and maintenance of cell identity, which are responsible for the organization of a cell-type-specific cis-regulatory repertoire. The basic functional and organizational principles that regulate inflammatory gene expression in professional cells of the innate immune system provide general paradigms on the interplay between differentiation and environmental responses. PMID:23650641

  7. T regulatory cell suppression of colitis: the role of TGF‐β

    OpenAIRE

    Duchmann, R.; Zeitz, M

    2006-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF‐β) and interleukin 2 may be involved in IBD peripheral regulatory T cell pathophysiology, raising the possibility of therapeutic application of TGF‐β induced regulatory T cells in IBD patients

  8. Role of regulatory dendritic cells in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omid; Umetsu, Dale T

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient inducers of all immune responses, and are capable of either inducing productive immunity or maintaining the state of tolerance to self antigens and allergens. In this review, we summarize the emerging literature on DCs, with emphasis on the regulatory function of DCs in allergy and asthma. In particular, we summarize recent data regarding the relationship between DC subsets and TH1, TH2, and regulatory T (TReg) cells. The diverse functions of DCs have been attributed to distinct lineages of DCs, which arise from common immature precursor cells that differentiate in response to specific maturation-inducing or local microenvironment conditions. These subsets of DCs induce different lineages of T cells, such as TH1, TH2, and TReg cells, including Th1Reg and Th2Reg cells, which regulate allergic diseases and asthma. Subsets of DCs regulate the induction of a variety of T-cell subtypes, which suppress the development of allergy and asthma, thus providing anti-inflammatory responses and protective immunity. PMID:15659264

  9. Interleukin-2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 and its downstream target STAT5 have effects on many aspects of immune function. This has been perhaps best documented in regulatory T cells. In this review we summarize the initial findings supporting a role for IL2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and outline more recent studies describing how this critical signaling pathway entrains regulatory T cell differentiation and affects regulatory T cell function.

  10. Continuous requirement for the T cell receptor for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Andrew G; Arvey, Aaron; Jin, Wei; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) maintain immunological tolerance and their deficiency results in fatal multi-organ autoimmunity. Although heightened T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is critical for the differentiation of Treg cells, the role of TCR signaling in Treg cell function remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate inducible ablation of the TCR results in Treg cell dysfunction which cannot be attributed to impaired Foxp3 expression, decreased expression of Treg cell signature g...

  11. Influence of Dietary Components on Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high-fat diets are documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence on the ...

  12. Regulatory Allospecific T Cell Clones Abrogate Chronic Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Grimm, Martin R.; Lutz, Jens; Lange, Volkmar; Lenhard, Susanne M.; Aviles, Beatriz; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Samsonov, Dimitry; Meyer, Detlef; Hancock, Wayne W.; Heemann, Uwe; Gasser, Martin; Chandraker, Anil

    2009-01-01

    True alloantigen-specific tolerance is the ultimate goal of solid organ transplantation, eliminating the need for long-term immunosuppression. Recent evidence suggests that Th1-derived cytokines are associated with rejection and Th2-derived cytokines with long-term allograft survival, but the roles of these subsets in rejection and tolerance are incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed the functional and regulatory capacities of T cell clones derived from tolerant and rejecting rats (Wistar...

  13. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, HUIYUN; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Guo, Lianyi; Sun, Xiaoyun; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play diff...

  14. Regulatory T Cells in Many Flavors Control Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Anuradha; Khare, Anupriya; Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Qi, Zengbiao; Ray, Prabir

    2010-01-01

    That regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in controlling allergic diseases such as asthma is now undisputed. The cytokines most commonly implicated in Treg-mediated suppression of allergic asthma are TGF-β and IL-10. In addition to naturally occurring Tregs, adaptive Tregs, induced in response to foreign antigens, have been demonstrated in recent studies. The concept of inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTregs) has considerable significance in preventing asthma if generated early enough in ...

  15. Characterization of regulatory T cells in urban newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Tzianabos Arthur O; Cruikshank William W; Wallace Paul K; Visness Cynthia M; McLoughlin Rachel M; Ruiz-Perez Begona; Ly Ngoc P; O'Connor George T; Gold Diane R; Gern James E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In the United States, asthma prevalence is particularly high among urban children. Although the underlying immune mechanism contributing to asthma has not been identified, having impaired T regulatory (Treg) cells at birth may be a determining factor in urban children. The objective of this study was to compare Treg phenotype and function in cord blood (CB) of newborns to those in peripheral blood (PB) of a subset of participating mothers. Methods Treg numbers, expression,...

  16. The role of regulatory T cells in cancer immunology

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteside TL

    2015-01-01

    Theresa L Whiteside University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, US Abstract: Regulatory T cells (Treg) are generally considered to be significant contributors to tumor escape from the host immune system. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that in some human cancers, Treg are necessary to control chronic inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and limit inflammation-associated cancer development. The dual role of Treg in cancer and underpinnings of Treg diversity are not well und...

  17. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  18. Regulatory landscape for cell therapy--EU view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBlane, James W

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses regulation of cell therapies in the European Union (EU), covering cell sourcing and applications for clinical trials and marketing authorisation applications. Regulatory oversight of cell sourcing and review of applications for clinical trials with cell therapies are handled at national level, that is, separately with each country making its own decisions. For clinical trials, this can lead to different decisions in different countries for the same trial. A regulation is soon to come into force that will address this and introduce a more efficient clinical trial application process. However, at the marketing authorisation stage, the process is pan-national: the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (CHMP) is responsible for giving the final scientific opinion on all EU marketing authorisation applications for cell therapies: favourable scientific opinions are passed to the European Commission (EC) for further consultation and, if successful, grant of a marketing authorisation valid in all 28 EU countries. In its review of applications for marketing authorisations (MAAs) for cell therapies, the CHMP is obliged to consult the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), who conduct detailed scientific assessments of these applications, with assessment by staff from national regulatory authorities and specialist advisors to the regulators. PMID:25997566

  19. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis;

    2006-01-01

    Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS......) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between...... neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to CD25+ TGF-beta1+ CTLA-4+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells that suppress encephalitogenic T cells and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Suppression is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4 but not...

  20. SOCS1 and Regulation of Regulatory T Cells Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have suggested that natural regulatory T cells (Tregs lose Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 expression and suppression activity under certain inflammatory conditions. Treg plasticity has been studied because it may be associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Some studies showed that a minor uncommitted Foxp3+ T cell population, which lacks hypomethylation at Treg-specific demethylation regions (TSDRs, may convert to effector/helper T cells. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling, has been reported to play an important role in Treg cell integrity and function by protecting the cells from excessive inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss Treg plasticity and maintenance of suppression functions in both physiological and pathological settings. In addition, we discuss molecular mechanisms of maintaining Treg plasticity by SOCS1 and other molecules. Such information will be useful for therapy of autoimmune diseases and reinforcement of antitumor immunity.

  1. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  2. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  3. Partitioning of bone marrow into stem cell regulatory domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Maloney, M A; Lamela, R A; Banda, M J; Patt, H M

    1982-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that bone marrow consists of discrete stem cell regulatory volumes or domains, we studied spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) population growth kinetics in unirradiated WBB6F1-W/Wv mice receiving various doses of +/+ bone marrow cells. Assay of femoral marrow CFU-S content in the eight recipient dose groups revealed a family of growth curves having an initial dose-independent exponential phase and a subsequent dose-dependent deceleration phase. CFU-S content at the gr...

  4. Programming of regulatory T cells from pluripotent stem cells and prevention of autoimmunity*

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Rizwanul; Lei, Fengyang; Xiong, Xiaofang; Bian, Yanqing; Zhao, Baohua; Wu, Yuzhang; Song, Jianxun

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are being used to treat autoimmunity and prevent organ rejection; however, Treg cell-based therapies have been hampered by the technical limitation in obtaining a high number of functional Treg cells. Here we show how to generate functional Treg cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and to determine the potential role of such cells for Treg-based immunotherapy against autoimmunity in a therapeutic setting. Ligation of a Notch ligand and transduction of the...

  5. IL-9 production by regulatory T cells recruits mast cells that are essential for regulatory T cell-induced immune-suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Eller, Kathrin; Wolf, Dominik; Huber, Julia M; Metz, Martin; Mayer, Gert; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Maurer, Marcus; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Wolf, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    Both, mast cells (MC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) have gained attention as immunosuppressive cell populations. To investigate a possible interaction, we used the Th1- and Th17-dependent model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), in which both MC and Treg have been shown to play a protective role.

  6. T regulatory cells and their counterparts: masters of immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, C; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2009-05-01

    The interaction of environmental and genetic factors with the immune system can lead to the development of allergic diseases. The essential step in this progress is the generation of allergen-specific CD4(+) T-helper (Th) type 2 cells that mediate several effector functions. The influence of Th2 cytokines leads to the production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies by B cells, development and recruitment of eosinophils, mucus production and bronchial hyperreactivity, as well as tissue homing of other Th2 cells and eosinophils. Meanwhile, Th1 cells may contribute to chronicity and the effector phases. T cells termed T regulatory (Treg) cells, which have immunosuppressive functions and cytokine profiles distinct from that of either Th1 or Th2 cells, have been intensely investigated during the last 13 years. Treg cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines. Treg cells are able to inhibit the development of allergen-specific Th2 and Th1 cell responses and therefore play an important role in a healthy immune response to allergens. In addition, Treg cells potently suppress IgE production and directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. Currently, Treg cells represent an exciting area of research, where understanding the mechanisms of peripheral tolerance to allergens may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches for the prevention and cure of allergic diseases. PMID:19422105

  7. Natural and induced T regulatory cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeegbe, Dennis O; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg) cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg) cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cells. The fork-head transcription factor (Foxp3) typically is expressed by natural CD4+ Treg cells, and thus serves as a marker to definitively identify these cells. On the contrary, there is less consensus on what constitutes iTreg cells as their precise definition has been somewhat elusive. This is in part due to their distinct phenotypes which are shaped by exposure to certain inflammatory or "assault" signals stemming from the underlying immune disorder. The "policing" activity of Treg cells tends to be uni-directional in several pathological conditions. On one end of the spectrum, Treg cell suppressive activity is beneficial by curtailing T cell response against self-antigens and allergens thus preventing autoimmune diseases and allergies. On the other end however, their inhibitory roles in limiting immune response against pseudo-self antigens as in tumors often culminates into negative outcomes. In this review, we focus on this latter aspect of Treg cell immunobiology by highlighting the involvement of nTreg cells in various animal models and human tumors. We further discuss iTreg cells, relationship with their natural counterpart, and potential co-operation between the two in modulating immune response against tumors. Lastly, we discuss studies focusing on these cells as targets for improving anti-tumor immunity. PMID:23874336

  8. A population dynamics analysis of the interaction between adaptive regulatory T cells and antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fouchet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells are central actors in the maintenance of tolerance of self-antigens or allergens and in the regulation of the intensity of the immune response during infections by pathogens. An understanding of the network of the interaction between regulatory T cells, antigen presenting cells and effector T cells is starting to emerge. Dynamical systems analysis can help to understand the dynamical properties of an interaction network and can shed light on the different tasks that can be accomplished by a network. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model to describe a interaction network of adaptive regulatory T cells, in which mature precursor T cells may differentiate into either adaptive regulatory T cells or effector T cells, depending on the activation state of the cell by which the antigen was presented. Using an equilibrium analysis of the mathematical model we show that, for some parameters, the network has two stable equilibrium states: one in which effector T cells are strongly regulated by regulatory T cells and another in which effector T cells are not regulated because the regulatory T cell population is vanishingly small. We then simulate different types of perturbations, such as the introduction of an antigen into a virgin system, and look at the state into which the system falls. We find that whether or not the interaction network switches from the regulated (tolerant state to the unregulated state depends on the strength of the antigenic stimulus and the state from which the network has been perturbed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the interaction network studied in this paper plays an essential part in generating and maintaining tolerance against allergens and self-antigens.

  9. Regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis in regularly dividing cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribal S Darwish

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Ribal S DarwishDepartment of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USAAbstract: The balance between cell survival and death is essential for normal development and homeostasis of organisms. Apoptosis is a distinct type of cell death with ultrastructural features that are consistent with an active, inherently controlled process. Abnormalities and ­dysregulation of apoptosis contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple disease processes. Apoptosis is strictly regulated by several positive and negative feedback mechanisms that regulate cell death and determine the final outcome after cell exposure to apoptotic stimuli. Mitochondria and caspases are central components of the regulatory mechanisms of ­apoptosis. Recently, noncaspase pathways of apoptosis have been explored through the studies of ­apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G. Multiple difficulties in the apoptosis research relate to apoptosis detection and imaging. This article reviews current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis.Keywords: caspases, apoptosis-inducing factor, apoptosis inhibitory proteins, cytochrome c, mitochondria 

  10. Interaction between adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.U. Engela (Anja); C.C. Baan (Carla); A. Peeters (Anna); W. Weimar (Willem); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit immunosuppressive capabilities, which have evoked interest in their application as cell therapy in transplant patients. So far it has been unclear whether allogeneic MSCs and host regulatory T-cells (Tregs) functionally influence each other. We inves

  11. Transplantation tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宁翰; 吴宏飞; 吴军; 张炜; 眭元庚; 贺厚光; 张春雷; 郑峻松

    2004-01-01

    Background With potent suppressive effect on responder T cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have become the focus of attention only recently and they may play an important role in transplantation tolerance. However, the mechanism of action is not clear. This study was designed to assess the possibility of using CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to induce transplantation tolerance and to investigate their mechanism of action.Methods CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation techniques. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to assess the ability of Treg cells to suppress effector T cells. Before skin transplantation, various numbers of CD4+CD25+Treg cells, which have been induced using complex skin antigens from the donor, were injected into the host mice either intraperitoneally (0.5×105, 1×105, 2×105, 3×105, 4×105, or 5×105) or by injection through the tail vein (5×103, 1×104, 2×104, 5×104, 1×105, 2×105). Skin grafts from two different donor types were used to assess whether the induced Treg cells were antigen-specific. The survival time of the allografts were observed. Single photon emission computed tomography was also used to determine the distribution of Treg cells before and after transplantation.Results Treg cells have suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte reactions. Grafts survived longer in mice receiving CD4+CD25+ Treg cell injections than in control mice. There was a significant difference between groups receiving intraperitoneal injection of either 2×105 or 3×105 CD4+CD25+Treg cells and the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Better results were achieved when Treg cells were injected via the tail vein than when injected intraperitoneally. The transplantation tolerance induced by CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was donor-specific. Analysis of the localization of Treg cells revealed that Treg cells mainly migrated from the liver to the allografts and the spleen.Conclusions CD4+CD25+Treg cells can induce donor

  12. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  13. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have revealed the functional similarity between helper-like ILCs and Th cells, some aspects of ILCs including the development of this lineage remain elusive. It is intriguing that the majority of transcription factors involved in multiple stages of T cell development, differentiation, and function also play critical roles during ILC development. Regulators such as Id2, GATA-3, Nfil3, TOX, and TCF-1 are expressed and function at various stages of ILC development. In this review, we will summarize the expression and functions of these transcription factors shared by ILCs and Th cells. We will also propose a complex transcriptional regulatory network for the lineage commitment of ILCs.

  14. Regulatory T cells Enhance Mast Cell Production of IL-6 via Surface-bound TGFβ1

    OpenAIRE

    Ganeshan, Kirthana; Bryce, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation is a hallmark of allergic reactions but mast cells can also produce many cytokines that modulate immunity. Recently, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to inhibit mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis but their influence on cytokine production remained unknown. Here, we show that, rather than inhibit, Tregs actually enhance mast cell production of IL-6. We demonstrate that, while inhibition of degranulation was OX40/OX40L dependent, enhancement of IL-6 ...

  15. Regulatory T Cells in Post-stroke Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesz, Arthur; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The secondary neuroinflammatory response has come into focus of experimental stroke research. Immunological mechanisms after acute stroke are being investigated in the hope to identify novel and druggable pathways that contribute to secondary infarct growth after stroke. Among a variety of neuroimmunological events after acute brain ischemia, including microglial activation, brain leukocyte invasion, and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors, lymphocytes have been identified as the key leukocyte subpopulation driving the neuroinflammatory response and contributing to stroke outcome. Several studies have shown that pro-inflammatory lymphocyte subpopulations worsen stroke outcome and that inhibiting their invasion to the injured brain is neuroprotective. In contrast to the effector functions of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes, regulatory T cells (Treg) are critically involved in maintaining immune homeostasis and have been characterized as disease-limiting protective cells in several inflammatory conditions, particularly in primary inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). However, due to the complex function of regulatory cells in immune homeostasis and disease, divergent findings have been described for the role of Treg in stroke models. Emerging evidence suggests that this discrepancy arises from potentially differing functions of Treg depending on the predominant site of action within the neurovascular unit and the surrounding inflammatory milieu. This article will provide a comprehensive review of current findings on Treg in brain ischemia models and discuss potential reasons for the observed discrepancies. PMID:27030356

  16. Specific Control of Immunity by Regulatory CD8 T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoleiTang; TrevorRFSmith

    2005-01-01

    T lymphocytes with dedicated suppressor function (Treg) play a crucial role in the homeostatic control of immunity in the periphery. Several Treg phenotypes have now been identified in the CD4 and CD8 T cell populations, suggesting their down-regulatory function in both human and animal models of autoimmunity, transplantation and tumor immunity. Here we will focus on the CD8 Treg population and their ability to specifically inhibit a pathogenic autoimmune response. This review will detail the current advances in the knowledge of CD8 Treg in the context of antigen specificity, phenotype, MHC restriction, mechanism of action, and priming. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):11-19.

  17. Influence of dietary components on regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Tregs) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence bearing on the impact of dietary...... components on diseases in which Tregs play a seminal role will be discussed. Among chronic diseases where dietary factors could have a direct influence via modulation of Tregs homeostasis and functions, we will review chronic tissue-specific autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as IBD, T1D, MS, RA and...

  18. CD4+CD25bright T cells in human intestinal lamina propria as regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Shin; Kanai, Takanori; Oshima, Shigeru; Uraushihara, Koji; Totsuka, Teruji; Sawada, Taisuke; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Koganei, Kazutaka; Fukushima, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2004-09-01

    It is well known that immune responses in the intestine remain in a state of controlled inflammation, suggesting that not only active suppression by regulatory T cells plays an important role in the normal intestinal homeostasis, but also its dysregulation leads to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we demonstrate that the CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells reside in the human intestinal lamina propria (LP) and functionally retain regulatory activities. All human LP CD4(+) T cells regardless of CD25 expression constitutively expressed CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein, and Foxp3 and proliferate poorly. Although LP CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells showed an activated and anergic/memory phenotype, they did not retain regulatory activity. In LP CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, however, cells expressing CD25 at high levels (CD4(+)CD25(bright)) suppressed the proliferation and various cytokine productions of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells by themselves produced fewer amounts of IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-10. Interestingly, LP CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells with regulatory T activity were significantly increased in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. These results suggest that CD4(+)CD25(bright) T cells found in the normal and inflamed intestinal mucosa selectively inhibit the host immune response and therefore may contribute to the intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:15322172

  19. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  20. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Guo, Lianyi; Sun, Xiaoyun; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play different role in controlling immune system, which complicates the involvement of Tregs in allergy. The aim of the present study is to attempt to classify subtypes of Tregs and summarize their roles in allergy. Tregs should include natural Tregs (nTreg) including inducible costimulator (ICOS)(+) Tregs, inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTreg), interleukin (IL)-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), CD8(+) Tregs and IL-17-producing Tregs. These cells share some common features including expression of Foxp3 (except for Tr1 cells), and secretion of inhibitory cytokine IL-10 and/or TGF-β. Furthermore, it is noticeable that Tregs likely contribute to allergic disorders such as dermatitis and airway inflammation, and play a crucial role in the treatment of allergy through their actions on suppression of effector T cells and inhibition of activation of mast cells and basophils. Modulation of functions of Tregs may provide a novel strategy to prevent and treat allergic diseases. PMID:24886492

  1. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence...

  2. Statins as Modulators of Regulatory T-Cell Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Forero-Peña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are pharmacological inhibitors of the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol. Some recent experimental studies have shown that besides their effects on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, statins may also have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. On the other hand, the induction and activity of regulatory T cells (Treg are key processes in the prevention of pathology during chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Hence, strategies oriented towards the therapeutic expansion of Tregs are gaining special attention among biomedical researchers. The potential effects of statins on the biology of Treg are of particular importance because of their eventual application as in vivo inducers of Treg in the treatment of multiple conditions. In this paper we review the experimental evidence pointing out to a potential effect of statins on the role of regulatory T cells in different conditions and discuss its potential clinical significance.

  3. Metabolic control of regulatory T cell development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance and play an important role in immunological diseases and cancers. Recent studies have revealed an intricate relationship between Treg biology and host and microbial metabolism. Various metabolites or nutrients produced by host and commensal microbes, such as vitamins and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), regulate Treg generation, trafficking, and function. Furthermore, cell intrinsic metabolic programs, orchestrated by mTOR and other metabolic sensors, modulate Foxp3 induction and Treg suppressive activity. Conversely, Tregs are crucial in regulating obesity-associated inflammation and host metabolic balance, and in shaping homeostasis of gut microbiota. We review here the interplay between Tregs and metabolism, with a particular focus on how host, commensal, and cellular metabolism impinge upon Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25248463

  4. MicroRNA 10a marks regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeker, Lukas T; Zhou, Xuyu; Gershberg, Kseniya;

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. We report that microRNA-10a (miR-10a) is expressed in Tregs but not in other T cells including individual thymocyte subsets. Expression profiling in inbred mouse strains demonstrated that non-obese diabetic (NOD...... vitro TGF-ß-induced, iTregs do not express miR-10a unless cultured in the presence of retinoic acid (RA) which has been associated with increased stability of iTreg, suggesting that miR-10a might play a role in stabilizing Treg. However, genetic ablation of miR-10a neither affected the number and...

  5. Characterization of regulatory T cells in urban newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzianabos Arthur O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, asthma prevalence is particularly high among urban children. Although the underlying immune mechanism contributing to asthma has not been identified, having impaired T regulatory (Treg cells at birth may be a determining factor in urban children. The objective of this study was to compare Treg phenotype and function in cord blood (CB of newborns to those in peripheral blood (PB of a subset of participating mothers. Methods Treg numbers, expression, and suppressive function were quantified in subjects recruited prenatally from neighborhoods where ≥ 20% of families have incomes below the poverty line. Proportion of Treg cells and expression of naïve (CD45RA or activated (CD45RO, CD69, and HLA-DR markers in CD4+T cells was measured by flow cytometry. Treg suppressive capacity was determined by quantifying PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation in mononuclear cell samples with and without CD25 depletion. Results In an urban cohort of 119 newborns and 82 mothers, we found that newborns had similar number of cells expressing FOXP3 as compared to the mothers but had reduced numbers of CD4+CD25+bright cells that predominantly expressed the naïve (CD45RA rather than the activated/memory (CD45RO phenotype found in the mothers. Additionally, the newborns had reduced mononuclear cell TGF-β production, and reduced Treg suppression of PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation compared to the mothers. Conclusion U.S. urban newborns have Treg cells that express FOXP3, albeit with an immature phenotype and function as compared to the mothers. Longitudinal follow-up is needed to delineate Treg cell maturation and subsequent risk for atopic diseases in this urban birth cohort.

  6. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  7. Distinct cytokines balance the development of regulatory T cells and interleukin-10-producing regulatory B cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holáň, Vladimír; Zajícová, Alena; Javorková, Eliška; Trošan, Peter; Chudičková, Milada; Pavlíková, M.; Krulová, Magdaléna

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 4 (2014), s. 577-586. ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/1568; GA ČR GAP304/11/0653 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021620858 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Autoregulation * B cells * Cytokines Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.795, year: 2014

  8. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2008-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment which leads to a lifelong tolerance against previously disease-causing allergens due to restoration of normal immunity against allergens. The description of T-regulatory (Treg) cells being involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens has led to great interest whether they represent a major target for allergen-SIT and whether it would be possible to manipulate Treg cells to increase its efficacy. Activationinduced cell death, anergy and/or immune response modulation by Treg cells are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. There is growing evidence that anergy, tolerance and active suppression are not entirely distinct, but rather represent linked mechanisms possibly involving the same cells and multiple suppressor mechanisms. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to Treg cells appears as a crucial event in the control of healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-SIT. The Treg cell response is characterized by abolished allergen- induced specific T-cell proliferation and suppressed Thelper (Th)1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion. In addition, mediators of allergic inflammation that trigger cAMP-associated G-protein-coupled receptors, such as histamine receptor-2, may contribute to peripheral tolerance mechanisms. The increased levels of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-Beta that are produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production, while simultaneously increasing production of non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress effector cells of allergic inflammation such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms. It is associated with regulation of antibody isotypes and effector cells to the direction of a healthy immune response. By the application of the recent knowledge in Treg

  9. Feedback control of regulatory T cell homeostasis by dendritic cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Mouquet, Hugo; Victora, Gabriel D.; Eisenreich, Thomas; Yao, Kai-Hui; Masilamani, Revati F.; Dustin, Michael L; Rudensky, Alexander; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells (T reg cells) maintain self-tolerance and suppress autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to their effects on T cells, T reg cells are essential for maintaining normal numbers of dendritic cells (DCs): when T reg cells are depleted, there is a compensatory Flt3-dependent increase in DCs. However, little is known about how T reg cell homeostasis is maintained in vivo. We demonstrate the existence ...

  10. Cholera-like enterotoxins and Regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Christelle; Thiam, Fatou; Martino, Cyrille Di; Holton, John; Clements, John D; Kohli, Evelyne

    2010-07-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) and the heat-labile enterotoxin of E. coli (LT), as well as their non toxic mutants, are potent mucosal adjuvants of immunization eliciting mucosal and systemic responses against unrelated co-administered antigens in experimental models and in humans (non toxic mutants). These enterotoxins are composed of two subunits, the A subunit, responsible for an ADP-ribosyl transferase activity and the B subunit, responsible for cell binding. Paradoxically, whereas the whole toxins have adjuvant properties, the B subunits of CT (CTB) and of LT (LTB) have been shown to induce antigen specific tolerance when administered mucosally with antigens in experimental models as well as, recently, in humans, making them an attractive strategy to prevent or treat autoimmune or allergic disorders. Immunomodulation is a complex process involving many cell types notably antigen presenting cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this review, we focus on Treg cells and cholera-like enterotoxins and their non toxic derivates, with regard to subtype, in vivo/in vitro effects and possible role in the modulation of immune responses to coadministered antigens. PMID:22069660

  11. Cholera-Like Enterotoxins and Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Kohli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cholera toxin (CT and the heat-labile enterotoxin of E. coli (LT, as well as their non toxic mutants, are potent mucosal adjuvants of immunization eliciting mucosal and systemic responses against unrelated co-administered antigens in experimental models and in humans (non toxic mutants. These enterotoxins are composed of two subunits, the A subunit, responsible for an ADP-ribosyl transferase activity and the B subunit, responsible for cell binding. Paradoxically, whereas the whole toxins have adjuvant properties, the B subunits of CT (CTB and of LT (LTB have been shown to induce antigen specific tolerance when administered mucosally with antigens in experimental models as well as, recently, in humans, making them an attractive strategy to prevent or treat autoimmune or allergic disorders. Immunomodulation is a complex process involving many cell types notably antigen presenting cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs. In this review, we focus on Treg cells and cholera-like enterotoxins and their non toxic derivates, with regard to subtype, in vivo/in vitro effects and possible role in the modulation of immune responses to coadministered antigens.

  12. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis. PMID:27190026

  13. T regulatory cells: an overview and intervention techniques to modulate allergy outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaraguru Uday; Miller Christopher WT; Nandakumar Subhadra

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dysregulated immune response results in inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa leading to asthma and allergy in susceptible individuals. The T helper type 2 (Th2) subsets are primarily involved in this disease process. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence in support of T cells with regulatory potential that operates in non-allergic individuals. These regulatory T cells occur naturally are called natural T regulatory cells (nTregs) and express the transcription factor Foxp...

  14. Ubiquitous points of control over regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Posttranslational modification by ubiquitin tagging is crucial for regulating the stability, activity and cellular localization of many target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle progression, protein quality control, and signal transduction. It has long been appreciated that ubiquitin-mediated events are important for certain signaling pathways leading to leukocyte activation and the stimulation of effector function. Now it is clear that the activities of molecules and pathways central to immune regulation are also modified and controlled by ubiquitin tagging. Among the mechanisms of immune control, regulatory T cells (or Tregs) are themselves particularly sensitive to such regulation. E3 ligases and deubiquitinases both influence Tregs through their effects on the signaling pathways pertinent to these cells or through the direct, posttranslational regulation of Foxp3. In this review, we will summarize and discuss several examples of ubiquitin-mediated control over multiple aspects of Treg biology including the generation, function and phenotypic fidelity of these cells. Fully explored and exploited, these potential opportunities for Treg modulation may lead to novel immunotherapies for both positive and negative fine-tuning of immune restraint. PMID:24777637

  15. Regulatory T Cells in Melanoma Revisited by a Computational Clustering of FOXP3+ T Cell Subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hiroko; Josse, Julie; Tanioka, Miki; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Husson, François; Ono, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that express the transcription factor FOXP3 (FOXP3+ T cells) are commonly regarded as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). FOXP3+ T cells are reported to be increased in tumor-bearing patients or animals and are considered to suppress antitumor immunity, but the evidence is often contradictory. In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that FOXP3 is induced by antigenic stimulation and that some non-Treg FOXP3+ T cells, especially memory-phenotype FOXP3low cells, prod...

  16. The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Reyes García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes from the immune system are bone marrow-derived cells whose development and activities are carefully supervised by two sets of accessory cells. In the thymus, the immature young T lymphocytes are engulfed by epithelial “nurse cells” and retained in vacuoles, where most of them (95% are negatively selected and removed when they have an incomplete development or express high affinity autoreactive receptors. The mature T lymphocytes that survive to this selection process leave the thymus and are controlled in the periphery by another subpopulation of accessory cells called “regulatory cells,” which reduce any excessive immune response and the risk of collateral injuries to healthy tissues. By different times and procedures, nurse cells and regulatory cells control both the development and the functions of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Disorders in the T lymphocytes development and migration have been observed in some parasitic diseases, which disrupt the thymic microenvironment of nurse cells. In other cases, parasites stimulate rather than depress the functions of regulatory T cells decreasing T-mediated host damages. This paper is a short review regarding some features of these accessory cells and their main interactions with T immature and mature lymphocytes. The modulatory role that neurotransmitters and hormones play in these interactions is also revised.

  17. Influence of Dietary Components on Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Teimer, Roman; Bockermann, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Common dietary components including vitamins A and D, omega-3 and probiotics are now widely accepted to be essential to protect against many diseases with an inflammatory nature. On the other hand, high-fat diets are documented to exert multiple deleterious effects, including fatty liver diseases. Here we discuss the effect of dietary components on regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis, a central element of the immune system to prevent chronic tissue inflammation. Accordingly, evidence on the impact of dietary components on diseases in which Tregs play an influential role will be discussed. We will review chronic tissue-specific autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies among chronic diseases where dietary factors could have a direct influence via modulation of Tregs homeostasis and functions. PMID:22113499

  18. T regulatory cells and the immune aging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Ann Titi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Goronzy, Jorg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Constant exposure to new and persisting antigens and the need to replace cellular attrition with newly build cells lead to profound remodeling of the immune system during the second half of life. The impact of the immunosenescence process varies amongst the different functional subsets represented within the immune system, and emerging data suggest that progressive aging significantly affects frequencies, subset distribution and functional competence of regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the central role of Treg cells in immune homeostasis, age-related loss of Treg function would be predicted to render the host susceptible to excessive immunity, encountered in elderly humans as a syndrome of chronic-smoldering inflammation. Conversely, age-dependent gain of Treg activity would expose the host to greater risk of immune failure, such as the rising risk of malignancies and infections in the aging population. Emerging data suggest that some Treg populations, specifically naturally occurring Tregs (nTreg), seem to accumulate with advancing age, whereas inducible Tregs (iTreg) appear to be less available in the older host. More studies are necessary to elucidate functional competence of old Tregs, with emphasis on comparing efficacy of young on old Tregs for defined functional domains. Mechanisms of declining Treg inducibility are not understood, but may provide an opportunity for targeted immunomodulation in the elderly. On the horizon is the potential to develop novel therapeutic interventions that target Tregs to make the elderly more efficient in fighting cancers and infections and dampen the risk for senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:24296590

  19. Roles of regulatory T cells in cancer immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2016-08-01

    CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 are highly immune suppressive and play central roles in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis, yet in malignant tumors they promote tumor progression by suppressing effective antitumor immunity. Indeed, higher infiltration by Tregs is observed in tumor tissues, and their depletion augments antitumor immune responses in animal models. Additionally, increased numbers of Tregs and, in particular, decreased ratios of CD8(+) T cells to Tregs among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are correlated with poor prognosis in various types of human cancers. The recent success of cancer immunotherapy represented by immune checkpoint blockade has provided a new insight in cancer treatment, yet more than half of the treated patients did not experience clinical benefits. Identifying biomarkers that predict clinical responses and developing novel immunotherapies are therefore urgently required. Cancer patients whose tumors contain a large number of neoantigens stemming from gene mutations, which have not been previously recognized by the immune system, provoke strong antitumor T-cell responses associated with clinical responses following immune checkpoint blockade, depending on the resistance to Treg-mediated suppression. Thus, integration of a strategy restricting Treg-mediated immune suppression may expand the therapeutic spectrum of cancer immunotherapy towards patients with a lower number of neoantigens. In this review, we address the current understanding of Treg-mediated immune suppressive mechanisms in cancer, the involvement of Tregs in cancer immunotherapy, and strategies for effective and tolerable Treg-targeted therapy. PMID:27160722

  20. Andrographolide Ameliorate Rheumatoid Arthritis by Promoting the Development of Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Muhaimin Rifa’i

    2010-01-01

    Andrographolide is important material present in Andrographis paniculata. This material can promote T cell to develop into regulatory T cell, CD4+CD25+. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, a component of the innate immune response, which play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, have become the focus of numerous studies over the last decade. These cells have the potential to be exploited to treat autoimmune disease. These cells inhibit the immune respo...

  1. 89 Is Basophil Specific Response to Hymenoptera Venom Related to T Regulatory Cells?

    OpenAIRE

    Kucera, Petr; Hulikova, Katarina; Cvackova, Milada; Planska, Daniela; Riegerova, Kamila

    2012-01-01

    Background The exact mechanism of systemic hypersensitivity to venom is not exactly understood. It is suggested T cells with regulatory potential can downregulate other T cell subsets and effector cells, ex. mast cell or basophils. We focused on relationship of specific basophil reactivity in relationship to proportion of regulatory T cells. Methods Forty-five patients with history of systemic symptoms of allergy to Hymenoptera venom were included. Basophil reactivity before the treatment and...

  2. STAT6 Activation Confers upon T Helper Cells Resistance to Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillemer, Brendan B. L.; Qi, Zengbiao; Melgert, Barbro; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Ray, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted characteristics of T regulatory cells (Tregs) that underlie their suppressive function. However, mechanisms that override their suppressive function in the context of an adaptive immune response are not well understood. In the lungs of mice undergoing allergic inflamm

  3. Control of T cell infiltration and tumor rejection by regulatory T cells, basophils and macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Sektioglu, Ibrahim Murathan

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to immune rejection due to immunosuppressive mechanisms operative within the tumor microenvironment. Cancer patients frequently harbor elevated numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which inhibit efficient anti-tumor T cell responses. We employed different mouse models for Treg depletion in order to study the mechanisms that control tumor rejection. Depletion of about 99% Tregs in Foxp3DTR knock-in mice resulted in complete rejection of transplan...

  4. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Blatner, Nichole R.; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C.; Krantz, Seth B.; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L.; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-01-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (ΔTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion...

  5. Regulatory T-cell immunotherapy for allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Horch, Matthew; Nguyen, Vu H

    2012-01-01

    From mouse studies to recently published clinical trials, evidence has accumulated on the potential use of regulatory T cells (Treg) in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT). However, controversies remain as to the phenotype and stability of various Treg subsets and their respective roles in vivo, the requirement of antigen-specificity of Treg to reduce promiscuous suppression, and the molecular mechanisms by which Treg suppress, ...

  6. A Central Role for Induced Regulatory T Cells in Tolerance Induction in Experimental Colitis1

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Lin, Wen; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Salzman, Nita H.; Carlson, Marc R.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M.; Chatila, Talal A; Williams, Calvin B.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to thymus-derived or natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells, a second subset of induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells arises de novo from conventional CD4+ T cells in the periphery. The function of iTreg cells in tolerance was examined in a CD45RBhighCD4+ T cell transfer model of colitis. In situ-generated iTreg cells were similar to nTreg cells in their capacity to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro and their absence in vivo accelerated bowel disease. Treatment with nTreg cells reso...

  7. Resistin enhances the expansion of regulatory T cells through modulation of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistin, a member of adipokine family, is known to be involved in the modulation of immune responses including inflammatory activity. Interestingly, resistin is secreted by adipocytes in mice and rats whereas it is secreted by leukocytes in humans. However, the mechanism behind the effect of resistin on the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs remains poorly understood. Therefore, we examined regulatory effect of resistin on the induction and cellular modification of Tregs. Results Both protein and mRNA expression of FoxP3, a representative marker of Tregs, increased in a dose-dependent manner when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with resistin. At the same time, resistin had no direct effect on the induction of FoxP3 in CD4+ T cells, suggesting an indirect role through other cells type(s. Since DCs are an important player in the differentiation of T cells, we focused on the role of DCs in the modulation of Tregs by resistin. Resistin suppressed the expression of interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 and its target cytokines, IL-6, IL-23p19 and IL-12p40, in DCs. Furthermore, FoxP3 expression is increased in CD4+ T cells when co-cultured with DCs and concomitantly treated with resistin. Conclusion Our results suggest that resistin induces expansion of functional Tregs only when co-cultured with DCs.

  8. IL-2–dependent tuning of NK cell sensitivity for target cells is controlled by regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gasteiger, Georg; Hemmers, Saskia; Firth, Matthew A.; Le Floc’h, Audrey; Huse, Morgan; Sun, Joseph C.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the adaptive immune system took a toll in the form of pathologies mediated by self-reactive cells. Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) exert a critical brake on responses of T and B lymphocytes to self- and foreign antigens. Here, we asked whether T reg cells are required to restrain NK cells, the third lymphocyte lineage, whose features combine innate and adaptive immune cell properties. Although depletion of T reg cells led to systemic fatal autoimmunity, NK cell tolerance and...

  9. The Limits of Linked Suppression for Regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiro eIto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously found that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (T regs can adoptively transfer tolerance after its induction with co-stimulatory blockade in a mouse model of murine cardiac allograft transplantation. In these experiments, we tested an hypothesis with three components: 1 the T regs that transfer tolerance have the capacity for linked suppression, 2 the determinants that stimulate the T regs are expressed by the indirect pathway, and 3 the donor peptides contributing to these indirect determinants are derived from donor MHC antigens. Methods: 1st heart transplants were performed from the indicated donor strain to B10.D2 recipients along with co-stimulatory blockade treatment (250μg i.p. injection of MR1 on day 0 and 250μg i.p. injection of CTLA-4 Ig on day 2. At least 8 weeks later a 2nd heart transplant was performed to a new B10.D2 recipient that had been irradiated with 450 cGy. This recipient was given 40 x 106 naïve B10.D2 spleen cells plus 40 x 106 B10.D2 spleen cells from the first (tolerant recipient. We performed 3 different types of heart transplants with using various donor.Results: 1. T regs suppress the graft rejection in an antigen-specific manner. 2. T regs generated in the face of MHC disparities suppress the rejection of grafts expressing third party MHC along with tolerant MHC. Conclusion:The limits of linkage appear to be quantitative and not universally determined by either the indirect pathway or by peptides of donor MHC antigens.

  10. The importance of being a regulatory T cell in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David A

    2016-08-01

    Natural Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) defined by expression of the Foxp3 marker generated in the thymus against self autoantigens prevent systemic autoimmune and inflammatory disease. A second population of Tregs induced by exogenous antigens in the periphery (iTregs) are currently thought to play a key role in preventing infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss (occult and clinically-evident), pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and premature birth in outbred matings where the father is histoincompatible with the mother. Curiously, when iTregs are ablated in mice, fertility is usually not impaired and resorption rates in matings with allogeneic males can range from 0% to 100% in individual females. Analysis of possible explanations suggest iTregs prevent abortions by countering effects of environmental stressors. Depletion of iTregs at mid-pregnancy in mice only causes abortions in an artificial transgenic model. Effects of iTreg depletion on pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and premature birth remain to be tested. Tregs induced during pregnancy may also affect the health of offspring in post natal life as well as the health of the mother. PMID:27219894

  11. Prevention, Evaluation, and Rehabilitation of Cycling-Related Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Dana H; Babu, Ashwin N; Robidoux, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The unique quality of the bicycle is its ability to accommodate a wide variety of injuries and disabilities. Cycling for recreation, transportation, and competition is growing nationwide, and has proven health and societal benefits. The demands of each type of cycling dictate the necessary equipment, as well as potential for injury. Prevention of cycling-related injury in both the athlete and the recreational cyclist involves understanding the common mechanisms for both traumatic and overuse injury, and early correction of strength and flexibility imbalances, technique errors, and bicycle fit. PMID:27172085

  12. Adoptive Cell Therapy for Lymphoma with CD4 T Cells Depleted of CD137 Expressing Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Matthew J; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Houot, Roch; Varghese, Bindu; Lin, Jack T.; Swanson, Erica; Levy, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with anti-tumor T cells is a promising novel approach to the treatment of cancer. However, T cell therapy may be limited by the co-transfer of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we explored this hypothesis by using two cell surface markers, CD44 and CD137, to isolate anti-tumor CD4 T cells while excluding Tregs. In a murine model of B cell lymphoma, only CD137negCD44hi CD4 T cells infiltrated tumor sites and provided protection. Conversely, the population of CD137posCD44h...

  13. Andrographolide Ameliorate Rheumatoid Arthritis by Promoting the Development of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaimin Rifa’i

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide is important material present in Andrographis paniculata. This material can promote T cell to develop into regulatory T cell, CD4+CD25+. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells, a component of the innate immune response, which play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, have become the focus of numerous studies over the last decade. These cells have the potential to be exploited to treat autoimmune disease. These cells inhibit the immune response in an Ag-nonspecific manner, interacting with other T cells. These T cell populations actively control the properties of other immune cells by suppressing their functional activity to prevent autoimmunity but also influence the immune response to allergens as well as against tumor cells and pathogens. In this experiment we showed that active compound from Andrographis paniculata namely andrographolide can induce active regulatory T cell that has an efficacy to cure rheumatoid arthritis mice model.

  14. Activation of regulatory T cells during inflammatory response is not an exclusive property of stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Hendrik Gosemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis and systemic-inflammatory-response-syndrome (SIRS remain major causes for fatalities on intensive care units despite up-to-date therapy. It is well accepted that stem cells have immunomodulatory properties during inflammation and sepsis, including the activation of regulatory T cells and the attenuation of distant organ damage. Evidence from recent work suggests that these properties may not be exclusively attributed to stem cells. This study was designed to evaluate the immunomodulatory potency of cellular treatment during acute inflammation in a model of sublethal endotoxemia and to investigate the hypothesis that immunomodulations by cellular treatment during inflammatory response is not stem cell specific. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endotoxemia was induced via intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in wild type mice (C3H/HeN. Mice were treated with either vital or homogenized amniotic fluid stem cells (AFS and sacrificed for specimen collection 24 h after LPS injection. Endpoints were plasma cytokine levels (BD™ Cytometric Bead Arrays, T cell subpopulations (flow-cytometry and pulmonary neutrophil influx (immunohistochemistry. To define stem cell specific effects, treatment with either vital or homogenized human-embryonic-kidney-cells (HEK was investigated in a second subset of experiments. Mice treated with homogenized AFS cells showed significantly increased percentages of regulatory T cells and Interleukin-2 as well as decreased amounts of pulmonary neutrophils compared to saline-treated controls. These results could be reproduced in mice treated with vital HEK cells. No further differences were observed between plasma cytokine levels of endotoxemic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results revealed that both AFS and HEK cells modulate cellular immune response and distant organ damage during sublethal endotoxemia. The observed effects support the hypothesis, that immunomodulations are not

  15. Regulatory T Cells Control Immune Responses through Their Non-Redundant Tissue Specific Features

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtimäki, Sari; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are needed in the control of immune responses and to maintain immune homeostasis. Of this subtype of regulatory lymphocytes, the most potent are Foxp3 expressing CD4+ T cells, which can be roughly divided into two main groups; natural Treg cells (nTreg), developing in the thymus, and induced or adaptive Treg cells (iTreg), developing in the periphery from naïve, conventional T cells. Both nTreg cells and iTreg cells have their own, non-redundant roles in the immune s...

  16. IL-10-producing regulatory B-cells suppressed effector T-cells but enhanced regulatory T-cells in chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Cheng, Li-Sha; Wu, Sheng-di; Wang, Si-Qi; Li, Lei; She, Wei-Min; Li, Jing; Wang, Ji-Yao; Jiang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Non-specific immune responses to antigens have been demonstrated as being enhanced during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Here, we evaluated the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B-cells (Bregs) in the pathogenesis of HBV-related liver fibrosis (HBV-LF) and assessed their immunoregulatory effects. Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were enrolled in this study. Numbers and frequencies of peripheral B-cells (memory CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) cells, immature/transitional CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) cells, mature CD19(+)CD24(int)CD38(int) cells) were tested and analysed. Flow cytometry-sorted CD4(+)T cells were cultured with autologous Bregs to elucidate the effects of Bregs on CD4(+)T cells, including effector T and regulatory T-cells (Tregs). The potential immunoregulatory mechanism of Bregs was also investigated. The numbers of total B-cells and Bregs were enriched in CHB patients. The frequency of Bregs was negatively correlated with elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and histological inflammation grades (G), but positively correlated with advanced histological fibrosis stages (S) and enhanced HBV replication. The phenotype of Bregs was predominantly characterized as CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) In co-culture with Bregs, CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells from CHB patients produced less interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 but more IL-4 than CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells alone, whereas their conversions into Tregs and IL-10(+)T cells were enhanced. In addition, Breg depletion in CHB samples dramatically decreased Treg numbers and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, the observed regulatory effect was partly dependent on IL-10 release and cell-to-cell contact. Elevated Bregs can suppress effector T but enhance Treg functions, which might influence immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection. PMID:26980345

  17. Tumor-evoked regulatory B cells promote breast cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4⁺ T cells to T-regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Damdinsuren, Bazarragchaa; Bodogai, Monica; Gress, Ronald E; Sen, Ranjan; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Wersto, Robert P; Biragyn, Arya

    2011-05-15

    Pulmonary metastasis of breast cancer requires recruitment and expansion of T-regulatory cells (Treg) that promote escape from host protective immune cells. However, it remains unclear precisely how tumors recruit Tregs to support metastatic growth. Here we report the mechanistic involvement of a unique and previously undescribed subset of regulatory B cells. These cells, designated tumor-evoked Bregs (tBreg), phenotypically resemble activated but poorly proliferative mature B2 cells (CD19(+) CD25(High) CD69(High)) that express constitutively active Stat3 and B7-H1(High) CD81(High) CD86(High) CD62L(Low) IgM(Int). Our studies with the mouse 4T1 model of breast cancer indicate that the primary role of tBregs in lung metastases is to induce TGF-β-dependent conversion of FoxP3(+) Tregs from resting CD4(+) T cells. In the absence of tBregs, 4T1 tumors cannot metastasize into the lungs efficiently due to poor Treg conversion. Our findings have important clinical implications, as they suggest that tBregs must be controlled to interrupt the initiation of a key cancer-induced immunosuppressive event that is critical to support cancer metastasis. PMID:21444674

  18. Subpopulations of Regulatory T Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, and Behcet's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, JAE-RYONG; Chae, Jin-Nyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Ha, Jung-Sook

    2012-01-01

    Recently, subpopulations of regulatory T (Treg) cells, resting Treg (rTreg) and activated Treg (aTreg), have been discovered. The authors investigated the relationship between the change of Treg, aTreg and rTreg and autoimmune diseases. Treg cells and those subpopulations were analyzed by using the human regulatory T cell staining kit and CD45RA surface marker for 42 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 systemic lupus sclerosis (SLE), 7 Behcet's disease (BD), and 22 healthy controls. The proportion ...

  19. Dendritic cells as controllers of antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subpopulation of CD4+ lymphocytes that maintain immunological self-tolerance in the periphery. T reg also regulate or suppress other classes of immune response such as allograft rejection, allergy, tumor immunity, and responses to microbes. Treg express the Foxp3 transcription factor and CD25, the high affinity interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). T reg are divided into two types: naturally occurring Treg derived from thymus (natural Treg) and Treg induced from Foxp...

  20. T regulatory cells: an overview and intervention techniques to modulate allergy outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaraguru Uday

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dysregulated immune response results in inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa leading to asthma and allergy in susceptible individuals. The T helper type 2 (Th2 subsets are primarily involved in this disease process. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence in support of T cells with regulatory potential that operates in non-allergic individuals. These regulatory T cells occur naturally are called natural T regulatory cells (nTregs and express the transcription factor Foxp3. They are selected in the thymus and move to the periphery. The CD4 Th cells in the periphery can be induced to become regulatory T cells and hence called induced or adaptive T regulatory cells. These cells can make IL-10 or TGF-b or both, by which they attain most of their suppressive activity. This review gives an overview of the regulatory T cells, their role in allergic diseases and explores possible interventionist approaches to manipulate Tregs for achieving therapeutic goals.

  1. Regulatory T cells delay disease progression in Alzheimer-like pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansokho, Cira; Ait Ahmed, Dylla; Aid, Saba; Toly-Ndour, Cécile; Chaigneau, Thomas; Calle, Vanessa; Cagnard, Nicolas; Holzenberger, Martin; Piaggio, Eliane; Aucouturier, Pierre; Dorothée, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies highlight the implication of innate and adaptive immunity in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, and foster immunotherapy as a promising strategy for its treatment. Vaccines targeting amyloid-β peptide provided encouraging results in mouse models, but severe side effects attributed to T cell responses in the first clinical trial AN1792 underlined the need for better understanding adaptive immunity in Alzheimer's disease. We previously showed that regulatory T cells critically control amyloid-β-specific CD4(+)T cell responses in both physiological and pathological settings. Here, we analysed the impact of regulatory T cells on spontaneous disease progression in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease. Early transient depletion of regulatory T cells accelerated the onset of cognitive deficits in APPPS1 mice, without altering amyloid-β deposition. Earlier cognitive impairment correlated with reduced recruitment of microglia towards amyloid deposits and altered disease-related gene expression profile. Conversely, amplification of regulatory T cells through peripheral low-dose IL-2 treatment increased numbers of plaque-associated microglia, and restored cognitive functions in APPPS1 mice. These data suggest that regulatory T cells play a beneficial role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, by slowing disease progression and modulating microglial response to amyloid-β deposition. Our study highlights the therapeutic potential of repurposed IL-2 for innovative immunotherapy based on modulation of regulatory T cells in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26912648

  2. Dendritic Cells from Oral Cavity Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Maruyama, Akira; Okada, Kohei; Matsumoto, Misako; Morita, Akimichi; Seya, Tsukasa

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that dendritic cells (DCs) from the intestines have the capacity to induce Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T-regs) and regulate immunity versus tolerance in the intestines. However, the contribution of DCs to controlling immunity versus tolerance in the oral cavity has not been addressed. Here, we report that DCs from the oral cavity induce Foxp3+ T-regs as well as DCs from intestine. We found that oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes contained higher frequencies ...

  3. Regulatory networks define phenotypic classes of human stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Franz-Josef; Louise C. Laurent; Kostka, Dennis; Ulitsky, Igor; Williams, Roy; Lu, Christina; Park, In-Hyun; Rao, Mahendra S.; Shamir, Ron; Philip H. Schwartz; Schmidt, Nils O.; Loring, Jeanne F.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are defined as self-renewing cell populations that can differentiate into multiple distinct cell types. However, hundreds of different human cell lines from embryonic, fetal, and adult sources have been called stem cells, even though they range from pluripotent cells, typified by embryonic stem cells, which are capable of virtually unlimited proliferation and differentiation, to adult stem cell lines, which can generate a far more limited repertory of differentiated cell types. The...

  4. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, b...

  5. Unexpected Regulatory Role of CCR9 in Regulatory T Cell Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Evans-Marin

    Full Text Available T cells reactive to microbiota regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. As T cell trafficking to intestines is regulated through interactions between highly specific chemokine-chemokine receptors, efforts have been made to develop intestine-specific immunosuppression based on blocking these key processes. CCR9, a gut-trophic chemokine receptor expressed by lymphocytes and dendritic cells, has been implicated in the regulation of IBD through mediating recruitment of T cells to inflamed sites. However, the role of CCR9 in inducing and sustaining inflammation in the context of IBD is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that CCR9 deficiency in effector T cells and Tregs does not affect the development of colitis in a microbiota antigen-specific, T cell-mediated model. However, Treg cells express higher levels of CCR9 compared to those in effector T cells. Interestingly, CCR9 inhibits Treg cell development, in that CCR9-/- mice demonstrate a high level of Foxp3+ Tregs, and ligation of CCR9 by its ligand CCL25 inhibits Treg cell differentiation in vitro. Collectively, our data indicate that in addition to acting as a gut-homing molecule, CCR9 signaling shapes immune responses by inhibiting Treg cell development.

  6. Mobilization of regulatory T cells in response to carotid injury does not influence subsequent neointima formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Saxena

    Full Text Available AIM: T cells have been attributed an important role in modulating repair responses following vascular injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of different T cell subsets in this context. METHODS AND RESULTS: A non-obstructive collar was introduced to inflict carotid artery injury in mice and subsequent activation of immune cells in draining lymph nodes and spleen were studied by flow cytometry. Carotid artery injury of wild type mice was associated with mobilization of both Th1 type CD4(+IFNγ(+ and regulatory CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ T cells in draining lymph nodes. Studies using FoxP3-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic C57/Bl6 mice demonstrated scattered presence of regulatory T cells in the adventitial tissue of injured arteries as well as a massive emigration of regulatory T cells from the spleen in response to carotid injury. However, deletion of antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells (H2(0 mice, as well as deletion of regulatory T cells (through treatment with blocking anti-CD25 antibodies, did not affect neointima formation. Also deletion of antigen presentation to CD8(+ T cells (Tap1(0 mice was without effect on carotid collar-induced neointima formation. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that carotid artery injury is associated with mobilization of regulatory T cells. Depletion of regulatory T cells does not, however, influence the subsequent repair processes leading to the formation of a neointima. The results also demonstrate that lack of CD8(+ T cells does not influence neointima formation in presence of functional CD4(+ T cells and B cells.

  7. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    OpenAIRE

    Galhardo, Mafalda Sofia; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic m...

  8. Advances in distinguishing natural from induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiaohong; Chen, Maogen; Liu, Ya; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun; Brand, David; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    For more than a decade now, the regulatory T (Treg) cell has widely been considered as a critical subpopulation of T cells which can suppress effector T cell responses as well as suppressing the activity of other immune cells, such as mast cell, dendritic cells, and B cells. Treg cells have been broadly characterized as comprising of two main populations: thymus-derived natural Treg (nTreg) cells, and peripherally generated induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Both subsets have similar phenotypic char...

  9. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Yuki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Kawamoto, Seiji, E-mail: skawa@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Katayama, Akiko [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Nakano, Toshiaki [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Ohmori, Naoya [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Aki, Tsunehiro [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Goto, Shigeru [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Iwao Hospital, Yufuin (Japan); Chen, Chao-Long [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ono, Kazuhisa [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  10. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings

  11. Contribution of regulatory T cells to alleviation of experimental allergic asthma after specific immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maazi, H.; Shirinbak, S.; Willart, M.; Hammad, H. M.; Cabanski, M.; Boon, L.; Ganesh, V.; Baru, A. M.; Hansen, G.; Lambrecht, B. N.; Sparwasser, T.; Nawijn, M. C.; van Oosterhout, A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has been used since 1911, yet its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. There is evidence indicating that CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are induced during SIT in allergic patients. However, the contribution of these cells to SIT h

  12. Seminal fluid and the generation of regulatory T cells for embryo implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robertson, Sarah A; Prins, Jelmer R; Sharkey, David J; Moldenhauer, Lachlan M

    2013-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are essential mediators of the maternal immune adaptation necessary for embryo implantation. In mice, insufficient Treg cell activity results in implantation failure, or constrains placental function and fetal growth. In women, Treg cell deficiency is linked with unexplaine

  13. TGF-β-Induced Regulatory T Cells Directly Suppress B Cell Responses through a Noncytotoxic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anping; Liu, Ya; Chen, Weiqian; Wang, Julie; Xue, Youqiu; Huang, Feng; Rong, Liming; Lin, Jin; Liu, Dahai; Yan, Mei; Li, Quan-Zhen; Li, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) playing a crucial role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases consist of thymus-derived naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells (nTreg) and those that can be induced ex vivo with TGF-β (iTreg). Although both Treg subsets share similar phenotypes and functional characteristics, they also have potential biologic differences on their biology. The role of iTreg in regulating B cells remains unclear so far. The suppression assays of Treg subsets on activation, proliferation, and Abs production of B cells were measured using a Treg and B cell coculture system in vitro. Transwell and Ab blockade experiments were performed to assess the roles of cell contact and soluble cytokines. Treg were adoptively transferred to lupus mice to assess in vivo effects on B cells. Like nTreg, iTreg subset also directly suppressed activation and proliferation of B cells. nTreg subset suppressed B cell responses through cytotoxic manner related to expression of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin, whereas the role of iTreg subset on B cells did not involve in cytotoxic action but depending on TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, iTreg subset can significantly suppress Ab produced by lupus B cells in vitro. Comparison experiments using autoantibodies microarrays demonstrated that adoptive transfer of iTreg had a superior effect than nTreg subset on suppressing lupus B cell responses in vivo. Our data implicate a role and advantage of iTreg subset in treating B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, boosting the translational potential of these findings. PMID:27001954

  14. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  15. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  16. Functional role of regulatory T cells in B cell lymphoma and related mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Wan, Jun; Xia, Ruixiang; Huang, Zhenqi; Ni, Jing; Yang, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma (BCL) has a higher degree of malignancy and complicated pathogenic mechanism. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are known to exert certain immune suppression functions, in addition to immune mediating effects. Recent studies have revealed the role of Treg cells in pathogenesis and progression of multiple malignant tumors. This study therefore investigated the functional role and related mechanism of Treg cells in BCL. A cohort of thirty patients who were diagnosed with BCL in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Another thirty healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated and analyzed for the ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 genes were quantified by real-time PCR, while their serum levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Meanwhile all laboratory indexes for patients were monitored during the complete remission (CR) stage. BCL patients significantly elevated ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells, which were decreased at CR stage. mRNA levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10, in addition to protein levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 were potentiated in lymphoma patients but decreased in CR patients (Pregulating cytokines, thereby facilitating the pathogenesis and progression of lymphoma. PMID:26464657

  17. Increased T Regulatory Cells Are Associated with Adverse Clinical Features and Predict Progression in Multiple Myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Muthu Raja Karthick Raja; Říhová Lucie; Zahradová Lenka; Klincová Mária; Penka Miroslav; Hájek Roman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immune system homeostasis. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder frequently associated with impaired immune cell numbers and functions. Methods: We analyzed Treg cells in peripheral blood (n = 207) and bone marrow (n = 202) of pre-malignant and malignant MM patients using flow cytometry. Treg cells and their subsets from MM patients and healthy volunteers were functionally evaluated for their suppress...

  18. Neuropilin 1 deficiency on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells impairs mouse melanoma growth

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Wiebke; Hutzler, Marina; Abel, Simone; Alter, Christina; Stockmann, Christian; Kliche, Stefanie; Albert, Juliane; Sparwasser, Tim; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Westendorf, Astrid M; Schadendorf, Dirk; Buer, Jan; Helfrich, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T reg) cells is considered to be a critical step during tumor development and progression. T reg cells supposedly suppress locally an effective anti-tumor immune response within tumor tissues, although the precise mechanism by which T reg cells infiltrate the tumor is still unclear. We provide evidence that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp-1), highly expressed by Foxp3(+) T reg cells, regulates the immunological anti-tumor control by guiding T reg cells into the tumor ...

  19. Expansion and function of Foxp3-expressing T regulatory cells during tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Scott-Browne, James P.; Shafiani, Shahin; Tucker-Heard, Glady's; Ishida-Tsubota, Kumiko; Fontenot, Jason D.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Bevan, Michael J.; Urdahl, Kevin B.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) frequently establishes persistent infections that may be facilitated by mechanisms that dampen immunity. T regulatory (T reg) cells, a subset of CD4+ T cells that are essential for preventing autoimmunity, can also suppress antimicrobial immune responses. We use Foxp3-GFP mice to track the activity of T reg cells after aerosol infection with Mtb. We report that during tuberculosis, T reg cells proliferate in the pulmonary lymph nodes (pLNs), change their cell ...

  20. Runx-CBFβ complexes control Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rudra, Dipayan; Egawa, Takeshi; Chong, Mark M.W.; Treuting, Piper; Dan R. Littman; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3 plays an indispensable role in establishing stable transcriptional and functional programs of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Loss of Foxp3 expression in mature Treg cells results in a failure of suppressor function, yet the molecular mechanisms ensuring steady heritable Foxp3 expression in the Treg cell lineage remain unknown. Using Treg cell-specific gene targeting we found that Runx-CBFβ complexes were required for maintenance of Foxp3 mRNA and protein expression in Treg cells. Consequent...

  1. An Essential Role of the Transcription Factor GATA-3 for the Function of Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunqi; Su, Maureen A.; Wan, Yisong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Forkhead Box P3 (Foxp3)-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are central to maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. How Treg cell function and Foxp3 expression are regulated is an important question under intensive investigation. Here, we have demonstrated an essential role for the transcription factor GATA-3, a previously recognized Th2 cell master regulator, in controlling Treg cell function. Treg cell-specific GATA-3 deletion led to a spontaneous inflammatory disorder in mice. G...

  2. The regulatory role of B cells in autoimmunity, infections and cancer: Perspectives beyond IL10 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorosito Serrán, Melisa; Fiocca Vernengo, Facundo; Beccaria, Cristian G; Acosta Rodriguez, Eva V; Montes, Carolina L; Gruppi, Adriana

    2015-11-14

    The term regulatory B cells (B regs) is ascribed to a heterogeneous population of B cells with the function of suppressing inflammatory responses. They have been described mainly during the last decade in the context of different immune-mediated diseases. Most of the work on B regs has been focused on IL-10-producing B cells. However, B cells can exert regulatory functions independently of IL-10 production. Here we discuss the phenotypes, development and effector mechanisms of B regs and advances in their role in autoimmunity, infections and cancer. PMID:26424657

  3. Regulatory B cells and tolerance in transplantation: from animal models to human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eChesneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the role of B cells in transplantation was thought to be restricted to producing antibodies that have been clearly shown to be deleterious in the long term, but, in fact, B cells are also able to produce cytokine and to present antigen. Their role as regulatory cells in various pathological situations has also been highlighted, and their role in transplantation is beginning to emerge in animal, and also in human, models. This review summarizes the different studies in animals and humans that suggest a B-cell regulatory role in the transplant tolerance mechanisms.

  4. Endurance exercise diverts the balance between Th17 cells and regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chava Perry

    Full Text Available Endurance, marathon-type exertion is known to induce adverse changes in the immune system. Increased airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation are well documented in endurance athletes and endurance exercise is considered a major risk factor for asthma in elite athletes. Yet, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still to be deduced. We studied the effect of strenuous endurance exercise (marathon and half-ironman triathlon on CD4+ lymphocyte sub-populations and on the balance between effector and regulatory CD4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of trained athletes, Endurance exercise induced a significant increase in Th17 cells and a sustained decrease in peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Tregs. While interleukin (IL-2 levels remained undetectable, post-race serum IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF β levels were significantly elevated. Treg levels in sedentary controls' decreased in vitro after incubation with athletes' post-exercise serum, an effect that was attenuated by supplements of IL-2 or anti IL-6 neutralizing antibodies. Our data suggest that exercise-induced changes in serum cytokine levels promote alterations in Tregs and Th17 cell populations, which may divert the subtle balance in the immune system towards inflammation. This may explain allergic and autoimmune phenomena previously reported in endurance athletes and contribute to our understanding of exercise-related asthma.

  5. Sustained suppression by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is vital for infectious transplantation tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kendal, Adrian R.; Chen, Ye; Regateiro, Frederico S.; Ma, Jianbo; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Hori, Shohei; Waldmann, Herman

    2011-01-01

    A paradigm shift in immunology has been the recent discovery of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), of which CD4+Foxp3+ cells are proven as essential to self-tolerance. Using transgenic B6.Foxp3hCD2 mice to isolate and ablate Foxp3+ T reg cells with an anti-hCD2 antibody, we show for the first time that CD4+Foxp3+ cells are crucial for infectious tolerance induced by nonablative anti–T cell antibodies. In tolerant animals, Foxp3+ T reg cells are constantly required to suppress effector T cells ...

  6. Regulatory T cells control immune responses through their nonredundant tissue specific features

    OpenAIRE

    Sari eLehtimäki; Riitta eLahesmaa

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are needed to control immune responses and to maintain immune homeostasis. Most potent regulators are Foxp3 expressing CD4+ T cells which can be roughly divided in to two main groups, natural Treg cells (nTreg) developing in the thymus and induced or adaptive Treg cells (iTreg) developing in the periphery from naïve, conventional T cells. Both nTreg cells and iTreg cells have their own, nonredundant roles in the immune system, with nTreg cells mainly maintaining...

  7. T regulatory cell chemokine production mediates pathogenic T cell attraction and suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Scott J; Pesenacker, Anne M; Wang, Adele Y; Gillies, Jana; Mojibian, Majid; Morishita, Kim; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J; Verchere, C Bruce; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Levings, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) control immune homeostasis by preventing inappropriate responses to self and nonharmful foreign antigens. Tregs use multiple mechanisms to control immune responses, all of which require these cells to be near their targets of suppression; however, it is not known how Treg-to-target proximity is controlled. Here, we found that Tregs attract CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by producing chemokines. Specifically, Tregs produced both CCL3 and CCL4 in response to stimulation, and production of these chemokines was critical for migration of target T cells, as Tregs from Ccl3-/- mice, which are also deficient for CCL4 production, did not promote migration. Moreover, CCR5 expression by target T cells was required for migration of these cells to supernatants conditioned by Tregs. Tregs deficient for expression of CCL3 and CCL4 were impaired in their ability to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or islet allograft rejection in murine models. Moreover, Tregs from subjects with established type 1 diabetes were impaired in their ability to produce CCL3 and CCL4. Together, these results demonstrate a previously unappreciated facet of Treg function and suggest that chemokine secretion by Tregs is a fundamental aspect of their therapeutic effect in autoimmunity and transplantation. PMID:26854929

  8. Type 1 regulatory T cells: a new mechanism of peripheral immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hanyu; Zhang, Rong; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The lack of immune response to an antigen, a process known as immune tolerance, is essential for the preservation of immune homeostasis. To date, two mechanisms that drive immune tolerance have been described extensively: central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Under the new nomenclature, thymus-derived regulatory T (tT(reg)) cells are the major mediators of central immune tolerance, whereas peripherally derived regulatory T (pT(reg)) cells function to regulate peripheral immune tolerance. A third type of T(reg) cells, termed iT(reg), represents only the in vitro-induced T(reg) cells(1). Depending on whether the cells stably express Foxp3, pT(reg), and iT(reg) cells may be divided into two subsets: the classical CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells and the CD4(+)Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells(2). This review focuses on the discovery, associated biomarkers, regulatory functions, methods of induction, association with disease, and clinical trials of Tr1 cells. PMID:26051475

  9. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  10. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/− ) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by func...

  11. Inhaled corticosteroid use is associated with increased circulating T regulatory cells in children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Anne Marie; Dahlberg, Paul; Burmeister, Kristjan; Evans, Michael D.; Gangnon, Ronald; Roberg, Kathy A; Tisler, Christopher; DaSilva, Douglas; Pappas, Tressa; Salazar, Lisa; Lemanske, Robert F.; Gern, James E.; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Background T regulatory (Treg) cells are important in balancing immune responses and dysregulation of Treg cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple disease states including asthma. In this study, our primary aim was to determine Treg cell frequency in the peripheral blood of children with and without asthma. The secondary aim was to explore the association between Treg cell frequency with allergen sensitization, disease severity and medication use. Methods Peripheral blood mo...

  12. Induced and Natural Regulatory T Cells in the Development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mayne, Christopher G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal immune system mediates contact between the host, and the trillions of microbes that symbiotically colonize the gastrointestinal tract. Failure to tolerate the antigens within this “extended self” can result in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Within the adaptive immune system, the most significant cells modulating this interaction are Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Treg cells can be divided into two primary subsets: “natural” Treg (nTreg) cells, and “adaptive” or “induced” Tre...

  13. Diversification and senescence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tauro, Sharyn; Nguyen, Phuong; Li, Bofeng; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2013-01-01

    The fate of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) responding during autoimmunity is not well defined. We observed a marked elevation in KLRG1+ CNS-infiltrating Treg in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and assessed their origin and properties. KLRG1+ Treg showed increased activation marker expression, Foxp3 and CD25 levels, and more rapid cell cycling than KLRG1− cells. KLRG1− Treg converted into KLRG1+ cells and this was increased in the context of autoimmune inflammation. Conversi...

  14. Molecular determinants of regulatory T cell development: the essential roles of epigenetic changes

    OpenAIRE

    Yohko eKitagawa; Naganari eOhkura; Shimon eSakaguchi

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a distinct T cell subset, which plays a key role in immune tolerance and homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 controls a substantial part of Treg cell development and function. Yet its expression alone is insufficient for conferring developmental and functional characteristics of Treg cells. There is accumulating evidence that concurrent induction of Treg-specific epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression is crucial for lineage specification and funct...

  15. Harnessing Regulatory T Cells for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle; Denning, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Regulatory CD4+ T (Treg) cells are comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells that play a vital role in suppressing inflammation and maintaining immune tolerance. The immunoregulatory function of Treg cells is especially important in the intestine where the mucosa is exposed to a diverse array of foreign antigens—including those derived from food and commensal bacteria. Treg cells are enriched in the intestinal lamina propria and provide a crucial function in promoting toleran...

  16. HIV infection of naturally occurring and genetically reprogrammed human regulatory T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Oswald-Richter

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available A T-cell subset, defined as CD4(+CD25(hi (regulatory T-cells [Treg cells], was recently shown to suppress T-cell activation. We demonstrate that human Treg cells isolated from healthy donors express the HIV-coreceptor CCR5 and are highly susceptible to HIV infection and replication. Because Treg cells are present in very few numbers and are difficult to expand in vitro, we genetically modified conventional human T-cells to generate Treg cells in vitro by ectopic expression of FoxP3, a transcription factor associated with reprogramming T-cells into a Treg subset. Overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve human CD4(+ T-cells recapitulated the hyporesponsiveness and suppressive function of naturally occurring Treg cells. However, FoxP3 was less efficient in reprogramming memory T-cell subset into regulatory cells. In addition, FoxP3-transduced T-cells also became more susceptible to HIV infection. Remarkably, a portion of HIV-positive individuals with a low percentage of CD4(+ and higher levels of activated T-cells have greatly reduced levels of FoxP3(+CD4(+CD25(hi T-cells, suggesting disruption of the Treg cells during HIV infection. Targeting and disruption of the T-cell regulatory system by HIV may contribute to hyperactivation of conventional T-cells, a characteristic of HIV disease progression. Moreover, the ability to reprogram human T-cells into Treg cells in vitro will greatly aid in decoding their mechanism of suppression, their enhanced susceptibility to HIV infection, and the unique markers expressed by this subset.

  17. Increased T-regulatory cells within lymphocyte follicles in moderate COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plumb, J; Smyth, L J C; Adams, H R;

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoid follicles in the lung parenchyma are a characteristic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are reports of altered CD4 T-regulatory cell numbers in COPD lungs, but the location of these cells within COPD lung tissue specific follicles has not been investigated. T...

  18. Preeclampsia is Associated with lower Percentages of Regulatory T Cells in Maternal Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Jelmer R.; Boelens, Hendrik M.; Heimweg, Janneke; Van der Heide, Sicco; Dubois, Anthony E.; Van Oosterhout, Antoon J.; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Immunological mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. During pregnancy there is an increase in regulatory T (Treg) cells, which has an important role in regulating tolerance to the immunologically distinct fetus. We hypothesised that percentages of Treg cells are d

  19. Small non-coding RNAs, mammalian cells, and viruses: regulatory interactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benkirane Monsef

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA to regulate physiological viral infections. Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept. We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema.

  20. TRAF3 regulates the effector function of regulatory T cells and humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jae-Hoon; Hu, Hongbo; Jin, Jin; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Xiao, Yichuan; Gilbert, Brian E.; Brink, Robert; Ullrich, Stephen E.; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control different aspects of immune responses, but how the effector functions of Treg cells are regulated is incompletely understood. Here we identified TNF receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) as a regulator of Treg cell function. Treg cell–specific ablation of TRAF3 impaired CD4 T cell homeostasis, characterized by an increase in the Th1 type of effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the ablation of TRAF3 in Treg cells resulted in increased antigen-stimulated act...

  1. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  2. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Zhong; Jinfang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have reveale...

  3. Regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to retinal antigen by local FoxP3+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W McPherson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available While pathogenic CD4 T cells are well known mediators of autoimmune uveoretinitis, CD8 T cells can also be uveitogenic. Since preliminary studies indicated that C57BL/6 mice were minimally susceptible to autoimmune uveoretinitis induction by CD8 T cells, the basis of the retinal disease resistance was sought. Mice that express β-galactosidase (βgal on a retina-specific promoter (arrβgal mice were backcrossed to mice expressing green fluorescent protein and diphtheria toxin receptor under control of the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice, and to T cell receptor transgenic mice that produce βgal specific CD8 T cells (BG1 mice. These mice were used to explore the role of regulatory T cells in the resistance to retinal autoimmune disease. Experiments with T cells from double transgenic BG1 x Foxp3-DTR/GFP mice transferred into Foxp3-DTR/GFP x arrβgal mice confirmed that the retina was well protected from attempts to induce disease by adoptive transfer of activated BG1 T cells. The successful induction of retinal disease following unilateral intraocular administration of diphtheria toxin to deplete regulatory T cells showed that the protective activity was dependent on local, toxin-sensitive regulatory T cells; the opposite, untreated eye remained disease-free. Although there were very few Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the parenchyma of quiescent retina, and they did not accumulate in retina, their depletion by local toxin administration led to disease susceptibility. We propose that these regulatory T cells modulate the pathogenic activity of βgal-specific CD8 T cells in the retinas of arrβgal mice on a local basis, allowing immunoregulation to be responsive to local conditions.

  4. Thymic versus induced regulatory T cells – who regulates the regulators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Antonio Maria Povoleri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiological health must balance immunological responsiveness against foreign pathogens with tolerance towards self-components and commensals. Disruption of this balance causes autoimmune diseases/chronic inflammation, in case of excessive immune responses, and persistent infection/immunodeficiency if regulatory components are overactive. This homeostasis occurs at two different levels: at a resting state to prevent autoimmune disease, as autoreactive effector T-cells (Teffs are only partially deleted in the thymus, and during inflammation to prevent excessive tissue injury, contract the immune response and enable tissue repair. Adaptive immune cells with regulatory function (regulatory T-cells are essential to control Teffs. Two sets of regulatory T cell are required to achieve the desired control: those emerging de novo from embryonic/neonatal thymus (thymic or tTregs, whose function is to control autoreactive Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, and those induced in the periphery (peripheral or pTregs to acquire regulatory phenotype in response to pathogens/inflammation. The differentiation mechanisms of these cells determine their commitment to lineage and plasticity towards other phenotypes. tTregs, expressing high levels of IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25, and the transcription factor Foxp3, are the most important, since mutations or deletions in these genes cause fatal autoimmune diseases in both mice and men. In the periphery, instead, Foxp3+ pTregs can be induced from naïve precursors in response to environmental signals. Here, we discuss molecular signatures and induction processes, mechanisms and sites of action, lineage stability and differentiating characteristics of both Foxp3+ and Foxp3- populations of regulatory T cells, derived from the thymus or induced peripherally. We relate these predicates to programs of cell-based therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and induction of tolerance to transplants.

  5. Immunology Mechanism of CD4+ CD25 T Regulatory Cells Acting on Effector T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENGNing-han; WUHong-fei; WUJun; ZHANGWei; SUIYuan-gen; HEHou-guang; ZHANGChun-lei; ZHENGJun-song

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To detect the inhibiting co-stimulating molecule CTLA4 and cytokines secreted by Treg cells, and explore the immunology mechanism of T regulatory cells acting on effector T cells in co-cultured system(CCS) and separating-cultured system(SCS). Methods: Detecting the percentage of CTLA4 and CD28 expressed on the Treg ceils and effector T ceils, and then adding Treg cells to mixed lymphocyte reaction(MLR) system in CCS and TransWeil Milliceil-PCF SCS, at the same time, adding or not adding anti-IL-10 or anti-TGF.II1 to the reacting systems, examining the inhibitory capacity of Treg ceils exerting on the MLR. Results: Compared with effector T cells, Treg cells expressed higher level CTLA4 and secreted much more IL-10 and TGF-β(P<0.01). The inhibitory capacity of Treg cells co-cultured with effector T ceils is much stronger than that in separating cultured group(P<0.01). Moreover, the inhibiting rate of Treg ceils exerting on effector T ceils through secretin_g IL-10 was more powerful than that through secreting TGF-β1 (P<0.01). Coaclusion: Both ceil-to-ceil contact and cytokines secretion mechanisms are involved in CD4+ CD25+ Treg ceils operating function. However, the former is more important. Intresfingly, we for the first time pointfound that IL-10 plays more powerful roles than TGF-β1 in the cytokines secretion mechanism.

  6. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  7. Dissecting the fission yeast regulatory network reveals phase-specific control elements of its cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Liwen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are among the original model organisms in the study of the cell-division cycle. Unlike budding yeast, no large-scale regulatory network has been constructed for fission yeast. It has only been partially characterized. As a result, important regulatory cascades in budding yeast have no known or complete counterpart in fission yeast. Results By integrating genome-wide data from multiple time course cell cycle microarray experiments we reconstructed a gene regulatory network. Based on the network, we discovered in addition to previously known regulatory hubs in M phase, a new putative regulatory hub in the form of the HMG box transcription factor SPBC19G7.04. Further, we inferred periodic activities of several less known transcription factors over the course of the cell cycle, identified over 500 putative regulatory targets and detected many new phase-specific and conserved cis-regulatory motifs. In particular, we show that SPBC19G7.04 has highly significant periodic activity that peaks in early M phase, which is coordinated with the late G2 activity of the forkhead transcription factor fkh2. Finally, using an enhanced Bayesian algorithm to co-cluster the expression data, we obtained 31 clusters of co-regulated genes 1 which constitute regulatory modules from different phases of the cell cycle, 2 whose phase order is coherent across the 10 time course experiments, and 3 which lead to identification of phase-specific control elements at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in S. pombe. In particular, the ribosome biogenesis clusters expressed in G2 phase reveal new, highly conserved RNA motifs. Conclusion Using a systems-level analysis of the phase-specific nature of the S. pombe cell cycle gene regulation, we have provided new testable evidence for post-transcriptional regulation in the G2 phase of the fission yeast cell cycle

  8. Antileukemic T-cell Responses Can Be Predicted by the Composition of Specific Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Schick, Julia; Vogt, Valentin; Zerwes, Marion; Kröll, Tanja; Kraemer, Doris; Koehne, Claus-Henning; Hausmann, Andreas; Buhmann, Raymund; Tischer, Johanna; Schmetzer, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T-reg) are important regulators of immune responses. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before/after immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation or donor lymphocyte infusion), their suppressive role can contribute to suppress severe graft-versus-host reactions, but also to impair antileukemic reactions. As leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DCleu) are known to improve the antileukemic functionality of T cells, we evaluated the composition and development of distinct T-re...

  9. Type I interferons directly inhibit regulatory T cells to allow optimal antiviral T cell responses during acute LCMV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Shivani; Koch, Meghan A.; Pepper, Marion; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cells play an essential role in preventing autoimmunity but can also impair clearance of foreign pathogens. Paradoxically, signals known to promote T reg cell function are abundant during infection and could inappropriately enhance T reg cell activity. How T reg cell function is restrained during infection to allow the generation of effective antiviral responses remains largely unclear. We demonstrate that the potent antiviral type I interferons (IFNs) directly inhibit co...

  10. PLZF(+) Innate T Cells Support the TGF-β-Dependent Generation of Activated/Memory-Like Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Hi Jung; Lee, Jae-Ii; Park, Seong Hoe; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2016-06-30

    PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T cells and CD4 T cells are unique subsets of innate T cells. Both are selected via thymocyte-thymocyte interaction, and they contribute to the generation of activated/memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells in the thymus via the production of IL-4. Here, we investigated whether PLZF(+) innate T cells also affect the development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory CD4 T cells. Flow cytometry analysis of the thymus and spleen from both CIITA transgenic C57BL/6 and wild-type BALB/c mice, which have abundant PLZF(+) CD4 T cells and invariant natural killer T cells, respectively, revealed that Foxp3(+) T cells in these mice exhibited a CD103(+) activated/memory-like phenotype. The frequency of CD103(+) regulatory T cells was considerably decreased in PLZF(+) cell-deficient CIITA(Tg)Plzf(lu/lu) and BALB/c.CD1d(-/-) mice as well as in an IL-4-deficient background, such as in CIITA(Tg)IL-4(-/-) and BALB/c.lL-4(-/-) mice, indicating that the acquisition of an activated/memory-like phenotype was dependent on PLZF(+) innate T cells and IL-4. Using fetal thymic organ culture, we further demonstrated that IL-4 in concert with TGF-β enhanced the acquisition of the activated/memory-like phenotype of regulatory T cells. In functional aspects, the activated/memory-like phenotype of Treg cells was directly related to their suppressive function; regulatory T cells of CIITA(Tg)PIV(-/-) mice more efficiently suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation compared with their counterparts from wild-type mice. All of these findings suggest that PLZF(+) innate T cells also augmented the generation of activated/memory-like regulation via IL-4 production. PMID:27101876

  11. Regulatory subunits of PKA define an axis of cellular proliferation/differentiation in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall John C

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA exists in two isoforms, RI and RII, which distinguish the PKA isozymes, type I (PKA-I and type II (PKA-II. Evidence obtained from a variety of different experimental approaches has shown that the relative levels of type I and type II PKA in cells can play a major role in determining the balance between cell growth and differentiation. In order to characterize the effect of PKA type I and type II regulatory subunits on gene transcription at a global level, the PKA regulatory subunit genes for RIα and RIIβ were stably transfected into cells of the ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR8. Results RIα transfected cells exhibit hyper-proliferative growth and RIIβ transfected cells revert to a relatively quiescent state. Profiling by microarray revealed equally profound changes in gene expression between RIα, RIIβ, and parental OVCAR cells. Genes specifically up-regulated in RIα cells were highly enriched for pathways involved in cell growth while genes up-regulated in RIIβ cells were enriched for pathways involved in differentiation. A large group of genes (~3600 was regulated along an axis of proliferation/differentiation between RIα, parental, and RIIβ cells. RIα/wt and RIIβ/wt gene regulation was shown by two separate and distinct gene set analytical methods to be strongly cross-correlated with a generic model of cellular differentiation. Conclusion Overexpression of PKA regulatory subunits in an ovarian cancer cell line dramatically influences the cell phenotype. The proliferation phenotype is strongly correlated with recently identified clinical biomarkers predictive of poor prognosis in ovarian cancer suggesting a possible pivotal role for PKA regulation in disease progression.

  12. Human in vitro induced T regulatory cells and memory T cells share common demethylation of specific FOXP3 promoter region

    OpenAIRE

    Bégin, Philippe; Schulze, Janika; Baron, Udo; Olek, Sven; Rebecca N Bauer; Passerini, Laura; Baccheta, Rosa; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FOXP3 gene is the master regulator for T regulatory cells and is under tight DNA methylation control at the Treg specific demethylated region (TSDR) in its first intron. This said, methylation of its promoter region, the significance of which is unknown, has also been associated with various immune-related disease states such as asthma, food allergy, auto-immunity and cancer. Here, we used induced T regulatory cells (iTreg) as a target cell population to identify candidate hypo...

  13. CTLA-4 promotes Foxp3 induction and regulatory T cell accumulation in the intestinal lamina propria

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, M. J.; Griseri, T; Johnson, A M F; Young, W; Powrie, F; Izcue, A

    2012-01-01

    Thymic induction of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells relies on CD28 costimulation and high-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) signals, whereas Foxp3 (forkhead box P3) induction on activated peripheral CD4+ T cells is inhibited by these signals. Accordingly, the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) promoted, but was not essential for CD4+ T-cell Foxp3 induction in vitro. We show that CTLA-4-deficient cells are equivalent to wild-type cells in the thymic induction of Fo...

  14. The development of thymic Foxp3+ regulatory T cells: TGF-β matters

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wanjun; Konkel, Joanne E.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 can be generated in the thymus (tTreg cells), but the cellular and molecular pathways driving their development remain incompletely understood. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is essential for the generation of Foxp3+ Treg cells converted from peripheral naive CD4+ T cells (pTreg cells), yet a role for TGF-β in tTreg-cell development was initially refuted. Nevertheless, recent studies have unmasked a requirement for TGF...

  15. IL-9 production by regulatory T cells recruits mast cells that are essential for regulatory T cell-induced immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Kathrin; Wolf, Dominik; Huber, Julia M; Metz, Martin; Mayer, Gert; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Maurer, Marcus; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Wolf, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    Both mast cells (MCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) have gained attention as immunosuppressive cell populations. To investigate a possible interaction, we used the Th1- and Th17-dependent model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), in which both MCs and Tregs have been shown to play a protective role. Transfer of wild-type (wt) Tregs into wt recipients almost completely prevents development of NTS and leads to a profound increase of MCs in the renal draining lymph nodes (LNs). By contrast, transfer of wt Tregs into animals deficient in MCs, which are characterized by an exaggerated susceptibility to NTS, no longer exhibited protective effects. Blocking the pleiotropic cytokine IL-9, known to be involved in MC recruitment and proliferation, by means of a mAb in mice receiving Tregs abrogated protection from NTS. Moreover, transfer of IL-9-deficient Tregs also failed to protect from NTS. In the absence of Treg-derived IL-9, MCs fail to accumulate in the LNs, despite the fact that IL-9 deficiency does not alter the general suppressive activity of Tregs. In summary, to our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vivo evidence that the nephroprotective, anti-inflammatory effects of Tregs critically depend on IL-9-mediated attraction of MCs into kidney-draining LNs. PMID:21115728

  16. Regulatory T cells in the bone marrow microenvironment in patients with prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ende; Wang, Lin; Dai, Jinlu; Kryczek, Ilona; Wei, Shuang; Vatan, Linda; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Sparwasser, Tim; Wang, Guobin; Evan T. Keller; Zou, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone marrow. What defines the cellular and molecular predilection for prostate cancer to metastasize to bone marrow is not well understood. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells contribute to self-tolerance and tumor immune pathology. We now show that functional Treg cells are increased in the bone marrow microenvironment in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis, and that CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling pathway contributes to Treg cell bone marrow...

  17. The uncommon roles of common gene regulatory factors in the genomes of differentiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of comparative regulatory mechanisms in developmental processes, the article of Calero-Nieto et al (2014, this issue) is of particular interest. This work uncovers the causal combinatorial subtleties of the distinct enhancer occupancy profiles displayed by ten different transcription factors, which are expressed in common in two hematopoietic cell types, a stem cell-like precursor and primary mast cells.

  18. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiss, Dietmar M.W.; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.; Roovers, Rob C.; Coffer, Paul J.; Sijts, Alice J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, m...

  19. Regulatory CD4+Foxp3+ T cells control the severity of anaphylaxis.

    OpenAIRE

    Reem Kanjarawi; Michel Dy; Emilie Bardel; Tim Sparwasser; Bertrand Dubois; Salah Mecheri; Dominique Kaiserlian

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening outcome of immediate-type hypersensitivity to allergen, consecutive to mast cell degranulation by allergen-specific IgE. Regulatory T cells (Treg) can control allergic sensitization and mast cell degranulation, yet their clinical benefit on anaphylactic symptoms is poorly documented. Here we investigated whether Treg action during the effector arm of the allergic response alleviates anaphylaxis. METHODS: We used a validated model of IgE-mediated pa...

  20. Altering the distribution of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells results in tissue-specific inflammatory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sather, Blythe D.; Treuting, Piper; Perdue, Nikole; Miazgowicz, Mike; Fontenot, Jason D.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T reg) are essential for maintaining self-tolerance, but their functional mechanisms and sites of action in vivo are poorly defined. We examined the homing receptor expression and tissue distribution of T reg cells in the steady state and determined whether altering their distribution by removal of a single chemokine receptor impairs their ability to maintain tissue-specific peripheral tolerance. We found that T reg cells are distributed throughout all nonlympho...

  1. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells maintain immune homeostasis in the skin

    OpenAIRE

    DUDDA, Jan C.; Perdue, Nikole; Bachtanian, Eva; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous immune responses must be tightly controlled to prevent unwanted inflammation in response to innocuous antigens, while maintaining the ability to combat skin-tropic pathogens. Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells are potent immune regulators and are found at high frequency in both human and mouse skin. Although T reg cells migrate to the skin and can dampen immune responses during experimentally induced inflammation or infection, the importance of cutaneous T reg cells for maintaining n...

  2. OX40 engagement and chemotherapy combination provides potent antitumor immunity with concomitant regulatory T cell apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Rizzuto, Gabrielle A.; Merghoub, Taha; Cohen, Adam D.; Avogadri, Francesca; Lesokhin, Alexander M.; Weinberg, Andrew D.; Wolchok, Jedd D; Houghton, Alan N.

    2009-01-01

    Expansion and recruitment of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells are mechanisms used by growing tumors to evade immune elimination. In addition to expansion of effector T cells, successful therapeutic interventions may require reduction of T reg cells within the tumor microenvironment. We report that the combined use of the alkylating agent cyclophosphamide (CTX) and an agonist antibody targeting the co-stimulatory receptor OX40 (OX86) provides potent antitumor immunity capable of regressi...

  3. Infected site-restricted Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells are specific for microbial antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Suffia, Isabelle J.; Reckling, Stacie K.; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Goldszmid, Romina S.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2006-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (T reg) cells are involved in control of the immune response, including response to pathogens. Previous work has demonstrated that the repertoire of natural T reg cells may be biased toward self-antigen recognition. Whether they also recognize foreign antigens and how this recognition contributes to their function remain unknown. Our studies addressed the antigenic specificity of natural T reg cells that accumulate at sites of chronic infection with Leishmania major in mi...

  4. Diminished Expression of Complement Regulatory Proteins on Peripheral Blood Cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Machado Xavier; João Carlos Tavares Brenol; Priscila Schmidt Lora; Odirlei Andre Monticielo; Amanda Kirchner Piccoli; Laiana Schneider; Ana Paula Alegretti

    2012-01-01

    CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD35 are proteins with complement regulatory (Creg) properties that ensure cell and tissue integrity when this system is activated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Creg expression on peripheral blood cells from SLE patients and its association with cytopenia and disease activity. Flow cytometric analyses were performed on blood cells from 100 SLE patients and 61 healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, we observed in SLE patients with lymphopenia and n...

  5. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was...

  6. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was...

  7. The role of regulatory T cells in the modulation of anti-tumor immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Radosavljević Gordana D.; Jovanović Ivan P.; Kanjevac Tatjana V.; Arsenijević Nebojša N.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that the loss of regulatory function by deple­ + Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a subset of CD4 T cells whose function is to suppress immune responses. Treg lymphocytes can be divided into two subsets: natural nTreg lymphocytes that are developed in the thymus and inducible iTreg lymphocytes, which originate from conventional T lymphocytes on the periphery. The majority of Treg lymphocytes express high levels of interleukin­2 (IL­2) receptor α chain (CD25) and tra...

  8. Tumor Regulatory T Cells Potently Abrogate Antitumor Immunity1

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zuqiang; Kim, Jin H.; Falo, Louis D.; You, Zhaoyang

    2009-01-01

    Treg from mice bearing a breast tumor were elevated (tumor Treg). In vitro, whereas tumor Treg ability to inhibit tumor-primed CD4+ T cell activity is comparable to Treg from naïve mice (naïve Treg), only tumor Treg suppress naïve CD8+ T cell activation and DC function. Neither tumor Treg nor naïve Treg can suppress antitumor immunity at the effector phase of the immune response induced by adoptively-transferred tumor-primed CD4+ T cells. This is consistent with the observation that, in this ...

  9. Stretch-Enhancers Delineate Disease-Associated Regulatory Nodes in T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Kanno, Yuka; Furumoto, Yasuko; Jiang, Kan; Parker, Stephen C.; Erdos, Michael; Davis, Sean R.; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gadina, Massimo; Tang, Zhonghui; Ruan, Yijun; Collins, Francis S.; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O’Shea, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancers regulate spatiotemporal gene expression and impart cell-specific transcriptional outputs that drive cell identity1. Stretch- or super-enhancers (SEs) are a subset of enhancers especially important for genes associated with cell identity and genetic risk of disease2,3,4,5,6. CD4+ T cells are critical for host defense and autoimmunity. Herein, we analyzed maps of T cell SEs as a non-biased means of identifying key regulatory nodes involved in cell specification. We found that cytokines and cytokine receptors were the dominant class of genes exhibiting SE architecture in T cells. This notwithstanding, the locus encoding Bach2, a key negative regulator of effector differentiation, emerged as the most prominent T cell SE, revealing a network wherein SE-associated genes critical for T cell biology are repressed by BACH2. Disease-associated SNPs for immune-mediated disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), were highly enriched for T cell-SEs versus typical enhancers (TEs) or SEs in other cell lineages7. Intriguingly, treatment of T cells with the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, tofacitinib, disproportionately altered the expression of RA risk genes with SE structures. Together, these results indicate that genes with SE architecture in T cells encompass a variety of cytokines and cytokine receptors but are controlled by a “guardian” transcription factor, itself endowed with an SE. Thus, enumeration of SEs allows unbiased determination of key regulatory nodes in T cells, which are preferentially modulated by pharmacological intervention. PMID:25686607

  10. Gene regulatory networks in embryonic stem cells and brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Yan, Xiaowei; Tian, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are endowed with the ability to generate multiple cell lineages and carries great therapeutic potentials in regenerative medicines. Future application of ESCs in human health and diseases will embark on the delineation of molecular mechanisms that define the biology of ESCs. Here we discuss how the finite ESC components mediate the intriguing task of brain development and exhibits biomedical potentials to cure diverse neurological disorders.

  11. In colorectal cancer mast cells contribute to systemic regulatory T-cell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatner, Nichole R; Bonertz, Andreas; Beckhove, Philipp; Cheon, Eric C; Krantz, Seth B; Strouch, Matthew; Weitz, Juergen; Koch, Moritz; Halverson, Amy L; Bentrem, David J; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2010-04-01

    T-regulatory cells (Treg) and mast cells (MC) are abundant in colorectal cancer (CRC) tumors. Interaction between the two is known to promote immune suppression or loss of Treg functions and autoimmunity. Here, we demonstrate that in both human CRC and murine polyposis the outcome of this interaction is the generation of potently immune suppressive but proinflammatory Treg (DeltaTreg). These Treg shut down IL10, gain potential to express IL17, and switch from suppressing to promoting MC expansion and degranulation. This change is also brought about by direct coculture of MC and Treg, or culture of Treg in medium containing IL6 and IL2. IL6 deficiency in the bone marrow of mice susceptible to polyposis eliminated IL17 production by the polyp infiltrating Treg, but did not significantly affect the growth of polyps or the generation of proinflammatory Treg. IL6-deficient MC could generate proinflammatory Treg. Thus, MC induce Treg to switch function and escalate inflammation in CRC without losing T-cell-suppressive properties. IL6 and IL17 are not needed in this process. PMID:20308560

  12. Mechanisms and treatment of allergic disease in the big picture of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2009-04-01

    Various populations of regulatory T (Treg) cells have been shown to play a central role in the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis and the establishment of controlled immune responses. Their identification as key regulators of immunologic processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens has opened an important era in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases. Both naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and inducible populations of allergen-specific, IL-10-secreting Treg type 1 (T(R)1) cells inhibit allergen-specific effector cells in experimental models. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears to be a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in allergen-specific immunotherapy. Forkhead box protein 3-positive CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and T(R)1 cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils; interaction with resident tissue cells and remodeling; and suppression of effector T-cell migration to tissues. Current strategies for drug development and allergen-specific immunotherapy exploit these observations, with the potential for preventive therapies and cure for allergic diseases. PMID:19348912

  13. Regulatory network modelling of iron acquisition by a fungal pathogen in contact with epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthke Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks can be used to predict regulatory interactions of an organism faced with environmental changes, but can prove problematic, especially when focusing on complicated multi-factorial processes. Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen. During the infection process, this fungus is able to adapt to conditions of very low iron availability. Such adaptation is an important virulence attribute of virtually all pathogenic microbes. Understanding the regulation of iron acquisition genes will extend our knowledge of the complex regulatory changes during the infection process and might identify new potential drug targets. Thus, there is a need for efficient modelling approaches predicting key regulatory events of iron acquisition genes during the infection process. Results This study deals with the regulation of C. albicans iron uptake genes during adhesion to and invasion into human oral epithelial cells. A reverse engineering strategy is presented, which is able to infer regulatory networks on the basis of gene expression data, making use of relevant selection criteria such as sparseness and robustness. An exhaustive use of available knowledge from different data sources improved the network prediction. The predicted regulatory network proposes a number of new target genes for the transcriptional regulators Rim101, Hap3, Sef1 and Tup1. Furthermore, the molecular mode of action for Tup1 is clarified. Finally, regulatory interactions between the transcription factors themselves are proposed. This study presents a model describing how C. albicans may regulate iron acquisition during contact with and invasion of human oral epithelial cells. There is evidence that some of the proposed regulatory interactions might also occur during oral infection. Conclusions This study focuses on a typical problem in Systems Biology where an interesting biological phenomenon is studied using a small

  14. Regulatory and Helper Follicular T Cells and Antibody Avidity to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Glycoprotein 120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Matthew J; Zhong-Min, Ma; Caccuri, Francesca; McKinnon, Katherine; Schifanella, Luca; Guan, Yongjun; Gorini, Giacomo; Venzon, David; Fenizia, Claudio; Binello, Nicolò; Gordon, Shari N; Miller, Christopher J; Franchini, Genoveffa; Vaccari, Monica

    2015-10-01

    T follicular regulatory cells (TFR) are a suppressive CD4(+) T cell subset that migrates to germinal centers (GC) during Ag presentation by upregulating the chemokine receptor CXCR5. In the GC, TFR control T follicular helper cell (TFH) expansion and modulate the development of high-affinity Ag-specific responses. In this study, we identified and characterized TFR as CXCR5(+)CCR7(-) "follicular" T regulatory cells in lymphoid tissues of healthy rhesus macaques, and we studied their dynamics throughout infection in a well-defined animal model of HIV pathogenesis. TFR were infected by SIVmac251 and had comparable levels of SIV DNA to CXCR5(-)CCR7(+) "T zone" T regulatory cells and TFH. Contrary to the SIV-associated TFH expansion in the chronic phase of infection, we observed an apparent reduction of TFR frequency in cell suspension, as well as a decrease of CD3(+)Foxp3(+) cells in the GC of intact lymph nodes. TFR frequency was inversely associated with the percentage of TFH and, interestingly, with the avidity of the Abs that recognize the SIV gp120 envelope protein. Our findings show changes in the TFH/TFR ratio during chronic infection and suggest possible mechanisms for the unchecked expansion of TFH cells in HIV/SIV infection. PMID:26297759

  15. Regulatory T cells in children with allergy and asthma: it is time to act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays allergy and asthma are a huge medical problem. Despite deeper and more precise knowledge concerning their pathogenesis and the role of the immune system in these processes, so far immunotherapy is the only treatment which can modify the course of these diseases. Considering that regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a great significance in pathogenesis of both diseases it seems appropriate to pay attention to their role in the treatment process. This work summarizes the Treg cells characteristics, the influence of allergen specific immunotherapy and other treatment modalities on Treg cells, and the possibility of using Treg cells in therapy. PMID:25462834

  16. The role of regulatory T cells in respiratory infections and allergy and asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Sarah; Mills, Kingston

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED PubMed ID: 20425510 The role of distinct CD4+ T cell populations in regulating the nature and strength of immune responses is well documented, and in the past has principally focused on the cross regulation of Th1 and Th2 cells, which secrete IFN-? and IL-4 respectively. However, the identification of T cells capable of suppressing responses mediated by both Th1 and Th2 cells, termed regulatory T (Treg) cells, has prompted a paradigm shift in our understanding of t...

  17. CCR6 marks regulatory T cells as a colon-tropic, interleukin-10-producing phenotype1

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamura, Kazuya; Farber, Joshua M; Kelsall, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of CCR6 and its ligand, CCL20, are increased in the colon of humans with inflammatory bowel diseases and mice with experimental colits, however their role in disease pathogenesis remains obscure. Here we demonstrate a role for CCR6 on regulatory T (Treg)3 cells in the T cell-transfer model of colitis. Rag2−/− mice given Ccr6−/− CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells had more severe colitis with increased IFN-γ-producing T cells, compared to the mice given WT cells. While equivalent frequency of in...

  18. A Requisite Role for Induced Regulatory T cells in Tolerance Based on Expanding Antigen Receptor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Jason B; Jia, Shuang; Nickerson, Derek; Schmitt, Erica G.; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yassai, Maryam; Li, Shun-Hwa; Relland, Lance M.; Wise, Petra M; Chen, Andrew; Zheng, Yu-Qian; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gorski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although both natural and induced regulatory T (nTreg and iTreg) cells can enforce tolerance, the mechanisms underlying their synergistic actions have not been established. We examined the functions of nTreg and iTreg cells by adoptive transfer immunotherapy of newborn Foxp3-deficient mice. As monotherapy, only nTreg cells prevented disease lethality, but did not suppress chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Provision of Foxp3-sufficient conventional T cells with nTreg cells reconstituted t...

  19. Dynamic expression of T-bet and GATA3 by regulatory T cells maintains immune tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fang; Sharma, Suveena; Edwards, Julie; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells can express the transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 but the function of this expression and whether such cells represent stable subsets is still unknown. By using multiple reporter tools, we show that the expression of T-bet and GATA3 in Treg cells is dynamically influenced by the cytokine environment. Treg cell-specific deletion of either Tbx21 or Gata3 genes singly did not result in loss of Treg cell functions; however, mice with combined deficiency of both genes...

  20. Interplay between regulatory T cells and PD-1 in modulating T cell exhaustion and viral control during chronic LCMV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Kamphorst, Alice O; Wieland, Andreas; Araki, Koichi; Iyer, Smita S; West, Erin E.; O’Mara, Leigh; Yang, Shu; Konieczny, Bogumila T.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Freeman, Gordon J; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cells are critical for preventing autoimmunity mediated by self-reactive T cells, but their role in modulating immune responses during chronic viral infection is not well defined. To address this question and to investigate a role for T reg cells in exhaustion of virus-specific CD8 T cells, we depleted T reg cells in mice chronically infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). T reg cell ablation resulted in 10–100-fold expansion of functional LCMV-specific C...

  1. The dynamics of effector T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the promotion and regulation of autoimmune encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Korn, Thomas; Anderson, Ana C.; Bettelli, Estelle; Oukka, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    The Th1/Th2 paradigm of T helper cell subsets had to be revised when IL-17 producing T cells (Th17) were identified as a distinct T helper cell lineage. Th17 cells are very efficient inducers of tissue inflammation and crucial initiators of organ specific autoimmunity. Whereas Th17 cells promote autoimmune tissue inflammation, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T-reg) are necessary and sufficient to prevent autoimmunity throughout the life span of an individual. Here, we review recent findings of how...

  2. Dendritic cells induce antigen-specific regulatory T cells that prevent graft versus host disease and persist in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sela, Uri; Olds, Peter; Park, Andrew; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2011-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells) effectively suppress immunity, but it is not determined if antigen-induced T reg cells (iT reg cells) are able to persist under conditions of inflammation and to stably express the transcription factor Foxp3. We used spleen cells to stimulate the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) in the presence of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and retinoic acid. We found that the CD11chigh dendritic cell fraction was the most potent at inducing high numbers of allo...

  3. Photo(chemotherapy reduces circulating Th17 cells and restores circulating regulatory T cells in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Furuhashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photo(chemotherapy is widely used to treat psoriasis, the pathogenesis of which might be caused by an imbalance of Th17 cells/regulatory T cells (Treg. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of photo(chemotherapy on the Th17/Treg balance and Treg function. METHODS: Peripheral blood was obtained from psoriasis patients treated with bath-psoralen ultraviolet A (UVA, n = 50 or narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB, n = 18, and age-matched healthy volunteers (n = 20. CD3(+CD4(+IL-17A(+ or CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+cells were analyzed to estimate Th17 or Treg number by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, CD4(+ CD25(- T cells from patients treated with PUVA(n = 14 were incubated in CFSE and activated with or without CD4(+ CD25(+T cells, and the suppressive function of CD4(+ CD25(+T cells were analyzed. RESULTS: Photo(chemotherapy significantly reduced Th17 levels from 5.66 ± 3.15% to 2.96 ± 2.89% in patients with increased Th17 (Th17/CD4>3.01% [mean+SD of controls]. In contrast, photo(chemotherapy significantly increased Treg levels from 2.77 ± 0.75 to 3.40 ± 1.88% in patients with less than 4.07% Treg level, defined as the mean of controls. Furthermore, while Treg suppressed the CD4(+CD25(- T cell proliferation to a greater extent in controls (Treg Functional Ratio 94.4 ± 4.28% than in patients (70.3±25.1%, PUVA significantly increased Treg Functional Ratio to 88.1 ± 6.47%. Th17 levels in severe patients (>30 PASI were significantly higher as compared to controls. Th17 levels that were left after treatment in the patients not achieving PASI 50 (3.78 ± 4.18% were significantly higher than those in the patients achieving PASI 75 (1.83±1.87%. Treg levels in patients achieving PASI 90 (4.89 ± 1.70% were significantly higher than those in the patients not achieving PASI 90 (3.90 ± 1.66%. Treg levels prior to treatment with Th17 high decreased group (5.16 ± 2.20% was significantly higher than that with Th17 high increased group

  4. Targeting Foxp3+ regulatory T cells-related immunosuppression for cancer immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Li-li; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the current research into Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) cell surface molecules, plasticity of Treg cells and mechanisms of Treg cell suppression and to explore the possibilities to interfere in Treg cell suppression of anti-tumor immunity.Data sources A literature search of all English articles was performed on the online electronic PubMed database dated 1995 to 2010. The keywords searched included: CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T lymphocytes, cancer, and immunotherapy. After finding relevant articles within these search limits, a manual search was conducted through the references from these articles.Study selection Articles regarding the role of Treg cells in tumor immunity and the utility of Treg cells in tumor immunotherapy.Results The results show that significant numbers of Treg cells are found in many tumors and it has been shown that the number of tumor infiltrating Treg cells correlates with adverse clinic outcomes. Treg cells are emerging as a key component of acquired tolerance to tumors.Conclusions Several mechanisms of immunosuppression can be mediated by Treg cell function. Distinct immunosuppressive molecules expressed by Treg cells or diverse molecules related to Treg induction or migration represent potential drug targets for caner immunotherapy.

  5. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhao Chen; Megan S. Ford; Kevin J. Young; Li Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  6. The Role and Mechanisms of Double Negative Regulatory T Cells in the Suppression of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenhaoChen; MeganS.Ford; KevinJ.Young; LiZhang

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance and in down-regulating various immune responses. Thus, there has recently been an increasing interest in studying the biology of Treg cells as well as their potential application in treating immune diseases. Many types of Treg cell subsets have been reported in a variety of disease models.Among these subsets, αβ-TCR+CD3+CD4*CD8* double negative (DN) Treg cells are defined by their capability of inhibiting immune responses via directly killing effector T cells in an antigen specific fashion. Furthermore,DN Treg cells have been shown to develop regulatory activity after encountering specific antigens, partially mediated by the acquisition of MHC-peptide complexes from antigen presenting cells (APCs). The presentation of acquired alloantigens on DN T cells allows for the specific interaction between DN Treg cells and alloantigen reactive effector T cells. Once the DN Treg and target cells have come into contact, killing is then mediated by Fas/Fas-ligand interactions, and perhaps through other unidentified pathways. Further characterization of the functions, molecular expression and mechanisms of activation of DN Treg cells will help in the development of novel therapies to induce antigen specific tolerance to self and foreign antigens. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):328-335.

  7. Transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that govern embryonic stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satyabrata; Levasseur, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are defined by their simultaneous capacity for limitless self-renewal and the ability to specify cells borne of all germ layers. The regulation of ESC pluripotency is governed by a set of core transcription factors that regulate transcription by interfacing with nuclear proteins that include the RNA polymerase II core transcriptional machinery, histone modification enzymes, and chromatin remodeling protein complexes. The growing adoption of systems biological approaches used in stem cell biology over last few years has contributed significantly to our understanding of pluripotency. Multilayered approaches coupling transcriptome profiling and proteomics (Nanog-, Oct4-, and Sox2-centered protein interaction networks or "interactomes") with transcription factor chromatin occupancy and epigenetic footprint measurements have enabled a more comprehensive understanding of ESC pluripotency and self-renewal. Together with the genetic and biochemical characterization of promising pluripotency modifying proteins, these systems biological approaches will continue to clarify the molecular underpinnings of the ESC state. This will most certainly contribute to the improvement of current methodologies for the derivation of pluripotent cells from adult tissues. PMID:23756950

  8. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that p

  9. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  10. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  11. Revival of the regulatory T cell: new targets for drug development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Offringa, R.; Melief, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Compelling new evidence supports the idea that regulatory T cells play a major role in our immune system. Several subsets of these regulators have been identified recently. Differences in the phenotypical and functional characteristics of these subsets have immunological implications. From our growi

  12. Phenotypic and functional markers for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)-modified regulatory dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A W; Holmstrøm, K; Jensen, S S; Fuchs, D; Rasmussen, S; Kvistborg, P; Claesson, M H; Zocca, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of dendritic cells (DCs) to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance has been hampered by the lack of a widely acknowledged method for generating human regulatory DCs but even more so by the non-existence of reliable markers. Thus, we set out to find reliable markers that can be...

  13. Frequencies and role of regulatory T cells in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Nijman, H. W.; Hoogenboom, B.-N.; Jager, P.; van Baarle, D.; Schuuring, E.; Abdulahad, W.; Miedema, F.; van der Zee, A. G.; Daemen, T.

    2007-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is crucial for developing cervical cancer and its precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. Regulatory T cells (T-regs) might be involved in the failure of the immune system to control the development of HPV-induced cancer. We invest

  14. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  15. Regulatory T cells and immunodeficiency in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn Frej; Ødum, Niels; Geisler, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    unclear. The identification of a subset of highly immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) triggered a variety of studies investigating if MF and SS are malignant proliferations of Tregs but seemingly discordant findings have been reported. Here, we review the literature to clarify the role of Tregs...

  16. Regulatory T cells in health and disease : putting the pieces together

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercoulen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) are indispensable for immune balance. In patients with autoimmunity, Treg are either present in lower numbers or not functioning properly and, therefore, inflammation is not suppressed. In murine models and in human studies increase of Treg frequency or function

  17. Regulatory T cells and toll-like receptors : regulating the regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Garritsen, A.; Adema, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in maintaining control of leucocytes. Several studies have shown that in vivo Treg depletion results in autoimmune syndromes like thyroiditis, gastritis, diabetes mellitus and colitis, but at the same time, may also result in improved anti-tumour vaccina

  18. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in autoimmune hepatitis are fully functional and not reduced in frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiseler, M.; Sebode, M.; Franke, B.; Wortmann, F.; Schwinge, D.; Quaas, A.; Baron, U.; Olek, S.; Wiegard, C.; Lohse, A.W.; Weiler-Normann, C.; Schramm, C.; Herkel, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is not understood, but it was suggested that AIH may be related to a numerical or functional impairment of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), which are important mediators of immune tolerance to self-antigens. However, the rol

  19. Effect of Salmonella infection on cecal tonsil regulatory T cell properties in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to study Regulatory T cell (Treg) properties post-Salmonella infection in broiler birds. Four-day-old broiler chicks were orally infected with 5x106 CFU/ml Salmonella enteritidis or sterile PBS (control). Samples were collected at 4, 7, 10, and 14 d post-infection. ...

  20. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    markers might be used to select switchgrass genotypes with improved composition in breeding programs for biofuel and forage production. Because the SSAC continues to be characterized by collaborators in the bioenergy community, the data generated will be used to identify additional markers in higher resolution genotyping data to approach identifying the genes and alleles that cause natural variation in switchgrass cell wall quality. For example, these markers can be surveyed in the 2100-member Oklahoma Southern and Northern Lowland switchgrass collections that this project also characterized. An orthogonal approach to biodiversity studies, using comparative functional genomics permits systematic querying of how much regulatory information is likely to be transferable from dicots to grasses and use of accumulated functional genomics resources for better-characterized grass species, such as rice, itself a biomass source in global agriculture and in certain regions. The project generated and tested a number of specific hypotheses regarding cell wall transcription factors and enzymes of grasses. To aid identification of cell wall regulators, the project assembled a novel, highdepth and -quality gene association network using a general linearized model scoring system to combine rice gene network data. Using known or putative orthologs of Arabidopsis cell wall biosynthesis genes and regulators, the project pulled from this network a cell wall sub-network that includes 96 transcription factors. Reverse genetics of a co-ortholog of the Arabidopsis MYB61 transcription factor in rice revealed that this regulatory node has evolved the ability to regulate grass-specific cell wall synthesis enzymes. A transcription factor with such activity has not been previously characterized to our knowledge, representing a major conclusion of this work. Changes in gene expression in a protoplast-based assay demonstrated positive or negative roles in cell wall regulation for eleven other

  1. Regulatory T Cells Resist Cyclosporine-Induced Cell Death via CD44-Mediated Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Ruppert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporine A (CSA is an immunosuppressive agent that specifically targets T cells and also increases the percentage of pro-tolerogenic CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg through unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that CD44, a receptor for the extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA, promotes Treg stability in IL-2-low environments. Here, we asked whether CD44 signaling also promotes Treg resistance to CSA. We found that CD44 cross-linking promoted Foxp3 expression and Treg viability in the setting of CSA treatment. This effect was IL-2 independent but could be suppressed using sc-355979, an inhibitor of Stat5-phosphorylation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of HA synthesis impairs Treg homeostasis but that this effect could be overcome with exogenous IL-2 or CD44-cross-linking. Together, these data support a model whereby CD44 cross-linking by HA promotes IL-2-independent Foxp3 expression and Treg survival in the face of CSA.

  2. Cholera-Like Enterotoxins and Regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyne Kohli; John Holton; John D. Clements; Cyrille Di Martino; Fatou Thiam; Christelle Basset

    2010-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) and the heat-labile enterotoxin of E. coli (LT), as well as their non toxic mutants, are potent mucosal adjuvants of immunization eliciting mucosal and systemic responses against unrelated co-administered antigens in experimental models and in humans (non toxic mutants). These enterotoxins are composed of two subunits, the A subunit, responsible for an ADP-ribosyl transferase activity and the B subunit, responsible for cell binding. Paradoxically, whereas the whole toxins h...

  3. Regulatory T cells and regulation of allergic airway disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Helen; Taube, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Diseases like asthma have dramatically increased in the last decades. The reasons for the rising prevalence are still controversially discussed. Besides the genetic predisposition a number of different causes are thought to affect the increase of allergies. These include the hygiene hypothesis as well as changes in intestinal microbiota. Allergic airway inflammation is driven by T cells but it has become clear that tolerance and also suppression of allergic inflammation are mediated by so cal...

  4. PD-1 marks dysfunctional regulatory T cells in malignant gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lowther, Daniel E.; Goods, Brittany A.; Lucca, Liliana E.; Lerner, Benjamin A.; Raddassi, Khadir; van Dijk, David; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Duan, Xiangguo; Gunel, Murat; Coric, Vlad; Krishnaswamy, Smita; Love, J. Christopher; Hafler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies targeting the immune checkpoint receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) have shown remarkable efficacy in treating cancer. CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ Tregs are critical regulators of immune responses in autoimmunity and malignancies, but the functional status of human Tregs expressing PD-1 remains unclear. We examined functional and molecular features of PD-1hi Tregs in healthy subjects and patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), combining functional assays, RNA sequencing,...

  5. IL-12 Converts Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells to Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T Cells with Inhibitory Functions During Induction of Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Cao, Anthony T.; Weaver, Casey T.; Elson, Charles O; Cong, Yingzi

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are plastic, but the in vivo mechanisms by which they are converted into Foxp3+interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells, and whether these converted cells retain the ability to inhibit colitis, are not clear.

  6. Gene-gene interaction in regulatory T-cell function in atopy and asthma development in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R.W.B.; Kerkhof, M.; Reijmerink, N.E.; Thijs, C.; Smit, H.A.; Schayck, C.P. van; Brunekreef, B.; Oosterhout, A.J.; Postma, D.S.; Koppelman, G.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory T-cell dysfunction is associated with development of the complex genetic conditions atopy and asthma. Therefore, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in the development and function of regulatory T cells are associated with atopy and asthma de

  7. Gene-gene interaction in regulatory T-cell function in atopy and asthma development in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, Renske W. B.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Reijmerink, Naomi E.; Thijs, Carel; Smit, Henriette A.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Brunekreef, Bert; van Oosterhout, Antoon J.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cell dysfunction is associated with development of the complex genetic conditions atopy and asthma. Therefore, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in the development and function of regulatory T cells are associated with atopy and asthma de

  8. Selective inhibition of regulatory T cells by targeting PI3K-Akt pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Eid, R; Samara, RN; Ozbun, L; Abdalla, MY; Berzofsky, JA; Friedman, KM; Mkrtichyan, M; Khleif, SN

    2014-01-01

    Despite the strides that immunotherapy has made in mediating tumor regression, the clinical effects are often transient, and therefore more durable responses still are needed. The temporary nature of the therapy-induced immune response can be attributed to tumor immune evasion mechanisms, mainly the effect of suppressive immune cells and, in particular, T regulatory cells (Treg). Although the depletion of Treg has been shown to be effective in enhancing immune responses, selective depletion o...

  9. p38β, A Novel Regulatory Target of Pokemon in Hepatic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Tan; Min Liu; Deliang Cao; Zhe Chen; Nannan Zhang; Feng Liu; Yuyang Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene involved in various biological processes and cancer development, such as cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Pokemon is recognized as a transcription factor localized upstream of several oncogenes, regulating their expression. p38MAPKs act as key regulatory factors in cellular signaling pathways associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. p38β, a member of p38MAPK family, is closely correlated...

  10. Transient regulatory T cell ablation deters oncogene-driven breast cancer and enhances radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, Paula D.; Plitas, George; Rudra, Dipayan; Lee, Sue Y.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rational combinatorial therapeutic strategies have proven beneficial for the management of cancer. Recent success of checkpoint blockade in highly immunogenic tumors has renewed interest in immunotherapy. Regulatory T (T reg) cells densely populate solid tumors, which may promote progression through suppressing anti-tumor immune responses. We investigated the role of T reg cells in murine mammary carcinogenesis using an orthotopic, polyoma middle-T antigen-driven model in Foxp3 DTR knockin mi...

  11. Electroacupuncture Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma via Modulating CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Youngjoo Kwon; Sung-Hwa Sohn; Gihyun Lee; Youngeun Kim; Hyejung Lee; Minkyu Shin; Hyunsu Bae

    2012-01-01

    A mouse pulmonary hypersensitivity experimental model that mimics human asthma was developed, and electroacupuncture (EA) treatment was shown to reduce allergic inflammatory processes. In addition, we also assessed whether the beneficial effects of EA on allergic asthma could be correlated with CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Cellular profiles and histopathologic analysis demonstrated that peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates were significantly decreased in ...

  12. Phenotype and function of regulatory T cells in Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowakowska, Dominika Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical to the maintenance of immune tolerance, partly by controlling the unwanted activation of effector T cells (Teff) and thereby enhancing the resolution of autoimmune and allergic inflammation. Recent data suggest that Treg can specialize to better control different types of inflammation by using transcriptional machinery which controls differentiation and function of Teff. This thesis addresses questions related to the efficacious use of Tre...

  13. Repeated Bouts of Aerobic Exercise Enhance Regulatory T Cell Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lowder, Thomas; Dugger, Kari; Deshane, Jessy; Estell, Kim; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2009-01-01

    We have reported previously that moderate intensity aerobic exercise training attenuates airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. Recent studies implicate regulatory T (Treg) cells in decreasing asthma-related airway inflammation; as such, the current study examined the effect of exercise on Treg cell function in a murine asthma model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) prior to the start of exercise training at a moderate intensity 3× / week for 4 wks; exercise was performed as t...

  14. Regulatory T Cells Prevent Liver Fibrosis During HIV Type 1 Infection in a Humanized Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nunoya, Jun-ichi; Washburn, Michael L.; Kovalev, Grigoriy I; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease is associated with aberrant immune activation, and coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) exacerbates hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of HIV-1 infection or host immune modulation in liver pathogenesis is not clearly defined. Here, we report that regulatory T (Treg) cells prevent liver immunopathogenesis during HIV-1 infection in a humanized mouse model. In the absence of Treg cells, HIV-1 infection induced liver fibros...

  15. Small non-coding RNAs, mammalian cells, and viruses: Regulatory interactions?

    OpenAIRE

    Benkirane Monsef; Jeang Kuan-Teh; Yeung Man

    2007-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections. Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept. We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema. © 2007 Yeung et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. Efficient nucleic acid delivery to murine regulatory T cells by gold nanoparticle conjugates

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Gamrad; Christoph Rehbock; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Jan Buer; Stephan Barcikowski; Wiebke Hansen

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses have to be tightly controlled to guarantee maintenance of immunological tolerance and efficient clearance of pathogens and tumorigenic cells without induction of unspecific side effects. CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in these processes due to their immunosuppressive function. Genetic modification of Tregs would be helpful to understand which molecules and pathways are involved in their function, but currently available methods are limited by tim...

  17. Localisation pattern of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is associated with clinical behaviour in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mizukami, Y.; Kono, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Akaike, H.; Kamimura, K.; Sugai, H.; Fujii, H.

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that the population of regulatory T cells (T regs) is increased in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes in cancer-bearing hosts. Recently, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3, Foxp3, is thought to be the most reliable marker of T regs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence and localisation pattern of Foxp3+ cells in gastric cancer (n=80) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to the clinical outcome of gastric cancer patients. Immunohistochemical stainin...

  18. Foxp3 exploits a preexistent enhancer landscape for regulatory T cell lineage specification

    OpenAIRE

    Samstein, Robert M.; Arvey, Aaron; Josefowicz, Steven Z.; Peng, Xiao; Reynolds, Alex; Sandstrom, Richard; Neph, Shane; Sabo, Peter; Kim, Jeong M.; Liao, Will; O. Li, Ming; Leslie, Christina; John A. Stamatoyannopoulos; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, whose identity and function are defined by the transcription factor Foxp3, are indispensable for immune homeostasis. It is unclear whether Foxp3 exerts its Treg lineage specification function through active modification of the chromatin landscape and establishment of new enhancers or by exploiting a pre-existing enhancer landscape. Analysis of the chromatin accessibility of Foxp3-bound enhancers in Treg and Foxp3-negative T cells showed that Foxp3 was bound overwhel...

  19. Convergences and divergences of thymus- and peripherally-derived regulatory T cells in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ALESSIA eBUROCCHI; MARIO PAOLO COLOMBO; Silvia ePICONESE

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg) is a common event characterizing the vast majority of human and experimental tumors and it is now well established that Treg represent a crucial hurdle for a successful immunotherapy. Treg are currently classified, according to their origin, into thymus-derived (tTreg) or peripherally induced (pTreg) cells. Controversy exists over the prevalent mechanism accounting for Treg expansion in tumors, since both tTreg proliferation and de novo pTreg differe...

  20. Defects in CTLA-4 are associated with abnormal regulatory T cell function in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Flores-Borja, Fabian; Jury, Elizabeth C.; Mauri, Claudia; Ehrenstein, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal for the treatment of autoimmunity is to restore immunological tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in immune tolerance, and Treg functional abnormalities have been identified in different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have previously shown that natural Treg from RA patients are competent at suppressing responder T cell proliferation but not cytokine production. Here, we explore the hypothesis that this Treg defect in RA is l...

  1. Intratumoral regulatory T cells upregulate immunosuppressive molecules in head and neck cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jie, H-B; Gildener-Leapman, N; Li, J.; Srivastava, R. M.; Gibson, S P; Whiteside, T L; Ferris, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although regulatory T cells (Treg) are highly enriched in human tumours compared with peripheral blood, expression of the immune-checkpoint receptors, immunosuppressive molecules and function of Treg in these two sites remains undefined. Methods: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from a cohort of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The immunosuppressive phenotypes and function of intratumoral Treg were compared with ...

  2. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. PMID:21509780

  3. T cells that cannot respond to TGF-β escape control by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlén, Linda; Read, Simon; Gorelik, Leonid; Hurst, Stephen D.; Coffman, Robert L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Powrie, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (T reg) cells play a pivotal role in control of the immune response. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been shown to be required for T reg cell activity; however, precisely how it is involved in the mechanism of suppression is poorly understood. Using the T cell transfer model of colitis, we show here that CD4+CD45RBhigh T cells that express a dominant negative TGF-β receptor type II (dnTβRII) and therefore cannot respond to TGF-β, escape control by T reg cells i...

  4. Pathogen-specific regulatory T cells delay the arrival of effector T cells in the lung during early tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shafiani, Shahin; Tucker-Heard, Glady’s; Kariyone, Ai; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Urdahl, Kevin B.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the adaptive immune system to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is impeded by activated Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells. The importance of pathogen-specific T reg cells in this process has not been addressed. We show that T reg cell expansion after aerosol Mtb infection does not occur until Mtb is transported to the pulmonary lymph node (pLN), and Mtb-specific T reg cells have an increased propensity to proliferate. Even small numbers of Mtb-specific T reg cells are c...

  5. Dicer-dependent microRNA pathway safeguards regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Liston, Adrian; Lu, Li-Fan; O'Carroll, Donal; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cells are indispensable for preventing autoimmunity. Incumbent to this role is the ability of T reg cells to exert their suppressor function under inflammatory conditions. We found that T reg cell–mediated tolerance is critically dependent on the Dicer-controlled microRNA (miRNA) pathway. Depletion of miRNA within the T reg cell lineage resulted in fatal autoimmunity indistinguishable from that in T reg cell–deficient mice. In disease-free mice lacking Dicer in all T cell...

  6. Regulatory T cells in induced sputum of asthmatic children: association with inflammatory cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Hamzaoui Agnès; Ammar Jamel; Hamzaoui Kamel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated whether the induced sputum (IS) pool and the function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells are altered in asthma pediatric patients. Methods Treg activity was studied in the IS of 40 asthmatic children. CD3+ cells were analyzed for the expression of FoxP3 mRNA by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IS cells from asthm...

  7. Isolated CD39 Expression on CD4+ T Cells Denotes both Regulatory and Memory Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Q.; Yan, J.; Putheti, P.; Wu, Y.; X. Sun; Toxavidis, V.; Tigges, J.; Kassam, N.; Enjyoji, K.; Robson, S C; Strom, T. B.; Gao, W.

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) express both ectoenzymes CD39 and CD73, which in tandem hydrolyze pericellular ATP into adenosine, an immunoinhibitory molecule that contributes to Treg suppressive function. Using Foxp3GFP knockin mice, we noted that the mouse CD4+CD39+ T-cell pool contains two roughly equal size Foxp3+ and Foxp3− populations. While Foxp3+CD39+ cells are CD73bright and are the bone fide Tregs, Foxp3−CD39+ cells do not have suppressive activity and are CD44+CD62L−CD25−CD73dim...

  8. Brown adipose tissue harbors a distinct sub-population of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasa Medrikova

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical determinants of both immune responses and metabolic control. Here we show that systemic ablation of Treg cells compromised the adaptation of whole-body energy expenditure to cold exposure, correlating with impairment in thermogenic marker gene expression and massive invasion of pro-inflammatory macrophages in brown adipose tissue (BAT. Indeed, BAT harbored a unique sub-set of Treg cells characterized by a unique gene signature. As these Treg cells respond to BAT activation upon cold exposure, this study defines a BAT-specific Treg sub-set with direct implications for the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to environmental stress.

  9. Cutting Edge: Integrin α4 Is Required for Regulatory B Cell Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatigny, Simon; Wagner, Catriona A; Bettelli, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    The neutralization of integrin α4 (Itga4) is currently used as treatment in multiple sclerosis. Although most studies have focused on its function on lymphocyte migration to the CNS, we have uncovered the importance of Itga4 for the generation of regulatory B cells in peripheral immune organs and their control of pathogenic T cell response and CNS pathology. Our study underscores the importance of looking at the dual role of B cells in CNS autoimmunity and provides important perspectives regarding the efficacy and side effects associated with Itga4 neutralization and other B cell-targeting therapies. PMID:27016608

  10. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyong; Xiao, Li; Du, Guosheng; Gao, Yu; Chen, Wen; Yang, Shaozhen; Fan, Wenmei; Shi, Bingyi

    2016-09-01

    Sirolimus can significantly amplify regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo and in vitro, but the specific mechanism of this has not been well documented. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro in this study. The results showed that the percentages of both CD19+CD24+CD38+TGF-β1+ Bregs and CD19+CD24+CD38+IL-10+ Bregs to B cells were elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. Sirolimus significantly enhances the cytokine production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in PBMCs with B cells, and the enhancement significantly decreased in PBMCs without B cells. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs to T cells was also elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. The elevation of Tregs percentage decreased in PBMCs without B cells and recovered when additional TGF-β1 and IL-10 were added. The amplification of Tregs by Sirolimus was partially inhibited when either TGF-β1 or IL-10 was neutralized, and it even disappeared when these two cytokines were both neutralized. These results indicate that Sirolimus can amplify Bregs and Tregs in PBMCs in vitro, and Bregs may be the why Sirolimus amplifies Tregs. PMID:27258186

  11. Regulatory Roles of Metabolites in Cell Signaling Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Li; Wei Xu; Shimin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that cellular metabolites,in addition to being sources of fuel and macromolecular substrates,are actively involved in signaling and epigenetic regulation.Many metabolites,such as cyclic AMP,which regulates phosphorylation/dephosphorylation,have been identified to modulate DNA and histone methylation and protein stability.Metabolite-driven cellular regulation occurs through two distinct mechanisms:proteins allosterically bind or serve as substrates for protein signaling pathways,and metabolites covalently modify proteins to regulate their functions.Such novel protein metabolites include fumarate,succinyl-CoA,propionyl-CoA,butyryl-CoA and crontonyl-CoA.Other metabolites,including α-ketoglutarate,succinate and fumarate,regulate epigenetic processes and cell signaling via protein binding.Here,we summarize recent progress in metabolite-derived post-translational protein modification and metabolite-binding associated signaling regulation.Uncovering metabolites upstream of cell signaling and epigenetic networks permits the linkage of metabolic disorders and human diseases,and suggests that metabolite modulation may be a strategy for innovative therapeutics and disease prevention techniques.

  12. CD8+ CD205+ splenic dendritic cells are specialized to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Dudziak, Diana; Heidkamp, Gordon F; Fiorese, Christopher; Bonito, Anthony J; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2008-11-15

    Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) mediate immunological self-tolerance and suppress immune responses. A subset of dendritic cells (DCs) in the intestine is specialized to induce Treg in a TGF-beta- and retinoic acid-dependent manner to allow for oral tolerance. In this study we compare two major DC subsets from mouse spleen. We find that CD8(+) DEC-205/CD205(+) DCs, but not the major fraction of CD8(-) DC inhibitory receptor-2 (DCIR2)(+) DCs, induce functional Foxp3(+) Treg from Foxp3(-) precursors in the presence of low doses of Ag but without added TGF-beta. CD8(+)CD205(+) DCs preferentially express TGF-beta, and the induction of Treg by these DCs in vitro is blocked by neutralizing Ab to TGF-beta. In contrast, CD8(-)DCIR2(+) DCs better induce Foxp3(+) Treg when exogenous TGF-beta is supplied. In vivo, CD8(+)CD205(+) DCs likewise preferentially induce Treg from adoptively transferred, Ag-specific DO11.10 RAG(-/-) Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells, whereas the CD8(-)DCIR2(+) DCs better stimulate natural Foxp3(+) Treg. These results indicate that a subset of DCs in spleen, a systemic lymphoid organ, is specialized to differentiate peripheral Foxp3(+) Treg, in part through the endogenous formation of TGF-beta. Targeting of Ag to these DCs might be useful for inducing Ag-specific Foxp3(+) Treg for treatment of autoimmune diseases, transplant rejection, and allergy. PMID:18981112

  13. PD-L1 Regulates the Development, Maintenance, and Function of Induced Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Salinas, Victor H.; Vanguri, Vijay K.; Francisco, Loise Marie; Brown, Keturah Elise; Freeman, Gordon James; Kuchroo, Vijay Kumar; Sharpe, Arlene Helen

    2009-01-01

    Both the programmed death (PD) 1–PD-ligand (PD-L) pathway and regulatory T (T reg) cells are instrumental to the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. We demonstrate that PD-L1 has a pivotal role in regulating induced T reg (iT reg) cell development and sustaining iT reg cell function. PD-L1\\(^{−/−}\\) antigen-presenting cells minimally convert naive CD4 T cells to iT reg cells, showing the essential role of PD-L1 for iT reg cell induction. PD-L1–coated beads induce iT reg cells in vitro, indic...

  14. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: I. Phenotype and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Nielsen, Janne; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    it has become increasingly clear that regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) play an important role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance, and that this cell subset exerts its function by suppressing the proliferation or function of autoreactive T cells. Based on human and murine...... observations, this review presents a characterization of the phenotype and functions of the Treg cells in vitro and in vivo. An overview of the surface molecules associated with and the cytokines produced by the Treg cells is given and the origin, activation requirements and mode of action of the Treg cells...... are discussed. Finally, we address the possibility that Treg cells may play a central role in immune homeostasis, regulating not only autoimmune responses, but also immune responses toward foreign antigens....

  15. Regulatory T cell induction during Plasmodium chabaudi infection modifies the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro S Farias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is used as an animal model for human multiple sclerosis (MS, which is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by activation of Th1 and/or Th17 cells. Human autoimmune diseases can be either exacerbated or suppressed by infectious agents. Recent studies have shown that regulatory T cells play a crucial role in the escape mechanism of Plasmodium spp. both in humans and in experimental models. These cells suppress the Th1 response against the parasite and prevent its elimination. Regulatory T cells have been largely associated with protection or amelioration in several autoimmune diseases, mainly by their capacity to suppress proinflammatory response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we verified that CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells (T regs generated during malaria infection (6 days after EAE induction interfere with the evolution of EAE. We observed a positive correlation between the reduction of EAE clinical symptoms and an increase of parasitemia levels. Suppression of the disease was also accompanied by a decrease in the expression of IL-17 and IFN-γ and increases in the expression of IL-10 and TGF-β1 relative to EAE control mice. The adoptive transfer of CD4(+CD25(+ cells from P. chabaudi-infected mice reduced the clinical evolution of EAE, confirming the role of these T regs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data corroborate previous findings showing that infections interfere with the prevalence and evolution of autoimmune diseases by inducing regulatory T cells, which regulate EAE in an apparently non-specific manner.

  16. DNA-protein interaction at erythroid important regulatory elements of MEL cells by in vivo footprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using ligation-mediated PCR method to study the status of DNA-protein interaction at hypersensitive site 2 of locus control Region and β maj promoter of MEL cell line before and after induction, MEL cell has been cultured and induced to differentiation by Hemin and DMSO, then the live cells have been treated with dimethyl sulfate. Ligation mediated PCR has been carried out following the chemical cleavage. The results demonstrate that before and after induction, the status of DNA-protein interaction at both hypersensitive site 2 and β maj promoter change significantly, indicating that distal regulatory elements (locus control region, hypersensitive sites) as well as proximal regulatory elements (promoter, enhancer) of β -globin gene cluster participate in the regulation of developmental specificity.

  17. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  18. p42.3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell and its protein regulatory network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianhua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the p42.3 gene expression in gastric cancer (GC cell, find the relationship between protein structure and function, establish the regulatory network of p42.3 protein molecule and then to obtain the optimal regulatory pathway. Methods The expression of p42.3 gene was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and other biotechnologies. The relationship between the spatial conformation of p42.3 protein molecule and its function was analyzed using bioinformatics, MATLAB and related knowledge about protein structure and function. Furthermore, based on similarity algorithm of spatial layered spherical coordinate, we compared p42.3 molecule with several similar structured proteins which are known for the function, screened the characteristic nodes related to tumorigenesis and development, and established the multi variable relational model between p42.3 protein expression, cell cycle regulation and biological characteristics in the level of molecular regulatory networks. Finally, the optimal regulatory network was found by using Bayesian network. Results (1 The expression amount of p42.3 in G1 and M phase was higher than that in S and G2 phase; (2 The space coordinate systems of different structural domains of p42.3 protein were established in Matlab7.0 software; (3 The optimal pathway of p42.3 gene in protein regulatory network in gastric cancer is Ras protein, Raf-1 protein, MEK, MAPK kinase, MAPK, tubulin, spindle protein, centromere protein and tumor. Conclusion It is of vital significance for mechanism research to find out the action pathway of p42.3 in protein regulatory network, since p42.3 protein plays an important role in the generation and development of GC.

  19. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Allergic Airway Inflammation by Inducing Regulatory T Cells in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kyu-Sup Cho; Mi-Kyung Park; Shin-Ae Kang; Hee-Young Park; Sung-Lyong Hong; Hye-Kyung Park; Hak-Sun Yu; Hwan-Jung Roh

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation, the immunomodulatory mechanism of ASCs remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether regulatory T cells (Tregs) induction is a potential mechanism in immunomodulatory effects of ASCs on allergic airway disease and how these induced Tregs orchestrate allergic inflammation. Intravenous administration of ASCs significantly reduced allerg...

  20. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S; Jonathan M Green; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation...

  1. Sox10 controls migration of B16F10 melanoma cells through multiple regulatory target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikjoo Seong

    Full Text Available It is believed that the inherent differentiation program of melanocytes during embryogenesis predisposes melanoma cells to high frequency of metastasis. Sox10, a transcription factor expressed in neural crest stem cells and a subset of progeny lineages, plays a key role in the development of melanocytes. We show that B16F10 melanoma cells transfected with siRNAs specific for Sox10 display reduced migratory activity which in turn indicated that a subset of transcriptional regulatory target genes of Sox10 is likely to be involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells. We carried out a microarray-based gene expression profiling using a Sox10-specific siRNA to identify relevant regulatory targets and found that multiple genes including melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r partake in the regulation of migration. We provide evidences that the effect of Sox10 on migration is mediated in large part by Mitf, a transcription factor downstream to Sox10. Among the mouse melanoma cell lines examined, however, only B16F10 showed robust down-regulation of Sox10 and inhibition of cell migration indicating that further dissection of dosage effects and/or cell line-specific regulatory networks is necessary. The involvement of Mc1r in migration was studied in detail in vivo using a murine metastasis model. Specifically, B16F10 melanoma cells treated with a specific siRNA showed reduced tendency in metastasizing to and colonizing the lung after being injected in the tail vein. These data reveal a cadre of novel regulators and mediators involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells that represents potential targets of therapeutic intervention.

  2. Regulatory T cell reprogramming towards a Th2 cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Burton, Oliver T.; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C.; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible mice (Il4raF709) with enhanced IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of T helper 2 (Th2) cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral blood all...

  3. Regulatory T cell number in multiple sclerosis patients: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Bistoon-Beigloo, Sara; Bakhtiyari, Salar; Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Darabi, Shahram; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Abdanipour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), defined as CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells by expression of CD4, high-affinity IL-2 receptor and the transcription factor, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). They play a pivotal role in protecting individuals from autoimmunity and a growing body of evidence suggests their role in the prevention of multiple sclerosis development. However, there are discrepancies about the type of defect in the Treg cells of multiple sclerosis patients and especially whether the Treg number alteration could be contributed to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Indeed, whether low number of Treg cells can be a risk factor contributing to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis is the matter of debate and there is not any comprehensive agreement on it. Thus, the objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to precisely quantify the nature and magnitude of the association between Treg cell number and the risk ratio/odds ratio (OR) of multiple sclerosis in the case-control studies. Hence, medical databases of Embase, PubMed/Medline, PubMed, PubMed Central and SCOPUS were searched for empirical papers using "Regulatory T cell frequency", "Treg frequency" in combination with "multiple sclerosis". In the case-control studies, papers were reviewed for inclusion/exclusion criteria and 8 publications were included. Under random-effect model meta-analysis the data showed that the frequency of Treg cells was not a risk factor in multiple sclerosis using current laboratory methods. PMID:26856947

  4. Increased intratumoral FOXP3-positive regulatory immune cells during interleukin-2 treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Krogh; Donskov, Frede; Nordsmark, Marianne; Marcussen, Niels; von der Maase, Hans

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The administration of interleukin-2 (IL-2) may increase the frequency of peripherally circulating FOXP3-positive regulatory immune cells, thus potentially compromising this treatment option for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The impact of IL-2-based therapy on the...... accumulation of FOXP3-positive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma is unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Baseline (n = 58) and on-treatment (n = 42) tumor core biopsies were prospectively obtained from patients with clear cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma before and...... during IL-2-based immunotherapy. Immunohistochemical expression of FOXP3 was estimated by stereological counting technique and correlated with other immune cell subsets and overall survival. RESULTS: A significant increase in absolute intratumoral FOXP3-positive immune cells was observed comparing...

  5. Regulatory T Cells Vary over Bleeding Segments in Asthmatic and non-Asthmatic Women

    OpenAIRE

    Wegienka, Ganesa; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Havstad, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Sex hormones may play an important role in observed gender differences in asthma incidence and severity. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are presumed to be involved in asthma and may vary with hormone levels. To investigate the effects of sex hormones on levels of Treg cells (percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ lymphocytes that are CD127), a cohort of 13 women (6 with and 7 without an asthma diagnosis) had blood drawn multiple times over the course of a bleeding segment (bleeding interval plus the ...

  6. Within-woman change in regulatory T cells from pregnancy to the postpartum period

    OpenAIRE

    Wegienka, Ganesa; Havstad, Suzanne; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Zoratti, Edward M.; Ownby, Dennis R.; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are an important area of investigation in human health and disease. In this study, the trajectory of percentage of Treg cells (defined as CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD127− lymphocytes) was measured in the blood of 208 women during pregnancy and up to 3 additional times in the postpartum period (1, 6 and 12 months postpartum). Whether the trajectory was affected by gravidity, parity, neonatal sex, pet exposure, maternal atopic and asthma status, smoking, maternal race or ot...

  7. Foxp3 Processing by Proprotein Convertases and Control of Regulatory T Cell Function*

    OpenAIRE

    de Zoeten, Edwin F.; Lee, Iris; Wang, Liqing; Chen, Chunxia; Ge, Guanghui; Wells, Andrew D.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Özkaynak, Engin

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3 is a 47-kDa transcription factor central to regulatory T cell (Treg) function. The importance of Foxp3+ Tregs in controlling self-reactive T cells and preventing autoimmunity is well established. Our analysis of Foxp3 expression in natural Tregs led to identification of a shorter 41-kDa Foxp3 species in activated Tregs, indicating that Foxp3 may be processed by proteolytic cleavage upon cell activation. Searches of murine and human Foxp3 sequences for potential c...

  8. Vagaries of Fluorochrome Reporter Gene Expression in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schallenberg, Sonja; Petzold, Cathleen; Tsai, Pei-Yun; Sparwasser, Tim; Kretschmer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell lineage commitment and expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be induced at the CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (DP) and CD4(+)CD8(?) single-positive stages of thymic development, as well as in postthymic CD4(+) T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues. The availability of transgenic mice with Foxp3-dependent fluorochrome reporter gene expression has greatly facilitated studies on the intra- and extrathymic generation of murine Foxp3(+) Treg cells. ...

  9. Mbd2 Promotes Foxp3 Demethylation and T-Regulatory-Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liqing; Liu, Yujie; Han, Rongxiang; Ulf H Beier; Thomas, Rajan M.; Wells, Andrew D.; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    Use of Foxp3-positive (Foxp3+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells as potential cellular therapy in patients with autoimmunity, or post-stem cell or -organ transplantation, requires a sound understanding of the transcriptional regulation of Foxp3. Conserved CpG dinucleotides in the Treg-specific demethylation region (TSDR) upstream of Foxp3 are demethylated only in stable, thymus-derived Foxp3+ Treg cells. Since methyl-binding domain (Mbd) proteins recruit histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling com...

  10. Donor Requirements for Regulatory T Cell Suppression of Murine Graft Versus Host Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pierini, Antonio; Colonna, Lucrezia; Alvarez, Maite; Schneidawind, Dominik; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Baker, Jeanette; Pan, Yuqiong; Florek, Mareike; Kim, Byung-Su; Negrin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of freshly isolated natural occurring CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) prevents graft versus host disease (GvHD) in several animal models and following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in clinical trials. Donor derived Treg have been mainly used as they share the same MHC with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (Tcon) that are primarily responsible for GvHD. Third-party derived Treg are a promising alternative for cellular therapy as they can be prepared in ...

  11. Context and location dependence of adaptive Foxp3+ regulatory T cell formation during immunopathological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Heiber, Joshua F.; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) may arise in the thymus (natural Treg, nTreg) or through the adaptive upregulation of Foxp3 after T cell activation (induced Treg, iTreg). In this brief review, we explore evidence for the formation and function of iTreg during pathologic conditions. Determining the ontogeny and function of Treg populations has relied on the use of manipulated systems in which either iTreg or nTreg are absent, or lineage tracing of T cell clones through repertoire ...

  12. Involvement of regulatory T cells and selected cytokines in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuśka-Prot, Monika; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J; Maślanka, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Asthma pathogenesis is complex and involves the interplay of many factors and actions. Airway inflammation in allergic asthma is characterized by an exaggerated activation of T helper type 2 cells, IgE production and infiltration and activation of eosinophils. The results of studies conducted in recent years indicate that the deficit of naturally occurring Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ and Foxp3+CD25+CD8+ regulatory T cells and type 1 regulatory T cells plays a pivotal role in the development of this disease. Moreover, numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that a decrease in IL-10 production and an increase in IL-17 production have an important place in the pathophysiology of asthma. TGF-β is another important cytokine involved in this disease. TGF-β has a paradoxical status in relation to asthma pathogenesis because it seems to play a role in both suppressing and promoting asthma development. This review discusses briefly clinical and experimental data concerning the involvement of T regulatory cells and IL-10, IL-17 and TGF-β in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:27356599

  13. An integrated gene regulatory network controls stem cell proliferation in teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Ping Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial stem cells reside in specific niches that regulate their self-renewal and differentiation, and are responsible for the continuous regeneration of tissues such as hair, skin, and gut. Although the regenerative potential of mammalian teeth is limited, mouse incisors grow continuously throughout life and contain stem cells at their proximal ends in the cervical loops. In the labial cervical loop, the epithelial stem cells proliferate and migrate along the labial surface, differentiating into enamel-forming ameloblasts. In contrast, the lingual cervical loop contains fewer proliferating stem cells, and the lingual incisor surface lacks ameloblasts and enamel. Here we have used a combination of mouse mutant analyses, organ culture experiments, and expression studies to identify the key signaling molecules that regulate stem cell proliferation in the rodent incisor stem cell niche, and to elucidate their role in the generation of the intrinsic asymmetry of the incisors. We show that epithelial stem cell proliferation in the cervical loops is controlled by an integrated gene regulatory network consisting of Activin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, and Follistatin within the incisor stem cell niche. Mesenchymal FGF3 stimulates epithelial stem cell proliferation, and BMP4 represses Fgf3 expression. In turn, Activin, which is strongly expressed in labial mesenchyme, inhibits the repressive effect of BMP4 and restricts Fgf3 expression to labial dental mesenchyme, resulting in increased stem cell proliferation and a large, labial stem cell niche. Follistatin limits the number of lingual stem cells, further contributing to the characteristic asymmetry of mouse incisors, and on the basis of our findings, we suggest a model in which Follistatin antagonizes the activity of Activin. These results show how the spatially restricted and balanced effects of specific components of a signaling network can regulate stem cell

  14. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  15. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance of...... immune homeostasis and self-tolerance by counteracting the development and effector functions of potentially autoreactive T cells. We have in the previous APMIS review described the phenotype and physiology of Treg cells. The present overview deals with the thymic origin of Treg cells and their role in...... disease models such as autoimmune gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, we will consider some aspects of the therapeutic potential of Treg cells....

  16. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Aibo; Ma, Xiaopeng; Demarque, Maud; Jin, Wei; Xin, Huawei; Dejean, Anne; Dong, Chen

    2016-07-26

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells. PMID:27425617

  17. Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3+CD25+ T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-α treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3+CD25+ T cells is dependent on TGF-β but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3+CD25+ T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3+CD25+ T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-α treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

  18. Liver accumulation of Plasmodium chabaudi-infected red blood cells and modulation of regulatory T cell and dendritic cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia M Medeiros

    Full Text Available It is postulated that accumulation of malaria-infected Red Blood Cells (iRBCs in the liver could be a parasitic escape mechanism against full destruction by the host immune system. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo mechanism of this accumulation and its potential immunological consequences. A massive liver accumulation of P. c. chabaudi AS-iRBCs (Pc-iRBCs was observed by intravital microscopy along with an over expression of ICAM-1 on day 7 of the infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Phenotypic changes were also observed in regulatory T cells (Tregs and dendritic cells (DCs that were isolated from infected livers, which indicate a functional role for Tregs in the regulation of the liver inflammatory immune response. In fact, the suppressive function of liver-Tregs was in vitro tested, which demonstrated the capacity of these cells to suppress naive T cell activation to the same extent as that observed for spleen-Tregs. On the other hand, it is already known that CD4+ T cells isolated from spleens of protozoan parasite-infected mice are refractory to proliferate in vivo. In our experiments, we observed a similar lack of in vitro proliferative capacity in liver CD4+ T cells that were isolated on day 7 of infection. It is also known that nitric oxide and IL-10 are partially involved in acute phase immunosuppression; we found high expression levels of IL-10 and iNOS mRNA in day 7-infected livers, which indicates a possible role for these molecules in the observed immune suppression. Taken together, these results indicate that malaria parasite accumulation within the liver could be an escape mechanism to avoid sterile immunity sponsored by a tolerogenic environment.

  19. Reprint of "Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was lower (pTreg cell population (mean (%)±SE) was also lower (pasthma in neonates. PMID:25644204

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women impairs regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra Chary, A; Hemalatha, R; Seshacharyulu, M; Vasudeva Murali, M; Jayaprakash, D; Dinesh Kumar, B

    2015-03-01

    Regulatory T cells and IgE receptors (CD23 and CD21) on B cells were assessed in vitamin D deficient pregnant women. For this, 153 pregnant women were recruited from a government hospital and were categorized into three groups based on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) status. Regulatory T cell population (Treg cells) and CD23/CD21 expression on B cells were quantified by FACS ARIA II in maternal blood at third trimester; and the same parameters were evaluated in cord blood soon after delivery. In addition, TGF β and IL-10 were quantified in maternal and cord blood by using Milliplex kits. In a representative sample of eight women from each group (vitamin D sufficient, insufficient and deficient), placental tissues were processed for mRNA expressions of vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoic acid receptor (RXR), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) and vitamin D regulating enzymes. Of the 153 pregnant women, 18 were sufficient (≥30 ng/mL), 55 were insufficient (20-29 ng/mL) and 80 were deficient (≤19 ng/mL) for 25(OH)D3 status. The maternal blood Treg cell population (mean (%)± SE) was lower (pTreg cell population (mean (%)± SE) was also lower (pasthma in neonates. PMID:25448751

  1. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10-/- cell transfer-induced colitis progression. → Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. → Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10)-/- mice. IL-10-/- cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  2. Interleukin-6 controls uterine Th9 cells and CD8(+) T regulatory cells to accelerate parturition in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Olson, David M; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a determinant of the timing of parturition and birth in mice. We previously demonstrated that genetic IL6 deficiency delays parturition by ~24 h, and this is restored by administration of exogenous IL6. In this study, we have investigated whether IL6 influences the number or phenotypes of T cells or other leukocytes in uterine decidual tissue at the maternal-fetal interface. In late gestation, decidual leukocytes in Il6 null mutant (Il6(-/-)) mice exhibit an altered profile, characterized by reduced numbers of cells expressing the monocyte/macrophage marker F4/80 or the T-cell marker CD4, increased cells expressing the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD49b or the dendritic cell marker CD11c, but no change in cells expressing the neutrophil marker Ly6G. These changes are specific to late pregnancy, as similar differences in decidual leukocytes were not evident in mid-gestation Il6(-/-) mice. The IL6-regulated changes in decidual NK and dendritic cells appear secondary to local recruitment, as no comparable changes occurred in peripheral blood of Il6(-/-) mice. When exogenous IL6 was administered to restore normal timing of parturition, a partial reversal of the altered leukocyte profile was observed, with a 10% increase in the proportion of decidual CD4(+) T cells, a notable 60% increase in CD8(+) T cells including CD8(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and a 60% reduction in CD4(+)IL9(+) Th9 cells. Together these findings suggest that IL6-controlled accumulation of decidual CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) regulatory T cells, with an associated decline in decidual Th9 cells, is instrumental for progressing parturition in mice. PMID:26073576

  3. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  4. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Mathian

    Full Text Available A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV high dose methylprednisolone (MP on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE.We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1 naïve Treg (nTreg FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2 effector Treg (eTreg FoxP3highCD45RA- cells; and (3 non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA- cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0 and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8. The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score.Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53-8.43 at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83-14.60 at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0, 4.64% (0.50-12.40 at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1 and 7.50% (1.02-20.70 at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2, and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20-17.70 at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03-9.72 at day 2 (p = 0.005; nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2.IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE.

  5. Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Differences in Site-specific Cell Fate Determination in Mammalian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan eErtaylan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis - the generation of new neurons - is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a and Nr3c1.We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report thirty-one candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar - Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2 - Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact.Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis.

  6. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: T-regulatory cells and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2006-05-01

    Activation-induced cell death, anergy, or immune response modulation by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. Genetic predisposition and environmental instructions tune thresholds for the activation of T cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident tissue cells in allergic diseases. Skewing allergen-specific effector T cells to a Treg-cell phenotype seems to be crucial in maintaining a healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-specific immunotherapy. The Treg-cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T-cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of T-helper 1- and T-helper 2-type cytokines. Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, including cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and cell surface molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1, and histamine receptor 2. The increased levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production while simultaneously increasing the production of noninflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms on T cells, regulation of antibody isotypes, and suppression of effector cells. The application of current knowledge of Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches to the prevention and cure of allergic disease. PMID:16701141

  7. Cinnamon Ameliorates Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice via Regulatory T Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Susanta Mondal; Kalipada Pahan

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material used for centuries throughout the world. Here, we have explored a novel use of cinnamon powder in protecting Tregs and treating the disease process of experiment...

  8. Peripheral blood T Regulatory cell counts may not predict transplant rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Li; Zhang Jie; Zhang Chuntao; Shan Juan; Huang Yuchuan; Li Shengfu; Li Youping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent evidence shows that allograft survival rates show a positive correlation with the number of circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs). This study investigated both the number and the cytokine profiles exhibited by Foxp3+ Tregs in blood, spleen and lymph nodes of Lewis rat recipients of BN rat cardiac allografts after a single-dose of Rapamycin (RAPA). Results Rats were divided into three groups: control group (containing healthy control and acute rejection group), and ...

  9. Adipose tissue macrophages induce PPARγ-high FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Toshiharu Onodera; Atsunori Fukuhara; Myoung Ho Jang; Jihoon Shin; Keita Aoi; Junichi Kikuta; Michio Otsuki; Masaru Ishii; Iichiro Shimomura

    2015-01-01

    Numerous regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in adipose tissues compared with other lymphoid or non-lymphoid tissues. Adipose Tregs regulate inflammatory state and insulin sensitivity. However, the mechanism that maintains Tregs in adipose tissue remains unclear. Here, we revealed the contribution of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) to the induction and proliferation of adipose Tregs. ATMs isolated from mice under steady state conditions induced Tregs with high expression of PPARγ compare...

  10. Subsets of human CD4+ regulatory T cells express the peripheral homing receptor CXCR3

    OpenAIRE

    Hoerning, André; Koss, Kerith; Datta, Dipak; Boneschansker, Leonard; Jones, Caroline N.; Wong, Ian Y.; Irimia, Daniel; Calzadilla, Katiana; Benitez, Fanny; Hoyer, Peter F.; Harmon, William E.; Briscoe, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) migrate into peripheral sites of inflammation such as allografts undergoing rejection, where they serve to suppress the immune response. In this study, we find that ~30–40% of human CD25hi FOXP3+ CD4+ Tregs express the peripheral CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) and that this subset has potent immunoregulatory properties. Consistently, we observed that proliferative responses as well as IFN-γ production were significantly higher using CXCR3-depleted versus undeplete...

  11. Characterization of the 17 strains of regulatory T cell-inducing human-derived Clostridia

    OpenAIRE

    Narushima, Seiko; Sugiura, Yuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Atarashi, Koji; Hattori, Masahira; Suematsu, Makoto; Honda, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays important roles in the development of the host immune system. We have previously shown that a combination of 46 strains of commensal Clostridia isolated from conventionally reared mice can induce the accumulation of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in the mouse colonic lamina propria. Subsequently, we succeeded in isolating and selecting 17 strains of Clostridia from a healthy human fecal sample that can significantly increase the number and function of colonic Tr...

  12. Optimal isolation of functional Foxp3+ induced regulatory T cells using DEREG mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Baru, Abdul Mannan; Untucht, Christopher; Ganesh, Venkateswaran; Hesse, Christina; Mayer, Christian T.; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3 reporter mice including DEREG (DEpletion of REGulatory T cells) mice have greatly helped in exploring the biology of Foxp3(+) Tregs. DEREG mice express a DTR-eGFP fusion protein under the control of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-encoded Foxp3 promoter, allowing the viable isolation and inducible depletion of Foxp3(+) Tregs. Adaptive Tregs differentiated in vitro to express Foxp3 (iTregs) are gaining high interest as potential therapeutics for inflammatory conditions such as au...

  13. Regulatory Networks that Direct the Development of Specialized Cell Types in the Drosophila Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Lovato, TyAnna L.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila cardiac tube was once thought to be a simple linear structure, however research over the past 15 years has revealed significant cellular and molecular complexity to this organ. Prior reviews have focused upon the gene regulatory networks responsible for the specification of the cardiac field and the activation of cardiac muscle structural genes. Here we focus upon highlighting the existence, function, and development of unique cell types within the dorsal vessel, and discuss th...

  14. Regulatory T Cells and IL-10 Independently Counterregulate Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses Induced by Transcutaneous Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela Stein; Michael Weber; Steve Prüfer; Beate Schmid; Edgar Schmitt; Hans-Christian Probst; Ari Waisman; Peter Langguth; Hansjörg Schild; Markus P Radsak

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The imidazoquinoline derivate imiquimod induces inflammatory responses and protection against transplanted tumors when applied to the skin in combination with a cognate peptide epitope (transcutaneous immunization, TCI). Here we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and the suppressive cytokine IL-10 in restricting TCI-induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TCI was performed with an ointment containing the TLR7 agonist imiqui...

  15. Regulatory T Cell Immunotherapy for Type 1 Diabetes: A Step Closer to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Gautier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Regulatorycell (Treg) therapy has shown promises in experimental models of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases. Now, Bluestone et al. (2015) report in a phase 1, dose-escalation study that ex vivo-expanded autologous polyclonal Treg therapy is safe and well tolerated in adult patients with recent-onset T1D. PMID:26863486

  16. Regulatory T-cell stability and plasticity in mucosal and systemic immune systems

    OpenAIRE

    Murai, M.; Krause, P.; Cheroutre, H.; Kronenberg, M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) express the forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and suppress pathological immune responses against self and foreign antigens, including commensal microorganisms. Foxp3 has been proposed as a master key regulator for Treg, required for their differentiation, maintenance, and suppressive functions. Two types of Treg have been defined. Natural Treg (nTreg) are usually considered to be a separate sublineage arising during thymus differentiation. Induced Treg (iT...

  17. A major role for Bim in regulatory T cell homeostasis1

    OpenAIRE

    Chougnet, Claire A.; Tripathi, Pulak; Lages, Celine S.; Raynor, Jana; Sholl, Allyson; Fink, Pamela; Plas, David R.; Hildeman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that regulatory T cells (Treg) accumulate dramatically in aged animals and negatively impact the ability to control persistent infection. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the age-dependent accrual of Treg remain unclear. Here, we show that Treg accumulation with age is progressive and likely not the result of increased thymic output, increased peripheral proliferation, nor from enhanced peripheral conversion. Instead, we found that Treg from aged mice are more res...

  18. Regulatory T cells in health and disease : putting the pieces together

    OpenAIRE

    Vercoulen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) are indispensable for immune balance. In patients with autoimmunity, Treg are either present in lower numbers or not functioning properly and, therefore, inflammation is not suppressed. In murine models and in human studies increase of Treg frequency or function suppresses autoimmunity. Therefore, Treg are important candidates for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory diseases. In order to develop a safe therapy utilizing Treg, it is important to know h...

  19. Control of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cell-intrinsic Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Wang, Sen; Georgiev, Peter; Sefik, Esen; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-11-01

    Receptors of the Notch family direct the differentiation of helper T cell subsets, but their influence on regulatory T cell (T(reg) cell) responses is obscure. We found here that lineage-specific deletion of components of the Notch pathway enhanced T(reg) cell-mediated suppression of type 1 helper T cell (T(H)1 cell) responses and protected against their T(H)1 skewing and apoptosis. In contrast, expression in T(reg) cells of a gain-of-function transgene encoding the Notch1 intracellular domain resulted in lymphoproliferation, exacerbated T(H)1 responses and autoimmunity. Cell-intrinsic canonical Notch signaling impaired T(reg) cell fitness and promoted the acquisition by T(reg) cells of a T(H)1 cell-like phenotype, whereas non-canonical Notch signaling dependent on the adaptor Rictor activated the kinase AKT-transcription factor Foxo1 axis and impaired the epigenetic stability of Foxp3. Our findings establish a critical role for Notch signaling in controlling peripheral T(reg) cell function. PMID:26437242

  20. Deletion of CTLA-4 on regulatory T cells during adulthood leads to resistance to autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Alison M; Lovitch, Scott B; Sage, Peter T; Juneja, Vikram R; Lee, Youjin; Trombley, Justin D; Arancibia-Cárcamo, Carolina V; Sobel, Raymond A; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2015-09-21

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of T cell responses. Germline Ctla4 deficiency is lethal, making investigation of the function of CTLA-4 on mature T cells challenging. To elucidate the function of CTLA-4 on mature T cells, we have conditionally ablated Ctla4 in adult mice. We show that, in contrast to germline knockout mice, deletion of Ctla4 during adulthood does not precipitate systemic autoimmunity, but surprisingly confers protection from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and does not lead to increased resistance to MC38 tumors. Deletion of Ctla4 during adulthood was accompanied by activation and expansion of both conventional CD4(+)Foxp3(-) (T conv) and regulatory Foxp3(+) (T reg cells) T cell subsets; however, deletion of CTLA-4 on T reg cells was necessary and sufficient for protection from EAE. CTLA-4 deleted T reg cells remained functionally suppressive. Deletion of Ctla4 on T reg cells alone or on all adult T cells led to major changes in the Ctla4 sufficient T conv cell compartment, including up-regulation of immunoinhibitory molecules IL-10, LAG-3 and PD-1, thereby providing a compensatory immunosuppressive mechanism. Collectively, our findings point to a profound role for CTLA-4 on T reg cells in limiting their peripheral expansion and activation, thereby regulating the phenotype and function of T conv cells. PMID:26371185

  1. Involvement of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wen-bo; LI Ying; LIU Xin; ZHANG Ling-yan; WANG Xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoietic activity. However, there is no information about the effect of Treg cells in the pathogenesis of polycythaemia vera (PV).Methods In this study, we investigated the percentage and function of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of 21 PV patients and 25 healthy donors. Treg cells were identified and characterized as CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ by flow cytometry.The suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was assessed by the proliferation and cytokine secretion of the co-cultured CD4+CD25- fractions.Results The results showed that the percentage of Treg cells in the peripheral blood of PV patients significantly increased compared to healthy controls ((10.93±4.02)% vs (5.86±1.99)%, P <0.05). Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of FOXP3 was higher in CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Coordinately, when co-cultured with the activated CD4+CD25-cells, the CD4+CD25+ Treg cells showed enhanced suppressive function in PV. Yet, the underlying mechanism for the increased frequency and function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells is still to be clarified.Conclusion Treg cells expansion might account for the abnormal T cell immunity in PV patients and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of PV.

  2. Involvement of regulatory volume decrease in the migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wen MAO; Li Xin CHEN; Li Wei WANG; Tim JACOB; Xue Rong SUN; Hui LI; Lin Yan ZHU; Pan LI; Ping ZHONG; Si Huai NIE

    2005-01-01

    The transwell chamber migration assay and CCD digital camera imaging techniques were used to investigate the relationship between regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and cell migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2Z cells). Both migrated and non-migrated CNE-2Z cells, when swollen by 47% hypotonic solution, exhibited RVD which was inhibited by extracellular application of chloride channel blockers adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen. However, RVD rate in migrated CNE-2Z cells was bigger than that of non-migrated cells and the sensitivity of migrated cells to NPPB and tamoxifen was higher than that of nonmigrated cells. ATP, NPPB and tamoxifen also inhibited migration of CNE-2Z cells. The inhibition of migration was positively correlated to the blockage of RVD, with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.99, suggesting a functional relationship between RVD and cell migration. We conclude that RVD is involved in cell migration and RVD may play an important role in migratory process in CNE-2Z cells.

  3. Suppression of HIV Replication by CD8+ Regulatory T-Cells in Elite Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Kang, Jun; Fan, Jianhua; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in the Chinese macaque model that an oral vaccine made of inactivated SIV and Lactobacillus plantarum induced CD8+ regulatory T-cells, which suppressed the activation of SIV+CD4+ T-cells, prevented SIV replication, and protected macaques from SIV challenges. Here, we sought whether a similar population of CD8+ T-regs would induce the suppression of HIV replication in elite controllers (ECs), a small population (3‰) of HIV-infected patients with undetectable HIV replication. For that purpose, we investigated the in vitro antiviral activity of fresh CD8+ T-cells on HIV-infected CD4+ T-cells taken from 10 ECs. The 10 ECs had a classical genomic profile: all of them carried the KIR3DL1 gene and 9 carried at least 1 allele of HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile (i.e., with an isoleucine residue at position 80). In the nine HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile-positive patients, we demonstrated a strong viral suppression by KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells that required cell-to-cell contact to switch off the activation signals in infected CD4+ T-cells. KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells withdrawal and KIR3DL1 neutralization by a specific anti-killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) antibody inhibited the suppression of viral replication. Our findings provide the first evidence for an instrumental role of KIR-expressing CD8+ regulatory T-cells in the natural control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27148256

  4. Identification of two regulatory elements controlling Fucosyltransferase 7 transcription in murine CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Matthias; Ratsch, Boris A; Mardahl, Maibritt; Schröter, Micha F; Engelbert, Dirk; Triebus, Julia; Hamann, Alf; Syrbe, Uta

    2014-11-01

    Fucosyltransferase VII encoded by the gene Fut7 is essential in CD4(+) T cells for the generation of E- and P-selectin ligands (E- and P-lig) which facilitate recruitment of lymphocytes into inflamed tissues and into the skin. This study aimed to identify regulatory elements controlling the inducible Fut7 expression in CD4(+) T cells that occurs upon activation and differentiation of naive T cells into effector cells. Comparative analysis of the histone modification pattern in non-hematopoetic cells and CD4(+) T cell subsets revealed a differential histone modification pattern within the Fut7 locus including a conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) identified by cross-species conservation comparison suggesting that regulatory elements are confined to this region. Cloning of the CNS located about 500 bp upstream of the Fut7 locus, into a luciferase reporter vector elicited reporter activity after transfection of the αβ-WT T cell line, but not after transfection of primary murine CD4(+) Th1 cells. As quantification of different Fut7 transcripts revealed a predominance of transcripts lacking the first exons in primary Th1 cells we searched for an alternative promoter. Cloning of an intragenic region spanning a 1kb region upstream of exon 4 into an enhancer-containing vector indeed elicited promoter activity. Interestingly, also the CNS enhanced activity of this intragenic minimal promoter in reporter assays in primary Th1 cells suggesting that both elements interact in primary CD4(+) T cells to induce Fut7 transcription. PMID:24915132

  5. Cell therapy medicinal product regulatory framework in Europe and its application for MSC based therapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis eAncans

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs, including cell therapy products, form a new class of medicines in the European Union. Since ATMPs are at the forefront of scientific innovation in medicine, specific regulatory framework has been developed for these medicines and implemented from 2009. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT has been established at European Medicines Agency (EMA for centralized classification, certification and evaluation procedures, and other ATMP related tasks. Guidance documents, initiatives and interaction platforms are available to make the new framework more accessible for small and medium-sized enterprises, academia, hospitals and foundations. Good understanding of centralised and national components of the regulatory system is required to plan product development. It is in the best interests of cell therapy developers to utilise provided resources starting with the preclinical stage. Whilst there have not been mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based medicine authorisations in the EU, three MSC products have received marketing approval in other regions since 2011. Information provided on regulatory requirements, procedures and initiatives is aimed to facilitate MSC based medicinal product development and authorisation in the EU.

  6. Prediction and Validation of Gene Regulatory Elements Activated During Retinoic Acid Induced Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandi, Zoltan; Horvath, Attila; Nagy, Peter; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development is a multistep process involving activation and repression of many genes. Enhancer elements in the genome are known to contribute to tissue and cell-type specific regulation of gene expression during the cellular differentiation. Thus, their identification and further investigation is important in order to understand how cell fate is determined. Integration of gene expression data (e.g., microarray or RNA-seq) and results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide studies (ChIP-seq) allows large-scale identification of these regulatory regions. However, functional validation of cell-type specific enhancers requires further in vitro and in vivo experimental procedures. Here we describe how active enhancers can be identified and validated experimentally. This protocol provides a step-by-step workflow that includes: 1) identification of regulatory regions by ChIP-seq data analysis, 2) cloning and experimental validation of putative regulatory potential of the identified genomic sequences in a reporter assay, and 3) determination of enhancer activity in vivo by measuring enhancer RNA transcript level. The presented protocol is detailed enough to help anyone to set up this workflow in the lab. Importantly, the protocol can be easily adapted to and used in any cellular model system. PMID:27403939

  7. CD8+ CD205+ splenic dendritic cells are specialized to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Dudziak, Diana; Heidkamp, Gordon F; Fiorese, Christopher; Bonito, Anthony J.; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2008-01-01

    Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T reg) mediate immunological self-tolerance and suppress immune responses. A subset of dendritic cells (DCs) in the intestine is specialized to induce T reg in a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and retinoic acid (RA) dependent manner to allow for oral tolerance. Here we compare two major DC subsets from mouse spleen. We find that CD8+ DEC-205/CD205+ DCs, but not the major fraction of CD8− dendritic cell inhibitory receptor-2 (DCIR2)+ DCs, induce function...

  8. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) tunes T regulatory cell development and is required for suppressive function1

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Weishan; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Kannan, Arun K.; Huang, Lu; August, Avery

    2014-01-01

    ITK is a key signaling mediator downstream of TcR, mediating T cell positive selection, innate T cell and CD4+ Th2/Th17 differentiation. Here we show that ITK also negatively tunes IL-2-induced expansion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). In vivo, Treg abundance is inversely correlated with ITK expression, and iTreg development is inversely dependent on ITK kinase activity. While Treg development normally requires both hematopoietic and thymic MHC class 2 (MHC2) expression, the absence of I...

  9. Special regulatory T cell review: The resurgence of the concept of contrasuppression in immunoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The original concept of contrasuppression (CS) is evident in many immunoregulatory mechanisms. Inhibition of suppressor activity--CS--may be critical in microbial infection and autoimmunity. The major cellular interactions involved in suppression are the CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T regulatory cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1) : PD-L1/L2 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) : CD80/86 pathways. These cellular functions are affected by dendritic cells (DC) and a complex array of cytokines of which interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) are especially significant. Inhibition of regulatory cells, suppressor pathways or cytokines, is consistent with CS and can be attributed to IL-6, IL-2, PD-1 or PD-L-1 antibodies, blockade of CTLA-4 : CD80/86 pathway, inhibition of CD40-CD40L pathways, and TGF-beta, IL-10 antibodies. Contrasuppression may regulate innate immunity by Toll-like receptor expressed not only in non-cognate DC, monocytes, natural killer cells and gammadelta T cells but also in adaptive T cells. Furthermore, cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity may be facilitated by contrasuppressor activity. ''What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.'' From Romeo and Juliet (II, 47-8) W. Shakespeare. PMID:18154618

  10. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune-regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S;

    2016-01-01

    and at relapse. Regulatory B cells (Bregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was...... identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8(+):CD4......(+) and CD8(+):Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive...

  11. Regulatory T cell reprogramming toward a Th2-cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-03-17

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible (Il4ra(F709)) mice with enhanced interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral-blood allergen-specific Treg cells of food-allergic children. Selective augmentation of IL-4R signaling in Treg cells induced their reprogramming into Th2-like cells and disease susceptibility, whereas Treg-cell-lineage-specific deletion of Il4 and Il13 was protective. IL-4R signaling impaired the capacity of Treg cells to suppress mast cell activation and expansion, which in turn drove Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells. Interruption of Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells might thus provide candidate therapeutic strategies in food allergy. PMID:25769611

  12. Interferon-Beta Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Patients Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells for Immune Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bettina Trinschek; Felix Luessi; Catharina C. Gross; Heinz Wiendl; Helmut Jonuleit

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by imbalanced immune regulatory networks, and MS patient-derived T effector cells are inefficiently suppressed through regulatory T cells (Treg), a phenomenon known as Treg resistance. In the current study we investigated T cell function in MS patients before and after interferon-beta therapy. We compared cytokine profile, responsiveness for Treg-mediated suppression ex vivo and evaluated reactivity of T cells in vi...

  13. A gene regulatory network for root epidermis cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bruex

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The root epidermis of Arabidopsis provides an exceptional model for studying the molecular basis of cell fate and differentiation. To obtain a systems-level view of root epidermal cell differentiation, we used a genome-wide transcriptome approach to define and organize a large set of genes into a transcriptional regulatory network. Using cell fate mutants that produce only one of the two epidermal cell types, together with fluorescence-activated cell-sorting to preferentially analyze the root epidermis transcriptome, we identified 1,582 genes differentially expressed in the root-hair or non-hair cell types, including a set of 208 "core" root epidermal genes. The organization of the core genes into a network was accomplished by using 17 distinct root epidermis mutants and 2 hormone treatments to perturb the system and assess the effects on each gene's transcript accumulation. In addition, temporal gene expression information from a developmental time series dataset and predicted gene associations derived from a Bayesian modeling approach were used to aid the positioning of genes within the network. Further, a detailed functional analysis of likely bHLH regulatory genes within the network, including MYC1, bHLH54, bHLH66, and bHLH82, showed that three distinct subfamilies of bHLH proteins participate in root epidermis development in a stage-specific manner. The integration of genetic, genomic, and computational analyses provides a new view of the composition, architecture, and logic of the root epidermal transcriptional network, and it demonstrates the utility of a comprehensive systems approach for dissecting a complex regulatory network.

  14. Foxp3-deficient regulatory T cells do not revert into conventional effector CD4+ T cells but constitute a unique cell subset1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczma, Michal; Podolsky, Robert; Garge, Nikhil; Daniely, Danielle; Pacholczyk, Rafal; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Kraj, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Homeostasis in the immune system is maintained by specialized regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) expressing transcription factor Foxp3. According to the current paradigm, high affinity interactions between T cell receptors (TCRs) and class II MHC/peptide complexes in thymus “instruct” developing thymocytes to upregulate Foxp3 and become Treg cells. However, the loss or downregulation of Foxp3 does not disrupt the development of Treg cells but abrogates their suppressor function. Here we show that...

  15. Postoperative Regulatory T-Cells and Natural Killer Cells in Stage I Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Underwent Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Lobectomy or Thoracotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Sai Zhang; Sai-Bo Pan; Qing-Hua Lyu; Pin Wu; Guang-Ming Qin; Qi Wang; Zhong-Liang He; Xue-Ming He; Ming Wu; Gang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) play key roles in suppressing cell-mediated immunity in cancer patients. Little is known about perioperative Treg fluctuations in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy, as a minimal invasive procedure for treating NSCLC, may have relatively less impact on the patient′s immune system. This study aimed to observe perioperative dynamics of circulating Treg and natural killer (NK) cell levels in NSCLC patients who un...

  16. Tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle regulatory checkpoints, and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms "tumor suppressor′s genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.

  17. Advances in distinguishing natural from induced Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaohong; Chen, Maogen; Liu, Ya; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun; Brand, David; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    For more than a decade now, the regulatory T (Treg) cell has widely been considered as a critical subpopulation of T cells which can suppress effector T cell responses as well as suppressing the activity of other immune cells, such as mast cell, dendritic cells, and B cells. Treg cells have been broadly characterized as comprising of two main populations: thymus-derived natural Treg (nTreg) cells, and peripherally generated induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Both subsets have similar phenotypic characteristics and comparable suppressive function against T cell-mediated immune response and diseases. However, both Foxp3 positive Treg subsets exhibit some specific differences such as different mRNA transcripts and protein expression, epigenetic modification, and stability. These subtle differences reinforce the notion that they represent unique and distinct subsets. Accurately distinguishing iTregs from nTregs will help to clarify the biological features and contributions of each Treg subsets in peripheral tolerance, autoimmunity and tumor immunity. One difficult problem is that it has not been possible to distinguish iTregs from nTregs using surface markers until two recent articles were published to address this possibility. This review will focus on very recent advances in using molecular markers to differentiate these Treg subsets. PMID:23329997

  18. Effect of house dust mite immunotherapy on interleukin-10-secreting regulatory T cells in asthmatic children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; XIANG Li; LIU Yong-ge; WANG Yong-hong; SHEN Kun-ling

    2010-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous specific immunotherapy has been demonstrated to be capable of inducing T-cell regulatory response.Interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays a crucial role in inducing allergen-specific tolerance.However the reports of the changes of IL-10 in house dust mite (HDM)-specific immunotherapy were varied.The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells in asthma children successfully treated with HDM immunotherapy.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 27 patients following 1.5--2 years of HDM-specific immunotherapy (SIT, SIT group) and from 27 matched treated asthmatic children allergic to HDM (asthmagroup).After 48 hours of in vitro stimulation with HDM extracts, IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells were measured by four colour flow cytometry.Sera were tested for allergen-specific IgG4 and IgE using the Immuno CAP 100 assay.Results PBMCs from children undergoing immunotherapy following HDM extracts stimuli produced significantly more IL-10 compared with the asthma group.The frequency of iTreg cells and aTreg cells increased in SIT group after HDM stimulation, while it was not affected in the asthma group.Among the iTreg cells and aTreg cells, the frequency of CD4+CD25-Foxp3-IL-10+ Treg cells increased the most which was 2 times higher than that in unstimulated cultures in SIT group.The levels of HDM-specific IgG4 of SIT group was significiently higher compared with asthma group, but there was no correlation of the levels of HDM-specific IgG4 and IL-10 secreting Treg cells.Conclusions HDM-specific immunotherapy can successfully upregulate the frequency of IL-10-secreting Treg cells.CD4+CD25-Foxp3-IL-10+ Treg cells may play a key role in inducing the immune tolerance in HDM-specific immunotherapy.

  19. Oligodeoxynucleotides stabilize Helios-expressing Foxp3+ human T regulatory cells during in vitro expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong Chan; Bhairavabhotla, Ravikiran; Yoon, Jeongheon; Golding, Amit; Thornton, Angela M; Tran, Dat. Q.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and adoptive therapy, and using Foxp3+ Tregs has been proposed as treatment for autoimmune diseases. The clinical use of Tregs will require large numbers of cells and methods for in vitro expansion of Tregs are being developed. Foxp3+ Tregs can be divided into 2 subpopulations based on expression of the transcription factor, Helios. Foxp3+Helios+ Tregs (70%) are thymic-derived, whereas Foxp3+Helios− Tregs (30%) are induced in the perip...

  20. PARP-1 Controls Immunosuppressive Function of Regulatory T Cells by Destabilizing Foxp3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pin; Maruyama, Takashi; Konkel, Joanne E.; Abbatiello, Brittany; Zamarron, Brian; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Chen, Wanjun

    2013-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a nuclear enzyme and transcription factor that is involved in inflammatory response, but its role in T cell response remains largely unknown. We show here that PARP-1 regulates the suppressive function of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Specifically, Tregs in mice with a null mutation of the PARP-1 gene (PARP-1–/–) showed significantly stronger suppressive activity than did wild-type Tregs in culture. We elucidate that this enhanced suppr...

  1. Convergences and Divergences of Thymus- and Peripherally Derived Regulatory T Cells in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Burocchi, Alessia; Colombo, Mario P.; Piconese, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg) is a common event characterizing the vast majority of human and experimental tumors and it is now well established that Treg represent a crucial hurdle for a successful immunotherapy. Treg are currently classified, according to their origin, into thymus-derived Treg (tTreg) or peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. Controversy exists over the prevalent mechanism accounting for Treg expansion in tumors, since both tTreg proliferation and de novo pTr...

  2. p38β, A novel regulatory target of Pokemon in hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Nannan; Cao, Deliang; Liu, Min; Tan, Ying; Jiang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene involved in various biological processes and cancer development, such as cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Pokemon is recognized as a transcription factor localized upstream of several oncogenes, regulating their expression. p38MAPKs act as key regulatory factors in cellular signaling pathways associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. p38β, a member of p38MAPK family, is closely correlated with tumorigenesis, but the mechanism of activation remains unclear. In this study, we found overexpression of Pokemon promoted the growth, migration and invasion of HepG2 cells. However, a p38 inhibitor SB202190 efficiently attenuated the promoting effect of Pokemon in the HepG2 cells. Targeted expression or silencing of Pokemon changed cellular p38β protein level and phosphorylation of downstream ATF2 in the p38 signaling pathway. Both dual luciferase report assay and ChIP assay suggested that p38β is a novel regulatory target of the transcription factor Pokemon and positively regulated by Pokemon in hepatic cells. PMID:23807508

  3. p38β, A Novel Regulatory Target of Pokemon in Hepatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene involved in various biological processes and cancer development, such as cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Pokemon is recognized as a transcription factor localized upstream of several oncogenes, regulating their expression. p38MAPKs act as key regulatory factors in cellular signaling pathways associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. p38β, a member of p38MAPK family, is closely correlated with tumorigenesis, but the mechanism of activation remains unclear. In this study, we found overexpression of Pokemon promoted the growth, migration and invasion of HepG2 cells. However, a p38 inhibitor SB202190 efficiently attenuated the promoting effect of Pokemon in the HepG2 cells. Targeted expression or silencing of Pokemon changed cellular p38β protein level and phosphorylation of downstream ATF2 in the p38 signaling pathway. Both dual luciferase report assay and ChIP assay suggested that p38β is a novel regulatory target of the transcription factor Pokemon and positively regulated by Pokemon in hepatic cells.

  4. Liver type I regulatory T cells suppress germinal center formation in HBV-tolerant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    The liver plays a critical role in inducing systemic immune tolerance, for example, during limiting hypersensitivity to food allergy and in rendering acceptance of allotransplant or even hepatotropic pathogens. We investigated the unknown mechanisms of liver tolerance by using an established hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, and found that these mice exhibited an antigen-specific tolerance toward peripheral HBsAg vaccination, showing unenlarged draining lymph node (DLN), lower number of germinal centers (GC), and inactivation of GC B cells and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Both in vivo and in vitro immune responses toward HBsAg were suppressed by mononuclear cells from HBV-carrier mice, which were CD4(+) Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1)-like cells producing IL-10. Using recipient Rag1(-/-) mice, hepatic Tr1-like cells from day 7 of HBV-persistent mice acquired the ability to inhibit anti-HBV immunity 3 d earlier than splenic Tr1-like cells, implying that hepatic Tr1-like cells were generated before those in spleen. Kupffer cell depletion or IL-10 deficiency led to impairment of Tr1-like cell generation, along with breaking HBV persistence. The purified EGFP(+)CD4(+) T cells (containing Tr1-like cells) from HBV-carrier mice trafficked in higher numbers to DLN in recipient mice after HBsAg vaccination, and subsequently inactivated both Tfh cells and GC B cells via secreting IL-10, resulting in impaired GC formation and anti-HB antibody production. Thus, our results indicate Tr1-like cells migrate from the liver to the DLN and inhibit peripheral anti-HBV immunity by negatively regulating GC B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:24089450

  5. Finding missing interactions of the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio eAzpeitia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOver the last few decades, the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche has become a model system for the study of plant development and the stem cell niche. Currently, many of the molecular mechanisms involved in root stem cell niche maintenance and development have been described. A few years ago, we published a gene regulatory network model integrating this information. This model suggested that there were missing components or interactions. Upon updating the model, the observed stable gene configurations of the root stem cell niche could not be recovered, indicating that there are additional missing components or interactions in the model. In fact, due to the lack of experimental data, gene regulatory networks inferred from published data are usually incomplete. However, predicting the location and nature of the missing data is a not trivial task. Here, we propose a set of procedures for detecting and predicting missing interactions in Boolean networks. We used these procedures to predict putative missing interactions in the A. thaliana root stem cell niche network model. Using our approach, we identified three necessary interactions to recover the reported gene activation configurations that have been experimentally uncovered for the different cell types within the root stem cell niche: 1 a regulation of PHABULOSA to restrict its expression domain to the vascular cells, 2 a self-regulation of WOX5, possibly by an indirect mechanism through the auxin signalling pathway and 3 a positive regulation of JACKDAW by MAGPIE. The procedures proposed here greatly reduce the number of possible Boolean functions that are biologically meaningful and experimentally testable and that do not contradict previous data. We believe that these procedures can be used on any Boolean network. However, because the procedures were designed for the specific case of the root stem cell niche, formal demonstrations of the procedures should be shown in future

  6. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A.; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for Treg-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in Treg cells than Tconv cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in Treg cells under inflammatory conditio...

  7. Regulatory T cells suppress systemic and mucosal immune activation to control intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcue, Ana; Coombes, Janine L; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main interface where the body encounters exogenous antigens. It is crucial that the local response here is tightly regulated to avoid an immune reaction against dietary antigens and commensal flora while still mounting an efficient defense against pathogens. Faults in establishing intestinal tolerance can lead to disease, inducing local and often also systemic inflammation. Studies in human as well as in animal models suggest a role for regulatory T cells (Tregs) in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Transfer of Tregs can not only prevent the development of colitis in animal models but also cure established disease, acting both systemically and at the site of inflammation. In this review, we discuss the major regulatory pathways, including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and their role in Treg-mediated control of systemic and mucosal responses. In addition, we give an overview of the known mechanisms of lymphocyte migration to the intestine and discuss how CD103 expression can influence the balance between regulatory and effector T cells. Further understanding of the factors that control the activity of Tregs in different immune compartments may facilitate the design of strategies to target regulation in a tissue-specific way. PMID:16903919

  8. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  9. The clinical correlation of regulatory T cells and cyclic adenosine monophosphate in enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    Full Text Available Brainstem encephalitis (BE and pulmonary edema (PE are notable complications of enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection.This study investigated the immunoregulatory characterizations of EV71 neurological complications by disease severity and milrinone treatment.Patients <18 years with virologically confirmed EV71 infections were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: the hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD or BE group, and the autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation or PE group. Cytokine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels, and the regulatory T cell (Tregs profiles of the patients were determined.Patients with ANS dysregulation or PE exhibited significantly low frequency of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3+ and CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells compared with patients with HFMD or BE. The expression frequency of CD4-CD8- was also significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE. Among patients with ANS dysregulation or PE, the expression frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ increased markedly after milrinone treatment, and was associated with reduction of plasma levels IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Plasma concentrations of cAMP were significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE compared with patients with HFMD or BE; however, cAMP levels increased after milrinone treatment.These findings suggested decreased different regulatory T populations and cAMP expression correlate with increased EV71 disease severity. Improved outcome after milrinone treatment may associate with increased regulatory T populations, cAMP expression and modulation of cytokines levels.

  10. 肌醇5'磷酸酶基因突变对K562细胞周期蛋白和Akt磷酸化的影响%Effects of SHIP gene mutation on cell cycle related proteins and phosphorylated Akt in K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琳; 罗建民; 刘小军; 温树鹏; 杨敬慈; 张敬宇

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of SHIP gene mutation on the cell cycle and its related gene expression in K562 cells.Methods The recombinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) containing F1V-SHIP gene was transfected into K562 cells.The transfection efficiency and cell cycle of K562/SHIP were assessed by flow cytometry (FCM).The proliferation of K562 ceils was detected by MTT assay,the mRNA levels of SHIP by real-time fluorescent relative-quantification reverse transcriptional PCR(FQ-PCR),and the protein levels of SHIP,CyclinDl,p21WAF1/CIPI and p27KIP1 by Western blot.Results Wild type SHIP inhibited K562 cell proliferation and caused a G0/G1 arrest [(34.2 ± 7.8) % vs (0.7 ± 8.3) % (P0.05).Conclusion ①wtSHIP gene can downregulate Akt phosphorylation and result in inhibition of cyclin D1 expression,up-regulating p27KIP1 and p21WIF1/CIPI expression,finally leading to the reduction of K562 cell proliferation,and inducing G0/G1 phase arrest.②SHIP gene suppresses the proliferation of K562,being dependent on its intact structure and function.%目的 从分子水平探讨肌醇5'磷酸酶(SHIP)基因突变对人白血病细胞系K562细胞周期及其相关基因表达的影响.方法 应用携带野生型和突变型SHIP及绿色荧光蛋白的慢病毒及空载体慢病毒质粒转染K562细胞,通过流式细胞术检测K562/SHIP细胞转染效率、细胞增殖指数及细胞周期变化;MTT法检测细胞增殖活性改变,实时荧光定量PCR(FQ-PCR)检测SHIP mRNA水平变化,Western blot检测各组K562细胞SHIP、细胞周期蛋白(cyclin)D1、p21WAF1/CIPI、P27KIP1蛋白表达水平及Akt磷酸化变化.结果 野生型SHIP基因能明显抑制K562细胞增殖,并产生明显的G0/G1期阻滞[G0/G1期细胞分别为(34.2±7.8)%和(0.7±8.3)%,P0.05].Western blot结果发现转染野生型SHIP基因后K562细胞Akt磷酸化和cyclin D1表达水平明显下降(P0.05).结论 ①野生型SHIP基因通过下调K562细胞Akt磷酸化

  11. Human and Mouse CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells at Steady State and during Interleukin-2 Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Churlaud, Guillaume; Pitoiset, Fabien; Jebbawi, Fadi; Lorenzon, Roberta; Bellier, Bertrand; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David

    2015-01-01

    International audience In addition to CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), CD8+ suppressor T cells are emerging as an important subset of regulatory T cells. Diverse populations of CD8+ T cells with suppressive activities have been described. Among them, a small population of CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells is found both in mice and humans. In contrast to thymic-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs, their origin and their role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are less understood. We repor...

  12. Future research and therapeutic applications of human stem cells: general, regulatory, and bioethical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liras Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is much to be investigated about the specific characteristics of stem cells and about the efficacy and safety of the new drugs based on this type of cells, both embryonic as adult stem cells, for several therapeutic indications (cardiovascular and ischemic diseases, diabetes, hematopoietic diseases, liver diseases. Along with recent progress in transference of nuclei from human somatic cells, as well as iPSC technology, has allowed availability of lineages of all three germ layers genetically identical to those of the donor patient, which permits safe transplantation of organ-tissue-specific adult stem cells with no immune rejection. The main objective is the need for expansion of stem cell characteristics to maximize stem cell efficacy (i.e. the proper selection of a stem cell and the efficacy (maximum effect and safety of stem cell derived drugs. Other considerations to take into account in cell therapy will be the suitability of infrastructure and technical staff, biomaterials, production costs, biobanks, biosecurity, and the biotechnological industry. The general objectives in the area of stem cell research in the next few years, are related to identification of therapeutic targets and potential therapeutic tests, studies of cell differentiation and physiological mechanisms, culture conditions of pluripotent stem cells and efficacy and safety tests for stem cell-based drugs or procedures to be performed in both animal and human models in the corresponding clinical trials. A regulatory framework will be required to ensure patient accessibility to products and governmental assistance for their regulation and control. Bioethical aspects will be required related to the scientific and therapeutic relevance and cost of cryopreservation over time, but specially with respect to embryos which may ultimately be used for scientific uses of research as source of embryonic stem cells, in which case the bioethical conflict may be further

  13. Immune intervention with T regulatory cells: past lessons and future perspectives for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Manuela; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2011-06-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are attacked and destroyed by the immune system. Although man-made insulin is life-saving, it is not a cure and it cannot prevent long-term complications. In addition, most T1D patients would do almost anything to achieve release from the burden of daily glucose monitoring and insulin injection. Despite the formation of very large and promising clinical trials, a means to prevent/cure T1D in humans remains elusive. This has led to an increasing interest in the possibility of using T cells with regulatory properties (Treg cells) as a biological therapy to preserve and restore tolerance to self-antigens. In the present review we will attempt to consolidate learning from the past and to describe what we now believe could in the future become a successful Treg-cell based immune intervention in T1D. PMID:21831659

  14. Boosting airway T-regulatory cells by gastrointestinal stimulation as a strategy for asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, D H; Judd, S; Thomas, J A; Larcombe, A N; Sly, P D; Holt, P G

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of atopic asthma is transient airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR) preceded by aeroallergen-induced Th-cell activation. This is preceded by upregulation of CD86 on resident airway dendritic cells (DCs) that normally lack competence in T-cell triggering. Moreover, AHR duration is controlled via T-regulatory (Treg) cells, which can attenuate CD86 upregulation on DC. We show that airway mucosal Treg/DC interaction represents an accessible therapeutic target for asthma control. Notably, baseline airway Treg activity in sensitized rats can be boosted by microbe-derived stimulation of the gut, resulting in enhanced capacity to control CD86 expression on airway DC triggered by aeroallergen and accelerated resolution of AHR. PMID:20668438

  15. Distinct Gene Regulatory Pathways for Human Innate versus Adaptive Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koues, Olivia I; Collins, Patrick L; Cella, Marina; Robinette, Michelle L; Porter, Sofia I; Pyfrom, Sarah C; Payton, Jacqueline E; Colonna, Marco; Oltz, Eugene M

    2016-05-19

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) serve as sentinels in mucosal tissues, sensing release of soluble inflammatory mediators, rapidly communicating danger via cytokine secretion, and functioning as guardians of tissue homeostasis. Although ILCs have been extensively studied in model organisms, little is known about these "first responders" in humans, especially their lineage and functional kinships to cytokine-secreting T helper (Th) cell counterparts. Here, we report gene regulatory circuitries for four human ILC-Th counterparts derived from mucosal environments, revealing that each ILC subset diverges as a distinct lineage from Th and circulating natural killer cells but shares circuitry devoted to functional polarization with their Th counterparts. Super-enhancers demarcate cohorts of cell-identity genes in each lineage, uncovering new modes of regulation for signature cytokines, new molecules that likely impart important functions to ILCs, and potential mechanisms for autoimmune disease SNP associations within ILC-Th subsets. PMID:27156452

  16. Engraftment of embryonic stem cells and differentiated progeny by host conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuqiong; Leveson-Gower, Dennis B; de Almeida, Patricia E; Pierini, Antonio; Baker, Jeanette; Florek, Mareike; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Kim, Byung-Su; Ke, Rong; Wu, Joseph C; Negrin, Robert S

    2015-03-24

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many medical conditions; however, their utility is limited by immune rejection. The objective of our study is to establish tolerance or promote engraftment of transplanted ESCs as well as mature cell populations derived from ESCs. Luciferase (luc(+))-expressing ESCs were utilized to monitor the survival of the ESCs and differentiated progeny in living recipients. Allogeneic recipients conditioned with fractioned total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) or TLI plus regulatory T cells (T(reg)) promoted engraftment of ESC allografts after transplantation. Following these treatments, the engraftment of transplanted terminally differentiated endothelial cells derived from ESCs was also significantly enhanced. Our findings provide clinically translatable strategies of inducing tolerance to adoptively transferred ESCs for cell replacement therapy of medical disorders. PMID:25801020

  17. FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: association with disease stage and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum, L M; Woetmann, A; Odum, Niels;

    2007-01-01

    FOXP3 is a unique marker for CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). In solid tumours, high numbers of Tregs are associated with a poor prognosis. Knowledge about the implications of Tregs for the behaviour of haematological malignancies is limited. In this study, skin biopsies from 86 patients with...... mycosis fungoides (MF) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) unspecified were analysed for the expression of FOXP3 on tumour cells and tumour-infiltrating Tregs. Labelling of above 10% of the neoplastic cells was seen in one case classified as an aggressive epidermotropic CD8+ cytotoxic CTCL. In the...... remaining 85 cases, the atypical neoplastic infiltrate was either FOXP3 negative (n=80) or contained only very occasional weakly positive cells (n=5). By contrast, all biopsies showed varying numbers of strongly FOXP3+ tumour-infiltrating Tregs. MF with early or infiltrated plaques had significantly higher...

  18. Perioperative dynamic alterations in peripheral regulatory T and B cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tianxiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intratumoral and circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs have been shown to be critical in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However there is limited knowledge on the alterations of regulatory B cells (Bregs. We here investigated perioperative dynamic alterations of peripheral circulating Tregs and Bregs in HCC patients to reveal the relationship between regulatory lymphocytes and its clinical implications. Methods 36 patients with HCC, 6 with chronic hepatitis B infection and 10 healthy donors were enrolled for this study. Frequencies of peripheral Tregs and Bregs were measured by flow cytometry with antibodies against CD4, CD25, CD127, CD19 and IL-10 before, and after radical surgery. Then, clinical informatics of HCC patients was achieved through Digital Evaluation Score System (DESS for the assessment of disease severity. Finally, we analysed correlations between digitalized clinical features and kinetics of circulating regulatory lymphocytes. Results Level of circulating CD4+CD25+CD127- Tregs in HCC patients was significantly lower than that in healthy donors and patients with chronic hepatitis B infection before surgery, but was increased after surgery. Preoperative level of CD19+ IL-10+ Bregs in HCC patients was also significantly lower than the other groups. However it dramatically was elevated right after surgery and remained elevated compared to controls (about 7 days after surgery, P = 0.04. Frequency of circulating Tregs was correlated with circulating leukocytes, ferritin, and clinical features suggesting tumor aggressiveness including portal vein thrombosis, hepatic vein involvement and advanced clinical stages. Frequency of circulating Bregs was associated with Hepatitis B e Antigen (HBeAg and Hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA copy number. In addition, DESS was significantly and positively correlated with other staging systems. Conclusion Frequencies of peripheral Tregs and Bregs in HCC patients

  19. CTLA-4 promotes Foxp3 induction and regulatory T cell accumulation in the intestinal lamina propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M J; Griseri, T; Johnson, A M F; Young, W; Powrie, F; Izcue, A

    2013-03-01

    Thymic induction of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells relies on CD28 costimulation and high-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) signals, whereas Foxp3 (forkhead box P3) induction on activated peripheral CD4(+) T cells is inhibited by these signals. Accordingly, the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) promoted, but was not essential for CD4(+) T-cell Foxp3 induction in vitro. We show that CTLA-4-deficient cells are equivalent to wild-type cells in the thymic induction of Foxp3 and maintenance of Foxp3 populations in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, but their accumulation in the colon, where Treg cells specific for commensal bacteria accumulate, is impaired. In a T cell-transfer model of colitis, the two known CTLA-4 ligands, B7-1 and B7-2, had largely redundant roles in inducing inflammation and promoting Treg cell function. However, B7-2 proved more efficient than B7-1 in inducing Foxp3 in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal an unappreciated role for CTLA-4 in establishing the Foxp3(+) compartment in the intestine. PMID:22910217

  20. Naturally Occurring Self-Reactive CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells: Universal Immune Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nafiseh Pakravan; Agheel Tabar Molla Hassan; Zuhair Muhammad Hassan

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring thymus-arisen CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered to play a central role in self-tolerance. Precise signals that promote the development of Treg cells remain elusive, but considerable evidence suggests that costimulatory molecules, cytokines, the nature of the TCR and the niche or the context in which the T cell encounters antigen in the thymus play important roles. Analysis of TCR from Treg cells has demonstrated that a large proportion of this population has a higher avidity to self-antigen in comparison with TCR from CD4+CD25- cells and that peripheral antigen is required for their development, maintenance, or expansion. Treg cells have been shown to undergo expansion in the periphery, likely regulated by the presence of self-antigen. Many studies have shown that the involvement of Treg cells in the tolerance induction is antigen-specific, even with MHC-mismatched,in transplantation/graft versus host disease (GVHD), autoimmunity, cancer, and pregnancy. Theses studies concluded a vital role for self-reactive Treg cells in maintenance of the body integrity. Based on those studies, we hypothesize that self-reactive Treg cells are shared among all healthy individuals and recognize same self-antigens and their TCR encodes for few dominant antigens of each organ which defines the healthy self. These dominant self antigens can be regarded as "universal immune code".

  1. Serotonin transporter protein overexpression and association to Th17 and T regulatory cells in lupoid leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi Goyonlo, Vahid; Elnour, Husameldin; Nordlind, Klas

    2014-03-01

    The immunopathogenesis of chronic non-healing Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis is challenging. There is a bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems, serotonin being an important mediator in this respect. Our aim was to study the role of the serotonin transporter protein (SERT) and its relation to T cell-related immune responses in lupoid leishmaniasis. Paraffin-embedded skin biopsies of 12 cases of lupoid and 12 cases of usual types of cutaneous leishmaniasis were investigated using immunohistochemistry regarding expression of SERT, Th1, Th2, Th17 and T regulatory cell (Treg) markers. SERT as well as Tregs and interleukin (IL)-17 positive cells were more prevalent while IL-5 (Th2) and interferon (IFN)-γ (Th1) expressing cells were less numerous in the lupoid tissue compared to those from the usual type of leishmaniasis. The majority of the SERT(+) cells were also tryptase(+) (mast cells). There was a positive correlation between a higher number of SERT(+) and IL-17(+) cells in the lupoid type, while lower numbers of SERT(+) cells were significantly related to lower percentages of CD25(+) cells in the usual type of leishmaniasis. These results might indicate a role for SERT, Th17 and Tregs in the pathogenesis of lupoid leishmaniasis. PMID:23989888

  2. The lysophosphatidylserine receptor GPR174 constrains regulatory T cell development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael J; Li, Chien-Ming; Xu, Ying; An, Jinping; Huang, Yong; Cyster, Jason G

    2015-06-29

    Regulatory T cell (T reg cell) numbers and activities are tightly calibrated to maintain immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. Here, we report that the lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) receptor GPR174 is abundantly expressed in developing and mature T reg cells. In mice that lacked this X-linked gene, T reg cell generation in the thymus was intrinsically favored, and a higher fraction of peripheral T reg cells expressed CD103. LysoPS could act in vitro via GPR174 to suppress T cell proliferation and T reg cell generation. In vivo, LysoPS was detected in lymphoid organ and spinal cord tissues and was abundant in the colon. Gpr174(-/Y) mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than wild-type mice, and GPR174 deficiency in T reg cells contributed to this phenotype. This study provides evidence that a bioactive lipid, LysoPS, negatively influences T reg cell accumulation and activity through GPR174. As such, GPR174 antagonists might have therapeutic potential for promoting immune regulation in the context of autoimmune disease. PMID:26077720

  3. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  4. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  5. Increased Frequency of Suppressive Regulatory T Cells and T-cell Mediated Antigen Loss Results in Murine Melanoma Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Shawn M.; Twitty, Christopher G.; Maston, Levi D.; Antony, Paul A.; Lim, May; Hu, Hong-Ming; Petrausch, Ulf; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Fox, Bernard A.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic treatment of large established tumors using immunotherapy has yielded few promising results. We investigated if adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells together with tumor-specific CD4+ T cells would mediate regression of large established B16BL6-D5 (D5) melanomas in lymphopenic Rag1−/− recipients devoid of regulatory T cells. The combined adoptive transfer of subtherapeutic doses of both TRP1-specific TCR transgenic Rag1−/− CD4+ T cells and gp100-specific TCR transgenic Rag1−/− CD8+ T cells into lymphopenic recipients, that received vaccination, led to regression of large (100–400 mm2) melanomas. The same treatment strategy was ineffective in lymphoreplete wt mice. Twenty-five percent of mice (15/59) had tumors recur (15–180 days post regression). Recurrent tumors were depigmented and had decreased expression of gp100, the epitope targeted by the CD8+ T cells. Mice with recurrent melanoma had increased CD4+Foxp3+ TRP1-specific T cells compared to mice that did not show evidence of disease. Importantly, splenocytes from mice with recurrent tumor were able to suppress the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of splenocytes from tumor-free mice. These data demonstrate that large established tumors can be treated by a combination of tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Additionally, recurrent tumors exhibited decreased antigen expression and were accompanied by conversion of the therapeutic tumor-specific CD4+ T cell population to a FoxP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cell population. PMID:22723522

  6. B regulatory cells are increased in hypercholesterolaemic mice and protect from lesion development via IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Asa C; Cross, Amanda J; Cole, Jennifer E; Blair, Paul A; Leib, Christoph; Goddard, Michael E; Rosser, Elizabeth C; Park, Inhye; Hultgårdh Nilsson, Anna; Nilsson, Jan; Mauri, Claudia; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Whilst innate B1-B cells are atheroprotective, adaptive B2-B cells are considered pro-atherogenic. Different subsets of B regulatory cells (B(reg)) have been described. In experimental arthritis and lupus-like disease, B(reg) are contained within the CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cell pool. The existence and role of B(reg) in vascular disease is not known. We sought to investigate the existence, identity and location of B(reg) in vascular disease. The representation of B2-B cell subsets in the spleens and lymph nodes (LNs) of Apolipoprotein E(-/-) (ApoE(-/-)) mice compared to controls was characterised by flow cytometry. Additionally, we utilised a model of neointima formation based on the placement of a perivascular collar around the carotid artery in ApoE(-/-) mice to ascertain whether B cells and B cell subsets confer protection against lesion development. Adoptive transfer of B cells was performed from wild type or genetically modified mice. We showed that CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cells are unexpectedly increased in the draining LNs of ApoE(-/-) mice. Adoptive transfer of LN-derived B2-B cells or purified CD21(hi)CD23(hi)CD24(hi) B cells to syngeneic mice reduced lesion size and inflammation without changing serum cholesterol levels. Follicular B2-B cells did not confer protection. IL-10 blockade or transfer of IL10-deficient B cells prevented LN-derived B cell-mediated protection. This is the first identification of a specific LN-derived B2-B(reg) subset that confers IL-10 mediated protection from neointima formation. This may open the way for immune modulatory approaches in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26063196

  7. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  8. Requirements for efficient cell-type proportioning: regulatory timescales, stochasticity and lateral inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuty, B; Kaneko, K

    2016-01-01

    The proper functioning of multicellular organisms requires the robust establishment of precise proportions between distinct cell types. This developmental differentiation process typically involves intracellular regulatory and stochastic mechanisms to generate cell-fate diversity as well as intercellular signaling mechanisms to coordinate cell-fate decisions at tissue level. We thus surmise that key insights about the developmental regulation of cell-type proportion can be captured by the modeling study of clustering dynamics in population of inhibitory-coupled noisy bistable systems. This general class of dynamical system is shown to exhibit a very stable two-cluster state, but also metastability, collective oscillations or noise-induced state hopping, which can prevent from timely and reliably reaching a robust and well-proportioned clustered state. To circumvent these obstacles or to avoid fine-tuning, we highlight a general strategy based on dual-time positive feedback loops, such as mediated through transcriptional versus epigenetic mechanisms, which improves proportion regulation by coordinating early and flexible lineage priming with late and firm commitment. This result sheds new light on the respective and cooperative roles of multiple regulatory feedback, stochasticity and lateral inhibition in developmental dynamics. PMID:27172110

  9. The Lupus Susceptibility Gene Pbx1 Regulates the Balance between Follicular Helper T Cell and Regulatory T Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Chul; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Titov, Anton A; Seay, Howard R; Li, Shiwu; Brusko, Todd M; Croker, Byron P; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Morel, Laurence

    2016-07-15

    Pbx1 controls chromatin accessibility to a large number of genes and is entirely conserved between mice and humans. The Pbx1-d dominant-negative isoform is more frequent in CD4(+) T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls. Pbx1-d is associated with the production of autoreactive T cells in mice carrying the Sle1a1 lupus-susceptibility locus. Transgenic (Tg) expression of Pbx1-d in CD4(+) T cells reproduced the phenotypes of Sle1a1 mice, with increased inflammatory functions of CD4(+) T cells and impaired Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis. Pbx1-d-Tg expression also expanded the number of follicular helper T cells (TFHs) in a cell-intrinsic and Ag-specific manner, which was enhanced in recall responses and resulted in Th1-biased Abs. Moreover, Pbx1-d-Tg CD4(+) T cells upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-21, and miR-155, which were implicated in Treg and follicular helper T cell homeostasis. Our results suggest that Pbx1-d impacts lupus development by regulating effector T cell differentiation and promoting TFHs at the expense of Tregs. In addition, our results identify Pbx1 as a novel regulator of CD4(+) T cell effector function. PMID:27296664

  10. Foxp3-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes liver allograft tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells in rats

    OpenAIRE

    QI, HAIZHI; Chen, Guangshun; Huang, Yaxun; Si, Zhongzhou; Li, Jiequn

    2015-01-01

    Background The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) is a master regulatory gene necessary for the development and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have recently emerged as promising candidates for cell-based immunosuppression/tolerance induction protocols. Thus, we hypothesized that MSC-based Foxp3 gene therapy would improve immunosuppressive capacity of MSC and induce donor-specific allograft tolerance in rat’s liver allograft model. Meth...

  11. Human mesenchymal stem cells elevate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells of asthmatic patients via heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-guo; Zhuan-sun, Yong-xun; Wen, Bing; Wu, Hao; Huang, Feng-ting; Ghimire, Hridaya bibhu; Ran, Pi-xin

    2013-09-01

    Up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a new target in the treatment of asthma. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can up-regulate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in vitro, meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. However the mechanism has not yet been adequately understood. Hence, we wondered what effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 made on regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from asthmatic patients and healthy controls were co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which were pretreated with Hemin (the revulsive of Heme Oxygenase-1), Protoporphyrin Ⅸ zinc (the inhibitor of Heme Oxygenase-1) and saline. The expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in MSCs was enhanced by Hemin and inhibited by Protoporphyrin  zinc in vitro. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 elevated the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells, meanwhile, inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 decreased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells as compared with mesenchymal stem cells alone. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Heme Oxygenase-1 contributed to the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells in asthma.  PMID:23893806

  12. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Toshihito [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Department of Digestive Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Sashinami, Hiroshi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Sato, Fuyuki; Kijima, Hiroshi [Department of Pathology and Bioscience, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Ishiguro, Yoh; Fukuda, Shinsaku [Department of Digestive Internal Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Yoshihara, Shuichi [Department of Glycomedicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Hakamada, Ken-Ichi [Department of Digestive Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Nakane, Akio, E-mail: a27k03n0@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10{sup -/-} cell transfer-induced colitis progression. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10){sup -/-} mice. IL-10{sup -/-} cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-{gamma}, IL-12, TNF-{alpha}, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor {gamma}t (ROR{gamma}t) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  13. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment

  14. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  15. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Mintao [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Peng [Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Cao, Hong [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yongzhen [The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Zheng; Su, Tingting [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-05-10

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  16. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  17. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Júnior

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (TREG cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163. In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  18. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita Júnior, D. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruvinel, W.M. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biomedicina, Universidade Católica de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Araujo, J.A.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G. [Disciplina de Imunologia Clínica e Alergia, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.E.C. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Departamento de Medicina, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-22

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25{sup +/high}CD127{sup Ø/low}FoxP3{sup +}, and effector T cells were defined as CD25{sup +}CD127{sup +}FoxP3{sup Ø}. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4{sup +}TREG and CD28{sup +}TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L{sup +}TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR{sup +}, HLA-DR{sup +}, OX40{sup +}, and CD45RO{sup +} cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L{sup +} cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L{sup +}TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease.

  19. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease

  20. Overexpression or silencing of FOXO3a affects proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells and expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Sang

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have been considered to be of great significance in therapeutic angiogenesis. Furthermore, the Forkhead box O (FOXO transcription factors are known to be important regulators of cell cycle. Therefore, we investigated the effects of changes in FOXO3a activity on cell proliferation and cell cycle regulatory proteins in EPCs. The constructed recombinant adenovirus vectors Ad-TM (triple mutant-FOXO3a, Ad-shRNA-FOXO3a and the control Ad-GFP were transfected into EPCs derived from human umbilical cord blood. Assessment of transfection efficiency using an inverted fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry indicated a successful transfection. Additionally, the expression of FOXO3a was markedly increased in the Ad-TM-FOXO3a group but was inhibited in the Ad-shRNA-FOXO3a group as seen by western blotting. Overexpression of FOXO3a suppressed EPC proliferation and modulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins including upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27(kip1 and downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. In the Ad-shRNA-FOXO3a group, the results were counter-productive. Furthermore, flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis suggested that the active mutant of FOXO3a caused a noticeable increase in G1- and S-phase frequencies, while a decrease was observed after FOXO3a silencing. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that FOXO3a could possibly inhibit EPC proliferation via cell cycle arrest involving upregulation of p27(kip1 and downregulation of CDK2, cyclin D1 and PCNA.

  1. A cell-regulatory mechanism involving feedback between contraction and tissue formation guides wound healing progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Valero

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound.

  2. The control of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenardo Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells are believed to play an important role in suppressing autoimmunity and maintaining peripheral tolerance. How their survival is regulated in the periphery is less clear. Here we show that Treg cells express receptors for gamma chain cytokines and are dependent on an exogenous supply of these cytokines to overcome cytokine withdrawal apoptosis in vitro. This result was validated in vivo by the accumulation of Treg cells in Bim-/- and Bcl-2 tg mice which have arrested cytokine deprivation apoptosis. We also found that CD25 and Foxp3 expression were down-regulated in the absence of these cytokines. CD25+ cells from Scurfy mice do not depend on cytokines for survival demonstrating that Foxp3 increases their dependence on cytokines by suppressing cytokine production in Treg cells. Our study reveals that the survival of Treg cells is strictly dependent on cytokines and cytokine producing cells because they do not produce cytokines. Our study thus, demonstrates that different gamma chain cytokines regulate Treg homeostasis in the periphery by differentially regulating survival and proliferation. These findings may shed light on ways to manipulate Treg cells that could be utilized for their therapeutic applications. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Avinash Bhandoola, Fred Ramsdell (nominated by Juan Carlos Zuniga-Pflucker and Anne Cooke.

  3. Functional and genomic analyses of FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells as regulatory T (Treg)-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOXP3, a forkhead transcription factor is essential for the development and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast to conversion of murine naive T cells to Tregs by transduction of Foxp3, it is controversial whether ectopic expression of FOXP3 in human CD4+ T cells is sufficient for acquisition of suppressive activity. Here, we show that retroviral transduction of FOXP3 induces a Treg phenotype in human leukemic CD4+ Jurkat-T cells, evidenced by increased expression of Treg-associated cell surface markers as well as inhibition of cytokine production. Furthermore, FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells suppress the proliferation of human CD4+CD25- T cells. Additionally, DNA microarray analysis identifies Treg-related genes regulated by FOXP3. Our study demonstrates that enforced expression of FOXP3 confers Treg-like properties on Jurkat-T cells, which can be a convenient and efficient Treg-like cell model for further study to identify Treg cell surface markers and target genes regulated by FOXP3

  4. Human Blood and Mucosal Regulatory T Cells Express Activation Markers and Inhibitory Receptors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lord, James D.; Shows, Donna M.; Chen, Janice; Thirlby, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Background FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for preventing intestinal inflammation. However, FOXP3+ T cells are paradoxically increased in the intestines of patients with the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). We determined whether these FOXP3+ cells in IBD patients share or lack the phenotype of such cells from patients without IBD. Methods We quantified and characterized FOXP3+ Treg populations, as well as FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, in ...

  5. Regulatory IgDhi B Cells Suppress T Cell Function via IL-10 and PD-L1 during Progressive Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaut, Robert G; Lamb, Ian M; Toepp, Angela J; Scott, Benjamin; Mendes-Aguiar, Carolina O; Coutinho, Jose F V; Jeronimo, Selma M B; Wilson, Mary E; Harty, John T; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Petersen, Christine A

    2016-05-15

    During visceral leishmaniasis (VL), Th1-based inflammation is induced to control intracellular parasites. Inflammation-based pathology was shown to be dampened by IL-10 and eventual programmed death 1-mediated T cell exhaustion. Cell type(s) responsible for the initiation of T cell-produced IL-10 during VL are unknown. CD19(+), CD5(-), CD1d(-), IgD(hi) regulatory B cells from healthy controls produced IL-10 in the absence of infection or stimulation, in contrast to IgD(lo/neg) B cells. IgD(hi) B cells may have a de novo versus induced regulatory program. The population of IgD(hi) B cells increased 3-fold as VL progressed. B cells from VL dogs were necessary and sufficient to suppress Th1 cell effector function. IgD(hi) B cells induced IL-10 production by T cells and IgD(lo) B cells. Blockage of B cell-specific PD-L1 restored Th1 responses. IgD(hi) regulatory B cells represent a novel regulatory B cell that may precipitate T cell exhaustion during VL. PMID:27076677

  6. Consumption of probiotics increases the effect of regulatory T cells in transfer colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emil Rathsach; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics may alter immune regulation. Recently, we showed that the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ influenced the activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate if L. acidophilus NCFM™ also affects the function of...... Tregs in vivo. METHODS: Development of colitis after transfer of CD4+CD25- T cells and protection from colitis by Tregs was studied in immunodeficient SCID mice which were simultaneously tube-fed with L. acidophilus NCFM™ or L. salivarius Ls-33 for 5 weeks. RESULTS: Probiotic-fed SCID mice transplanted...... with low numbers of Tregs in addition to the disease-inducing T cells were completely protected from colitis. This was in contrast to the control group, which showed intermediate levels of inflammation. In addition, feeding with probiotics lowered serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in both colitic...

  7. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  8. IL-10 and regulatory T cells cooperate in allergen-specific immunotherapy to ameliorate allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Livia; Maxeiner, Joachim; Meyer-Martin, Helen; Reuter, Sebastian; Finotto, Susetta; Klein, Matthias; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias; Taube, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Human studies demonstrated that allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) represents an effective treatment for allergic diseases. IT involves repeated administration of the sensitizing allergen, indicating a crucial contribution of T cells to its medicinal benefit. However, the underlying mechanisms of IT, especially in a chronic disease, are far from being definitive. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the suppressive mechanisms of IT in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma. OVA-sensitized mice were challenged with OVA or PBS for 4 wk. After development of chronic airway inflammation, mice received OVA-specific IT or placebo alternately to airway challenge for 3 wk. To analyze the T cell-mediated mechanisms underlying IT in vivo, we elaborated the role of T-bet-expressing Th1 cells, T cell-derived IL-10, and Ag-specific thymic as well as peripherally induced Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. IT ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in a chronic asthma model. Of note, IT even resulted in a regression of structural changes in the airways following chronic inhaled allergen exposure. Concomitantly, IT induced Th1 cells, Foxp3(+), and IL-10-producing Treg cells. Detailed analyses revealed that thymic Treg cells crucially contribute to the effectiveness of IT by promoting IL-10 production in Foxp3-negative T cells. Together with the peripherally induced Ag-specific Foxp3(+) Treg cells, thymic Foxp3(+) Treg cells orchestrate the curative mechanisms of IT. Taken together, we demonstrate that IT is effective in a chronic allergic disease and dependent on IL-10 and thymic as well as peripherally induced Ag-specific Treg cells. PMID:25527785

  9. Stat3 Programs Th17-Specific Regulatory T Cells to Control GN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Malte A.; Luig, Michael; Wegscheid, Claudia; Goerke, Boeren; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Brix, Silke R.; Yan, Isabell; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Hagl, Beate; Renner, Ellen D.; Tiegs, Gisa; Wiech, Thorsten; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    A pathogenic role for Th17 cells in inflammatory renal disease is well established. The mechanisms underlying their counter-regulation are, however, largely unknown. Recently, Th17 lineage-specific regulatory T cells (Treg17) that depend on activation of the transcription factor Stat3 were identified. We studied the function of Treg17 in the nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) model of crescentic GN. The absence of Treg17 cells in Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice resulted in the aggravation of NTN and skewing of renal and systemic immune responses toward Th17. Detailed analysis of Stat3-deficient Tregs revealed that the survival, activation, proliferation, and suppressive function of these cells remained intact. However, Tregs from Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacked surface expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6, which resulted in impaired renal trafficking. Furthermore, aggravation of NTN was reversible in the absence of Th17 responses, as shown in CD4Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacking both Treg17 and Th17 cells, suggesting that Th17 cells are indeed the major target of Treg17 cells. Notably, immunohistochemistry revealed CCR6-bearing Treg17 cells in kidney biopsy specimens of patients with GN. CCR6 expression on human Treg17 cells also appears dependent on STAT3, as shown by analysis of Tregs from patients with dominant-negative STAT3 mutations. Our data indicate the presence and involvement of Stat3/STAT3-dependent Treg17 cells that specifically target Th17 cells in murine and human crescentic GN, and suggest the kidney-specific action of these Treg17 cells is regulated by CCR6-directed migration into areas of Th17 inflammation. PMID:24511136

  10. Treatment of Graft-versus-Host Disease with Naturally Occurring T Regulatory Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trzonkowski, Piotr; Dukat-Mazurek, Anna; Bieniaszewska, Maria; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Dobyszuk, Anita; Juścińska, Jolanta; Dutka, Magdalena; Myśliwska, Jolanta; Hellmann, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    A significant body of evidence suggests that treatment with naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) is an appropriate therapy for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). GvHD is a major complication of bone marrow transplantation in which the transplanted immune system recognizes recipient tissues as a non-self and destroys them. In many cases, this condition significantly deteriorates the quality of life of the affected patients. It is also one of the most important causes of deat...

  11. Partial Regulatory T Cell Depletion Prior to Schistosomiasis Vaccination Does Not Enhance the Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Fan; Zhou, Sha; Xu, Zhipeng; Hoellwarth, Jason; Chen, Xiaojun; He, Lei; Zhang, Rongbo; Feng LIU; Wang, Jun; Su, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not only influence self-antigen specific immune responses, but also dampen the protective effect induced by a number of vaccines. The impact of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on vaccines against schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that is a major public health concern, however, has not been examined. In this study, a DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST) was constructed and its potential effects were...

  12. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika;

    2006-01-01

    /chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis, the...... authors found down regulation of the mRNA expression of the inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR1 and CXCR3 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL7. Also the transcripts for CCR9, CCL25, CCL17, and CXCL1 are found down regulated in protected compared with colitic animals. In addition, the authors...

  13. Characterization of T-regulatory cells, induced by immature dendritic cells, which inhibit enteroantigen-reactive colitis-inducing T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Kristensen, Nanna N; Kury, Evelyn;

    2004-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, derived from co-cultures of unfractionated CD4(+) T cells and immature dendritic cells (DC), suppress enteroantigen-induced proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. The DC-induced Treg cells are a mixture of CD25(+) (10-20%) and CD25(-) (80-90%) T cells. However, all the...... suppressor activity in vitro and in vivo resides in the CD25(+) T-cell subset. The CD25(+) DC-induced Treg cells can inhibit enteroantigen-induced proliferation in vitro through a transwell membrane, and their function does not appear to depend on previous activation. DC-induced CD25(+) Treg cells display a...... naive phenotype, expressing high levels of CD45RB and l-selectin (CD62L). In addition, the DC-induced Treg cells mediate a stronger suppressive activity than prototype CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The DC-induced Treg cells, and hereof purified CD25(+) and CD25(-) T-cell fractions, were co-injected into...

  14. T-bet regulates differentiation of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells in programmed cell death-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, M; Kondo, Y; Yokosawa, M; Tsuboi, H; Takahashi, S; Shibayama, S; Matsumoto, I; Sumida, T

    2015-02-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important role in peripheral T cell tolerance, but whether or not it affects the differentiation of helper T cell subsets remains elusive. Here we describe the importance of PD-1 in the control of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell activation and development of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) regulatory T cells (Tr(egs)). PD-1-deficient T cell-specific T-bet transgenic (P/T) mice showed growth retardation, and the majority died within 10 weeks. P/T mice showed T-bet over-expression, increased interferon (IFN)-γ production by CD4(+) T cells and significantly low FoxP3(+) T(reg) cell percentage. P/T mice developed systemic inflammation, which was probably induced by augmented Th1 response and low FoxP3(+) T(reg) count. The study identified a unique, previously undescribed role for PD-1 in Th1 and T(reg) differentiation, with potential implication in the development of Th1 cell-targeted therapy. PMID:25219397

  15. The Qa-1 Dependent CD8+ T Cell Mediated Regulatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The immune system has evolved a variety of regulatory mechanisms to ensure the peripheral self-tolerance as well as the optimal capacity to elicit effective anti-infection immunity. At present, there is no satisfactory conceptual framework to explain how the peripheral immunity is regulated at a biological system level, which enables the immune system to perform its essential functions to mount effective immunity to virtually any foreign antigens but avoid harmful immune responses to self. In this regard, during the past few years, an "affinity/avidity model of peripheral T cell regulation" has been proposed and tested, which opens up a new paradigm to understand how the peripheral immunity, to both self and foreign antigens, is regulated. The paradigm is based on the discovery of a subset CD8+ T cells with TCRs which specifically recognize a unique set of self-peptides presented by the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 differentially expressed on T cells as a function of the affinity/avidity of T cell activation.These Qa-1 restricted CD8+ T cells represent an example of how the immune system utilizes a unified mechanism to regulate adaptive immunity to both self and foreign antigens. Thus, by selectively down-regulating T cells of intermediate affinity/avidity, to any antigens, the immune system controls the adaptive immunity without the necessity to distinguish self from non-self in the periphery at the level of T cell regulation.

  16. XAF1 expression and regulatory effects of somatostatin on XAF1 in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chunde

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin prevents cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Downregulation of the XAF1 transcript may occur during the development of prostate cancer. It is interesting to evaluate the potential regulatory effects of somatostatin on XAF1 expression during the development of prostate cancer cells. Methods XAF1 mRNA and protein expression in human prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1, androgen dependent prostate cancer LNCaP, and androgen independent DU145 and PC3 cells were evaluated using RT-PCR and Western blot. The regulation of XAF1 mRNA and protein expression by somatostatin and its analogue Octreotide was evaluated. Results Substantial levels of XAF1 mRNA and proteins were detected in RWPE-1 cells, whereas prostate cancer cells LNCaP, DU145 and PC3 exhibited lower XAF1 expression. Somatostatin and Octreotide up-regulated XAF1 mRNA and protein expression in all prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions XAF1 down-regulation may contribute to the prostate cancer development. The enhanced XAF1 expression by somatostatin indicates a promising strategy for prostate cancer therapy.

  17. Role of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Arsenic Trioxide-induced Promyelocytic Leukemia Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chaoyun; Zhu, Dihan; Zhuo, Jianjiang; Li, Limin; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Zen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) has been shown to operate as a negative regulator in cancer cell survival. The mechanism underneath such function, however, remains poorly defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that overexpression of SIRPα in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells results in apoptosis possibly via inhibiting the β-catenin signaling pathway and upregulating Foxo3a. Pharmacological activation of β-catenin signal pathway attenuates apoptosis caused by SIRPα. Interestingly, we also find that the pro-apoptotic effect of SIRPα plays an important role in arsenic trioxide (ATO)-induced apoptosis in APL cells. ATO treatment induces the SIRPα protein expression in APL cells and abrogation of SIRPα induction by lentivirus-mediated SIRPα shRNA significantly reduces the ATO-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic study further shows that induction of SIRPα protein in APL cells by ATO is mediated through suppression of c-Myc, resulting in reduction of three SIRPα-targeting microRNAs: miR-17, miR-20a and miR-106a. In summary, our results demonstrate that SIRPα inhibits tumor cell survival and significantly contributes to ATO-induced APL cell apoptosis. PMID:27010069

  18. A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Mika; Gawel, Danuta R; Alfredsson, Lars; Baranzini, Sergio; Björkander, Janne; Blomgran, Robert; Hellberg, Sandra; Eklund, Daniel; Ernerudh, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Konstantinell, Aelita; Lahesmaa, Riita; Lentini, Antonio; Liljenström, H Robert I; Mattson, Lina; Matussek, Andreas; Mellergård, Johan; Mendez, Melissa; Olsson, Tomas; Pujana, Miguel A; Rasool, Omid; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Stenmarker, Margaretha; Tripathi, Subhash; Viitala, Miro; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Huan; Nestor, Colm E; Benson, Mikael

    2015-11-11

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorphisms. A gene regulatory network (GRN) was constructed by time series profiling of the transcriptomes and methylomes of human CD4(+) T cells during in vitro differentiation into four helper T cell lineages, in combination with sequence-based TF binding predictions. The TFs GATA3, MAF, and MYB were identified as early regulators and validated by ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) and small interfering RNA knockdowns. Differential mRNA expression of the TFs and their targets in T cell-associated diseases supports their clinical relevance. To directly test if the TFs were altered early in disease, T cells from patients with two T cell-mediated diseases, multiple sclerosis and seasonal allergic rhinitis, were analyzed. Strikingly, the TFs were differentially expressed during asymptomatic stages of both diseases, whereas their targets showed altered expression during symptomatic stages. This analytical strategy to identify early regulators of disease by combining GRNs with genome-wide association studies may be generally applicable for functional and clinical studies of early disease development. PMID:26560356

  19. Current status and regulatory perspective of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Kim, Dongyoon; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Park, Zewon; Choi, Min Joung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T) have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potent efficacy against terminal cancers. CAR-Ts are reported to exert higher efficacy than monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates, and act via mechanisms distinct from T cell receptor-engineered T cells. These cells are constructed by transducing genes encoding fusion proteins of cancer antigen-recognizing single-chain Fv linked to intracellular signaling domains of T cell receptors. CAR-Ts are classified as first-, second- and third-generation, depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. This review covers the current status of CAR-T research, including basic proof-of-concept investigations at the cell and animal levels. Currently ongoing clinical trials of CAR-T worldwide are additionally discussed. Owing to the lack of existing approved products, several unresolved concerns remain with regard to safety, efficacy and manufacturing of CAR-T, as well as quality control issues. In particular, the cytokine release syndrome is the major side-effect impeding the successful development of CAR-T in clinical trials. Here, we have addressed the challenges and regulatory perspectives of CAR-T therapy. PMID:26895243

  20. Freeze-thaw lysates of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells induce differentiation of functionally competent regulatory T cells from memory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Finney, Olivia C; Lawrence, Emma; Gray, Alice P; Njie, Madi; Riley, Eleanor M.; Walther, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring regulatory T (nTreg) cells derived from the thymus, functionally competent Treg cells can be induced in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes in response to TCR stimulation with cytokine costimulation. Using these artificial stimulation conditions, both naïve as well as memory CD4+ T cells can be converted into induced Treg (iTreg) cells, but the cellular origin of such iTreg cells in vivo or in response to more physiologic stimulation with pathogen-derive...

  1. Regulatory T cells and IL-10 independently counterregulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses induced by transcutaneous immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Stein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The imidazoquinoline derivate imiquimod induces inflammatory responses and protection against transplanted tumors when applied to the skin in combination with a cognate peptide epitope (transcutaneous immunization, TCI. Here we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (T(reg and the suppressive cytokine IL-10 in restricting TCI-induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TCI was performed with an ointment containing the TLR7 agonist imiquimod and a CTL epitope was applied to the depilated back skin of C57BL/6 mice. Using specific antibodies and FoxP3-diphteria toxin receptor transgenic (DEREG mice, we interrogated inhibiting factors after TCI: by depleting FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells we found that specific CTL-responses were greatly enhanced. Beyond this, in IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice or after blocking of IL-10 signalling with an IL-10 receptor specific antibody, the TCI induced CTL response is greatly enhanced indicating an important role for this cytokine in TCI. However, by transfer of T(reg in IL-10(-/- mice and the use of B cell deficient JHT(-/- mice, we can exclude T(reg and B cells as source of IL-10 in the setting of TCI. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We identify T(reg and IL-10 as two important and independently acting suppressors of CTL-responses induced by transcutaneous immunization. Advanced vaccination strategies inhibiting T(reg function and IL-10 release may lead the development of effective vaccination protocols aiming at the induction of T cell responses suitable for the prophylaxis or treatment of persistent infections or tumors.

  2. Chloroquine treatment enhances regulatory T cells and reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Thomé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The modulation of inflammatory processes is a necessary step, mostly orchestrated by regulatory T (Treg cells and suppressive Dendritic Cells (DCs, to prevent the development of deleterious responses and autoimmune diseases. Therapies that focused on adoptive transfer of Treg cells or their expansion in vivo achieved great success in controlling inflammation in several experimental models. Chloroquine (CQ, an anti-malarial drug, was shown to reduce inflammation, although the mechanisms are still obscure. In this context, we aimed to access whether chloroquine treatment alters the frequency of Treg cells and DCs in normal mice. In addition, the effects of the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with CQ on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE, an experimental model for human Multiple Sclerosis, was investigated as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55 peptide. C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally treated with chloroquine. Results show that the CQ treatment provoked an increase in Treg cells frequency as well as a decrease in DCs. We next evaluated whether prophylactic CQ administration is capable of reducing the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE. Our results demonstrated that CQ-treated mice developed mild EAE compared to controls that was associated with lower infiltration of inflammatory cells in the central nervous system CNS and increased frequency of Treg cells. Also, proliferation of MOG35-55-reactive T cells was significantly inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Similar results were observed when chloroquine was administrated after disease onset. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that CQ treatment promotes the expansion of Treg cells, corroborating previous reports indicating that chloroquine has immunomodulatory properties. Our results also show that CQ treatment suppress the inflammation in the CNS of

  3. Bifidobacterium breve attenuates murine dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases regulatory T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    Full Text Available While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition.

  4. Mesenteric IL-10-producing CD5(+) regulatory B cells suppress cow's milk casein-induced allergic responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Do Kyun; Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, Min Bum; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bokyung; Beaven, Michael A; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a hypersensitive immune reaction to food proteins. We have previously demonstrated the presence of IL-10-producing CD5(+) B cells and suggested their potential role in regulating cow's milk casein allergy in humans and IgE-mediated anaphylaxis in mice. In this study, we determined whether IL-10-producing CD5(+) regulatory B cells control casein-induced food allergic responses in mice and, if so, the underlying mechanisms. The induction of oral tolerance (OT) by casein suppressed casein-induced allergic responses including the decrease of body temperature, symptom score, diarrhea, recruitment of mast cells and eosinophils into jejunum, and other biological parameters in mice. Notably, the population of IL-10-producing CD5(+) B cells was increased in mesenteric lymph node (MLN), but not in spleen or peritoneal cavity (PeC) in OT mice. The adoptive transfer of CD5(+) B cells from MLN, but not those from spleen and PeC, suppressed the casein-induced allergic responses in an allergen-specific and IL-10-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of IL-10-producing CD5(+) B cells on casein-induced allergic response was dependent on Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Taken together, mesenteric IL-10-producing regulatory B cells control food allergy via Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and could potentially act as a therapeutic regulator for food allergy. PMID:26785945

  5. Suppression of SIV-specific CD4+ T cells by infant but not adult macaque regulatory T cells: implications for SIV disease progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J.; Abel, Kristina; McCune, Joseph M.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of regulatory T cells (T reg cells) on the course of HIV and SIV disease is unknown. T reg cells could suppress protective antiviral responses and accelerate disease progression. Alternatively, these cells might block T cell activation and thereby limit viral replication as well as activation-associated immunopathology. Given the higher frequency of T reg cells known to be present during human fetal ontogeny, such influences may be most important in the context of perinatal infecti...

  6. Gamma c-signaling cytokines induce a regulatory T cell phenotype in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprzycka, Monika; Zhang, Qian; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka;

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that malignant mature CD4(+) T lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) variably display some aspects of the T regulatory phenotype. Whereas seven cell lines representing a spectrum of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoproliferative disorders expressed...... that FOXP3-expressing cells were common among the CD7-negative enlarged atypical and small lymphocytes at the early skin patch and plaque stages. Their frequency was profoundly diminished at the tumor stage and in the CTCL lymph node lesions with or without large cell transformation. These results...... indicate that the T regulatory cell features are induced in CTCL T cells by common gamma chain signaling cytokines such as IL-2 and do not represent a fully predetermined, constitutive phenotype independent of the local environmental stimuli to which these malignant mature CD4(+) T cells become exposed....

  7. Regulatory T cell derived Exosomes: possible therapeutic and diagnostic tools in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akansha eAgarwal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released by many cells of the body. These small vesicles play an important part in intercellular communication both in the local environment and systemically, facilitating in the transfer of proteins, cytokines as well as miRNA between cells. The observation that exosomes isolated from immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs modulate the immune response has paved the way for these structures to be considered as potential immunotherapeutic reagents. Indeed clinical trials using DC derived exosomes to facilitate immune responses to specific cancer antigens are now underway. Exosomes can also have a negative effect on the immune response and exosomes isolated from regulatory T cells (Tregs and other subsets of T cells have been shown to have immune suppressive capacities. Here we review what is currently known about Treg derived exosomes and their contribution to immune regulation, as well as highlighting their possible therapeutic potential for preventing graft rejection, and their possible use as diagnostic tools to assess transplant outcome.

  8. Notch and TGFβ form a positive regulatory loop and regulate EMT in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiesi; Jain, Saket; Azad, Abul K; Xu, Xia; Yu, Hai Chuan; Xu, Zhihua; Godbout, Roseline; Fu, YangXin

    2016-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, the mechanisms that regulate EMT in EOC are not fully understood. Here, we report that activation of Notch1 induces EMT in EOC cells as evidenced by downregulation of E-cadherin and cytokeratins, upregulation of Slug and Snail, as well as morphological changes. Interestingly, activation of Notch1 increases TGFβ/Smad signaling by upregulating the expression of TGFβ and TGFβ type 1 receptor. Time course experiments demonstrate that inhibition of Notch by DAPT (a γ-secretase inhibitor) decreases TGFβ-induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads at late, but not at early, timepoints. These results suggest that Notch activation plays a role in sustaining TGFβ/Smad signaling in EOC cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch by DAPT decreases TGFβ induction of Slug and repression of E-cadherin and knockdown of Notch1 decreases TGFβ-induced repression of E-cadherin, indicating that Notch is required, at least in part, for TGFβ-induced EMT in EOC cells. On the other hand, TGFβ treatment increases the expression of Notch ligand Jagged1 and Notch target gene HES1 in EOC cells. Functionally, the combination of Notch1 activation and TGFβ treatment is more potent in promoting motility and migration of EOC cells than either stimulation alone. Taken together, our results indicate that Notch and TGFβ form a reciprocal positive regulatory loop and cooperatively regulate EMT and promote EOC cell motility and migration. PMID:27075926

  9. Signaling and Gene Regulatory Networks Governing Definitive Endoderm Derivation From Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Neely, Eric; Fallahi, Hossein; Massumi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The generation of definitive endoderm (DE) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a fundamental stage in the formation of highly organized visceral organs, such as the liver and pancreas. Currently, there is a need for a comprehensive study that illustrates the involvement of different signaling pathways and their interactions in the derivation of DE cells from PSCs. This study aimed to identify signaling pathways that have the greatest influence on DE formation using analyses of transcriptional profiles, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, and protein localization data. Using this approach, signaling networks involved in DE formation were constructed using systems biology and data mining tools, and the validity of the predicted networks was confirmed experimentally by measuring the mRNA levels of hub genes in several PSCs-derived DE cell lines. Based on our analyses, seven signaling pathways, including the BMP, ERK1-ERK2, FGF, TGF-beta, MAPK, Wnt, and PIP signaling pathways and their interactions, were found to play a role in the derivation of DE cells from PSCs. Lastly, the core gene regulatory network governing this differentiation process was constructed. The results of this study could improve our understanding surrounding the efficient generation of DE cells for the regeneration of visceral organs. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1994-2006, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26755186

  10. Regulatory T cells control diabetes without compromising acute anti-viral defense☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Dave, Amy; Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Miller, Jacqueline; von Herrath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While previous reports have demonstrated the efficacy of regulatory T cell therapy in the prevention of diabetes, systemic immunocompromise and Treg instability remain key safety concerns. Here we examined the influence of induced Treg (iTreg) cell therapy on anti-viral host defense and autoimmune T cell responses during acute viral infection in a murine model of autoimmune diabetes. Protective transfers of iTregs maintained IL-10 expression, and expanded in vivo and controlled diabetes, despite losing FoxP3 expression. Adoptive transfer of iTregs affected neither the primary anti-viral CD8 T cell response nor viral clearance, although a significant and sustained suppression of CD4 T cell responses was observed. Following acute viral clearance, iTregs transferred early suppressed both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, which resulted in the reversion of diabetes. These observations indicate that iTregs suppress local autoimmune processes while preserving the immunocompetent host's ability to combat acute viral infection. PMID:24858581

  11. Tissue-specific targeting of cell fate regulatory genes by E2f factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, L M; Liu, Y; Pakenham, C A; Dugal-Tessier, D; Ruzhynsky, V; Bae, S; Tsai, S-Y; Leone, G; Slack, R S; Blais, A

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle proteins are important regulators of diverse cell fate decisions, and in this capacity have pivotal roles in neurogenesis and brain development. The mechanisms by which cell cycle regulation is integrated with cell fate control in the brain and other tissues are poorly understood, and an outstanding question is whether the cell cycle machinery regulates fate decisions directly or instead as a secondary consequence of proliferative control. Identification of the genes targeted by E2 promoter binding factor (E2f) transcription factors, effectors of the pRb/E2f cell cycle pathway, will provide essential insights into these mechanisms. We identified the promoter regions bound by three neurogenic E2f factors in neural precursor cells in a genome-wide manner. Through bioinformatic analyses and integration of published genomic data sets we uncovered hundreds of transcriptionally active E2f-bound promoters corresponding to genes that control cell fate processes, including key transcriptional regulators and members of the Notch, fibroblast growth factor, Wnt and Tgf-β signaling pathways. We also demonstrate a striking enrichment of the CCCTC binding factor transcription factor (Ctcf) at E2f3-bound nervous system-related genes, suggesting a potential regulatory co-factor for E2f3 in controlling differentiation. Finally, we provide the first demonstration of extensive tissue specificity among E2f target genes in mammalian cells, whereby E2f3 promoter binding is well conserved between neural and muscle precursors at genes associated with cell cycle processes, but is tissue-specific at differentiation-associated genes. Our findings implicate the cell cycle pathway as a widespread regulator of cell fate genes, and suggest that E2f3 proteins control cell type-specific differentiation programs by regulating unique sets of target genes. This work significantly enhances our understanding of how the cell cycle machinery impacts cell fate and differentiation, and will

  12. The Chromatin-Modifying Enzyme Ezh2 Is Critical for the Maintenance of Regulatory T Cell Identity after Activation

    OpenAIRE

    DuPage, Michel; Chopra, Gaurav; Quiros, Jason; Rosenthal, Wendy L.; Morar, Malika M.; Holohan, Dan; Zhang, Ruan; Turka, Laurence; Marson, Alexander; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are required for immune homeostasis. Chromatin remodeling is essential for establishing diverse cellular identities, but how the epigenetic program in Treg cells is maintained throughout the dynamic activation process remains unclear. Here we have shown that CD28 co-stimulation, an extracellular cue intrinsically required for Treg cell maintenance, induced the chromatin-modifying enzyme, Ezh2. Treg-specific ablation of Ezh2 resulted in spontaneous autoimmunity ...

  13. Development of Virus-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ Regulatory T Cells Induced by Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fang; Chi, Jing; Peng, Guangyong; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Lingyun; Feng, Dongju; Xie, Fangyi; Gu, Bin; Qin, Jian; CHEN, YUN; Yao, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is an important immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory virus. The mechanisms by which HHV-6 establishes latency and immunosuppression in its host are not well understood. Here we characterized HHV-6-specific T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HHV-6-infected donors. Our results showed that HHV-6 infection could induce both CD4+ and CD8+ HHV-6-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells. These HHV-6-specific Treg cells had potent suppressive activity a...

  14. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  15. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Allergic Airway Inflammation by Inducing Regulatory T Cells in a Mouse Model of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Sup Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation, the immunomodulatory mechanism of ASCs remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether regulatory T cells (Tregs induction is a potential mechanism in immunomodulatory effects of ASCs on allergic airway disease and how these induced Tregs orchestrate allergic inflammation. Intravenous administration of ASCs significantly reduced allergic symptoms and inhibited eosinophilic inflammation. Airway hyperresponsiveness, total immune cell and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, mucus production, and serum allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 were significantly reduced after ASCs administration. ASCs significantly inhibited Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 and enhanced Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, levels of IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 were significantly increased after ASCs administration. Interestingly, this upregulation was accompanied by increased Treg populations. In conclusion, ASCs ameliorated allergic airway inflammation and improved lung function through the induction of Treg expansion. The induction of Treg by ASCs involves the secretion of soluble factors such as IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 and Treg might be involved in the downregulation of Th2 cytokines and upregulation of Th1 cytokines production.

  16. Adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by inducing regulatory T cells in a mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Sup; Park, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Shin-Ae; Park, Hee-Young; Hong, Sung-Lyong; Park, Hye-Kyung; Yu, Hak-Sun; Roh, Hwan-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation, the immunomodulatory mechanism of ASCs remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether regulatory T cells (Tregs) induction is a potential mechanism in immunomodulatory effects of ASCs on allergic airway disease and how these induced Tregs orchestrate allergic inflammation. Intravenous administration of ASCs significantly reduced allergic symptoms and inhibited eosinophilic inflammation. Airway hyperresponsiveness, total immune cell and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, mucus production, and serum allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 were significantly reduced after ASCs administration. ASCs significantly inhibited Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and enhanced Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, levels of IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 were significantly increased after ASCs administration. Interestingly, this upregulation was accompanied by increased Treg populations. In conclusion, ASCs ameliorated allergic airway inflammation and improved lung function through the induction of Treg expansion. The induction of Treg by ASCs involves the secretion of soluble factors such as IDO, TGF-β, and PGE2 and Treg might be involved in the downregulation of Th2 cytokines and upregulation of Th1 cytokines production. PMID:25246732

  17. Induction of regulatory T cells: A role for probiotics and prebiotics to suppress autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Mitesh; Kumar, Prasant; Laddha, Naresh C; Kemp, E Helen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells that play a vital role in suppressing inflammation and maintaining immune tolerance. Given the crucial role of Tregs in maintaining immune homeostasis, it is probably not surprising that many microbial species and their metabolites have the potential to induce Tregs. There is now great interest in the therapeutic potential of probiotics and prebiotics based strategies for a range of autoimmune disorders. This review will summarise recent findings concerning the role of probiotics and prebiotics in induction of Tregs to ameliorate the autoimmune conditions. In addition, the article is focused to explain the different mechanisms of Treg induction and function by these probiotics and prebiotics, based on the available studies till date. The article further proposes that induction of Tregs by probiotics and prebiotics could lead to the development of new therapeutic approach towards curbing the autoimmune response and as an alternative to detrimental immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26774011

  18. IDO expressing fibroblasts promote the expansion of antigen specific regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Terry-Ann; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Farrokhi, Ali; Ghahary, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs) can be induced and expanded by dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Here we report that a possible alternative to DCs are IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts (DFs), which are easier to isolate and sustain in culture compared to DCs. When mouse splenocytes were co-cultured with IDO expressing DFs, a significant increase in frequency and the number of Tregs was found compared to those of control group (13.16%±1.8 vs. 5.53%±1.2, pa subset of Tregs which can be used to generate antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:23891282

  19. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: ELISA determined the Foxp3...... (r = -0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = -0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3(+) Treg numbers with AAA size (r = -0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive...... transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10(-/-)) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen...

  20. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Weiss, Brendan M; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-07-21

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab's effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8(+):CD4(+) and CD8(+):Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8(+) PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38(+) immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  1. Induced Foxp3+ T Cells Colonizing Tolerated Allografts Exhibit the Hypomethylation Pattern Typical of Mature Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrands, Robert; Chen, Ye; Kendal, Adrian R.; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Waldmann, Herman; Howie, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 require acquisition of a specific hypomethylation pattern to ensure optimal functional commitment, limited lineage plasticity, and long-term maintenance of tolerance. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of these epigenetic changes in vivo will contribute to the clinical exploitation of Foxp3+ Treg. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo generated antigen-specific Foxp3+ Treg can acquire Treg-specific epigenetic characteristics and prevent skin graft rejection in an animal model. PMID:27148253

  2. Induced Foxp3(+) T Cells Colonizing Tolerated Allografts Exhibit the Hypomethylation Pattern Typical of Mature Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrands, Robert; Chen, Ye; Kendal, Adrian R; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman; Howie, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 require acquisition of a specific hypomethylation pattern to ensure optimal functional commitment, limited lineage plasticity, and long-term maintenance of tolerance. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of these epigenetic changes in vivo will contribute to the clinical exploitation of Foxp3(+) Treg. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo generated antigen-specific Foxp3(+) Treg can acquire Treg-specific epigenetic characteristics and prevent skin graft rejection in an animal model. PMID:27148253

  3. Acid Sphingomyelinase (ASM is a Negative Regulator of Regulatory T Cell (Treg Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuetao Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Regulatory T cell (Treg is required for the maintenance of tolerance to various tissue antigens and to protect the host from autoimmune disorders. However, Treg may, indirectly, support cancer progression and bacterial infections. Therefore, a balance of Treg function is pivotal for adequate immune responses. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM is a rate limiting enzyme involved in the production of ceramide by breaking down sphingomyelin. Previous studies in T-cells have suggested that ASM is involved in CD28 signalling, T lymphocyte granule secretion, degranulation, and vesicle shedding similar to the formation of phosphatidylserine-exposing microparticles from glial cells. However, whether ASM affects the development of Treg has not yet been described. Methods: Splenocytes, isolated Naive T lymphocytes and cultured T cells were characterized for various immune T cell markers by flow cytometery. Cell proliferation was measured by Carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE dye, cell cycle analysis by Propidium Iodide (PI, mRNA transcripts by q-RT PCR and protein expression by Western Blotting respectively. Results: ASM deficient mice have higher number of Treg compared with littermate control mice. In vitro induction of ASM deficient T cells in the presence of TGF-β and IL-2 lead to a significantly higher number of Foxp3+ induced Treg (iTreg compared with control T-cells. Further, ASM deficient iTreg has less AKT (serine 473 phosphorylation and Rictor levels compared with control iTreg. Ceramide C6 led to significant reduction of iTreg in both ASM deficient and WT mice. The reduction in iTreg leads to induction of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17 but not IFN-γ mRNA levels. Conclusion: ASM is a negative regulator of natural and iTreg.

  4. Regulatory T cells: serious contenders in the promise for immunological tolerance in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar eSafinia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy.Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  5. The Role of Foxp3-Expressing Regulatory T Cells and T Helpers in Immunopathogenesis of Multidrug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    E. G. Churina; Urazova, O. I.; V. V. Novitskiy

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulation structure of regulatory T cells and T helpers of peripheral blood in patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis depending on the clinical form of disease and sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs has been analyzed in this work. It has been shown that the leading part in immune suppression at infiltrative, dissemination, and fibrosis-cavity pulmonary tuberculosis is played by natural regulatory CD4+CD25+Foxp3+-T lymphocytes. Thus we estimat...

  6. Alterations in regulatory T cells induced by specific oligosaccharides improve vaccine responsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel A Schijf

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet(+ (Th1 activated CD69(+CD4(+ T cells (p<0.001 and reduced percentage of Gata-3(+ (Th2 activated CD69(+CD4(+T cells (p<0.001 was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4(+Foxp3(+ could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 (+ /T-bet(+ (Th1-Tregs was significantly reduced (p<0.05 in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response.These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines.

  7. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27215229

  8. Regulatory T Cell Infusion Can Enhance Memory T Cell and Alloantibody Responses in Lymphodepleted Nonhuman Primate Heart Allograft Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzelarab, M B; Zhang, H; Guo, H; Lu, L; Zahorchak, A F; Wiseman, R W; Nalesnik, M A; Bhama, J K; Cooper, D K C; Thomson, A W

    2016-07-01

    The ability of regulatory T cells (Treg) to prolong allograft survival and promote transplant tolerance in lymphodepleted rodents is well established. Few studies, however, have addressed the therapeutic potential of adoptively transferred, CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-) Foxp3(+) (Treg) in clinically relevant large animal models. We infused ex vivo-expanded, functionally stable, nonselected Treg (up to a maximum cumulative dose of 1.87 billion cells) into antithymocyte globulin-lymphodepleted, MHC-mismatched cynomolgus monkey heart graft recipients before homeostatic recovery of effector T cells. The monkeys also received tacrolimus, anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibodies and tapered rapamycin maintenance therapy. Treg administration in single or multiple doses during the early postsurgical period (up to 1 month posttransplantation), when host T cells were profoundly depleted, resulted in inferior graft function compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased incidences of effector memory T cells, enhanced interferon-γ production by host CD8(+) T cells, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and antidonor alloantibodies. The findings caution against infusion of Treg during the early posttransplantation period after lymphodepletion. Despite marked but transient increases in Treg relative to endogenous effector T cells and use of reputed "Treg-friendly" agents, the host environment/immune effector mechanisms instigated under these conditions can perturb rather than favor the potential therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred Treg. PMID:26700196

  9. TLR-2 Activation Induces Regulatory T Cells and Long-Term Suppression of Asthma Manifestations in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Motta, Alexandre C.; Gras, Renee; Shirinbak, Soheila; Maazi, Hadi; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The T regulatory (Treg) cell subset is critically important for the regulation of immune responses. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells has been shown to be sufficie

  10. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Erde; Aristo Vojdani

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor ...

  11. Pathogenic T cells persist after reversal of autoimmune disease by immunosuppression with regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eric; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune disease can be prevented with immunosuppressive agents; however, the effectiveness of these treatments in advanced stage of disease and the fate of pathogenic T cells following such treatments are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that a single dose of in vitro-induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) resulted in the functional repair and restitution of stomach tissue that had been severely damaged in advanced autoimmune gastritis. iTreg cells caused depletion or inactivation of autoreactive naïve T cells that were antigen inexperienced, however, autoreactive effector/memory T cells persisted in treated mice, resulting in residual cellular infiltrates within the repaired stomach tissue. The persisting autoreactive T cells were able to rapidly cause autoimmune disease if iTreg cells were removed. Similar data were obtained from mice treated continuously with corticosteroid, in that there was substantial restitution of the gastric mucosa; however, effector T cells persisted and rapidly caused pathology following drug removal. Therefore, iTreg cells or corticosteroid can suppress pathogenic autoreactive cells in advanced autoimmune disease, reversing tissue damage and improving tissue function. However, the persistence of pathogenic T cells represents a disease risk. PMID:23420509

  12. Regulatory mechanism of the flavoprotein Tah18-dependent nitric oxide synthesis and cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Nasuno, Ryo; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Akira; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. The regulatory mechanism of NO generation in unicellular eukaryotic yeast cells is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian and bacterial NO synthase (NOS) orthologues, even though yeast produces NO under oxidative stress conditions. Recently, we reported that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously shown to transfer electrons to the iron-sulfur cluster protein Dre2, is involved in NOS-like activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the other hand, Tah18 was reported to promote apoptotic cell death after exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we showed that NOS-like activity requiring Tah18 induced cell death upon treatment with H2O2. Our experimental results also indicate that Tah18-dependent NO production and cell death are suppressed by enhancement of the interaction between Tah18 and its molecular partner Dre2. Our findings indicate that the Tah18-Dre2 complex regulates cell death as a molecular switch via Tah18-dependent NOS-like activity in response to environmental changes. PMID:27178802

  13. Trichostatin A Promotes the Generation and Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Doñas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells are a specific subset of lymphocytes that suppress immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. They can be generated in the thymus as well as in the periphery through differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. The forkhead box P3 transcription factor (Foxp3 is a crucial molecule regulating the generation and function of Tregs. Here we show that the foxp3 gene promoter becomes hyperacetylated in in vitro differentiated Tregs compared to naïve CD4+ T cells. We also show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA stimulated the in vitro differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into Tregs and that this induction was accompanied by a global increase in histone H3 acetylation. Importantly, we also demonstrated that Tregs generated in the presence of TSA have phenotypical and functional differences from the Tregs generated in the absence of TSA. Thus, TSA-generated Tregs showed increased suppressive activities, which could potentially be explained by a mechanism involving the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73. Our data show that TSA could potentially be used to enhance the differentiation and suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells.

  14. Dual regulatory role for phosphatase and tensin homolog in specification of intestinal endocrine cell subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sébastien AB Roy; Marie-Josée Langlois; Julie C Carrier; Fran(c)ois Boudreau; Nathalie Rivard; Nathalie Perreault

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the impact of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) in the specification of intestinal enteroendocrine subpopulations.METHODS:Using the Cre/IoxP system,a mouse with conditional intestinal epithelial Pten deficiency was generated.Pten mutant mice and controls were sacrificed and small intestines collected for immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.Blood was collected on 16 h fasted mice by cardiac puncture.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure blood circulating ghrelin,somatostatin (SST) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) levels.RESULTS:Results show an unexpected dual regulatory role for epithelial Pten signalling in the specification/differentiation of enteroendocrine cell subpopulations in the small intestine.Our data indicate that Pten positively regulates chromogranin A (CgA) expressing subpopulations,including cells expressing secretin,ghrelin,gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK).In contrast,Pten negatively regulates the enteroendocrine subtype specification of non-expressing CgA cells such as GIP and SST expressing cells.CONCLUSION:The present results demonstrate that Pten signalling favours the enteroendocrine progenitor to specify into cells expressing CgA including those producing CCK,gastrin and ghrelin.

  15. Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+CD27-CD28- T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27-CD28- T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4+CD27-CD28- cells are regulatory T cells (TR). CD4+CD27-CD28- cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4+ T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4+CD27-CD28- TR expressed FoxP3, TGFβ, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4+CD27-CD28- TR expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4+CD27-CD28- TR significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFβ inhibition. The CMV-CD4+CD27-CD28- TR of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4+CD27-CD28- TR. The CMV-CD4+CD27-CD28- TR may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

  16. Regulatory T cell-mediated suppression of Th9 cell development and effector function

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    T helper (Th) 9 cells are an important subpopulation of the CD4+ T helper cells. Due to their ability to secrete Interleukin-(IL-)9, Th9 cells essentially contribute to the expulsion of parasitic helminths from the intestinal tract but they play also an immunopathological role in the course of asthma. Recently, a beneficial function of Th9 cells in anti-tumor immune responses was published. In a murine melanoma tumor model Th9 cells were shown to enhance the anti-melanoma immune response via ...

  17. Human adipose-tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells induce functional de-novo regulatory T cells with methylated FOXP3 gene DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engela, A. U.; Hoogduijn, M. J.; Boer, K.; Litjens, N. H. R.; Betjes, M. G. H.; Weimar, W.; Baan, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are interesting candidates for cellular therapy for autoimmune disorders, graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. MSC inhibit the proliferation of effector T cells and induce T cells with a regulatory phenotype. So far

  18. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits proliferation but not the suppressive function of regulatory T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoo, A.L.; Joosten, I.; Michels, M.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; He, X.; Netea, M.G.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Koenen, H.J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is known to induce regulatory T (Treg) cells by rendering antigen-presenting cells tolerogenic, its direct effect on human naturally occurring Treg cells is unclear. Here, we investigated if and how 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)2D3] can directly affect the proliferation and functio

  19. Regulatory B and T cell responses in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Birte

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur due to faulty self-tolerance. Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are classic examples of organ-specific autoimmune diseases. GD is an auto-antibody-mediated disease where autoantibodies are produced against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). HT is primarily a T-cell mediated disease, and whether B cells play a pathogenic role in the pathogenesis is still unclear. Both GD and HT are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid gland by self-reactive T cells and B cells. In the first paper of this thesis, the role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were investigated in the context of GD and HT. First, we studied the role of the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) in healthy donors. The self-antigen TG, but not the foreign recall antigen tetanus toxoid (TT), was able to induce interleukin 10 (IL-10) secretion by B cells and CD4+ T cells. These IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) from healthy donors were enriched with the CD5+ and CD24hi phenotype. In addition, TG was able to induce IL-6 production by B cells. In contrast, TT induced production of Th1-type pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and IL-2. In the second paper, the frequency and phenotype of B10 was investigated in healthy donors and patients with GD or HT.  The frequencies of B10 cells were similar in the three groups, irrespective of whether IL-10 was induced by a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin, by CpG oligodeoxynucletodies (ODN) 2006, or by TG. Several phenotypes have been associated with B10 cells such as CD5+, CD25+, TIM-1+, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+. We found that larger proportions of B10 cells in patients with GD or HT were CD25+ and TIM-1+ than B10 cells in healthy donors. In healthy donors, B10 cells were CD24hiCD38-, whereas for HT patients these cells were primarily CD24intCD38int. For GD patients, we found lower proportions of B10 cells

  20. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p +CD8− and peripheral CD4+ T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8+ population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4+ T cells, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4+ T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4+ thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  1. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liang [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ouyang, Weiming [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Office of Biotechnology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, United States Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin, Boquan [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  2. Regulatory T cells in induced sputum of asthmatic children: association with inflammatory cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzaoui Agnès

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells play an essential role in maintaining immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated whether the induced sputum (IS pool and the function of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells are altered in asthma pediatric patients. Methods Treg activity was studied in the IS of 40 asthmatic children. CD3+ cells were analyzed for the expression of FoxP3 mRNA by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. IS cells from asthmatics and controls were stained for Treg markers and analyzed by flow cytometry. We also studied the ability of Treg cells to differentiate monocytes toward alternatively activated macrophages (AAM, and to suppress proinflammatory cytokines. Results (i Mild and moderate asthmatics had significantly decreased expression of FoxP3/β-actin mRNA and decreased proportions of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ cells compared to healthy children; (ii patients with moderate asthma had even lower proportions of FoxP3 expression compared to mild asthmatic patients; (iii monocytes cultured with Treg cells displayed typical features of AAM, including up-regulated expression of CD206 (macrophage mannose receptor and CD163 (hemoglobin scavenger receptor, and an increased production of chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18. In addition, Treg cells from asthmatics have a reduced capacity to suppress LPS-proinflammatory cytokine production from monocytes/macrophages (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusion Asthma pediatric patients display a decreased bronchial Treg population. The impaired bronchial Treg activity is associated with disease severity.

  3. Angiopoietin 2 stimulates TIE2-expressing monocytes to suppress T cell activation and to promote regulatory T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Chen, Yung-Yi; Muthana, Munitta; Welford, Abigail F; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Murdoch, Craig; De Palma, Michele; Lewis, Claire E

    2011-04-01

    Angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) is a proangiogenic cytokine whose expression is often upregulated by endothelial cells in tumors. Expression of its receptor, TIE2, defines a highly proangiogenic subpopulation of myeloid cells in circulation and tumors called TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs). Genetic depletion of TEMs markedly reduces tumor angiogenesis in various tumor models, emphasizing their essential role in driving tumor progression. Previously, we demonstrated that ANGPT2 augments the expression of various proangiogenic genes, the potent immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10, and a chemokine for regulatory T cells (Tregs), CCL17 by TEMs in vitro. We now show that TEMs also express higher levels of IL-10 than TIE2(-) macrophages in tumors and that ANGPT2-stimulated release of IL-10 by TEMs suppresses T cell proliferation, increases the ratio of CD4(+) T cells to CD8(+) T cells, and promotes the expansion of CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+) Tregs. Furthermore, syngeneic murine tumors expressing high levels of ANGPT2 contained not only high numbers of TEMs but also increased numbers of Tregs, whereas genetic depletion of tumor TEMs resulted in a marked reduction in the frequency of Tregs in tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that ANGPT2-stimulated TEMs represent a novel, potent immunosuppressive force in tumors. PMID:21368233

  4. Virus-specific regulatory T cells ameliorate encephalitis by repressing effector T cell functions from priming to effector stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the presence of pathogen-specific Foxp3+ CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg in infected animals, but little is known about where and how these cells affect the effector T cell responses and whether they are more suppressive than bulk Treg populations. We recently showed the presence of both epitope M133-specific Tregs (M133 Treg and conventional CD4 T cells (M133 Tconv in the brains of mice with coronavirus-induced encephalitis. Here, we provide new insights into the interactions between pathogenic Tconv and Tregs responding to the same epitope. M133 Tregs inhibited the proliferation but not initial activation of M133 Tconv in draining lymph nodes (DLN. Further, M133 Tregs inhibited migration of M133 Tconv from the DLN. In addition, M133 Tregs diminished microglia activation and decreased the number and function of Tconv in the infected brain. Thus, virus-specific Tregs inhibited pathogenic CD4 T cell responses during priming and effector stages, particularly those recognizing cognate antigen, and decreased mortality and morbidity without affecting virus clearance. These cells are more suppressive than bulk Tregs and provide a targeted approach to ameliorating immunopathological disease in infectious settings.

  5. Adrenomedullin as a Growth and Cell Fate Regulatory Factor for Adult Neural Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Martínez-Herrero; Ignacio M Larráyoz; Laura Ochoa-Callejero; Josune García-Sanmartín; Alfredo Martínez

    2012-01-01

    The use of stem cells as a strategy for tissue repair and regeneration is one of the biomedical research areas that has attracted more interest in the past few years. Despite the classic belief that the central nervous system (CNS) was immutable, now it is well known that cell turnover occurs in the mature CNS. Postnatal neurogenesis is subjected to tight regulation by many growth factors, cell signals, and transcription factors. An emerging molecule involved in this process is adrenomedullin...

  6. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. PMID:27012310

  7. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  8. Regulatory T cells, inherited variation, and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Keith L; Maurer, Matthew J; Preston, Claudia C; Moysich, Kirsten B; Goergen, Krista; Hawthorne, Kieran M; Cunningham, Julie M; Odunsi, Kunle; Hartmann, Lynn C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Oberg, Ann L; Goode, Ellen L

    2015-12-01

    The immune system constitutes one of the host factors modifying outcomes in ovarian cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are believed to be a major factor in preventing the immune response from destroying ovarian cancers. Understanding mechanisms that regulate Tregs in the tumor microenvironment could lead to the identification of novel targets aimed at reducing their influence. In this study, we used immunofluorescence-based microscopy to enumerate Tregs, total CD4 T cells, and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells in fresh frozen tumors from over 400 patients with ovarian cancer (>80 % high-grade serous). We sought to determine whether Tregs were associated with survival and genetic variation in 79 genes known to influence Treg induction, trafficking, or function. We used Cox regression, accounting for known prognostic factors, to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with T cell counts and ratios. We found that the ratios of CD8 T cells and total CD4 T cells to Tregs were associated with improved overall survival (CD8/Treg HR 0.84, p = 0.0089; CD4/Treg HR 0.88, p = 0.046) and with genetic variation in IL-10 (p = 0.0073 and 0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, the associations between the ratios and overall survival remained similar (IL-10 and clinical covariate-adjusted CD8/Treg HR 0.85, p = 0.031; CD4/Treg HR 0.87, p = 0.093), suggesting that this association was not driven by variation in IL-10. Thus, integration of novel tumor phenotyping measures with extensive clinical and genetic information suggests that the ratio of T cells to Tregs may be prognostic of outcome in ovarian cancer, regardless of inherited genotype in genes related to Tregs. PMID:26298430

  9. Bistability analyses of CD4+ T follicular helper and regulatory cells during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Abedi, Vida; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Hoops, Stefan; Ciupe, Stanca; Caughman, John; Andrew, Tricity; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2016-06-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a highly plastic subset of CD4+ T cells specialized in providing B cell help and promoting inflammatory and effector responses during infectious and immune-mediate diseases. Helicobacter pylori is the dominant member of the gastric microbiota and exerts both beneficial and harmful effects on the host. Chronic inflammation in the context of H. pylori has been linked to an upregulation in T helper (Th)1 and Th17 CD4+ T cell phenotypes, controlled in part by the cytokine, interleukin-21. This study investigates the differentiation and regulation of Tfh cells, major producers of IL-21, in the immune response to H. pylori challenge. To better understand the conditions influencing the promotion and inhibition of a chronically elevated Tfh population, we used top-down and bottom-up approaches to develop computational models of Tfh and T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cell differentiation. Stability analysis was used to characterize the presence of two bi-stable steady states in the calibrated Tfh/Tfr models. Stochastic simulation was used to illustrate the ability of the parameter set to dictate two distinct behavioral patterns. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis helped identify the importance of various parameters on the establishment of Tfh and Tfr cell populations. The core network model was expanded into a more comprehensive and predictive model by including cytokine production and signaling pathways. From the expanded network, the interaction between TGFB-Induced Factor Homeobox 1 (Tgif1) and the retinoid X receptor (RXR) was displayed to exert control over the determination of the Tfh response. Model simulations predict that Tgif1 and RXR respectively induce and curtail Tfh responses. This computational hypothesis was validated experimentally by assaying Tgif1, RXR and Tfh in stomachs of mice infected with H. pylori. PMID:26947272

  10. WNT16B from Ovarian Fibroblasts Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells through β-Catenin Signal in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Cong Shen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for cancer can induce a series of secreted factors into the tumor microenvironment, which can affect cancer progression. Wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus integration site 16B (WNT16B is a new member of the WNT family and has been reported to play growth-related roles in previous studies. In this study, we found WNT16B could be expressed and secreted into the microenvironment by human ovarian fibroblasts after DNA damage-associated treatment, including chemotherapy drugs and radiation. We also demonstrated that fibroblast-derived WNT16B could result in accumulation of β-catenin in dendritic cells and secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, which contributed to the differentiation of regulatory T cells in a co-culture environment. These results shed light on the roles of WNT16B in immune regulation, especially in regard to cancer treatment.

  11. Induction of CD8+ Regulatory T Cells Protects Macaques against SIV Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV have so far met with limited success. Given that CD4+ T cell activation drives the initial burst of viral replication, we explored in macaques whether an oral vaccine comprised of Lactobacillus plantarum, a commensal bacterium that favors immune tolerance, and inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus mac239 (SIVmac239 would induce CD4+ T cell unresponsiveness/tolerance toward SIV antigens and thereby prevent the establishment of SIV infection. The tolerogenic vaccine induced MHC-Ib/E-restricted CD8+ regulatorycells (Tregs that suppressed SIV-harboring CD4+ T cell activation and ex vivo SIV replication in 15 of 16 animals without inducing SIV-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Of 16 macaques that were intrarectally challenged with SIVmac239 or heterologous strain SIVB670, 15 were sterilely protected. In four macaques that were rechallenged intravenously, plasma SIV levels peaked slightly and then dropped to undetectable levels, although the animals subsequently harbored intracellular SIV DNA. Infusion of CD8 antibodies confirmed the role of CD8+ Tregs in preventing/suppressing SIV in vivo. These findings suggest a new avenue of research toward developing an HIV-1 vaccine.

  12. Nature of Regulatory T Cells in the Context of Allergic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozdemir Cevdet

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT is the cornerstone of the management of allergic diseases, which targets modification of the immunologic response, along with environmental allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy. SIT is associated with improved tolerance to allergen challenge, with a decrease in immediate-phase and late-phase allergic inflammation. SIT has the potential to prevent development of new sensitizations and progression of allergic rhinitis to asthma. It has a role in cellular and humoral responses in a modified pattern. The ratio of T helper (Th1 cytokines to Th2 cytokines is increased following SIT, and functional regulatory T cells are induced. Interleukin-10 production by monocytes, macrophages, and B and T cells is increased, as well as expression of transforming growth factor β. SIT is associated with increases in allergen-specific antibodies in IgA, IgG1, and IgG4 isotypes. These blocking-type immunoglobulins, particularly IgG4, may compete with IgE binding to allergen, decreasing the allergen presentation with the high- and low-affinity receptors for IgE (FcεRI and FcεRII, respectively. Additionally, SIT reduces the number of mast cells and eosinophils in the target tissues and release of mediators from these cells.

  13. The Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Cistrome: GATA Factor-Dependent cis-Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, K J; Johnson, K D; Gao, X; Keles, S; Bresnick, E H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators mediate the genesis and function of the hematopoietic system by binding complex ensembles of cis-regulatory elements to establish genetic networks. While thousands to millions of any given cis-element resides in a genome, how transcriptional regulators select these sites and how site attributes dictate functional output is not well understood. An instructive system to address this problem involves the GATA family of transcription factors that control vital developmental and physiological processes and are linked to multiple human pathologies. Although GATA factors bind DNA motifs harboring the sequence GATA, only a very small subset of these abundant motifs are occupied in genomes. Mechanistic studies revealed a unique configuration of a GATA factor-regulated cis-element consisting of an E-box and a downstream GATA motif separated by a short DNA spacer. GATA-1- or GATA-2-containing multiprotein complexes at these composite elements control transcription of genes critical for hematopoietic stem cell emergence in the mammalian embryo, hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation, and erythroid cell maturation. Other constituents of the complex include the basic helix-loop-loop transcription factor Scl/TAL1, its heterodimeric partner E2A, and the Lim domain proteins LMO2 and LDB1. This chapter reviews the structure/function of E-box-GATA composite cis-elements, which collectively constitute an important sector of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cistrome. PMID:27137654

  14. Electroacupuncture Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma via Modulating CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjoo Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mouse pulmonary hypersensitivity experimental model that mimics human asthma was developed, and electroacupuncture (EA treatment was shown to reduce allergic inflammatory processes. In addition, we also assessed whether the beneficial effects of EA on allergic asthma could be correlated with CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg. Cellular profiles and histopathologic analysis demonstrated that peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates were significantly decreased in the EA-treated groups when compared to the OVA and anti-CD25 Ab-injected (Treg depletion groups. Furthermore, total BAL cells were reduced in the EA groups when compared to other groups. Interestingly, the population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Tregs in pneumonocytes increased in EA-treated group when compared to OVA and Treg depletion groups. These results imply that EA stimulation at ST 36 may affect CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg in an OVA-induced experimental model and may enhance Treg function by suppressing other T cells and limiting the immune response.

  15. Harnessing memory adaptive regulatory T cells to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Rui Li; Bas J.G. Baaten; Linda M. Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreatic islets.There is an immediate need to restore both β-cell function and immune tolerance to control disease progression and ultimately cure T1D.Currently,there is no effective treatment strategy to restore glucose regulation in patients with T1D.FoxP3-expressing CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are potential candidates to control autoimmunity because they play a central role in maintaining self-tolerance.However,deficiencies in either naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) themselves and/or their ability to control pathogenic effector T cells have been associated with T1D.Here,we hypothesize that nTregs can be replaced by FoxP3+ adaptive Tregs (aTregs),which are uniquely equipped to combat autoreactivity in T1D.Unlike nTregs,aTregs are stable and provide long-lived protection.In this review,we summarize the current understanding of aTregs and their potential for use as an immunological intervention to treat T1D.

  16. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  17. Regulatory T cells enhance mast cell production of IL-6 via surface-bound TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Kirthana; Bryce, Paul J

    2012-01-15

    Mast cell degranulation is a hallmark of allergic reactions, but mast cells can also produce many cytokines that modulate immunity. Recently, CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to inhibit mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis, but their influence on cytokine production remained unknown. In this study, we show that, rather than inhibit, Tregs actually enhance mast cell production of IL-6. We demonstrate that, whereas inhibition of degranulation was OX40/OX40 ligand dependent, enhancement of IL-6 was due to TGF-β. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the Treg-derived TGF-β was surface-bound, because the interaction was contact dependent, and no TGF-β was detectable in the supernatant. Soluble TGF-β1 alone was sufficient to enhance mast cell IL-6 production, and these supernatants were sufficient to promote Th17 skewing, but those from Treg-mast cell cultures were not, supporting this being surface-bound TGF-β from the Tregs. Interestingly, the augmentation of IL-6 production occurred basally or in response to innate stimuli (LPS or peptidoglycan), adaptive stimuli (IgE cross-linking by specific Ag), and cytokine activation (IL-33). We demonstrate that TGF-β led to enhanced transcription and de novo synthesis of IL-6 upon activation without affecting IL-6 storage or mRNA stability. In vivo, the adoptive transfer of Tregs inhibited mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis in a model of food allergy but promoted intestinal IL-6 and IL-17 production. Consequently, our findings establish that Tregs can exert divergent influences upon mast cells, inhibiting degranulation via OX40/OX40 ligand interactions while promoting IL-6 via TGF-β. PMID:22156492

  18. Cell-penetrable mouse forkhead box protein 3 alleviates experimental arthritis in mice by up-regulating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Baoju; Sun, Mengyi; Wu, Weijiang; Huang, Lili; Sun, Aihua; Zong, Yangyong; Xia, Sheng; Shi, Liyun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) have potential applications in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. However, their numbers are limited. Forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) is a key transcription factor that controls T(reg) development and function. Here, we generated a cell-permeable fusion protein, protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated mouse FoxP3 protein (PTD-mFoxP3), and evaluated whether PTD-mFoxp3 can alleviate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. As expected, PTD-mFoxP3 was transduced into cells effectively, and inhibited T cell activation and attenuated the cell proliferation. It decreased interleukin (IL) 2 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and increased IL-10 expression in activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. PTD-mFoxP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells attenuated proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, PTD-mFoxP3 blocked the Th17 differentiation programme in vitro and down-regulated IL-17 production from T cells by modulating induction and levels of retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt). Intra-articular delivery of PTD-mFoxP3 delayed disease incidence remarkably and alleviated autoimmune symptoms of CIA mice. Moreover, protective effects of PTD-mFoxP3 were associated with regulating the balance of T helper type 17 (Th17) and T(regs). These results suggest that PTD-mFoxP3 may be a candidate for RA therapy. PMID:25809415

  19. A Role for Regulatory T Cells in a Murine Model of Epicutaneous Toluene Diisocyanate Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Carrie Mae; Marshall, Nikki B; Lukomska, Ewa; Kashon, Michael L; Meade, B Jean; Shane, Hillary; Anderson, Stacey E

    2016-07-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is a leading cause of chemical-induced occupational asthma which impacts workers in a variety of industries worldwide. Recently, the robust regulatory potential of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has become apparent, including their functional role in the regulation of allergic disease; however, their function in TDI-induced sensitization has not been explored. To elucidate the kinetics, phenotype, and function of Tregs during TDI sensitization, BALB/c mice were dermally exposed (on each ear) to a single application of TDI (0.5-4% v/v) or acetone vehicle and endpoints were evaluated via RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The draining lymph node (dLN) Treg population expanded significantly 4, 7, and 9 days after single 4% TDI exposure. This population was identified using a variety of surface and intracellular markers and was found to be phenotypically heterogeneous based on increased expression of markers including CD103, CCR6, CTLA4, ICOS, and Neuropilin-1 during TDI sensitization. Tregs isolated from TDI-sensitized mice were significantly more suppressive compared with their control counterparts, further supporting a functional role for Tregs during TDI sensitization. Last, Tregs were depleted prior to TDI sensitization and an intensified sensitization response was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that Tregs exhibit a functional role during TDI sensitization. Because the role of Tregs in TDI sensitization has not been previously elucidated, these data contribute to the understanding of the immunologic mechanisms of chemical induced allergic disease. PMID:27103660

  20. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and the influence of T regulatory cells: a cohort study in The Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Zaidi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The factors associated with the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV patients commencing antiretroviral therapy have not been fully elucidated. Using a longitudinal study design, this study addressed whether alteration in the levels of T regulatory cells contributed to the development of IRIS in a West African cohort of HIV-1 and HIV-2 patients. Seventy-one HIV infected patients were prospectively recruited to the study and followed up for six months. The patients were categorized as IRIS or non-IRIS cases following published clinical guidelines. The levels of T regulatory cells were measured using flow cytometry at baseline and all follow-up visits. Baseline cytokine levels of IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MIP-1β, IL-1, IL-12, IL-13, and IL-10 were measured in all patients. RESULTS: Twenty eight percent of patients (20/71 developed IRIS and were predominantly infected with HIV-1. Patients developing IRIS had lower nadir CD4 T cells at baseline (p = 0.03 and greater CD4 T cell reconstitution (p = 0.01 at six months post-ART. However, the development of IRIS was not influenced by the levels of T regulatory cells. Similarly, baseline cytokine levels did not predict the onset of IRIS. CONCLUSION: The development of IRIS was not associated with differences in levels of T regulatory cells or baseline pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  1. Dynamics of Regulatory T-Cells during Pregnancy: Effect of HIV Infection and Correlations with Other Immune Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Richardson; Adriana Weinberg

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Regulatory T cells (Treg) increase in the context of HIV infection and pregnancy. We studied Treg subpopulations in HIV-infected and uninfected women during pregnancy and their relationship with inflammation, activation and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood obtained from 20 HIV-infected and 18 uninfected women during early and late gestation was used to measure Treg and activated T cells (Tact) by flow cytometry; plasma cytokines and inflammatory markers by E...

  2. Cutting Edge: Distinct Glycolytic and Lipid Oxidative Metabolic Programs Are Essential for Effector and Regulatory CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan D Michalek; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Jacobs, Sarah R.; Macintyre, Andrew N.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Mason, Emily F.; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Nichols, Amanda G.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes can differentiate into effector T cell (Teff) or inducible regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets with specific immunological roles. We show that Teff and Treg require distinct metabolic programs to support these functions. Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells expressed high surface levels of the glucose transporter Glut1 and were highly glycolytic. Treg, in contrast, expressed low levels of Glut1 and had high lipid oxidation rates. Consistent with glycolysis and lipid oxidation p...

  3. TLR-2 Activation Induces Regulatory T Cells and Long-Term Suppression of Asthma Manifestations in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Motta, Alexandre C; Renée Gras; Soheila Shirinbak; Hadi Maazi; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The T regulatory (Treg) cell subset is critically important for the regulation of immune responses. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells has been shown to be sufficient for the suppression of airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma. Intervention strategies aimed at expanding the Treg cell population locally in the airways of sensitized individuals a...

  4. Schistosoma mansoni Larvae Do Not Expand or Activate Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells during Their Migratory Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Redpath, Stephen A.; van der Werf, Nienke; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maizels, Rick M.; Taylor, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in suppression of immune responses during parasitic helminth infection, both by controlling damaging immunopathology and by inhibiting protective immunity. During the patent phase of Schistosoma mansoni infection, Foxp3+ Treg cells are activated and suppress egg-elicited Th2 responses, but little is known of their induction and role during the early prepatent larval stage of infection. We quantified Foxp3+ Treg cell responses during the first 3...

  5. Inhibition of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell function by calcineurin-dependent interleukin-2 production

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiser, Robert; Nguyen, Vu H; Beilhack, Andreas; Buess, Martin; Schulz, Stephan; Baker, Jeanette; Contag, Christopher H.; Negrin, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control immunologic tolerance and antitumor immune responses. Therefore, in vivo modification of Treg function by immunosuppressant drugs has broad implications for transplantation biology, autoimmunity, and vaccination strategies. In vivo bioluminescence imaging demonstrated reduced early proliferation of donor-derived luciferase-labeled conventional T cells in animals treated with Treg cells after major histocompatibility complex mismatch bone marrow tran...

  6. Murine regulatory T cells contain hyper-proliferative and death-prone subsets with differential ICOS expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Shen, Shudan; Gorentla, Balachandra; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for self-tolerance. It has been an enigma that Treg exhibit an anergic phenotype reflected by hypo-proliferation in vitro following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation but undergo vigorous proliferation in vivo. We report here that, different from conventional T cells (Tcon), murine Treg are prone to death but hyper-proliferative in vitro and in vivo. During in vitro culture, most Treg die with or without TCR stimulation, correlated with constitutive activa...

  7. Tumor-derived γδ regulatory T cells suppress innate and adaptive immunity through the induction of immunosenescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jian; Ma, Chunling; Eddy C. Hsueh; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Zhang, Yanping; Varvares, Mark A.; Hoft, Daniel F.; Peng, Guangyong

    2013-01-01

    Fundamentally understanding the suppressive mechanisms utilized by different subsets of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T (Treg) cells is critical for the development of effective strategies for anti-tumor immunotherapy. γδ Treg cells have recently been identified in human diseases including cancer. However, the suppressive mechanisms and functional regulations of this new subset of unconventional Treg cells are largely unknown. In the current studies, we explored the suppressive mechanism(s) u...

  8. 5-Azacytidine and Rapamycin: different and synergistic effect on ex vivo expansion of natural human T Regulatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conteduca, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Natural T regulatory cells (Treg) are challenging to expand ex vivo, and this has severely hindered in vivo evaluation of their therapeutic potential. 5-Azacytidine (5-azaC) and Rapamycin (RAPA) are immunosuppressive drugs that promote selectively the expansion of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether 5-azaC and RAPA could be used together to promote the ex vivo expansion of Tregs purified from adult human peripheral blood. METHODS: CD4+C...

  9. Selective inhibition of regulatory T cells by targeting the PI3K-Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Eid, Rasha; Samara, Raed N; Ozbun, Laurent; Abdalla, Maher Y; Berzofsky, Jay A; Friedman, Kevin M; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2014-11-01

    Despite the strides that immunotherapy has made in mediating tumor regression, the clinical effects are often transient, and therefore more durable responses are still needed. The temporary nature of the therapy-induced immune response can be attributed to tumor immune evasion mechanisms, mainly the effect of suppressive immune cells and, in particular, regulatory T cells (Treg). Although the depletion of Tregs has been shown to be effective in enhancing immune responses, selective depletion of these suppressive cells without affecting other immune cells has not been very successful, and new agents are sought. We found that PI3K-Akt pathway inhibitors selectively inhibit Tregs with minimal effect on conventional T cells (Tconv). Our results clearly show selective in vitro inhibition of activation (as represented by a decrease in downstream signaling) and proliferation of Tregs in comparison with Tconvs when treated with different Akt and PI3K inhibitors. This effect has been observed in both human and murine CD4 T cells. In vivo treatment with these inhibitors resulted in a significant and selective reduction in Tregs in both naïve and tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, these PI3K-Akt inhibitors led to a significant therapeutic antitumor effect, which was shown to be Treg dependent. Here, we report the use of PI3K-Akt pathway inhibitors as potent agents for the selective depletion of suppressive Tregs. We show that these inhibitors are able to enhance the antitumor immune response and are therefore promising clinical reagents for Treg depletion. PMID:25080445

  10. Selective inhibition of regulatory T cells by targeting PI3K-Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Eid, R; Samara, RN; Ozbun, L; Abdalla, MY; Berzofsky, JA; Friedman, KM; Mkrtichyan, M; Khleif, SN

    2014-01-01

    Despite the strides that immunotherapy has made in mediating tumor regression, the clinical effects are often transient, and therefore more durable responses still are needed. The temporary nature of the therapy-induced immune response can be attributed to tumor immune evasion mechanisms, mainly the effect of suppressive immune cells and, in particular, T regulatory cells (Treg). Although the depletion of Treg has been shown to be effective in enhancing immune responses, selective depletion of these suppressive cells without affecting other immune cells has not been very successful, and new agents are sought. We found that PI3K-Akt pathway inhibitors selectively inhibit Treg with minimal effect on conventional T cells (Tconv). Our results clearly show selective in vitro inhibition of activation (as represented by a decrease in downstream signaling) and proliferation of Treg in comparison to Tconv when treated with different Akt and PI3K inhibitors. This effect has been observed in both human and murine CD4 T cells. In vivo treatment with these inhibitors resulted in a significant and selective reduction in Treg both in naïve and tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, these PI3K-Akt inhibitors led to a significant therapeutic antitumor effect, which was shown to be Treg-dependent. Here, we report the use of PI3K-Akt pathway inhibitors as potent agents for the selective depletion of suppressive Treg. We show that these inhibitors are able to enhance the antitumor immune response and are therefore promising clinical reagents for Treg-depletion. PMID:25080445

  11. TRAF6 is essential for maintenance of regulatory T cells that suppress Th2 type autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Muto

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs maintain immune homeostasis by limiting inflammatory responses. TRAF6 plays a key role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity by mediating signals from various receptors including the T-cell receptor (TCR. T cell-specific deletion of TRAF6 has been shown to induce multiorgan inflammatory disease, but the role of TRAF6 in Tregs remains to be investigated. Here, we generated Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient mice using Foxp3-Cre and TRAF6-flox mice. Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient (cKO mice developed allergic skin diseases, arthritis, lymphadenopathy and hyper IgE phenotypes. Although TRAF6-deficient Tregs possess similar in vitro suppression activity compared to wild-type Tregs, TRAF6-deficient Tregs did not suppress colitis in lymphopenic mice very efficiently due to reduced number of Foxp3-positive cells. In addition, the fraction of TRAF6-deficient Tregs was reduced compared with wild-type Tregs in female cKO mice without inflammation. Moreover, adoptive transfer of Foxp3 (+ Tregs into Rag2(-/- mice revealed that TRAF6-deficient Tregs converted into Foxp3(- cells more rapidly than WT Tregs under lymphopenic conditions. Fate-mapping analysis also revealed that conversion of Tregs from Foxp3(+ to Foxp3(- (exFoxp3 cells was accelerated in TRAF6-deficient Tregs. These data indicate that TRAF6 in Tregs plays important roles in the maintenance of Foxp3 in Tregs and in the suppression of pathogenic Th2 type conversion of Tregs.

  12. Abrogation of CD40–CD154 Signaling Impedes the Homeostasis of Thymic Resident Regulatory T Cells by Altering the Levels of IL-2, but Does Not Affect Regulatory T Cell Development

    OpenAIRE

    Cuss, Steven M.; Green, E. Allison

    2012-01-01

    Identification of costimulatory signals required for murine regulatory T (Treg) cell development relies on measuring the frequency of total thymic Treg cells. However, the thymus contains both resident and newly developed Treg cells; whether such signals target both populations is unknown. In this study, we show that CD40–CD154 blockade specifically targeted thymic resident Treg cells, but not, as was previously believed, newly developed Treg cells. Unlike CD28–CD80/CD86 signals, CD40–CD154 s...

  13. Dietary gluten reduces the number of intestinal regulatory T cells in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Maria; Josephsen, Jytte; Aasted, Bent;

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that gluten-free diet reduces the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, though the mechanism is not known. However, regulatory T cells (Treg) are likely to play an important role. Also, it is known that dietary gluten induces an...... intestinal increase in the bacterium Lactococcus garvieae, but the importance of this phenomenon for T1D development is doubtful. Our hypothesis is that gluten is responsible for mediating its effect on T1D through the influence on Treg development independent of gluten-induced Lactococci. Four groups of...... female NOD and BALB / c mice of 3 week old were fed either a gluten-free diet or a standard diet. Lactococcus garvieae or saline water was administered per oral to one of each dietary group. Spleen and Peyer's patches were sampled from BALB / c mice for flow cytometric monitoring of IL-10 and Treg. NOD...

  14. Induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells: a potential new weapon to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lan; Huimin Fan; Valerie Quesniaux; Bernhard Ryffel; Zhongmin Liu; Song Guo Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) consisting of natural and induced Treg subsets play a crucial role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis against self-antigen.The actions designed to correct defects in numbers or functions of Tregs may be therapeutic in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.While recent studies demonstrated that natural Tregs are instable and dysfunctional in the inflammatory condition,induced Tregs (iTregs) may have a different feature.Here we review the progress of iTregs,particularly focus on their stability and function in the established autoimmune diseases.The advantage of iTregs as therapeutics used under inflammatory conditions is highlighted.Proper generation and manipulation of iTregs used for cellular therapy may provide a promise for the treatment of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  15. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were...... recruited from our outpatient retinal clinic. Control individuals were typically spouses. The diagnosis of neovascular AMD was confirmed using fluorescein and indocyaningreen angiography. Fresh venous blood was analyzed by flow cytometry using fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies to the Treg surface antigens...... CD4, CD25, CD127, CD45RA, and CD31. Main outcome measures were the percentage of CD25(high)CD127(low) Tregs, the percentage of CD45RA(+) naïve Tregs, and the percentage of CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant Tregs. RESULTS: Comparing patients with neovascular AMD to controls, no significant differences...

  16. Positive and negative regulatory mechanisms for fine-tuning cellularity and functions of medullary thymic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishin eAkiyama

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-tolerant T cells and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus. A wide variety of cell-cell interactions in the thymus is required for the differentiation, proliferation, and repertoire selection of T cells. Various secreted and cell surface molecules expressed in thymic epithelial cells mediate these processes. Moreover, cytokines expressed by cells of hematopoietic origin regulate the cellularity of thymic epithelial cells (TECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF family RANK ligand, lymphotoxin, and CD40 ligand, expressed in T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, promote the differentiation and proliferation of medullary TECs (mTECs that play critical roles in the induction of immune tolerance. A recent study suggests that interleukin-22 (IL-22 produced by ILCs promotes regeneration of TECs after irradiation. Intriguingly, TGF-β and osteoprotegerin limit cellularity of mTECs, thereby attenuating regulatory T cell generation. We will review recent insights into the molecular basis for cell-cell interactions regulating differentiation and proliferation of mTECs and also discuss about a perspective on use of mathematical models for understanding this complicated system.

  17. Perforin Expression by CD4+ Regulatory T Cells Increases at Multiple Sclerosis Relapse: Sex Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sánchez-Ramón

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS represents the leading cause of neurological deficit among young adults, affecting women more frequently than men. In MS, the extent of central nervous system lesions is determined by the net balance between self-reactive and regulatory T-cells at any given time, among other factors, as well as by the effect of inflammatory response. Here, we studied both CD4+ and CD8+ TReg in parallel in blood and CSF during MS relapse. A recruitment of both regulatory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (TReg within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF takes place during MS relapse. Not previously described, the presence of CD4+ TReg in CSF was higher in women than in men, which could account for the sexual dimorphism in the incidence of MS. A direct correlation between plasma oestradiol (E2 and IL-2 levels was observed, in line with a putative circuit of E2 and perforin expression by CD4+ TReg playing a role in MS. Also, serum IFN-alpha was higher in females, with direct correlation with serum E2 levels. This is the first study to analyze perforin expression by CD4+ TReg in MS, which was greatly enhanced in CSF, what points out a relevant role of this molecule in the suppressive effects of the CD4+ TReg in MS, and contributes to the understanding of MS pathophysiology.

  18. EMSA Eritin Drives Expansion of Regulatory T Cells and Promotes T Cells Differentiation in Irradiated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mansur; Widjajanto, Edi; Widodo, M Aris; Sumitro, Sutiman B

    2016-07-01

    Sublethal irradiation therapy in cancer treatment causes generalized immunosuppression, which results in a range of DNA damage. We examined the significance of a polyherbal medicine called "EMSA Eritin" on immunological responses in sublethally irradiated mice focusing on the involvement of Treg, naïve T cell, and also the development and differentiation of T cells in thymus. Normal BALB/c mice were sublethally irradiated with dose of 600 rad. The irradiated mice were then orally administered by EMSA Eritin once a day at different doses: 1.04, 3.12, 9.37 mg/g body weight. The treatment was performed for 14 days. On day 15, immunological responses were observed by analyzing the status of Treg and differentiation of T cells in thymus. The administration of EMSA Eritin to irradiated mice resulted in a significant increase of pre T cells, Treg cells, and naïve T cells, which in general could maintain and normalize healthy condition in mice. PMID:26170134

  19. Peripheral blood T Regulatory cell counts may not predict transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows that allograft survival rates show a positive correlation with the number of circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs). This study investigated both the number and the cytokine profiles exhibited by Foxp3+ Tregs in blood, spleen and lymph nodes of Lewis rat recipients of BN rat cardiac allografts after a single-dose of Rapamycin (RAPA). Results Rats were divided into three groups: control group (containing healthy control and acute rejection group), and recipients treated with a single dose of RAPA on either Day 1 (1D group)or Day 3 (3D group) post-transplant. We analyzed the number of Foxp3+Tregs and the expression of Foxp3 and cytokines in the peripheral blood and the peripheral lymphoid tissues. No difference was found in the numbers of circulating Foxp3+ Tregs between these three groups. RAPA administration significantly increased Foxp3 expression in peripheral lymphoid tissues after a single dose of RAPA on Day 3 post-transplant. Foxp3+Tregs inhibited the activity of effector T cells (Teff) via the secretion of TGF-β1. Conclusion The number of Tregs in the recipient's blood may not be a good predictor of transplant rejection. Foxp3+Tregs inhibit the activity of Teff cells mainly in the peripheral lymphoid tissues. PMID:20633262

  20. Peripheral blood T Regulatory cell counts may not predict transplant rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence shows that allograft survival rates show a positive correlation with the number of circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs. This study investigated both the number and the cytokine profiles exhibited by Foxp3+ Tregs in blood, spleen and lymph nodes of Lewis rat recipients of BN rat cardiac allografts after a single-dose of Rapamycin (RAPA. Results Rats were divided into three groups: control group (containing healthy control and acute rejection group, and recipients treated with a single dose of RAPA on either Day 1 (1D groupor Day 3 (3D group post-transplant. We analyzed the number of Foxp3+Tregs and the expression of Foxp3 and cytokines in the peripheral blood and the peripheral lymphoid tissues. No difference was found in the numbers of circulating Foxp3+ Tregs between these three groups. RAPA administration significantly increased Foxp3 expression in peripheral lymphoid tissues after a single dose of RAPA on Day 3 post-transplant. Foxp3+Tregs inhibited the activity of effector T cells (Teff via the secretion of TGF-β1. Conclusion The number of Tregs in the recipient's blood may not be a good predictor of transplant rejection. Foxp3+Tregs inhibit the activity of Teff cells mainly in the peripheral lymphoid tissues.

  1. The Macrophage Galactose-Type C-Type Lectin (MGL Modulates Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Grazia Zizzari

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are physiologically designed to prevent autoimmune disease and maintain self-tolerance. In tumour microenvironments, their presence is related to a poor prognosis, and they influence the therapeutic outcome due to their capacity to suppress the immune response by cell-cell contact and to release immunosuppressive cytokines. In this study, we demonstrate that Treg immunosuppressive activity can be modulated by the cross-linking between the CD45RA expressed by Tregs and the C-type lectin MGL. This specific interaction strongly decreases the immunosuppressive activity of Tregs, restoring the proliferative capacity of co-cultured T lymphocytes. This effect can be attributed to changes in CD45RA and TCR signalling through the inhibition of Lck and inactivation of Zap-70, an increase in the Foxp3 methylation status and, ultimately, the reduced production of suppressive cytokines. These results indicate a role of MGL as an immunomodulator within the tumour microenvironment interfering with Treg functions, suggesting its possible use in the design of anticancer vaccines.

  2. Rapid and high-throughput construction of microbial cell-factories with regulatory noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Na, Dokyun; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-11-01

    Due to global crises such as pollution and depletion of fossil fuels, sustainable technologies based on microbial cell-factories have been garnering great interest as an alternative to chemical factories. The development of microbial cell-factories is imperative in cutting down the overall manufacturing cost. Thus, diverse metabolic engineering strategies and engineering tools have been established to obtain a preferred genotype and phenotype displaying superior productivity. However, these tools are limited to only a handful of genes with permanent modification of a genome and significant labor costs, and this is one of the bottlenecks associated with biofactory construction. Therefore, a groundbreaking rapid and high-throughput engineering tool is needed for efficient construction of microbial cell-factories. During the last decade, copious small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been discovered in bacteria. These are involved in substantial regulatory roles like transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation by modulating mRNA elongation, stability, or translational efficiency. Because of their vulnerability, ncRNAs can be used as another layer of conditional control over gene expression without modifying chromosomal sequences, and hence would be a promising high-throughput tool for metabolic engineering. Here, we review successful design principles and applications of ncRNAs for high-throughput metabolic engineering or physiological studies of diverse industrially important microorganisms. PMID:26027891

  3. Treatment of graft-versus-host disease with naturally occurring T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzonkowski, Piotr; Dukat-Mazurek, Anna; Bieniaszewska, Maria; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Dobyszuk, Anita; Juścińska, Jolanta; Dutka, Magdalena; Myśliwska, Jolanta; Hellmann, Andrzej

    2013-12-01

    A significant body of evidence suggests that treatment with naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs) is an appropriate therapy for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). GvHD is a major complication of bone marrow transplantation in which the transplanted immune system recognizes recipient tissues as a non-self and destroys them. In many cases, this condition significantly deteriorates the quality of life of the affected patients. It is also one of the most important causes of death after bone marrow transplantation. Tregs constitute a population responsible for dominant tolerance to self-tissues in the immune system. These cells prevent autoimmune and allergic reactions and decrease the risk of rejection of allotransplants. For these reasons, Tregs are considered as a cellular drug in GvHD. The results of the first clinical trials with these cells are already available. In this review we present important experimental facts which led to the clinical use of Tregs. We then critically evaluate specific requirements for Treg therapy in GvHD and therapies with Tregs currently under clinical investigation, including our experience and future perspectives on this kind of cellular treatment. PMID:23813436

  4. The kinase DYRK1A reciprocally regulates the differentiation of Th17 and regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Bernard; Gagnon, John D; Goel, Gautam; Roche, Marly I; Conway, Kara L; Tran, Khoa; Aldrich, Leslie N; Sundberg, Thomas B; Paterson, Alison M; Mordecai, Scott; Dombkowski, David; Schirmer, Melanie; Tan, Pauline H; Bhan, Atul K; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; O'Shea, John J; Medoff, Benjamin D; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L; Sharpe, Arlene H; Shaw, Stanley Y; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2015-01-01

    The balance between Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells critically modulates immune homeostasis, with an inadequate Treg response contributing to inflammatory disease. Using an unbiased chemical biology approach, we identified a novel role for the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A in regulating this balance. Inhibition of DYRK1A enhances Treg differentiation and impairs Th17 differentiation without affecting known pathways of Treg/Th17 differentiation. Thus, DYRK1A represents a novel mechanistic node at the branch point between commitment to either Treg or Th17 lineages. Importantly, both Treg cells generated using the DYRK1A inhibitor harmine and direct administration of harmine itself potently attenuate inflammation in multiple experimental models of systemic autoimmunity and mucosal inflammation. Our results identify DYRK1A as a physiologically relevant regulator of Treg cell differentiation and suggest a broader role for other DYRK family members in immune homeostasis. These results are discussed in the context of human diseases associated with dysregulated DYRK activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05920.001 PMID:25998054

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G and Regulatory T Cells During Specific Immunotherapy for Pollen Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Johnsen, Claus;

    2013-01-01

    Background: TH2-biased immune responses are important in allergy pathogenesis. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) might include the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 blocking antibodies, a reduction in the number of effector cells, and skewing of......G4). Methods: Eleven birch and/or grass pollen-allergic patients and 10 healthy nonatopic controls were studied before and during SIT. Tregs, chemokine receptors, soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G), Ig-like transcript (ILT) 2, specific IgE, and IgG4 were studied. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were...... stimulated with pollen extract in vitro and immune factors were evaluated. Results: During SIT, the main changes in the peripheral blood were an increase in CXCR3+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs and a decrease in CCR4+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs, an increase in allergen-specific IgG4, and a decrease in sHLA-G during...

  6. Ex Vivo Costimulatory Blockade to Generate Regulatory T Cells From Patients Awaiting Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, E C; Cole, G A; Wylie, W H; Kelner, R H; Janec, K J; Yuan, H; Oppatt, J; Brennan, L L; Turka, L A; Markmann, J

    2016-07-01

    Short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation have improved dramatically, but chronic rejection and regimen-related toxicity continue to compromise overall patient outcomes. Development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as a means to decrease alloresponsiveness and limit the need for pharmacologic immunosuppression is an active area of preclinical and clinical investigation. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory effects of end-stage renal disease on the efficacy of various strategies to generate and expand recipient Tregs for kidney transplantation are incompletely characterized. In this study, we show that Tregs can be successfully generated from either freshly isolated or previously cryopreserved uremic recipient (responder) and healthy donor (stimulator) peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the strategy of ex vivo costimulatory blockade with belatacept during mixed lymphocyte culture. Moreover, these Tregs maintain a CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) surface phenotype, high levels of intracellular FOXP3 and significant demethylation of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylation region on allorestimulation with donor stimulator cells. These data support evaluation of this simple, brief Treg production strategy in clinical trials of mismatched kidney transplantation. PMID:26790369

  7. [Analysis of the transcriptional profiling of cell cycle regulatory networks of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells in batch and fed-batch cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmao; Ye, Lingling; Liu, Hong; Li, Shichong; Wang, Qiwei; Wu, Benchuan; Chen, Zhaolie

    2011-08-01

    In the light of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line 11G-S expressing human recombinant pro-urokinase, the differences of gene expression levels of the cells in different growth phases in both batch and fed-batch cultures were revealed by using gene chip technology. Then, based on the known cell cycle regulatory networks, the transcriptional profiling of the cell cycle regulatory networks of the cells in batch and fed-batch cultures was analyzed by using Genmapp software. Among the approximate 19 191 target genes in gene chip, the number of down-regulated genes was more than those of up-regulated genes of the cells in both batch and fed-batch cultures. The number of down-regulated genes of the cells in the recession phase in fed-batch culture was much more than that of the cells in batch culture. Comparative transcriptional analysis of the key cell cycle regulatory genes of the cells in both culture modes indicated that the cell proliferation and cell viability of the cells in both batch and fed-batch cultures were mainly regulated through down-regulating Cdk6, Cdk2, Cdc2a, Ccne1, Ccne2 genes of CDKs, Cyclin and CKI family and up-regulating Smad4 gene. PMID:22097809

  8. Structure-function analysis of the beta regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 by targeting embryonic stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziercher, Léa; Filhol, Odile; Laudet, Béatrice; Prudent, Renaud; Cochet, Claude; Buchou, Thierry

    2011-10-01

    Programs that govern stem cell maintenance and pluripotency are dependent on extracellular factors and of intrinsic cell modulators. Embryonic stem (ES) cells with a specific depletion of the gene encoding the regulatory subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2β) revealed a viability defect. However, analysis of CK2β functions along the neural lineage established CK2β as a positive regulator for neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC) proliferation and multipotency. By using an in vitro genetic conditional approach, we demonstrate in this work that specific domains of CK2β involved in the regulatory function towards CK2 catalytic subunits are crucial structural determinants for ES cell homeostasis. PMID:21861102

  9. Identifying viable regulatory and innovation pathways for regenerative medicine: a case study of cultured red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, J; Tait, J; Mastroeni, M; Turner, M L; Mountford, J C; Bruce, K

    2015-01-25

    The creation of red blood cells for the blood transfusion markets represents a highly innovative application of regenerative medicine with a medium term (5-10 year) prospect for first clinical studies. This article describes a case study analysis of a project to derive red blood cells from human embryonic stem cells, including the systemic challenges arising from (i) the selection of appropriate and viable regulatory protocols and (ii) technological constraints related to stem cell manufacture and scale up to clinical Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standard. The method used for case study analysis (Analysis of Life Science Innovation Systems (ALSIS)) is also innovative, demonstrating a new approach to social and natural science collaboration to foresight product development pathways. Issues arising along the development pathway include cell manufacture and scale-up challenges, affected by regulatory demands emerging from the innovation ecosystem (preclinical testing and clinical trials). Our discussion reflects on the efforts being made by regulators to adapt the current pharmaceuticals-based regulatory model to an allogeneic regenerative medicine product and the broader lessons from this case study for successful innovation and translation of regenerative medicine therapies, including the role of methodological and regulatory innovation in future development in the field. PMID:25094050

  10. Role of human leukocyte antigen-G in the induction of adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Silvia; Magnani, Chiara Francesca; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-12-01

    Adaptive type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are suppressor cells characterized by the production of interleukin (IL)-10 in the absence of IL-4. IL-10 is essential not only for suppression of effector cells by Tr1 cells, but also for their differentiation in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known on the molecular mechanisms underneath the IL-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G, a non-classical HLA class I molecule, has both direct inhibitory effects on natural killer cells, dendritic cells (DC), and T cells and long-term tolerogenic indirect effects by inducing regulatory T (Tr) cells. In the present review, we discuss current findings on Tr-cell induction by the different isoforms of HLA-G, focusing on the relationship among HLA-G, its ligands, and IL-10. We recently described a subset of human DC, termed DC-10, that express high levels of HLA-G and ILT4, secrete high amounts of IL-10, and induce allospecific Tr1 cells in vitro via an IL-10-dependent ILT4/HLA-G pathway. IL-10, HLA-G, and ILT4 may also be involved in Tr1-cell induction in vivo. Overall, these data demonstrate that cross-regulation between IL-10 and HLA-G may be instrumental for Tr1-cell induction and tolerance. PMID:19664675

  11. IL-9 contributes to immunosuppression mediated by regulatory T cells and mast cells in B-cell non-hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Li; Gao, Jun-Ming; Li, Pei-Pei; Wang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    It has been known that regulatory T (Treg) cells and mast cells (MCs) are involved in tumor immunity regulation, but the exact roles and mechanisms of Treg cells and MCs in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are incompletely defined. In the present study, we found that the number of Foxp3(+) Treg cells and CD117(+) MCs increased in B-cell NHL patients. Concomitantly, a high level of interleukin (IL)-9 was observed in the sera from B-cell NHL patients. Neutralizing IL-9 significantly inhibited tumor growth in the lymphoma model of murine, and this process was associated with down-regulation of Treg cells and MCs. Furthermore, IL-9 was also demonstrated to induce expression of MC-related genes and proliferation of MCs from the bone marrow stem cells. Collectively, our results indicate that Treg cell and MCs are involved in immunosuppression in B-cell NHL, and IL-9 is a key mediator of Treg cells and MCs in that process. These findings provide novel insight for the pathogenesis and possible therapeutic strategy of B-cell NHL. PMID:21898141

  12. Gut Mucosal FOXP3+ Regulatory CD4+ T Cells and Nonregulatory CD4+ T Cells Are Differentially Affected by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques▿

    OpenAIRE

    Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Hofmann, Jörg; Unbehaun, Anett; Kunkel, Désirée; Moos, Verena; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sauermann, Ulrike; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents a major site for human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV) replication and CD4+ T-cell depletion. Despite severe depletion of mucosal CD4+ T cells, FOXP3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) are highly increased in the gut mucosa of chronically HIV-infected individuals and may contribute to HIV pathogenesis, either by their immunosuppressive function or as a significant target cell population for virus production. Little is known about the suscepti...

  13. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  14. Oral tolerance to cancer can be abrogated by T regulatory cell inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maria C; Casey, Garrett; Larkin, John O; Guinn, Barbara-ann; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Oral administration of tumour cells induces an immune hypo-responsiveness known as oral tolerance. We have previously shown that oral tolerance to a cancer is tumour antigen specific, non-cross-reactive and confers a tumour growth advantage. We investigated the utilisation of regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion on oral tolerance to a cancer and its ability to control tumour growth. Balb/C mice were gavage fed homogenised tumour tissue--JBS fibrosarcoma (to induce oral tolerance to a cancer), or PBS as control. Growth of subcutaneous JBS tumours were measured; splenic tissue excised and flow cytometry used to quantify and compare systemic Tregs and T effector (Teff) cell populations. Prior to and/or following tumour feeding, mice were intraperitoneally administered anti-CD25, to inactivate systemic Tregs, or given isotype antibody as a control. Mice which were orally tolerised prior to subcutaneous tumour induction, displayed significantly higher systemic Treg levels (14% vs 6%) and faster tumour growth rates than controls (p<0.05). Complete regression of tumours were only seen after Treg inactivation and occurred in all groups--this was not inhibited by tumour feeding. The cure rates for Treg inactivation were 60% during tolerisation, 75% during tumour growth and 100% during inactivation for both tolerisation and tumour growth. Depletion of Tregs gave rise to an increased number of Teff cells. Treg depletion post-tolerisation and post-tumour induction led to the complete regression of all tumours on tumour bearing mice. Oral administration of tumour tissue, confers a tumour growth advantage and is accompanied by an increase in systemic Treg levels. The administration of anti-CD25 Ab decreased Treg numbers and caused an increase in Teffs. Most notably Treg cell inhibition overcame established oral tolerance with consequent tumor regression, especially relevant to foregut cancers where oral tolerance is likely to be induced by the shedding of tumour tissue into the

  15. Regulatory CD4+Foxp3+ T cells control the severity of anaphylaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Kanjarawi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening outcome of immediate-type hypersensitivity to allergen, consecutive to mast cell degranulation by allergen-specific IgE. Regulatory T cells (Treg can control allergic sensitization and mast cell degranulation, yet their clinical benefit on anaphylactic symptoms is poorly documented. Here we investigated whether Treg action during the effector arm of the allergic response alleviates anaphylaxis. METHODS: We used a validated model of IgE-mediated passive systemic anaphylaxis, induced by intravenous challenge with DNP-HSA in mice passively sensitized with DNP-specific IgE. Anaphylaxis was monitored by the drop in body temperature as well as plasma histamine and serum mMCP1 levels. The role of Treg was analyzed using MHC class II-deficient (Aβ(°/° mice, treatment with anti-CD25 or anti-CD4 mAbs and conditional ablation of Foxp3(+ Treg in DEREG mice. Therapeutic efficacy of Treg was also evaluated by transfer experiments using FoxP3-eGFP knock-in mice. RESULTS: Anaphylaxis did not occur in mast cell-deficient W/W(v mutant mice and was only moderate and transient in mice deficient for histamine receptor-1. Defects in constitutive Treg, either genetic or induced by antibody or toxin treatment resulted in a more severe and/or sustained hypothermia, associated with a rise in serum mMCP1, but not histamine. Adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+ Treg from either naïve or DNP-sensitized donors similarly alleviated body temperature loss in Treg-deficient DEREG mice. CONCLUSION: Constitutive Foxp3(+ Treg can control the symptomatic phase of mast cell and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis in mice. This might open up new therapeutic avenues using constitutive rather than Ag-specific Treg for inducing tolerance in allergic patients.

  16. Vitamin D status is positively correlated with regulatory T cell function in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Smolders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS, a compromised regulatory T cell (Treg function is believed to be critically involved in the disease process. In vitro, the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D has been shown to promote Treg development. A poor vitamin D status has been linked with MS incidence and MS disease activity. In the present study, we assess a potential in vivo correlation between vitamin D status and Treg function in relapsing remitting MS (RRMS patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD were measured in 29 RRMS patients. The number of circulating Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry, and their functionality was tested in vitro in a CFSE-based proliferation suppression assay. Additionally, the intracellular cytokine profile of T helper cells was determined directly ex-vivo by flow-cytometry. Serum levels of 25(OHD correlated positively with the ability of Tregs to suppress T cell proliferation (R = 0.590, P = 0.002. No correlation between 25(OHD levels and the number of Tregs was found. The IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio (Th1/Th2-balance was more directed towards IL-4 in patients with favourable 25(OHD levels (R = -0.435, P = 0.023. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show an association of high 25(OHD levels with an improved Treg function, and with skewing of the Th1/Th2 balance towards Th2. These findings suggest that vitamin D is an important promoter of T cell regulation in vivo in MS patients. It is tempting to speculate that our results may not only hold for MS, but also for other autoimmune diseases. Future intervention studies will show whether modulation of vitamin D status results in modulation of the T cell response and subsequent amelioration of disease activity.

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Expressing Aortic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Protect against Atherosclerosis by Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Lee, Jun Seong; Machmach, Kawthar; Shim, Dahee; Choi, Junhee; Wi, Young Jin; Jang, Hyung Seok; Jung, In-Hyuk; Kim, Kyeongdae; Yoon, Won Kee; Miah, Mohammad Alam; Li, Bin; Chang, Jinsam; Bego, Mariana G; Pham, Tram N Q; Loschko, Jakob; Fritz, Jörg Hermann; Krug, Anne B; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Keler, Tibor; Guimond, Jean V; Haddad, Elie; Cohen, Eric A; Sirois, Martin G; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Colonna, Marco; Oh, Goo Taeg; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Cheong, Cheolho

    2016-05-10

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are unique bone-marrow-derived cells that produce large amounts of type I interferon in response to microbial stimulation. Furthermore, pDCs also promote T cell tolerance in sterile-inflammation conditions. However, the immunomodulatory role of aortic pDCs in atherosclerosis has been poorly understood. Here, we identified functional mouse and human pDCs in the aortic intima and showed that selective, inducible pDC depletion in mice exacerbates atherosclerosis. Aortic pDCs expressed CCR9 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1), an enzyme involved in driving the generation of regulatorycells (Tregs). As a consequence, loss of pDCs resulted in decreased numbers of Tregs and reduced IL-10 levels in the aorta. Moreover, antigen presentation by pDCs expanded antigen-specific Tregs in the atherosclerotic aorta. Notably, Tregs ablation affected pDC homeostasis in diseased aorta. Accordingly, pDCs in human atherosclerotic aortas colocalized with Tregs. Collectively, we identified a mechanism of atheroprotection mediated by tolerogenic aortic pDCs. PMID:27166946

  18. Characterization of regulatory dendritic cells differentiated from the bone marrow of UV-irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Royce L X; Scott, Naomi M; Bisley, Jackie L; Lambert, Misty J; Gorman, Shelley; Norval, Mary; Hart, Prue H

    2013-12-01

    When antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) differentiated from the bone marrow (BM) of UV-irradiated mice (UV-BMDCs) were adoptively transferred into naive mice or mice pre-sensitized with that antigen, the recipients exhibited a reduced immune response following antigen challenge. Hence, UV-BMDCs are poorly immunogenic and can suppress pre-existing immunity. The UV-induced effect on BM-derived DCs was rapid (observed 1 day after UV radiation), long-lasting (observed 10 days after UV radiation) and UV dose-dependent. The mechanism by which UV-BMDCs could regulate immunity was investigated. The CD11c(+) cells, differentiated using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor + interleukin-4, were confirmed to be DCs because they did not express the myeloid-derived suppressor cell marker, Gr1. UV-BMDCs did not display altered antigen uptake, processing or ability to activate T cells in vitro. When gene expression in UV-BMDCs and DCs differentiated from the BM of non-irradiated mice (control-BMDCs) was examined, Ccl7, Ccl8 and CSF1R (CD115) mRNA transcripts were up-regulated in UV-BMDCs compared with control-BMDCs. However, neutralizing antibodies for Ccl7 and Ccl8 did not abrogate the reduced immunogenicity of UV-BMDCs in vivo. Moreover, the up-regulation of CSF1R transcript did not correspond with increased receptor expression on UV-BMDCs. The phenotypes of UV-BMDCs and control-BMDCs were similar, with no difference in the expression of CD4, CD8α, CD103, B220 or F4/80, or the regulatory molecules CCR7 (CD197), FasL (CD95L), B7H3 (CD276) and B7H4. However, PDL1 (CD274) expression was reduced in UV-BMDCs compared with control-BMDCs following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. In summary, UV-BMDCs do not express the classical phenotypic or gene expression properties of DCs reported by others as 'regulatory' or 'tolerogenic'. PMID:23826713

  19. Adenosine generation catalyzed by CD39 and CD73 expressed on regulatory T cells mediates immune suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Deaglio, Silvia; Dwyer, Karen M.; GAO, WENDA; Friedman, David; Usheva, Anny; Erat, Anna; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Enjyoji, Keiichii; Linden, Joel; Oukka, Mohamed; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Strom, Terry B.; Robson, Simon C.

    2007-01-01

    The study of T regulatory cells (T reg cells) has been limited by the lack of specific surface markers and an inability to define mechanisms of suppression. We show that the expression of CD39/ENTPD1 in concert with CD73/ecto-5′-nucleotidase distinguishes CD4+/CD25+/Foxp3+ T reg cells from other T cells. These ectoenzymes generate pericellular adenosine from extracellular nucleotides. The coordinated expression of CD39/CD73 on T reg cells and the adenosine A2A receptor on activated T effector...

  20. Signaling through C5a receptor and C3a receptor diminishes function of murine natural regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Wing-hong; Van der Touw, William; Paz-Artal, Estela; Li, Ming O.; Heeger, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Thymus-derived (natural) CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (nT reg cells) are required for immune homeostasis and self-tolerance, but must be stringently controlled to permit expansion of protective immunity. Previous findings linking signals transmitted through T cell–expressed C5a receptor (C5aR) and C3a receptor (C3aR) to activation, differentiation, and expansion of conventional CD4+CD25− T cells (T conv cells), raised the possibility that C3aR/C5aR signaling on nT reg cells could physiologi...