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Sample records for cell cycle-dependent regulation

  1. Differential regulation of survivin by p53 contributes to cell cycle dependent apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan JIN; Yong WEI; Lei XIONG; Ying YANG; Jia Rui WU

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cell-cycle checkpoints are tightly correlated with the regulation of apoptosis, in which p53 plays an important role. Our present works show that the expression of E6/E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus in HeLa cells is inhibited in the presence of anti-tumor reagent tripchlorolide (TC), which results in the up-regulation of p53 in HeLa cells. Interestingly, under the same TC-treatment, the cells at the early S-phase are more susceptible to apoptosis than those at the middle S-phase although p53 protein is stabilized to the same level in both situations.Significant difference is exhibited between the two specified expression profiles. Further analysis demonstrates that anti-apoptotic gene survivin is up-regulated by p53 in the TC-treated middle-S cells, whereas it is down-regulated by p53 in the TC-treated early-S cells. Taken together, the present study indicates that the differential p53-regulated expression of survivin at different stages of the cell cycle results in different cellular outputs under the same apoptosis-inducer.

  2. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  3. Cell-cycle-dependent PC-PLC regulation by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuchao; Jia, Chengyou; Zhao, Qianlei; Zhang, Chunyi; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2009-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is involved in the cell signal transduction, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The mechanism of its action, however, has not been fully understood, particularly, the role of PC-PLC in the cell cycle. In the present study, we found that cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) and PC-PLC were co-immunoprecipitated reciprocally by either antibody in rat hepatoma cells CBRH-7919 as well as in rat liver tissue. Using confocal microscopy, we found that PC-PLC and Cdc20 were co-localized in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum region (the "juxtanuclear quality control" compartment, JUNQ). The expression level and activities of PC-PLC changed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and were inversely correlated with the expression of Cdc20. Intriguingly, Cdc20 overexpression altered the subcellular localization and distribution of PC-PLC, and caused PC-PLC degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Taken together, our data indicate that PC-PLC regulation in cell cycles is controlled by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated UPP.

  4. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

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    Kito, Hiroaki [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ohya, Susumu [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Division of Pathological Sciences, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  5. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  6. Estrogen Receptor Beta Displays Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression and Regulates the G1 Phase through a Non-Genomic Mechanism in Prostate Carcinoma Cells

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    Antoni Hurtado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is well known that estrogens regulate cell cycle progression, but the specific contributions and mechanisms of action of the estrogen receptor beta (ERβ remain elusive.

  7. CtIP is regulated by the APC/C-Cdh1 to mediate cell cycle-dependent control of DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Harmen R.; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; Neugebauer, Christine; Fehrmann, Rudolf; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Sartori, Alessandro A.; van Vugt, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Human cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms for responding to DNA damage to maintain genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. For instance, the cell cycle can be arrested at different stages to allow time for DNA repair. The APC/C-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase regulates mitotic exit but is also implic

  8. Improved localization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in cells with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride as fluorescent redox dye reveals its cell cycle-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiks, Wilma M; van Marle, Jan; van Oven, Carel; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Cascante, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Since the introduction of cyano-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride (CTC), a tetrazolium salt that gives rise to a fluorescent formazan after reduction, it has been applied to quantify activity of dehydrogenases in individual cells using flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that the fluorescent formazan was exclusively localized at the surface of individual cells and not at intracellular sites of enzyme activity. In the present study, the technique has been optimized to localize activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) intracellularly in individual cells. Activity was demonstrated in cultured fibrosarcoma cells in different stages of the cell cycle. Cells were incubated for the detection of G6PD activity using a medium containing 6% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol, 5 mM CTC, magnesium chloride, sodium azide, the electron carrier methoxyphenazine methosulphate, NADP, and glucose-6-phosphate. Before incubation, cells were permeabilized with 0.025% glutaraldehyde. Fluorescent formazan was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of fibrosarcoma cells. The amount of fluorescent formazan in cells increased linearly with incubation time when measured with flow cytometry and CLSM. When combining the Hoechst staining for DNA with the CTC method for the demonstration of G6PD activity, flow cytometry showed that G6PD activity of cells in S phase and G2/M phase is 27 +/- 4% and 43 +/- 4% higher, respectively, than that of cells in G1 phase. CLSM revealed that cells in all phases of mitosis as well as during apoptosis contained considerably lower G6PD activity than cells in interphase. It is concluded that posttranslational regulation of G6PD is responsible for this cell cycle-dependent activity.

  9. Use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine labelling and flow cytometry to study cell cycle-dependent regulation of human cytomegalovirus gene expression.

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    Wiebusch, Lüder; Hagemeier, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle position at the time of infection has a profound influence on human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene expression and therefore needs consideration in the design and control of HCMV experiments. While G0/G1 cells support the immediate onset of viral transcription, cells progressing through the S and G2 cell cycle phases prevent HCMV from entering the lytic replication cycle. Here, we provide two fast and reliable protocols that allow one to determine the cell cycle distribution of the designated host cells and monitor viral protein expression as a function of the cell cycle state. Both protocols make use of the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine and "click" chemistry to label HCMV-non-permissive S phase cells in a gentle and sensitive way.

  10. Cell cycle-dependent induction of autophagy, mitophagy and reticulophagy.

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    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Vitale, Ilio; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-09-15

    When added to cells, a variety of autophagy inducers that operate through distinct mechanisms and target different organelles for autophagic destruction (mitochondria in mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum in reticulophagy) rarely induce autophagic vacuolization in more than 50% or the cells. Here we show that this heterogeneity may be explained by cell cycle-specific effects. The BH3 mimetic ABT737, lithium, rapamycin, tunicamycin or nutrient depletion stereotypically induce autophagy preferentially in the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle, as determined by simultaneous monitoring of cell cycle markers and the cytoplasmic aggregation of GFP-LC3 in autophagic vacuoles. These results point to a hitherto neglected crosstalk between autophagic vacuolization and cell cycle regulation.

  11. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  12. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

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    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun-Joo [TissueGene Inc. 9605 Medical Center Dr., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Yoo, Hae Yong [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Yong, E-mail: choicy@skku.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  13. Cell cycle dependent RRM2 may serve as proliferation marker and pharmaceutical target in adrenocortical cancer

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    Grolmusz, Vince Kornél; Karászi, Katalin; Micsik, Tamás; Tóth, Eszter Angéla; Mészáros, Katalin; Karvaly, Gellért; Barna, Gábor; Szabó, Péter Márton; Baghy, Kornélia; Matkó, János; Kovalszky, Ilona; Tóth, Miklós; Rácz, Károly; Igaz, Péter; Patócs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is a rare, but agressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Histopathological diagnosis is challenging and pharmacological options for treatment are limited. By the comparative reanalysis of the transcriptional malignancy signature with the cell cycle dependent transcriptional program of ACC, we aimed to identify novel biomarkers which may be used in the histopathological diagnosis and for the prediction of therapeutical response of ACC. Comparative reanalysis of publicly available microarray datasets included three earlier studies comparing transcriptional differences between ACC and benign adrenocortical adenoma (ACA) and one study presenting the cell cycle dependent gene expressional program of human ACC cell line NCI-H295R. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on ACC samples. In vitro effects of antineoplastic drugs including gemcitabine, mitotane and 9-cis-retinoic acid alone and in combination were tested in the NCI-H295R adrenocortical cell line. Upon the comparative reanalysis, ribonucleotide reductase subunit 2 (RRM2), responsible for the ribonucleotide dezoxyribonucleotide conversion during the S phase of the cell cycle has been validated as cell cycle dependently expressed. Moreover, its expression was associated with the malignancy signature, as well. Immunohistochemical analysis of RRM2 revealed a strong correlation with Ki67 index in ACC. Among the antiproliferative effects of the investigated compounds, gemcitabine showed a strong inhibition of proliferation and an increase of apoptotic events. Additionally, RRM2 has been upregulated upon gemcitabine treatment. Upon our results, RRM2 might be used as a proliferation marker in ACC. RRM2 upregulation upon gemcitabine treatment might contribute to an emerging chemoresistance against gemcitabine, which is in line with its limited therapeutical efficacy in ACC, and which should be overcome for successful clinical applications.

  14. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

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    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  15. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

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    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  16. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of pRb-like protein in root meristem cells of Vicia faba.

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    Polit, Justyna Teresa; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell cycle progression by controlling the G1-to-S phase transition. As evidenced in mammals, pRb has three functionally distinct binding domains and interacts with a number of proteins including the E2F family of transcription factors, proteins with a conserved LxCxE motif (D-type cyclin), and c-Abl tyrosine kinase. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb inhibits its ability to bind target proteins, thus enabling further progression of the cell cycle. As yet, the roles of pRb and pRb-binding factors have not been well characterized in plants. By using antibody which specifically recognizes phosphorylated serines (S807/811) in the c-Abl tyrosine kinase binding C-domain of human pRb, we provide evidence for the cell cycle-dependent changes in pRb-like proteins in root meristems cells of Vicia faba. An increased phosphorylation of this protein has been found correlated with the G1-to-S phase transition.

  17. Cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of Theileria annulata schizont surface proteins.

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    Olga Wiens

    Full Text Available The invasion of Theileria sporozoites into bovine leukocytes is rapidly followed by the destruction of the surrounding host cell membrane, allowing the parasite to establish its niche within the host cell cytoplasm. Theileria infection induces host cell transformation, characterised by increased host cell proliferation and invasiveness, and the activation of anti-apoptotic genes. This process is strictly dependent on the presence of a viable parasite. Several host cell kinases, including PI3-K, JNK, CK2 and Src-family kinases, are constitutively activated in Theileria-infected cells and contribute to the transformed phenotype. Although a number of host cell molecules, including IkB kinase and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, are recruited to the schizont surface, very little is known about the schizont molecules involved in host-parasite interactions. In this study we used immunofluorescence to detect phosphorylated threonine (p-Thr, serine (p-Ser and threonine-proline (p-Thr-Pro epitopes on the schizont during host cell cycle progression, revealing extensive schizont phosphorylation during host cell interphase. Furthermore, we established a quick protocol to isolate schizonts from infected macrophages following synchronisation in S-phase or mitosis, and used mass spectrometry to detect phosphorylated schizont proteins. In total, 65 phosphorylated Theileria proteins were detected, 15 of which are potentially secreted or expressed on the surface of the schizont and thus may be targets for host cell kinases. In particular, we describe the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of two T. annulata surface proteins, TaSP and p104, both of which are highly phosphorylated during host cell S-phase. TaSP and p104 are involved in mediating interactions between the parasite and the host cell cytoskeleton, which is crucial for the persistence of the parasite within the dividing host cell and the maintenance of the transformed state.

  18. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

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    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Shih, Ie-Ming; Tseng, Yiider

    2011-02-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G0/G1 and G2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis.

  19. The Single Cell Proteome Project - Cell-Cycle Dependent Protein Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    sequencing or hybridization array capillary chromatography. After a 6-min-long preliminary technologies.30,31 separation, fractions from the first...characterize single cells. These tools include mass cating cells contain diploid, S-phase and tetraploid frac- spectrometry, electrochemistry and capillary...separation tions; and some advanced tumors contain tetraploid and methods. This review focuses on the use of capillary aneuploid cells [2

  20. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

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    Giulia Oliva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria.

  1. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

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    Oliva, Giulia; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Knoth, Maike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA) and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria. PMID:28074027

  2. Identification of Cell Cycle Dependent Interaction Partners of the Septins by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

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    Christian Renz

    Full Text Available The septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that, in the baker's yeast, assemble into a highly ordered array of filaments at the mother bud neck. These filaments undergo significant structural rearrangements during the cell cycle. We aimed at identifying key components that are involved in or regulate the transitions of the septins. By combining cell synchronization and quantitative affinity-purification mass-spectrometry, we performed a screen for specific interaction partners of the septins at three distinct stages of the cell cycle. A total of 83 interaction partners of the septins were assigned. Surprisingly, we detected DNA-interacting/nuclear proteins and proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis predominantly present in alpha-factor arrested that do not display an assembled septin structure. Furthermore, two distinct sets of regulatory proteins that are specific for cells at S-phase with a stable septin collar or at mitosis with split septin rings were identified. Complementary methods like SPLIFF and immunoprecipitation allowed us to more exactly define the spatial and temporal characteristics of selected hits of the AP-MS screen.

  3. Cdc6 localizes to S- and G2-phase centrosomes in a cell cycle-dependent manner

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    Kim, Gwang Su; Kang, Jeeheon; Bang, Sung Woong; Hwang, Deog Su, E-mail: dshwang@snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Cdc6 protein is a component of the pre-replicative complex required for chromosomal replication initiation. • Cdc6 localized to centrosomes of S and G2 phases in a cell cycle-dependent manner. • The centrosomal localization was governed by centrosomal localization signal sequences of Cdc6. • Deletions or substitution mutations on the centrosomal localization signal interfered with centrosomal localization of the Cdc6 proteins. - Abstract: The Cdc6 protein has been primarily investigated as a component of the pre-replicative complex for the initiation of chromosome replication, which contributes to maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Here, we show that Cdc6 localized to the centrosomes during S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The centrosomal localization was mediated by Cdc6 amino acid residues 311–366, which are conserved within other Cdc6 homologues and contains a putative nuclear export signal. Deletions or substitutions of the amino acid residues did not allow the proteins to localize to centrosomes. In contrast, DsRed tag fused to the amino acid residues localized to centrosomes. These results indicated that a centrosome localization signal is contained within amino acid residues 311–366. The cell cycle-dependent centrosomal localization of Cdc6 in S and G2 phases suggest a novel function of Cdc6 in centrosomes.

  4. FasL and FADD delivery by a glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon virus enhanced apoptosis in primary human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Paula Y

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant cancer of the brain and is notoriously difficult to treat due to the highly proliferative and infiltrative nature of the cells. Herein, we explored the combination treatment of pre-established human glioma xenograft using multiple therapeutic genes whereby the gene expression is regulated by both cell-type and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanism conferred by recombinant HSV-1 amplicon vectors. Results We demonstrated for the first time that Ki67-positive proliferating primary human glioma cells cultured from biopsy samples were effectively induced into cell death by the dual-specific function of the pG8-FasL amplicon vectors. These vectors were relatively stable and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity in vivo. Intracranial implantation of pre-transduced glioma cells resulted in better survival outcome when compared with viral vectors inoculated one week post-implantation of tumor cells, indicating that therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the viral spread and mode of viral vectors administration. We further showed that pG8-FasL amplicon vectors are functional in the presence of commonly used treatment regimens for human brain cancer. In fact, the combined therapies of pG8-FasL and pG8-FADD in the presence of temozolomide significantly improved the survival of mice bearing intracranial high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Taken together, our results showed that the glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon vector is potentially useful as an adjuvant therapy to complement the current gene therapy strategy for gliomas.

  5. Cell cycle-dependent differentiation dynamics balances growth and endocrine differentiation in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yung Hae; Larsen, Hjalte List; Rué, Paul;

    2015-01-01

    Organogenesis relies on the spatiotemporal balancing of differentiation and proliferation driven by an expanding pool of progenitor cells. In the mouse pancreas, lineage tracing at the population level has shown that the expanding pancreas progenitors can initially give rise to all endocrine...

  6. Cell cycle-dependent mobility of Cdc45 determined in vivo by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Broderick

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication is a dynamic process requiring the co-operation of specific replication proteins. We measured the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS in vivo in asynchronous cells and in cells synchronized at the G1/S transition and during S phase. Our data show that eGFP-Cdc45 mobility is faster in G1/S transition compared to S phase suggesting that Cdc45 is part of larger protein complex formed in S phase. Furthermore, the size of complexes containing Cdc45 was estimated in asynchronous, G1/S and S phase-synchronized cells using gel filtration chromatography; these findings complemented the in vivo FCS data. Analysis of the mobility of eGFP-Cdc45 and the size of complexes containing Cdc45 and eGFP-Cdc45 after UVC-mediated DNA damage revealed no significant changes in diffusion rates and complex sizes using FCS and gel filtration chromatography analyses. This suggests that after UV-damage, Cdc45 is still present in a large multi-protein complex and that its mobility within living cells is consistently similar following UVC-mediated DNA damage.

  7. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is cell cycle dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terleth, C; Waters, R; Brouwer, J; van de Putte, P

    1990-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus after UV irradiation. Here we analysed the repair of both loci after irradiating yeast cells at different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. In all stages repair of the active MAT alpha locus occurs at a rate of 30% removal of dimers per hour after a UV dose of 60 J/m2. The inactive HML alpha is repaired as efficiently as MAT alpha following irradiation in G2 whereas repair of HML alpha is less efficient in the other stages. Thus differential repair is observed in G1 and S but not in G2. Apparently, in G2 a chromatin structure exists in which repair does not discriminate between transcriptionally active and inactive DNA or, alternatively, an additional repair mechanism might exist which is only operational during G2.

  8. p53 represses autophagy in a cell cycle-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Orhon, Idil; Kepp, Oliver; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Autophagy is one of the principal mechanisms of cellular defense against nutrient depletion and damage to cytoplasmic organelles. When p53 is inhibited by a pharmacological antagonist (cyclic pifithrin-alpha), depleted by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or deleted by homologous recombination, multiple signs of autophagy are induced. Here, we show by epistatic analysis that p53 inhibition results in a maximum level of autophagy that cannot be further enhanced by a variety of different autophagy inducers including lithium, tunicamycin-induced stress of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or inhibition of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) with the BH3 mimetic ABT737. Chemical inducers of autophagy (including rapamycin, lithium, tunicamycin and ABT737) induced rapid depletion of the p53 protein. The absence or the inhibition of p53 caused autophagy mostly in the G(1) phase, less so in the S phase and spares the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The possible pathophysiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23 is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fischer

    Full Text Available The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23 is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1 was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  10. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23) is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; Grundke, Inga; Sohr, Sindy; Quaas, Marianne; Hoffmann, Saskia; Knörck, Arne; Gumhold, Catalina; Rother, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23) is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  11. Cell cycle-dependent activity of the volume- and Ca2+-activated anion currents in Ehrlich lettre ascites cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Bergdahl, Andreas; Christophersen, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the volume-regulated anion current (VRAC) and other anion currents in control or modulation of cell cycle progression; however, the precise involvement of anion channels in this process is unclear. Here, Cl- currents in Ehrlich Lettre Ascites (ELA) cells were monitored...... during cell cycle progression, under three conditions: (i) after osmotic swelling (i.e., VRAC), (ii) after an increase in the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration (i.e., the Ca2+-activated Cl- current, CaCC), and (iii) under steady-state isotonic conditions. The maximal swelling-activated VRAC current......+ in the pipette), was unaltered from G0 to G1, but decreased in early S phase. A novel high-affinity anion channel inhibitor, the acidic di-aryl-urea NS3728, which inhibited both VRAC and CaCC, attenuated ELA cell growth, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between cell cycle progression and cell cycle...

  12. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastià, N., E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Radiation Protection Service, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, A. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hervás, D. [Biostatistics Unit, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pantelias, G.; Hatzi, V.I. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Soriano, J.M. [Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen GIBI230, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Unidad Mixta de Investigación en Endocrinología, Nutrición y Dietética Clínica, IIS La Fe, Health Research Institute La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Villaescusa, J.I. [Radiation Protection Service, Universitary and Politechnic Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Curcumin and trans-resveratrol can exert radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects. • The mechanisms underlying such dual action were elucidated using the PCC and G2-assay. • Radioprotection occurs in non-cycling cells exposed to curcumin and resveratrol. • Radiosensitization occurs in cycling cells exposed to the chemicals. • G2-checkpoint abrogation by the chemicals underlies the radiosensitizing mechanism. - Abstract: Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140 μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220 μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity

  13. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxymethylation, and cell fate determination.

  14. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Gersende; Hussein, Mourad; Kulis, Marta; Delaloy, Céline; Chatonnet, Fabrice; Pignarre, Amandine; Avner, Stéphane; Lemarié, Maud; Mahé, Elise A; Verdaguer-Dot, Núria; Queirós, Ana C; Tarte, Karin; Martín-Subero, José I; Salbert, Gilles; Fest, Thierry

    2015-11-03

    Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-?1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxy)methylation, and cell fate determination.

  15. Cell Cycle-dependent Changes in Localization and Phosphorylation of the Plasma Membrane Kv2.1 K+ Channel Impact Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Contact Sites in COS-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Melanie M; Austin, Daniel C; Sack, Jon T; Trimmer, James S

    2015-12-04

    The plasma membrane (PM) comprises distinct subcellular domains with diverse functions that need to be dynamically coordinated with intracellular events, one of the most impactful being mitosis. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is conditionally localized to large PM clusters that represent specialized PM:endoplasmic reticulum membrane contact sites (PM:ER MCS), and overexpression of Kv2.1 induces more exuberant PM:ER MCS in neurons and in certain heterologous cell types. Localization of Kv2.1 at these contact sites is dynamically regulated by changes in phosphorylation at one or more sites located on its large cytoplasmic C terminus. Here, we show that Kv2.1 expressed in COS-1 cells undergoes dramatic cell cycle-dependent changes in its PM localization, having diffuse localization in interphase cells, and robust clustering during M phase. The mitosis-specific clusters of Kv2.1 are localized to PM:ER MCS, and M phase clustering of Kv2.1 induces more extensive PM:ER MCS. These cell cycle-dependent changes in Kv2.1 localization and the induction of PM:ER MCS are accompanied by increased mitotic Kv2.1 phosphorylation at several C-terminal phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv2.1 is significantly increased upon metaphase arrest in COS-1 and CHO cells, and in a pancreatic β cell line that express endogenous Kv2.1. The M phase clustering of Kv2.1 at PM:ER MCS in COS-1 cells requires the same C-terminal targeting motif needed for conditional Kv2.1 clustering in neurons. The cell cycle-dependent changes in localization and phosphorylation of Kv2.1 were not accompanied by changes in the electrophysiological properties of Kv2.1 expressed in CHO cells. Together, these results provide novel insights into the cell cycle-dependent changes in PM protein localization and phosphorylation.

  16. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    at the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non......-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose...

  17. Cloning and cell cycle-dependent expression of DNA replication gene dnaC from Caulobacter crescentus.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Chromosome replication in the asymmetrically dividing bacteria Caulobacter crescentus is discontinuous with the new, motile swarmer cell undergoing an obligatory presynthetic gap period (G1 period) of 60 min before the initiation of DNA synthesis and stalk formation. To examine the regulation of the cell division cycle at the molecular level, we have cloned the DNA chain elongation gene dnaC from a genomic DNA library constructed in cosmid vector pLAFR1-7. To ensure that the cloned sequence c...

  18. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Variations in the FTIR Spectroscopy of HeLa Cells Treated with Trichostatin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng-qiu; QI Jian; YANG Zhan-guo

    2011-01-01

    It is quite complex to evaluate the mechanism of action for antitumor drugs on cancer cells.Studies have pointed out that there is an unique advantage of Fourier transform infrared spectrum to obtain a fingerprint of all molecules present in the cells when cancer cells were exposed to anti-cancer drugs.Trichostatin A (TSA) is a most potent reversible inhibitor of mammalian histone deacetylases.It can inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.In the present study,HeLa cells were exposed to 0,50,100,200,300 and 400 nmol · L-1 TSA,and FTIR spectra were applied to evaluate the effect of TSA on cancer cells.Results show that there is some significant relationship between the changes in FTIR absorption and cell cycle arresting.On the other hand,this investigation shows that the concentration of TSA had to be more than 200 nmol · L-1 in order to ensure A1080 cm-1/A1540cm-1 ≥1 for inhibiting cell proliferation.

  19. Using a GFP-gene fusion technique to study the cell cycle-dependent distribution of calmodulin in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朝军; 吕品; 张东才

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-calmodulin (CaM) fusion gene method was used to examine the distribution of calmodulin during various stages of cell cycle. First, it was found that the distribution of CaM in living cells changes with the cell cycle. CaM was found mainly in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. It began to move into the nucleus when the cell entered S phase. At G2 phase, CaM became more concentrated in the nucleus than in cytoplasm. Second, the accumulation of CaM in the nucleus during G2 phase appeared to be related to the onset of mitosis, since inhibiting the activation of CaM at this stage resulted in blocking the nuclear membrane breakdown and chromatin condensation. Finally, after the cell entered mitosis, a high concentration of CaM was found at the polar regions of the mitotic spindle. At this time, inhibiting the activity of CaM would cause a disruption of the spindle structure. The relationship between the stage-specific distribution of CaM and its function in regulat

  20. Cell cycle-dependent adaptor complex for ClpXP-mediated proteolysis directly integrates phosphorylation and second messenger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C; Joshi, Kamal K; Zik, Justin J; Trinh, Katherine; Kamajaya, Aron; Chien, Peter; Ryan, Kathleen R

    2014-09-30

    The cell-division cycle of Caulobacter crescentus depends on periodic activation and deactivation of the essential response regulator CtrA. Although CtrA is critical for transcription during some parts of the cell cycle, its activity must be eliminated before chromosome replication because CtrA also blocks the initiation of DNA replication. CtrA activity is down-regulated both by dephosphorylation and by proteolysis, mediated by the ubiquitous ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Here we demonstrate that proteins needed for rapid CtrA proteolysis in vivo form a phosphorylation-dependent and cyclic diguanylate (cdG)-dependent adaptor complex that accelerates CtrA degradation in vitro by ClpXP. The adaptor complex includes CpdR, a single-domain response regulator; PopA, a cdG-binding protein; and RcdA, a protein whose activity cannot be predicted. When CpdR is unphosphorylated and when PopA is bound to cdG, they work together with RcdA in an all-or-none manner to reduce the Km of CtrA proteolysis 10-fold. We further identified a set of amino acids in the receiver domain of CtrA that modulate its adaptor-mediated degradation in vitro and in vivo. Complex formation between PopA and CtrA depends on these amino acids, which reside on alpha-helix 1 of the CtrA receiver domain, and on cdG binding by PopA. These results reveal that each accessory factor plays an essential biochemical role in the regulated proteolysis of CtrA and demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first example of a multiprotein, cdG-dependent proteolytic adaptor.

  1. Hair-cycle-dependent expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein and its type I receptor: evidence for regulation at the anagen to catagen transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Mee; Woodard, Grant L; Dunbar, Maureen; Gocken, Todd; Jimènez, Juan A; Foley, John

    2003-05-01

    The humoral hypercalcemia factor parathyroid hormone-related protein is a paracrine-signaling molecule that regulates the development of several organ systems, including the skin. In pathologic circumstances such as hypercalcemia and in development, parathyroid hormone-related protein signaling appears to be mediated by the type I parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor. In order to clarify the role of the ligand and receptor pair in cutaneous biology, gene expression was monitored in a series of murine skin samples ranging from embryonic day 14 to 2 y with in situ hybridization and RNase protection. In all samples, high levels of parathyroid hormone-related protein transcripts were exclusively expressed in the developing and adult hair follicle but were not observed in the interfollicular epidermis. In the adult, parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA expression was dynamically regulated as a function of the murine hair cycle in a way similar to other signaling molecules that regulate the anagen to catagen transition. PTH receptor transcripts were abundantly expressed in the developing dermis. In the adult skin, PTH receptor mRNA was markedly reduced, but again demonstrated hair-cycle-dependent expression. The dorsal skin of the keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mouse was used to evaluate the impact of overexpression of the peptide on the murine hair cycle. All types of hair were 30-40% shorter in adult keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mice as compared with wild-type littermates. This appeared to result from a premature entry into the catagen phase of the hair cycle. Finally, the relationship between parathyroid hormone-related protein signaling and other growth factors that regulate the hair cycle was examined by cross-breeding experiments employing keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mice and fibroblast growth factor-5-knockout mice. It appears that parathyroid hormone-related protein and

  2. Sex and estrous cycle-dependent rapid protein kinase signaling actions of estrogen in distal colonic cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Fiona

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol (E2) rapidly inhibits Cl(-) secretion in rat and human distal colonic epithelium. The inhibition has been shown to occur via targeting of a basolateral K(+) channel identified as the KCNQ1 (KvLQT1) channel. E2 indirectly modulates the channel activity via a cascade of second messengers which are rapidly phosphorylated in response to E2. The anti-secretory mechanism may be the manner by which E2 induces fluid retention in the intestine during periods of high circulating plasma E2. Here we review the sex-dependent and estrous cycle regulation of this novel rapid response to E2. The inhibition of KCNQ1 channel activity and Cl(-) secretion will be of interest in the future in the investigation of the retentive effects of estrogen in female tissue and also in the study of secretory disorders and drugable targets of the intestine.

  3. Cytotoxic activity of Justicia spicigera is inhibited by bcl-2 proto-oncogene and induces apoptosis in a cell cycle dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R; Cantú-Garza, F A; Mendoza-Mata, M T; Chavez-González, M A; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano-Ramírez, I R

    2001-12-01

    Identification of organic compounds from plants is of clinical significance because of the effect that they might have in patients with haematopoietic disorders. We studied the effect of the plant extract Justicia spicigera (Acanthaceae) in different haematopoietic cells: human leukaemic cell lines, umbilical cord blood cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. By examining colony formation and performing the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay it was shown that the plant extract of Justicia spicigera contains cytotoxic factors for leukaemic cells and has no proliferative activity on normal haematopoietic progenitor cells. Our results show that this plant extract induces apoptosis in the human leukaemia cell line TF-1, but not in the bcl-2 transfectant cell line TB-1. Similar results were obtained using a haemopoietic cell line 32D and 32DBcl2. The cultures of umbilical cord blood cells and mouse bone marrow that contain granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) do not proliferate or become terminally differentiated in the presence of the infusion of Justicia spicigera. GM-CSF that acts by abrogating programmed cell death is not sufficient to inhibit the apoptotic stimulus in TF-1 and 32D cells. Moreover mouse fibroblasts (3T3) and two cervical carcinoma cell lines CALO and INBL, undergo apoptosis in the presence of different concentrations of an infusion from the plant. Our data show that there is a strong correlation between the cytotoxic effect and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that the plant infusion of Justicia spicigera does not contain any haematopoietic activity, induces apoptosis inhibited by bcl-2 and is linked to cell proliferation.

  4. Ulk4 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Guan, Zhenlong; Shen, Qin; Flinter, Frances; Domínguez, Laura; Ahn, Joo Wook; Collier, David A; O'Brien, Timothy; Shen, Sanbing

    2016-09-01

    The size of neural stem cell (NSC) pool at birth determines the starting point of adult neurogenesis. Aberrant neurogenesis is associated with major mental illness, in which ULK4 is proposed as a rare risk factor. Little is known about factors regulating the NSC pool, or function of the ULK4. Here, we showed that Ulk4(tm1a/tm1a) mice displayed a dramatically reduced NSC pool at birth. Ulk4 was expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner and peaked in G2/M phases. Targeted disruption of the Ulk4 perturbed mid-neurogenesis and significantly reduced cerebral cortex in postnatal mice. Pathway analyses of dysregulated genes in Ulk4(tm1a/tm1a) mice revealed Ulk4 as a key regulator of cell cycle and NSC proliferation, partially through regulation of the Wnt signaling. In addition, we identified hemizygous deletion of ULK4 gene in 1.2/1,000 patients with pleiotropic symptoms including severe language delay and learning difficulties. ULK4, therefore, may significantly contribute to neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. Stem Cells 2016;34:2318-2331.

  5. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment...... to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  6. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  7. Regulating regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, N T; Chao, N

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress activation of other immune cells and thereby maintain immune system homeostasis, self-tolerance as well as control excessive response to foreign antigens. The mere concept of Tregs was the subject of significant controversy among immunologists for many years owing to the paucity of reliable markers for defining these cells and the ambiguity of the nature and molecular basis of suppressive phenomena. However, recent advances in the molecular characterization of this cell population have firmly established their existence and their vital role in the vertebrate immune system. Of interest, accumulating evidence from both humans and experimental animal models has implicated the involvement of Tregs in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The demonstration that Tregs could separate GVHD from graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity suggests that their immunosuppressive potential could be manipulated to reduce GVHD without detrimental consequence on GVT effect. Although a variety of T lymphocytes with suppressive capabilities have been reported, the two best-characterized subsets are the naturally arising, intrathymic-generated Tregs (natural Tregs) and the peripherally generated, inducible Tregs (inducible Tregs). This review summarizes our current knowledge of the generation, function and regulation of these two populations of Tregs during an immune response. Their role in the development of GVHD and their therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of GVHD will also be described.

  8. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  9. Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    energy numbers are 2.3X and 5.7X the theoretical values for lithium thionyl chloride respectively (1100 Whr/liter and 590 Whr/kg), which has the...REPORT Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 16-Aug-2010 Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell Report Title ABSTRACT Advances in lithium primary battery technology

  10. Regulators of Tfh cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendra Motiram Jogdand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The follicular helper T (Tfh cells help is critical for activation of B cells, antibody class switching and germinal center formation. The Tfh cells are characterized by the expression of CXCR5, ICOS, PD-1, Bcl-6, and IL-21. They are involved in clearing infections and are adversely linked with autoimmune diseases and also have a role in viral replication as well as clearance. Tfh cells are generated from naïve CD4 T cells with sequential steps involving cytokine signaling (IL-21, IL-6, IL-12, activin A, migration and positioning in the germinal center by CXCR5, surface receptors (ICOS/ICOSL, SAP/SLAM as well as transcription factor (Bcl-6, c-Maf, STAT3 signaling and repressor miR155. On the other hand Tfh generation is negatively regulated at specific steps of Tfh generation by specific cytokine (IL-2, IL-7, surface receptor (PD-1, CTLA-4, transcription factors Blimp-1, STAT5, T-bet, KLF-2 signaling and repressor miR 146a. Interestingly, miR 17-92 and FOXO1 acts as a positive as well as a negative regulator of Tfh differentiation depending on the time of expression and disease specificity. Tfh cells are also generated from the conversion of other effector T cells as exemplified by Th1 cells converting into Tfh during viral infection. The mechanistic details of effector T cells conversion into Tfh are yet to be clear. To manipulate Tfh cells for therapeutic implication and or for effective vaccination strategies, it is important to know positive and negative regulators of Tfh generation. Hence, in this review we have highlighted and interlinked molecular signaling from cytokines, surface receptors, transcription factors, ubiquitin Ligase and miRNA as positive and negative regulators for Tfh differentiation.

  11. Cell swelling and volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular space in the brain is typically 20% of the tissue volume and is reduced to at least half its size under conditions of neural insult. Whether there is a minimum size to the extracellular space was discussed. A general model for cell volume regulation was presented, followed by a ...

  12. Cell cycle regulation by feed-forward loops coupling transcription and phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csikász-Nagy, Attila; Kapuy, Orsolya; Tóth, Attila;

    2009-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle requires precise temporal coordination of the activities of hundreds of 'executor' proteins (EPs) involved in cell growth and division. Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (Cdks) play central roles in regulating the production, activation, inactivation and destruction......) from Cdk1. By mathematical modelling, we show that such FFLs can activate EPs at different phases of the cell cycle depending of the effective signs (+ or -) of the regulatory steps of the FFL. We provide several case studies of EPs that are controlled by FFLs exactly as our models predict. The signal......-transduction properties of FFLs allow one (or a few) Cdk signal(s) to drive a host of cell cycle responses in correct temporal sequence....

  13. A Cell Cycle-Regulated Toxoplasma Deubiquitinase, TgOTUD3A, Targets Polyubiquitins with Specific Lysine Linkages

    OpenAIRE

    Animesh Dhara; Anthony P Sinai; William J Sullivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The contribution of ubiquitin-mediated mechanisms in the regulation of the Toxoplasma gondii cell cycle has remained largely unexplored. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a T. gondii deubiquitinase (TGGT1_258780) of the ovarian-tumor domain-containing (OTU) family, which, based on its structural homology to the human OTUD3 clade, has been designated TgOTUD3A. The TgOTUD3A protein is expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner mimicking its mRNA expression, indicatin...

  14. Genome regulation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puck, T T; Krystosek, A; Chan, D C

    1990-05-01

    A theory is presented proposing that genetic regulation in mammalian cells is at least a two-tiered effect; that one level of regulation involves the transition between gene exposure and sequestration; that normal differentiation requires a different spectrum of genes to be exposed in each separate state of differentiation; that the fiber systems of the cell cytoskeleton and the nuclear matrix together control the degree of gene exposure; that specific phosphorylation of these elements causes them to assume a different organizational network and to impose a different pattern of sequestration and exposure on the elements of the genome; that the varied gene phosphorylation mechanisms in the cell are integrated in this function; that attachment of this network system to specific parts of the chromosomes brings about sequestration or exposure of the genes in their neighborhood in a fashion similar to that observed when microtubule elements attach through the kinetochore to the centromeric DNA; that one function of repetitive sequences is to serve as elements for the final attachment of this fibrous network to the specific chromosomal loci; and that at least an important part of the calcium manifestation as a metabolic trigger of different differentiation states involves its acting as a binding agent to centers of electronegativity, in particular proteins and especially phosphorylated groups, so as to change the conformation of the fiber network that ultimately controls gene exposure in the mammalian cell. It would appear essential to determine what abnormal gene exposures and sequestrations are characteristic of each type of cancer; which agonists, if any, will bring about reverse transformation; and whether these considerations can be used in therapy.

  15. Ion Channels Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume...

  16. VRK1 regulates Cajal body dynamics and protects coilin from proteasomal degradation in cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Lara; Sanz-García, Marta; Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Lazo, Pedro A

    2015-06-12

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear organelles associated with ribonucleoprotein functions and RNA maturation. CBs are assembled on coilin, its main scaffold protein, in a cell cycle dependent manner. The Ser-Thr VRK1 (vaccinia-related kinase 1) kinase, whose activity is also cell cycle regulated, interacts with and phosphorylates coilin regulating assembly of CBs. Coilin phosphorylation is not necessary for its interaction with VRK1, but it occurs in mitosis and regulates coilin stability. Knockdown of VRK1 or VRK1 inactivation by serum deprivation causes a loss of coilin phosphorylation in Ser184 and of CBs formation, which are rescued with an active VRK1, but not by kinase-dead VRK1. The phosphorylation of coilin in Ser184 occurs during mitosis before assembly of CBs. Loss of coilin phosphorylation results in disintegration of CBs, and of coilin degradation that is prevented by proteasome inhibitors. After depletion of VRK1, coilin is ubiquitinated in nuclei, which is partly mediated by mdm2, but its proteasomal degradation occurs in cytosol and is prevented by blocking its nuclear export. We conclude that VRK1 is a novel regulator of CBs dynamics and stability in cell cycle by protecting coilin from ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome, and propose a model of CB dynamics.

  17. Materials as stem cell regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William L.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    The stem cell/material interface is a complex, dynamic microenvironment in which the cell and the material cooperatively dictate one another's fate: the cell by remodelling its surroundings, and the material through its inherent properties (such as adhesivity, stiffness, nanostructure or degradability). Stem cells in contact with materials are able to sense their properties, integrate cues via signal propagation and ultimately translate parallel signalling information into cell fate decisions. However, discovering the mechanisms by which stem cells respond to inherent material characteristics is challenging because of the highly complex, multicomponent signalling milieu present in the stem cell environment. In this Review, we discuss recent evidence that shows that inherent material properties may be engineered to dictate stem cell fate decisions, and overview a subset of the operative signal transduction mechanisms that have begun to emerge. Further developments in stem cell engineering and mechanotransduction are poised to have substantial implications for stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.

  18. Cell-cycle-dependent variation in UV absorption spectrum of Hela cells treated with Trichostatin A%HeLa细胞经曲古菌素A处理后紫外光谱的细胞周期依赖性变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengqiu Zhang; Xiaoxia Wang; Zhanguo Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to discovery the different cell cycle arrest effect after different densities HeLa cells treated with Trichostatin A (TSA). In addition, this study would find some important relationship between cycle arrest effect and UV absorption spectrum of cell. Methods: 0.2 μM TSA was applied to act on HeLa cells of different density. Then, the cycle arrest effect and UV absorption spectrum of cells were investigated, which provide support to analyze the effect of TSA on cancer cells. Results: Cell cycle arrest effect in G0/G1 of the lower density cells was more obvious than that in other groups. The other discovery in this work was that the cellular UV absorption value was higher when the density of cultured cell was lower. Conclusion: This experiment would guide the clinical study on early or late stage cancer patients in the future. On the other hand, this work indicates when cells were arrested in G0/G1 phase, the cellular absorption value increased at the same time, so UV absorption spectrum could characterize the change of cell cycle.

  19. Regulating cell differentiation at different layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    Cell differentiation is a basic behavior in the developmental process of multi-cellular organisms,through which various cell types are generated from one embryonic cell for further building different tissues and organs of animals or plants.It is estimated that there are more than two hundred cell types in a human body.To understand the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation,researchers usually focus on a question how particular genes are selectively expressed during the differentiation process.However,more and more evidence indicates that the regulation of cell differentiation is far beyond simply controlling the expression of genetic program,which is supported by the collection of four research articles in this issue that the regulation of cell differentiation involves various factors at different layers,including epigenetics,metabolism and cell-cell interaction.

  20. STK31 is a cell-cycle regulated protein that contributes to the tumorigenicity of epithelial cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Lin Kuo

    Full Text Available Serine/threonine kinase 31 (STK31 is one of the novel cancer/testis antigens for which its biological functions remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that STK31 is overexpressed in many human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. STK31 co-localizes with pericentrin in the centrosomal region throughout all phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, when cells undergo mitosis, STK31 also localizes to the centromeres, central spindle, and midbody. This localization behavior is similar to that of chromosomal passenger proteins, which are known to be the important players of the spindle assembly checkpoint. The expression of STK31 is cell cycle-dependent through the regulation of a putative D-box near its C-terminal region. Ectopically-expressed STK31-GFP increases cell migration and invasive ability without altering the proliferation rate of cancer cells, whereas the knockdown expression of endogenous STK31 by lentivirus-derived shRNA results in microtubule assembly defects that prolong the duration of mitosis and lead to apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that the aberrant expression of STK31 contributes to tumorigenicity in somatic cancer cells. STK31 might therefore act as a potential therapeutic target in human somatic cancers.

  1. Regulation of Power Conversion in Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Mu-zhong; ZHANG J.; K. Scott

    2004-01-01

    Here we report a regulation about power conversion in fuel cells. This regulation is expressed as that total power produced by fuel cells is always proportional to the square of the potential difference between the equilibrium potential and work potential. With this regulation we deduced fuel cell performance equation which can describe the potential vs. the current performance curves, namely, polarization curves of fuel cells with three power source parameters: equilibrium potential E0; internal resistance R; and power conversion coefficient K. The concept of the power conversion coefficient is a new criterion to evaluate and compare the characteristics and capacity of different fuel cells. The calculated values obtained with this equation agree with practical performance of different types of fuel cells.

  2. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  3. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  4. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  5. Biophysical regulation of stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govey, Peter M; Loiselle, Alayna E; Donahue, Henry J

    2013-06-01

    Bone adaptation to its mechanical environment, from embryonic through adult life, is thought to be the product of increased osteoblastic differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells. In parallel with tissue-scale loading, these heterogeneous populations of multipotent stem cells are subject to a variety of biophysical cues within their native microenvironments. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells-the most broadly studied source of osteoblastic progenitors-undergo osteoblastic differentiation in vitro in response to biophysical signals, including hydrostatic pressure, fluid flow and accompanying shear stress, substrate strain and stiffness, substrate topography, and electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, stem cells may be subject to indirect regulation by mechano-sensing osteocytes positioned to more readily detect these same loading-induced signals within the bone matrix. Such paracrine and juxtacrine regulation of differentiation by osteocytes occurs in vitro. Further studies are needed to confirm both direct and indirect mechanisms of biophysical regulation within the in vivo stem cell niche.

  6. Cartilage stem cells: regulation of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M

    1989-01-01

    The developing limb bud is a useful source of cartilage stem cells for studies on the regulation of chondrogenesis. In high density cultures these cells can progress through all stages of chondrogenesis to produce mineralized hypertrophic cartilage. If the cells are maintained in a spherical shape, single stem cells can progress through a similar sequence. The actin cytoskeleton is implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis since conditions that favor its disruption promote chondrogenesis and conditions that favor actin assembly inhibit chondrogenesis. Since a number of extracellular matrix receptors mediate effects of the extracellular matrix on cytoskeletal organization and some of these receptors are developmentally regulated, it is proposed that matrix receptor expression plays a central role in the divergence of connective tissue cells during development.

  7. Involvement of elevated expression of multiple cell-cycle regulator, DTL/RAMP (denticleless/RA-regulated nuclear matrix associated protein), in the growth of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, T; Nishidate, T; Park, J H; Lin, M L; Shimo, A; Hirata, K; Nakamura, Y; Katagiri, T

    2008-09-25

    To investigate the detailed molecular mechanism of mammary carcinogenesis and discover novel therapeutic targets, we previously analysed gene expression profiles of breast cancers. We here report characterization of a significant role of DTL/RAMP (denticleless/RA-regulated nuclear matrix associated protein) in mammary carcinogenesis. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and northern blot analyses confirmed upregulation of DTL/RAMP in the majority of breast cancer cases and all of breast cancer cell lines examined. Immunocytochemical and western blot analyses using anti-DTL/RAMP polyclonal antibody revealed cell-cycle-dependent localization of endogenous DTL/RAMP protein in breast cancer cells; nuclear localization was observed in cells at interphase and the protein was concentrated at the contractile ring in cytokinesis process. The expression level of DTL/RAMP protein became highest at G(1)/S phases, whereas its phosphorylation level was enhanced during mitotic phase. Treatment of breast cancer cells, T47D and HBC4, with small-interfering RNAs against DTL/RAMP effectively suppressed its expression and caused accumulation of G(2)/M cells, resulting in growth inhibition of cancer cells. We further demonstrate the in vitro phosphorylation of DTL/RAMP through an interaction with the mitotic kinase, Aurora kinase-B (AURKB). Interestingly, depletion of AURKB expression with siRNA in breast cancer cells reduced the phosphorylation of DTL/RAMP and decreased the stability of DTL/RAMP protein. These findings imply important roles of DTL/RAMP in growth of breast cancer cells and suggest that DTL/RAMP might be a promising molecular target for treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Ion channels regulating mast cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmole, I; Bradding, P

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma and related allergic conditions. Mast cell activation leads to the degranulation of preformed mediators such as histamine and the secretion of newly synthesised proinflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes and cytokines. Excess release of these mediators contributes to allergic disease states. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ is essential for mast cell mediator release. From the Ca2+ channels that mediate this influx, to the K+ , Cl- and transient receptor potential channels that set the cell membrane potential and regulate Ca2+ influx, ion channels play a critical role in mast cell biology. In this review we provide an overview of our current knowledge of ion channel expression and function in mast cells with an emphasis on how channels interact to regulate Ca2+ signalling.

  9. Glial Cell Regulation of Rhythmic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. Rob; Ng, Fanny S.; Sengupta, Sukanya; You, Samantha; Huang, Yanmei

    2015-01-01

    Brain glial cells, in particular astrocytes and microglia, secrete signaling molecules that regulate glia–glia or glia–neuron communication and synaptic activity. While much is known about roles of glial cells in nervous system development, we are only beginning to understand the physiological functions of such cells in the adult brain. Studies in vertebrate and invertebrate models, in particular mice and Drosophila, have revealed roles of glia–neuron communication in the modulation of complex behavior. This chapter emphasizes recent evidence from studies of rodents and Drosophila that highlight the importance of glial cells and similarities or differences in the neural circuits regulating circadian rhythms and sleep in the two models. The chapter discusses cellular, molecular, and genetic approaches that have been useful in these models for understanding how glia–neuron communication contributes to the regulation of rhythmic behavior. PMID:25707272

  10. Trypanosoma brucei PUF9 regulates mRNAs for proteins involved in replicative processes over the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Archer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Many genes that are required at specific points in the cell cycle exhibit cell cycle-dependent expression. In the early-diverging model eukaryote and important human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, regulation of gene expression in the cell cycle and other processes is almost entirely post-transcriptional. Here, we show that the T. brucei RNA-binding protein PUF9 stabilizes certain transcripts during S-phase. Target transcripts of PUF9--LIGKA, PNT1 and PNT2--were identified by affinity purification with TAP-tagged PUF9. RNAi against PUF9 caused an accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and unexpectedly destabilized the PUF9 target mRNAs, despite the fact that most known Puf-domain proteins promote degradation of their target mRNAs. The levels of the PUF9-regulated transcripts were cell cycle dependent, peaking in mid- to late- S-phase, and this effect was abolished when PUF9 was targeted by RNAi. The sequence UUGUACC was over-represented in the 3' UTRs of PUF9 targets; a point mutation in this motif abolished PUF9-dependent stabilization of a reporter transcript carrying the PNT1 3' UTR. LIGKA is involved in replication of the kinetoplast, and here we show that PNT1 is also kinetoplast-associated and its over-expression causes kinetoplast-related defects, while PNT2 is localized to the nucleus in G1 phase and redistributes to the mitotic spindle during mitosis. PUF9 targets may constitute a post-transcriptional regulon, encoding proteins involved in temporally coordinated replicative processes in early G2 phase.

  11. Tip cells: master regulators of tubulogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2014-07-01

    The normal development of an organ depends on the coordinated regulation of multiple cell activities. Focusing on tubulogenesis, we review the role of specialised cells or groups of cells that are selected from within tissue primordia and differentiate at the outgrowing tips or leading edge of developing tubules. Tip or leading cells develop distinctive patterns of gene expression that enable them to act both as sensors and transmitters of intercellular signalling. This enables them to explore the environment, respond to both tissue intrinsic signals and extrinsic cues from surrounding tissues and to regulate the behaviour of their neighbours, including the setting of cell fate, patterning cell division, inducing polarity and promoting cell movement and cell rearrangements by neighbour exchange. Tip cells are also able to transmit mechanical tension to promote tissue remodelling and, by interacting with the extracellular matrix, they can dictate migratory pathways and organ shape. Where separate tubular structures fuse to form networks, as in the airways of insects or the vascular system of vertebrates, specialised fusion tip cells act to interconnect disparate elements of the developing network. Finally, we consider their importance in the maturation of mature physiological function and in the development of disease.

  12. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells can derive from the same precursors as B and T cells, however to achieve lineage specificity, several transcription factors need to be activated or annulled. While a few important transcription factors have identified for NK genesis the mechanisms of how this is achieved is far from resolved. Adding to the complexity of this, NK cells are found and potentially develop in diverse locations in vivo and it remains to be addressed if a common NK cell precursor seeds diverse niches and how transcription factors may differentially regulate NK cell commitment in distinct microenvironments. Here we will summarise some recent findings in NK cell commitment and discuss how a NK cell transcriptional network might be organised, while addressing some misconceptions and anomalies along the way.

  13. Regulating regulator y T cells to achieve transplant tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Tao; Wayne W. Hancock

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial roles in both induction and maintenance of tolerance. This active immune regulation may contribute not only to the control of immune responses to self-antigens and thereby prevent autoimmune diseases, but also the control of responses to non-self molecules in adaptive immunity. Numerous experimental and clinical studies indicate that manipulating the balance between regulatory and responder T cells is an effective strategy to control immune responsiveness after transplantation. DATA SOURCES:Literature search was conducted using PubMed on the related subjects. Part of the material was based on the most recent work in the authors' laboratory. RESULTS: We propose some new strategies to achieve transplant tolerance in rodent animals via manipulating Treg function, including using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to regulate Foxp3 transcription and enhance Treg suppression, induction of Treg-sparing apoptosis via Nur77, and identiifcation of the co-inhibitory molecule herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) as an effector molecule for Treg function. CONCLUSION:Regulation of Treg function will deifnitely provide us very promising tools to achieve clinical tolerance in the future.

  14. Gangliosides regulate tumor cell adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Tamara; Jabbar, Adnan A; Wen, Fei-Qui; Patel, Dharmesh A; Valentino, Leonard A

    2003-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins is critical for migration and invasion. The factors that regulate tumor cell adhesion are poorly characterized. Gangliosides promote platelet adhesion and may also play a role in the adhesion of other cell types. We hypothesized that pharmacological depletion of membrane gangliosides from adherent cells would abrogate adhesion to collagen and promote migration and invasion. To test these hypotheses, LA-N1 neuroblastoma cells, which avidly adhere to collagen and are rich with membrane gangliosides (43.69 nmol/10(8) cells), were cultured in the presence of D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol-HCl. Endogenous gangliosides were reduced by 98% (0.76 nmol/10(8) cells) and adhesion to collagen decreased by 67%. There were no changes in cell morphology, viability, proliferation rate or apoptosis. Pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells in conditioned medium from control cells restored adhesion to collagen (0.45 +/- 0.002), comparable to that of control cells (0.49 +/- 0.035). Similarly, pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells with purified GD2 completely restored adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner. When LA-N1 cells were cultured with retinoic acid, a biological response modifier known to increase endogenous gangliosides, adhesion to collagen increased. Next, we questioned whether changes in adhesion would be reflected as changes in migration and invasion. Cells depleted of endogenous cellular gangliosides migrated more than control cells. Finally, control cells replete with their endogenous gangliosides demonstrated less invasive potential than control cells. The data demonstrate that endogenous tumor gangliosides increase neuroblastoma cell adhesion to collagen and reduce migration and invasion in vitro.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of the mammalian cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Baverstock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how mammalian cells are regulated epigenetically to express phenotype is a priority. The cellular phenotypic transition, induced by ionising radiation, from a normal cell to the genomic instability phenotype, where the ability to replicate the genotype accurately is compromised, illustrates important features of epigenetic regulation. Based on this phenomenon and earlier work we propose a model to describe the mammalian cell as a self assembled open system operating in an environment that includes its genotype, neighbouring cells and beyond. Phenotype is represented by high dimensional attractors, evolutionarily conditioned for stability and robustness and contingent on rules of engagement between gene products encoded in the genetic network. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We describe how this system functions and note the indeterminacy and fluidity of its internal workings which place it in the logical reasoning framework of predicative logic. We find that the hypothesis is supported by evidence from cell and molecular biology. CONCLUSIONS: Epigenetic regulation and memory are fundamentally physical, as opposed to chemical, processes and the transition to genomic instability is an important feature of mammalian cells with probable fundamental relevance to speciation and carcinogenesis. A source of evolutionarily selectable variation, in terms of the rules of engagement between gene products, is seen as more likely to have greater prominence than genetic variation in an evolutionary context. As this epigenetic variation is based on attractor states phenotypic changes are not gradual; a phenotypic transition can involve the changed contribution of several gene products in a single step.

  16. Redox regulation in cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent (redox regulation) signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processe...

  17. Physiology of cell volume regulation in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Lambert, Ian H; Pedersen, Stine F

    2009-01-01

    and their regulation by, e.g., membrane deformation, ionic strength, Ca(2+), protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements, GTP binding proteins, lipid mediators, and reactive oxygen species, upon changes in cell volume. We also discuss the nature of the upstream elements in volume sensing in vertebrate...

  18. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  19. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  20. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (patho)physiology. PMID:25544597

  1. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K. Salabei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (pathophysiology.

  2. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

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    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  3. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  4. Regulated Hyaluronan Synthesis by Vascular Cells

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    Manuela Viola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular microenvironment plays a critical role in several pathologies including atherosclerosis. Hyaluronan (HA content often reflects the progression of this disease in promoting vessel thickening and cell migration. HA synthesis is regulated by several factors, including the phosphorylation of HA synthase 2 (HAS2 and other covalent modifications including ubiquitination and O-GlcNAcylation. Substrate availability is important in HA synthesis control. Specific drugs reducing the UDP precursors are able to reduce HA synthesis whereas the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP increases the concentration of HA precursor UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc leading to an increase of HA synthesis. The flux through the HBP in the regulation of HA biosynthesis in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs was reported as a critical aspect. In fact, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation reduced HA production whereas increased O-GlcNAcylation augmented HA secretion. Additionally, O-GlcNAcylation regulates HAS2 gene expression resulting in accumulation of its mRNA after induction of O-GlcNAcylation with glucosamine treatments. The oxidized LDLs, the most common molecules related to atherosclerosis outcome and progression, are also able to induce a strong HA synthesis when they are in contact with vascular cells. In this review, we present recent described mechanisms involved in HA synthesis regulation and their role in atherosclerosis outcome and development.

  5. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus.

  6. Business Cycle Dependent Unemployment Benefits with Wealth Heterogeneity and Precautionary Savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Mark Strøm

    In the wake of the financial and economic crisis the discussion about social insurance and optimal stabilization policies has re-blossomed. This paper adds to the literature by studying the effects of a business cycle dependent level of unemployment benefits in a model with labor market matching......, wealth heterogeneity, precautionary savings, and aggregate fluctuations in productivity. The results are ambiguous: both procyclical and countercyclical unemployment benefits can increase welfare relative to business cycle invariant benefits. Procyclical benefits are beneficial due to countercyclicality...... of the distortionary effect (on job creation) from providing unemployment insurance, whereas countercyclical benefits facilitate consumption smoothing....

  7. Regulation of satellite cell function in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Alway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms contributing to sarcopenia include reduced satellite cell (myogenic stem cell function that is impacted by the environment (niche of these cells. Satellite cell function is affected by oxidative stress, which is elevated in aged muscles, and this along with changes in largely unknown systemic factors, likely contribute to the manner in which satellite cells respond to stressors such as exercise, disuse or rehabilitation in sarcopenic muscles. Nutritional intervention provides one therapeutic strategy to improve the satellite cell niche and systemic factors, with the goal of improving satellite cell function in aging muscles. Although many elderly persons consume various nutraceuticals with the hope of improving health, most of these compounds have not been thoroughly tested, and the impacts that they might have on sarcopenia, and satellite cell function are not clear. This review discusses data pertaining to the satellite cell responses and function in aging skeletal muscle, and the impact that three compounds: resveratrol, green tea catechins and β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate have on regulating satellite cell function and therefore contributing to reducing sarcopenia or improving muscle mass after disuse in aging. The data suggest that these nutraceutical compounds improve satellite cell function during rehabilitative loading in animal models of aging after disuse (i.e., muscle regeneration. While these compounds have not been rigorously tested in humans, the data from animal models of aging provide a strong basis for conducting additional focused work to determine if these or other nutraceuticals can offset the muscle losses, or improve regeneration in sarcopenic muscles of older humans via improving satellite cell function.

  8. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  9. Cell volume regulation: physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, I H; Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2008-01-01

    not only under physiological conditions, e.g. following accumulation of nutrients, during epithelial absorption/secretion processes, following hormonal/autocrine stimulation, and during induction of apoptosis, but also under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. hypoxia, ischaemia and hyponatremia....../hypernatremia. On the other hand, it has recently become clear that an increase or reduction in cell volume can also serve as a specific signal in the regulation of physiological processes such as transepithelial transport, cell migration, proliferation and death. Although the mechanisms by which cell volume perturbations...... are sensed are still far from clear, significant progress has been made with respect to the nature of the sensors, transducers and effectors that convert a change in cell volume into a physiological response. In the present review, we summarize recent major developments in the field, and emphasize...

  10. Auxin regulation of cell polarity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue; Chen, Jisheng; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2015-12-01

    Auxin is well known to control pattern formation and directional growth at the organ/tissue levels via the nuclear TIR1/AFB receptor-mediated transcriptional responses. Recent studies have expanded the arena of auxin actions as a trigger or key regulator of cell polarization and morphogenesis. These actions require non-transcriptional responses such as changes in the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking, which are commonly regulated by ROP/Rac GTPase-dependent pathways. These findings beg for the question about the nature of auxin receptors that regulate these responses and renew the interest in ABP1 as a cell surface auxin receptor, including the work showing auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) interacts with the extracellular domain of the transmembrane kinase (TMK) receptor-like kinases in an auxin-dependent manner, as well as the debate on this auxin binding protein discovered about 40 years ago. This review highlights recent work on the non-transcriptional auxin signaling mechanisms underscoring cell polarity and shape formation in plants.

  11. Regulation of cell-cell adhesion by Rap1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yasuyuki; Hogan, Catherine; Braga, Vania M M

    2006-01-01

    Rap1 has been implicated in the regulation of morphogenesis and cell-cell contacts in vivo (Asha et al., 1999; Hariharan et al., 1991; Knox and Brown, 2002) and in vitro (Hogan et al., 2004; Price et al., 2004). Among cell-cell adhesion molecules regulated by Rap1 is cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesive receptor. Assembly of cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts triggers Rap1 activation, and Rap function is necessary for the stability of cadherins at junctions (Hogan et al., 2004; Price et al., 2004). Here we describe assays to access the effects of Rap1 on cadherin-dependent adhesion in epithelia, in particular the method used for Rap1 localization, activation, and function modulation by microinjection. We focus on controls and culture conditions to determine the specificity of the phenotype with respect to cadherin receptors. This is important, because different receptors that accumulate at sites of cell-cell contacts are also able to activate Rap1 (Fukuyama et al., 2005; Mandell et al., 2005).

  12. Regulating cell-cell junctions from A to Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Jeff

    2016-04-25

    Epithelial sheets often present a "cobblestone" appearance, but the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of this arrangement are unclear. In this issue, Choi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506115) show that afadin and ZO-1 regulate tension and maintain zonula adherens architecture in response to changes in contractility.

  13. Cell cycle phase regulates glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Matthews

    Full Text Available The glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. In contrast to many other nuclear receptors, GR is thought to be exclusively cytoplasmic in quiescent cells, and only translocate to the nucleus on ligand binding. We now demonstrate significant nuclear GR in the absence of ligand, which requires nuclear localisation signal 1 (NLS1. Live cell imaging reveals dramatic GR import into the nucleus through interphase and rapid exclusion of the GR from the nucleus at the onset of mitosis, which persists into early G(1. This suggests that the heterogeneity in GR distribution is reflective of cell cycle phase. The impact of cell cycle-driven GR trafficking on a panel of glucocorticoid actions was profiled. In G2/M-enriched cells there was marked prolongation of glucocorticoid-induced ERK activation. This was accompanied by DNA template-specific, ligand-independent GR transactivation. Using chimeric and domain-deleted receptors we demonstrate that this transactivation effect is mediated by the AF1 transactivation domain. AF-1 harbours multiple phosphorylation sites, which are consensus sequences for kinases including CDKs, whose activity changes during the cell cycle. In G2/M there was clear ligand independent induction of GR phosphorylation on residues 203 and 211, both of which are phosphorylated after ligand activation. Ligand-independent transactivation required induction of phospho-S211GR but not S203GR, thereby directly linking cell cycle driven GR modification with altered GR function. Cell cycle phase therefore regulates GR localisation and post-translational modification which selectively impacts GR activity. This suggests that cell cycle phase is an important determinant in the cellular response to Gc, and that mitotic index contributes to tissue Gc sensitivity.

  14. Redox Regulation in Cancer Stem Cells

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    Shijie Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and ROS-dependent (redox regulation signaling pathways and transcriptional activities are thought to be critical in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation during growth and organogenesis. Aberrant ROS burst and dysregulation of those ROS-dependent cellular processes are strongly associated with human diseases including many cancers. ROS levels are elevated in cancer cells partially due to their higher metabolism rate. In the past 15 years, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs has been gaining ground as the subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties and characteristics have been identified in various cancers. CSCs possess low levels of ROS and are responsible for cancer recurrence after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, how CSCs control ROS production and scavenging and how ROS-dependent signaling pathways contribute to CSCs function remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the role of redox balance, especially in ROS-dependent cellular processes in cancer stem cells (CSCs. We updated recent advances in our understanding of ROS generation and elimination in CSCs and their effects on CSC self-renewal and differentiation through modulating signaling pathways and transcriptional activities. The review concludes that targeting CSCs by manipulating ROS metabolism/dependent pathways may be an effective approach for improving cancer treatment.

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidong eHu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been tremendous progress in characterizing the transcriptional network regulating hESCs (MacArthur et al., 2009; Loh et al., 2011, including those signaling events mediated by Oct4, Nanog and Sox2. There is growing interest in the epigenetic machinery involved in hESC self-renewal and differentiation. In general, epigenetic regulation includeschromatin reorganization, DNA modification and histone modification, which are not directly related to alterations in DNA sequences. Various protein complexes, includingPolycomb, trithorax, NuRD, SWI/SNF andOct4, have been shown to play critical roles in epigenetic control of hESC maintenance and differentiation. Hence, we will formally review recent advances in unraveling the multifaceted role of epigenetic regulation in hESC self-renewal and induced differentiation, particularly with respect to chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation events. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance/differentiation of hESCs and reprogramming of somatic cells will greatly strengthen our capacity to generate various types of cells to treat human diseases.

  16. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  17. Sex-Specific and Estrous Cycle-Dependent Antidepressant-Like Effects and Hippocampal Akt Signaling of Leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Nicole; Wang, Xuezhen; Sun, Linshan; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Sex differences in the incidence of depression and antidepressant treatment responses are well documented. Depression is twice as common in women as in men. Recent studies indicate that low levels of leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, are associated with increased symptoms of depression in women. Leptin has been shown to produce antidepressant-like effects in male rodents. In the present study, we examined sex differences and estrous cycle variations in antidepressant-like responses to leptin. Leptin administration significantly reduced immobility, a putative measure of behavioral despair, in the forced swim test in intact female mice in the proestrus phase but not in the diestrus phase of the estrous cycle. Moreover, leptin administration stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of female mice in proestrus but not in diestrus, in correlation with its differential behavioral effects in these two phases of the cycle. Leptin-induced behavioral responses and stimulation of hippocampal Akt phosphorylation in female mice were abolished by ovariectomy. By contrast, the antidepressant-like effect of leptin in male mice was not affected by gonadectomy (castration). Pretreatment with 17β-estradiol restored sensitivity to the effects of leptin on behavior and hippocampal Akt phosphorylation in ovariectomized female mice. These results suggest leptin regulates depression-like behavior and hippocampal Akt signaling in a sex-specific and estrous cycle-dependent manner.

  18. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  20. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  1. Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaster Robert

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in the diseased organ. PSCs are vitamin A-storing, fibroblast-like cells with close morphological and biochemical similarities to hepatic stellate cells (also known as Ito-cells. In response to profibrogenic mediators such as various cytokines, PSCs undergo an activation process that involves proliferation, exhibition of a myofibroblastic phenotype and enhanced production of ECM proteins. The intracellular mediators of activation signals, and their antagonists, are only partially known so far. Recent data suggest an important role of enzymes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family in PSC activation. On the other hand, ligands of the nuclear receptor PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulate maintenance of a quiescent PSC phenotype. In the future, targeting regulators of the PSC activation process might become a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic fibrosis.

  2. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  3. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  4. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  5. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interfac...

  6. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa, Allan V.; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia,Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases...

  7. Regulation of Immune Cells by Eicosanoid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy D. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Eicosanoids are potent, bioactive, lipid mediators that regulate important components of the immune response, including defense against infection, ischemia, and injury, as well as instigating and perpetuating autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. Although these lipids have numerous effects on diverse cell types and organs, a greater understanding of their specific effects on key players of the immune system has been gained in recent years through the characterization of individual eicosanoid receptors, the identification and development of specific receptor agonists and inhibitors, and the generation of mice genetically deficient in various eicosanoid receptors. In this review, we will focus on the receptors for prostaglandin D2, DP1 and DP2/CRTH2; the receptors for leukotriene B4, BLT1 and BLT2; and the receptors for the cysteinyl leukotrienes, CysLT1 and CysLT2, by examining their specific effects on leukocyte subpopulations, and how they may act in concert towards the development of immune and inflammatory responses.

  8. The cell cycle regulated transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Archer

    Full Text Available Progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle requires the regulation of hundreds of genes to ensure that they are expressed at the required times. Integral to cell cycle progression in yeast and animal cells are temporally controlled, progressive waves of transcription mediated by cell cycle-regulated transcription factors. However, in the kinetoplastids, a group of early-branching eukaryotes including many important pathogens, transcriptional regulation is almost completely absent, raising questions about the extent of cell-cycle regulation in these organisms and the mechanisms whereby regulation is achieved. Here, we analyse gene expression over the Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle, measuring changes in mRNA abundance on a transcriptome-wide scale. We developed a "double-cut" elutriation procedure to select unperturbed, highly synchronous cell populations from log-phase cultures, and compared this to synchronization by starvation. Transcriptome profiling over the cell cycle revealed the regulation of at least 430 genes. While only a minority were homologous to known cell cycle regulated transcripts in yeast or human, their functions correlated with the cellular processes occurring at the time of peak expression. We searched for potential target sites of RNA-binding proteins in these transcripts, which might earmark them for selective degradation or stabilization. Over-represented sequence motifs were found in several co-regulated transcript groups and were conserved in other kinetoplastids. Furthermore, we found evidence for cell-cycle regulation of a flagellar protein regulon with a highly conserved sequence motif, bearing similarity to consensus PUF-protein binding motifs. RNA sequence motifs that are functional in cell-cycle regulation were more widespread than previously expected and conserved within kinetoplastids. These findings highlight the central importance of post-transcriptional regulation in the proliferation of parasitic kinetoplastids.

  9. Role of prolactin in B cell regulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Farez, Mauricio F; Ysrraelit, María Célica

    2014-04-15

    The role of prolactin in MS pathogenesis was investigated. Prolactin levels were higher in MS subjects both during remission and exacerbation compared to control subjects. Prolactin increased JAK2 expression and Stat phosphorylation on B cells, up-regulated anti-MOG antibody secreting cell numbers, BAFF levels, and Bcl-2expression, and down-regulated expression of Trp63. Prolactin levels correlated positively with anti-MOG secreting cell numbers, and negatively with induced apoptotic B cells. Additionally, prolactin decreased B cell receptor-mediated activation threshold, and induced CD40 expression in B cells. These findings suggest that prolactin promotes B cell autoreactivity in MS through different mechanisms.

  10. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  11. Pellino-1 Selectively Regulates Epithelial Cell Responses to Rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  12. Pellino-1 selectively regulates epithelial cell responses to rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  13. Regulation of Water in Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowles, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    Cell water relationships are important topics to be included in cell biology courses. Differences exist in the control of water relationships in plant cells relative to control in animal cells. One important reason for these differences is that turgor pressure is a consideration in plant cells. Diffusion and osmosis are the underlying factors…

  14. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  15. Genetic regulation of programmed cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis during animal development, and has been conserved in animals as different as nematodes and humans. Recent studies of Drosophila have provided valuable information toward our understanding of genetic regulation of death. Different signals trigger the novel death regulators rpr, hid, and grim, that utilize the evolutionarily conserved iap and ark genes to modulate caspase function. Subsequent removal of dying cells also appears to be accomplished by conserved mechanisms. The similarity between Drosophila and human in cell death signaling pathways illustrate the promise of fruit flies as a model system to elucidate the mechanisms underlying regulation of programmed cell death.

  16. Expression profiling of genes regulated by TGF-beta: Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGF-beta is one of the key cytokines implicated in various disease processes including cancer. TGF-beta inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis in normal epithelial cells and in contrast, acts as a pro-tumour cytokine by promoting tumour angiogenesis, immune-escape and metastasis. It is not clear if various actions of TGF-beta on normal and tumour cells are due to differential gene regulations. Hence we studied the regulation of gene expression by TGF-beta in normal and cancer cells. Results Using human 19 K cDNA microarrays, we show that 1757 genes are exclusively regulated by TGF-beta in A549 cells in contrast to 733 genes exclusively regulated in HPL1D cells. In addition, 267 genes are commonly regulated in both the cell-lines. Semi-quantitative and real-time qRT-PCR analysis of some genes agrees with the microarray data. In order to identify the signalling pathways that influence TGF-beta mediated gene regulation, we used specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase, ERK kinase, JNK kinase and integrin signalling pathways. The data suggest that regulation of majority of the selected genes is dependent on at least one of these pathways and this dependence is cell-type specific. Interestingly, an integrin pathway inhibitor, RGD peptide, significantly affected TGF-beta regulation of Thrombospondin 1 in A549 cells. Conclusion These data suggest major differences with respect to TGF-beta mediated gene regulation in normal and transformed cells and significant role of non-canonical TGF-beta pathways in the regulation of many genes by TGF-beta.

  17. Regulation of Stem Cell Differentiation by Histone Methyltransferases and Demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, D; Bracken, A P; Agger, K

    2008-01-01

    The generation of different cell types from stem cells containing identical genetic information and their organization into tissues and organs during development is a highly complex process that requires defined transcriptional programs. Maintenance of such programs is epigenetically regulated...... and the factors involved in these processes are often essential for development. The activities required for cell-fate decisions are frequently deregulated in human tumors, and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate these processes is therefore important for understanding both developmental...

  18. MicroRNA regulation of natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eSullivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune lymphocytes critical for host defense against viral infection and surveillance against malignant transformation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a family of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent advances have highlighted the importance of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in NK cell development, maturation, and function. This review focuses on several facets of this regulatory mechanism in NK cells: 1 the expressed NK cell miRNA transcriptome; 2 the impact of total miRNA deficiency on NK cells; 3 the role of specific miRNAs regulating NK cell development, survival, and maturation; 4 the intrinsic role of miRNAs regulating NK cell function, including cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity; and 5 the role of NK cell miRNAs in disease. Currently our knowledge of how miRNAs regulate NK cell biology is limited, and thus we also explore key open questions in the field, as well as approaches and techniques to ascertain the role of individual miRNAs as important molecular regulators.

  19. Msh homeobox genes regulate cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincecum, J M; Fannon, A; Song, K; Wang, Y; Sassoon, D A

    1998-07-01

    Msx-1 and Msx-2 are two closely related homeobox genes expressed in cephalic neural crest tooth buds, the optic cup endocardial cushions, and the developing limb [Hill and Davidson, 1991; Monaghan et al., 1991; Robert et al., 1991]. These sites correspond to regions of active cell segregation and proliferation under the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions [Brown et al., 1993; Davidson et al., 1991], suggesting that Msx-1 and Msx-2 regulate cell-cell interactions. We have investigated the potential relationship between expression of the Msh homeobox genes (Msx-1 and Msx-2) and cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell sorting. We report that cell lines stably expressing Msx-1 or Msx-2 differentially sort on the basis of Msh gene expression. We demonstrate in vitro that initial cell aggregation involves calcium-dependent adhesion molecules (cadherins) and that Msh genes regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that Msh genes play a role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and provide a link between the genetic phenomena of homeobox gene expression and cellular events involved in morphogenesis, including cell sorting and proliferation.

  20. Epigenetic regulation in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Natasha M; Chong, Suyinn; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical during spermatogenesis. In this review, the epigenetic regulation and the consequences of its aberrant regulation during mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis are described. The current knowledge on epigenetic modifications that occur during male meiosis is discussed, with special attention on events that define meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Finally, the recent studies focused on transgenerational and paternal effects in mice and humans are discussed. In many cases, these epigenetic effects resulted in impaired fertility and potentially long-ranging affects underlining the importance of research in this area.

  1. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eCacalano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, key members of a distinct hempatopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, are critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally-infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of immune surveillance. Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anti-cancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates with poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells which determine the outcome of cancer immunity are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of natural killer cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Common stemness regulators of embryonic and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christiana; Hadjimichael; Konstantina; Chanoumidou; Natalia; Papadopoulou; Panagiota; Arampatzi; Joseph; Papamatheakis; Androniki; Kretsovali

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells(ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells is regulated by a well characterized gene transcription circuitry. The circuitry is assembled by ESC specific transcription factors, signal trans-ducing molecules and epigenetic regulators. Growing understanding of stem-like cells, albeit of more complex phenotypes, present in tumors(cancer stem cells), provides a common conceptual and research frame-work for basic and applied stem cell biology. In this review, we highlight current results on biomarkers, gene signatures, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators that are common in embryonic and cancer stem cells. We discuss their role in determining the cell phenotype and finally, their potential use to design next generation biological and pharmaceutical approaches for regenerative medicine and cancer therapies.

  3. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  4. Regulators of DNA methylation in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Termanis, Ausma

    2013-01-01

    Although the many cells within a mammal share the same DNA sequence, their gene expression programmes are highly heterogeneous, and their functions correspondingly diverse. This heterogeneity within an isogenic population of cells arises in part from the ability of each cell to respond to its immediate surroundings via a network of signalling pathways. However, this is not sufficient to explain many of the transcriptional and functional differences between cells, particularly t...

  5. Autoimmunity: regulatory B cells--IL-35 and IL-21 regulate the regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, Thomas F; Leonard, Warren J

    2014-08-01

    IL-21 regulates the activity and number of IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (B10 cells) that modulate immune responses and limit diverse autoimmune diseases. A new study demonstrates that IL-35 has a similar function. Identifying regulatory circuits that control B10-cell function in vivo might open the door to future treatments for autoimmune diseases.

  6. T-cell regulation in lepromatous leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidist Bobosha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB. Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae, lepromatous leprosy (LL patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1 responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8% gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1% remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02 numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL.

  7. Regulation of cell adhesion strength by peripheral focal adhesion distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D

    2011-12-21

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength.

  8. Regulated expression of erythropoietin by two human hepatoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.A.; Glass, G.A.; Cunningham, J.M.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-11-01

    The development of a cell culture system that produces erythropoietin (Epo) in a regulated manner has been the focus of much effort. The authors have screened multiple renal and hepatic cell lines for either constitutive or regulated expression of Epo. Only the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep3B and HepG2, made significant amounts of Epo as measured both by radioimmunoassay and in vitro bioassay (as much as 330 milliunits per 10/sup 6/ cells in 24 hr). The constitutive production of Epo increased dramatically as a function of cell density in both cell lines. At cell densities < 3.3 x 10/sup 5/ cells per cm/sup 2/, there was little constitutive release of Epo in the medium. With Hep3B cells grown at low cell densities, a mean 18-fold increase in Epo expression was seen in response to hypoxia and a 6-fold increase was observed in response to incubation in medium containing 50 ..mu..M cobalt(II) chloride. At similar low cell densities, Epo production in HepG2 cells could be enhanced an average of about 3-fold by stimulation with either hypoxia or cobalt(II) chloride. Upon such stimulation, both cell lines demonstrated markedly elevated levels of Epo mRNA. Hence, both Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines provide an excellent in vitro system in which to study the physiological regulation of Epo expression.

  9. Regulation of Germinal Center Reactions by B and T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonseok Chung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Break of B cell tolerance to self-antigens results in the development of autoantibodies and, thus, leads to autoimmunity. How B cell tolerance is maintained during active germinal center (GC reactions is yet to be fully understood. Recent advances revealed several subsets of T cells and B cells that can positively or negatively regulate GC B cell responses in vivo. IL-21-producing CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells comprise a distinct lineage of helper T cells—termed follicular helper T cells (TFH—that can provide help for the development of GC reactions where somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place. Although the function of TFH cells is beneficial in generating high affinity antibodies against infectious agents, aberrant activation of TFH cell or B cell to self-antigens results in autoimmunity. At least three subsets of immune cells have been proposed as regulatory cells that can limit such antibody-mediated autoimmunity, including follicular regulatory T cells (TFR, Qa-1 restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells (CD8+TREG, and regulatory B cells (BREG. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of GC B cell regulation with specific emphasis on the newly identified immune cell subsets involved in this process.

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of Adaptive NK Cell Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, Bianca; Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were previously considered to represent short-lived, innate lymphocytes. However, mouse models have revealed expansion and persistence of differentiated NK cell subsets in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, paralleling antigen-specific T cell differentiation. Congruently, analyses of humans have uncovered CMV-associated NK cell subsets characterized by epigenetic diversification processes that lead to altered target cell specificities and functional capacities. Here, focusing on responses to viruses, we review similarities and differences between mouse and human adaptive NK cells, identifying molecular analogies that may be key to transcriptional reprogramming and functional alterations. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic diversification and hypothesize that processes driving epigenetic diversification may represent a more widespread mechanism for fine-tuning and optimization of cellular immunity.

  11. Nanotechnology in the regulation of stem cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Chuen Wu, Ching-Li Tseng, Chi-Chang Wu, Feng-Chen Kao, Yuan-Kun Tu, Edmund C So and Yang-Kao Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are known for their potential to repair damaged tissues. The adhesion, growth and differentiation of stem cells are likely controlled by the surrounding microenvironment which contains both chemical and physical cues. Physical cues in the microenvironment, for example, nanotopography, were shown to play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. Thus, controlling stem cell behavior by nanoscale topography has become an important issue in stem cell biology. Nanotechnology has emerged as a new exciting field and research from this field has greatly advanced. Nanotechnology allows the manipulation of sophisticated surfaces/scaffolds which can mimic the cellular environment for regulating cellular behaviors. Thus, we summarize recent studies on nanotechnology with applications to stem cell biology, including the regulation of stem cell adhesion, growth, differentiation, tracking and imaging. Understanding the interactions of nanomaterials with stem cells may provide the knowledge to apply to cell–scaffold combinations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  12. Signal Transduction Involved in Cell Volume Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th. van der Wijk (Thea)

    2001-01-01

    textabstract1.fammalian cells are surrounded by a selective permeable plasma membrane that allmvs the interior of the cell to differ in composition from the surrounding solution. The plasma membrane is formed by a bilayer of (phospho-) lipids and contains many different proteins. Hydrophobic molecul

  13. The regulation of erythrocyte survival and suicidal cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Föller, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The life span of erythrocytes is tightly regulated. Therefore, a mechanism is required to remove senescent or damaged erythrocytes without rupture of the cell membrane resulting in the release of hemoglobin which may impair kidney function. The mechanism of suicidal erythrocyte death is called eryptosis and shares similarities with apoptosis of nucleated cells such as exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, blebbing of the membrane, cell s...

  14. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  15. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-08-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell-cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species.

  16. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  17. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature.

  18. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  19. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  20. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  1. c-Myc regulates cell proliferation during lens development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available Myc protooncogenes play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, growth, differentiation and survival during development. In various developing organs, c-myc has been shown to control the expression of cell cycle regulators and its misregulated expression is detected in many human tumors. Here, we show that c-myc gene (Myc is highly expressed in developing mouse lens. Targeted deletion of c-myc gene from head surface ectoderm dramatically impaired ocular organogenesis, resulting in severe microphtalmia, defective anterior segment development, formation of a lens stalk and/or aphakia. In particular, lenses lacking c-myc presented thinner epithelial cell layer and growth impairment that was detectable soon after its inactivation. Defective development of c-myc-null lens was not caused by increased cell death of lens progenitor cells. Instead, c-myc loss reduced cell proliferation, what was associated with an ectopic expression of Prox1 and p27(Kip1 proteins within epithelial cells. Interestingly, a sharp decrease in the expression of the forkhead box transcription factor Foxe3 was also observed following c-myc inactivation. These data represent the first description of the physiological roles played by a Myc family member in mouse lens development. Our findings support the conclusion that c-myc regulates the proliferation of lens epithelial cells in vivo and may, directly or indirectly, modulate the expression of classical cell cycle regulators in developing mouse lens.

  2. FXR: a metabolic regulator and cell protector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Dong Wang; Wei-Dong Chen; David D Moore; Wendong Huang

    2008-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription fac-tors. As a metabolic regulator, FXR plays key roles in bile acid, cholesterol, lipid, and glucose metabolism. Therefore, FXR is a potential drug target for a number of metabolic disorders, especially those related to the metabolic syn-drome. More recently, our group and others have extended the functions of FXR to more than metabolic regulation, which include anti-bacterial growth in intestine, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis. These new findings suggest that FXR has much broader roles than previously thought, and also higl light FXR as a drug target for mul-tiple diseases. This review summarizes the basic information of FXR but focuses on its new functions.

  3. Regulated genes in mesenchymal stem cells and gastriccancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori Tanabe; Kazuhiko Aoyagi; Hiroshi Yokozaki; Hiroki Sasaki

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the genes regulated in mesenchymalstem cells (MSCs) and diffuse-type gastric cancer (GC),gene expression was analyzed.METHODS: Gene expression of MSCs and diffuse-typeGC cells were analyzed by microarray. Genes relatedto stem cells, cancer and the epithelial-mesenchymaltransition (EMT) were extracted from human genelists using Gene Ontology and reference information.Gene panels were generated, and messenger RNAgene expression in MSCs and diffuse-type GC cells wasanalyzed. Cluster analysis was performed using the NCSSsoftware.RESULTS: The gene expression of regulator of G-proteinsignaling 1 (RGS1) was up-regulated in diffuse-type GCcells compared with MSCs. A panel of stem-cell relatedgenes and genes involved in cancer or the EMT wereexamined. Stem-cell related genes, such as growtharrest-specific 6, musashi RNA-binding protein 2 andhairy and enhancer of split 1 (Drosophila), NOTCHfamily genes and Notch ligands, such as delta-like 1(Drosophila) and Jagged 2, were regulated.CONCLUSION: Expression of RGS1 is up-regulated,and genes related to stem cells and NOTCH signalingare altered in diffuse-type GC compared with MSCs.

  4. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  5. miR-148 regulates Mitf in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikta S Haflidadóttir

    Full Text Available The Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (Mitf is an important regulator in melanocyte development and has been shown to be involved in melanoma progression. The current model for the role of Mitf in melanoma assumes that the total activity of the protein is tightly regulated in order to secure cell proliferation. Previous research has shown that regulation of Mitf is complex and involves regulation of expression, splicing, protein stability and post-translational modifications. Here we show that microRNAs (miRNAs are also involved in regulating Mitf in melanoma cells. Sequence analysis revealed conserved binding sites for several miRNAs in the Mitf 3'UTR sequence. Furthermore, miR-148 was shown to affect Mitf mRNA expression in melanoma cells through a conserved binding site in the 3'UTR sequence of mouse and human Mitf. In addition we confirm the previously reported effects of miR-137 on Mitf. Other miRNAs, miR-27a, miR-32 and miR-124 which all have conserved binding sites in the Mitf 3'UTR sequence did not have effects on Mitf. Our data show that miR-148 and miR-137 present an additional level of regulating Mitf expression in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Loss of this regulation, either by mutations or by shortening of the 3'UTR sequence, is therefore a likely factor in melanoma formation and/or progression.

  6. MAPK signal pathways in the regulation of cell proliferation in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    MAPK families play an important role in complex cellular programs like proliferation, differentiation,development, transformation, and apoptosis. At least three MAPK families have been characterized: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun kinase (JNK/SAPK) and p38 MAPK. The above effects are fulfilled by regulation of cell cycle engine and other cell proliferation related proteins. In this paper we discussed their functions and cooperation with other signal pathways in regulation of cell proliferation.

  7. Circadian cycle-dependent MeCP2 and brain chromatin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Samitier-Martí, Mireia; Petazzi, Paolo; Sáez, Mauricio; Szczesna, Karolina; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a chromosomal protein of the brain, very abundant especially in neurons, where it plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Hence it has the potential to be affected by the mammalian circadian cycle. We performed expression analyses of mice brain frontal cortices obtained at different time points and we found that the levels of MeCP2 are altered circadianly, affecting overall organization of brain chromatin and resulting in a circadian-dependent regulation of well-stablished MeCP2 target genes. Furthermore, this data suggests that alterations of MeCP2 can be responsible for the sleeping disorders arising from pathological stages, such as in autism and Rett syndrome.

  8. Cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in regulation of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Singh

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a ubiquitous, multi-step process that is essential for growth and proliferation of cells. The role of membrane lipids in cell cycle regulation is not explored well, although a large number of cytoplasmic and nuclear regulators have been identified. We focus in this work on the role of membrane cholesterol in cell cycle regulation. In particular, we have explored the stringency of the requirement of cholesterol in the regulation of cell cycle progression. For this purpose, we utilized distal and proximal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, and monitored their effect on cell cycle progression. We show that cholesterol content increases in S phase and inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis results in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase under certain conditions. Interestingly, G1 arrest mediated by cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, our results show that the requirement of cholesterol for G1 to S transition is absolute, and even immediate biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, differing with cholesterol merely in a double bond, could not replace cholesterol for reversing the cell cycle arrest. These results are useful in the context of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, that are associated with impaired cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis.

  9. Mechanism of T cell regulation by microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Chang-Ping Wu; Bin-Feng Lu; Jing-Ting Jiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding single-stranded RNAs that can modulate target gene expression at post-transcriptional level and participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. T cells have important functions in acquired immune response;miRNAs regulate this immune response by targeting the mRNAs of genes involved in T cell development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. For instance, miR-181 family members function in progression by targeting Bcl2 and CD69, among others. MiR-17 to miR-92 clusters function by binding to CREB1, PTEN, and Bim. Considering that the suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells is involved in cancer progression, we should investigate the mechanism by which miRNA regulates T cells to develop new approaches for cancer treatment.

  10. Paneth cells: the hub for sensing and regulating intestinal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Zhihua

    2016-05-01

    The complex interplay between symbiotic bacteria and host immunity plays a key role in shaping intestinal homeostasis and maintaining host health. Paneth cells, as one of the major producers of antimicrobial peptides in the intestine under steady-state conditions, play a vital role in regulating intestinal flora. Many studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated genes have put Paneth cells at the center of IBD pathogenesis. In this perspective, we focus on mechanistic studies of different cellular processes in Paneth cells that are regulated by various IBD-associated susceptibility genes, and we discuss the hypothesis that Paneth cells function as the central hub for sensing and regulating intestinal flora in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  11. Metabolic regulation of regulatory T cell development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David John Coe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require ATP-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets have been shown to require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses.

  12. Collective cell migration requires suppression of actomyosin at cell-cell contacts mediated by DDR1 and the cell polarity regulators Par3 and Par6

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo-Carcedo, Cristina; Hooper, Steven; Chaudhry, Shahid I.; Williamson, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Leitinger, Birgit; Sahai, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Collective cell migration occurs in a range of contexts: cancer cells frequently invade in cohorts while retaining cell-cell junctions. Here we show that collective cancer cell invasion depends on reducing actomyosin contractility at sites of cell-cell contact. When actomyosin is not down-regulated at cell-cell contacts migrating cells lose cohesion. We provide a novel molecular mechanism for this down-regulation. Depletion of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) blocks collective cancer cell i...

  13. Neural progenitor cells regulate microglia functions and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Kira I; Andres, Robert H; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Bieri, Gregor; Hasegawa-Moriyama, Maiko; He, Yingbo; Guzman, Raphael; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2012-11-01

    We found mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to have a secretory protein profile distinct from other brain cells and to modulate microglial activation, proliferation and phagocytosis. NPC-derived vascular endothelial growth factor was necessary and sufficient to exert at least some of these effects in mice. Thus, neural precursor cells may not only be shaped by microglia, but also regulate microglia functions and activity.

  14. Identifying microRNAs that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Detection and quantification of neurite outgrowth Cells were plated and treated in 96-well plates. For measuring...inhibits the stemness of glioma stem cells by target- ing RTVP-1. Oncotarget 2013; 4(5):665-76; PMID:23714687 14. Trang P, Wiggins JF, Daige CL, Cho C...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0241 TITLE: Identifying that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Liqin Du

  15. Upregulation of Phagocytic Clearance of Apoptotic Cells by Autoimmune Regulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石亮; 胡丽华; 李一荣

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of autoimmune regulator(AIRE) on phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells,a recombinant expression vector containing full-length human AIRE cDNA was transfected into 16HBE cells.After incubation with transfected 16HBE cells,engulfment of apoptotic HL-60 cells induced by camptothecin was detected by myeloperoxidase(MPO) staining.The change in the expression of Rac 1 in transfected 16HBE cells was determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting.The results showed that the phagocytosis perce...

  16. Insulin and glucagon regulate pancreatic α-cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Liu

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM results from insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, in the setting of hyperglucagonemia. Glucagon is a 29 amino acid peptide hormone, which is secreted from pancreatic α cells: excessively high circulating levels of glucagon lead to excessive hepatic glucose output. We investigated if α-cell numbers increase in T2DM and what factor (s regulate α-cell turnover. Lepr(db/Lepr(db (db/db mice were used as a T2DM model and αTC1 cells were used to study potential α-cell trophic factors. Here, we demonstrate that in db/db mice α-cell number and plasma glucagon levels increased as diabetes progressed. Insulin treatment (EC50 = 2 nM of α cells significantly increased α-cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner compared to non-insulin-treated α cells. Insulin up-regulated α-cell proliferation through the IR/IRS2/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, and increased insulin-mediated proliferation was prevented by pretreatment with rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor. GcgR antagonism resulted in reduced rates of cell proliferation in αTC1 cells. In addition, blockade of GcgRs in db/db mice improved glucose homeostasis, lessened α-cell proliferation, and increased intra-islet insulin content in β cells in db/db mice. These studies illustrate that pancreatic α-cell proliferation increases as diabetes develops, resulting in elevated plasma glucagon levels, and both insulin and glucagon are trophic factors to α-cells. Our current findings suggest that new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of T2DM may include targeting α cells and glucagon.

  17. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  18. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Málaga-Trillo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins (PrPs are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1 mediates Ca(+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2 modulates Ca(+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin-based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development.

  19. Regulation of L-threonine dehydrogenase in somatic cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chuanchun; Gu, Hao; Wang, Jiaxu; Lu, Weiguang; Mei, Yide; Wu, Mian

    2013-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metabolic remodeling plays an important role in the regulation of somatic cell reprogramming. Threonine catabolism mediated by L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) has been recognized as a specific metabolic trait of mouse embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether TDH-mediated threonine catabolism could regulate reprogramming. Here, we report TDH as a novel regulator of somatic cell reprogramming. Knockdown of TDH inhibits, whereas induction of TDH enhances reprogramming efficiency. Moreover, microRNA-9 post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of TDH and thereby inhibits reprogramming efficiency. Furthermore, protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT5) interacts with TDH and mediates its post-translational arginine methylation. PRMT5 appears to regulate TDH enzyme activity through both methyltransferase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Functionally, TDH-facilitated reprogramming efficiency is further enhanced by PRMT5. These results suggest that TDH-mediated threonine catabolism controls somatic cell reprogramming and indicate the importance of post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of TDH.

  20. Surface topography during neural stem cell differentiation regulates cell migration and cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Catherine; Short, Aaron; Nelson, Tyler; Gygli, Patrick; Ortiz, Cristina; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Stocker, Ben; Cronin, James; Lannutti, John; Winter, Jessica; Otero, José Javier

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine the contribution of scaffold topography to the migration and morphology of neural stem cells by mimicking anatomical features of scaffolds found in vivo. We mimicked two types of central nervous system scaffolds encountered by neural stem cells during development in vitro by constructing different diameter electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber mats, a substrate that we have shown to be topographically similar to brain scaffolds. We compared the effects of large fibers (made to mimic blood vessel topography) with those of small-diameter fibers (made to mimic radial glial process topography) on the migration and differentiation of neural stem cells. Neural stem cells showed differential migratory and morphological reactions with laminin in different topographical contexts. We demonstrate, for the first time, that neural stem cell biological responses to laminin are dependent on topographical context. Large-fiber topography without laminin prevented cell migration, which was partially reversed by treatment with rock inhibitor. Cell morphology complexity assayed by fractal dimension was inhibited in nocodazole- and cytochalasin-D-treated neural precursor cells in large-fiber topography, but was not changed in small-fiber topography with these inhibitors. These data indicate that cell morphology has different requirements on cytoskeletal proteins dependent on the topographical environment encountered by the cell. We propose that the physical structure of distinct scaffolds induces unique signaling cascades that regulate migration and morphology in embryonic neural precursor cells. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3485-3502, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Viral infections and cell cycle G2/M regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Y.ZHAO; Robert T.ELDER

    2005-01-01

    Progression of cells from G2 phase of the cell cycle to mitosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that requires activation of the Cdc2 kinase, which determines onset of mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. In both human and fission yeast(Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cells, the activity of Cdc2 is regulated in part by the phosphorylation status of tyrosine 15(Tyr15) on Cdc2, which is phosphorylated by Wee1 kinase during late G2 and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the Cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase to trigger entry into mitosis. These Cdc2 regulators are the downstream targets of two well-characterized G2/M checkpoint pathways which prevent cells from entering mitosis when cellular DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is inhibited. Increasing evidence suggests that Cdc2 is also commonly targeted by viral proteins,which modulate host cell cycle machinery to benefit viral survival or replication. In this review, we describe the effect of viral protein R (Vpr) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on cell cycle G2/M regulation. Based on our current knowledge about this viral effect, we hypothesize that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a mechanism that is to some extent different from the classic G2/M checkpoints. One the unique features distinguishing Vpr-induced G2 arrest from the classic checkpoints is the role of phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Vpr-induced G2 arrest.Interestingly, PP2A is targeted by a number of other viral proteins including SV40 small T antigen, polyomavirus T antigen, HTLV Tax and adenovirus E4orf4. Thus an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Vpr-induced G2 arrest will provide additional insights into the basic biology of cell cycle G2/M regulation and into the biological significance of this effect during host-pathogen interactions.

  2. Regulation of germ cell meiosis in the fetal ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Cassy M; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fertility depends on correct regulation of meiosis, the special form of cell division that gives rise to haploid gametes. In female mammals, germ cells enter meiosis during fetal ovarian development, while germ cells in males avoid entering meiosis until puberty. Decades of research have shown that meiotic entry, and germ cell sex determination, are not initiated intrinsically within the germ cells. Instead, meiosis is induced by signals produced by the surrounding somatic cells. More recently, retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been implicated in meiotic induction during fetal XX and postnatal XY germ cell development. Evidence for an intricate system of RA synthesis and degradation in the fetal ovary and testis has emerged, explaining past observations of infertility in vitamin A-deficient rodents. Here we review how meiosis is triggered in fetal ovarian germ cells, paying special attention to the role of RA in this process.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  4. Retinoic acid signalling in thymocytes regulates T cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendland, Kerstin; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Kotarsky, Knut

    The Vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) has emerged as an important regulator of peripheral T cell responses. However, whether there is endogenous retinoic acid receptor (RAR) signaling in developing thymocytes and the potential impact of such signals in thymocyte development remains unclear...... further enhanced in recently generated CD69+ CD4+ SP cells. To address the potential biological significance of RA signaling in developing thymocytes, we evaluated T cell development in CD4Cre-dnRAR mice, where RA signaling is blocked in thymocytes from the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) stage onwards due...... of this cell subset. Collectively, our data suggest a direct role for RA signaling in regulating thymocyte homeostasis and T cell development....

  5. The histone demethylase UTX regulates stem cell migration and hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sebastian; Gyárfás, Tobias; Richter, Cornelia; Özhan, Günes; Fu, Jun; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Muders, Michael H; Michalk, Irene; Jakob, Christiane; Dahl, Andreas; Klink, Barbara; Bandola, Joanna; Bachmann, Michael; Schröck, Evelin; Buchholz, Frank; Stewart, A Francis; Weidinger, Gilbert; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Brenner, Sebastian

    2013-03-28

    Regulated migration of hematopoietic stem cells is fundamental for hematopoiesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell trafficking are poorly defined. Based on a short hairpin RNA library and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) migration screening assay, we identified the histone 3 lysine 27 demethylase UTX (Kdm6a) as a novel regulator for hematopoietic cell migration. Using hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from our conditional UTX knockout (KO) mice, we were able to confirm the regulatory function of UTX on cell migration. Moreover, adult female conditional UTX KO mice displayed myelodysplasia and splenic erythropoiesis, whereas UTX KO males showed no phenotype. During development, all UTX KO female and a portion of UTX KO male embryos developed a cardiac defect, cranioschisis, and died in utero. Therefore, UTY, the male homolog of UTX, can compensate for UTX in adults and partially during development. Additionally, we found that UTX knockdown in zebrafish significantly impairs SDF-1/CXCR4-dependent migration of primordial germ cells. Our data suggest that UTX is a critical regulator for stem cell migration and hematopoiesis.

  6. Activin Receptor Signaling Regulates Prostatic Epithelial Cell Adhesion and Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Simon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutational changes coupled with endocrine, paracrine, and/or autocrine signals regulate cell division during carcinogenesis. The hormone signals remain undefined, although the absolute requirement in vitro for fetal serum indicates the necessity for a fetal serum factor(s in cell proliferation. Using prostatic cancer cell (PCC lines as a model of cancer cell proliferation, we have identified the fetal serum component activin A and its signaling through the activin receptor type II (ActRII, as necessary, although not sufficient, for PCC proliferation. Activin A induced Smad2 phosphorylation and PCC proliferation, but only in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS. Conversely, activin A antibodies and inhibin A suppressed FBS-induced PCC proliferation confirming activin A as one of multiple serum components required for PCC proliferation. Basic fibroblast growth factor was subsequently shown to synergize activin A-induced PCC proliferation. Inhibition of ActRII signaling using a blocking antibody or antisense-P decreased mature ActRII expression, Smad2 phosphorylation, and the apparent viability of PCCs and neuroblastoma cells grown in FBS. Suppression of ActRII signaling in PCC and neuroblastoma cells did not induce apoptosis as indicated by the ratio of active/inactive caspase 3 but did correlate with increased cell detachment and ADAM-15 expression, a disintegrin whose expression is strongly correlated with prostatic metastasis. These findings indicate that ActRII signaling is required for PCC and neuroblastoma cell viability, with ActRII mediating cell fate via the regulation of cell adhesion. That ActRII signaling governs both cell viability and cell adhesion has important implications for developing therapeutic strategies to regulate cancer growth and metastasis.

  7. How does cell size regulation affect population growth?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of a growing microbial colony is well characterized by the population growth rate. However, at the single-cell level, isogenic cells often exhibit different cell-cycle durations. For evolutionary dynamics, it is thus important to establish the connection between the population growth rate and the heterogeneous single-cell generation time. Existing theories often make the assumption that the generation times of mother and daughter cells are independent. However, it has been shown that to maintain a bounded cell size distribution, cells that grow exponentially at the single-cell level need to adopt cell size regulation, leading to a negative correlation of mother-daughter generation time. In this work, we construct a general framework to describe the population growth in the presence of size regulation. We derive a formula for the population growth rate, which only depends on the variability of single-cell growth rate, independent of other sources of noises. Our work shows that a population ca...

  8. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  9. Evolution of cell cycle control: same molecular machines, different regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Decades of research has together with the availability of whole genomes made it clear that many of the core components involved in the cell cycle are conserved across eukaryotes, both functionally and structurally. These proteins are organized in complexes and modules that are activated or deacti......Decades of research has together with the availability of whole genomes made it clear that many of the core components involved in the cell cycle are conserved across eukaryotes, both functionally and structurally. These proteins are organized in complexes and modules that are activated...... or deactivated at specific stages during the cell cycle through a wide variety of mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, phosphorylation, subcellular translocation and targeted degradation. In a series of integrative analyses of different genome-scale data sets, we have studied how these different...... layers of regulation together control the activity of cell cycle complexes and how this regulation has evolved. The results show surprisingly poor conservation of both the transcriptional and the post-translation regulation of individual genes and proteins; however, the changes in one layer of regulation...

  10. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  11. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  12. Cell-specific Regulation of APOBEC3F by Interferons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songcheng YING; Xuzhao ZHANG; Phuong Thi Nguyen SARKIS; Rongzhen XU; Xiaofang YU

    2007-01-01

    Human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3F (A3F) has broad anti-viral activity against hepatitis B virus and retroviruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, its regulation in viral natural target cells such CD4+ T lymphocytes, macrophages, and primary liver cells has not been well studied. Here we showed that A3F was up-regulated by interferon (IFN)-α in primary hepatocytes and multiple liver cell lines as well as macrophages. Although the IFN-α signaling pathway was active in T lymphoid cells and induction of other IFN stimulated genes such as PKR was detected, A3F and APOBEC3G (A3G) were not induced by IFN-o in these cells. Thus, additional factors other than known IFN-stimulated genes also regulated IFN-α-induced A3F expression distinctly. A3F and A3G expression levels in primary hepatocytes, especially after IFN-α stimulation, were comparable to those in CD4+ T lymphocytes in some individuals. Significant variations of A3F and A3G expression in primary hepatocytes from various subjects were observed. Individual variations in A3F and/or A3G regulation and expression might influence the clinical outcomes of hepatitis B infection.

  13. Regulation of germinal center B-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Garcia-Ibanez, Laura; Toellner, Kai-Michael

    2016-03-01

    Germinal centers (GC) are the main sites where antigen-activated B-cell clones expand and undergo immunoglobulin gene hypermutation and selection. Iterations of this process will lead to affinity maturation, replicating Darwinian evolution on the cellular level. GC B-cell selection can lead to four different outcomes: further expansion and evolution, apoptosis (non-selection), or output from the GC with differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells. T-helper cells in GC have been shown to have a central role in regulating B-cell selection by sensing the density of major histocompatibility complex (MHC):peptide antigen complexes. Antigen is provided on follicular dendritic cells in the form of immune complex. Antibody on these immune complexes regulates antigen accessibility by shielding antigen from B-cell receptor access. Replacement of antibody on immune complexes by antibody generated from GC-derived plasma cell output will gradually reduce the availability of antigen. This antibody feedback can lead to a situation where a slow rise in selection stringency caused by a changing environment leads to directional evolution toward higher affinity antibody.

  14. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  15. Peyer's patch innate lymphoid cells regulate commensal bacteria expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Kojima, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Ayano; Kanno, Yumiko; Kobata, Tetsuji

    2015-05-01

    Anatomical containment of commensal bacteria in the intestinal mucosa is promoted by innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). However, the mechanism by which ILCs regulate bacterial localization to specific regions remains unknown. Here we show that Peyer's patch (PP) ILCs robustly produce IL-22 and IFN-γ in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Antibiotic treatment of mice decreased both IL-22+ and IFN-γ+ cells in PPs. Blockade of both IL-2 and IL-23 signaling in vitro lowered IL-22 and IFN-γ production. PP ILCs induced mRNA expression of the antibacterial proteins RegIIIβ and RegIIIγ in intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, in vivo depletion of ILCs rather than T cells altered bacterial composition and allowed bacterial proliferation in PPs. Collectively, our results show that ILCs regulate the expansion of commensal bacteria in PPs.

  16. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  17. Cell cycle regulation by glucosamine in human pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Lu, Chih-Shen; Kou, Yu Ru; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Airway epithelial cells play an important role against intruding pathogens. Glucosamine, a commonly used supplemental compound, has recently begun to be regarded as a potential anti-inflammatory molecule. This study aimed to uncover how glucosamine impacts on cellular proliferation in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) and bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). With trypan blue-exclusion assay, we observed that glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) caused a decrease in cell number at 24 and 48 h; with a flow cytometric analysis, we also noted an enhanced cell accumulation within the G(0)/G(1) phase at 24 h and induction of late apoptosis at 24 and 48 h by glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) in A549 cells and HBECs. Examination of phosphorylation in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, we found an inhibitory effect by glucosamine at 20 and 50 mM. Glucosamine at 50 mM was demonstrated to elevate both the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), but also caused a reduction in p21 protein expression. In addition, glucosamine attenuated p21 protein stability via the proteasomal proteolytic pathway, as well as inducing p21 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, our results suggest that a high dose of glucosamine may inhibit cell proliferation through apoptosis and disturb cell cycle progression with a halt at G(0)/G(1) phase, and that this occurs, at least in part, by a reduction in Rb phosphorylation together with modulation of p21, p53 and HO-1 expression, and nuclear p21 accumulation.

  18. Protein Kinase D Regulates Cell Death Pathways in Experimental Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Guha, Sushovan; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early e...

  19. Nuclear annexin II negatively regulates growth of LNCaP cells and substitution of ser 11 and 25 to glu prevents nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of annexin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala-Sanmartin Jesus

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin II heavy chain (also called p36, calpactin I is lost in prostate cancers and in a majority of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Loss of annexin II heavy chain appears to be specific for prostate cancer since overexpression of annexin II is observed in a majority of human cancers, including pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and brain tumors. Annexin II exists as a heterotetramer in complex with a protein ligand p11 (S100A10, and as a monomer. Diverse cellular functions are proposed for the two forms of annexin II. The monomer is involved in DNA synthesis. A leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES in the N-terminus of annexin II regulates its nuclear export by the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway. Mutation of the NES sequence results in nuclear retention of annexin II. Results Annexin II localized in the nucleus is phosphorylated, and the appearance of nuclear phosphorylated annexin II is cell cycle dependent, indicating that phosphorylation may play a role in nuclear entry, retention or export of annexin II. By exogenous expression of annexin II in the annexin II-null LNCaP cells, we show that wild-type annexin II is excluded from the nucleus, whereas the NES mutant annexin II localizes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear retention of annexin II results in reduced cell proliferation and increased doubling time of cells. Expression of annexin II, both wild type and NES mutant, causes morphological changes of the cells. By site-specific substitution of glutamic acid in the place of serines 11 and 25 in the N-terminus, we show that simultaneous phosphorylation of both serines 11 and 25, but not either one alone, prevents nuclear localization of annexin II. Conclusion Our data show that nuclear annexin II is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and that substitution of serines 11 and 25 inhibit nuclear entry of annexin II. Aberrant accumulation of nuclear annexin II retards proliferation of LNCa

  20. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment. PMID:23150585

  1. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled.

  2. Regulative Function of Telomerase and Extracelluar Regulated Protein Kinases to Leukemic Cell Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李登举; 张瑶珍; 曹文静; 孙岚; 徐慧珍; 路武

    2002-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the regulative function of telomerase and phosphorylated (acti-vated) extracelluar regulated protein kinase (ERK) i and 2 in the leukemic cell lines HL-60 andK562 proliferation inhibition and apoptosis, three chemotherapeutic drugs Harringtonine (HRT),Vincristine(VCR)and Etoposide(Vp16)were selected as inducers. The proliferation inhibition ratewas detected by MTT method, the cell cycle and cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometryand the telomerase activity was detected by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP)assay and bioluminescence analysis method. The phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein expression wasdetected by western blot method. The results showed that HRT, VCR and Vp16 could inhibit cellproliferation, induce apoptosis, inhibit telomerase activity and down-regulate the protein expres-sion of phosphorylated ERK. It was suggested that ERK signal transduction pathway was involvedin the down-regulation of telomerase activity and the onset of apoptosis in the leukemic cells treat-ed by HRT, VCR and Vp16.

  3. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Xi [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); State Key Lab of Animal Nutrition, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Shi, Taiping [Chinese National Human Genome Center, Beijing. 3-707 North YongChang Road BDA, Beijing 100176 (China); Song, Quansheng [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Hongshan, E-mail: hongshan@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Dalong [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  4. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  5. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  6. Regulated growth of diatom cells on self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Koichi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We succeeded in regulating the growth of diatom cells on chemically modified glass surfaces. Glass surfaces were functionalized with -CF3, -CH3, -COOH, and -NH2 groups using the technique of self-assembled monolayers (SAM, and diatom cells were subsequently cultured on these surfaces. When the samples were rinsed after the adhesion of the diatom cells on the modified surfaces, the diatoms formed two dimensional arrays; this was not possible without the rinsing treatment. Furthermore, we examined the number of cells that grew and their motility by time-lapse imaging in order to clarify the interaction between the cells and SAMs. We hope that our results will be a basis for developing biodevices using living photosynthetic diatom cells.

  7. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-05-27

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction signaling pathways in two-dimensional culture. Furthermore, a putative rapid shift from original mechanosensing to de novo cell-derived matrix sensing in more physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture is pointed out. A comprehensive understanding of stem cell responses to this stimulus is essential for designing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment and advancing stem cell-based clinical applications for tissue engineering.

  8. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the cadherin cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, C

    1992-04-17

    Differential adhesion between embryonic cells has been proposed to be mediated by a family of closely related glycoproteins called the cadherins. The cadherins mediate adhesion in part through an interaction between the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and intracellular proteins, called the catenins. To determine whether these interactions could regulate cadherin function in embryos, a form of N-cadherin was generated that lacks an extracellular domain. Expression of this mutant in Xenopus embryos causes a dramatic inhibition of cell adhesion. Analysis of the mutant phenotype shows that at least two regions of the N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain can inhibit adhesion and that the mutant cadherin can inhibit catenin binding to E-cadherin. These results suggest that cadherin-mediated adhesion can be regulated by cytoplasmic interactions and that this regulation may contribute to morphogenesis when emerging tissues coexpress several cadherin types.

  9. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  10. Isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of muscle stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-ichiro eFukada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available keletal muscle has great regenerative capacity which is dependent on muscle stem cells, also known as satellite cells. A loss of satellite cells and/or their function impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and leads to a loss of skeletal muscle power; therefore, the molecular mechanisms for maintaining satellite cells in a quiescent and undifferentiated state are of great interest in skeletal muscle biology. Many studies have demonstrated proteins expressed by satellite cells, including Pax7, M-cadherin, Cxcr4, syndecan3/4, and c-met. To further characterize satellite cells, we established a method to directly isolate satellite cells using a monoclonal antibody, SM/C-2.6. Using SM/C-2.6 and microarrays, we measured the genes expressed in quiescent satellite cells and demonstrated that Hesr3 may complement Hesr1 in generating quiescent satellite cells. Although Hesr1- or Hesr3-single knockout mice show a normal skeletal muscle phenotype, including satellite cells, Hesr1/Hesr3-double knockout mice show a gradual decrease in the number of satellite cells and increase in regenerative defects dependent on satellite cell numbers. We also observed that a mouse’s genetic background affects the regenerative capacity of its skeletal muscle and have established a line of DBA/2-background mdx mice that has a much more severe phenotype than the frequently used C57BL/10-mdx mice. The phenotype of DBA/2-mdx mice also seems to depend on the function of satellite cells. In this review, we summarize the methodology of direct isolation, characterization, and molecular regulation of satellite cells based on our results. The relationship between the regenerative capacity of satellite cells and progression of muscular disorders is also summarized. In the last part, we discuss application of the accumulating scientific information on satellite cells to treatment of patients with muscular disorders.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  12. Purinergic Signaling as a Regulator of Th17 Cell Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Fernández

    Full Text Available T helper type 17 (Th17 lymphocytes, characterized by the production of interleukin-17 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, are present in intestinal lamina propria and have been described as important players driving intestinal inflammation. Recent evidence, supporting the notion of a functional and phenotypic instability of Th17 cells, has shown that Th17 differentiate into type 1 regulatory (Tr1 T cells during the resolution of intestinal inflammation. Moreover, it has been suggested that the expression of CD39 ectonucleotidase endows Th17 cells with immunosuppressive properties. However, the exact role of CD39 ectonucleotidase in Th17 cells has not been studied in the context of intestinal inflammation. Here we show that Th17 cells expressing CD39 ectonucleotidase can hydrolyze ATP and survive to ATP-induced cell death. Moreover, in vitro-generated Th17 cells expressing the CD39 ectonucleotidase produce IL-10 and are less pathogenic than CD39 negative Th17 cells in a model of experimental colitis in Rag-/- mice. Remarkably, we show that CD39 activity regulates the conversion of Th17 cells to IL-10-producing cells in vitro, which is abrogated in the presence of ATP and the CD39-specific inhibitor ARL67156. All these data suggest that CD39 expression by Th17 cells allows the depletion of ATP and is crucial for IL-10 production and survival during the resolution of intestinal inflammation.

  13. Planar cell polarity pathway regulates nephrin endocytosis in developing podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayeva, Sima; Rocque, Brittany; Aoudjit, Lamine; Zilber, Yulia; Li, Jane; Baldwin, Cindy; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Takano, Tomoko; Torban, Elena

    2013-08-16

    The noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls a variety of cell behaviors such as polarized protrusive cell activity, directional cell movement, and oriented cell division and is crucial for the normal development of many tissues. Mutations in the PCP genes cause malformation in multiple organs. Recently, the PCP pathway was shown to control endocytosis of PCP and non-PCP proteins necessary for cell shape remodeling and formation of specific junctional protein complexes. During formation of the renal glomerulus, the glomerular capillary becomes enveloped by highly specialized epithelial cells, podocytes, that display unique architecture and are connected via specialized cell-cell junctions (slit diaphragms) that restrict passage of protein into the urine; podocyte differentiation requires active remodeling of cytoskeleton and junctional protein complexes. We report here that in cultured human podocytes, activation of the PCP pathway significantly stimulates endocytosis of the core slit diaphragm protein, nephrin, via a clathrin/β-arrestin-dependent endocytic route. In contrast, depletion of the PCP protein Vangl2 leads to an increase of nephrin at the cell surface; loss of Vangl2 functions in Looptail mice results in disturbed glomerular maturation. We propose that the PCP pathway contributes to podocyte development by regulating nephrin turnover during junctional remodeling as the cells differentiate.

  14. Purinergic Signaling as a Regulator of Th17 Cell Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Dominique; Flores-Santibáñez, Felipe; Neira, Jocelyn; Osorio-Barrios, Francisco; Tejón, Gabriela; Nuñez, Sarah; Hidalgo, Yessia; Fuenzalida, Maria Jose; Meza, Daniel; Ureta, Gonzalo; Lladser, Alvaro; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Guixé, Victoria; Quintana, Francisco J.; Bono, Maria Rosa; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    T helper type 17 (Th17) lymphocytes, characterized by the production of interleukin-17 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, are present in intestinal lamina propria and have been described as important players driving intestinal inflammation. Recent evidence, supporting the notion of a functional and phenotypic instability of Th17 cells, has shown that Th17 differentiate into type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells during the resolution of intestinal inflammation. Moreover, it has been suggested that the expression of CD39 ectonucleotidase endows Th17 cells with immunosuppressive properties. However, the exact role of CD39 ectonucleotidase in Th17 cells has not been studied in the context of intestinal inflammation. Here we show that Th17 cells expressing CD39 ectonucleotidase can hydrolyze ATP and survive to ATP-induced cell death. Moreover, in vitro-generated Th17 cells expressing the CD39 ectonucleotidase produce IL-10 and are less pathogenic than CD39 negative Th17 cells in a model of experimental colitis in Rag-/- mice. Remarkably, we show that CD39 activity regulates the conversion of Th17 cells to IL-10-producing cells in vitro, which is abrogated in the presence of ATP and the CD39-specific inhibitor ARL67156. All these data suggest that CD39 expression by Th17 cells allows the depletion of ATP and is crucial for IL-10 production and survival during the resolution of intestinal inflammation. PMID:27322617

  15. Xnrs and activin regulate distinct genes during Xenopus development: activin regulates cell division.

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    Joana M Ramis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mesoderm of the amphibian embryo is formed through an inductive interaction in which vegetal cells of the blastula-staged embryo act on overlying equatorial cells. Candidate mesoderm-inducing factors include members of the transforming growth factor type beta family such as Vg1, activin B, the nodal-related proteins and derrière. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Microarray analysis reveals different functions for activin B and the nodal-related proteins during early Xenopus development. Inhibition of nodal-related protein function causes the down-regulation of regionally expressed genes such as chordin, dickkopf and XSox17alpha/beta, while genes that are mis-regulated in the absence of activin B tend to be more widely expressed and, interestingly, include several that are involved in cell cycle regulation. Consistent with the latter observation, cells of the involuting dorsal axial mesoderm, which normally undergo cell cycle arrest, continue to proliferate when the function of activin B is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations reveal distinct functions for these two classes of the TGF-beta family during early Xenopus development, and in doing so identify a new role for activin B during gastrulation.

  16. Revealed: The spy who regulates neuroblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2014-11-30

    Neuroblastoma (NB), an embryonal tumour of the sympathetic nervous system, is thought to originate from undifferentiated neural crest cells and is known to exhibit extremely heterogeneous biological and clinical behaviors. Occurring in very young children, the median age at diagnosis is 17 months and it accounts for 10% of all pediatric cancer mortalities. The standard treatment regimen for patients with high-risk NB includes induction and surgery followed by isotretinoin or Accutane (13-cis retinoic acid) treatment, which is shown to induce terminal differentiation of NB cells. However, molecular regulators that maintain an undifferentiated phenotype in NB cells are still poorly understood.

  17. Putting On The Breaks: Regulating Organelle Movements in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julianna K.Vick; Andreas Nebenführ

    2012-01-01

    A striking characteristic of plant cells is that their organelles can move rapidly through the cell.This movement,commonly referred to as cytoplasmic streaming,has been observed for over 200 years,but we are only now beginning to decipher the mechanisms responsible for it.The identification of the myosin motor proteins responsible for these movements allows us to probe the regulatory events that coordinate organelle displacement with normal cell physiology.This review will highlight several recent developments that have provided new insight into the regulation of organelle movement,both at the cellular level and at the molecular level.

  18. GABA Regulates Stem Cell Proliferation before Nervous System Formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Doris,; Kriegstein, Arnold; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; HISTONE H2AX-DEPENDENT GABAA RECEPTOR REGULATION OF STEM CELL PROLIFERATION: Andäng M, Hjerling-Leffler J, Moliner A, Lundgren TK, Castelo-Branco G, Nanou E, Pozas E, Bryja V, Halliez S, Nishimaru H, Wilbertz J, Arenas E, Koltzenburg M, Charnay P, El Manira A, Ibañez CF, Ernfors P. Nature20084517177:460-46418185516 Stem cell self-renewal implies proliferation under continued maintenance of multipotency. Small changes in numbers of stem cells may lead to large differenc...

  19. Protein S Regulates Neural Stem Cell Quiescence and Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelentsova, Katya; Talmi, Ziv; Abboud-Jarrous, Ghada; Sapir, Tamar; Capucha, Tal; Nassar, Maria; Burstyn-Cohen, Tal

    2017-03-01

    Neurons are continuously produced in brains of adult mammalian organisms throughout life-a process tightly regulated to ensure a balanced homeostasis. In the adult brain, quiescent Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) residing in distinct niches engage in proliferation, to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated neurons and astrocytes. The mechanisms governing the intricate regulation of NSC quiescence and neuronal differentiation are not completely understood. Here, we report the expression of Protein S (PROS1) in adult NSCs, and show that genetic ablation of Pros1 in neural progenitors increased hippocampal NSC proliferation by 47%. We show that PROS1 regulates the balance of NSC quiescence and proliferation, also affecting daughter cell fate. We identified the PROS1-dependent downregulation of Notch1 signaling to correlate with NSC exit from quiescence. Notch1 and Hes5 mRNA levels were rescued by reintroducing Pros1 into NCS or by supplementation with purified PROS1, suggesting the regulation of Notch pathway by PROS1. Although Pros1-ablated NSCs show multilineage differentiation, we observed a 36% decrease in neurogenesis, coupled with a similar increase in astrogenesis, suggesting PROS1 is instructive for neurogenesis, and plays a role in fate determination, also seen in aged mice. Rescue experiments indicate PROS1 is secreted by NSCs and functions by a NSC-endogenous mechanism. Our study identifies a duple role for PROS1 in stem-cell quiescence and as a pro-neurogenic factor, and highlights a unique segregation of increased stem cell proliferation from enhanced neuronal differentiation, providing important insight into the regulation and control of NSC quiescence and differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:679-693.

  20. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

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    Atefeh Lafzi

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation.

  1. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  2. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  3. Regulation of Parvalbumin Basket cell plasticity in rule learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico

    2015-04-24

    Local inhibitory Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks shift to one of two possible opposite configurations depending on whether behavioral learning involves acquisition of new information or consolidation of validated rules. This reflects the existence of PV Basket cell subpopulations with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, output target neurons and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons is recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons is recruited in new information acquisition. This involves regulation of early-born PV neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born PV neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation.

  4. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  5. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  6. Studies on regulation of the cell cycle in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Požgajová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms including plants and animals are composed of millions of cells. These cells perform different functions for the organism although they possess the same chromosomes and carry the same genetic information. Thus, to be able to understand multicellular organism we need to understand the life cycle of individual cells from which the organism comprises. The cell cycle is the life cycle of a single cell in the plant or animal body. It involves series of events in which components of the cell doubles and afterwards equally segregate into daughter cells. Such process ensures growth of the organism, and specialized reductional cell division which leads to production of gamets, assures sexual reproduction. Cell cycle is divided in the G1, S, G2 and M phase. Two gap-phases (G1 and G2 separate S phase (or synthesis and M phase which stays either for mitosis or meiosis. Essential for normal life progression and reproduction is correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Defects in the division program lead to aneuploidy, which in turn leads to birth defects, miscarriages or cancer. Even thou, researchers invented much about the regulation of the cell cycle, there is still long way to understand the complexity of the regulatory machineries that ensure proper segregation of chromosomes. In this paper we would like to describe techniques and materials we use for our studies on chromosome segregation in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  7. SOCS1 and Regulation of Regulatory T Cells Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have suggested that natural regulatory T cells (Tregs lose Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3 expression and suppression activity under certain inflammatory conditions. Treg plasticity has been studied because it may be associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Some studies showed that a minor uncommitted Foxp3+ T cell population, which lacks hypomethylation at Treg-specific demethylation regions (TSDRs, may convert to effector/helper T cells. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1, a negative regulator of cytokine signaling, has been reported to play an important role in Treg cell integrity and function by protecting the cells from excessive inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss Treg plasticity and maintenance of suppression functions in both physiological and pathological settings. In addition, we discuss molecular mechanisms of maintaining Treg plasticity by SOCS1 and other molecules. Such information will be useful for therapy of autoimmune diseases and reinforcement of antitumor immunity.

  8. The metabolic switch and its regulation in cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The primary features of cancer are maintained via intrinsically modified metabolic activity, which is characterized by enhanced nutrient supply, energy production, and biosynthetic activity to synthesize a variety of macromolecular components during each passage through the cell cycle. This metabolic shift in transformed cells, as compared with non-proliferating cells, in-volves aberrant activation of aerobic glycolysis, de novo lipid biosynthesis and glutamine-dependent anaplerosis to fuel robust cell growth and proliferation. Here, we discuss the unique metabolic characteristics of cancer, the constitutive regulation of metabolism through a variety of signal transduction pathways and/or enzymes involved in metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, and their implications in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Regulation of Antimicrobial Peptides in Aedes aegypti Aag2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rudian; Zhu, Yibin; Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Gong

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of immune effectors that play a role in combating microbial infections in invertebrates. Most of the current information on the regulation of insect AMPs in microbial infection have been gained from Drosophila, and their regulation in other insects are still not completely understood. Here, we generated an AMP induction profile in response to infections with some Gram-negative, -positive bacteria, and fungi in Aedes aegypti embryonic Aag2 cells. Most of the AMP inductions caused by the gram-negative bacteria was controlled by the Immune deficiency (Imd) pathway; nonetheless, Gambicin, an AMP gene discovered only in mosquitoes, was combinatorially regulated by the Imd, Toll and JAK-STAT pathways in the Aag2 cells. Gambicin promoter analyses including specific sequence motif deletions implicated these three pathways in Gambicin activity, as shown by a luciferase assay. Moreover, the recognition between Rel1 (refer to Dif/Dorsal in Drosophila) and STAT and their regulatory sites at the Gambicin promoter site was validated by a super-shift electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our study provides information that increases our understanding of the regulation of AMPs in response to microbial infections in mosquitoes. And it is a new finding that the A. aegypti AMPs are mainly regulated Imd pathway only, which is quite different from the previous understanding obtained from Drosophila.

  10. Regulation of Antimicrobial Peptides in Aedes aegypti Aag2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rudian; Zhu, Yibin; Pang, Xiaojing; Xiao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Gong

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important group of immune effectors that play a role in combating microbial infections in invertebrates. Most of the current information on the regulation of insect AMPs in microbial infection have been gained from Drosophila, and their regulation in other insects are still not completely understood. Here, we generated an AMP induction profile in response to infections with some Gram-negative, -positive bacteria, and fungi in Aedes aegypti embryonic Aag2 cells. Most of the AMP inductions caused by the gram-negative bacteria was controlled by the Immune deficiency (Imd) pathway; nonetheless, Gambicin, an AMP gene discovered only in mosquitoes, was combinatorially regulated by the Imd, Toll and JAK-STAT pathways in the Aag2 cells. Gambicin promoter analyses including specific sequence motif deletions implicated these three pathways in Gambicin activity, as shown by a luciferase assay. Moreover, the recognition between Rel1 (refer to Dif/Dorsal in Drosophila) and STAT and their regulatory sites at the Gambicin promoter site was validated by a super-shift electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our study provides information that increases our understanding of the regulation of AMPs in response to microbial infections in mosquitoes. And it is a new finding that the A. aegypti AMPs are mainly regulated Imd pathway only, which is quite different from the previous understanding obtained from Drosophila. PMID:28217557

  11. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Seth Childers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  12. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Burke

    Full Text Available Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  13. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqin eMa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate re-programming.

  14. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  15. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB.

  16. Megakaryocytes regulate hematopoietic stem cell quiescence via Cxcl4 secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Ingmar; Lucas, Daniel; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Lambert, Michele P.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Scheiermann, Christoph; Schiff, Lauren; Poncz, Mortimer; Bergman, Aviv; Frenette, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) lodge in specialized microenvironments that tightly control their proliferative state to adapt to the varying needs for replenishment of blood cells while also preventing exhaustion1. All putative niche cells suggested thus far have a non-hematopoietic origin2-8. Thus, it remains unclear how feedback from mature cells is conveyed to HSCs to adjust proliferation. Here we show that megakaryocytes (Mk) can directly regulate HSC pool size. Three-dimensional whole-mount imaging revealed that endogenous HSCs are frequently located adjacent to Mk in a non-random fashion. Selective in vivo depletion of Mk resulted in specific loss of HSC quiescence and led to a marked expansion of functional HSCs. Gene expression analyses revealed that Mk were the source of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 4 (Cxcl4, also named platelet factor 4, Pf4) in the BM and Cxcl4 injection reduced HSC numbers via increased quiescence. By contrast, Cxcl4−/− mice exhibited increased HSC numbers and proliferation. Combined use of whole-mount imaging and computational modelling was highly suggestive of a megakaryocytic niche capable of influencing independently HSC maintenance by regulating quiescence. Thus, these results indicate that a terminally differentiated HSC progeny contributes to niche activity by directly regulating HSC behavior. PMID:25326802

  17. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    TCR and cytokine receptor signaling play key roles in the complex homeostatic mechanisms that maintain a relative stable number of T cells throughout life. Despite the homeostatic mechanisms, a slow decline in naive T cells is typically observed with age. The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif...... controls TCR down-regulation and plays a central role in fine-tuning TCR expression and signaling in T cells. In this study, we show that the age-associated decline of naive T cells is strongly accelerated in CD3gammaLLAA knock-in mice homozygous for a double leucine to alanine mutation in the CD3gamma di......-leucine-based motif, whereas the number of memory T cells is unaffected by the mutation. This results in premature T cell population senescence with a severe dominance of memory T cells and very few naive T cells in middle-aged to old CD3gamma mutant mice. The reduced number of naive T cells in CD3gamma mutant mice...

  18. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition.

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  20. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  1. Regulatory T Cells: Molecular Actions on Effector Cells in Immune Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiel Arce-Sillas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory cells play a key role in the control of the immune response, both in health and during illness. While the mechanisms through which T regulatory cells exert their function have been extensively described, their molecular effects on effector cells have received little attention. Thus, this revision is aimed at summarizing our current knowledge on those regulation mechanisms on the target cells from a molecular perspective.

  2. Leading research on cell proliferation regulation technology; Saibo zoshoku seigyo gijutsu no sendo kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For developing intelligent material, animal test alternative model, bio-cell analysis equipment, self-controlling bio-reactor and medical material, development of functional cells was studied by cell proliferation regulation technology. In fiscal 1996, the expression analysis and separation technology of specific gene for cell proliferation, and the intracellular regulation technology were surveyed from the viewpoint of intracellular regulation. The cell proliferation regulation technology by specific regulating material of cells, extracellular matrix, coculture system and embryonic cell was surveyed from the viewpoint of extracellular regulation. In addition, based on these survey results, new cell culture/analysis technology, new bio-material, artificial organ system, energy saving bio-reactor, environment purification microorganism, and animal test alternative model were surveyed as applications to industrial basic technologies from a long-term viewpoint. The approach to cell proliferation regulation requires preparation of a concrete proliferation regulation technology system of cells, and concrete application targets. 268 refs., 43 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. The roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in fate determinations of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Yanan; Hou, Jingmei; Liu, Yun; Liu, Yang; Yang, Hao; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process by which spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew and differentiate into spermatozoa under the elaborate coordination of testicular microenvironment, namely, niche. Sertoli cells, which locate around male germ cells, are the most critical component of the niche. Significant progress has recently been made by peers and us on uncovering the effects of Sertoli cells on regulating fate determinations of SSCs. Here we addressed the roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in normal and abnormal spermatogenesis. Specifically, we summarized the biological characteristics of Sertoli cells, and we emphasized the roles of Sertoli cells in mediating the self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, de-differentiation, and trans-differentiation of SSCs. The association between abnormal function of Sertoli cells and impaired spermatogenesis was discussed. Finally, we highlighted several issues to be addressed for further investigation on the effects and mechanisms of Sertoli cells in spermatogenesis. Since Sertoli cells are the key supportive cells for SSCs and they are very receptive to modification, a better understanding of the roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in SSC biology and spermatogenesis would make it feasible to identify novel targets for gene therapy of male infertility as well as seek more efficient and safer strategies for male contraception.

  4. Regulation of osteoprotegerin expression by Notch signaling in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeeranan Manokawinchoke; Thanaphum Osathanon; Prasit Pavasant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of Notch signaling on osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line. Methods: Activation of Notch signaling was performed by seeding cells on Jagged1 immobilized surfaces. In other experiments, a γ-secretase inhibitor was added to the culture medium to inhibit intracellular Notch signaling. OPG mRNA and protein were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Finally, publicly available microarray database analysis was performed using connection up- or down-regulation expression analysis of microarrays software. Results: Jagged1-treatment of HSC-4 cells enhanced HES1 and HEY1 mRNA expres-sion, confirming the intracellular activation of Notch signaling. OPG mRNA and protein levels were significantly suppressed upon Jagged1 treatment. Correspondingly, HSC-4 cells treated with a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of HES1 and HEY1 mRNA levels, and a marked increase in OPG protein expression was observed. These results implied that Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in HSC-4 cells. However, Jagged1 did not alter OPG expression in another human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HSC-5) or a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line (HN22). Conclusions: Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in an HSC-4 cell line and this mechanism could be cell line specific.

  5. The evolving paradigm of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of immunity by cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; Rodvold, J J; Mahadevan, N R

    2016-01-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) has been thought to influence tumorigenesis mainly through cell-intrinsic, pro-survival effects. In recent years, however, new evidence has emerged showing that the UPR is also the source of cell-extrinsic effects, particularly directed at those immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. Here we will review and discuss this new body of information with focus on the role of cell-extrinsic effects on innate and adaptive immunity, suggesting that the transmission of ER stress from cancer cells to myeloid cells in particular is an expedient used by cancer cells to control the immune microenvironment, which acquires pro-inflammatory as well as immune-suppressive characteristics. These new findings can now be seen in the broader context of similar phenomena described in Caenorhabditis elegans, and an analogy with quorum sensing and 'community effects' in prokaryotes and eukaryotes can be drawn, arguing that a cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation of heterologous cells may be phylogenetically conserved. Finally, we will discuss the role of aneuploidy as an inducer of proteotoxic stress and potential initiator of cell-nonautonomous UPR-based regulation. In presenting these new views, we wish to bring attention to the cell-extrinsic regulation of tumor growth, including tumor UPR-based cell-nonautonomous signaling as a mechanism of maintaining tumor heterogeneity and resistance to therapy, and suggest therapeutically targeting such mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment.

  6. Regulation of osteoprotegerin expression by Notch signaling in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeeranan Manokawinchoke; Thanaphum Osathanon; Prasit Pavasant

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of Notch signaling on osteoprotegerin(OPG)expression in a human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.Methods: Activation of Notch signaling was performed by seeding cells on Jagged1 immobilized surfaces. In other experiments, a g-secretase inhibitor was added to the culture medium to inhibit intracellular Notch signaling. OPG m RNA and protein were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Finally, publicly available microarray database analysis was performed using connection up- or down-regulation expression analysis of microarrays software.Results: Jagged1-treatment of HSC-4 cells enhanced HES1 and HEY1 m RNA expression, confirming the intracellular activation of Notch signaling. OPG m RNA and protein levels were significantly suppressed upon Jagged1 treatment. Correspondingly, HSC-4 cells treated with a g-secretase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of HES1 and HEY1 m RNA levels, and a marked increase in OPG protein expression was observed.These results implied that Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in HSC-4 cells.However, Jagged1 did not alter OPG expression in another human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line(HSC-5) or a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line(HN22).Conclusions: Notch signaling regulated OPG expression in an HSC-4 cell line and this mechanism could be cell line specific.

  7. Role of Ran GTPase in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qing; LU Zhigang; ZHANG Chuanmao

    2004-01-01

    Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily,is a multifunctional protein and abundant in the nucleus.Many evidences suggest that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in multiple aspects of the cell cycle regulation.So far it has been conformed that Ran and its interacting proteins control the nucleocytoplasmic transport, the nuclear envelope (NE) assembly, the DNA replication and the spindle assembly, although many details of the mechanisms are waiting for elucidation. It has also been implicated that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in regulating the integrity of the nuclear structure, the mRNA transcription and splicing, and the RNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In this review we mainly discuss the mechanisms by which Ran and its interacting proteins regulate NE assembly, DNA replication and spindle assembly.

  8. IAP family of cell death and signaling regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silke, John; Vucic, Domagoj

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins interface with, and regulate a large number of, cell signaling pathways. If there is a common theme to these pathways, it is that they are involved in the development of the immune system, immune responses, and unsurprisingly, given their name, cell death. Beyond that it is difficult to discover an underlying logic because sometimes IAPs are required to inhibit or prevent signaling, whereas in other cases they are required for signaling to take place. In whatever role they play, they are recruited into signaling complexes and function as ubiquitin E3 ligases, via their RING domains. This review discusses IAP regulation of signaling pathways and focuses on the mammalian IAPs, XIAP, c-IAP1, and c-IAP2, with a particular emphasis on techniques and methods that were used to uncover their roles. We also provide a perspective on targeting IAP proteins for therapeutic intervention and methods used to define the clinical relevance of IAP proteins.

  9. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 regulates sensory cell survival in the cochlea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Quan Chen

    Full Text Available This study delineates the role of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3 in hair cell death induced by several etiologies of acquired hearing loss (noise trauma, aminoglycoside treatment, age. In vivo, Prx3 transiently increased in mouse cochlear hair cells after traumatic noise exposure, kanamycin treatment, or with progressing age before any cell loss occurred; when Prx3 declined, hair cell loss began. Maintenance of high Prx3 levels via treatment with the radical scavenger 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate prevented kanamycin-induced hair cell death. Conversely, reducing Prx3 levels with Prx3 siRNA increased the severity of noise-induced trauma. In mouse organ of Corti explants, reactive oxygen species and levels of Prx3 mRNA and protein increased concomitantly at early times of drug challenge. When Prx3 levels declined after prolonged treatment, hair cells began to die. The radical scavenger p-phenylenediamine maintained Prx3 levels and attenuated gentamicin-induced hair cell death. Our results suggest that Prx3 is up-regulated in response to oxidative stress and that maintenance of Prx3 levels in hair cells is a critical factor in their susceptibility to acquired hearing loss.

  10. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  11. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  12. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew A Sproul; Zhiheng Xu; Michael Wilhelm; Stephen Gire; Lloyd A Greene

    2009-01-01

    Here, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in regulation of neuronal apoptosis. In two paradigms of neuron apopto-sis--nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation and DNA damage--cellular levels of c-Cbl and Cbl-b fell well before the onset of cell death. NGF deprivation also induced rapid loss of tyrosine phosphorylation (and most likely, activa-tion) of c-Cbl. Targeting e-Cbl and Cbl-b with siRNAs to mimic their loss/inactivation sensitized neuronal cells to death promoted by NGF deprivation or DNA damage. One potential mechanism by which Cbl proteins might affect neuronal death is by regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. We demonstrate that Cbl pro-teins interact with the JNK pathway components mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3 and POSH and that knockdown of Cbl proteins is sufficient to increase JNK pathway activity. Furthermore, expression of c-Cbl blocks the ability of MLKs to signal to downstream components of the kinase cascade leading to JNK activation and protects neuronal cells from death induced by MLKs, but not from downstream JNK activators. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Cbls suppress cell death in healthy neurons at least in part by inhibiting the ability of MLKs to activate JNK signaling. Apoptotic stimuli lead to loss of Cbl protein/activity, thereby removing a critical brake on JNK acti-vation and on cell death.

  13. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  14. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  15. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yontao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP. The pipeline (i reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Results Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between

  16. Metric dynamics for membrane transformation through regulated cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiroshi C.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an equation for describing three-dimensional membrane transformation through proliferation of its component cells regulated by morphogen density distributions on the membrane. The equation is developed in a two-dimensional coordinate system mapped on the membrane, referred to as the membrane coordinates. When the membrane expands, the membrane coordinates expand in the same manner so that the membrane is invariant in the coordinates. In the membrane coordinate system, the ...

  17. Ets-1 regulates energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Verschoor

    Full Text Available Cancer cells predominantly utilize glycolysis for ATP production even in the presence of abundant oxygen, an environment that would normally result in energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Although the molecular mechanism for this metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis has not been fully elucidated, it is likely that mitochondrial damage to the electron transport chain and the resulting increased production of reactive oxygen species are significant driving forces. In this study, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor Ets-1 in the regulation of mitochondrial function and metabolism. Ets-1 was over-expressed using a stably-incorporated tetracycline-inducible expression vector in the ovarian cancer cell line 2008, which does not express detectable basal levels of Ets-1 protein. Microarray analysis of the effects of Ets-1 over-expression in these ovarian cancer cells shows that Ets-1 up-regulates key enzymes involved in glycolysis and associated feeder pathways, fatty acid metabolism, and antioxidant defense. In contrast, Ets-1 down-regulates genes involved in the citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and mitochondrial proteins. At the functional level, we have found that Ets-1 expression is directly correlated with cellular oxygen consumption whereby increased expression causes decreased oxygen consumption. Ets-1 over-expression also caused increased sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors, as well as growth inhibition in a glucose-depleted culture environment. Collectively our findings demonstrate that Ets-1 is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism and response to oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0819, USA. 7Present address: Department of Immunology , The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 7455...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0132 TITLE: Regulation of Breast Cancer Stem Cell by Tissue Rigidity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jing...for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of

  19. RhoC and ROCKs regulate cancer cell interactions with endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Nicolas; Im, Jae Hong; Garg, Ritu; Cox, Susan; Soyer, Magali; Riou, Philippe; Colomba, Audrey; Muschel, Ruth J; Ridley, Anne J

    2015-06-01

    RhoC is a member of the Rho GTPase family that is implicated in cancer progression by stimulating cancer cell invasiveness. Here we report that RhoC regulates the interaction of cancer cells with vascular endothelial cells (ECs), a crucial step in the metastatic process. RhoC depletion by RNAi reduces PC3 prostate cancer cell adhesion to ECs, intercalation between ECs as well as transendothelial migration in vitro. Depletion of the kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2, two known RhoC downstream effectors, similarly decreases cancer interaction with ECs. RhoC also regulates the extension of protrusions made by cancer cells on vascular ECs in vivo. Transient RhoC depletion is sufficient to reduce both early PC3 cell retention in the lungs and experimental metastasis formation in vivo. Our results indicate RhoC plays a central role in cancer cell interaction with vascular ECs, which is a critical event for cancer progression.

  20. Gamma Delta T-Cells Regulate Inflammatory Cell Infiltration of the Lung after Trauma-Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    propose that resident +% T cells regulate the influx of !" T cells and MDSCs, which are the primary effector cells of the inflammatory and healing ...Choudhry MA, Schwacha MG: T cells of the gammadelta T-cell receptor lineage play an important role in the postburn wound healing process. J Burn Care Res...Schock BC, Okamoto T, McGrew GM, Last JA: Susceptibility to ozone -induced acute lung injury in iNOS-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 282

  1. Matrix rigidity regulates cancer cell growth and cellular phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Tilghman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix have an important role in cell growth and differentiation. However, it is unclear as to what extent cancer cells respond to changes in the mechanical properties (rigidity/stiffness of the microenvironment and how this response varies among cancer cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we used a recently developed 96-well plate system that arrays extracellular matrix-conjugated polyacrylamide gels that increase in stiffness by at least 50-fold across the plate. This plate was used to determine how changes in the rigidity of the extracellular matrix modulate the biological properties of tumor cells. The cell lines tested fall into one of two categories based on their proliferation on substrates of differing stiffness: "rigidity dependent" (those which show an increase in cell growth as extracellular rigidity is increased, and "rigidity independent" (those which grow equally on both soft and stiff substrates. Cells which grew poorly on soft gels also showed decreased spreading and migration under these conditions. More importantly, seeding the cell lines into the lungs of nude mice revealed that the ability of cells to grow on soft gels in vitro correlated with their ability to grow in a soft tissue environment in vivo. The lung carcinoma line A549 responded to culture on soft gels by expressing the differentiated epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Slug. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that the mechanical properties of the matrix environment play a significant role in regulating the proliferation and the morphological properties of cancer cells. Further, the multiwell format of the soft-plate assay is a useful and effective adjunct to established 3-dimensional cell culture models.

  2. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  3. The Drosophila actin regulator ENABLED regulates cell shape and orientation during gonad morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    Full Text Available Organs develop distinctive morphologies to fulfill their unique functions. We used Drosophila embryonic gonads as a model to study how two different cell lineages, primordial germ cells (PGCs and somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, combine to form one organ. We developed a membrane GFP marker to image SGP behaviors live. These studies show that a combination of SGP cell shape changes and inward movement of anterior and posterior SGPs leads to the compaction of the spherical gonad. This process is disrupted in mutants of the actin regulator, enabled (ena. We show that Ena coordinates these cell shape changes and the inward movement of the SGPs, and Ena affects the intracellular localization of DE-cadherin (DE-cad. Mathematical simulation based on these observations suggests that changes in DE-cad localization can generate the forces needed to compact an elongated structure into a sphere. We propose that Ena regulates force balance in the SGPs by sequestering DE-cad, leading to the morphogenetic movement required for gonad compaction.

  4. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  5. Copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubman, Alexandra; White, Anthony R

    2014-05-22

    Copper is an essential element in many biological processes. The critical functions associated with copper have resulted from evolutionary harnessing of its potent redox activity. This same property also places copper in a unique role as a key modulator of cell signal transduction pathways. These pathways are the complex sequence of molecular interactions that drive all cellular mechanisms and are often associated with the interplay of key enzymes including kinases and phosphatases but also including intracellular changes in pools of smaller molecules. A growing body of evidence is beginning to delineate the how, when and where of copper-mediated control over cell signal transduction. This has been driven by research demonstrating critical changes to copper homeostasis in many disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration and therapeutic potential through control of disease-associated cell signalling changes by modulation of copper-protein interactions. This timely review brings together for the first time the diverse actions of copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways and discusses the potential strategies for controlling disease-associated signalling processes using copper modulators. It is hoped that this review will provide a valuable insight into copper as a key signal regulator and stimulate further research to promote our understanding of copper in disease and therapy.

  6. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  7. From stem cell to erythroblast: regulation of red cell production at multiple levels by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey; Flygare, Johan; Chou, Song

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of production of red blood cells at several levels: (1) the ability of erythropoietin and adhesion to a fibronectin matrix to stimulate the rapid production of red cells by inducing terminal proliferation and differentiation of committed erythroid CFU-E progenitors; (2) the regulated expansion of the pool of earlier BFU-E erythroid progenitors by glucocorticoids and other factors that occurs during chronic anemia or inflammation; and (3) the expansion of thehematopoietic cell pool to produce more progenitors of all hematopoietic lineages.

  8. Effector T cell differentiation: are master regulators of effector T cells still the masters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Collins, Mary; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-12-01

    Effector CD4 T cell lineages have been implicated as potent inducers of autoimmune diseases. Tbet, Gata3 and Rorgt are master transcriptional regulators of Th1, Th2 and Th17 lineages respectively and promote the distinct expression of signature cytokines. Significant progress has been made in understanding the transcriptional network that drives CD4 T cell differentiation, revealing novel points of regulation mediated by transcription factors, cell surface receptors, cytokines and chemokines. Epigenetic modifications and metabolic mediators define the transcriptional landscape in which master transcription factors operate and collaborate with a network of transcriptional modifiers to guide lineage specification, plasticity and function.

  9. A hybrid model of mammalian cell cycle regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Singhania

    Full Text Available The timing of DNA synthesis, mitosis and cell division is regulated by a complex network of biochemical reactions that control the activities of a family of cyclin-dependent kinases. The temporal dynamics of this reaction network is typically modeled by nonlinear differential equations describing the rates of the component reactions. This approach provides exquisite details about molecular regulatory processes but is hampered by the need to estimate realistic values for the many kinetic constants that determine the reaction rates. It is difficult to estimate these kinetic constants from available experimental data. To avoid this problem, modelers often resort to 'qualitative' modeling strategies, such as Boolean switching networks, but these models describe only the coarsest features of cell cycle regulation. In this paper we describe a hybrid approach that combines the best features of continuous differential equations and discrete Boolean networks. Cyclin abundances are tracked by piecewise linear differential equations for cyclin synthesis and degradation. Cyclin synthesis is regulated by transcription factors whose activities are represented by discrete variables (0 or 1 and likewise for the activities of the ubiquitin-ligating enzyme complexes that govern cyclin degradation. The discrete variables change according to a predetermined sequence, with the times between transitions determined in part by cyclin accumulation and degradation and as well by exponentially distributed random variables. The model is evaluated in terms of flow cytometry measurements of cyclin proteins in asynchronous populations of human cell lines. The few kinetic constants in the model are easily estimated from the experimental data. Using this hybrid approach, modelers can quickly create quantitatively accurate, computational models of protein regulatory networks in cells.

  10. Heregulin, a new regulator of telomere length in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Rubio, Miguel A; Campisi, Judith; Lupu, Ruth

    2015-11-24

    The growth factor heregulin (HRG) promotes breast cancer (BC) tumorigenesis and metastasis and differentially modulates BC cell responses to DNA-damaging agents via its dual extracellular and nuclear localization. Given the central role of telomere dysfunction to drive carcinogenesis and to alter the chemotherapeutic profile of transformed cells, we hypothesized that an unanticipated nuclear function of HRG might be to regulate telomere length. Engineered overexpression of the HRGβ2 isoform in non-aggressive, HRG-negative MCF-7 BC cells resulted in a significant shortening of telomeres (up to 1.3 kb) as measured by Southern blotting of telomere terminal restriction fragments. Conversely, antisense-mediated suppression of HRGβ2 in highly aggressive, HRG-overexpressing MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells increased telomere length up to 3.0 kb. HRGβ2 overexpression promoted a marked upregulation of telomere-binding protein 2 (TRF2) protein expression, whereas its knockdown profoundly decreased TRF2 expression. Double staining of endogenous HRGβ2 with telomere-specific peptide nucleic acid probe/fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA/FISH) revealed the partial localization of HRG at the chromosome ends. Moreover, a predominantly nucleoplasmic staining pattern of endogenous HRGβ2 appeared to co-localize with TRF2 and, concomitantly with RAP1, a telomere regulator that specifically interacts with TRF2. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of HRG decreased the expression of TRF2 and RAP1, decreased their presence at chromosome ends, and coincidentally resulted in the formation of longer telomeres. This study uncovers a new function for HRGβ2 in controlling telomere length, in part due to its ability to regulate and interact with the telomere-associated proteins TRF2 and RAP1.

  11. Estrous cycle dependent fluctuations of regulatory neuropeptides in the lower urinary tract of female rats upon colon-bladder cross-sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qing Pan

    Full Text Available Co-morbidity of bladder, bowel, and non-specific pelvic pain symptoms is highly prevalent in women. Little evidence is present on modulation of pelvic pain syndromes by sex hormones, therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the effects of hormonal fluctuations within the estrous cycle on regulatory neuropeptides in female rats using a model of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The estrous cycle in female rats (Sprague-Dawley, 230-250 g was assessed by vaginal smears and weight of uterine horns. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction was induced by a single inflammatory insult to the distal colon. Protein expression of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, nerve growth factor (NGF, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the pelvic organs, sensory ganglia and lumbosacral spinal cord was compared in rats in proestrus (high estrogen vs diestrus (low estrogen. Under normal physiological conditions, concentration of SP and CGRP was similar in the distal colon and urinary bladder during all phases of the estrous cycle, however, acute colitis induced a significant up-regulation of CGRP content in the colon (by 63% and urinary bladder (by 54%, p≤0.05 to control of rats in proestrus. These changes were accompanied by a significant diminution of CGRP content in L6-S2 DRG after colonic treatment, likely associated with its release in the periphery. In rats with high estrogen at the time of testing (proestrus, experimental colitis caused a significant up-regulation of BDNF colonic content from 26.1±8.5 pg/ml to 83.4±32.5 pg/ml (N = 7, p≤0.05 to control and also induced similar effects on BDNF in the urinary bladder which was also up-regulated by 5-fold in rats in proestrus (p≤0.05 to respective control. Our results demonstrate estrous cycle dependent fluctuations of regulatory neuropeptides in the lower urinary tract upon colon-bladder cross-sensitization, which may contribute to pain fluctuations in female patients

  12. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in four colonic adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, S R; Wilkinson, J; Broitman, S A

    1995-12-01

    Colon tumor cells, unlike normal human fibroblasts, exhibited an uncoupling of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol from cellular growth, when endogenous cholesterol synthesis was inhibited by mevinolin, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoAR) competitive inhibitor [Fabricant, M., and Broitman, S.A. (1990) Cancer Res. 50, 632-636]. Further evaluation of cholesterol metabolism was conducted in two undifferentiated (SW480, SW1417) and two differentiated (HT29, CACO2) colonic adenocarcinoma (adeno-CA) cell lines and an untransformed human fibroblast, AG1519A. Cells grown in monolayer culture to near subconfluency were used to assess endogenous cholesterol synthesis by 14C-acetate incorporation, in response to the following treatments in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS)-supplemented minimum essential medium (MEM): LPDS alone, LDL, mevinolin, mevinolin with LDL, and 25-hydroxy-cholesterol (25-OH-CH). Complete fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented MEM was used as control. All colon tumor lines exhibited similarly high endogenous cholesterol synthesis in both FBS and LPDS relative to the fibroblasts which demonstrated low basal levels in FBS and maximal synthesis in LPDS. LDL treatment did not inhibit cholesterol synthesis in colon tumor cells, but suppressed that in the fibroblast by 70%. Sterol repression of cholesterol synthesis mediated by 25-OH-CH occurred in all cells. Mevinolin caused a reduction in cholesterol synthesis in the colonic cancer cell lines, which was not further decreased by concurrent addition of LDL. In contrast, in mevinolin-treated fibroblasts, LDL further inhibited cholesterol synthesis. When the effect of cell density on cholesterol synthesis regulation was evaluated under conditions of sparse density in SW480 and SW147, results indicated that (i) basal rates of cholesterol synthesis were higher, (ii) LDL inhibited cholesterol synthesis more effectively, and (iii) mevinolin or 25-OH-CH had a more pronounced effect than in

  13. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to a...

  14. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume re...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed.......The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... regulation both rely on the spatially and temporally coordinated function of ion channels and transporters. In healthy epithelia, specific ion channels/transporters localize to the luminal and basolateral membranes, contributing to functional epithelial polarity. In pathophysiological processes...

  15. ECM remodelling components regulated during jaw periosteal cell osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dorothea; Ardjomandi, Nina; Munz, Adelheid; Friedrich, Björn; Reinert, Siegmar

    2011-10-01

    Human JPCs (jaw periosteal cells) are a promising source for the engineering of cell-based osteoinductive grafts in oral surgery. For this purpose, cell characteristics of this stem cell source should be elucidated in detail. Analysis of gene expression profiles may help us to evaluate key factors and cellular targets of JPC osteogenesis. Because little is known about the interplay of osteogenic-related components, we analysed the expression of different collagen types reflecting important players for extracellular matrix assembly and of TIMPs (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases) responsible for the inhibition of matrix degradation. Gene expression analyses using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) during JPC osteogenesis revealed the induction of several collagen types' expression (VII, VIII, XI and XII), and some of them (types I, VIII and XI) seemed to be susceptible to BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2) that is known to be a potent osteogenic inducer of periosteal cells. Among the TIMPs, only TIMP-4 and RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) expressions were strongly up-regulated during JPC osteogenesis. Proteome profiler analysis of supernatants from untreated and differentiated JPCs confirmed the gene expression data in terms of TIMP expression. In summary, we identified new collagen types and TIMPs that seem to play important roles during the osteogenesis of jaw periosteal progenitor cells.

  16. Peroxiredoxin 3 levels regulate a mitochondrial redox setpoint in malignant mesothelioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cunniff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3, a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin located exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix, is the principal peroxidase responsible for metabolizing mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, a byproduct of cellular respiration originating from the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Mitochondrial oxidants are produced in excess in cancer cells due to oncogenic transformation and metabolic reorganization, and signals through FOXM1 and other redox-responsive factors to support a hyper-proliferative state. Over-expression of PRX3 in cancer cells has been shown to counteract oncogene-induced senescence and support tumor cell growth and survival making PRX3 a credible therapeutic target. Using malignant mesothelioma (MM cells stably expressing shRNAs to PRX3 we show that decreased expression of PRX3 alters mitochondrial structure, function and cell cycle kinetics. As compared to control cells, knockdown of PRX3 expression increased mitochondrial membrane potential, basal ATP production, oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification rates. shPRX3 MM cells failed to progress through the cell cycle compared to wild type controls, with increased numbers of cells in G2/M phase. Diminished PRX3 expression also induced mitochondrial hyperfusion similar to the DRP1 inhibitor mdivi-1. Cell cycle progression and changes in mitochondrial networking were rescued by transient expression of either catalase or mitochondrial-targeted catalase, indicating high levels of hydrogen peroxide contribute to perturbations in mitochondrial structure and function in shPRX3 MM cells. Our results indicate that PRX3 levels establish a redox set point that permits MM cells to thrive in response to increased levels of mROS, and that perturbing the redox status governed by PRX3 impairs proliferation by altering cell cycle-dependent dynamics between mitochondrial networking and energy metabolism.

  17. Natural killer cells and cancer: regulation by the killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Amanda K; Campbell, Kerry S

    2009-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune effector cells that make up approximately 10-15% of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in humans and are primarily involved in immunosurveillance to eliminate transformed and virally-infected cells. They were originally defined by their ability to spontaneously eliminate rare cells lacking expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) self molecules, which is commonly referred to as "missing self" recognition. The molecular basis for missing self recognition emerges from the expression of MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface that tolerize NK cells toward normal MHC-I-expressing cells. By lacking inhibitory receptor ligands, tumor cells or virus-infected cells that have down-modulated surface MHC-I expression become susceptible to attack by NK cells. Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR; CD158) constitute a family of MHC-I binding receptors that plays a major role in regulating the activation thresholds of NK cells and some T cells in humans. Here, we review the multiple levels of KIR diversity that contribute to the generation of a highly varied NK cell repertoire and explain how this diversity can influence susceptibility to a variety of diseases, including cancer. We further describe strategies by which KIR can be manipulated therapeutically to treat cancer, through the exploitation of KIR/MHC-I ligand mismatch to potentiate hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the use of KIR blockade to enhance tumor cell killing.

  18. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  19. Silver nanoparticles disrupt regulation of steroidogenesis in fish ovarian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degger, Natalie; Tse, Anna C K; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2015-12-01

    Despite the influx of silver nanoparticles (nAg) into the marine environment, their effects on fish reproduction remain completely unexplored. Using ovarian primary cells from marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma), in vitro studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of two differently coated nAg particles (Oleic Acid, (OA) nAg and Polyvinylpyrrolidone, (PVP) nAg) on fish ovarian tissues, using AgNO3 as a positive control. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay and expression of key genes regulating steroidogenesis (StAR, CYP 19a, CYP 11a, 3βHSD and 20βHSD) were determined by Q-RT-PCR. EC50 values for PVP nAg, OA nAg and AgNO3 were 7.25μgL(-1), 924.4μgL(-1), and 42.0μgL(-1) respectively, showing that toxicity of silver was greatly enhanced in the PVP coated nano-form. Down regulation of CYP 19a was observed in both nAg and AgNO3 treatments, while down regulation of 3βHSD was only found in the OA nAg and AgNO3 treatments. For the first time, our results demonstrated that nAg can affect specific genes regulating steroidogenesis, implicating nAg as a potential endocrine disruptor.

  20. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  1. Caspases regulate VAMP-8 expression and phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yong Hou Sunny; Cai, Deyu Tarika; Huang, Dachuan; Wang, Cheng Chun; Wong, Siew Heng

    2009-09-18

    During an inflammation and upon encountering pathogens, immature dendritic cells (DC) undergo a maturation process to become highly efficient in presenting antigens. This transition from immature to mature state is accompanied by various physiological, functional and morphological changes including reduction of caspase activity and inhibition of phagocytosis in the mature DC. Caspases are cysteine proteases which play essential roles in apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VAMP-8, (a SNARE protein of the early/late endosomes) which has been shown previously to inhibit phagocytosis in DC, is a substrate of caspases. Furthermore, we identified two putative conserved caspase recognition/cleavage sites on the VAMP-8 protein. Consistent with the up-regulation of VAMP-8 expression upon treatment with caspase inhibitor (CI), immature DC treated with CI exhibits lower phagocytosis activity. Thus, our results highlight the role of caspases in regulating VAMP-8 expression and subsequently phagocytosis during maturation of DC.

  2. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  3. Neuron-NG2 Cell Synapses: Novel Functions for Regulating NG2 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Kun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells are a population of CNS cells that are distinct from neurons, mature oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. These cells can be identified by their NG2 proteoglycan expression. NG2 cells have a highly branched morphology, with abundant processes radiating from the cell body, and express a complex set of voltage-gated channels, AMPA/kainate, and GABA receptors. Neurons notably form classical and nonclassical synapses with NG2 cells, which have varied characteristics and functions. Neuron-NG2 cell synapses could fine-tune NG2 cell activities, including the NG2 cell cycle, differentiation, migration, and myelination, and may be a novel potential therapeutic target for NG2 cell-related diseases, such as hypoxia-ischemia injury and periventricular leukomalacia. Furthermore, neuron-NG2 cell synapses may be correlated with the plasticity of CNS in adulthood with the synaptic contacts passing onto their progenies during proliferation, and synaptic contacts decrease rapidly upon NG2 cell differentiation. In this review, we highlight the characteristics of classical and nonclassical neuron-NG2 cell synapses, the potential functions, and the fate of synaptic contacts during proliferation and differentiation, with the emphasis on the regulation of the NG2 cell cycle by neuron-NG2 cell synapses and their potential underlying mechanisms.

  4. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J.; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-c...

  5. Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis by Sertoli cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Ren; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2015-04-01

    Spermatogenesis is a continuous and productive process supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which arise from undifferentiated precursors known as gonocytes and are strictly controlled in a special 'niche' microenvironment in the seminiferous tubules. Sertoli cells, the only somatic cell type in the tubules, directly interact with SSCs to control their proliferation and differentiation through the secretion of specific factors. Spermatocyte meiosis is another key step of spermatogenesis, which is regulated by Sertoli cells on the luminal side of the blood-testis barrier through paracrine signaling. In this review, we mainly focus on the role of Sertoli cells in the regulation of SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis, with particular emphasis on paracrine and endocrine-mediated signaling pathways. Sertoli cell growth factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), as well as Sertoli cell transcription factors, such as ETS variant 5 (ERM; also known as ETV5), nociceptin, neuregulin 1 (NRG1), and androgen receptor (AR), have been identified as the most important upstream factors that regulate SSC self-renewal and spermatocyte meiosis. Other transcription factors and signaling pathways (GDNF-RET-GFRA1 signaling, FGF2-MAP2K1 signaling, CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling, CCL9-CCR1 signaling, FSH-nociceptin/OPRL1, retinoic acid/FSH-NRG/ERBB4, and AR/RB-ARID4A/ARID4B) are also addressed.

  6. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Shimono

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression.

  7. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  8. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  9. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Milgrom-Hoffman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1 in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1 along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  10. Regulation of cell survival by Na+/H+ exchanger-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Jeffrey R; Abu Jawdeh, Bassam G

    2008-09-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE1) is a ubiquitous plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger typically associated with maintenance of intracellular volume and pH. In addition to the NHE1 role in electroneutral Na(+)/H(+) transport, in renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro the polybasic, juxtamembrane NHE1 cytosolic tail domain acts as a scaffold, by binding with ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, which initiates formation of a signaling complex that culminates in Akt activation and opposition to initial apoptotic stress. With robust apoptotic stimuli renal tubular epithelial cell NHE1 is a caspase substrate, and proteolytic cleavage may permit progression to apoptotic cell death. In vivo, genetic or pharmacological NHE1 loss of function causes renal tubule epithelial cell apoptosis and renal dysfunction following streptozotocin-induced diabetes, ureteral obstruction, and adriamycin-induced podocyte toxicity. Taken together, substantial in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that NHE1 regulates tubular epithelial cell survival. In contrast to connotations of NHE1 as an unimportant "housekeeping" protein, this review highlights that NHE1 activity is critical for countering tubular atrophy and chronic renal disease progression.

  11. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  12. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  13. Swelling-activated ion channels: functional regulation in cell-swelling, proliferation and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stutzin, A; Hoffmann, E K

    2006-01-01

    Cell volume regulation is one of the most fundamental homeostatic mechanisms and essential for normal cellular function. At the same time, however, many physiological mechanisms are associated with regulatory changes in cell size meaning that the set point for cell volume regulation is under phys...... as key players in the maintenance of normal steady-state cell volume, with particular emphasis on the intracellular signalling pathways responsible for their regulation during hypotonic stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis....

  14. Mast Cell-activated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Regulate Proliferation and Lineage Commitment of CD34+ Progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoulfia eAllakhverdi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shortly after allergen exposure, the number of bone marrow and circulating CD34+ progenitors increases. We aim to analyze the possible mechanism whereby the allergic reaction stimulates bone marrow to release these effector cells in increased numbers. We hypothesize that mast cells may play a predominant role in this process. Objective: To examine the effect of IgE-activated mast cells on bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells which regulate proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ progenitors. Methods: Primary mast cells were derived from CD34+ precursors and activated with IgE/anti-IgE. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells were co-cultured with CD34+ progenitor cells and stimulated with IL1/TNF or IgE/anti-IgE activated mast cells in Transwell system. Results: Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells produce low level of TSLP under steady state conditions, which is markedly increased by stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF or IgE-activated mast cells. The latter also triggers BM-MSCs production of G-CSF, and GM-CSF while inhibiting SDF-1. Mast cell-activated mesenchymal stromal cells stimulate CD34+ cells to proliferate and to regulate their expression of early allergy-associated genes. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance: This in vitro study indicates that IgE-activated mast cells trigger bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells to release TSLP and hematopoietic growth factors and to regulate the proliferation and lineage commitment of CD34+ precursor cells. The data predict that the effective inhibition of mast cells should impair mobilization and accumulation of allergic effector cells and thereby reduce the severity of allergic diseases.

  15. Regulation of plant cells, cell walls and development by mechanical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  16. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM,Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by cisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM,Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and without cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin...

  17. [Thiamine and its derivatives in the regulation of cell metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylicki, Adam; Siemieniuk, Magdalena

    2011-07-06

    For over 70 years thiamine (vitamin B1) has aroused the interest of biologists, biochemists and medical doctors because of its multilateral participation in key biochemical and physiological processes. The thiamine molecule is composed of pyrimidine and thiazole rings which are linked by a methylene bridge. It is synthesized by microorganisms, fungi and plants, whereas animals and humans have to obtain it from food. There are several known forms of vitamin B1 inside cells: free thiamine, three phosphate esters (mono-, di-, and triphosphate), and the recently found adenosine thiamine triphosphate. Thiamine has a dual, coenzymatic and non-coenzymatic role. First of all, it is a precursor of thiamin diphosphate, which is a coenzyme for over 20 characterized enzymes which are involved in cell bioenergetic processes leading to the synthesis of ATP. Moreover, these enzymes take part in the biosynthesis of pentose (required for the synthesis of nucleotides), amino acids and other organic compounds of cell metabolism. On the other hand, recent discoveries show the non-coenzymatic role of thiamine derivatives in the process of regulation of gene expression (riboswitches in microorganisms and plants), the stress response, and perhaps so far unknown signal transduction pathways associated with adverse environmental conditions, or transduction of nerve signals with participation of thiamine triphosphate and adenosine thiamine triphosphate. From the clinical point of view thiamine deficiency is related to beri-beri, Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and other pathologies of the nervous system, and it is successfully applied in medical practice. On the other hand, identifying new synthetic analogues of thiamine which could be used as cytostatics, herbicides or agents preventing deficiency of vitamin B1 is currently the major goal of the research. In this paper we present the current state of knowledge of thiamine and its derivatives, indicating

  18. Folate receptor {alpha} regulates cell proliferation in mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Congjun; Evans, Chheng-Orn [Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory of Molecular Neurosurgery and Biotechnology, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Stevens, Victoria L. [Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Owens, Timothy R. [Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Oyesiku, Nelson M., E-mail: noyesik@emory.edu [Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory of Molecular Neurosurgery and Biotechnology, Emory University, School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We have previously found that the mRNA and protein levels of the folate receptor alpha (FR{alpha}) are uniquely over-expressed in clinically human nonfunctional (NF) pituitary adenomas, but the mechanistic role of FR{alpha} has not fully been determined. We investigated the effect of FR{alpha} over-expression in the mouse gonadotroph {alpha}T3-1 cell line as a model for NF pituitary adenomas. We found that the expression and function of FR{alpha} were strongly up-regulated, by Western blotting and folic acid binding assay. Furthermore, we found a higher cell growth rate, an enhanced percentage of cells in S-phase by BrdU assay, and a higher PCNA staining. These observations indicate that over-expression of FR{alpha} promotes cell proliferation. These effects were abrogated in the same {alpha}T3-1 cells when transfected with a mutant FR{alpha} cDNA that confers a dominant-negative phenotype by inhibiting folic acid binding. Finally, by real-time quantitative PCR, we found that mRNA expression of NOTCH3 was up-regulated in FR{alpha} over-expressing cells. In summary, our data suggests that FR{alpha} regulates pituitary tumor cell proliferation and mechanistically may involve the NOTCH pathway. Potentially, this finding could be exploited to develop new, innovative molecular targeted treatment for human NF pituitary adenomas.

  19. Cell Adhesion Regulates Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Coregulators in Different Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer cells adhere to a tumor basement membrane, while secretoryepithelial cells reside in a suprabasal cell compartment. Since tumor cells are derived fromsuprabasal epithelial cells, they experience de-novo substratum adhesion in the context ofoncogenesis. We therefore analyzed whether cell-matrix adhesion could affect the proteinexpression and activity of the AR. In this study, AR protein expression declined uponsuspension of BPH-1-AR cells, but not in PC-3-AR cells shown by Western blot. In a timecourse study, BPH-1 cell lost AR expression within 6 hours, and the synthetic androgen,R1881 reduced the loss of AR expression. We further explored the mechanism of AR loss insuspended BPH-1 cells. BPH-1-AR cells underwent apoptosis (anoikis when suspended for2 - 5 hours. Suspension did not induce significant apoptosis or decreasing of AR expressionin PC-3 cells. Inhibition of apoptosis in suspended BPH-1-AR cells, either by expression ofBcl-2 or Bcl-xl or by treatment with Z-VAD, a caspase inhibitor, prevented loss of ARprotein. In contrast, the calpain protease inhibitor , ALLN, accelerated the loss of AR proteinexpression. Additionally, cell-matrix adhesion changed the expression of coregulators of ARin the mRNA level of prostate cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that AR proteinexpression was reduced through activation of cell death pathways, and thus indirectly through cell suspension in BPH-AR cells. The activity of AR can also be regulated by adhesion in PC-3-AR and LNCaP cells through affecting the coregulators level.

  20. Calcium in ciliated protozoa: sources, regulation, and calcium-regulated cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, H; Klauke, N

    2001-01-01

    In ciliates, a variety of processes are regulated by Ca2+, e.g., exocytosis, endocytosis, ciliary beat, cell contraction, and nuclear migration. Differential microdomain regulation may occur by activation of specific channels in different cell regions (e.g., voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in cilia), by local, nonpropagated activation of subplasmalemmal Ca stores (alveolar sacs), by different sensitivity thresholds, and eventually by interplay with additional second messengers (cilia). During stimulus-secretion coupling, Ca2+ as the only known second messenger operates at approximately 5 microM, whereby mobilization from alveolar sacs is superimposed by "store-operated Ca2+ influx" (SOC), to drive exocytotic and endocytotic membrane fusion. (Content discharge requires binding of extracellular Ca2+ to some secretory proteins.) Ca2+ homeostasis is reestablished by binding to cytosolic Ca2+-binding proteins (e.g., calmodulin), by sequestration into mitochondria (perhaps by Ca2+ uniporter) and into endoplasmic reticulum and alveolar sacs (with a SERCA-type pump), and by extrusion via a plasmalemmal Ca2+ pump and a Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Comparison of free vs total concentration, [Ca2+] vs [Ca], during activation, using time-resolved fluorochrome analysis and X-ray microanalysis, respectively, reveals that altogether activation requires a calcium flux that is orders of magnitude larger than that expected from the [Ca2+] actually required for local activation.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  2. Regulation of stem cell factor expression in inflammation and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla A Da Silva

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a major mast cell growth factor, which could be involved in the local increase of mast cell number in the asthmatic airways. In vivo, SCF expression increases in asthmatic patients and this is reversed after treatment with glucocorticoids. In vitro in human lung fibroblasts in culture, IL-1beta, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, confirms this increased SCF mRNA and protein expression implying the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2 very early post-treatment, and glucocorticoids confirm this decrease. Surprisingly, glucocorticoids potentiate the IL-1beta-enhanced SCF expression at short term treatment, implying increased SCF mRNA stability and SCF gene transcription rate. This potentiation involves p38 and ERK1/2. Transfection experiments with the SCF promoter including intron1 also confirm this increase and decrease of SCF expression by IL-1beta and glucocorticoids, and the potentiation by glucocorticoids of the IL-1beta-induced SCF expression. Deletion of the GRE or kappaB sites abolishes this potentiation, and the effect of IL-1beta or glucocorticoids alone. DNA binding of GR and NF-kappaB are also demonstrated for these effects. In conclusion, this review concerns new mechanisms of regulation of SCF expression in inflammation that could lead to potential therapeutic strategy allowing to control mast cell number in the asthmatic airways.

  3. Regulation of NK-cell function by mucins via antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarin, G; Redzovic, A; Medancic, S Srsen; Rukavina, D

    2010-12-01

    Decidual antigen-presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) and CD14(+) macrophages, as mediators of the first encounter with fetal antigens, appear to be critically involved in the initiation of primary immune response by regulating innate- and adaptive immunity. Interleukin-15, produced by them, permits the proliferation and differentiation of CD3(-)CD16(-)CD94(+)NKG2A(+)CD56(+bright) decidual NK cells that identify trophoblast cells. These cells are able to kill them after Th1 cytokine overstimulation and by increasing the release of preformed cytotoxic mediators. Thus, the local microenvironment is a potent modulator of antigen-presenting cell functions. Tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and mucine 1 (MUC-1) are glycoproteins secreted by uterine epithelial cells. Our hypothesis is that TAG-72 and MUC-1 are the natural ligands for carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of endocytic mannose receptor (MR or CD206) and DC-specific ICAM non-integrin (DC-SIGN or CD209) expressed on decidual CD14(+) macrophages and CD1a(+) DCs. They might be able to condition antigen-presenting cells to produce distinct profiles of cyto/chemokines with consequential reduction in NK-cell numbers and cytotoxic potential leading to insufficient control over trophoblast growth. This hypothesis could explain the disappearance of MUC-1 beneath the attached embryo during the process of successful implantation when tight regulation of trophoblast invasion is needed. As IL-15 is the earliest and the most important factor in NK-cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, we expected primarily an increase of IL-15 expression in antigen-presenting cells concomitant with the disappearance of mucins and the enhancement in NK cells numbers and of cytotoxic potential after their close contact with early pregnancy decidual antigen-presenting cells. If our hypothesis is correct, it would contribute to the understanding of the role of mucins in the redirection of immune response

  4. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-04-07

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100-200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500-1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling.

  5. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and increases cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55-102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55-102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D.

  6. Local positive feedback regulation determines cell shape in root hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Gapper, Catherine; Kaya, Hidetaka; Bell, Elizabeth; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Dolan, Liam

    2008-02-29

    The specification and maintenance of growth sites are tightly regulated during cell morphogenesis in all organisms. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE 2 reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (RHD2 NADPH) oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulate a Ca2+ influx into the cytoplasm that is required for root hair growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that Ca2+, in turn, activated the RHD2 NADPH oxidase to produce ROS at the growing point in the root hair. Together, these components could establish a means of positive feedback regulation that maintains an active growth site in expanding root hair cells. Because the location and stability of growth sites predict the ultimate form of a plant cell, our findings demonstrate how a positive feedback mechanism involving RHD2, ROS, and Ca2+ can determine cell shape.

  7. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  8. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  9. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaad M; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2014-02-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks.

  10. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  11. Regulation of cell proliferation and cell density by the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byskov Kristina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstact Background The inorganic phosphate (Pi transporter, PiT1 (SLC20A1, is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. It has previously been shown that down-regulation of PiT1 severely impaired the proliferation of two transformed human cells lines, HepG2 and HeLa, and the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. Moreover, PiT1 knock-out mice do not survive past E12.5 and from E10.5, the embryos were found to be growth-retarded and showed reduced proliferation of liver cells. Isolated mouse embryonic fibroblasts with knocked out as well as reduced PiT1 expression levels also exhibited impaired proliferation. Together these results suggest that a certain level of PiT1 is important for proliferation. We have here investigated the role of PiT1 in regulation of cell proliferation using two strictly density-inhibited cells lines, the murine MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cells. Results We found that knock-down of PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells led to impaired proliferation supporting that at least a certain level of PiT1 is important for wildtype level of proliferation. We, however, also observed that MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cells themselves regulate their endogenous PiT1 mRNA levels with lower levels in general correlating with decreased proliferation/increased cell density. Moreover, over-expression of human PiT1 led to increased proliferation of both MC3T3-E1 and NIH3T3 cultures and resulted in higher cell densities in cultures of these two strictly density-inhibited cell lines. In addition, when we transformed NIH3T3 cells by cultivation in fetal bovine serum, cells over-expressing human PiT1 formed more colonies in soft agar than control cells. Conclusions We conclude that not only is a certain level of PiT1 necessary for normal cell division as suggested by previously published studies, rather the cellular PiT1 level is involved in regulating cell proliferation and cell density and an increased PiT1 expression can indeed make NIH3T3 cells more sensitive to

  12. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  13. Human NK cells positively regulate gammadelta T cells in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Li, Baiqing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-02-15

    The decrease in NK cell activity and the loss of gammadelta T cells in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients have been reported. In this study, we observed that the proliferating response of gammadelta T cells to the heat-treated Ags of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from different individuals was noted to be dependent on the content or function of NK cells in PBMC in a population study. We also found that NK cells were directly rapidly activated by the heat-treated Ags from M. tuberculosis (H37Ra) in vitro; in turn, the activated NK cells improved gammadelta T cell proliferation both by CD54-mediated cell-cell contact through the forming immune synapse and by soluble factors TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IL-12, but not IFN-gamma. Our results demonstrated that an interaction between NK cells and gammadelta T cells existed in antituberculosis immunity. Up-regulating the function of NK cells might be beneficial to the prevention and control of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  14. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Regulate Fgf Signaling and Cell Polarity during Collective Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Venero Galanternik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is a highly regulated morphogenetic movement during embryonic development and cancer invasion that involves the precise orchestration and integration of cell-autonomous mechanisms and environmental signals. Coordinated lateral line primordium migration is controlled by the regulation of chemokine receptors via compartmentalized Wnt/β-catenin and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf signaling. Analysis of mutations in two exostosin glycosyltransferase genes (extl3 and ext2 revealed that loss of heparan sulfate (HS chains results in a failure of collective cell migration due to enhanced Fgf ligand diffusion and loss of Fgf signal transduction. Consequently, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated ectopically, resulting in the subsequent loss of the chemokine receptor cxcr7b. Disruption of HS proteoglycan (HSPG function induces extensive, random filopodia formation, demonstrating that HSPGs are involved in maintaining cell polarity in collectively migrating cells. The HSPGs themselves are regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf pathways and thus are integral components of the regulatory network that coordinates collective cell migration with organ specification and morphogenesis.

  15. Solar-cycle dependence of a model turbulence spectrum using IMP and ACE observations over 38 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, R. A.; Nel, A. E.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Ab initio modulation models require a number of turbulence quantities as input for any reasonable diffusion tensor. While turbulence transport models describe the radial evolution of such quantities, they in turn require observations in the inner heliosphere as input values. So far we have concentrated on solar minimum conditions (e.g. Engelbrecht and Burger 2013, ApJ), but are now looking at long-term modulation which requires turbulence data over at a least a solar magnetic cycle. As a start we analyzed 1-minute resolution data for the N-component of the magnetic field, from 1974 to 2012, covering about two solar magnetic cycles (initially using IMP and then ACE data). We assume a very simple three-stage power-law frequency spectrum, calculate the integral from the highest to the lowest frequency, and fit it to variances calculated with lags from 5 minutes to 80 hours. From the fit we then obtain not only the asymptotic variance at large lags, but also the spectral index of the inertial and the energy, as well as the breakpoint between the inertial and energy range (bendover scale) and between the energy and cutoff range (cutoff scale). All values given here are preliminary. The cutoff range is a constraint imposed in order to ensure a finite energy density; the spectrum is forced to be either flat or to decrease with decreasing frequency in this range. Given that cosmic rays sample magnetic fluctuations over long periods in their transport through the heliosphere, we average the spectra over at least 27 days. We find that the variance of the N-component has a clear solar cycle dependence, with smaller values (~6 nT2) during solar minimum and larger during solar maximum periods (~17 nT2), well correlated with the magnetic field magnitude (e.g. Smith et al. 2006, ApJ). Whereas the inertial range spectral index (-1.65 ± 0.06) does not show a significant solar cycle variation, the energy range index (-1.1 ± 0.3) seems to be anti-correlated with the variance

  16. B cells regulate CD4+ T cell responses to papain following B cell receptor-independent papain uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel F; Woodruff, Matthew C; Carroll, Michael C; Austen, K Frank; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-07-15

    Papain, a cysteine protease allergen with inherent adjuvant activity, induces potent IL-4 expression by T cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of mice following footpad immunization. In this study, we identify a novel, non-BCR-mediated capacity for B cells to rapidly bind and internalize papain. B cells subsequently regulate the adaptive immune response by enhancing ICOS expression on CD4(+) T cells and amplifying Th2 and follicular helper T cell induction. Ab blockade of ICOS ligand, expressed by popliteal lymph node B cells, but not dendritic cells, at the peak of the response inhibits IL-4 responses in wild-type mice but not B cell-deficient mice. Thus, B cells play a critical role in amplifying adjuvant-dependent Th2 polarization following noncanonical acquisition and internalization of the cysteine protease papain.

  17. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  18. Slit/Robo Signaling Regulates Cell Fate Decisions in the Intestinal Stem Cell Lineage of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Biteau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  19. MALT1 is an intrinsic regulator of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüstle, A; Brenner, D; Knobbe-Thomsen, C B; Cox, M; Lang, P A; Lang, K S; Mak, T W

    2015-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and their absence or dysfunction can lead to autoimmunity. However, the molecular pathways that govern Treg biology remain obscure. In this study, we show that the nuclear factor-κB signalling mediator mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is an important novel regulator of both Tregs originating in the thymus ('natural' or nTregs) and Tregs induced to differentiate from naive thymocyte helper (Th) cells in the periphery ('induced' or iTregs). Our examination of mice deficient for MALT1 revealed that these mutants have a reduced number of total Tregs. In young Malt1(-/-) mice, nTregs are totally absent and iTreg are diminished in the periphery. Interestingly, total Treg numbers increase in older Malt1(-/-) mice as well as in Malt1(-/-) mice subjected to experimentally induced inflammation. iTregs isolated from WT and Malt1(-/-) mice were indistinguishable with respect to their ability to suppress the activities of effector T cells, but Malt1(-/-) iTregs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Treatment of WT and Malt1(-/-) Th cells in vitro with the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys strongly enhanced the induction and proliferation of Malt1(-/-) iTregs. Our data suggest that MALT1 supports nTreg development in the thymus but suppresses iTreg induction in the periphery during inflammation. Our data position MALT1 as a key molecule that contributes to immune tolerance at steady-state while facilitating immune reactivity under stress conditions.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 25 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cdd.2015.104.

  20. Vertebrate Ctr1 coordinates morphogenesis and progenitor cell fate and regulates embryonic stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Haremaki, Tomomi; Fraser, Stuart T.; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Baron, Margaret H.; Weinstein, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis involves two distinct processes. On the one hand, cells must specialize, acquiring fates appropriate to their positions (differentiation); on the other hand, they must physically construct the embryo through coordinated mechanical activity (morphogenesis). In early vertebrate development, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) regulates multiple embryonic events, including germ layer differentiation and morphogenesis; the cellular components that direct FGF signaling to evoke these diff...

  1. Time-course regulation of quercetin on cell survival/proliferation pathways in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén; Angeles Martín, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2008-04-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid, has been shown to possess anticarcinogenic properties, but the precise molecular mechanisms of action are not thoroughly elucidated. This study was aimed at investigating the time-course regulation effect of quercetin on survival/proliferation pathways in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Quercetin induced a significant time-dependent inactivation of the major survival signaling proteins, i. e., phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha), in concert with a time-dependent activation of key death-related signals: c-jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and PKC-delta. These data suggest that quercetin exerts a tight regulation of survival/proliferation pathways that requires the integration of different signals and persists over time, being the balance of these regulatory signals what determines the fate of HepG2 cells.

  2. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal mod...

  3. The associated regulators and signal pathway in rILl-16/CD4 mediated growth regulation in Jurkat cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    IL-16 is a ligand and chemotactic factor for CD4+ T cells. IL-16 inhibits the CD3 mediated lymphocyteactivation and proliferation. The effects of IL-16 on the target cells are dependent on the cell type, thepresence of co-activators etc. To understand the regulation function and mechanism of IL-16 on targetcells, we used a 130 a.a. recombinant IL-16 to study its effects on the growth of Jurkat T leukemia cellsin vitro. We found that the rIL-16 stimulated the proliferation of Jurkat cells at low dose (10-9M), butinhibited the growth of the cells at higher concentration (10-5M). Results showed that 10-5 M of rIL-16treatment induced an enhanced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. The treatment blocked the expression of FasL, butup-regulated the c-myc and Bid expression in the cells. Pre-treatment of PKC inhibitor or MEK1 inhibitormarkedly increased or decreased the rIL-16 induced growth-inhibiting effects on Jurkat cells, respectively.The results suggested that the rIL-16 might be a regulator for the growth or apoptosis of Jurkat cells ata dose-dependent manner. The growth-inhibiting effects of rIL-16 might be Fas/FasL independent, but,associated with the activation of PKC, up-regulated expression of c-Myc and Bid, and the participation ofthe ERK signal pathway in Jurkat cells.

  4. Cytokinin signaling regulates pavement cell morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjiang Li; Tongda Xu; Deshu Lin; Mingzhang Wen; Mingtang Xie; Jér(o)me Duclercq; Agnieszka Bielach

    2013-01-01

    The puzzle piece-shaped Arabidopsis leaf pavement cells (PCs) with interdigitated lobes and indents is a good model system to investigate the mechanisms that coordinate cell polarity and shape formation within a tissue.Auxin has been shown to coordinate the interdigitation by activating ROP GTPase-dependent signaling pathways.To identify additional components or mechanisms,we screened for mutants with abnormal PC morphogenesis and found that cytokinin signaling regulates the PC interdigitation pattern.Reduction in cytokinin accumulation and defects in cytokinin signaling (such as in ARR7-over-expressing lines,the ahk3cre1 cytokinin receptor mutant,and the ahp12345 cytokinin signaling mutant) enhanced PC interdigitation,whereas over-production of cytokinin and over-activation of cytokinin signaling in an ARR20 over-expression line delayed or abolished PC interdigitation throughout the cotyledon.Genetic and biochemical analyses suggest that cytokinin signaling acts upstream of ROPs to suppress the formation of interdigitated pattern.Our results provide novel mechanistic understanding of the pathways controlling PC shape and uncover a new role for cytokinin signaling in cell morphogenesis.

  5. Stretch-regulated Exocytosis/Endocytosis in Bladder Umbrella Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truschel, Steven T.; Wang, Edward; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Rojas, Raul; Lavelle, John; Zeidel, Mark; Stoffer, David; Apodaca, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The epithelium of the urinary bladder must maintain a highly impermeable barrier despite large variations in urine volume during bladder filling and voiding. To study how the epithelium accommodates these volume changes, we mounted bladder tissue in modified Ussing chambers and subjected the tissue to mechanical stretch. Stretching the tissue for 5 h resulted in a 50% increase in lumenal surface area (from ∼2900 to 4300 μm2), exocytosis of a population of discoidal vesicles located in the apical cytoplasm of the superficial umbrella cells, and release of secretory proteins. Surprisingly, stretch also induced endocytosis of apical membrane and 100% of biotin-labeled membrane was internalized within 5 min after stretch. The endocytosed membrane was delivered to lysosomes and degraded by a leupeptin-sensitive pathway. Last, we show that the exocytic events were mediated, in part, by a cyclic adenosine monophosphate, protein kinase A-dependent process. Our results indicate that stretch modulates mucosal surface area by coordinating both exocytosis and endocytosis at the apical membrane of umbrella cells and provide insight into the mechanism of how mechanical forces regulate membrane traffic in nonexcitable cells. PMID:11907265

  6. WNT signaling regulates self-renewal and differentiation of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabelle Bisson; David M Prowse

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics were identified in human prostate cancer cell lines by their abil-ity to form from single cells self-renewing prostaspheres in non-adherent cultures. Prostaspheres exhibited heteroge-neous expression of proliferation, differentiation and stem cell-associated makers CD44, ABCG2 and CD133. Treat-ment with WNT inhibitors reduced both prostasphere size and self-renewal, In contrast, addition of Wnt3a caused increased prostasphere size and self-renewal, which was associated with a significant increase in nuclear β-catenin, keratin 18, CD133 and CD44 expression. As a high proportion of LNCaP and C4-2B cancer cells express androgen receptor we determined the effect of the androgen receptor antagonist bicalutamide. Androgen receptor inhibition reduced prostasphere size and expression of PSA, but did not inhibit prostasphere formation. These effects are con-sistent with the androgen-independent self-renewal of cells with stem cell characteristics and the androgen-dependent proliferation of transit amplifying cells. As the canonical WNT signaling effector β-catenin can also associate with the androgen receptor, we propose a model for tumour propagation involving a balance between WNT and androgen re-ceptor activity. That would affect the self-renewal of a cancer cell with stem cell characteristics and drive transit am-plifying cell proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that WNT activity regulates the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell characteristics independently of androgen receptor activity. Inhibition of WNT signaling therefore has the potential to reduce the self-renewal of prostate cancer cells with stem cell charac-teristics and improve the therapeutic outcome.

  7. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  8. Nitric Oxide Prevents Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Regulation of Gene Expression, Cell Signaling, and Control of Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Cahuana, Gladys M; Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Salguero-Aranda, Carmen; Beltran-Povea, Amparo; Hitos, Ana B; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Martin, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) delays mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by regulating genes linked to pluripotency and differentiation. Nevertheless, no profound study has been conducted on cell differentiation regulation by this molecule through signaling on essential biological functions. We sought to demonstrate that NO positively regulates the pluripotency transcriptional core, enforcing changes in the chromatin structure, in addition to regulating cell proliferation, and signaling pathways with key roles in stemness. Culturing mESCs with 2 μM of the NO donor diethylenetriamine/NO (DETA/NO) in the absence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induced significant changes in the expression of 16 genes of the pluripotency transcriptional core. Furthermore, treatment with DETA/NO resulted in a high occupancy of activating H3K4me3 at the Oct4 and Nanog promoters and repressive H3K9me3 and H3k27me3 at the Brachyury promoter. Additionally, the activation of signaling pathways involved in pluripotency, such as Gsk3-β/β-catenin, was observed, in addition to activation of PI3 K/Akt, which is consistent with the protection of mESCs from cell death. Finally, a decrease in cell proliferation coincides with cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Our results provide novel insights into NO-mediated gene regulation and cell proliferation and suggest that NO is necessary but not sufficient for the maintenance of pluripotency and the prevention of cell differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2078-2088, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Epigenetic regulations of hematopoietic stem cells ageing and the regulation of traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Zheng Yang; Xin-Yuan Luan; Shu-Bin Wang

    2016-01-01

    因为衰老而导致的干细胞功能缺陷会影响组织的稳态,并最终导致机体寿命缩短。干细胞具有自我更新和增殖分化能力,在机体生长发育过程中对组织的自我修复及再生无疑是至关重要的。成体干细胞中研究比较透彻的干细胞是造血干细胞(HSCs),但是对其自身衰老调控的机制尚不清楚。表观修饰的改变被认为是哺乳动物衰老的标志之一,并且参与了HSCs 的衰老过程。另外,近期的研究发现HSCs 的衰老与血液肿瘤密切相关,因此表观遗传调控者或许可以成为治疗血液肿瘤的新靶点。长久以来中药一直被用于治疗血液肿瘤并且疗效确切,比如三氧化二砷。在这篇综述中,我们总结了表观修饰改变与HSCs 衰老的关系,并且重点论述了DNA 甲基化及组蛋白修饰调控HSCs 衰老的机制。我们还总结了目前用于治疗血液肿瘤的部分中药,并对其表观遗传调控的角色进行了论述,旨在为开发新的药物提供依据。%Age-related defects in stem cells can limit proper tissue maintenance and hence contribute to a shortened lifespan. Given the essential role of a stem cell to self-renew, differentiate, and proliferate, it is no wonder that they are critically important to an organism during development and to tissue self-healing and regeneration. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as one of adult stem cells, have been well characterized recently. However, the regulation mechanism of HSCs ageing remains unclear. Epigenetic alterations are now recognized as a hallmark of mammalian ageing and involved in HSCs ageing. In addition, recent studies showed that HSCs ageing is related to hematological malignancies. Therefore, epigenetic modifiers maybe novel targets for hematological malignancies therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat hematological malignancies for centuries. Here, we aim to review the current progress in the

  10. GATA-1 directly regulates Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wen-Zhong; Ai, Zhi-Ying [College of Life Sciences, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Wang, Zhi-Wei [School of Life Sciences and Medical Center, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chen, Lin-Lin [College of Life Sciences, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Guo, Ze-Kun, E-mail: gzknwaf@126.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Yong, E-mail: zylabnwaf@126.com [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Key Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Nanog safeguards pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Insight into the regulation of Nanog is important for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pluripotency of mESCs. In a silico analysis, we identify four GATA-1 putative binding sites in Nanog proximal promoter. The Nanog promoter activity can be significantly repressed by ectopic expression of GATA-1 evidenced by a promoter reporter assay. Mutation studies reveal that one of the four putative binding sites counts for GATA-1 repressing Nanog promoter activity. Direct binding of GATA-1 on Nanog proximal promoter is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data provide new insights into the expanded regulatory circuitry that coordinates Nanog expression. - Highlights: • The Nanog proximal promoter conceives functional element for GATA-1. • GATA-1 occupies the Nanog proximal promoter in vitro and in vivo. • GATA-1 transcriptionally suppresses Nanog.

  11. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  12. Phosphofructokinase-1 Negatively Regulates Neurogenesis from Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengyun; Qian, Xiaodan; Qin, Cheng; Lin, Yuhui; Wu, Haiyin; Chang, Lei; Luo, Chunxia; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), a major regulatory glycolytic enzyme, has been implicated in the functions of astrocytes and neurons. Here, we report that PFK-1 negatively regulates neurogenesis from neural stem cells (NSCs) by targeting pro-neural transcriptional factors. Using in vitro assays, we found that PFK-1 knockdown enhanced, and PFK-1 overexpression inhibited the neuronal differentiation of NSCs, which was consistent with the findings from NSCs subjected to 5 h of hypoxia. Meanwhile, the neurogenesis induced by PFK-1 knockdown was attributed to the increased proliferation of neural progenitors and the commitment of NSCs to the neuronal lineage. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of PFK-1 also increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we demonstrated that the neurogenesis mediated by PFK-1 was likely achieved by targeting mammalian achaete-scute homologue-1 (Mash 1), neuronal differentiation factor (NeuroD), and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (Sox2). All together, our results reveal PFK-1 as an important regulator of neurogenesis.

  13. Prion protein expression regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Miranda

    Full Text Available Cellular prion protein (PRNP is a glycoprotein involved in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs. Although the physiological function of PRNP is largely unknown, its key role in prion infection has been extensively documented. This study examines the functionality of PRNP during the course of embryoid body (EB differentiation in mouse Prnp-null (KO and WT embryonic stem cell (ESC lines. The first feature observed was a new population of EBs that only appeared in the KO line after 5 days of differentiation. These EBs were characterized by their expression of several primordial germ cell (PGC markers until Day 13. In a comparative mRNA expression analysis of genes playing an important developmental role during ESC differentiation to EBs, Prnp was found to participate in the transcription of a key pluripotency marker such as Nanog. A clear switching off of this gene on Day 5 was observed in the KO line as opposed to the WT line, in which maximum Prnp and Nanog mRNA levels appeared at this time. Using a specific antibody against PRNP to block PRNP pathways, reduced Nanog expression was confirmed in the WT line. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of ITGB5 (integrin αvβ5 in the KO line rescued the low expression of Nanog on Day 5, suggesting the regulation of Nanog transcription by Prnp via this Itgb5. mRNA expression analysis of the PRNP-related proteins PRND (Doppel and SPRN (Shadoo, whose PRNP function is known to be redundant, revealed their incapacity to compensate for the absence of PRNP during early ESC differentiation. Our findings provide strong evidence for a relationship between Prnp and several key pluripotency genes and attribute Prnp a crucial role in regulating self-renewal/differentiation status of ESC, confirming the participation of PRNP during early embryogenesis.

  14. Stromal interaction molecule 1 regulates growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human tongue squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaobo; Song, Laixiao; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-30

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common type of oral carcinomas. However, the molecular mechanism by which OTSCC developed is not fully identified. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a transmembrane protein, mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). STIM1 is involved in several types of cancers. Here, we report that STIM1 contributes to the development of human OTSCC. We knocked down STIM1 in OTSCC cell line Tca-8113 with lentivirus-mediated shRNA and found that STIM1 knockdown repressed the proliferation of Tca-8113 cells. In addition, we also showed that STIM1 deficiency reduced colony number of Tca-8113 cells. Knockdown of STIM1 repressed cells to enter M phase of cell cycle and induced cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis and found that STIM1 was associated with p53 and MAPK pathways, which may contribute to the effects of STIM1 on cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Finally, we confirmed that STIM1 controlled the expression of MDM2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible α (GADD45A) in OTSCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that STIM1 contributes to the development of OTSCC partially through regulating p53 and MAPK pathways to promote cell cycle and survival.

  15. A family business: stem cell progeny join the niche to regulate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Fuchs, Elaine

    2012-01-23

    Stem cell niches, the discrete microenvironments in which the stem cells reside, play a dominant part in regulating stem cell activity and behaviours. Recent studies suggest that committed stem cell progeny become indispensable components of the niche in a wide range of stem cell systems. These unexpected niche inhabitants provide versatile feedback signals to their stem cell parents. Together with other heterologous cell types that constitute the niche, they contribute to the dynamics of the microenvironment. As progeny are often located in close proximity to stem cell niches, similar feedback regulations may be the underlying principles shared by different stem cell systems.

  16. Trichostatin A Regulates hGCN5 Expression and Cell Cycle on Daudi Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongli; CHEN Yan; CUI Guohui; WU Gang; WANG Tao; HU Jianli

    2006-01-01

    The expression of human general control of amino acid synthesis protein 5 (hGCN5) in human Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells in vitro, effects of Trichostatin A (TSA) on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism of TSA inhibiting proliferation of Daudi cells were investigated. The effects of TSA on the growth of Daudi cells were studied by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The effect of TSA on the cell cycle of Daudi cells was assayed by a propidium iodide method. Immunochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the expression of hGCN5. The proliferation of Daudi cells was decreased in TSA-treated group with a 24 h IC50 value of 415.3979 μg/L. TSA induced apoptosis of Daudi cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment with TSA (200 and 400 μg/L) for 24 h, the apoptosis rates of Daudi cells were (14.74±2.04) % and (17.63±1.25) %, respectively. The cell cycle was arrested in G0/G1 phase (50, 100 μtg/L) and in G2/M phase (200 μg/L) by treatment with TSA for 24 h.The expression of hGCN5 protein in Daudi cells was increased in 24 h TSA-treated group by immunochemistry and Western blot (P<0.05). It was suggested that TSA as HDACIs could increase the expression of hGCN5 in Daudi cells, and might play an important role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of B-NHL cell line Daudi cells.

  17. Cellular Mechanisms in Regulating Mammary Cell Turnover During Lactation and Dry Period in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Theil, P K; Sørensen, M T

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in regulating mammary cell turnover during the pregnancy-lactaion cycle in dairy cows are unclear. The objective of present experiment was to describe expression of genes encoding proteins known to be involved in pathways regulating mammary cell proliferation, apoptosis......, differentiation, cell survival, and tissue remodeling....

  18. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  19. Tetrahydrouridine inhibits cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation regardless of cytidine deaminase expression levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naotake Funamizu

    Full Text Available Tetrahydrouridine (THU is a well characterized and potent inhibitor of cytidine deaminase (CDA. Highly expressed CDA catalyzes and inactivates cytidine analogues, ultimately contributing to increased gemcitabine resistance. Therefore, a combination therapy of THU and gemcitabine is considered to be a potential and promising treatment for tumors with highly expressed CDA. In this study, we found that THU has an alternative mechanism for inhibiting cell growth which is independent of CDA expression. Three different carcinoma cell lines (MIAPaCa-2, H441, and H1299 exhibited decreased cell proliferation after sole administration of THU, while being unaffected by knocking down CDA. To investigate the mechanism of THU-induced cell growth inhibition, cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry was performed. This analysis revealed that THU caused an increased rate of G1-phase occurrence while S-phase occurrence was diminished. Similarly, Ki-67 staining further supported that THU reduces cell proliferation. We also found that THU regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S checkpoint by suppressing E2F1. As a result, a combination regimen of THU and gemcitabine might be a more effective therapy than previously believed for pancreatic carcinoma since THU works as a CDA inhibitor, as well as an inhibitor of cell growth in some types of pancreatic carcinoma cells.

  20. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-06-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5-CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion.

  1. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  2. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, M; Nakagawa, S; Aono, S; Usui, T; Uemura, T

    2000-07-29

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to another. Artificial perturbation of this switch results in blocking of their escape from the neural tube. Intracellular modulations of cadherin activity also seem to play a role in regulation of cell adhesion. We identified p120ctn as a regulator of cadherin function in carcinoma cells. With such regulators, cells may make a choice as to whether they should maintain stable cell contacts or disrupt their association. Finally, we found another type of cadherin-mediated cell patterning: Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity in Drosophila imaginal discs. Thus, the cadherin superfamily receptors control the patterning of cell assemblies through a variety of mechanisms.

  3. Phytoestrogens regulate the proliferation and expression of stem cell factors in cell lines of malignant testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasibeder, Astrid; Venkataramani, Vivek; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim; Schweyer, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Phytoestrogens have been shown to exert anti-proliferative effects on different cancer cells. In addition it could be demonstrated that inhibition of proliferation is associated with downregulation of the known stem cell factors NANOG, POU5F1 and SOX2 in tumor cells. We demonstrate the potential of Belamcanda chinensis extract (BCE) and tectorigenin as anticancer drugs in cell lines of malignant testicular germ cell tumor cells (TGCT) by inhibition of proliferation and regulating the expression of stem cell factors. The TGCT cell lines TCam-2 and NTera-2 were treated with BCE or tectorigenin and MTT assay was used to measure the proliferation of tumor cells. In addition, the expression of stem cell factors was analyzed by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, global expression analysis was performed by microarray technique. BCE and tectorigenin inhibited proliferation and downregulated the stem cell factors NANOG and POU5F1 in TGCT cells. In addition, gene expression profiling revealed induction of genes important for the differentiation and inhibition of oncogenes. Utilizing connectivity map in an attempt to elucidate mechanism underlying BCE treatments we found highly positive association to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) amongst others. Causing no histone deacetylase inhibition, the effects of BCE on proliferation and stem cell factors may be based on histone-independent mechanisms such as direct hyperacetylation of transcription factors. Based on these findings, phytoestrogens may be useful as new agents in the treatment of TGCT.

  4. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.berndt@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Büttner, Robert, E-mail: Robert-Buettner@gmx.net [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gühne, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie_guehne@gmx.net [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gleinig, Anna, E-mail: annagleinig@yahoo.com [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Richter, Petra, E-mail: P.Richter@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Chen, Yuan, E-mail: Yuan.Chen@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Franz, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Franz@med.uni-jena.de [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Liebmann, Claus, E-mail: Claus.Liebmann@uni-jena.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  5. LIGHT/TNFSR14 can regulate hepatic lipase expression by hepatocytes independent of T cells and Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy Chellan

    Full Text Available LIGHT/TNFSF14 is a costimulatory molecule expressed on activated T cells for activation and maintenance of T cell homeostasis. LIGHT over expressed in T cells also down regulates hepatic lipase levels in mice through lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR signaling. It is unclear whether LIGHT regulates hepatic lipase directly by interacting with LTβR expressing cells in the liver or indirectly by activation of T cells, and whether Kupffer cells, a major cell populations in the liver that expresses the LTβR, are required. Here we report that LIGHT expression via an adenoviral vector (Ad-LIGHT is sufficient to down regulate hepatic lipase expression in mice. Depletion of Kupffer cells using clodronate liposomes had no effect on LIGHT-mediated down regulation of hepatic lipase. LIGHT-mediated regulation of hepatic lipase is also independent of LIGHT expression by T cells or activation of T cells. This is demonstrated by the decreased hepatic lipase expression in the liver of Ad-LIGHT infected recombination activating gene deficient mice that lack mature T cells and by the Ad-LIGHT infection of primary hepatocytes. Hepatic lipase expression was not responsive to LIGHT when mice lacking LTβR globally or only on hepatocytes were infected with Ad-LIGHT. Therefore, our data argues that interaction of LIGHT with LTβR on hepatocytes, but not Kupffer cells, is sufficient to down regulate hepatic lipase expression and that this effect can be independent of LIGHT's costimulatory function.

  6. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Biased DNA Segregation in Response to Cell Adhesion Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Freida

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biased DNA segregation is a mitotic event in which the chromatids carrying the original template DNA strands and those carrying the template copies are not segregated randomly into the two daughter cells. Biased segregation has been observed in several cell types, but not in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, and the factors affecting this bias have yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated cell adhesion geometries as a potential parameter by plating hMSCs from healthy donors on fibronectin-coated micropatterns. On symmetric micropatterns, the segregation of sister chromatids to the daughter cells appeared random. In contrast, on asymmetric micropatterns, the segregation was biased. This sensitivity to asymmetric extracellular cues was reproducible in cells from all donors but was not observed in human skin-derived fibroblasts or in a fibroblastic cell line used as controls. We conclude that the asymmetry of cell adhesion is a major factor in the regulation of biased DNA segregation in hMSCs.

  7. WASP family members and formin proteins coordinate regulation of cell protrusions in carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Corina; Wang, Weigang; Dovas, Athanassios; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Sidani, Mazen; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Desmarais, Vera; Holman, Holly A; Kitchen, Susan; Backer, Jonathan M; Alberts, Art; Condeelis, John

    2008-03-24

    We examined the role of the actin nucleation promoters neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and WAVE2 in cell protrusion in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), a key regulator in carcinoma cell invasion. We found that WAVE2 knockdown (KD) suppresses lamellipod formation and increases filopod formation, whereas N-WASP KD has no effect. However, simultaneous KD of both proteins results in the formation of large jagged protrusions with lamellar properties and increased filopod formation. This suggests that another actin nucleation activity is at work in carcinoma cells in response to EGF. A mammalian Diaphanous-related formin, mDia1, localizes at the jagged protrusions in double KD cells. Constitutively active mDia1 recapitulated the phenotype, whereas inhibition of mDia1 blocked the formation of these protrusions. Increased RhoA activity, which stimulates mDia1 nucleation, was observed in the N-WASP/WAVE2 KD cells and was shown to be required for the N-WASP/WAVE2 KD phenotype. These data show that coordinate regulation between the WASP family and mDia proteins controls the balance between lamellar and lamellipodial protrusion activity.

  8. Matrix Stiffness Regulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation through Septin 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Ting; Hur, Sung Sik; Chang, Joann; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa) in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa). ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9), the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin αvβ3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation. PMID:23118862

  9. Matrix stiffness regulates endothelial cell proliferation through septin 9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa. ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9, the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin α(vβ(3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation.

  10. Chemoattractant signaling between tumor cells and macrophages regulates cancer cell migration, metastasis and neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Green

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages are known to influence cancer progression by modulation of immune function, angiogenesis, and cell metastasis, however, little is known about the chemokine signaling networks that regulate this process. Utilizing CT26 colon cancer cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages as a model cellular system, we demonstrate that treatment of CT26 cells with RAW 264.7 conditioned medium induces cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Inflammatory gene microarray analysis indicated CT26-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages upregulate SDF-1alpha and VEGF, and that these cytokines contribute to CT26 migration in vitro. RAW 264.7 macrophages also showed a robust chemotactic response towards CT26-derived chemokines. In particular, microarray analysis and functional testing revealed CSF-1 as the major chemoattractant for RAW 264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, in the chick CAM model of cancer progression, RAW 264.7 macrophages localized specifically to the tumor periphery where they were found to increase CT26 tumor growth, microvascular density, vascular disruption, and lung metastasis, suggesting these cells home to actively invading areas of the tumor, but not the hypoxic core of the tumor mass. In support of these findings, hypoxic conditions down regulated CSF-1 production in several tumor cell lines and decreased RAW 264.7 macrophage migration in vitro. Together our findings suggest a model where normoxic tumor cells release CSF-1 to recruit macrophages to the tumor periphery where they secrete motility and angiogenic factors that facilitate tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  11. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bimczok, Diane; John Y. Kao; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA res...

  12. Regulation of epidermal Langerhans cell migration by lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, M; Dearman, R J; Uribe-Luna, S; Headon, D R; Ward, P P; Conneely, O M; Kimber, I

    2000-05-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a member of the transferrin family of iron-binding glycoproteins to which several anti-inflammatory functions have been ascribed. LF has been shown to down-regulate expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), although the possibility has been raised that the activity of LF in this regard was indirect and secondary to its ability to bind to and inactivate the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) used to induce cytokine production. However, the identification of putative membrane receptors for LF raises the possibility that the interaction of LF with its receptor may be one important route through which this protein exerts anti-inflammatory activity. In the present investigations the biological properties of LF have been examined in a model of cutaneous immune function where the allergen-induced migration of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) from the skin and their subsequent accumulation as dendritic cells (DC) in skin-draining lymph nodes are known to be dependent upon the de novo synthesis of TNF-alpha, but independent of exogenous LPS. Consistent with the protein having direct anti-inflammatory properties, it was found that the intradermal injection of recombinant murine LF (either iron-saturated or iron-depleted LF) inhibited significantly allergen (oxazolone) -induced LC migration and DC accumulation. That these inhibitory effects were secondary to the inhibition of local TNF-alpha synthesis was suggested by the findings that first, LF was unable to inhibit LC migration induced by intradermal injection of TNF-alpha itself, and second, that migration stimulated by local administration of another epidermal cytokine, interleukin 1beta, which is also dependent upon TNF-alpha production, was impaired significantly by prior treatment with LF. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated the presence of LF in skin, associated primarily with keratinocytes. Collectively these data support the possession by

  13. Mangiferin Facilitates Islet Regeneration and β-Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cell Cycle and β-Cell Regeneration Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Lian; Li, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yuan-De; Lu, Bang-Min; Shi, Zheng; An, Na; Zhao, Liang-Kai; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Bao, Jin-Ku; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Mangiferin, a xanthonoid found in plants including mangoes and iris unguicularis, was suggested in previous studies to have anti-hyperglycemic function, though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study was designed to determine the therapeutic effect of mangiferin by the regeneration of β-cells in mice following 70% partial pancreatectomy (PPx), and to explore the mechanisms of mangiferin-induced β-cell proliferation. For this purpose, adult C57BL/6J mice after 7–14 days post-PPx, or a sham operation were subjected to mangiferin (30 and 90 mg/kg body weight) or control solvent injection. Mangiferin-treated mice exhibited an improved glycemia and glucose tolerance, increased serum insulin levels, enhanced β-cell hyperplasia, elevated β-cell proliferation and reduced β-cell apoptosis. Further dissection at the molecular level showed several key regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin D1, D2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were significantly up-regulated in mangiferin-treated mice. In addition, critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1), neurogenin 3 (Ngn3), glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2), Forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo-1), and glucokinase (GCK), were found to be promoted by mangiferin at both the mRNA and protein expression level. Thus, mangiferin administration markedly facilitates β-cell proliferation and islet regeneration, likely by regulating essential genes in the cell cycle and the process of islet regeneration. These effects therefore suggest that mangiferin bears a therapeutic potential in preventing and/or treating the diabetes. PMID:24853132

  14. Mangiferin Facilitates Islet Regeneration and β-Cell Proliferation through Upregulation of Cell Cycle and β-Cell Regeneration Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lian Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin, a xanthonoid found in plants including mangoes and iris unguicularis, was suggested in previous studies to have anti-hyperglycemic function, though the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study was designed to determine the therapeutic effect of mangiferin by the regeneration of β-cells in mice following 70% partial pancreatectomy (PPx, and to explore the mechanisms of mangiferin-induced β-cell proliferation. For this purpose, adult C57BL/6J mice after 7–14 days post-PPx, or a sham operation were subjected to mangiferin (30 and 90 mg/kg body weight or control solvent injection. Mangiferin-treated mice exhibited an improved glycemia and glucose tolerance, increased serum insulin levels, enhanced β-cell hyperplasia, elevated β-cell proliferation and reduced β-cell apoptosis. Further dissection at the molecular level showed several key regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin D1, D2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 were significantly up-regulated in mangiferin-treated mice. In addition, critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1, neurogenin 3 (Ngn3, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2, Forkhead box protein O1 (Foxo-1, and glucokinase (GCK, were found to be promoted by mangiferin at both the mRNA and protein expression level. Thus, mangiferin administration markedly facilitates β-cell proliferation and islet regeneration, likely by regulating essential genes in the cell cycle and the process of islet regeneration. These effects therefore suggest that mangiferin bears a therapeutic potential in preventing and/or treating the diabetes.

  15. Membrane mechanisms and intracellular signalling in cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Dunham, Philip B.

    1995-01-01

    Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation.......Volume regulation, Signal transduction, Calcium-calmodulin, Stretch-activated channels, Eicosanoids, Macromolecular crowding, Cytoskeleton, Protein phosphorylation, dephosphorylation....

  16. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-xiu Zhu; Ya-li Cao; Bin Li; Jia Wang; Xiao-bing Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM, Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by eisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM, Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and withont cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM, Chk2 and p53 were increased in HeLa cells treated with cisplatin. The cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase in HeLa cells treated with cisplatin. Conclusion Activation of ATM, Chk2 and p53 might be critical in determining whether cells survive or undergo apoptesis. Targeting ATM, Chk2 and p53 pathway might he a promising strategy for reversing chemoresistance to clsplatin in cervical cancer.

  17. PAX2 regulates ADAM10 expression and mediates anchorage-independent cell growth of melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boyoung Lee

    Full Text Available PAX transcription factors play an important role during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated PAX2 protein levels in melanocytes and melanoma cells by Western Blot and immunofluorescence analysis and characterized the role of PAX2 in the pathogenesis of melanoma. In vitro we found weak PAX2 protein expression in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Compared to melanocytes increased PAX2 protein levels were detectable in melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, in tissue sections of melanoma patients nuclear PAX2 expression strongly correlated with nuclear atypia and the degree of prominent nucleoli, indicating an association of PAX2 with a more atypical cellular phenotype. In addition, with chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PAX2 overexpression and PAX2 siRNA we present compelling evidence that PAX2 can regulate ADAM10 expression, a metalloproteinase known to play important roles in melanoma metastasis. In human tissue samples we found co-expression of PAX2 and ADAM10 in melanocytes of benign nevi and in melanoma cells of patients with malignant melanoma. Importantly, the downregulation of PAX2 by specific siRNA inhibited the anchorage independent cell growth and decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the downregulation of PAX2 abrogated the chemoresistance of melanoma cells against cisplatin, indicating that PAX2 expression mediates cell survival and plays important roles during melanoma progression.

  18. Effects of tachyplesin on the regulation of cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Fu Li; Gao-Liang Ouyang; Xuan-Xian Peng; Shui-Gen Hong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of tachyplesin on the cell cycle regulation in human hepatcarcinoma cells.METHODS: Effects of tachyplesin on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells were assayed with flow cytometry. The protein levels of p53, p16, cyclin D1 and CDK4 were assayed by immunocytochemistry. The mRNA levels of p21WAF1/CIP1 and c-myc genes were examined with in situ hybridization assay.RESULTS: After tachyplesin treatment, the cell cycle arrested at G0/G1 phase, the protein levels of mutant p53, cyclin D1 and CDK4 and the mRNA level of c-myc gene were decreased, whereas the levels of p16 protein and p21wWF1/CIP1 mRNA increased.CONCLUSION: Tachyplesin might arrest the cell at G0/G1 phase by upregulating the levels of p16 protein and p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA and downregulating the levels of mutant p53, cyclin D1 and CDK4 proteins and c-myc mRNA, and induce the differentiation of human hepatocacinoma cells.

  19. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  20. Activated Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells regulate Beige Fat Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Woo; Odegaard, Justin I.; Mukundan, Lata; Qiu, Yifu; Molofsky, Ari B.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Yun, Karen; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), an innate source of the type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-5 and -13, participate in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Although type 2 immunity is critically important for mediating metabolic adaptations to environmental cold, the functions of ILC2s in beige or brown fat development are poorly defined. We report here that activation of ILC2s by IL-33 is sufficient to promote the growth of functional beige fat in thermoneutral mice. Mechanistically, ILC2 activation results in the proliferation of bipotential adipocyte precursors (APs) and their subsequent commitment to the beige fat lineage. Loss- and gain-of-function studies reveal that ILC2-and eosinophil-derived type 2 cytokines stimulate signaling via the IL-4Rα in PDGFRα+ APs to promote beige fat biogenesis. Together, our results highlight a critical role for ILC2s and type 2 cytokines in the regulation of adipocyte precursor numbers and fate, and as a consequence, adipose tissue homeostasis. PMID:25543153

  1. REST regulates oncogenic properties of glioblastoma stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mohamed M.; Sathyan, Pratheesh; Singh, Sanjay K.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liang, Shoudan; Gumin, Joy; El-Mesallamy, Hala Osman; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Fuller, Gregory N.; Lang, Frederick F.; Majumder, Sadhan

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Although many GBM tumors are believed to be caused by self-renewing, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GSCs), the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs are only now being unraveled. Here we showed that GSCs derived from GBM patient specimens express varying levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, suggesting heterogeneity across different GSC lines. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments indicated that REST maintains self-renewal of GSCs. High REST-expressing GSCs (HR-GSCs) produced tumors histopathologically distinct from those generated by low REST-expressing GSCs (LR-GSCs) in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. Knockdown of REST in HR-GSCs resulted in increased survival in GSC-transplanted mice and produced tumors with higher apoptotic and lower invasive properties. Conversely, forced expression of exogenous REST in LR-GSCs produced decreased survival in mice and produced tumors with lower apoptotic and higher invasive properties, similar to HR-GSCs. Thus, based on our results, we propose that a novel function of REST is to maintain self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs and that REST can play a major role in mediating tumorigenicity in GBM. PMID:22228704

  2. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation.

  3. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  4. Re-thinking cell cycle regulators : the cross-talk with metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluis eFajas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of genetically engineered mice deficient for cell cycle regulators, including E2F1, cdk4, or, pRB showed that the major phenotypes are metabolic perturbations. These key cell cycle regulators contribute to lipid synthesis, glucose production, insulin secretion, and glycolytic metabolism and it has been shown how deregulation of those pathways can lead to metabolic perturbations and related metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes. The cyclin-cdk-Rb-E2F1 pathway regulates adipogenesis in addition to its well-described roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer. It was also proved that E2F1 directly participates in the regulation of pancreatic growth and function. Similarly, cyclin D3, cdk4, and cdk9 are also adipogenic factors with strong effects on whole organism metabolism. These examples illustrate the growing notion that cell cycle regulatory proteins can also modulate metabolic processes. Cell cycle regulators are activated by insulin and glucose, even in non-proliferating cells. Most importantly cell cycle regulators trigger the adaptive metabolic switch that normal and cancer cells require in order to proliferate. These changes include increased lipid synthesis, decreased oxidative, and increased glycolytic metabolism. In summary, cell cycle regulators are essential in the control of anabolic, biosynthetic processes, and block at the same time oxidative and catabolic pathways, which are the metabolic hallmarks of cancer.

  5. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Huang, Xiaohua [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Clinical Biochemistry, College of Laboratory Medicine, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); An, Yue [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Ren, Feng [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta [Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Xiao, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [The Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650228 (China); Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Clayton 3800 (Australia); Ma, Keli, E-mail: makeli666@aliyun.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Li, Yali, E-mail: yalilipaper@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Department of Anatomy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119078 (Singapore)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  6. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  7. FSH regulates acetycholine production by ovarian granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amsterdam Abraham

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been previously shown that cultured granulosa cells (GCs derived from human ovarian preovulatory follicles contain choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine (ACh synthesis. They also produce ACh and express functional muscarinic ACh receptors. ACh can act on GCs to increase proliferation, disrupt gap junctional communication, alter intracellular calcium levels, as well as expression of transcription factors, suggesting an unrecognized role of ACh in GC function. To gain further insights into the possible role of ACh in the ovary, we examined ChAT expression in the gland before and after birth, as well as in adults, and studied the regulation of ACh production by FSH. Methods ChAT immunohistochemistry was performed using ovarian samples of different species and ages (embryonic, postnatal and adult rats and mice, including embryonic ovaries from mice null for ChAT, neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys and adult humans. ACh was measured by HPLC and/or a fluorescence based method in rat ovaries and in a FSH receptor-expressing cell line (rat GFSHR-17 cultured with or without FSH. Results In adult rat, as well as in all other species, ovarian ChAT immunoreactivity is associated with GCs of antral follicles, but not with other structures, indicating that GCs are the only ovarian source of ACh. Indeed ACh was clearly detected in adult rat ovaries by two methods. ChAT immunoreactivity is absent from embryonic and/or neonatal ovaries (mouse/rat and monkey and ovarian development in embryonic mice null for ChAT appears normal, suggesting that ACh is not involved in ovarian or follicular formation. Since ChAT immunoreactivity is present in GCs of large follicles and since the degree of the ChAT immunoreactivity increases as antral follicles grow, we tested whether ACh production is stimulated by FSH. Rat GFSHR-17 cells that stably express the FSH receptor, respond to FSH with an increase in ACh

  8. The Gcn2 Regulator Yih1 Interacts with the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Cdc28 and Promotes Cell Cycle Progression through G2/M in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Silva

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Yih1, when overexpressed, inhibits the eIF2 alpha kinase Gcn2 by competing for Gcn1 binding. However, deletion of YIH1 has no detectable effect on Gcn2 activity, suggesting that Yih1 is not a general inhibitor of Gcn2, and has no phenotypic defect identified so far. Thus, its physiological role is largely unknown. Here, we show that Yih1 is involved in the cell cycle. Yeast lacking Yih1 displays morphological patterns and DNA content indicative of a delay in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle, and this phenotype is independent of Gcn1 and Gcn2. Accordingly, the levels of phosphorylated eIF2α, which show a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation, are not altered in cells devoid of Yih1. We present several lines of evidence indicating that Yih1 is in a complex with Cdc28. Yih1 pulls down endogenous Cdc28 in vivo and this interaction is enhanced when Cdc28 is active, suggesting that Yih1 modulates the function of Cdc28 in specific stages of the cell cycle. We also demonstrate, by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation, that endogenous Yih1 and Cdc28 interact with each other, confirming Yih1 as a bona fide Cdc28 binding partner. Amino acid substitutions within helix H2 of the RWD domain of Yih1 enhance Yih1-Cdc28 association. Overexpression of this mutant, but not of wild type Yih1, leads to a phenotype similar to that of YIH1 deletion, supporting the view that Yih1 is involved through Cdc28 in the regulation of the cell cycle. We further show that IMPACT, the mammalian homologue of Yih1, interacts with CDK1, the mammalian counterpart of Cdc28, indicating that the involvement with the cell cycle is conserved. Together, these data provide insights into the cellular function of Yih1/IMPACT, and provide the basis for future studies on the role of this protein in the cell cycle.

  9. Estrous cycle-dependent changes of Fas expression in the bovine corpus luteum: influence of keratin 8/18 intermediate filaments and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Alice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fas expression and Fas-induced apoptosis are mechanisms attributed to the selective destruction of cells of the corpus luteum (CL during luteal regression. In certain cell-types, sensitivity to these death-inducing mechanisms is due to the loss or cleavage of keratin-containing intermediate filaments. Specifically, keratin 8/18 (K8/K18 filaments are hypothesized to influence cell death in part by regulating Fas expression at the cell surface. Methods Here, Fas expression on bovine luteal cells was quantified by flow cytometry during the early (Day 5, postovulation and late stages (Days 16–18, postovulation of CL function, and the relationship between Fas expression, K8/K18 filament expression and cytokine-induced cell death in vitro was evaluated. Results Both total and cell surface expression of Fas on luteal cells was greater for early versus late stage bovine CL (89% vs. 44% of cells for total Fas; 65% vs.18% of cells for cell surface Fas; respectively, P0.05, n=4 CL/stage, despite evidence these conditions increased Fas expression on HepG2 cells (P0.05 or stage of CL (P>0.05, n= 4 CL/stage on this outcome. Conclusion In conclusion, we rejected our null hypothesis that the cell surface expression of Fas does not differ between luteal cells of early and late stage CL. The results also did not support the idea that K8/K18 filaments influence the expression of Fas on the surface of bovine luteal cells. Potential downstream effects of these filaments on death signaling, however, remain a possibility. Importantly, the elevated expression of Fas observed on cells of early stage bovine CL compared to late stage bovine CL raises a provocative question concerning the physiological role(s of Fas in the corpus luteum, particularly during early luteal development.

  10. Human decorin regulates proliferation and migration of human lung cancer A549 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Shuo; XU Jin-fu; CAO Wei-jun; LI Hui-ping; HU Cheng-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Decorin is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan and it plays an important role in regulation of cell growth and migration in various tumor cell lines.Decorin was found down-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer tissue and may be involved in regulation of lung cancer development.Methods In this study,lentivirus-mediated RNA interference and over expression were employed to change the expression levels of decorin in lung cancer A549 cells.We tested the cell cycle of A549 cells and the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1,cyclin D1,epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR),P53,and P21.Results We found that up-regulation of decorin could inhibit proliferation,block cell cycle at G1 and decrease invasive activity of A549 cells.Moreover,we also show that up-regulation of decorin induced significant decreases of TGF-β1,cyclin D1 expression,phosphorylation of EGFR,and increases of P53 and P21 expression.Opposite results were observed in A549 cells with down-regulation of decorin.Conclusion Our results suggest that decorin is a key regulator involved in proliferation and migration ofA549 cells.

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  12. Selection of Aptamers for CED-9/Bcl-2 Family Cell Death Regulations and Their Application in Study of Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ding Xue, Ph.D. Chonglin Yang, Ph.D. Nathan Camp CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Aptamers for CED-9/Bcl-2 Family Cell Death Regulations and Their Application in Study of Apoptosis Regulation and Drug Design for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT...aptamers for CED-9/Bcl-2 family cell death regulators and their application in study of apoptosis regulation and drug design for breast cancer. The 4th Era

  13. Environmental cues from CNS, PNS, and ENS cells regulate CNS progenitor differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännvall, Karin; Corell, Mikael; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin;

    2008-01-01

    Cellular origin and environmental cues regulate stem cell fate determination. Neuroepithelial stem cells form the central nervous system (CNS), whereas neural crest stem cells generate the peripheral (PNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS). CNS neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) fate determination...

  14. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie;

    2004-01-01

    as a constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell...

  15. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  16. Dendritic cell SIRPα regulates homeostasis of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Ken; Kotani, Takenori; Saito, Yasuyuki; Respatika, Datu; Murata, Yoji; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is expressed predominantly in myeloid lineage cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages, mediates cell-cell signaling. In the immune system, SIRPα is thought to be important for homeostasis of DCs, but it remains unclear whether SIRPα intrinsic to DCs is indeed indispensable for such functional role. Thus, we here generated the mice, in which SIRPα was specifically ablated in CD11c(+) DCs (Sirpa(Δ) (DC) ). Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice manifested a marked reduction of CD4(+) CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the secondary lymphoid organs, as well as of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Such reduction of cDCs in Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice was comparable to that apparent with the mice, in which SIRPα was systemically ablated. Expression of SIRPα in DCs was well correlated with that of either endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) or Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 2 (EBI2), both of which were also implicated in the regulation of DC homeostasis. Indeed, ESAM(+) or EBI2(+) cDCs were markedly reduced in the spleen of Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice. Thus, our results suggest that SIRPα intrinsic to CD11c(+) DCs is essential for homeostasis of cDCs in the secondary lymphoid organs and skin.

  17. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  18. Focal Adhesion Kinase Regulates Expression of Thioredoxin-interacting Protein (TXNIP) in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter ac...

  19. Growth factors and the kidney: regulation of epithelial cell movement and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, L G

    1996-12-01

    The control of epithelial cell movement and shape change is complex and requires regulation of a broad range of events including cell-cell adhesion contacts, cell-substratum interactions, and the actin cytoskeleton. Utilizing the hepatocyte growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor, c-met, the present review examines how growth factor receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways, which can then regulate the events necessary for epithelial cells to disassemble their existing structure, undergo extensive shape change and cell body movement, and reassemble into a polarized epithelium. The role of growth factor-mediated activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C-gamma, c-src family members, and ras family members is addressed in relation to integrin-mediated cell-basement membrane contacts, cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  20. Polycomb-group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell regulation and hematopoietic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radulovic, V.; de Haan, G.; Klauke, K.

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins have been shown to be involved in this process by repressing genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and differentiation. PcGs are

  1. Arabidopsis TCP20 links regulation of growth and cell division control pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    During postembryonic plant development, cell division is coupled to cell growth. There is a stringent requirement to couple these processes in shoot and root meristems. As cells pass through meristems, they transit through zones with high rates of cell growth and proliferation during organogenesis. This transition implies a need for coordinate regulation of genes underpinning these two fundamental cell functions. Here, we report a mechanism for coregulation of cell division control genes and ...

  2. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Er-Wen [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xue, Sheng-Jiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [Department of Pharmacy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Suo-Wen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: mdlijie@sina.com [Department of Anaesthesiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchaogaj@21cn.com [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  3. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  4. A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Mika; Gawel, Danuta; Alfredsson, Lars; Baranzini, Sergio; Bjorkander, Janne; Blomgran, Robert; Hellberg, Sandra; Eklund, Daniel; Ernerudh, Jan; KOCKUM, Ingrid; Konstantinell, Aelita; Lahesmaa, Riita; Lentini, Antonio; Liljenström, H. Robert I.; Mattson, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorph...

  5. Regulation and functional roles of rebound potentiation at cerebellar stellate cell - Purkinje cell synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoo eHirano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje cells receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs and send sole output from the cerebellar cortex. Long-term depression, a type of synaptic plasticity, at excitatory parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses has been studied extensively as a primary cellular mechanism of motor learning. On the other hand, at inhibitory synapses on a Purkinje cell, postsynaptic depolarization induces long-lasting potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. This synaptic plasticity is called rebound potentiation (RP, and its molecular regulatory mechanisms have been studied. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration caused by depolarization induces RP through enhancement of GABAA receptor (GABAAR responsiveness. RP induction depends on binding of GABAAR with GABAAR associated protein (GABARAP which is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII. Whether RP is induced or not is determined by the balance between phosphorylation and de-phosphorylation activities regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and by metabotropic GABA and glutamate receptors. Recent studies have revealed that the subunit composition of CaMKII has significant impact on RP induction. A Purkinje cell expresses both alpha- and beta-CaMKII, and the latter has much higher affinity for Ca2+/calmodulin than the former. It was shown that when the relative amount of alpha- to beta-CaMKII is large, RP induction is suppressed. The functional significance of RP has also been studied using transgenic mice in which a peptide inhibiting association of GABARAP and GABAAR is expressed selectively in Purkinje cells. The transgenic mice show abrogation of RP and subnormal adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex, a type of motor learning. Thus, RP is involved in a certain type of motor learning.

  6. Meeting at mitosis: cell cycle-specific regulation of c-Src by RPTPalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustelin, Tomas; Hunter, Tony

    2002-01-15

    Exquisite regulation is required for cells to properly enter and exit the phases of the cell cycle. The transmembrane receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha, an important protein that participates in the transition of the cell cycle from G2 to mitosis activates the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src in vivo. Mustelin and Hunter discuss new findings that describe the highly regulated activation of RPTPalpha and c-Src that occurs just before entry into the mitotic phase. These findings also raise several questions that pertain to redistribution of RPTPalpha in the cell, and the role of phosphorylation and dimerization in regulating RPTPalpha activity.

  7. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  8. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  9. Regulation of programmed cell death by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lademann, Ulrik Axel; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    PA) observed in tumours; however, several lines of evidence suggest that PAI-1 may contribute directly to the pathology of the disease. PAI-1 has been reported to have an effect on most of the basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion, and cell proliferation and increasing...... numbers of reports suggest that PAI-1 also can regulate programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells and normal cells. A number of reports suggest that PAI-1 can inhibit PCD through its pro-adhesive/anti-proteolytic property whereas other reports suggest that PAI-1 induces PCD through its anti......-adhesive property.Furthermore,it has been suggested that PAI-1 can either induce or inhibit PCD though activation of cell signalling pathways.This review will focus on the regulation of programmed cell death by PAI-1 in both normal cells and cancer cells....

  10. Regulator T cells: specific for antigen and/or antigen receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, B; de Durana, Y Diaz; Li, N; Sercarz, E E

    2003-05-01

    Adaptive immune responses are regulated by many different molecular and cellular effectors. Regulator T cells are coming to their rights again, and these T cells seem to have ordinary alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs) and to develop in the thymus. Autoimmune responses are tightly regulated by such regulatory T cells, a phenomenon which is beneficial to the host in autoimmune situations. However, the regulation of autoimmune responses to tumour cells is harmful to the host, as this regulation delays the defence against the outgrowth of neoplastic cells. In the present review, we discuss whether regulatory T cells are specific for antigen and/or for antigen receptors. Our interest in these phenomena comes from the findings that T cells produce many more TCR-alpha and TCR-beta chains than are necessary for surface membrane expression of TCR-alphabeta heterodimers with CD3 complexes. Excess TCR chains are degraded by the proteasomes, and TCR peptides thus become available to the assembly pathway of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Consequently, do T cells express two different identification markers on the cell membrane, the TCR-alphabeta clonotype for recognition by B-cell receptors and clonotypic TCR-alphabeta peptides for recognition by T cells?

  11. The phytoalexin resveratrol regulates the initiation of hypersensitive cell death in Vitis cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a major phytoalexin produced by plants in response to various stresses and promotes disease resistance. The resistance of North American grapevine Vitis rupestris is correlated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR, while susceptible European Vitis vinifera cv. 'Pinot Noir' does not exhibit HR, but expresses basal defence. We have shown previously that in cell lines derived from the two Vitis species, the bacterial effector Harpin induced a rapid and sensitive accumulation of stilbene synthase (StSy transcripts, followed by massive cell death in V. rupestris. In the present work, we analysed the function of the phytoalexin resveratrol, the product of StSy. We found that cv. 'Pinot Noir' accumulated low resveratrol and its glycoside trans-piceid, whereas V. rupestris produced massive trans-resveratrol and the toxic oxidative δ-viniferin, indicating that the preferred metabolitism of resveratrol plays role in Vitis resistance. Cellular responses to resveratrol included rapid alkalinisation, accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein 5 (PR5 transcripts, oxidative burst, actin bundling, and cell death. Microtubule disruption and induction of StSy were triggered by Harpin, but not by resveratrol. Whereas most responses proceeded with different amplitude for the two cell lines, the accumulation of resveratrol, and the competence for resveratrol-induced oxidative burst differed in quality. The data lead to a model, where resveratrol, in addition to its classical role as antimicrobial phytoalexin, represents an important regulator for initiation of HR-related cell death.

  12. The stem cell factor SOX2 regulates the tumorigenic potential in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütz, Katharina; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Farsakova, Katarina; Ogris, Manfred; Krebs, Stefan; Anton, Martina; Vieth, Michael; Schüller, Ulrich; Schneider, Marlon R; Blum, Helmut; Wagner, Ernst; Jung, Andreas; Gerhard, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide, which is mainly attributable to late diagnosis and poor treatment options. Infection with Helicobacter pylori, different environmental factors and genetic alterations are known to influence the risk of developing gastric tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gastric carcinogenesis are still not fully understood, making it difficult to design targeted therapeutic approaches. Aberrant expression of the specific gastric differentiation marker SOX2 has been observed in stomach cancer. However, the role of SOX2 in gastric tumors has not been well established to date. To elucidate the role of SOX2 in gastric tumorigenesis, SOX2 transcriptional activity was blocked in AZ-521 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of SOX2 reduced cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis and induced changes in cell cycle. Blocking of SOX2 also reduced the tumorigenic potential of AZ-521 cells in vivo. In addition, correlation of SOX2 expression and proliferation was observed in a subset of human gastric tumors. Finally, target genes of SOX2 were for the first time identified by RNA microarray in GC cells. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that SOX2 controls several aspects related to GC development and progression by regulating the expression of members of important signaling pathways. These findings could provide new therapeutic options for a subset of GCs exhibiting SOX2 deregulation.

  13. Regulation of granulosa cell cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) binding and effect of CART signaling inhibitor on granulosa cell estradiol production during dominant follicle selection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Joseph K; Jimenez-Krassel, Fermin; Ireland, James J; Lv, Lihua; Smith, George W

    2013-12-01

    We previously established a potential role for cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CARTPT) in dominant follicle selection in cattle. CARTPT expression is elevated in subordinate versus dominant follicles, and treatment with the mature form of the CARTPT peptide (CART) decreases follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated granulosa cell estradiol production in vitro and follicular fluid estradiol and granulosa cell CYP19A1 mRNA in vivo. However, mechanisms that regulate granulosa cell CART responsiveness are not understood. In this study, we investigated hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in vitro and temporal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in bovine follicles collected at specific stages of a follicular wave. We also determined the effect of inhibition of CART receptor signaling in vivo on estradiol production in future subordinate follicles. Granulosa cell CART binding in vitro was increased by FSH, and this induction was blocked by estrogen receptor antagonist treatment. In follicles collected in vivo at specific stages of a follicular wave, granulosa cell CART binding in the F2 (second largest), future subordinate follicle increased during dominant follicle selection. Injection into the F2 follicle (at onset of diameter deviation) of an inhibitor of the o/i subclass of G proteins (previously shown to block CART actions in vitro) resulted in increased follicular fluid estradiol concentrations in vivo. Collectively, results demonstrate hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART binding in vitro and temporal regulation of CART binding in subordinate follicles during dominant follicle selection. Results also suggest that CART signaling may help suppress estradiol-producing capacity of the F2 (subordinate) follicle during this time period.

  14. Dynamics and Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Haiyun

    2007-01-01

    @@ The actin cytoskeleton constituted of globular actin (G-actin) is a ubiquitous component of eukaryotic cells and plays crucial roles in diverse physiological processes in plant cells, such as cytoplasmic streaming, organelle and nucleus positioning, cell morphogenesis, cell division, tip growth, etc.

  15. TCR down-regulation boosts T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity and protection against poxvirus infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Regner, Matthias; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T (Tc) cells play a key role in the defense against virus infections. Tc cells recognize infected cells via the T-cell receptor (TCR) and subsequently kill the target cells by one or more cytotoxic mechanisms. Induction of the cytotoxic mechanisms is finely tuned by the activation signals...... from the TCR. To determine whether TCR down-regulation affects the cytotoxicity of Tc cells, we studied TCR down-regulation-deficient CD3¿LLAA mice. We found that Tc cells from CD3¿LLAA mice have reduced cytotoxicity due to a specific deficiency in exocytosis of lytic granules. To determine whether......-regulation critically increases Tc cell cytotoxicity and protection against poxvirus infection....

  16. A plant U-box protein, PUB4, regulates asymmetric cell division and cell proliferation in the root meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinoshita, A.; Hove, ten C.A.; Tabata, R.; Yamada, M.; Shimizu, N.; Ishida, T.; Yamaguchi, K.; Shigenobu, S.; Takebayashi, Y.; Luchies, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kurata, T.; Wada, T.; Seo, M.; Hasebe, M.; Blilou, I.; Fukuda, H.; Scheres, B.; Heidstra, R.; Kamiya, Y.; Sawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    The root meristem (RM) is a fundamental structure that is responsible for postembryonic root growth. The RM contains the quiescent center (QC), stem cells and frequently dividing meristematic cells, in which the timing and the frequency of cell division are tightly regulated. In Arabidopsis thaliana

  17. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF- production through down-regulation of IRF4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barun Poudel; Hyeon-Hui Ki; Young-Mi Lee; Dae-Ki Kim

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-, interleukin (IL)-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF- on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF- therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  18. Temporal Changes in FLT3-ITD Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Leukemogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    effects on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and other hematopoietic progenitors, we have been characterizing its function in fetal , neonatal and adult...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0120 TITLE: Temporal Changes in FLT3-ITD Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Leukemogenesis PRINCIPAL...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Temporal Changes in FLT3-ITD Regulation of Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Leukemogenesis 5b. GRANT

  19. Analysis of cell-cycle regulation following exposure of lung-derived cells to γ-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, D.; Lucchetti, C.; Cassone, M.; D'Agostino, L.; Caputi, M.; Giordano, A.

    Acute exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation results in a delay of cell-cycle progression and/or augmentation of apoptosis. Following ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, cell-cycle arrest in the G1- or G2-phase of the cell-cycle prevents or delays DNA replication or mitosis, providing time for the DNA repair machinery to exert its function. Deregulation or failing of cell-cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair mechanisms may lead normal cells bearing chromosome mutations to acquire neoplastic autonomy, which in turn can trigger the onset of cancer. Existing studies have focused on the impact of p53 status on the radiation response of lung cancer (LC) cell lines in terms of both cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis, while no comparative studies have been performed on the radiation response of lung derived normal and cancerous epithelial cells. To investigate the radiation response in normal and cancerous phenotypes, along with the role and impact of p53 status, and possible correlations with pRb/p105 or other proteins involved in carcinogenesis and cell-cycle regulation, we selected two lung-derived epithelial cell lines, one normal (NL20, p53 wild-type) and one non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), H358 (known to be p53-deficient). We compared the levels of γ-induced cell proliferation ability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptotic index, and expression levels of cell-cycle regulating and regulated proteins. The different cell sensitivity, apoptotic response and protein expression profiles resulting from our study for NL20 and H358 cells suggest that still unknown mechanisms involving p53, pRb/p105 and their target molecules might play a pivotal role in determining cell sensitivity and resistance upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  20. Deficiency of GRP94 in the hematopoietic system alters proliferation regulators in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biquan; Tseng, Chun-Chih; Adams, Gregor B; Lee, Amy S

    2013-12-01

    We have previously reported that acute inducible knockout of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP94 led to an expansion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool. Here, we investigated the effectors and mechanisms for this phenomenon. We observed an increase in AKT activation in freshly isolated GRP94-null HSC-enriched Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells, corresponding with higher production of PI(3,4,5)P3, indicative of PI3K activation. Treatment of GRP94-null LSK cells with the AKT inhibitor MK2206 compromised cell expansion, suggesting a causal relationship between elevated AKT activation and increased proliferation in GRP94-null HSCs. Microarray analysis demonstrated a 97% reduction in the expression of the hematopoietic cell cycle regulator Ms4a3 in the GRP94-null LSK cells, and real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this down-regulation in the LSK cells but not in the total bone marrow (BM). A further examination comparing freshly isolated BM LSK cells with spleen LSK cells, as well as BM LSK cells cultured in vitro, revealed specific down-regulation of Ms4a3 in freshly isolated BM GRP94-null LSK cells. On examining cell surface proteins that are known to regulate stem cell proliferation, we observed a reduced expression of cell surface connexin 32 (Cx32) plaques in GRP94-null LSK cells. However, suppression of Cx32 hemichannel activity in wild-type LSK cells through mimetic peptides did not lead to increased LSK cell proliferation in vitro. Two other important cell surface proteins that mediate HSC-niche interactions, specifically Tie2 and CXCR4, were not impaired by Grp94 deletion. Collectively, our study uncovers novel and unique roles of GRP94 in regulating HSC proliferation.

  1. Distinct and shared transcriptomes are regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoforms in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaee, Amir H; Brandal, Stephanie; Lee, Youl-Nam; Jie, Chunfa; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2007-01-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is an essential basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor for mast cell development. Mice deficient in Mitf harbor a severe mast cell deficiency, and Mitf-mutant mast cells cultured ex vivo display a number of functional defects. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic program regulated by Mitf may provide important insights into mast cell differentiation. Multiple, distinct isoforms of Mitf have been identified in a variety of cell types; we found that Mitf-a, Mitf-e, and Mitf-mc were the major isoforms expressed in mast cells. To determine the physiologic function of Mitf in mast cells, we restored expression of these isoforms in primary mast cells from Mitf(-/-) mice. We found that these isoforms restored granular morphology and integrin-mediated migration. By microarray analysis, proteases, signaling molecules, cell surface receptor, and transporters comprised the largest groups of genes up-regulated by all isoforms. Furthermore, we found that isoforms also regulated distinct genes sets, suggesting separable biological activities. This work defines the transcriptome regulated by Mitf in mast cells and supports its role as master regulator of mast cell differentiation. Expression of multiple isoforms of this transcription factor may provide for redundancy of biological activities while also allowing diversity of function.

  2. Regulation of the G1 phase of the mammalian cell cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In any multi-cellular organism, the balance between cell division and cell death maintains a constant cell num ber. Both cell division cycle and cell death are highly regulated events. Whether the cell will proceed through the cycle or not, depends upon whether the conditions re quired at the checkpoints during the cycle are filfilled. In higher eucaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, signals that arrest the cycle usually act at a G1 checkpoint. Cells that pass this restriction point are committed to complete the cycle. Regulation of the G1 phase of the cell cycle is extremely complex and involves many different families of proteins such as retinoblastoma family, cyclin dependent kinases, cyclins, and cyclin kinase inhibitors.

  3. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A regulates cell growth through the p53-p21 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA inhibits normal cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA deficiency leads to an increase in p21 by enhanced p53 acetylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA causes cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway. -- Abstract: MsrA is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Although MsrA is well-characterized as an antioxidant and has been implicated in the aging process and cellular senescence, its roles in cell proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role of MsrA in normal cell proliferation and describe the regulation mechanism of cell growth by this protein. Down-regulation of MsrA inhibited cell proliferation, but MsrA overexpression did not promote it. MsrA deficiency led to an increase in p21, a major cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, thereby causing cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. While protein levels of p53 were not altered upon MsrA deficiency, its acetylation level was significantly elevated, which subsequently activated p21 transcription. The data suggest that MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway.

  4. Regulations and ethical codes for clinical cell therapy trials in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hooshang Saberi; Nazi Derakhshanrad; Babak Arjmand; Jafar Ai; Masoud Soleymani; Amir Ali Hamidieh; Mohammad Taghi Joghataei; Zahid Hussain Khan; Seyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The local regulations for conducting experimental and clinical cell therapy studies are dependent on the national and cultural approach to the issue, and may have many common aspects as well as differences with the regulations in other countries. The study reflects the latest national aspects of cell therapy in Iran and relevant regulations. Methods:The following topics are discussed in the article including sources of cell harvest, regulations for cell disposal, stem cell manufacturing, and economic aspects of stem cell, based on current practice in Iran. Results:All cell therapy trials in Iran are required to strictly abide with the ethical codes, national and local regulations, and safety requirements, as well as considering human rights and respect. Adherence to these standards has facilitated the conduct of human cell therapy trials for research, academic advancement, and therapy. Conclusions:The cell therapy trials based on the aforementioned regulations may be assumed to be ethical and they are candidates for clinical translations based on safety and efficacy issues.

  5. The Long Noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY Regulates Cell Proliferation in Primary Human Melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Mazar, Joseph; Lee, Bongyong; Sawada, Junko; Li, Jian-Liang; Shelley, John; Govindarajan, Subramaniam; Towler, Dwight; Mattick, John S; Komatsu, Masanobu; Dinger, Marcel E; Perera, Ranjan J

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY (formerly SPRY4-IT1), which lies within the intronic region of the SPRY4 gene, is up-regulated in human melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. SPRIGHTLY regulates a number of cancer hallmarks, including proliferation, motility, and apoptosis. To better understand its oncogenic role, SPRIGHTLY was stably transfected into human melanocytes, which resulted in increased cellular proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and development of a multinucleated dendritic-like phenotype. RNA sequencing and mass spectrometric analysis of SPRIGHTLY-expressing cells revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, chromosome organization, regulation of DNA damage responses, and cell cycle. The proliferation marker Ki67, minichromosome maintenance genes 2-5, antiapoptotic gene X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 7 were all up-regulated in SPRIGHTLY-expressing melanocytes, whereas the proapoptotic tumor suppressor gene DPPIV/CD26 was down-regulated, followed by an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting an increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Because down-regulation of DPPIV is known to be associated with malignant transformation in melanocytes, SPRIGHTLY-mediated DPPIV down-regulation may play an important role in melanoma pathobiology. Together, these findings provide important insights into how SPRIGHTLY regulates cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation in primary human melanocytes.

  6. Down-regulation of mTOR leads to up-regulation of osteoprotegerin in bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.aichi-gakuin.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi-Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8650 (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi-Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8650 (Japan)

    2009-06-19

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. mTOR, which is the mammalian target of rapamycin, is a kinase and central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. By using Rapamycin, we studied whether mTOR pathway is associated with OPG protein production in the mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2. Rapamycin markedly increased the level of soluble OPG in ST2 cells. This antibiotic treatment resulted in the suppression of phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin had no effects on the proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis of the cells. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-4, which can induce OPG protein in ST2 cells, also resulted in a decrease in the density of the phospho-mTOR-band, suggesting that the suppression of the phospho-mTOR pathway is necessary for OPG production in ST2 cells. Thus, suitable suppression of mTOR phosphorylation is a necessary requirement for OPG production in bone marrow stromal cells.

  7. Microtubules and Lis-1/NudE/dynein regulate invasive cell-on-cell migration in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachen Yang

    Full Text Available The environment through which cells migrate in vivo differs considerably from the in vitro environment where cell migration is often studied. In vivo many cells migrate in crowded and complex 3-dimensional tissues and may use other cells as the substratum on which they move. This includes neurons, glia and their progenitors in the brain. Here we use a Drosophila model of invasive, collective migration in a cellular environment to investigate the roles of microtubules and microtubule regulators in this type of cell movement. Border cells are of epithelial origin and have no visible microtubule organizing center (MTOC. Interestingly, microtubule plus-end growth was biased away from the leading edge. General perturbation of the microtubule cytoskeleton and analysis by live imaging showed that microtubules in both the migrating cells and the substrate cells affect movement. Also, whole-tissue and cell autonomous deletion of the microtubule regulator Stathmin had distinct effects. A screen of 67 genes encoding microtubule interacting proteins uncovered cell autonomous requirements for Lis-1, NudE and Dynein in border cell migration. Net cluster migration was decreased, with initiation of migration and formation of dominant front cell protrusion being most dramatically affected. Organization of cells within the cluster and localization of cell-cell adhesion molecules were also abnormal. Given the established role of Lis-1 in migrating neurons, this could indicate a general role of Lis-1/NudE, Dynein and microtubules, in cell-on-cell migration. Spatial regulation of cell-cell adhesion may be a common theme, consistent with observing both cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements in both systems.

  8. Nutritional regulation of mammary cell apoptosis in lactating ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colitti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in understanding the control of the mammary cell population now offer new insights to understand the decline in milk yield of dairy animals, which has long been a biological conundrum for the mammary biologists. Evidence indicates that change in mammary cell number is the result of an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell removal and that this is a principal cause of declining production (Stefanon et al., 2001. Further, it suggests that the persistency of lactation, the rate of decline in milk yield with stage of lactation, is strongly influenced by the rate of cell death by apoptosis in the lactating gland (Wilde et al., 1997. The most significant advance in understanding the cell biology underpinning persistency of lactation has come from the demonstration that cell loss during lactation occurs by apoptosis. Several researches obtained in cell cultures in mouse and rat have indicated that gene expression and cellular activities are modulated by the reactive oxygen species..........

  9. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  10. Regulation of cancer cell migration and invasion by sphingosine-1-phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James; R; Van; Brocklyn

    2010-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingo-lipid that has been implicated in regulation of a number of cancer cell malignant behaviors, including cell proliferation, survival, chemotherapeutic resistance and angiogenesis. However, the effects of S1P on cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis, are perhaps its most complex, due to the fact that, depending upon the S1P receptors that mediate its responses and the crosstalk with other signaling pathways, S1P can either positively or negatively regulate invasion. This review summarizes the effects of S1P on cancer cell invasion and the mechanisms by which it affects this important aspect of cancer cell behavior.

  11. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....

  12. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  13. Single-cell Analysis of Lambda Immunity Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Eisen, Harvey;

    2003-01-01

    We have examined expression of the ¿cI operon in single cells via a rexgfp substitution. Although average fluorescence agreed with expectations for expression of ¿-repressor, fluorescence fluctuated greatly from cell-to-cell. Fluctuations in repressor concentration are not predicted by previous...

  14. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  15. Regulation of monocyte cell fate by blood vessels mediated by Notch signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Giagnorio, Roberto; Jussofie, Jasmin; Soehnlein, Oliver; Duchene, Johan; Briseño, Carlos G; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Krishnasamy, Kashyap; Limbourg, Anne; Kapanadze, Tamar; Ishifune, Chieko; Hinkel, Rabea; Radtke, Freddy; Strobl, Lothar J; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Napp, L Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Yasutomo, Koji; Kupatt, Christian; Murphy, Kenneth M; Adams, Ralf H; Weber, Christian; Limbourg, Florian P

    2016-08-31

    A population of monocytes, known as Ly6C(lo) monocytes, patrol blood vessels by crawling along the vascular endothelium. Here we show that endothelial cells control their origin through Notch signalling. Using combinations of conditional genetic deletion strategies and cell-fate tracking experiments we show that Notch2 regulates conversion of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into Ly6C(lo) monocytes in vivo and in vitro, thereby regulating monocyte cell fate under steady-state conditions. This process is controlled by Notch ligand delta-like 1 (Dll1) expressed by a population of endothelial cells that constitute distinct vascular niches in the bone marrow and spleen in vivo, while culture on recombinant DLL1 induces monocyte conversion in vitro. Thus, blood vessels regulate monocyte conversion, a form of committed myeloid cell fate regulation.

  16. Expression and regulation of the endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3 in Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKewitz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (ERV are an integral part of our genome. Expression of ERV is usually switched off but reactivation of ERV has been observed in varying human diseases including cancer. Recently, reactivation of ERV associated promoters in Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL cells has been described. Despite relatively good prognosis, not all patients with HL can be cured with the established therapy and this therapy is associated with severe late side effects. Therefore, new targets are required for the development of future treatment strategies. Reactivated ERV might represent such target structures. Therefore, we asked which ERV loci are expressed in HL cells. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence for a general activation of ERV transcription in HL cells. In contrast, we observed down-regulation of ERV3, an ERV with potential tumor suppressor function, in HL cells in comparison to normal blood cells. Interestingly, ERV3 was also differentially expressed in published DNA microarray data from resting versus cycling B cells. Treatment of HL cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat strongly up-regulated ERV3 expression. In addition, we observed up-regulation in HL cells after treatment with hypoxia-mimetic cobalt(II chloride. Like vorinostat, cobalt(II chloride inhibited cell growth of HL cells. Our results suggest that cell cycle inhibition of HL cells is accompanied by up-regulation of ERV3.

  17. Time-dependent regulation of yeast glycolysis upon nitrogen starvation depends on cell history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Dool, P.; Canelas, A. B.; Kiewiet, J.; Bouwman, J.; van Gulik, W. M.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Bakker, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated how the glycolytic flux was regulated in time upon nitrogen starvation of cells with different growth histories. We have compared cells grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures under respiratory conditions (low dilution rate of 0.1/h) to cells grown under r

  18. Undifferentiated Embryonic Cell Transcription Factor 1 Regulates ESC Chromatin Organization and Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Susanne M.; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Johannes, Frank; Wardenaar, Rene; Tesson, Bruno M.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; de Haan, Gerald; Eggen, Bart J. L.; O’Neill, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES ce

  19. Polarized membrane traffic and cell polarity development is dependent on dihydroceramide synthase-regulated sphinganine turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ijzendoorn, SCD; van der Wouden, JM; Liebisch, G; Schmitz, G; Hoekstra, D

    2004-01-01

    Sphingoid bases have been implicated in various cellular processes including cell growth, apoptosis and cell differentiation. Here, we show that the regulated turnover of sphingoid bases is crucial for cell polarity development, i.e., the biogenesis of apical plasma membrane domains, in well-differe

  20. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari Kermani, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells...

  1. Self-regulating control of parasitic loads in a fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fuel cell power system comprises an internal or self-regulating control of a system or device requiring a parasitic load. The internal or self-regulating control utilizes certain components and an interconnection scheme to produce a desirable, variable voltage potential (i.e., power) to a system or device requiring parasitic load in response to varying operating conditions or requirements of an external load that is connected to a primary fuel cell stack of the system. Other embodiments comprise a method of designing such a self-regulated control scheme and a method of operating such a fuel cell power system.

  2. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  3. The regulation of function, growth and survival of GLP-1-producing L-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Holst, Jens Juul; Kappe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    secretion of GLP-1 by selective targeting of the molecular mechanisms regulating secretion from the L-cell has been the focus of much recent research. An additional and promising strategy for enhancing endogenous secretion may be to increase the L-cell mass in the intestinal epithelium, but the mechanisms....... The mechanisms inducing this lipototoxicity involved increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, regulation of GLP-1-secreting cells is discussed, with a focus on the mechanisms underlying GLP-1 secretion, long-term regulation of growth, differentiation and survival under normal...

  4. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bisteau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  5. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisteau, Xavier [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); Caldez, Matias J.; Kaldis, Philipp, E-mail: kaldis@imcb.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); National University of Singapore (NUS), Department of Biochemistry, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2014-01-13

    The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  6. Protein feature based identification of cell cycle regulated proteins in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Jensen, Lars Juhl;

    2003-01-01

    DNA microarrays have been used extensively to identify cell cycle regulated genes in yeast; however, the overlap in the genes identified is surprisingly small. We show that certain protein features can be used to distinguish cell cycle regulated genes from other genes with high confidence (features...... include protein phosphorylation, glycosylation, subcellular location and instability/degradation). We demonstrate that co-expressed, periodic genes encode proteins which share combinations of features, and provide an overview of the proteome dynamics during the cycle. A large set of novel putative cell...... cycle regulated proteins were identified, many of which have no known function....

  7. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Regulate Apoptosis of Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Ding, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are promising cell resource for the cell-based therapy for periodontitis and regeneration of bio-root. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDLSCs on neutrophil, a critical constituent of innate immunity, and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of PDLSCs on the proliferation and apoptosis of resting neutrophils and IL-8 activated neutrophils was tested under cell-cell contact culture and Transwell culture, with or without anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody. We found that PDLSCs could promote the proliferation and reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils whether under cell-cell contact or Transwell culture. Anti-IL-6 antibody reduced PDLSCs-mediated inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis. IL-6 at the concentration of 10ng/ml and 20ng/ml could inhibit neutrophil apoptosis statistically. Collectively, PDLSCs could reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils via IL-6.

  8. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  9. Regulated Production of Mature Insulin in Rat Hepatoma Cells:Insulin Production is Up-regulated by Dexamethasone and Down-regulated by Insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yu QIN; Kun-Tang SHEN; Lu-Jun SONG; Xin ZHANG; Ze-Guang HAN

    2006-01-01

    We engineered an artificial β cell line that produces an up-regulation of insulin in response to dexamethasone, and a down-regulation in response to insulin. A regulatory secretion system was devised by placing proinsulin cDNA containing genetically engineered furin endoprotease cleavage sites and a regulatory promoter for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and an insulin expressing retrovirus vector (pN-PEPCK-mINS) was constructed and transfected into Hepa1-6 cells. The levels of insulin in culture medium and expression of insulin gene was estimated by radioimmunoassay and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The clone (Hepa1-6/INS21), which secreted the highest level of insulin (10.79 μIU/106 cells per day), was selected for the regulation experiment. Compared with the non-treated Hepa1-6/INS21 cells, insulin production was augmented 3.6-fold by the addition of 10-7 M of dexamethasone. Addition of exogenous insulin to the culture medium decreased insulin mRNA expression remarkably on RT-PCR results, while dexamethasone increased insulin gene expression at the transcriptional level. The data indicated that genetically engineered Hepa1-6 cells could synthesize process and secrete insulin in a physiological manner.

  10. Regulators of G-Protein signaling RGS10 and RGS17 regulate chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mourad W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical therapeutic challenge in epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the development of chemoresistance among tumor cells following exposure to first line chemotherapeutics. The molecular and genetic changes that drive the development of chemoresistance are unknown, and this lack of mechanistic insight is a major obstacle in preventing and predicting the occurrence of refractory disease. We have recently shown that Regulators of G-protein Signaling (RGS proteins negatively regulate signaling by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a growth factor elevated in malignant ascites fluid that triggers oncogenic growth and survival signaling in ovarian cancer cells. The goal of this study was to determine the role of RGS protein expression in ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Results In this study, we find that RGS2, RGS5, RGS10 and RGS17 transcripts are expressed at significantly lower levels in cells resistant to chemotherapy compared with parental, chemo-sensitive cells in gene expression datasets of multiple models of chemoresistance. Further, exposure of SKOV-3 cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy causes acute, persistent downregulation of RGS10 and RGS17 transcript expression. Direct inhibition of RGS10 or RGS17 expression using siRNA knock-down significantly reduces chemotherapy-induced cell toxicity. The effects of cisplatin, vincristine, and docetaxel are inhibited following RGS10 and RGS17 knock-down in cell viability assays and phosphatidyl serine externalization assays in SKOV-3 cells and MDR-HeyA8 cells. We further show that AKT activation is higher following RGS10 knock-down and RGS 10 and RGS17 overexpression blocked LPA mediated activation of AKT, suggesting that RGS proteins may blunt AKT survival pathways. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that chemotherapy exposure triggers loss of RGS10 and RGS17 expression in ovarian cancer cells, and that loss of expression contributes to the development of chemoresistance, possibly

  11. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Cheng, Jung-Chien [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada); Huang, He-Feng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Leung, Peter C.K., E-mail: peter.leung@ubc.ca [Department of Reproductive Endocrinology, Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Child and Family Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  12. Regulation of apoptosis pathways in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-09-10

    Cancer stem cell are considered to represent a population within the bulk tumor that share many similarities to normal stem cells as far as their capacities to self-renew, differentiate, proliferate and to reconstitute the entire tumor upon serial transplantation are concerned. Since cancer stem cells have been shown to be critical for maintaining tumor growth and have been implicated in treatment resistance and tumor progression, they constitute relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, it has been postulated that eradication of cancer stem cells will be pivotal in order to achieve long-term relapse-free survival. However, one of the hallmarks of cancer stem cells is their high resistance to undergo cell death including apoptosis in response to environmental cues or cytotoxic stimuli. Since activation of apoptosis programs in tumor cells underlies the antitumor activity of most currently used cancer therapeutics, it will be critical to develop strategies to overcome the intrinsic resistance to apoptosis of cancer stem cells. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of cancer stem cells to evade apoptosis will likely open new avenues to target this critical pool of cells within the tumor in order to develop more efficient treatment options for patients suffering from cancer.

  13. MARCH1 down-regulation in IL-10-activated B cells increases MHC class II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbas, Tristan; Steimle, Viktor; Lapointe, Réjean; Ishido, Satoshi; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    IL-10 is vastly studied for its anti-inflammatory properties on most immune cells. However, it has been reported that IL-10 activates B cells, up-regulates their MHC class II molecules and prevents apoptosis. As MARCH1 was shown to be responsible for the intracellular sequestration of MHC class II molecules in dendritic cells and monocytes in response to IL-10, we set out to clarify the role of this ubiquitin ligase in B cells. Here, we demonstrate in mice that splenic follicular B cells represent the major cell population that up-regulate MHC II molecules in the presence of IL-10. Activation of these cells through TLR4, CD40 or the IL-10 receptor caused the down-regulation of MARCH1 mRNA. Accordingly, B cells from MARCH1-deficient mice do not up-regulate I-A(b) in response to IL-10. In all, our results demonstrate that IL-10 can have opposite effects on MARCH1 regulation in different cell types.

  14. The Hippo pathway regulates homeostatic growth of stem cell niche precursors in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Didem P; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2015-02-01

    The Hippo pathway regulates organ size, stem cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in adult organs. Whether the Hippo pathway influences establishment of stem cell niche size to accommodate changes in organ size, however, has received little attention. Here, we ask whether Hippo signaling influences the number of stem cell niches that are established during development of the Drosophila larval ovary, and whether it interacts with the same or different effector signaling pathways in different cell types. We demonstrate that canonical Hippo signaling regulates autonomous proliferation of the soma, while a novel hippo-independent activity of Yorkie regulates autonomous proliferation of the germ line. Moreover, we demonstrate that Hippo signaling mediates non-autonomous proliferation signals between germ cells and somatic cells, and contributes to maintaining the correct proportion of these niche precursors. Finally, we show that the Hippo pathway interacts with different growth pathways in distinct somatic cell types, and interacts with EGFR and JAK/STAT pathways to regulate non-autonomous proliferation of germ cells. We thus provide evidence for novel roles of the Hippo pathway in establishing the precise balance of soma and germ line, the appropriate number of stem cell niches, and ultimately regulating adult female reproductive capacity.

  15. CFTR is involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion in human and rodent alpha cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Pedersen, Morten Gram; Lindqvist, Andreas; Wierup, Nils; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Eliasson, Lena

    2017-12-01

    Glucagon is the main counterregulatory hormone in the body. Still, the mechanism involved in the regulation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic alpha cells remains elusive. Dysregulated glucagon secretion is common in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) that develop CF related diabetes (CFRD). CF is caused by a mutation in the Cl(-) channel Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but whether CFTR is present in human alpha cells and regulate glucagon secretion has not been investigated in detail. Here, both human and mouse alpha cells showed CFTR protein expression, whereas CFTR was absent in somatostatin secreting delta cells. CFTR-current activity induced by cAMP was measured in single alpha cells. Glucagon secretion at different glucose levels and in the presence of forskolin was increased by CFTR-inhibition in human islets, whereas depolarization-induced glucagon secretion was unaffected. CFTR is suggested to mainly regulate the membrane potential through an intrinsic alpha cell effect, as supported by a mathematical model of alpha cell electrophysiology. In conclusion, CFTR channels are present in alpha cells and act as important negative regulators of cAMP-enhanced glucagon secretion through effects on alpha cell membrane potential. Our data support that loss-of-function mutations in CFTR contributes to dysregulated glucagon secretion in CFRD.

  16. Effects of p21 Gene Down-Regulation through RNAi on Antler Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Guo

    Full Text Available Cell cycle is an integral part of cell proliferation, and consists mainly of four phases, G1, S, G2 and M. The p21 protein, a cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, plays a key role in regulating cell cyclevia G1 phase control. Cells capable of epimorphic regeneration have G2/M accumulation as their distinctive feature, whilst the majority of somatic cells rest at G1 phase. To investigate the role played byp21 in antler regeneration, we studied the cell cycle distribution of antler stem cells (ASCs, via down-regulation of p21 in vitro using RNAi. The results showed that ASCs had high levels of p21 mRNA expression and rested at G1 phase, which was comparable to the control somatic cells. Down-regulation of p21 did not result in ASC cell cycle re-distribution toward G2/M accumulation, but DNA damage and apoptosis of the ASCs significantly increased and the process of cell aging was slowed. These findings suggest that the ASCs may have evolved to use an alternative, p21-independent cell cycle regulation mechanism. Also a unique p21-dependent inhibitory effect may control DNA damage as a protective mechanism to ensure the fast proliferating ASCs do not become dysplastic/cancerous. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the role played by p21 in the ASCs could give insight into a mammalian system where epimorphic regeneration is initiated whilst the genome stability is effectively maintained.

  17. Effects of p21 Gene Down-Regulation through RNAi on Antler Stem Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianqian; Wang, Datao; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle is an integral part of cell proliferation, and consists mainly of four phases, G1, S, G2 and M. The p21 protein, a cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, plays a key role in regulating cell cyclevia G1 phase control. Cells capable of epimorphic regeneration have G2/M accumulation as their distinctive feature, whilst the majority of somatic cells rest at G1 phase. To investigate the role played byp21 in antler regeneration, we studied the cell cycle distribution of antler stem cells (ASCs), via down-regulation of p21 in vitro using RNAi. The results showed that ASCs had high levels of p21 mRNA expression and rested at G1 phase, which was comparable to the control somatic cells. Down-regulation of p21 did not result in ASC cell cycle re-distribution toward G2/M accumulation, but DNA damage and apoptosis of the ASCs significantly increased and the process of cell aging was slowed. These findings suggest that the ASCs may have evolved to use an alternative, p21-independent cell cycle regulation mechanism. Also a unique p21-dependent inhibitory effect may control DNA damage as a protective mechanism to ensure the fast proliferating ASCs do not become dysplastic/cancerous. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the role played by p21 in the ASCs could give insight into a mammalian system where epimorphic regeneration is initiated whilst the genome stability is effectively maintained. PMID:26308075

  18. Effects of p21 Gene Down-Regulation through RNAi on Antler Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianqian; Wang, Datao; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle is an integral part of cell proliferation, and consists mainly of four phases, G1, S, G2 and M. The p21 protein, a cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, plays a key role in regulating cell cyclevia G1 phase control. Cells capable of epimorphic regeneration have G2/M accumulation as their distinctive feature, whilst the majority of somatic cells rest at G1 phase. To investigate the role played byp21 in antler regeneration, we studied the cell cycle distribution of antler stem cells (ASCs), via down-regulation of p21 in vitro using RNAi. The results showed that ASCs had high levels of p21 mRNA expression and rested at G1 phase, which was comparable to the control somatic cells. Down-regulation of p21 did not result in ASC cell cycle re-distribution toward G2/M accumulation, but DNA damage and apoptosis of the ASCs significantly increased and the process of cell aging was slowed. These findings suggest that the ASCs may have evolved to use an alternative, p21-independent cell cycle regulation mechanism. Also a unique p21-dependent inhibitory effect may control DNA damage as a protective mechanism to ensure the fast proliferating ASCs do not become dysplastic/cancerous. Understanding of the mechanism underlying the role played by p21 in the ASCs could give insight into a mammalian system where epimorphic regeneration is initiated whilst the genome stability is effectively maintained.

  19. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  20. Both cell substratum regulation and hormonal regulation of milk protein gene expression are exerted primarily at the posttranscriptional level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, R.S.; Rosen, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism by which individual peptide and steroid hormones and cell-substratum interactions regulate milk protein gene expression has been studied in the COMMA-D mammary epithelial cell line. In the presence of insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, growth of COMMA-D cells on floating collagen gels in comparison with that on a plastic substratum resulted in a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in the relative rate of ..beta..-casein gene transcription but a 37-fold increase in ..beta..-casein mRNA accumulation. In contrast, whey acidic protein gene transcription was constitutive in COMMA-D cells grown on either substratum, but its mRNA was unstable and little intact mature mRNA was detected. Culturing COMMA-D cells on collagen also promoted increased expression of other genes expressed in differentiated mammary epithelial cells, including those encoding ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-casein, transferrin, malic enzyme, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase but decreased the expression of actin and histone genes. Using COMMA-D cells, the authors defined further the role of individual hormones in influencing ..beta..-casein gene transcription. With insulin alone, a basal level of ..beta..-casein gene transcription was detected in COMMA-D cells grown on floating collagen gels. Addition of prolactin but not hydrocortisone resulted in a 2.5- to 3.0-fold increase in ..beta..-casein gene transcription, but both hormones were required to elicit the maximal 73-fold induction in mRNA accumulation. The posttranscriptional effect of hormones on casein mRNA accummulation preceded any detectable changes in the relative rate of transcription. Thus, regulation by both hormones and cell substratum of casein gene expression is exerted primarily at the post transcriptional level.

  1. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  2. CRTAM is negatively regulated by ZEB1 in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Marquez, C; Valle-Rios, R; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    2015-08-01

    T cell activation leads to the induction of genes that are required for appropriate immune responses. This includes CRTAM (Class-I MHC-restricted T cell associated molecule), a protein that plays a key role in T cell development, proliferation, and generating cell polarity during activation. We previously characterized the CRTAM promoter and described how AP-1 family members are important for inducing CRTAM expression upon antigenic activation. Here, we show that CRTAM is a molecular target for ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box-binding protein), a homeodomain/Zn finger transcription factor. Overexpression of ZEB1 repressed CRTAM promoter activity, as well as endogenous CRTAM levels in human T cells. ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression was abolished when E-box-like elements in the CRTAM promoter are mutated. In summary, ZEB1 functions as a transcriptional repressor for the CRTAM gene in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, thereby modulating adaptive immune responses.

  3. Professional regulation: a potentially valuable tool in responding to "stem cell tourism".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzeczny, Amy; Caulfield, Timothy; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Bell, Peter; Crooks, Valorie A; Kamenova, Kalina; Master, Zubin; Rachul, Christen; Snyder, Jeremy; Toews, Maeghan; Zoeller, Sonja

    2014-09-01

    The growing international market for unproven stem cell-based interventions advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis over the internet ("stem cell tourism") is a source of concern because of the risks it presents to patients as well as their supporters, domestic health care systems, and the stem cell research field. Emerging responses such as public and health provider-focused education and national regulatory efforts are encouraging, but the market continues to grow. Physicians play a number of roles in the stem cell tourism market and, in many jurisdictions, are members of a regulated profession. In this article, we consider the use of professional regulation to address physician involvement in stem cell tourism. Although it is not without its limitations, professional regulation is a potentially valuable tool that can be employed in response to problematic types of physician involvement in the stem cell tourism market.

  4. Professional Regulation: A Potentially Valuable Tool in Responding to “Stem Cell Tourism”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Zarzeczny

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing international market for unproven stem cell-based interventions advertised on a direct-to-consumer basis over the internet (“stem cell tourism” is a source of concern because of the risks it presents to patients as well as their supporters, domestic health care systems, and the stem cell research field. Emerging responses such as public and health provider-focused education and national regulatory efforts are encouraging, but the market continues to grow. Physicians play a number of roles in the stem cell tourism market and, in many jurisdictions, are members of a regulated profession. In this article, we consider the use of professional regulation to address physician involvement in stem cell tourism. Although it is not without its limitations, professional regulation is a potentially valuable tool that can be employed in response to problematic types of physician involvement in the stem cell tourism market.

  5. CD81, a cell cycle regulator, is a novel target for histone deacetylase inhibition in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensert, JoAnn M; Baranova, Oxana V; Weinstein, David E; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in cancer cell biology have focused on histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) because they target pathways critical to the development and progression of disease. In particular, HDACi's can induce expression of epigenetically silenced genes that promote growth arrest, differentiation and cell death. In glioma cells, one such repressed gene is the tetraspanin CD81, which regulates cytostasis in various cell lines and in astrocytes, the major cellular component of gliomas. Our studies show that HDACi's, trichostatin and sodium butyrate, promote growth arrest and differentiation with negligible cell death in glioma cells and induce expression of CD81 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21(CIP/WAF-1)), another regulator of cytostasis in astrocytes. Interference RNA knock-down of CD81 abrogates cytostasis promoted by HDAC inhibition indicating that HDACi-induced CD81 is responsible for growth arrest. Induction of CD81 expression through HDAC inhibition is a novel strategy to promote growth arrest in glioma cells.

  6. B-cell receptor-driven MALT1 activity regulates MYC signaling in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Beiying; Grau, Michael; Juilland, Mélanie; Klener, Pavel; Höring, Elisabeth; Molinsky, Jan; Schimmack, Gisela; Aukema, Sietse M; Hoster, Eva; Vogt, Niklas; Staiger, Annette M; Erdmann, Tabea; Xu, Wendan; Erdmann, Kristian; Dzyuba, Nicole; Madle, Hannelore; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Trneny, Marek; Dreyling, Martin; Jöhrens, Korinna; Lenz, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Siebert, Reiner; Tzankov, Alexandar; Klapper, Wolfram; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Krappmann, Daniel; Ott, German; Thome, Margot; Lenz, Georg

    2017-01-19

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a mature B-cell lymphoma characterized by poor clinical outcome. Recent studies revealed the importance of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in maintaining MCL survival. However, it remains unclear which role MALT1, an essential component of the CARD11-BCL10-MALT1 complex that links BCR signaling to the NF-κB pathway, plays in the biology of MCL. Here we show that a subset of MCLs is addicted to MALT1, as its inhibition by either RNA or pharmacologic interference induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Gene expression profiling following MALT1 inhibition demonstrated that MALT1 controls an MYC-driven gene expression network predominantly through increasing MYC protein stability. Thus, our analyses identify a previously unappreciated regulatory mechanism of MYC expression. Investigating primary mouse splenocytes, we could demonstrate that MALT1-induced MYC regulation is not restricted to MCL, but represents a common mechanism. MYC itself is pivotal for MCL survival because its downregulation and pharmacologic inhibition induced cytotoxicity in all MCL models. Collectively, these results provide a strong mechanistic rationale to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of targeting the MALT1-MYC axis in MCL patients.

  7. Gene Regulation by Retinoid Receptors in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    p53- HMEC-E6 cells at passage 11 and was tetraploid (92 chromosomes). These results are consis- 18 but not in parental or vector controls (Fig. 1 a...regions. Al- other three cells (14%,) were either tetraploid (92 chro-. though a majority of the 35 cells contained complex chro- mosomes) or...lane. Hybridization with altered the response of HMECs to rECM. p53’ HMEC- Abs to actin serves as the loading control. 476 The Jounal of Cell Biology

  8. Set7 mediated interactions regulate transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuano, Natasha K; Okabe, Jun; Ziemann, Mark; Cooper, Mark E; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-11-02

    Histone methylation by lysine methyltransferase enzymes regulate the expression of genes implicated in lineage specificity and cellular differentiation. While it is known that Set7 catalyzes mono-methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, the functional importance of this enzyme in stem cell differentiation remains poorly understood. We show Set7 expression is increased during mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation and is regulated by the pluripotency factors, Oct4 and Sox2. Transcriptional network analyses reveal smooth muscle (SM) associated genes are subject to Set7-mediated regulation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Set7 activity confirms this regulation. We observe Set7-mediated modification of serum response factor (SRF) and mono-methylation of histone H4 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) regulate gene expression. We conclude the broad substrate specificity of Set7 serves to control key transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

  9. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  10. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Li

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  11. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  12. Regulation of the cell cycle via mitochondrial gene expression and energy metabolism in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiong; Yang Jiao; Weiwei Huang; Mingxing Ma; Min Yu; Qinghua Cui; Deyong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Human cervical cancer HeLa cells have functional mitochondria.Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial metabolism plays an essential role in tumor cell proliferation.Nevertheless,how cells coordinate mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle progression remains to be clarified.To investigate the relationship between mitochondrial function and cell cycle regulation,the mitochondrial gene expression profile and cellular ATP levels were determined by cell cycle progress analysis in the present study.HeLa cells were synchronized in the G0/G1 phase by serum starvation,and re-entered cell cycle by restoring serum culture,time course experiment was performed to analyze the expression of mitochondrial transcription regulators and mitochondrial genes,mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP),cellular ATP levels,and cell cycle progression.The results showed that when arrested G0/G1 cells were stimulated in serum-containing medium,the amount of DNA and the expression levels of both mRNA and proteins in mitochondria started to increase at 2 h time point,whereas the MMP and ATP level elevated at 4 h.Furthermore,the cyclin D1 expression began to increase at 4 h after serum triggered cell cycle.ATP synthesis inhibitor-oligomycintreatment suppressed the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 expression levels and blocked cell cycle progression.Taken together,our results suggested that increased mitochondrial gene expression levels,oxidative phosphorylation activation,and cellular ATP content increase are important events for triggering cell cycle.Finally,we demonstrated that mitochondrial gene expression levels and cellular ATP content are tightly regulated and might play a central role in regulating cell proliferation.

  13. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  14. Common and unique elements of the ABA-regulated transcriptome of Arabidopsis guard cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhixin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the presence of drought and other desiccating stresses, plants synthesize and redistribute the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA. ABA promotes plant water conservation by acting on specialized cells in the leaf epidermis, guard cells, which border and regulate the apertures of stomatal pores through which transpirational water loss occurs. Following ABA exposure, solute uptake into guard cells is rapidly inhibited and solute loss is promoted, resulting in inhibition of stomatal opening and promotion of stomatal closure, with consequent plant water conservation. There is a wealth of information on the guard cell signaling mechanisms underlying these rapid ABA responses. To investigate ABA regulation of gene expression in guard cells in a systematic genome-wide manner, we analyzed data from global transcriptomes of guard cells generated with Affymetrix ATH1 microarrays, and compared these results to ABA regulation of gene expression in leaves and other tissues. Results The 1173 ABA-regulated genes of guard cells identified by our study share significant overlap with ABA-regulated genes of other tissues, and are associated with well-defined ABA-related promoter motifs such as ABREs and DREs. However, we also computationally identified a unique cis-acting motif, GTCGG, associated with ABA-induction of gene expression specifically in guard cells. In addition, approximately 300 genes showing ABA-regulation unique to this cell type were newly uncovered by our study. Within the ABA-regulated gene set of guard cells, we found that many of the genes known to encode ion transporters associated with stomatal opening are down-regulated by ABA, providing one mechanism for long-term maintenance of stomatal closure during drought. We also found examples of both negative and positive feedback in the transcriptional regulation by ABA of known ABA-signaling genes, particularly with regard to the PYR/PYL/RCAR class of soluble ABA receptors and

  15. Epigenetic regulation of adult neural stem cells: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Fitzsimons; E. van Bodegraven; M. Schouten; R. Lardenoije; K. Kompotis; G. Kenis; M. van den Hurk; M.P. Boks; C. Biojone; S. Joca; H.W. Steinbusch; K. Lunnon; D.F. Mastroeni; J. Mill; P.J. Lucassen; P.D. Coleman; D.L. Van den Hove; B.P.F. Rutten

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has demonstrated that several aspects of adult neural stem cells (NSCs), including their quiescence, proliferation, fate specification and differentiation, are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. These control the expression of specific sets of genes, often including those enco

  16. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 1 (IP6K1) Regulates Inositol Synthesis in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenxi; Ye, Cunqi; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2016-05-13

    myo-Inositol, the precursor of all inositol compounds, has pivotal roles in cell metabolism and signaling pathways. Although physiological studies indicate a strong correlation between abnormal intracellular inositol levels and neurological disorders, very little is known about the regulation of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. In this study, we report that IP6K1, an inositol hexakisphosphate kinase that catalyzes the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphate, regulates inositol synthesis in mammalian cells. Ip6k1 ablation led to profound changes in DNA methylation and expression of Isyna1 (designated mIno1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase. Interestingly, IP6K1 preferentially bound to the phospholipid phosphatidic acid, and this binding was required for IP6K1 nuclear localization and the regulation of mIno1 transcription. This is the first demonstration of IP6K1 as a novel negative regulator of inositol synthesis in mammalian cells.

  17. Effect of histone acetylate modification on the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene regulation in mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘念

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of histone acetylation change on the transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1)-associated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1(PAI-1)regulation in mesangial cells(MCs). Methods MCs were

  18. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia-lei [Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Lu, Fan-zhen [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shen, Xiao-Yong, E-mail: shengxiaoyong_sh@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Wu, Yun, E-mail: WuYun_hd@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhao, Li-ting [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  19. Regulation of cell-fate decisions in T lymphocyte differenttiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Nawijn (Martijn)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe acquisition of protective immunity is essential for survival. Protective itmllunity can be divided in innate immunity and acquired immunity. These two parts of the immune system have evolved to closely interact. Cells of the innate immune system, such as dendritic cells and macrophag

  20. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  1. Regulating CAR T Cells: A Remote Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Researchers have synthesized small organic molecules called adaptors that have a tumor-specific ligand on one end and FITC on the other. Instead of engineering a different chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) on T cells for each unique tumor antigen, these antigen-specific adaptors can be used to bridge FITC-binding CAR T and tumor cells.

  2. The PCP pathway regulates Baz planar distribution in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigouy, Benoit; Le Bivic, André

    2016-01-01

    The localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins along the Z-axis of epithelial cells is well understood while their distribution in the plane of the epithelium is poorly characterised. Here we provide a systematic description of the planar localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins in the Drosophila ommatidial epithelium. We show that the adherens junction proteins Shotgun and Armadillo, as well as the baso-lateral complexes, are bilateral, i.e. present on both sides of cell interfaces. In contrast, we report that other key adherens junction proteins, Bazooka and the myosin regulatory light chain (Spaghetti squash) are unilateral, i.e. present on one side of cell interfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate that planar cell polarity (PCP) and not the apical determinants Crumbs and Par-6 control Bazooka unilaterality in cone cells. Altogether, our work unravels an unexpected organisation and combination of apico-basal, cytoskeletal and planar polarity proteins that is different on either side of cell-cell interfaces and unique for the different contacts of the same cell. PMID:27624969

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Human Dendritic Cell Development, Survival and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) with a dual function in the immune system. On the one hand, these specialized leukocytes are equipped to alert the immune system to invading pathogens or other danger signals. On the other, DC can promote tolerogenic re

  4. Establishment of a cell-based assay to screen regulators for Klotho gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-liang XU; Hong GAO; Ke-qing OU-YANG; Shao-xi CAI; Ying-he HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To discover compounds which can regulate Klotho promoter activity. Klotho is an aging suppressor gene. A defect in Klotho gene expression in the mouse results in the phenotype similar to human aging. Recombinant Klotho protein improves age-associated diseases in animal models. It has been proposed that up-regulation of Klotho gene expression may have anti-aging effects. METHODS: Klotho promoter was cloned into a vector containing luciferase gene, and the reporter gene vector was transfected into HEK293 cells to make a stable cell line (HEK293/KL). A model for cellular aging was established by treating HEK293/KL cells with H2O2. These cells were treated with extracts from Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). The luciferase activity was detected to identify compounds that can regulate Klotho promoter. RESULTS:The expression of luciferase in these cells was under control of Klotho promoter and down-regulated after H2O2 treatment The down-regulation of luciferase expression was H2O2 concentration-dependent with an IC50 at approximately 0.006 %. This result demonstrated that the Klotho gene promoter was regulated by oxidative stress. Using the cell-based reporter gene assay, we screened natural product extracts for regulation of Klotho gene promoter. Several extracts were identified that could rescue the H2O2effects and up-regulated Klotho promoter activity. CONCLUSION: A cell -based assay for high-throughput drug screening was established to identify compounds that regulate Klotho promoter activity, and several hits were discovered from natural products. Further characterization of these active extracts could help to investigate Klotho function and aging mechanisms.

  5. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  6. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The physiological function of epithelia is transport of ions, nutrients, and fluid either in secretory or absorptive direction. All of these processes are closely related to cell volume changes, which are thus an integrated part of epithelial function. Transepithelial transport and cell volume...... expression of ion transporters and channels is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, it is timely to consider this especially for epithelia. Epithelial cells are highly proliferative and epithelial cancers, carcinomas, account for about 90% of all cancers. In this review we will focus on ion...... transporters and channels with key physiological functions in epithelia and known roles in the development of cancer in these tissues. Their roles in cell survival, cell cycle progression, and development of drug resistance in epithelial cancers will be discussed....

  7. Generation and Regulation of CD8+ Regulatory T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linrong Lu; Harvey Cantor

    2008-01-01

    Research into the suppressive activity of CD4+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) has defined a sublineage of CD4+ cells that contribute to self-tolerance and resistance to autoimmune disease. Much less attention has been given to the potential contribution of regulatory sublineages of CD8+ cells. Analysis of a small fraction of CD8+ cells that target autoreactive CD4+ cells through recognition of the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 in mouse and HLA-E in human has revitalized interest in CD8+ Treg. Here we summarize recent progress and future directions of research into the role of this CD8+ sublineage in resistance to autoimmune disease. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):401-406.

  8. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  9. Emerging Evidence for MicroRNAs as Regulators of Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Aisha [Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Sholl, Lynette M., E-mail: lmsholl@partners.org [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2011-10-24

    Cancer stem cells are defined as a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into the heterogeneous cell lineages that comprise the tumor. Many studies indicate that cancer stem cells may be responsible for treatment failure and relapse in cancer patients. The factors that regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translational repression and transcript degradation. miRNAs play a critical role in embryonic and inducible pluripotent stem cell regulation and emerging evidence supports their role in cancer stem cell evolution. To date, miRNAs have been shown to act either as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in driving critical gene expression pathways in cancer stem cells in a wide range of human malignancies, including hematopoietic and epithelial tumors and sarcomas. miRNAs involved in cancer stem cell regulation provide attractive, novel therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. This review attempts to summarize progress to date in defining the role of miRNAs in cancer stem cells.

  10. Emerging Evidence for MicroRNAs as Regulators of Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette M. Sholl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are defined as a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into the heterogeneous cell lineages that comprise the tumor. Many studies indicate that cancer stem cells may be responsible for treatment failure and relapse in cancer patients. The factors that regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate translational repression and transcript degradation. miRNAs play a critical role in embryonic and inducible pluripotent stem cell regulation and emerging evidence supports their role in cancer stem cell evolution. To date, miRNAs have been shown to act either as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in driving critical gene expression pathways in cancer stem cells in a wide range of human malignancies, including hematopoietic and epithelial tumors and sarcomas. miRNAs involved in cancer stem cell regulation provide attractive, novel therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. This review attempts to summarize progress to date in defining the role of miRNAs in cancer stem cells.

  11. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Bunn, Patrick T; Best, Shannon E; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S; Edwards, Chelsea L; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L; Smyth, Mark J; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  12. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  13. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  14. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  15. Nucleolin down-regulation is involved in ADP-induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and cell apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenmeng Wang

    Full Text Available High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 regulates epithelial cell integrity during the mesenchymal-epithelial transition in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambang, I F; Lee, Y K; Richardson, D R; Zhang, D

    2013-03-07

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) correlates with disruption of cell-cell adhesion, loss of cell polarity and development of epithelial cell malignancy. Identifying novel molecules that inhibit EMT has profound potential for developing mechanism-based therapeutics. We previously demonstrated that the endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) is a novel factor that can drive mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) and induce cell growth arrest in MDA-MB-231 cells. Here, we show that ERp29 is an important molecule in establishing epithelial cell integrity during the MET. We demonstrate that ERp29 regulates MET in a cell context-dependent manner. ERp29 overexpression induced a complete MET in mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 cells through downregulating the expression of transcriptional repressors (for example, Slug, Snai1, ZEB2 and Twist) of E-cadherin. In contrast, overexpression of ERp29 induces incomplete MET in basal-like BT549 cells in which the expression of EMT-related markers (for example, vimentin; cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and E-cadherin) and the transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin were not altered. However, ERp29 overexpression in both cell-types resulted in loss of filamentous stress fibers, formation of cortical actin and restoration of an epithelial phenotype. Mechanistic studies revealed that overexpression of ERp29 in both cell-types upregulated the expression of TJ proteins (zonula-occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and the core apical-basal polarity proteins (Par3 and Scribble) at the membrane to enhance cell-cell contact and cell polarization. Knockdown of ERp29 in the epithelial MCF-7 cells decreased the expression of these proteins, leading to the disruption of cell-cell adhesion. Taken together, ERp29 is a novel molecule that regulates MET and epithelial cell integrity in breast cancer cells.

  17. MiR-888 regulates side population properties and cancer metastasis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengjian; Chen, Liangbiao

    2014-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been reported to possess properties related to cancer metastasis. However, the mechanism by which microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate these properties remains unclear. This study aims to investigate a correlation between miRNAs and the side population (SP) of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 with CSC properties. miR-888 was found in our previous study to be up-regulated in SP cells and predicted to target E-Cadherin directly, indicating a potential role in maintaining SP properties and regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer metastasis. After the over-expression of miR-888 in MCF-7 cells and knock-down of its expression in SP cells, we found that miR-888 played a role in maintaining CSC-related properties. Next, miR-888 was found to regulate the EMT process by targeting related gene expression. Lastly, MCF-7 cells over-expressing miR-888 exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to adhere to the extracellular matrix and an increased potential for migration and invasion, whereas knock-down of miR-888 expression in SP cells reversed these trends. In conclusion, miR-888 maintains SP properties and regulates EMT and metastasis in MCF-7 cells, potentially by targeting E-Cadherin expression.

  18. Neuropilin 1 Receptor Is Up-Regulated in Dysplastic Epithelium and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Gallottini, Marina; Martins, Fabiana; Li, Erik; Mudge, Dayna R.; Nakayama, Hironao; Hida, Kyoko; Panigrahy, Dipak; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Bielenberg, Diane R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropilins are receptors for disparate ligands, including proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibitory class 3 semaphorin (SEMA3) family members. Differentiated cells in skin epithelium and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma highly express the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor. We examined the expression of NRP1 in human and mouse oral mucosa. NRP1 was significantly up-regulated in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NRP1 receptor localized to the outer suprabasal epithelial layers in normal tongue, an expression pattern similar to the normal skin epidermis. However, dysplastic tongue epithelium and OSCC up-regulated NRP1 in basal and proliferating epithelial layers, a profile unseen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. NRP1 up-regulation is observed in a mouse carcinogen-induced OSCC model and in human tongue OSCC biopsies. Human OSCC cell lines express NRP1 protein in vitro and in mouse tongue xenografts. Sites of capillary infiltration into orthotopic OSCC tumors correlate with high NRP1 expression. HSC3 xenografts, which express the highest NRP1 levels of the cell lines examined, showed massive intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. SEMA3A inhibited OSCC cell migration, suggesting that the NRP1 receptor was bioactive in OSCC. In conclusion, NRP1 is regulated in the oral epithelium and is selectively up-regulated during epithelial dysplasia. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester proangiogenic ligands within the neoplastic compartment, thereby recruiting neovessels toward tumor cells. PMID:26877262

  19. The RhoGEF TEM4 Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration by Suppressing Actomyosin Contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mitin

    Full Text Available Persistent cellular migration requires efficient protrusion of the front of the cell, the leading edge where the actin cytoskeleton and cell-substrate adhesions undergo constant rearrangement. Rho family GTPases are essential regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion dynamics. Here, we examined the role of the RhoGEF TEM4, an activator of Rho family GTPases, in regulating cellular migration of endothelial cells. We found that TEM4 promotes the persistence of cellular migration by regulating the architecture of actin stress fibers and cell-substrate adhesions in protruding membranes. Furthermore, we determined that TEM4 regulates cellular migration by signaling to RhoC as suppression of RhoC expression recapitulated the loss-of-TEM4 phenotypes, and RhoC activation was impaired in TEM4-depleted cells. Finally, we showed that TEM4 and RhoC antagonize myosin II-dependent cellular contractility and the suppression of myosin II activity rescued the persistence of cellular migration of TEM4-depleted cells. Our data implicate TEM4 as an essential regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that ensures proper membrane protrusion at the leading edge of migrating cells and efficient cellular migration via suppression of actomyosin contractility.

  20. Neuropilin 1 Receptor Is Up-Regulated in Dysplastic Epithelium and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Gallottini, Marina; Martins, Fabiana; Li, Erik; Mudge, Dayna R; Nakayama, Hironao; Hida, Kyoko; Panigrahy, Dipak; D'Amore, Patricia A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2016-04-01

    Neuropilins are receptors for disparate ligands, including proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and inhibitory class 3 semaphorin (SEMA3) family members. Differentiated cells in skin epithelium and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma highly express the neuropilin-1 (NRP1) receptor. We examined the expression of NRP1 in human and mouse oral mucosa. NRP1 was significantly up-regulated in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NRP1 receptor localized to the outer suprabasal epithelial layers in normal tongue, an expression pattern similar to the normal skin epidermis. However, dysplastic tongue epithelium and OSCC up-regulated NRP1 in basal and proliferating epithelial layers, a profile unseen in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. NRP1 up-regulation is observed in a mouse carcinogen-induced OSCC model and in human tongue OSCC biopsies. Human OSCC cell lines express NRP1 protein in vitro and in mouse tongue xenografts. Sites of capillary infiltration into orthotopic OSCC tumors correlate with high NRP1 expression. HSC3 xenografts, which express the highest NRP1 levels of the cell lines examined, showed massive intratumoral lymphangiogenesis. SEMA3A inhibited OSCC cell migration, suggesting that the NRP1 receptor was bioactive in OSCC. In conclusion, NRP1 is regulated in the oral epithelium and is selectively up-regulated during epithelial dysplasia. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester proangiogenic ligands within the neoplastic compartment, thereby recruiting neovessels toward tumor cells.

  1. FoxM1 Regulates Mammary Luminal Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janai R. Carr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of FoxM1 in breast cancer correlates with an undifferentiated tumor phenotype and a negative clinical outcome. However, a role for FoxM1 in regulating mammary differentiation was not known. Here, we identify another function of FoxM1, the ability to act as a transcriptional repressor, which plays an important role in regulating the differentiation of luminal epithelial progenitors. Regeneration of mammary glands with elevated levels of FoxM1 leads to aberrant ductal morphology and expansion of the luminal progenitor pool. Conversely, knockdown of FoxM1 results in a shift toward the differentiated state. FoxM1 mediates these effects by repressing the key regulator of luminal differentiation, GATA-3. Through association with DNMT3b, FoxM1 promotes methylation of the GATA-3 promoter in an Rb-dependent manner. This study identifies FoxM1 as a critical regulator of mammary differentiation with significant implications for the development of aggressive breast cancers.

  2. IL-35-producing B cells are critical regulators of immunity during autoimmune and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping; Roch, Toralf; Lampropoulou, Vicky; O'Connor, Richard A; Stervbo, Ulrik; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Dang, Van Duc; Jaimes, Yarúa; Daridon, Capucine; Li, Rui; Jouneau, Luc; Boudinot, Pierre; Wilantri, Siska; Sakwa, Imme; Miyazaki, Yusei; Leech, Melanie D; McPherson, Rhoanne C; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus; Hoehlig, Kai; Meinl, Edgar; Grützkau, Andreas; Grün, Joachim R; Horn, Katharina; Kühl, Anja A; Dörner, Thomas; Bar-Or, Amit; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Anderton, Stephen M; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-03-20

    B lymphocytes have critical roles as positive and negative regulators of immunity. Their inhibitory function has been associated primarily with interleukin 10 (IL-10) because B-cell-derived IL-10 can protect against autoimmune disease and increase susceptibility to pathogens. Here we identify IL-35-producing B cells as key players in the negative regulation of immunity. Mice in which only B cells did not express IL-35 lost their ability to recover from the T-cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast, these mice displayed a markedly improved resistance to infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as shown by their superior containment of the bacterial growth and their prolonged survival after primary infection, and upon secondary challenge, compared to control mice. The increased immunity found in mice lacking IL-35 production by B cells was associated with a higher activation of macrophages and inflammatory T cells, as well as an increased function of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). During Salmonella infection, IL-35- and IL-10-producing B cells corresponded to two largely distinct sets of surface-IgM(+)CD138(hi)TACI(+)CXCR4(+)CD1d(int)Tim1(int) plasma cells expressing the transcription factor Blimp1 (also known as Prdm1). During EAE, CD138(+) plasma cells were also the main source of B-cell-derived IL-35 and IL-10. Collectively, our data show the importance of IL-35-producing B cells in regulation of immunity and highlight IL-35 production by B cells as a potential therapeutic target for autoimmune and infectious diseases. This study reveals the central role of activated B cells, particularly plasma cells, and their production of cytokines in the regulation of immune responses in health and disease.

  3. Churchill regulates cell movement and mesoderm specification by repressing Nodal signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentzer Laura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell movements are essential to the determination of cell fates during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Churchill (ChCh has been proposed to regulate cell fate by regulating cell movements during gastrulation in the chick. However, the mechanism of action of ChCh is not understood. Results We demonstrate that ChCh acts to repress the response to Nodal-related signals in zebrafish. When ChCh function is abrogated the expression of mesodermal markers is enhanced while ectodermal markers are expressed at decreased levels. In cell transplant assays, we observed that ChCh-deficient cells are more motile than wild-type cells. When placed in wild-type hosts, ChCh-deficient cells often leave the epiblast, migrate to the germ ring and are later found in mesodermal structures. We demonstrate that both movement of ChCh-compromised cells to the germ ring and acquisition of mesodermal character depend on the ability of the donor cells to respond to Nodal signals. Blocking Nodal signaling in the donor cells at the levels of Oep, Alk receptors or Fast1 inhibited migration to the germ ring and mesodermal fate change in the donor cells. We also detect additional unusual movements of transplanted ChCh-deficient cells which suggests that movement and acquisition of mesodermal character can be uncoupled. Finally, we demonstrate that ChCh is required to limit the transcriptional response to Nodal. Conclusion These data establish a broad role for ChCh in regulating both cell movement and Nodal signaling during early zebrafish development. We show that chch is required to limit mesodermal gene expression, inhibit Nodal-dependant movement of presumptive ectodermal cells and repress the transcriptional response to Nodal signaling. These findings reveal a dynamic role for chch in regulating cell movement and fate during early development.

  4. Down-Regulating Cold Shock Protein Genes Impairs Cancer Cell Survival and Enhances Chemosensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

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