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Sample records for cell cycle pathways

  1. Simvastatin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer cells via PPARγ signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yongzhi; Qian, Guofeng; Dan, Han C.; Jiang, Wei; Ju, Lingao; Wu, Min; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Xinghuan

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin is currently one of the most common drugs for old patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic diseases by reducing cholesterol level and anti-lipid properties. Importantly, simvastatin has also been reported to have anti-tumor effect, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. We collected several human bladder samples and performed microarray. Data analysis suggested bladder cancer (BCa) was significantly associated with fatty acid/lipid metabolism via PPAR signalling pathway. We observed simvastatin did not trigger BCa cell apoptosis, but reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by PPARγ-activation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis indicated that simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, suggested by downregulation of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, simvastatin suppressed BCa cell metastasis by inhibiting EMT and affecting AKT/GSK3β. More importantly, we found that the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and the alterations of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1 triggered by simvastatin could be recovered by PPARγ-antagonist (GW9662), whereas the treatment of PPARα-antagonist (GW6471) shown no significant effects on the BCa cells. Taken together, our study for the first time revealed that simvastatin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase via PPARγ signalling pathway. PMID:27779188

  2. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S

    2007-01-01

    The partial cross-utilization of molecules and pathways involved in opposing processes like cell survival, proliferation and cell death, assures that mutations within one signaling cascade will also affect the other opposite process at least to some extent, thus contributing to homeostatic...... both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the induction...

  3. Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Cell Cycle Pathways in Breast Cell Lines With Different Transformation Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, Tania; Capasso, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice

    2016-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), abundant in fish, have been shown to affect development and progression of some types of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of our study was to further analyze and clarify the effects of these nutrients on the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer. Following treatments with DHA we examined cell viability, death, cell cycle, and some molecular effects in breast cell lines with different transformation, phenotypic, and biochemical characteristics (MCF-10A, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1). These investigations showed that DHA is able to affect cell viability, proliferation, and cell cycle progression in a different way in each assayed breast cell line. The activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and the expression and/or activation of molecules involved in cell cycle regulation such as p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p53, are very differently regulated by DHA treatments in each cell model. DHA selectively: (i) arrests non tumoral MCF-10A breast cells in G0 /G1 cycle phase, activating p21(Waf1/Cip1) , and p53, (ii) induces to death highly transformed breast cells SK-BR-3, reducing ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation and (iii) only slightly affects each analyzed process in MCF-7 breast cell line with transformation degree lower than SK-BR-3 cells. These findings suggest a more relevant inhibitory role of DHA within early development and late progression of breast cancer cell transformation and a variable effect in the other phases, depending on individual molecular properties and degree of malignancy of each clinical case.

  4. Pathways for Genome Integrity in G2 Phase of the Cell Cycle

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    Claus Storgaard Sørensen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genome integrity is important for normal cellular functions, organism development and the prevention of diseases, such as cancer. Cellular pathways respond immediately to DNA breaks leading to the initiation of a multi-facetted DNA damage response, which leads to DNA repair and cell cycle arrest. Cell cycle checkpoints provide the cell time to complete replication and repair the DNA damage before it can continue to the next cell cycle phase. The G2/M checkpoint plays an especially important role in ensuring the propagation of error-free copies of the genome to each daughter cell. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of DNA repair and checkpoint pathways in late S and G2 phases. This review will first describe the current understanding of normal cell cycle progression through G2 phase to mitosis. It will also discuss the DNA damage response including cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA double-strand break repair. Finally, we discuss the emerging concept that DNA repair pathways play a major role in the G2/M checkpoint pathway thereby blocking cell division as long as DNA lesions are present.

  5. Inhibition of Notch pathway prevents osteosarcoma growth by cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Setoguchi, T; Hirotsu, M; Gao, H; Sasaki, H; Matsunoshita, Y; Komiya, S

    2009-06-16

    The study shows constitutive activation of the Notch pathway in various types of malignancies. However, it remains unclear how the Notch pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. We investigated the expression of the Notch pathway molecules in osteosarcoma biopsy specimens and examined the effect of Notch pathway inhibition. Real-time PCR revealed overexpression of Notch2, Jagged1, HEY1, and HEY2. On the other hand, Notch1 and DLL1 were downregulated in biopsy specimens. Notch pathway inhibition using gamma-secretase inhibitor and CBF1 siRNA slowed the growth of osteosarcomas in vitro. In addition, gamma-secretase inhibitor-treated xenograft models exhibited significantly slower osteosarcoma growth. Cell cycle analysis revealed that gamma-secretase inhibitor promoted G1 arrest. Real-time PCR and western blot revealed that gamma-secretase inhibitor reduced the expression of accelerators of the cell cycle, including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, E2, and SKP2. On the other hand, p21(cip1) protein, a cell cycle suppressor, was upregulated by gamma-secretase inhibitor treatment. These findings suggest that inhibition of Notch pathway suppresses osteosarcoma growth by regulation of cell cycle regulator expression and that the inactivation of the Notch pathway may be a useful approach to the treatment of patients with osteosarcoma.

  6. Modulation of pentose phosphate pathway during cell cycle progression in human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vizan; G. Alcarraz-Vizan; S. Diaz-Moralli; O.N. Solovjeva; W.M. Frederiks; M. Cascante

    2009-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is dependent on multiple cellular and molecular events. Cell proliferation requires metabolic sources for the duplication of DNA and cell size. However, nucleotide reservoirs are not sufficient to support cell duplication and, therefore, bio-synthetic pathways should be upregul

  7. Cycle inhibiting factors (cifs): cyclomodulins that usurp the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells.

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    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are "cyclomodulins" that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  8. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs: Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Oswald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  9. Chapter 10 the primary cilium coordinates signaling pathways in cell cycle control and migration during development and tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Stine F; Satir, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell cycle control and migration are critical processes during development and maintenance of tissue functions. Recently, primary cilia were shown to take part in coordination of the signaling pathways that control these cellular processes in human health and disease. In this review, we present...... an overview of the function of primary cilia and the centrosome in the signaling pathways that regulate cell cycle control and migration with focus on ciliary signaling via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha). We also consider how the primary cilium and the centrosome interact...... with the extracellular matrix, coordinate Wnt signaling, and modulate cytoskeletal changes that impinge on both cell cycle control and cell migration....

  10. 6-OHDA Induces Cycle Reentry and Apoetosis of PC12 Cells through Activation of ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhentao ZHANG; Tao WANG; Xuebing CAO; Shenggang SUN; Lan WANG

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect and mechanism of cell cycle reentry induced by 6-hydrodopamine (6-OHDA) in PCI2 cells.By using neural differentiated PCI2 cells treated with 6-OHDA,the apoptosis model of dopaminergic neurons was established.Cell viability was measured by MTT.Cell apoptosis and the distribution of cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry.Western blot was used to detect the activation of extracellular regulator kinasel/2 (ERK1/2) pathway and the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (RB).Our results showed that after PC12 cells were treated wtih 6-OHDA,the viability of PC12 cells was declined in a concentration-dependent manner.Flow cytometry revealed that 6-OHDA could increase the apoptosis ratio of PC12 cells in a time-dependent manner.The percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase of cell cycle was decreased and that in S phase and G2/M phase increased.Simultaneously,ERK1/2 pathway was activated and phos- phorylated RB increased.It was concluded that 6-OHDA could induce cell cycle reentry of dopa-minergic neurons through the activation of ERK1/2 pathway and RB phosphorylation.The aberrant cell cycle reentry contributes to the apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons.

  11. Neuronal c-Abl activation leads to induction of cell cycle and interferon signaling pathways

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    Schlatterer Sarah D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of active c-Abl in adult mouse forebrain neurons in the AblPP/tTA mice resulted in severe neurodegeneration, particularly in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Neuronal loss was preceded and accompanied by substantial microgliosis and astrocytosis. In contrast, expression of constitutively active Arg (Abl-related gene in mouse forebrain neurons (ArgPP/tTA mice caused no detectable neuronal loss or gliosis, although protein expression and kinase activity were at similar levels to those in the AblPP/tTA mice. Methods To begin to elucidate the mechanism of c-Abl-induced neuronal loss and gliosis, gene expression analysis of AblPP/tTA mouse forebrain prior to development of overt pathology was performed. Selected results from gene expression studies were validated with quantitative reverse transcription PCR , immunoblotting and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeling, and by immunocytochemistry. Results Two of the top pathways upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice with c-Abl expression for 2 weeks were cell cycle and interferon signaling. However, only the expression of interferon signaling pathway genes remained elevated at 4 weeks of c-Abl induction. BrdU incorporation studies confirm that, while the cell cycle pathway is upregulated in AblPP/tTA mice at 2 weeks of c-Abl induction, the anatomical localization of the pathway is not consistent with previous pathology seen in the AblPP/tTA mice. Increased expression and activation of STAT1, a known component of interferon signaling and interferon-induced neuronal excitotoxicity, is an early consequence of c-Abl activation in AblPP/tTA mice and occurs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, the same region that goes on to develop severe neurodegenerative pathology and neuroinflammation. Interestingly, no upregulation of gene expression of interferons themselves was detected. Conclusions Our data suggest that the interferon signaling pathway may play a role in the pathologic processes

  12. A conserved DNA damage response pathway responsible for coupling the cell division cycle to the circadian and metabolic cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-12-01

    The circadian clock drives endogenous oscillations of cellular and physiological processes with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. Progression of the cell division cycle (CDC) has been found to be coupled to the circadian clock, and it has been postulated that gating of the CDC by the circadian cycle may have evolved to protect DNA from the mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light. When grown under nutrient-limiting conditions in a chemostat, prototrophic strains of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adopt a robust metabolic cycle of ultradian dimensions that temporally compartmentalizes essential cellular events. The CDC is gated by this yeast metabolic cycle (YMC), with DNA replication strictly segregated away from the oxidative phase when cells are actively respiring. Mutants impaired in such gating allow DNA replication to take place during the respiratory phase of the YMC and have been found to suffer significantly elevated rates of spontaneous mutation. Analogous to the circadian cycle, the YMC also employs the conserved DNA checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk2 to facilitate coupling with the CDC. These studies highlight an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that seems to confine cell division to particular temporal windows to prevent DNA damage. We hypothesize that DNA damage itself might constitute a "zeitgeber", or time giver, for both the circadian cycle and the metabolic cycle. We discuss these findings in the context of a unifying theme underlying the circadian and metabolic cycles, and explore the relevance of cell cycle gating to human diseases including cancer.

  13. Effects of digoxin on cell cycle, apoptosis and NF-κB pathway in Burkitt's lymphoma cells and animal model.

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    Wang, Ting; Xu, Peipei; Wang, Fan; Zhou, Di; Wang, Ruju; Meng, Li; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Min; Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Jian

    2017-01-13

    Digoxin has potential antitumor properties. This study investigated whether digoxin suppressed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells. Raji and NAMALWA cells were exposed to digoxin, followed by assay of cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle. Western blotting was used to analyze NF-κB activity. A xenograft model was established for therapeutic efficacy evaluation. Digoxin inhibited cell growth and resulted in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (G0/G1 for Raji cells; G2/M for NAMALWA cells). Digoxin inhibited DNA synthesis and induced morphological apoptotic characteristics. Besides, digoxin inhibited NF-κB and TNF-α-stimulated NF-κB activity, and suppressed NF-κB initiating genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, and c-myc), however, increased p21(cip1). Digoxin activated caspase-9/3. Furthermore, digoxin inhibited xenograft tumors growth and reduced Ki-67 and c-myc. Digoxin exerted antitumor effects on BL cells in vitro and in vivo might through regulating NF-κB and caspase pathway. These outcomes highlight the potential of digoxin as a therapeutic agent for BL.

  14. The p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway regulates G2/M cell cycle genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; Quaas, Marianne; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 functions predominantly as a transcription factor by activating and downregulating gene expression, leading to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. p53 was shown to indirectly repress transcription of the CCNB2, KIF23 and PLK4 cell cycle genes through the recently discovered p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. However, it remained unclear whether this pathway is commonly used. Here, we identify genes regulated by p53 through this pathway in a genome-wide computational approach. The bioinformatic analysis is based on genome-wide DREAM complex binding data, p53-depedent mRNA expression data and a genome-wide definition of phylogenetically conserved CHR promoter elements. We find 210 target genes that are expected to be regulated by the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. The target gene list was verified by detailed analysis of p53-dependent repression of the cell cycle genes B-MYB (MYBL2), BUB1, CCNA2, CCNB1, CHEK2, MELK, POLD1, RAD18 and RAD54L. Most of the 210 target genes are essential regulators of G2 phase and mitosis. Thus, downregulation of these genes through the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway appears to be a principal mechanism for G2/M cell cycle arrest by p53.

  15. Identification of transport pathways for citric acid cycle intermediates in the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

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    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Pajor, Ana M

    2008-04-01

    Citric acid cycle intermediates are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract through carrier-mediated mechanisms, although the transport pathways have not been clearly identified. This study examines the transport of citric acid cycle intermediates in the Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cell line, often used as a model of small intestine. Inulin was used as an extracellular volume marker instead of mannitol since the apparent volume measured with mannitol changed with time. The results show that Caco-2 cells contain at least three distinct transporters, including the Na+-dependent di- and tricarboxylate transporters, NaDC1 and NaCT, and one or more sodium-independent pathways, possibly involving organic anion transporters. Succinate transport is mediated mostly by Na+-dependent pathways, predominantly by NaDC1, but with some contribution by NaCT. RT-PCR and functional characteristics verified the expression of these transporters in Caco-2 cells. In contrast, citrate transport in Caco-2 cells occurs by a combination of Na+-independent pathways, possibly mediated by an organic anion transporter, and Na+-dependent mechanisms. The non-metabolizable dicarboxylate, methylsuccinate, is also transported by a combination of Na+-dependent and -independent pathways. In conclusion, we find that multiple pathways are involved in the transport of di- and tricarboxylates by Caco-2 cells. Since many of these pathways are not found in human intestine, this model may be best suited for studying Na+-dependent transport of succinate by NaDC1.

  16. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adel Fahmideh, Maral; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk.The study...... cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways....

  17. Eriocalyxin B induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through caspase- and p53-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lin [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yue, Grace G.L. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Clara B.S. [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Handong [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, CAS, Yunnan (China); Fung, Kwok Pui [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Ping Chung [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Han, Quanbin, E-mail: simonhan@hkbu.edu.hk [Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); School of Chinese Medicine, The Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, Po Sing, E-mail: psleung@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2012-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early and responds poorly to chemotherapy. A breakthrough in the development of new therapeutic agents is urgently needed. Eriocalyxin B (EriB), isolated from the Isodon eriocalyx plant, is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid with promise as a broad-spectrum anti-cancer agent. The anti-leukemic activity of EriB, including the underlying mechanisms involved, has been particularly well documented. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time EriB's potent cytotoxicity against four pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely PANC-1, SW1990, CAPAN-1, and CAPAN-2. The effects were comparable to that of the chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CAM), but with much lower toxicity against normal human liver WRL68 cells. EriB's cytoxicity against CAPAN-2 cells was found to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. Moreover, the p53 pathway was found to be activated by EriB in these cells. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that EriB inhibited the growth of human pancreatic tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without significant secondary adverse effects. These results suggest that EriB should be considered a candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment. -- Highlights: ► We study Eriocalyxin B (EriB)'s cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cancer cell lines. ► EriB inhibits cell proliferation via mediation of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. ► The effects are involved in caspase-dependent apoptosis and p53 pathway. ► In vivo study also shows EriB inhibits the growth of human pancreatic tumor. ► EriB can be a good candidate for chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  19. CtIP-BRCA1 modulates the choice of DNA double-strand break repair pathway throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Maximina H.; Hiom, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is tightly regulated during the cell cycle. In G1 phase, the absence of a sister chromatid means that repair of DSB occurs through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ)1. These pathways often involve loss of DNA sequences at the break site and are therefore error-prone. In late S and G2 phases, even though DNA end-joining pathways remain functional2, there is an increase in repair of DSB by homologous recomb...

  20. Cell-cycle-dependent PC-PLC regulation by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuchao; Jia, Chengyou; Zhao, Qianlei; Zhang, Chunyi; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2009-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is involved in the cell signal transduction, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The mechanism of its action, however, has not been fully understood, particularly, the role of PC-PLC in the cell cycle. In the present study, we found that cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) and PC-PLC were co-immunoprecipitated reciprocally by either antibody in rat hepatoma cells CBRH-7919 as well as in rat liver tissue. Using confocal microscopy, we found that PC-PLC and Cdc20 were co-localized in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum region (the "juxtanuclear quality control" compartment, JUNQ). The expression level and activities of PC-PLC changed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and were inversely correlated with the expression of Cdc20. Intriguingly, Cdc20 overexpression altered the subcellular localization and distribution of PC-PLC, and caused PC-PLC degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Taken together, our data indicate that PC-PLC regulation in cell cycles is controlled by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated UPP.

  1. Involvement of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in S-phase cell-cycle arrest induced by Furazolidone in human hepatoma G2 cells.

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    Sun, Yu; Tang, Shusheng; Jin, Xi; Zhang, Chaoming; Zhao, Wenxia; Xiao, Xilong

    2013-12-01

    Given the previously described essential role for the p38 mitogen-activation protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway in human hepatoma G2 cells (HepG2), we undertook the present study to investigate the role of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in cell-cycle arrest induced by Furazolidone (FZD). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of FZD on HepG2 cells by activating and inhibiting the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The cell cycle and proliferation of HepG2 cells treated with FZD were detected by flow cytometry and MTT assay in the presence or absence of p38 MAPK inhibitors (SB203580), respectively. Cyclin D1, cyclin D3 and CDK6 were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Our data showed that p38 MAPK became phosphorylated after stimulation with FZD. Activation of p38 MAPK could arise S-phase cell-cycle arrest and suppress cell proliferation. Simultaneously, inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway significantly prevented S-phase cell-cycle arrest, increased the percentage of cell viability and decreased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3 and CDK6. These results demonstrated that FZD arose S-phase cell-cycle arrest via activating the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in HepG2 cells. Cyclin D1, cyclin D3 and CDK6 are target genes functioning at the downstream of p38 MAPK in HepG2 cells induced by FZD.

  2. Systematic Characterization of Cell Cycle Phase-dependent Protein Dynamics and Pathway Activities by High-content Microscopy-assisted Cell Cycle Phenotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher Bruhn; Torsten Kroll; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is coordinated with metabolism, signaling and other complex cel-lular functions. The investigation of cellular processes in a cell cycle stage-dependent manner is often the subject of modern molecular and cell biological research. Cell cycle synchronization and immunostaining of cell cycle markers facilitate such analysis, but are limited in use due to unphysiological experimental stress, cell type dependence and often low flexibility. Here, we describe high-content microscopy-assisted cell cycle phenotyping (hiMAC), which integrates high-resolution cell cycle profiling of asynchronous cell populations with immunofluorescence microscopy. hiMAC is compatible with cell types from any species and allows for statistically pow-erful, unbiased, simultaneous analysis of protein interactions, modifications and subcellular locali-zation at all cell cycle stages within a single sample. For illustration, we provide a hiMAC analysis pipeline tailored to study DNA damage response and genomic instability using a 3–4-day protocol, which can be adjusted to any other cell cycle stage-dependent analysis.

  3. ROLE OF PI3K-AKT-mTOR AND Wnt SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN G1-S TRANSITION OF CELL CYCLE IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAKSHMIPATHI eVADLAKONDA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K–Akt pathway together with one of its downstream targets, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is a highly deregulated pathway in cancers. There is a reciprocal relation between the Akt phosphorylation and mTOR complexes. Akt phosphorylated at T308 activates mTORC1 by inhibition of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1/2, where as mTORC2 is recognized as the kinase that phosphorylates Akt at S473. Recent developments in the research on regulatory mechanisms of autophagy places mTORC1 mediated inhibition of autophagy at the central position in activation of proliferation and survival pathways in cells. Autophagy is a negative regulator of Wnt signaling pathway and the downstream effectors of Wnt signaling pathway, cyclin D1 and the c-Myc, are the key players in initiation of cell cycle and regulation of the G1-S transition in cancer cells. Production of reaction oxygen species (ROS, a common feature of a cancer cell metabolism, activates several downstream targets like the transcription factors FoxO, which play key roles in promoting the progression of cell cycle. A model is presented on the role of PI3K -Akt - mTOR and Wnt pathways in regulation of the progression of cell cycle through Go-G1-and S phases.

  4. HIV-1 Vpr protein activates the NF-κB pathway to promote G2/M cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibin Liang; Ruikang Liu; Yongquan Lin; Chen Liang; Juan Tan; Wentao Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Viral protein R(Vpr) plays an important role in the replication and pathogenesis of Human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1). Some of the various functions attributed to Vpr, including the induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest, activating the NF-κB pathway, and promoting viral reverse transcription, might be interrelated. To test this hypothesis, a panel of Vpr mutants were investigated for their ability to induce G2/M arrest and to activate the NF-κB pathway. The results showed that the Vpr mutants that failed to activate NF-κB also lost the activity to induce G2/M arrest, which suggests that inducing G2/M arrest via Vpr depends at least partially on the activation of NF-κB. This latter possibility is supported by data showing that knocking down the key factors in the NF-κB pathway – p65, Rel B, IKKα, or IKKβ– partially rescued the G2/M arrest induced by Vpr.Our results suggest that the NF-κB pathway is probably involved in Vpr-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest.

  5. Quantitative trait loci mapping reveals candidate pathways regulating cell cycle duration in Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwo Geoffrey

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated parasite biomass in the human red blood cells can lead to increased malaria morbidity. The genes and mechanisms regulating growth and development of Plasmodium falciparum through its erythrocytic cycle are not well understood. We previously showed that strains HB3 and Dd2 diverge in their proliferation rates, and here use quantitative trait loci mapping in 34 progeny from a cross between these parent clones along with integrative bioinformatics to identify genetic loci and candidate genes that control divergences in cell cycle duration. Results Genetic mapping of cell cycle duration revealed a four-locus genetic model, including a major genetic effect on chromosome 12, which accounts for 75% of the inherited phenotype variation. These QTL span 165 genes, the majority of which have no predicted function based on homology. We present a method to systematically prioritize candidate genes using the extensive sequence and transcriptional information available for the parent lines. Putative functions were assigned to the prioritized genes based on protein interaction networks and expression eQTL from our earlier study. DNA metabolism or antigenic variation functional categories were enriched among our prioritized candidate genes. Genes were then analyzed to determine if they interact with cyclins or other proteins known to be involved in the regulation of cell cycle. Conclusions We show that the divergent proliferation rate between a drug resistant and drug sensitive parent clone is under genetic regulation and is segregating as a complex trait in 34 progeny. We map a major locus along with additional secondary effects, and use the wealth of genome data to identify key candidate genes. Of particular interest are a nucleosome assembly protein (PFL0185c, a Zinc finger transcription factor (PFL0465c both on chromosome 12 and a ribosomal protein L7Ae-related on chromosome 4 (PFD0960c.

  6. Osthole Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Migration and Invasion via PTEN/Akt Pathways in Osteosarcoma

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    Lu Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Osteosarcoma is the second highest cause of cancer-related death in children and adolescents. Majority of osteosarcoma patients (90% show metastasis. Previous reports revealed that osthole showed antitumor activities via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. However, the potential effects and detailed molecular mechanisms involved remained unclear. Methods: Cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay in osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63 and SAOS-2. Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The effects of migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing assay and transwell assays. Moreover, the level of proteins expression was determined by Western blot. Results: The cell viability of MG63 and SAOS-2 were markedly inhibited by osthole in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested and the ability of migration and invasion was obviously reduced when cells were exposed to osthole. Moreover, enzymes involved in PTEN/Akt pathway were regulated such as PTEN and p-Akt proteins. Furthermore, osthole inhibited the tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion: Our study unraveled, for the first time, the ability of osthole to suppress osteosarcoma and elucidated the regulation of PTEN/Akt pathway as a signaling mechanism for the anti-tumor action of osthole. These findings indicate that osthole may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  7. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  8. Investigation of anticancer mechanism of oleuropein via cell cycle and apoptotic pathways in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçme, Mücahit; Eroğlu, Canan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Bağcı, Gülseren

    2016-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common types of pediatric tumors that can spread quickly in neuronal tissues. Oleuropein which is active compound of olive leaves, belongs to polyphenols group and has antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and anti-carcinogenic effects. The aim of the study is to determine the therapeutic effects of oleuropein on cell proliferation, invasion, colony formation, cell cycle and apoptotic mechanisms in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line under in vitro conditions. The effect of oleuropein on cell viability was determined by XTT method. 84 cell cycle control and 84 apoptosis related genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Effects of oleuropein on apoptosis were researched by TUNEL assay. Protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. Effects of oleuropein on cell invasion, colony formation and migration were detected by matrigel-chamber, colony formation assay and wound-healing assay, respectively. IC50 value of oleuropein in SH-SY5Y cells was detected as 350 μM at 48th hours. It is determined that oleuropein causes cell cycle arrest by down-regulating of CylinD1,CylinD2,CyclinD3,CDK4,CDK6 and up-regulating of p53 and CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN1A gene expressions. Oleuropein also induces apoptosis by inhibiting of Bcl-2 and activating of Bax,caspase-9 and caspase-3 gene expressions. Apoptotic cell ratio was found 36.4 ± 3.27% in oleuropein dose group. Oleuropein decreased invasion in SH-SY5Y cells and suppressed colony numbers in ratio of 53.6 ± 4.71%.Our results demonstrated that oleuropein can be a therapeutic agent in the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  9. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells.

  10. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints: analyses using tissue microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Juan F; Camacho, Francisca I; Morente, Manuel; Fraga, Máximo; Montalbán, Carlos; Alvaro, Tomás; Bellas, Carmen; Castaño, Angel; Díez, Ana; Flores, Teresa; Martin, Carmen; Martinez, Miguel A; Mazorra, Francisco; Menárguez, Javier; Mestre, Maria J; Mollejo, Manuela; Sáez, Ana I; Sánchez, Lydia; Piris, Miguel A

    2003-01-15

    Tumoral cells in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) display an increased growth fraction and diminished apoptosis, implying a profound disturbance of the cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. However, limitations of molecular techniques have prevented the analysis of the tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. Tissue microarray (TMA) is a powerful tool for analyzing a large number of molecular variables in a large series of tumors, although the feasibility of this technique has not yet been demonstrated in heterogeneous tumors. The expression of 29 genes regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in 288 HL biopsies using TMA. The sensitivity of the technique was validated by comparing the results with those obtained in standard tissue sections. The results revealed multiple alterations in different pathways and checkpoints, including G1/S and G2/M transition and apoptosis. Striking findings were the overexpression of cyclin E, CDK2, CDK6, STAT3, Hdm2, Bcl2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, and NF-kappaB proteins. A multiparametric analysis identified proteins associated with increased growth fraction (Hdm2, p53, p21, Rb, cyclins A, B1, D3, and E, CDK2, CDK6, SKP2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, STAT1, and STAT3), and proteins associated with apoptosis (NF-kappaB, STAT1, and RB). The analysis also demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cases displayed a characteristic profile, confirming the pathogenic role of EBV in HL. Survival probability depends on multiple biologic factors, including overexpression of Bcl2, p53, Bax, Bcl-X(L), MIB1, and apoptotic index. In conclusion, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor concurrent and overlapping alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. This appears to determine the viability of the tumoral cells and the clinical outcome.

  11. Induction of DNA damage and G2 cell cycle arrest by diepoxybutane through the activation of the Chk1-dependent pathway in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianyun; Wang, Zhi; Zou, Peng; Zhang, Guowei; Dong, Xiaomei; Ling, Xi; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Jinyi; Ye, Dongqing; Cao, Jia; Ao, Lin

    2015-03-16

    1,2:3,4-Diepoxybutane (DEB) is a major carcinogenic metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), which has been shown to cause DNA strand breaks in cells through its potential genotoxicity. The adverse effect of DEB on male reproductive cells in response to DNA damage has not been thoroughly studied, and the related mechanism is yet to be elucidated. Using mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cells, we demonstrated in the present study that DEB caused the proliferation inhibition and marked cell cycle arrest at the G2 phase but not apoptosis. DEB also induced DNA damage as evidenced by γ-H2AX expression, the comet assay, and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Meanwhile, DEB triggered the Chk1/Cdc25c/Cdc2 signal pathway, which could be abated in the presence of UCN-01 or Chk1 siRNA. GC-2 cells exposed to DEB experienced ROS generation and pretreatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, partly attenuated DEB-induced DNA damage, and G2 arrest. Furthermore, measurement of testicular cells showed an increased proportion of tetraploid cells in mice administrated with DEB, alongside the enhanced expression of p-Chk1. Also, the defective reproductive phenotypes, including reduced sperm motility, increased sperm malformation, and histological abnormality of testes, were observed. In conclusion, these results suggest DEB induces DNA damage and G2 cell cycle arrest by activating the Chk1-dependent pathway, while oxidative stress may be associated with eliciting toxicity in male reproductive cells.

  12. Mangiferin induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase through ATR-Chk1 pathway in HL-60 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z G; Yao, Y B; Yang, J; Tang, Y L; Huang, X

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine the effect of mangiferin on the cell cycle in HL-60 leukemia cells and expression of the cell cycle-regulatory genes Wee1, Chk1 and CDC25C and to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of the antileukemic action of mangiferin. The inhibitory effect of mangiferin on HL-60 leukemia cell proliferation was determined by the MTT assay. The impact of mangiferin on the HL-60 cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry. After the cells were treated with different concentrations of mangiferin, the expression levels of Wee1, Chk1 and CDC25C mRNA were determined by RT-PCR, and Western blot was used to evaluate the expression levels of cdc25c, cyclin B1, and Akt proteins. The inhibition of HL-60 cell growth by mangiferin was dose- and time-dependent. After treatment for 24 h, cells in G2/M phase increased, and G2/M phase arrest appeared with increased mRNA expression of Wee1, Chk1 and CDC25C. Mangiferin inhibited Chk1 and cdc25c mRNA expression at high concentrations and induced Wee1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. It significantly inhibited ATR, Chk1, Wee1, Akt, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation but increased cdc2 and cyclin B1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, mangiferin reduced cdc25c, cyclin B1, and Akt protein levels while inducing Wee1 protein expression. It also antagonized the phosphorylation effect of vanadate on ATR, and the phosphorylation effect of EGF on Wee1. These findings indicated that mangiferin inhibits cell cycle progression through the ATR-Chk1 stress response DNA damage pathway, leading to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in leukemia cells.

  13. Tristetraprolin induces cell cycle arrest in breast tumor cells through targeting AP-1/c-Jun and NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Ning, Huan; Gu, Ling; Wang, Qinghong; Lu, Wenbao; Peng, Hui; Cui, Weiguang; Ying, Baoling; Ross, Christina R; Wilson, Gerald M; Wei, Lin; Wold, William S M; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-08

    The main characteristic of cancers, including breast cancer, is the ability of cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably. However, the underlying mechanisms of cancer cell proliferation, especially those regulated by the RNA binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP), are not completely understood. In this study, we found that TTP inhibits cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo through inducing cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Our studies demonstrate that TTP inhibits c-Jun expression through the C-terminal Zn finger and therefore increases Wee1 expression, a regulatory molecule which controls cell cycle transition from the S to the G2 phase. In contrast to the well-known function of TTP in regulating mRNA stability, TTP inhibits c-Jun expression at the level of transcription by selectively blocking NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Reconstitution of NF-κB p65 completely abolishes the inhibition of c-Jun transcription by TTP. Moreover, reconstitution of c-Jun in TTP-expressing breast tumor cells diminishes Wee1 overexpression and promotes cell proliferation. Our results indicate that TTP suppresses c-Jun expression that results in Wee1 induction which causes cell cycle arrest at the S phase and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our study provides a new pathway for TTP function as a tumor suppressor which could be targeted in tumor treatment.

  14. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  15. P53-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through a caspase-3-independent, but caspase-9-dependent pathway in oridonin-treated MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao CUI; Jing-hua YU; Jin-nan WU; Shin-ichi TASHIRO; Satoshi ONODERA; Mutsuhiko MINAMI; Takashi IKEJIMA

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the caspase-3-independent mechanisms in oridonin-induced MCF-7 human breast cancer cell apoptosis in vitro. Methods: The viability of oridonin-treated MCF-7 cells was measured by MTT (thiazole blue) assay. Apoptotic cells with condensed nuclei were visualized by phase contrast microscopy. Nucleoso-mal DNA fragmentation was assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The apoptotic ratio was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Cell cycle alternation and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometric analysis. Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, heat shock protein (Hsp)90, p53, p-p53, p21, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and the inhibitor of caspase-activated Dnase (ICAD) protein expressions were detected by Western blot analysis. Results: Oridonin inhibited cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was altered through the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expressions. Pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and calpain inhibitor Ⅱ both decreased cell death ratio. Nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and the downregulation of △ψmit were detected in oridonin-induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis, which was involved in a postmitochondrial caspase-9-dependent pathway. Decreased Bcl-2 and Hsp90 expression levels and increased Bax and p21 expression levels were positively correlated with elevated levels of phosphorylated p53 phosphorylation. Moreover, PARP was partially cleaved by calpain rather than by capase-3. Conclusion: DNA damage provoked alternations in the mitochondrial and caspase-9 pathways as well as p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, but was not related to caspase-3 activity in oridonin-induced MCF-7 cells.

  16. Chaetoglobosin K induces apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest through p53-dependent pathway in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Gao, Ying; Rankin, Gary O; Rojanasakul, Yon; Cutler, Stephen J; Tu, Youying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-01-28

    Adverse side effects and acquired resistance to conventional platinum based chemotherapy have become major impediments in ovarian cancer treatment, and drive the development of more selective anticancer drugs. Chaetoglobosin K (ChK) was shown to have a more potent growth inhibitory effect than cisplatin on two cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR-3 and A2780/CP70, and was less cytotoxic to a normal ovarian cell line, IOSE-364, than to the cancer cell lines. Hoechst 33342 staining and Flow cytometry analysis indicated that ChK induced preferential apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest in both ovarian cancer cells with respect to the normal ovarian cells. ChK induced apoptosis through a p53-dependent caspase-8 activation extrinsic pathway, and caused G2 cell cycle arrest via cyclin B1 by increasing p53 expression and p38 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 and A2780/CP70 cells. DR5 and p21 might play an important role in determining the sensitivity of normal and malignant ovarian cells to ChK. Based on these results, ChK would be a potential compound for treating platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

  17. Induction of cell cycle arrest via the p21, p27–cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway in SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells by clioquinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clioquinol has been shown to have anticancer activity in several carcinoma cells. In this study, we preliminarily examined the effect of clioquinol in human SMMC-7721 hepatoma and QSG-7701 normal hepatic cells. Our results indicated that clioquinol did not significantly affect survival of QSG-7701 cells, whereas it reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in SMMC-7721 cells. Clioquinol did not trigger autophagy and apoptosis, while it induced cell cycle arrest in the S-phase in SMMC- 7721 cells. Additionally, down-regulation of cyclin D1, A2, E1, Cdk2 and up-regulation of p21, p27 were detected after the treatment with clioquinol. The results demonstrated for the first time that clioquinol suppressed cell cycle progression in the S-phase in SMMC-7721 cells via the p21, p27-cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway. This suggests that clioquinol may have a therapeutic potential as an anticancer drug for certain malignances.

  18. Phenylhydroquinone induces loss of thymocytes through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis elevation in p53-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yuichiro; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    ortho-Phenylphenol has been employed in post-harvest treatment of citrus fruits. Although o-phenylphenol has been reported to cause carcinomas in the urinary tract in rats, toxicity to the immune organs is still unknown. Herein, we report that administration of o-phenylphenol induces thymic atrophy and loss of thymocytes in female BALB/c mice. The influence seems to result from inhibition of the thymocyte development, because increased and decreased populations of the CD4⁻ CD8⁻ double-negative and CD4⁺ CD8⁺ double-positive thymocytes were observed in the o-phenylphenol-administered mice, respectively. ortho-Phenylphenol is metabolized to phenylhydroquinone by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. Phenylhydroquinone made cell cycle of thymocytes to be arrested through reduced expression of the genes associated with G₂/M phase and through phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15. Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 was upregulated by activation of not only ATR but also Erk1/2 and p38, leading to increase of apoptosis. Gene expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) was promoted in thymocytes from the o-phenylphenol-administered mice. Overall, our results suggest that o-phenylphenol induces CYP1A1 expression and is metabolized into phenylhydroquinone by the expressed CYP1A1 in thymocytes. The produced phenylhydroquinone in turn induces inhibition of thymocyte development through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the p53-dependent pathway.

  19. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

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    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    critical role in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, and reactive oxygen species generation. The proteomic study showed substantial differences in response to PLB treatment between PC-3 and DU145 cells. PLB treatment significantly modulated the expression of critical proteins that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and EMT signaling pathways in PC-3 cells but not in DU145 cells. Consistently, our Western blotting analysis validated the bioinformatic and proteomic data and confirmed the modulating effects of PLB on important proteins that regulated cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and EMT in PC-3 and DU145 cells. The data from the Western blot assay could not display significant differences between PC-3 and DU145 cells. These findings indicate that PLB elicits different proteomic responses in PC-3 and DU145 cells involving proteins and pathways that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidation/oxidation homeostasis. This is the first systematic study with integrated computational, proteomic, and functional analyses revealing the networks of signaling pathways and differential proteomic responses to PLB treatment in prostate cancer cells. Quantitative proteomic analysis using SILAC represents an efficient and highly sensitive approach to identify the target networks of anticancer drugs like PLB, and the data may be used to discriminate the molecular and clinical subtypes, and to identify new therapeutic targets and biomarkers, for prostate cancer. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of quantitative proteomic analysis in the identification of new targets and biomarkers for prostate cancer.Keywords: EMT, proteomics, SILAC

  20. Midazolam regulated caspase pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy, and cell cycle to induce apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells

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    So EC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Edmund Cheung So,1,2 Yung-Chia Chen,3 Shu-Chun Wang,4 Chia-Ching Wu,4 Man-Chi Huang,4 Meng-Shao Lai,4 Bo-Syong Pan,4,5 Fu-Chi Kang,6 Bu-Miin Huang4 1Department of Anesthesia, An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Department of Anesthesia, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Republic of China; 3Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 4Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC, USA; 6Department of Anesthesia, Chi Mei Medical Center, Chiali, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Midazolam is widely used as a sedative and anesthetic induction agent by modulating the different GABA receptors in the central nervous system. Studies have also shown that midazolam has an anticancer effect on various tumors. In a previous study, we found that midazolam could induce MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cell apoptosis by activating caspase cascade. However, the detailed mechanism related to the upstream and downstream pathways of the caspase cascade, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, autophagy, and p53 pathways plus cell cycle regulation in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, remains elusive.Methods: Flow cytometry assay and Western blot analyses were exploited.Results: Midazolam significantly decreased cell viability but increased sub-G1 phase cell numbers in MA-10 cells (P<0.05. Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining further confirmed that midazolam induced apoptosis. In addition, expressions of Fas and Fas ligand could be detected in MA-10 cells with midazolam treatments, and Bax translocation and cytochrome c release were also involved in midazolam-induced MA-10 cell apoptosis. Moreover, the staining and expression of LC3-II proteins could

  1. Zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway in a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

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    Rahman HS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1–3 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,2,4 Nazariah Allaudin Zeenathul,1,2 Hemn Hassan Othman,1,3 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Chee Wun How,2 Wan Abd Ghani Wan Nor Hafiza4,51Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimanyah, Sulaimanyah City, Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq; 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5College of Medical Laboratory Technology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: This investigation evaluated the antileukemia properties of a zerumbone (ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC prepared by hot high-pressure homogenization techniques in an acute human lymphoblastic leukemia (Jurkat cell line in vitro. The apoptogenic effect of the ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells was determined by fluorescent and electron microscopy, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity. An MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that ZER-NLC did not have adverse effects on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. ZER-NLC arrested the Jurkat cells at G2/M phase with inactivation of cyclin B1 protein. The study also showed that the antiproliferative effect of ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells is through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol, and subsequent cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP. These findings show that the ZER-NLC is a potentially useful treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in humans.Keywords: zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, mitochondrial pathway

  2. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Wei, Shao-Hua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Ao, Gui-Zhen [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Soochow University, Jiangsu (China); Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Xu, Guang-Lin, E-mail: xudunlop@126.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  3. The distinct interaction between cell cycle regulation and the widely conserved morphogenesis-related (MOR) pathway in the fungus Ustilago maydis determines morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorel, Elodie; Pérez-Martín, José

    2012-10-01

    The morphogenesis-related NDR kinase (MOR) pathway regulates morphogenesis in fungi. In spite of the high conservation of its components, impairing their functions results in highly divergent cellular responses depending on the fungal species. The reasons for such differences are unclear. Here we propose that the species-specific connections between cell cycle regulation and the MOR pathway could be partly responsible for these divergences. We based our conclusion on the characterization of the MOR pathway in the fungus Ustilago maydis. Each gene that encodes proteins of this pathway in U. maydis was deleted. All mutants exhibited a constitutive hyperpolarized growth, contrasting with the loss of polarity observed in other fungi. Using a conditional allele of the central NDR kinase Ukc1, we found that impairing MOR function resulted in a prolonged G2 phase. This cell cycle delay appears to be the consequence of an increase in Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation. Strikingly, prevention of the inhibitory Cdk1 phosphorylation abolished the hyperpolarized growth associated with MOR pathway depletion. We found that the prolonged G2 phase resulted in higher levels of expression of crk1, a conserved kinase that promotes polar growth in U. maydis. Deletion of crk1 also abolished the dramatic activation of polar growth in cells lacking the MOR pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation may act as an integrator of signaling cascades regulating fungal morphogenesis and that the distinct morphological response observed in U. maydis upon impairment of the MOR pathway could be due to a cell cycle deregulation.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded LMP1 triggers regulation of the ERK-mediated Op18/stathmin signaling pathway in association with cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuechi; Tang, Min; Tao, Yongguang; Li, Lili; Liu, Sufang; Guo, Lili; Li, Zijian; Ma, Xiaoqian; Xu, Juan; Cao, Ya

    2012-06-01

    The MAPKs are activated by a variety of cellular stimuli to participate in a series of signaling cascades and mediate diverse intracellular responses. One potential target of the MAPKs is Op18/stathmin, a molecule that acts as an integrator of diverse cell signaling pathways and regulates the dynamics of microtubules, which are involved in modulating a variety of cellular processes, including cell cycle progression and cell growth. Our study focused on the regulation of the MAPK-mediated Op18/stathmin signaling pathway, which is triggered by the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 ( LMP1) oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The results showed that the activity of MAPK, which was induced by LMP1, varied with cell cycle progression; LMP1 upregulated phosphorylation of ERK during the G(1)/S phase, but negatively regulated phosphorylation of ERK during the G(2)/M phase. We found that the regulation of Op18/stathmin signaling by LMP1 was mainly mediated through ERK. The inhibition of LMP1 expression attenuated the interaction of ERK with Op18/stathmin and promoted microtubule depolymerization. These findings indicate the existence of a new cell cycle-associated signaling pathway in which LMP1 regulates ERK-mediated Op18/stathmin signaling.

  5. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Weilin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L, a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-κB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-κB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-κB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKβ kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A

  6. KU004 induces G1 cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer SKBR-3 cells by modulating PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Tian, Chongchong; Xing, Mengtao; Wang, Xinzhi; Guo, Hongli; Sun, Lixin; Sun, Lan; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2014-06-01

    KU004 is a newly synthesized compound which has been demonstrated possessing potent anti-cancer activities through targeting the highly-expressed protein HER2 on the surface of the cells. In this study, we investigated the potential roles of KU004 in the induced-cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer SK-BR-3 cells. KU004 could not only inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3 in a concentration-dependent manner but also induce G1 phase arrest in SK-BR-3 cells. The western blot results showed KU004 decreased the expression of cyclin D, CDK-4, p-Rb708/780, and up-regulated the p21. In order to verify whether KU004 takes the anti-tumor effect thought the regulation of PI3K/Akt pathway, we used western blot to detect the expression of protein Akt, Her2, p-Akt and p-Her2. Our results shown that after KU004 treatment, the amount of p-Akt and p-Her2 decreased but the total amount of Akt and Her2 remained unchanged. In conclusion, these results provide a framework for further exploration of KU004 as a novel chemotherapeutic for human breast tumors by modulating PI3K/Akt pathway.

  7. Rapamycin reverses NPM-ALK-induced glucocorticoid resistance in lymphoid tumor cells by inhibiting mTOR signaling pathway, enhancing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, L; Gao, J; Li, Q; Zhu, Y P; Jia, C S; Fu, R Y; Chen, Y; Liao, Q K; Ma, Z

    2008-11-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is an oncogene product involved in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic malignancies. Recent studies have demonstrated that nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, originated from the fusion of NPM and ALK genes, causes cell transformation through diverse mechanisms. Here, we show a novel mechanism by which NPM-ALK transforms lymphoid tumor cells to become resistant to glucocorticoid (GC) or dexamethasone (Dex) treatment. Transformed BaF3 cells by NPM-ALK were much more resistant to Dex compared with their parental cells, and concurrently had a constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, as evidenced by hyperphosphorylation of its downstream effectors, p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin suppressed activation of p70S6K in BaF3/NPM-ALK cells and reversed GC resistance by synergistically inhibiting mTOR signaling pathway, enhancing cell cycle arrest at G(1) phase and promoting apoptotic cell death. In conclusion, our data indicate that the ALK fusion kinase, NPM-ALK, induces GC resistance by activating mTOR signaling, and addition of mTOR inhibitors to the chemotherapeutic regimen of ALK+ lymphomas may improve the prognosis.

  8. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase pathway induces apoptosis and prevents Epstein Barr virus reactivation in Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing compounds

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    Di Renzo Livia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EBV lytic cycle activators, such as phorbol esters, anti-immunoglobulin, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ, sodium butyrate, induce apoptosis in EBV-negative but not in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma (BL cells. To investigate the molecular mechanisms allowing EBV-infected cells to be protected, we examined the expression of viral and cellular antiapoptotic proteins as well as the activation of signal transduction pathways in BL-derived Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing agents. Results Our data show that, following EBV activation, the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 and the cellular anti-apoptotic proteins MCL-1 and BCL-2 were quickly up-regulated and that Raji cells remained viable even when exposed simultaneously to P(BU2, sodium butyrate and TGFβ. We report here that inhibition of p38 pathway, during EBV activation, led to a three fold increment of apoptosis and largely prevented lytic gene expression. Conclusion These findings indicate that, during the switch from the latent to the lytic phase of EBV infection, p38 MAPK phosphorylation plays a key role both for protecting the host cells from apoptosis as well as for inducing viral reactivation. Because Raji cells are defective for late antigens expression, we hypothesize that the increment of LMP1 gene expression in the early phases of EBV lytic cycle might contribute to the survival of the EBV-positive cells.

  9. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  10. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-11-01

    Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine-suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xenograft athymic nude mice. Solanine regulates the protein levels of cell cycle proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and P21 in vivo and in vitro. Also, in cultured DU145 cell, solanine significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, the administration of NAC, an active oxygen scavenger, markedly reduces solanine-induced cell death. Blockade of P38 MAPK kinase cannot suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS), but can suppress solanine-induced cell apoptosis. Also, inhibition of ROS by NAC inactivates P38 pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine may be through blocking the expression of cell cycle proteins and inducing apoptosis via ROS and activation of P38 pathway. These findings indicate an attractive therapeutic potential of solanine for suppression of prostate cancer.

  11. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  12. Prognostic implications of molecular and immunohistochemical profiles of the Rb and p53 cell cycle regulatory pathways in primary non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Louise

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Many studies have highlighted the aberrant expression and prognostic significance of individual proteins in either the Rb (particularly cyclin D1, p16INK4A, and pRb) or the p53 (p53 and p21Waf1) pathways in non-small cell lung cancer. We hypothesize that cumulative abnormalities within each and between these pathways would have significant prognostic potential regarding survival. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Our study population consisted of 106 consecutive surgically resected cases of predominantly early-stage non-small cell lung cancer from the National Cancer Institute-Mayo Clinic series, and assessment of proteins involved both immunohistochemical (cyclin D1, p21Waf1, pRb, p16INK4A, and p53) and mutational analysis (p53) in relationship to staging and survival. RESULTS: Cyclin D1 overexpression was noted in 48% of the tumors, p16INK4A negative in 53%, pRb negative in 17%, p53 immunopositive in 50%, p53 mutation frequency in 48%, and p21(Waf1) overexpression in 47%, none with prognostic significance. Cyclin D1 overexpression in pRb-negative tumors revealed a significantly worse prognosis with a mean survival of 2.3 years (P = 0.004). A simultaneous p53 mutation dramatically reduced the mean survival time to 0.9 years (P = 0.007). Cyclin D1 overexpression with either a p53 mutation or a p53 overexpression was also associated with a significantly poorer prognosis (P = 0.0033 and 0.0063, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Some cumulative abnormalities in the Rb and p53 pathways (e.g., cyclin D1 overexpression and p53 mutations) significantly cooperate to predict a poor prognosis; however, the complexity of the cell cycle protein interaction in any given tumor warrants caution in interpreting survival results when specific protein abnormalities are taken in isolation.

  13. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway impairs G2/M transition of cell cycle in late developing progenitors of the avian embryo retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Silva, Thayane Martins; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2013-01-01

    PI3K/Akt is an important pathway implicated in the proliferation and survival of cells in the CNS. Here we investigated the participation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway in cell cycle of developing retinal progenitors. Immunofluorescence assays performed in cultures of chick embryo retinal cells and intact tissues revealed the presence of phosphorylated Akt and 4E-BP1 in cells with typical mitotic profiles. Blockade of PI3K activity with the chemical inhibitor LY 294002 (LY) in retinal explants blocked the progression of proliferating cells through G2/M transition, indicated by an expressive increase in the number of cells labeled for phosphorylated histone H3 in the ventricular margin of the retina. No significant level of cell death could be detected at this region. Retinal explants treated with LY for 24 h also showed a significant decrease in the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3 and the hyperphosphorylated form of 4E-BP1. Although no change in the expression of cyclin B1 was detected, a significant decrease in CDK1 expression was noticed after 24 h of LY treatment both in retinal explants and monolayer cultures. Our results suggest that PI3K/Akt is an active pathway during proliferation of retinal progenitors and its activity appears to be required for proper CDK1 expression levels and mitosis progression of these cells.

  14. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway impairs G2/M transition of cell cycle in late developing progenitors of the avian embryo retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Moraes Ornelas

    Full Text Available PI3K/Akt is an important pathway implicated in the proliferation and survival of cells in the CNS. Here we investigated the participation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway in cell cycle of developing retinal progenitors. Immunofluorescence assays performed in cultures of chick embryo retinal cells and intact tissues revealed the presence of phosphorylated Akt and 4E-BP1 in cells with typical mitotic profiles. Blockade of PI3K activity with the chemical inhibitor LY 294002 (LY in retinal explants blocked the progression of proliferating cells through G2/M transition, indicated by an expressive increase in the number of cells labeled for phosphorylated histone H3 in the ventricular margin of the retina. No significant level of cell death could be detected at this region. Retinal explants treated with LY for 24 h also showed a significant decrease in the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3 and the hyperphosphorylated form of 4E-BP1. Although no change in the expression of cyclin B1 was detected, a significant decrease in CDK1 expression was noticed after 24 h of LY treatment both in retinal explants and monolayer cultures. Our results suggest that PI3K/Akt is an active pathway during proliferation of retinal progenitors and its activity appears to be required for proper CDK1 expression levels and mitosis progression of these cells.

  15. Noscapine Increases the Sensitivity of Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cell Line SKOV3/DDP to Cisplatin by Regulating Cell Cycle and Activating Apoptotic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Liang, Bingfeng; Yin, Jie; Li, Xiurong; Cheng, Jianxin

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapy drug against ovarian cancer. However, its strong toxic side effects and the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells seriously influence the effects of chemotherapy and quality of life in patients. Noscapine (Nos), a non-toxic benzylisoquinoline alkaloid extracted from opium, has been recently reported to have anti-cancer activity, but the mechanism of that effect has not been clearly established. In the present study, we investigated cytotoxicity of Nos in combination with cisplatin (DDP) in drug-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3/DDP in vitro and in vivo null mice xenograft model. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis, protein expression of several apoptotic factors was investigated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical method, and their mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro experiments showed that Nos significantly inhibited proliferation of SKOV3/DDP cells. DDP/Nos-combined treatment notably enhanced DDP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and increased the pro-apoptotic effect of DDP in SKOV3/DDP cells. DDP/Nos administration increased the proportion of G2/M cells, reduced both protein and mRNA expression of anti-apoptotic factors XIAP, surviving and NF-kB, and augmented protein and mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic caspase-3. In vivo experiments revealed that Nos/DDP treatment increased the apoptotic rate of xenograft tumors in null mice. Tumor volume decreased from 1.733 ± 0.155 g in mice treated with DDP alone to 1.191 ± 0.106 g in animals treated with Nos/DDP. These observations suggest that Nos increases the anti-cancer activity of DDP against the drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3/DDP by modulating the cell cycle and activating apoptotic pathways. The study provides a new chemotherapy strategy for the treatment of DDP-resistant human ovarian cancer.

  16. Vitamin C Inhibits Benzo[a]pyrene-lnduced Cell Cycle Changes Partly via Cyclin D1/ E2F Pathway in Human Embryo Lung Fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI GAO; BING-CI LIU; XIANG-LIN SHI; CHUAN-SHU HUANG; XIAO-WEI JLA; BAO-RONG YOU; MENG YE; FU-HAI SHEN; HONG-JU DU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effects of vitamin C on benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced changes of cell cycle in human embryo lung fibroblast (HELF) cells. Methods The stable transfectants, HELF transfected with antisense cyclin D1 and antisense CDK4, were established. Cells were cultured and pretreated with vitamin C before stimulation with B[a]P for 24 h. The expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1, and E2F4 were determined by Western blot. Flow cytometric analysis was employed to detect the distributions of cell cycle. Results B[a]P significantly elevated the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. Vitamin C decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-stimulated HELF cells. Dose-dependent relationships were not found between the different concentrations of vitamin C (10, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 μmol/L) and the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-treated transfectants were lower than those in B[a]P-treated HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F4 treated with vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 were decreased compared with those treated with antisense cyclin D1 alone. The effects of vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 on the expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F1/E2F4 were similar to those of antisense CDK4 alone. B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase. Both vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 suppressed the changes of cell cycle progressed by B[a]P. However, antisenseCDK4 did not attenuate the above changes. Vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 markedly suppressed B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle as compared with antisense CDK4. But the inhibitory effects of vitamin C combined with antisense cyclin D1 on B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle were similar to those of vitamin C alone or antisense cyclin D1 alone. Conclusions B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase via

  17. Plumbagin induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2015-01-01

    PLB and investigate the underlying mechanism in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that PLB exhibited potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via the modulation of cell cycle regulators including CDK1/CDC2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. PLB treatment concentration- and time-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog, beclin 1, and the ratio of LC3-II over LC3-I in both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. PLB induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK pathways and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic activities of PLB in both cell lines. Furthermore, SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and wortmannin, a potent, irreversible, and selective PI3K inhibitor, remarkably enhanced PLB-induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, indicating the roles of PI3K and p38 MAPK mediated signaling pathways in PLB-induced autophagic cell death in both cell lines. In addition, PLB significantly inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in both cell lines with an increase in the expression level of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. Moreover, PLB treatment significantly suppressed the expression of Sirt1 in both cell lines. These findings show that PLB promotes cell cycle arrest and autophagy but inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/protein kinase B/ mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 MAPK mediated pathways. Keywords: Plumbagin, pancreatic cancer, cell cycle, autophagy, EMT, Sirt1

  18. Hydroxylation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Enhanced biocompatibility through reduction of oxidative stress initiated cell membrane damage, cell cycle arrestment and extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    Modification of CNTs with hydroxyl group promotes their applications in biomedical area. However, the impact of hydroxylation on their biocompatibility is far from being completely understood. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive evaluation of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-OH) on the human normal liver L02 cell line, and compared it with that of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). Results demonstrated that compared with p-MWCNTs, MWCNTs-OH induced significantly lower oxidative stress as indicated by the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH), subsequently lead to less cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay, and showed slightly decreased arrestment of cell cycle distribution at G0/G1. More interestingly, MWCNTs-OH exhibited significantly lower tendency to activate caspase-8, a key molecule involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. All these in vitro results demonstrated that hydroxylation of MWCNTs enhanced their biocompatibility compare with p-MWCNTs.

  19. Piperine blocks interleukin-2-driven cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes by inhibiting multiple signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-04-02

    Piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in the fruits of black pepper plants, has diverse physiological effects, including the ability to inhibit immune cell-mediated inflammation. Since the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the clonal expansion and differentiation of T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of piperine on IL-2 signaling in IL-2-dependent mouse CTLL-2 T lymphocytes. Tritiated-thymidine incorporation assays and flow cytometric analysis of Oregon Green 488-stained cells showed that piperine inhibited IL-2-driven T lymphocyte proliferation; however, piperine did not cause T lymphocytes to die or decrease their expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, as determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that piperine blocked the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and STAT5 without affecting the upstream phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK3. In addition, piperine inhibited the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt, which are signaling molecules that regulate cell cycle progression. Piperine also suppressed the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1, Cdk4, Cdk6, cyclin B, cyclin D2, and Cdc25c protein phosphatase by IL-2-stimulated T lymphocytes, indicating G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Piperine-mediated inhibition of IL-2 signaling and cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes suggests that piperine should be further investigated in animal models as a possible natural source treatment for T lymphocyte-mediated transplant rejection and autoimmune disease.

  20. Xanthatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest at G2/M Checkpoint and Apoptosis via Disrupting NF-κB Pathway in A549 Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Lu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Xanthatin, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, has significant antitumor activity against a variety of cancer cells, yet little is known about its anticancer mechanism. In this study, we demonstrated that xanthatin had obvious dose-/time-dependent cytotoxicity against the human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line A549. Flow cytometry analysis showed xanthatin induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Xanthatin also had pro-apoptotic effects on A549 cells as evidenced by Hoechst 33258 staining and annexin V-FITC staining. Mechanistic data revealed that xanthatin downregulated Chk1, Chk2, and phosphorylation of CDC2, which contributed to the cell cycle arrest. Xathatin also increased total p53 protein levels, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and expression of the downstream factors procaspase-9 and procaspase-3, which triggered the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, xanthatin blocked phosphorylation of NF-κB (p65 and IκBa, which might also contribute to its pro-apoptotic effects on A549 cells. Xanthatin also inhibited TNFa induced NF-κB (p65 translocation. We conclude that xanthatin displays significant antitumor effects through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in A549 cells. These effects were associated with intrinsic apoptosis pathway and disrupted NF-κB signaling. These results suggested that xanthatin may have therapeutic potential against NSCLC.

  1. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  2. ZO-2 silencing induces renal hypertrophy through a cell cycle mechanism and the activation of YAP and the mTOR pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Calderón, Alaide; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Ponce, Arturo; López-Bayghen, Esther; Calderón-Salinas, José-Víctor; Luis Reyes, José; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Segovia, José; Angulo, Carla; Ramírez, Leticia; Gallego-Gutiérrez, Helios; Alarcón, Lourdes; Martín-Tapia, Dolores; Bautista-García, Pablo; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    Renal compensatory hypertrophy (RCH) restores normal kidney function after disease or loss of kidney tissue and is characterized by an increase in organ size due to cell enlargement and not to cell proliferation. In MDCK renal epithelial cells, silencing of the tight junction protein zona occludens 2 (ZO-2 KD) induces cell hypertrophy by two mechanisms: prolonging the time that cells spend at the G1 phase of the cell cycle due to an increase in cyclin D1 level, and augmenting the rate of protein synthesis. The latter is triggered by the nuclear accumulation and increased transcriptional activity of Yes-associated protein (YAP), the main target of the Hippo pathway, which results in decreased expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue. This in turn increased the level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, which transactivates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, leading to activation of the kinase S6K1 and increased synthesis of proteins and cell size. In agreement, in a rat model of uninephrectomy, RCH is accompanied by decreased expression of ZO-2 and nuclear expression of YAP. Our results reveal a novel role of ZO-2 as a modulator of cell size. PMID:27009203

  3. Blockage of PI3K/PKB/P27kip1 signaling pathway can antagonize 17β-estradiol-induced Ishikawa proliferation and cell cycle progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ It is well-known that risk for endometrial adenocar- cinoma increases in patients with high level of estrogen that is unopposed by progestin. And activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/PKB) pathway are responsible for hormone-dependent cell growth in endometrial carcinoma.2-4 PI3K produces phosphatidylinositol- 3-phosphates by phosphory- lating the D3 hydroxyl of phosphoinositides, leading to membrane translocation of PKB, on which PKB is phosphorylated and activated. Then the activated PKB can stimulate antiapoptotic cellular responses and block apoptotic functions of the cells, thus regulate the apoptosis and proliferation of cell, cell cycle progression, glucose usage, and angiogenesis.

  4. Methoxychlor and triclosan stimulates ovarian cancer growth by regulating cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Young; Yi, Bo-Rim; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Hwang, Kyung-A; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2014-05-01

    Methoxychlor and triclosan are emergent or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Methoxychlor [MXC; 1,1,1-trichlor-2,2-bis (4-methoxyphenyl) ethane] is an organochlorine pesticide that has been primarily used since dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was banned. In addition, triclosan (TCS) is used as a common component of soaps, deodorants, toothpastes, and other hygiene products at concentrations up to 0.3%. In the present study, the potential impact of MXC and TCS on ovarian cancer cell growth and underlying mechanism(s) was examined following their treatments in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells. As results, MXC and TCS induced BG-1 cell growth via regulating cyclin D1, p21 and Bax genes related with cell cycle and apoptosis. A methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay confirmed that the proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells was stimulated by MXC (10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9)M) or TCS (10(-6), 10(-7), 10(-8), and 10(-9)M). Treatment of BG-1 cells with MXC or TCS resulted in the upregulation of cyclin D1 and downregulation of p21 and Bax transcriptions. In addition, the protein level of cyclin D1 was increased by MXC or TCS while p21 and Bax protein levels appeared to be reduced in these cells. Furthermore, MXC- or TCS-induced alterations of these genes were reversed in the presence of ICI 182,780 (10(-7)M), suggesting that the changes in these gene expressions may be regulated by an ER-dependent signaling pathway. In conclusion, the results of our investigation indicate that two potential EDCs, MXC and TCS, may stimulate ovarian cancer growth by regulating cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes via an ER-dependent pathway.

  5. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  6. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration.

  7. Platinum-(Ⅳ)-derivative satraplatin induced G2/M cell cycle perturbation via p53-p21waf1/cip1-independent pathway in human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murugan KALIMUTHO; Antonella MINUTOLO; Sandro GRELLI; Giorgio FEDERICI; Sergio BERNARDINI

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Platinum-(Ⅳ)-derivative satraplatin represents a new generation of orally available anti-cancer drugs that are under development for the treatment of several cancers.Understanding the mechanisms of cell cycle modulation and apoptosis is necessary to define the mode of action of satraplatin.In this study,we investigate the ability of satraplatin to induce cell cycle perturbation,clonogenicity loss and apoptosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells.Methods:CRC cells were treated with satraplatin,and the effects of satraplatin on apoptosis and the cell cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry.Western blot analysis was used to investigate the effects of satraplatin on cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins.RTqPCR was used to evaluate p53-related mRNA modulation.Results:Satraplatin induced an accumulation of CRC cells predominantly in the G2/M phase.Increased p53 protein expression was observed in the p53 wild-type HCT116 and LoVo cells together with p21waf1/cip1 protein up-regulation.However,p21waf1/cip1 protein accumulation was not observed in the p53 mutant HCT15,HT29,and WiDr cells,even when p53 protein expression was compromised,suggesting that the cell cycle perturbation is p53-p21waf1/cip1 independent.Following a candidate approach,we found an elevated expression of 14-3-3o protein levels in CRC cells,which was independent of the status of p53,further supporting the role of satraplatin in the perturbation of the G2/M cell cycle phase.Moreover,satraplatin treatment induced apoptosis along with Bcl-2 protein down-regulation and abrogated the clonogenic formation of CRC cells in vitro.Conclusion:Collectively,our data suggest that satraplatin induces apoptosis in CRC cells,which is preceded by cell cycle arrest at G2/M due to the effect of 14-3-3σ and in a p53-p21waf1/cip1-independent manner.Taken together,these findings highlight the potential use of satraplatin for CRC treatment.

  8. Targeting the cell cycle and the PI3K pathway: a possible universal strategy to reactivate innate tumor suppressor programmes in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Pfeuty, Thérèse; Legraverend, Michel; Ludwig, Odile; Grierson, David S

    2010-04-01

    Corruption of the Rb and p53 pathways occurs in virtually all human cancers. This could be because it lends oncogene-bearing cells a surfeit of Cdk activity and growth, enabling them to elaborate strategies to evade tumor-suppressive mechanisms and divide inappropriately. Targeting both Cdk activities and the PI3K pathway might be therefore a potentially universal means to palliate their deficiency in cancer cells. We showed that the killing efficacy of roscovitine and 16 other purines and potentiation of roscovitine-induced apoptosis by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, decreased with increasing corruption of the Rb and p53 pathways. Further, we showed that purines differing by a single substitution, which exerted little lethal effect on distant cell types in rich medium, could display widely-differing cytotoxicity profiles toward the same cell types in poor medium. Thus, closely-related compounds targeting similar Cdks may interact with different targets that could compete for their interaction with therapeutically-relevant Cdk targets. In the perspective of clinical development in association with the PI3K pathway inhibitors, it might thus be advisable to select tumor cell type-specific Cdk inhibitors on the basis of their toxicity in cell-culture-based assays performed at a limiting serum concentration sufficient to suppress their interaction with undesirable crossreacting targets whose range and concentration would depend on the cell genotype.

  9. Achyranthes aspera Root Extracts Induce Human Colon Cancer Cell (COLO-205 Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway and S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagun Arora

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achyranthes aspera (AA has been used traditionally for the cure of various disorders. However, the action of root extracts of AA as anticancer agent and its cellular mechanism remain unclear. The aim was to screen the antitumor effect of ethanolic (EAA and aqueous (AAA root extracts on the growth of colon cancer COLO-205 cells by testing their cytotoxicity, followed by their effect on clonogenicity, migration, and induction of apoptosis. Mechanisms leading to apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were also investigated by expression studies of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, p16, p21, and p27 genes, followed by flow cytometric analysis for cell cycle distribution. Cytotoxicity screening of AA extracts indicated greater cytotoxic activity of AAA extract against COLO-205 cells. A series of events marked by apoptosis revealed loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation in AAA treated cells to a greater extent. The mRNA expression levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, p16, p21, and p27 were markedly increased in the AAA treated cells, along with decreased Bcl-2 expression. The cell cycle arrest at S phase was detected by flow cytometric analysis after treatment with AAA. Overall the study signifies the aqueous extracts as a promising therapeutic candidate against cancer.

  10. Avian reovirus nonstructural protein p17-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and host cellular protein translation shutoff involve activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulu, Julius L C; Huang, Wei R; Wang, L; Shih, Wen L; Liu, Hung J

    2010-08-01

    The effects of avian reovirus (ARV) p17 protein on cell cycle progression and host cellular protein translation were studied. ARV infection and ARV p17 transfection resulted in the accumulation of infected and/or transfected cells in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The accumulation of cells in the G(2)/M phase was accompanied by upregulation and phosphorylation of the G(2)/M-phase proteins ATM, p53, p21(cip1/waf1), Cdc2, cyclin B1, Chk1, Chk2, and Cdc25C, suggesting that p17 induces a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest through activation of the ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1)/Cdc2/cyclin B1 and ATM/Chk1/Chk2/Cdc25C pathways. The G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted in increased virus replication. In the present study, we also provide evidence demonstrating that p17 protein is responsible for ARV-induced host cellular protein translation shutoff. Increased phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and initiation factor eIF2alpha and reduced phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4B, and eIF4G, as well as 4E-BP1 and Mnk-1 in p17-transfected cells, demonstrated that ARV p17 suppresses translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors to induce host cellular protein translation shutoff. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin resulted in a decrease in the levels of phosphorylated 4E-BP1, eIF4B, and eIF4G and an increase in the levels eEF2 but did not affect ARV replication, suggesting that ARV replication was not hindered by inhibition of cap-dependent translation. Taken together, our data indicate that ARV p17-induced G(2)/M arrest and host cellular translation shutoff resulted in increased ARV replication.

  11. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 2 causes G2/M cell cycle arrest in ras-driven tumor cells through a Src-dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Salotti

    Full Text Available We recently reported that paracrine Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2 triggers senescence in Ras-driven Y1 and 3T3(Ras mouse malignant cell lines. Here, we show that although FGF2 activates mitogenic pathways in these Ras-dependent malignant cells, it can block cell proliferation and cause a G2/M arrest. These cytostatic effects of FGF2 are inhibited by PD173074, an FGF receptor (FGFR inhibitor. To determine which downstream pathways are induced by FGF2, we tested specific inhibitors targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K and protein kinase C (PKC. We show that these classical mitogenic pathways do not mediate the cytostatic activity of FGF2. On the other hand, the inhibition of Src family kinases rescued Ras-dependent malignant cells from the G2/M irreversible arrest induced by FGF2. Taken together, these data indicate a growth factor-sensitive point in G2/M that likely involves FGFR/Ras/Src pathway activation in a MEK, PI3K and PKC independent manner.

  13. 蛇毒合成的信号通路%Research progress of cell signaling pathway during the onset of the snake venom production cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宏丽; 何艳琴; 杨章民

    2012-01-01

    蛇毒液产生的周期分为活跃期和静息期两个阶段,在这两个阶段中毒腺分泌细胞的形态学和生物化学方面存在着许多不同.蛇咬物排毒或人工取毒后其释放的去甲肾上腺素(noradrenaline,NE)是分泌细胞中合成毒液所必需的,其中分泌细胞的α肾上腺素能受体(α-adrenoceptor,α-AR)和β肾上腺素能受体(β-adrenoceptor,β-AR)参与了这个过程.本文简要介绍在毒液产生周期的不同阶段中分泌细胞的变化,重点阐述了刺激α-AR和β-AR在引起毒液合成开始时所介导的相关细胞信号通路.最后简单探讨了其它刺激蛇毒腺引起毒液产生的可能因素及其调控机制.%The snake venom production cycle includes an active stage and a quiescent stage. There are many morphological and biochemical differences of the secretory epithelium in these two stages. The release of noradrenaline after a bite or manual extraction plays an essential role in triggering the venom production cycle, and both α- and β-adrenoceptors of the venom secreting cells are involved in the venom production cycle. In this paper, the morphological and biochemical changes of the secreting cells in the different stages of venom production cycle were described, and the cell signaling pathway involved in the adrenoceptor-mediated activation of the venom production cycle were introduced. Finally, other factors which probably stimulate the snake venom gland to produce venom and the related mechanisms were discussed briefly.

  14. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  15. Involvement of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in the regulation of cell cycle progression by PTHrP in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Natalia; Martín, María Julia; de Boland, Ana Russo; Gentili, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is distributed in most fetal and adult tissues, and its expression correlates with the severity of colon carcinoma. Recently we obtained evidence that in Caco-2 cells, a cell line from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, exogenous PTHrP increases the number of live cells, via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3-kinase and induces the expression of cyclin D1, a cell cycle regulatory protein. In this study, we further investigated the role of PTHrP in the regulation of the cell cycle progression in these intestinal cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that PTHrP treatment diminishes the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and increases the number in both S and G2/M phases. The hormone increases the expression of CDK6 and diminishes the amount of negative cell cycle regulators p27Kip1, p15INK4B, and p53. However, PTHrP does not modify the expression of cyclin D3, CDK4, and p16INK4A. In addition, inhibitors of ERK1/2 (PD98059), p38 MAPK (SB203580), and PI3Kinase (LY294002) reversed PTHrP response in Caco-2 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PTHrP positively modulates cell cycle progression and changes the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation via ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways in Caco-2 cells.

  16. The antiproliferative effect of indomethacin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules in glioma cells is mediated by cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and the inhibition of survival pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardi A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Andressa Bernardi,1,* Rudimar L Frozza,2,* Juliana B Hoppe,2 Christianne Salbego,2 Adriana R Pohlmann,1,3 Ana Maria O Battastini,2 Sílvia S Guterres11Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; 2Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; 3Departamento de Química Orgânica, Instituto de Química, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil *Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Despite recent advances in radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgical techniques, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM prognosis remains dismal. There is an urgent need for new therapeutic strategies. Nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers for anticancer drug delivery have attracted intense interest in recent years because they can provide sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery. Here, we investigate the mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative effect of indomethacin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (IndOH-LNC in glioma cells. IndOH-LNC were able to reduce cell viability by inducing apoptotic cell death in C6 and U138-MG glioma cell lines. Interestingly, IndOH-LNC did not affect the viability of primary astrocytes, suggesting that this formulation selectively targeted transformed cells. Mechanistically, IndOH-LNC induced inhibition of cell growth and cell-cycle arrest to be correlated with the inactivation of AKT and ß-catenin and the activation of GSK-3ß. IndOH-LNC also induced G0/G1 and/or G2/M phase arrest, which was accompanied by a decrease in the levels of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, pRb, and pcdc2 and an increase in the levels of Wee1 CDK inhibitor p21WAF1. Additionally, IndOH-LNC promoted GBM cell differentiation, observed as upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP protein and downregulation of nestin and CD133. Taken together, the crosstalk among antiproliferative effects

  17. YvcK of Bacillus subtilis is required for a normal cell shape and for growth on Krebs cycle intermediates and substrates of the pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görke, Boris; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2005-11-01

    The HPr-like protein Crh has so far been detected only in the bacillus group of bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, its gene is part of an operon composed of six ORFs, three of which exhibit strong similarity to genes of unknown function present in many bacteria. The promoter of the operon was determined and found to be constitutively active. A deletion analysis revealed that gene yvcK, encoded by this operon, is essential for growth on Krebs cycle intermediates and on carbon sources metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, cells lacking YvcK acquired media-dependent filamentous or L-shape-like aberrant morphologies. The presence of high magnesium concentrations restored normal growth and cell morphology. Furthermore, suppressor mutants cured from these growth defects appeared spontaneously with a high frequency. Such suppressing mutations were identified in a transposon mutagenesis screen and found to reside in seven different loci. Two of them mapped in genes of central carbon metabolism, including zwf, which encodes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and cggR, the product of which regulates the synthesis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. All these results suggest that YvcK has an important role in carbon metabolism, probably in gluconeogenesis required for the synthesis of cell wall precursor molecules. Interestingly, the Escherichia coli homologous protein, YbhK, can substitute for YvcK in B. subtilis, suggesting that the two proteins have been functionally conserved in these different bacteria.

  18. ETME, a novel β-elemene derivative, synergizes with arsenic trioxide in inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in hepatocarcinoma cells via a p53-dependent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Yu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic trioxide (ATO has been identified as an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL but is much less effective against solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In the search for ways to enhance its therapeutic efficacy against solid tumors, we have examined its use in combination with a novel derivative of β-elemene, N-(β-elemene-13-yltryptophan methyl ester (ETME. Here we report the effects of the combination on cell viability, apoptosis, the cell cycle and mitochondria membrane potential (MMP in HCC SMMC-7721 cells. We found that the two compounds acted synergistically to enhance antiproliferative activity and apoptosis. The combination also decreased the MMP, down-regulated Bcl-2 and pro-proteins of the caspase family, and up-regulated Bax and BID, all of which were reversed by the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α. In addition, the combination induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and reduced tumor volume and weight in an xenograft model of nude mice. Overall, the results suggest that ETME in combination with ATO may be useful in the treatment of HCC patients particularly those unresponsive to ATO alone.

  19. 4-O-Methylhonokiol Protects HaCaT Cells from TGF-β1-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest by Regulating of Canonical and Non-Canonical Pathways of TGF-β Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Jung-Il; Hyun, Jin-Won; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Koh, Young-Sang; Kim, Young-Heui; Kim, Ki-Ho; Ko, Ji-Hee; Yoo, Eun-Sook; Kang, Hee-Kyoung

    2017-02-13

    4-O-methylhonokiol, a neolignan compound from Magnolia Officinalis, has been reported to have various biological activities including hair growth promoting effect. However, although transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signal pathway has an essential role in the regression induction of hair growth, the effect of 4-O-methylhonokiol on the TGF-β signal pathwayhas not yet been elucidated. We thus examined the effect of 4-O-methylhonokiol on TGF-β-induced canonical and noncanonical pathways in HaCaT human keratinocytes. When HaCaT cells were pretreated with 4-O-methylhonokiol, TGF-β1-induced G1/G0 phase arrest and TGF- β1-induced p21 expression were decreased. Moreover, 4-O-methylhonokiol inhibited nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, Smad4 and Sp1 in TGF-β1-induced canonical pathway. We observed that ERK phosphorylation by TGF-β1 was significantly attenuated by treatment with 4-O-methylhonokiol. 4-O-methylhonokiol inhibited TGF-β1-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced the increase of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) mRNA level in TGF-β1-induced noncanonical pathway. These results indicate that 4-O-methylhonokiol could inhibit TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest through inhibition of canonical and noncanonical pathways in human keratinocyte HaCaT cell and that 4-O-methylhonokiol might have protective action on TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest.

  20. Parvovirus B19 NS1 protein induces cell cycle arrest at G2-phase by activating the ATR-CDC25C-CDK1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Zhou, Zhe; Xiong, Min; Zou, Wei; Deng, Xuefeng; Ganaie, Safder S.; Peng, Jianxin; Liu, Kaiyu; Wang, Shengqi; Ye, Shui Qing

    2017-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of primary human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) arrests infected cells at both late S-phase and G2-phase, which contain 4N DNA. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response (DDR) that facilitates viral DNA replication but is dispensable for cell cycle arrest at G2-phase; however, a putative C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD2) within NS1 is responsible for G2-phase arrest. To fully understand the mechanism underlying B19V NS1-induced G2-phase arrest, we established two doxycycline-inducible B19V-permissive UT7/Epo-S1 cell lines that express NS1 or NS1mTAD2, and examined the function of the TAD2 domain during G2-phase arrest. The results confirm that the NS1 TAD2 domain plays a pivotal role in NS1-induced G2-phase arrest. Mechanistically, NS1 transactivated cellular gene expression through the TAD2 domain, which was itself responsible for ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related) activation. Activated ATR phosphorylated CDC25C at serine 216, which in turn inactivated the cyclin B/CDK1 complex without affecting nuclear import of the complex. Importantly, we found that the ATR-CHK1-CDC25C-CDK1 pathway was activated during B19V infection of EPCs, and that ATR activation played an important role in B19V infection-induced G2-phase arrest. PMID:28264028

  1. Loss of DDB1 Leads to Transcriptional p53 Pathway Activation in Proliferating Cells, Cell Cycle Deregulation, and Apoptosis in Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilian; Holzschuh, Jochen; Driever, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-binding protein 1 (DDB1) is a large subunit of the heterodimeric DDB complex that recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the nucleotide excision repair process. DDB1 is also a component of the CUL4 E3 ligase complex involved in a broad spectrum of cellular processes by targeted ubiquitination of key regulators. Functions of DDB1 in development have been addressed in several model organisms, however, are not fully understood so far. Here we report an ENU induced mutant ddb1 allele (ddb1m863) identified in zebrafish (Danio rerio), and analyze its effects on development. Zebrafish ddb1 is expressed broadly, both maternally and zygotically, with enhanced expression in proliferation zones. The (ddb1m863 mutant allele affects the splice acceptor site of exon 20, causing a splicing defect that results in truncation of the 1140 amino acid protein after residue 800, lacking part of the β-propeller domain BPC and the C-terminal helical domain CTD. ddb1m863 zygotic mutant embryos have a pleiotropic phenotype, including smaller and abnormally shaped brain, head skeleton, eyes, jaw, and branchial arches, as well as reduced dopaminergic neuron groups. However, early forming tissues develop normally in zygotic ddb1m863 mutant embryos, which may be due to maternal rescue. In ddb1m863 mutant embryos, pcna-expressing proliferating cell populations were reduced, concurrent with increased apoptosis. We also observed a concomitant strong up-regulation of transcripts of the tumor suppressor p53 (tp53) and the cell cycle inhibitor cdkn1a (p21a/bCIP1/WAF1) in proliferating tissues. In addition, transcription of cyclin genes ccna2 and ccnd1 was deregulated in ddb1m863 mutants. Reduction of p53 activity by anti-sense morpholinos alleviated the apoptotic phenotype in ddb1m863 mutants. These results imply that Ddb1 may be involved in maintaining proper cell cycle progression and viability of dividing cells during development through transcriptional mechanisms regulating genes

  2. Cell cycle features of primate embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Marcy, Guillaume; Marchand, Mélanie; Négre, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don; Savatier, Pierre; Dehay, Colette

    2006-03-01

    Using flow cytometry measurements combined with quantitative analysis of cell cycle kinetics, we show that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by an extremely rapid transit through the G1 phase, which accounts for 15% of the total cell cycle duration. Monkey ESCs exhibit a non-phasic expression of cyclin E, which is detected during all phases of the cell cycle, and do not growth-arrest in G1 after gamma-irradiation, reflecting the absence of a G1 checkpoint. Serum deprivation or pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) did not result in any alteration in the cell cycle distribution, indicating that ESC growth does not rely on mitogenic signals transduced by the Ras/Raf/MEK pathway. Taken together, these data indicate that rhesus monkey ESCs, like their murine counterparts, exhibit unusual cell cycle features in which cell cycle control mechanisms operating during the G1 phase are reduced or absent.

  3. Life cycle analysis of transportation fuel pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-24

    The purpose of this work is to improve the understanding of the concept of life cycle analysis (LCA) of transportation fuels and some of its pertinent issues among non-technical people, senior managers, and policy makers. This work should provide some guidance to nations considering LCA-based policies and to people who are affected by existing policies or those being developed. While the concept of employing LCA to evaluate fuel options is simple and straightforward, the act of putting the concept into practice is complex and fraught with issues. Policy makers need to understand the limitations inherent in carrying out LCA work for transportation fuel systems. For many systems, even those that have been employed for a 100 years, there is a lack of sound data on the performance of those systems. Comparisons between systems should ideally be made using the same tool, so that differences caused by system boundaries, allocation processes, and temporal issues can be minimized (although probably not eliminated). Comparing the results for fuel pathway 1 from tool A to those of fuel system 2 from tool B introduces significant uncertainty into the results. There is also the question of the scale of system changes. LCA will give more reliable estimates when it is used to examine small changes in transportation fuel pathways than when used to estimate large scale changes that replace current pathways with completely new pathways. Some LCA tools have been developed recently primarily for regulatory purposes. These tools may deviate from ISO principles in order to facilitate simplicity and ease of use. In a regulatory environment, simplicity and ease of use are worthy objectives and in most cases there is nothing inherently wrong with this approach, particularly for assessing relative performance. However, the results of these tools should not be confused with, or compared to, the results that are obtained from a more complex and rigorous ISO compliant LCA. It should be

  4. Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff. activates intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in breast cancer cells associated with S phase cell cycle arrest via involvement of p21/p27 in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Hamed; Arya, Aditya; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Razavi, Mahboubeh; Hajrezaei, Maryam; Karim Khan, Ataul; Mohd Ali, Hapipah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Noordin, Mohamad Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer potential of Kelussia odoratissima. Several in vitro and in vivo biological assays were applied to explore the direct effect of an extract and bioactive compound of this plant against breast cancer cells and its possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods K. odoratissima methanol extract (KME) was prepared, and MTT assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. To identify the cytotoxic compound, a bioassay-guided investigation was performed on methanol extract. 8-Hydroxy-ar-turmerone was isolated as a bioactive compound. In vivo study was performed in the breast cancer rat model. LA7 cell line was used to induce the breast tumor. Histopathological and expression changes of PCNA, Bcl-2, Bax, p27 and p21 and caspase-3 were examined. The induction of apoptosis was tested using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) assay. To confirm the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, caspase-7 and caspase-9 assays were utilized. In addition, cell cycle arrest was evaluated. Results Our results demonstrated that K. odoratissima has an obvious effect on the arrest of proliferation of cancer cells. It induced apoptosis, transduced the cell death signals, decreased the threshold of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), upregulated Bax and downregulated Bcl-2. Conclusion This study demonstrated that K. odoratissima exhibits antitumor activity against breast cancer cells via cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:28203057

  5. c-Src regulates cell cycle proteins expression through protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 pathways in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Du, Liying; Feng, Renqing

    2013-07-01

    We have demonstrated that c-Src suppression inhibited the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of c-Src on the cell cycle progression using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2). Western blot analysis demonstrated the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 after c-Src suppression by PP2. Incubation of cells in the presence of PP2 significantly blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (AKT), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Specific pharmacological inhibitors of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathways were used to demonstrate the relationship between the signal cascade and cell cycle proteins expression. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT activity, whereas the p27 Kip1 expression was increased. In addition, knockdown of c-Src by siRNAs reduced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT, and GSK3β. After c-Src depletion by siRNAs, we observed significant down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and up-regulation of p27 Kip1. These results suggest that c-Src suppression by PP2 or siRNAs may regulate the progression of cell cycle through AKT/GSK3β and ERK1/2 pathways.

  6. Importance of the cell cycle phase for the choice of the appropriate DSB repair pathway, for genome stability maintenance: the trans-S double-strand break repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacôte, Fabien; Lopez, Bernard S

    2008-01-01

    A DNA double-strand break (DSB) is a highly harmful lesion that can lead to genome rearrangements. Two main pathways compete for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Depending on the cell cycle phase, the choice of one DSB repair pathway over the other will secure genome stability maintenance or in contrast will increase the risk of genetic instability. HR with the sister chromatid is an efficient way to maintain genome stability, for damage occurring at a post-replication stage. However, in G(1) checkpoint-defective cells, DSBs produced in the G(1) phase and not repaired by NHEJ, can progress through S phase and be processed by HR in late S/G(2) phase. We propose the "trans-S DSB repair" model to account for these data. In this situation HR cannot use the sister chromatid (which is also broken at the same locus) and is thus forced to use ectopic homologous sequences dispersed through the genome, increasing the risk of genetic instability. This shows that the two DSB repair pathways can compete through the cell cycle and underlines the importance of the association between the cell cycle checkpoint and the appropriate DNA repair pathway for genome stability maintenance.

  7. Artonin E induces p53-independent G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway and livin suppression in MCF-7 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Rasedee, Abdullah; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Kadir, Arifah; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Malami, Ibrahim; Lim, Kian Lam; Etti, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Artonin E is a prenylated flavonoid compound isolated from the stem bark of Artocarpus elasticus. This phytochemical has been previously reported to be drug-like with full compliance to Lipinski’s rule of five and good physicochemical properties when compared with 95% of orally available drugs. It has also been shown to possess unique medicinal properties that can be utilized in view of alleviating most human disease conditions. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic mechanism of Artonin E in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which has so far not been reported. In this context, Artonin E significantly suppressed the breast cancer cell’s viability while inducing apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. This apoptosis induction was caspase dependent, and it is mediated mainly through the intrinsic pathway with the elevation of total reactive oxygen species. Gene and protein expression studies revealed significant upregulation of cytochrome c, Bax, caspases 7 and 9, and p21 in Artonin E-treated MCF-7 cells, while MAPK and cyclin D were downregulated. Livin, a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis, whose upregulation has been noted to precede chemotherapeutic resistance and apoptosis evasion was remarkably repressed. In all, Artonin E stood high as a potential agent in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:28356713

  8. Esculetin, a natural coumarin compound, evokes Ca(2+) movement and activation of Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved cell cycle arrest in ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong-Tai; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Lin, You-Sheng; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-04-01

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin), a derivative of coumarin compound, is found in traditional medicinal herbs. It has been shown that esculetin triggers diverse cellular signal transduction pathways leading to regulation of physiology in different models. However, whether esculetin affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in breast cancer cells has not been explored. This study examined the underlying mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by esculetin and established the relationship between Ca(2+) signaling and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. The results showed that esculetin induced concentration-dependent rises in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in ZR-75-1 (but not in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cells. In ZR-75-1 cells, this Ca(2+) signal response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by the store-operated Ca(2+) channel blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pre-treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) abolished esculetin-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Conversely, incubation with esculetin abolished TG-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Esculetin induced cytotoxicity that involved apoptosis, as supported by the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and the proteolytic activation of caspase-9/caspase-3, which were partially reversed by pre-chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Moreover, esculetin increased the percentage of cells in G2/M phase and regulated the expressions of p53, p21, CDK1, and cyclin B1. Together, in ZR-75-1 cells, esculetin induced [Ca(2+)]i rises by releasing Ca(2+) from the ER and causing Ca(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Furthermore, esculetin activated Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved G2/M cell cycle arrest. Graphical abstract The summary of esculetin

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  10. c-Src regulates cell cycle proteins expression through protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 pathways in MCF-7 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Liu; Liying Du; Renqing Feng

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that c-Src suppression inhibited the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells.Here,we investigated the role of c-Src on the cell cycle progression using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2).Western blot analysis demonstrated the downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 after c-Src suppression by PP2.Incubation of cells in the presence of PP2 significantly blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2),protein kinase B (AKT),and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β).Specific pharmacological inhibitors of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/AKTpathways were used to demonstrate the relationship between the signal cascade and cell cycle proteins expression.The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT activity,whereas the p27 Kip1 expression was increased.In addition,knockdown of c-Src by siRNAs reduced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2,AKT,and GSK3β.After c-Src depletion by siRNAs,we observed significant down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E,and up-regulation of p27 Kip1.These results suggest that c-Src suppression by PP2 or siRNAs may regulate the progression of cell cycle through AKT/GSK3β and ERK1/2 pathways.

  11. Ferulago angulata activates intrinsic pathway of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells associated with G1 cell cycle arrest via involvement of p21/p27

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian H

    2014-09-01

    and the quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of MCF-7 cells after treatment with FALHE revealed an upregulation of Bax and a downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins. These findings proposed that FALHE suppressed the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Keywords: Ferulago angulata, apoptosis, cancer, MCF-7, cell cycle, p21/p27

  12. Phenformin Induces Cell Cycle Change, Apoptosis, and Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition and Regulates the AMPK/mTOR/p70s6k and MAPK/ERK Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a world-wide challenge, and additional anti-cancer therapies are still urgently needed. Emerging evidence has demonstrated the potent anti-tumor effect of biguanides, among which phenformin was reported to potentially be a more active anti-cancer agent than metformin. However, little attention has been given to the role of phenformin in breast cancer. In this study, we reveal the role of phenformin in cell death of the MCF7, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-231 and SUM1315 breast cancer cell lines. The respective IC50 values of phenformin in MCF7, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-231 and SUM1315 cells were 1.184±0.045 mM, 0.665±0.007 mM, 2.347±0.010 mM and 1.885±0.015 mM (mean± standard error. Phenformin induced cell cycle change and apoptosis in breast cancer cells via the AMPK/mTOR/p70s6k and MAPK/ERK pathways. Interestingly, phenformin induced MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition and decreased the migration rate in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, our results suggest that phenformin inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis after intracardiac injection into nude mice. Taken together, our study further confirms the potential benefit of phenformin in breast cancer treatment and provides novel mechanistic insight into its anti-cancer activity in breast cancer.

  13. Phenformin Induces Cell Cycle Change, Apoptosis, and Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition and Regulates the AMPK/mTOR/p70s6k and MAPK/ERK Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Ren, Lidong; Liu, Chenghao; Xia, Tiansong; Zha, Xiaoming; Wang, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a world-wide challenge, and additional anti-cancer therapies are still urgently needed. Emerging evidence has demonstrated the potent anti-tumor effect of biguanides, among which phenformin was reported to potentially be a more active anti-cancer agent than metformin. However, little attention has been given to the role of phenformin in breast cancer. In this study, we reveal the role of phenformin in cell death of the MCF7, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-231 and SUM1315 breast cancer cell lines. The respective IC50 values of phenformin in MCF7, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-231 and SUM1315 cells were 1.184±0.045 mM, 0.665±0.007 mM, 2.347±0.010 mM and 1.885±0.015 mM (mean± standard error). Phenformin induced cell cycle change and apoptosis in breast cancer cells via the AMPK/mTOR/p70s6k and MAPK/ERK pathways. Interestingly, phenformin induced MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition) and decreased the migration rate in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, our results suggest that phenformin inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis after intracardiac injection into nude mice. Taken together, our study further confirms the potential benefit of phenformin in breast cancer treatment and provides novel mechanistic insight into its anti-cancer activity in breast cancer.

  14. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis via the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway and other cancer signaling genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Min; Botnen, James H

    2009-09-01

    Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo, and our previous study demonstrated that submicromolar methylselenol generated by incubating methionase with seleno-l-methionine inhibits the migration and invasive potential of HT1080 tumor cells. However, little is known about the association between cancer signal pathways and methylselenol's inhibition of tumor cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrated that methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and we used a cancer signal pathway-specific array containing 15 different signal transduction pathways involved in oncogenesis to study the effect of methylselenol on cellular signaling. Using real-time RT-PCR, we confirmed that cellular mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C), heme oxygenase 1, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule, and PPARgamma genes were upregulated to 2.8- to 5.7-fold of the control. BCL2-related protein A1, hedgehog interacting protein, and p53 target zinc finger protein genes were downregulated to 26-52% of the control, because of methylselenol exposure. These genes are directly related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Methylselenol increased apoptotic cells up to 3.4-fold of the control and inhibited the extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression. Taken together, our studies identify 7 novel methylselenol responsive genes and demonstrate that methylselenol inhibits ERK1/2 pathway activation and c-Myc expression. The regulation of these genes is likely to play a key role in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor cell invasion.

  15. Inducing G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis through Generation Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-Mediated Mitochondria Pathway in HT-29 Cells by Dentatin (DEN and Dentatin Incorporated in Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin (DEN-HPβCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Abboodi Shakir Ashwaq

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dentatin (DEN, purified from the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f., has poor aqueous solubility that reduces its therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of DEN-HPβCD (hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex as an anticancer agent in HT29 cancer cell line and compare with a crystal DEN in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. The exposure of the cancer cells to DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex leads to cell growth inhibition as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. To analyze the mechanism, in which DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex causes the death in human colon HT29 cancer cells, was evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA-based assays for caspase-3, 8, 9, and reactive oxygen species (ROS. The findings showed that an anti-proliferative effect of DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex were via cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and eventually induced apoptosis through both mitochondrial and extrinsic pathways. The down-regulation of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP which leaded to apoptosis upon treatment, was investigated by Western-blotting. Hence, complexation between DEN and HPβCD did not diminish or eliminate the effective properties of DEN as anticancer agent. Therefore, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents in the future.

  16. Berberine attenuates high glucose-induced proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation in mesangial cells: involvement of suppression of cell cycle progression and NF-κB/AP-1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian; Wu, Teng; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Xiaolan; Hao, Jie; Huang, Junying; Wang, Lijing; Huang, Heqing

    2014-03-25

    Berberine has been shown to have renoprotective effects on diabetes through attenuating TGF-β1 and fibronectin (FN) expression. However, how berberine regulates TGF-β1 and FN is not fully clear. Here we investigated whether berberine inhibited TGF-β1 and FN expression in high glucose-cultured mesangial cells. Berberine significantly inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and hypertrophy by increasing the cell population in G1-phase and reducing that in S-phase. In addition, berberine reversed high glucose-induced down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Waf1)/(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Berberine inhibited p65 translocation to the nucleus and c-jun phosphorylation induced by high glucose. Furthermore, berberine attenuated high glucose-induced expression of TGF-β1 and FN. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that high glucose-induced transcription activity of NF-κB and AP-1 was blocked by berberine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that high glucose increased that NF-κB and AP-1 DNA binding activity. These data indicate that berberine inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and hypertrophy by modulating cell cycle progress. In addition, berberine suppressed high glucose-induced TGF-β1 and FN expression by blocking NF-κB/AP-1 pathways.

  17. Inducing G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis through Generation Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Mediated Mitochondria Pathway in HT-29 Cells by Dentatin (DEN) and Dentatin Incorporated in Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin (DEN-HPβCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwaq, Al-Abboodi Shakir; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Yeap, Swee Keong

    2016-01-01

    Dentatin (DEN), purified from the roots of Clausena excavata Burm f., has poor aqueous solubility that reduces its therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of DEN-HPβCD (hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) complex as an anticancer agent in HT29 cancer cell line and compare with a crystal DEN in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The exposure of the cancer cells to DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex leads to cell growth inhibition as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. To analyze the mechanism, in which DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex causes the death in human colon HT29 cancer cells, was evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA)-based assays for caspase-3, 8, 9, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The findings showed that an anti-proliferative effect of DEN or DEN-HPβCD complex were via cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and eventually induced apoptosis through both mitochondrial and extrinsic pathways. The down-regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) which leaded to apoptosis upon treatment, was investigated by Western-blotting. Hence, complexation between DEN and HPβCD did not diminish or eliminate the effective properties of DEN as anticancer agent. Therefore, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents in the future. PMID:27763535

  18. Fuel cell hybrid taxi life cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.baptista@ist.utl.pt [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribau, Joao; Bravo, Joao; Silva, Carla [IDMEC-Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Adcock, Paul; Kells, Ashley [Intelligent Energy, Charnwood Building, HolywellPark, Ashby Road, Loughborough, LE11 3GR (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    A small fleet of classic London Taxis (Black cabs) equipped with hydrogen fuel cell power systems is being prepared for demonstration during the 2012 London Olympics. This paper presents a Life Cycle Analysis for these vehicles in terms of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, focusing on the impacts of alternative vehicle technologies for the Taxi, combining the fuel life cycle (Tank-to-Wheel and Well-to-Tank) and vehicle materials Cradle-to-Grave. An internal combustion engine diesel taxi was used as the reference vehicle for the currently available technology. This is compared to battery and fuel cell vehicle configurations. Accordingly, the following energy pathways are compared: diesel, electricity and hydrogen (derived from natural gas steam reforming). Full Life Cycle Analysis, using the PCO-CENEX drive cycle, (derived from actual London Taxi drive cycles) shows that the fuel cell powered vehicle configurations have lower energy consumption (4.34 MJ/km) and CO{sub 2} emissions (235 g/km) than both the ICE Diesel (9.54 MJ/km and 738 g/km) and the battery electric vehicle (5.81 MJ/km and 269 g/km). - Highlights: > A Life Cycle Analysis of alternative vehicle technologies for the London Taxi was performed. > The hydrogen powered vehicles have the lowest energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions results. > A hydrogen powered solution can be a sustainable alternative in a full life cycle framework.

  19. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  20. The investigational Aurora kinase A inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237 induces cell cycle G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy via p38 MAPK and Akt/mTOR signaling pathways in human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li JP

    2015-03-01

    /M phase in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells which was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK1/cell division cycle (CDC 2, CDK2, and cyclin B1 and upregulation of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53, suggesting that ALS induces G2/M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/CDC2/cyclin B1 pathways. ALS induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells; ALS significantly decreased the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, but increased the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA, and increased the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 9. ALS significantly increased the expression level of membrane-bound microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II and beclin 1 and induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the pro-autophagic activities of ALS. Furthermore, treatment with wortmannin markedly downregulated ALS-induced p38 MAPK activation and LC3 conversion. In addition, knockdown of the p38 MAPK gene by ribonucleic acid interference upregulated Akt activation and resulted in LC3-II accumulation. These findings indicate that ALS promotes cellular apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells via modulation of p38 MAPK/Akt/ mTOR pathways. Further studies are warranted to further explore the molecular targets of ALS in the treatment of breast cancer.Keywords: ALS, breast cancer, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, p38 MAPK

  1. The cell-cycle state of stem cells determines cell fate propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-09-26

    Self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are fundamentally associated with cell-cycle progression to enable tissue specification, organ homeostasis, and potentially tumorigenesis. However, technical challenges have impaired the study of the molecular interactions coordinating cell fate choice and cell-cycle progression. Here, we bypass these limitations by using the FUCCI reporter system in human pluripotent stem cells and show that their capacity of differentiation varies during the progression of their cell cycle. These mechanisms are governed by the cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1-3 that control differentiation signals such as the TGF-β-Smad2/3 pathway. Conversely, cell-cycle manipulation using a small molecule directs differentiation of hPSCs and provides an approach to generate cell types with a clinical interest. Our results demonstrate that cell fate decisions are tightly associated with the cell-cycle machinery and reveal insights in the mechanisms synchronizing differentiation and proliferation in developing tissues.

  2. MicroRNA-302/367 Cluster Governs hESC Self-Renewal by Dually Regulating Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available miR-302/367 is the most abundant miRNA cluster in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and can promote somatic cell reprogramming. However, its role in hESCs remains poorly understood. Here, we studied functional roles of the endogenous miR-302/367 cluster in hESCs by employing specific TALE-based transcriptional repressors. We revealed that miR-302/367 cluster dually regulates hESC cell cycle and apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. Gene profiling and functional studies identified key targets of the miR-302/367 cluster in regulating hESC self-renewal and apoptosis. We demonstrate that in addition to its role in cell cycle regulation, miR-302/367 cluster conquers apoptosis by downregulating BNIP3L/Nix (a BH3-only proapoptotic factor and upregulating BCL-xL expression. Furthermore, we show that butyrate, a natural compound, upregulates miR-302/367 cluster expression and alleviates hESCs from apoptosis induced by knockdown of miR-302/367 cluster. In summary, our findings provide new insights in molecular mechanisms of how miR-302/367 cluster regulates hESCs.

  3. α-Tomatine-mediated anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo through cell cycle- and caspase-independent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Wu Chao

    Full Text Available α-Tomatine, a tomato glycoalkaloid, has been reported to possess antibiotic properties against human pathogens. However, the mechanism of its action against leukemia remains unclear. In this study, the therapeutic potential of α-tomatine against leukemic cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability experiments showed that α-tomatine had significant cytotoxic effects on the human leukemia cancer cell lines HL60 and K562, and the cells were found to be in the Annexin V-positive/propidium iodide-negative phase of cell death. In addition, α-tomatine induced both HL60 and K562 cell apoptosis in a cell cycle- and caspase-independent manner. α-Tomatine exposure led to a loss of the mitochrondrial membrane potential, and this finding was consistent with that observed on activation of the Bak and Mcl-1 short form (Mcl-1s proteins. Exposure to α-tomatine also triggered the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF from the mitochondria into the nucleus and down-regulated survivin expression. Furthermore, α-tomatine significantly inhibited HL60 xenograft tumor growth without causing loss of body weight in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. Immunohistochemical test showed that the reduced tumor growth in the α-tomatine-treated mice was a result of increased apoptosis, which was associated with increased translocation of AIF in the nucleus and decreased survivin expression ex vivo. These results suggest that α-tomatine may be a candidate for leukemia treatment.

  4. Alisertib induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR and sirtuin 1-mediated signaling pathways in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2015-01-01

    PC-3 cells in G2/M phase via regulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. ALS concentration-dependently induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2 but activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase signaling pathways. ALS significantly inhibited EMT in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. In addition, ALS suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 and pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin in both cell lines with a rise in the level of acetylated p53. These findings show that ALS induces cell cycle arrest and promotes autophagic cell death but inhibits EMT in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Erk1/2, and Sirt1-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, ALS may represent a promising anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. More studies are warranted to investigate other molecular targets and mechanisms and verify the efficacy and safety of ALS in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.Keywords: alisertib, pancreatic cancer, cell cycle, autophagy, EMT, Sirt1

  5. What cycles the cell? -Robust autonomous cell cycle models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Orit; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-12-01

    The cell cycle is one of the best studied cellular mechanisms at the experimental and theoretical levels. Although most of the important biochemical components and reactions of the cell cycle are probably known, the precise way the cell cycle dynamics are driven is still under debate. This phenomenon is not atypical to many other biological systems where the knowledge of the molecular building blocks and the interactions between them does not lead to a coherent picture of the appropriate dynamics. We here propose a methodology to develop plausible models for the driving mechanisms of embryonic and cancerous cell cycles. We first define a key property of the system (a cyclic behaviour in the case of the embryonic cell cycle) and set mathematical constraints on the types of two variable simplified systems robustly reproducing such a cyclic behaviour. We then expand these robust systems to three variables and reiterate the procedure. At each step, we further limit the type of expanded systems to fit the known microbiology until a detailed description of the system is obtained. This methodology produces mathematical descriptions of the required biological systems that are more robust to changes in the precise function and rate constants. This methodology can be extended to practically any type of subcellular mechanism.

  6. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  7. Molecular ties between the cell cycle and differentiation in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Victor C; Kirschner, Marc W

    2014-07-01

    Attainment of the differentiated state during the final stages of somatic cell differentiation is closely tied to cell cycle progression. Much less is known about the role of the cell cycle at very early stages of embryonic development. Here, we show that molecular pathways involving the cell cycle can be engineered to strongly affect embryonic stem cell differentiation at early stages in vitro. Strategies based on perturbing these pathways can shorten the rate and simplify the lineage path of ES differentiation. These results make it likely that pathways involving cell proliferation intersect at various points with pathways that regulate cell lineages in embryos and demonstrate that this knowledge can be used profitably to guide the path and effectiveness of cell differentiation of pluripotent cells.

  8. TNF-alpha impairs the S-G2/M cell cycle checkpoint and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair in premalignant skin cells: Role of the PI3K-Akt pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.; Calay, D.;

    2008-01-01

    in activation of the survival complex mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) and inhibition of the proapoptotic proteins Bad and Fox03a. In UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells (10-20 mJ cm(-2)), TNF-alpha increased the proportion of cycling cells and enhanced the rate of apoptosis. A significantly higher...

  9. Delayed cell cycle progression in selenoprotein W depleted cells is regulated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4–p38–p53 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a ubiquitous, highly conserved thioredoxin-like protein whose depletion causes a p53- and p21Cip1-dependent G1-phase cell cycle arrest in breast and prostate epithelial cells. SEPW1 depletion increases phosphorylation of Ser33 in p53, which is associated with decreased p53...

  10. 8-60hIPP5(m)-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest involves activation of ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1) pathways and delayed cyclin B1 nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qi-Yan; Zeng, Lin-Jie; Huang, Yu; Huang, Yong-Qi; Zhu, Qi-Fang; Liao, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that controls gene expression and cell cycle progression. The active mutant IPP5 (8-60hIPP5(m)), the latest member of the inhibitory molecules for PP1, has been shown to inhibit the growth of human cervix carcinoma cells (HeLa). In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, the present study assessed overexpression of 8-60hIPP5(m) in HeLa cells. Flow cytometric and biochemical analyses showed that overexpression of 8-60hIPP5(m) induced G2/M-phase arrest, which was accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B1 and phosphorylation of G2/M-phase proteins ATM, p53, p21(cip1/waf1) and Cdc2, suggesting that 8-60hIPP5(m) induces G2/M arrest through activation of the ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1)/Cdc2/ cyclin B1 pathways. We further showed that overexpression of 8-60hIPP5(m) led to delayed nuclear translocation of cyclin B1. 8-60hIPP5(m) also could translocate to the nucleus in G2/M phase and interact with pp1α and Cdc2 as demonstrated by co-precipitation assay. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel role for 8-60hIPP5(m) in regulation of cell cycle in HeLa cells, possibly contributing to the development of new therapeutic strategies for cervix carcinoma.

  11. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  12. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine‐suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xen...

  13. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-xiu Zhu; Ya-li Cao; Bin Li; Jia Wang; Xiao-bing Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM, Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by eisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM, Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and withont cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM, Chk2 and p53 were increased in HeLa cells treated with cisplatin. The cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase in HeLa cells treated with cisplatin. Conclusion Activation of ATM, Chk2 and p53 might be critical in determining whether cells survive or undergo apoptesis. Targeting ATM, Chk2 and p53 pathway might he a promising strategy for reversing chemoresistance to clsplatin in cervical cancer.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hui-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suntaek [Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Jin [CHA Cancer Institute, CHA University of Medicine and Science, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul, E-mail: bckim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  15. Treatment with bisphenol A and methoxychlor results in the growth of human breast cancer cells and alteration of the expression of cell cycle-related genes, cyclin D1 and p21, via an estrogen receptor-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Min-Ah; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-05-01

    Various endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous compounds found in the environment and have the potential to interfere with the endocrine system and hormonal regulation. Among EDCs, bisphenol A (BPA) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenol)-ethane [methoxychlor (MXC)] have estrogenic activity resulting in a variety of dysfunctions in the E2-mediated response by binding to estrogen receptors (ERs), causing human health problems such as abnormal reproduction and carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of BPA and MXC on cell proliferation facilitated by ER signaling in human breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells are known to be ERα-positive and to be a highly E2-responsive cancer cell line; these cells are, therefore, a useful in vitro model for detecting estrogenic activity in response to EDCs. We evaluated cancer cell proliferation following BPA and MXC treatment using an MTT assay. We analyzed alterations in the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle in MCF-7 cells by semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR following treatment with BPA or MXC compared to EtOH. To determine whether BPA and MXC stimulate cancer cell growth though ER signaling, we co-treated the cells with agonists (propyl pyrazoletriol, PPT; and diarylpropionitrile, DPN) or an antagonist (ICI 182,780) of ER signaling and reduced ERα gene expression via siRNA in MCF-7 cells before treatment with EDCs. These studies confirmed the carcinogenicity of EDCs in vitro. As a result, BPA and MXC induced the cancer cell proliferation by the upregulation of genes that promote the cell cycle and the downregulation of anti-proliferative genes, especially ones affecting the G1/S transition via ERα signaling. These collective results confirm the carcinogenicity of these EDCs in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether EDCs promote carcinogenesis in vivo.

  16. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-11-09

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells--including germline stem cells--become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions--GLP-1/Notch signaling--becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance.

  17. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  18. DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination during cell cycle in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Bozzella, Michael; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSBs are nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is an intrinsically error-prone pathway while HR results in accurate repair. To understand the origin of genomic instability in human cells it is important to know the contribution of each DSB repair pathway. Studies of rodent cells and human cancer cell lines have shown that the choice between NHEJ or HR pathways depends on cell cycle stage. Surprisingly, cell cycle regulation of DSB repair has not been examined in normal human cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints. Here we measured the efficiency of NHEJ and HR at different cell cycle stages in hTERT-immortalized diploid human fibroblasts. We utilized cells with chromosomally-integrated fluorescent reporter cassettes, in which a unique DSB is introduced by a rare-cutting endonuclease. We show that NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle, and its activity increases as cells progress from G1 to G2/M (G1cell cycle stages. We conclude that human somatic cells utilize error-prone NHEJ as the major DSB repair pathway at all cell cycle stages, while HR is used, primarily, in the S phase. PMID:18769152

  19. Epigenetic dynamics across the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kheir, Tony Bou; Lund, Anders H.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of the mammalian cell cycle depends on correct timing and co-ordination of a series of events, which are managed by the cellular transcriptional machinery and epigenetic mechanisms governing genome accessibility. Epigenetic chromatin modifications are dynamic across the cell cycle...... a correct inheritance of epigenetic chromatin modifications to daughter cells. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on the dynamics of epigenetic chromatin modifications during progression of the cell cycle....

  20. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  1. Persea declinata (Bl. Kosterm Bark Crude Extract Induces Apoptosis in MCF-7 Cells via G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest, Bcl-2/Bax/Bcl-xl Signaling Pathways, and ROS Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Narrima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persea declinata (Bl. Kosterm is a member of the Lauraceae family, widely distributed in Southeast Asia. It is from the same genus with avocado (Persea americana Mill, which is widely consumed as food and for medicinal purposes. In the present study, we examined the anticancer properties of Persea declinata (Bl. Kosterm bark methanolic crude extract (PDM. PDM exhibited a potent antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 16.68 µg/mL after 48 h of treatment. We observed that PDM caused cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, as exhibited by increased population at G0/G1 phase, higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, and DNA fragmentation. Mechanistic studies showed that PDM caused significant elevation in ROS production, leading to perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, cell permeability, and activation of caspases-3/7. On the other hand, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that PDM treatment increased the expression of the proapoptotic molecule, Bax, but decreased the expression of prosurvival proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, in a dose-dependent manner. These findings imply that PDM could inhibit proliferation in MCF-7 cells via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction, indicating its potential as a therapeutic agent worthy of further development.

  2. Benzo[a]pyrene induced p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis pathways in Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lilai; Lv, Biping; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2017-03-01

    The p53 pathways play an important role in carcinogenesis. In mammals, p53 and p53 target genes have been extensively studied, but little is known about their functions and regulation in fish. In this study, the cDNA fragments of p53 network genes, including p53, p21, mdm2, gadd45α, gadd45β, igfbp-3, and bax, were cloned from Chinese rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). These genes displayed high amino acid sequence identities with their zebrafish orthologs. The mRNA levels of p53 network genes and pathological changes in the liver were determined after adult rare minnow were exposed to 0.4, 2, and 10 µg/L of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) for 28 days. The results showed that p53, p21, mdm2, gadd45α, and bax mRNA expressions in the livers from males and females were significantly upregulated compared with those of the controls (p p53 network genes in the livers suggest that rare minnow is suitable as an experimental fish to screen environmental carcinogens. In addition, the p53 network genes in rare minnow could feasibly be used to identify the mechanism of environmental carcinogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 979-988, 2017.

  3. Reliance of Host Cholesterol Metabolic Pathways for the Life Cycle of Hepatitis C Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Ye

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, infects more than 170 million people worldwide and is the leading cause of liver failure in the United States. A unique feature of HCV is that the viral life cycle depends on cholesterol metabolism in host cells. This review summarizes the cholesterol metabolic pathways that are required for the replication, secretion, and entry of HCV. The potential application of drugs that alter host cholesterol...

  4. The circadian clock and cell cycle: interconnected biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the 'gating' controls of the circadian clock at various checkpoints of the cell cycle and also how the cell cycle can influence biological rhythms. The reciprocal influence that the circadian clock and cell cycle exert on each other suggests that these intertwined biological circuits are essential and multiple regulatory/control steps have been instated to ensure proper timekeeping.

  5. HSPA6 augments garlic extract-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; Implication for cell cycle dysregulation, signaling pathway alteration, and transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byungdoo; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of garlic extract (GE), the exact molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism associated with the inhibitory action of GE against bladder cancer EJ cell responses. Treatment with GE significantly inhibited proliferation of EJ cells dose-dependently through G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. This G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest by GE was due to the activation of ATM and CHK2, which appears to inhibit phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser216) and Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15), this in turn was accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p21WAF1. Furthermore, GE treatment was also found to induce phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK) and AKT. In addition, GE impeded the migration and invasion of EJ cells via inhibition of MMP-9 expression followed by decreased binding activities of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB motifs. Based on microarray datasets, we selected Heat shock protein A6 (HSPA6) as the most up-regulated gene responsible for the inhibitory effects of GE. Interestingly, overexpression of HSPA6 gene resulted in an augmentation effect with GE inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells. The augmentation effect of HSPA6 was verified by enhancing the induction of G2/M-phase-mediated ATM-CHK2-Cdc25C-p21WAF1-Cdc2 cascade, phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT signaling, and suppression of transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation in response to GE in EJ cells. Overall, our novel results indicate that HSPA6 reinforces the GE-mediated inhibitory effects of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells and may provide a new approach for therapeutic treatment of malignancies. PMID:28187175

  6. Fission Yeast Cell Cycle Synchronization Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormos-Pérez, Marta; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells can be synchronized by cell cycle arrest and release or by size selection. Cell cycle arrest synchronization is based on the block and release of temperature-sensitive cell cycle mutants or treatment with drugs. The most widely used approaches are cdc10-129 for G1; hydroxyurea (HU) for early S-phase; cdc25-22 for G2, and nda3-KM311 for mitosis. Cells can also be synchronized by size selection using centrifugal elutriation or a lactose gradient. Here we describe the methods most commonly used to synchronize fission yeast cells.

  7. Human Cpr (Cell Cycle Progression Restoration) Genes Impart a Far(-) Phenotype on Yeast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, M. C.; Liegeois, N.; Horecka, J.; DePinho, R A; Sprague-Jr., G. F.; Tyers, M; Elledge, S J

    1997-01-01

    Regulated cell cycle progression depends on the proper integration of growth control pathways with the basic cell cycle machinery. While many of the central molecules such as cyclins, CDKs, and CKIs are known, and many of the kinases and phosphatases that modify the CDKs have been identified, little is known about the additional layers of regulation that impinge upon these molecules. To identify new regulators of cell proliferation, we have selected for human and yeast cDNAs that when overexp...

  8. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  9. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  10. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  11. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation.

  12. High-Cycle-Life Lithium Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Carter, B.; Shen, D.; Somoano, R.

    1985-01-01

    Lithium-anode electrochemical cell offers increased number of charge/ discharge cycles. Cell uses components selected for compatibility with electrolyte solvent: These materials are wettable and chemically stable. Low vapor pressure and high electrochemical stability of solvent improve cell packaging, handling, and safety. Cell operates at modest temperatures - less than 100 degrees C - and is well suited to automotive, communications, and other applications.

  13. Autophagy and the Cell Cycle: A Complex Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; De Zio, Daniela; Cecconi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradation pathway, in which cytoplasmic material is sequestered in double-membrane vesicles and delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Under basal conditions, autophagy plays a homeostatic function. However, in response to various stresses, the pathway can be further induced to mediate cytoprotection. Defective autophagy has been linked to a number of human pathologies, including neoplastic transformation, even though autophagy can also sustain the growth of tumor cells in certain contexts. In recent years, a considerable correlation has emerged between autophagy induction and stress-related cell-cycle responses, as well as unexpected roles for autophagy factors and selective autophagic degradation in the process of cell division. These advances have obvious implications for our understanding of the intricate relationship between autophagy and cancer. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of the reciprocal regulation connecting the autophagy pathway and cell-cycle progression. Furthermore, key findings involving nonautophagic functions for autophagy-related factors in cell-cycle regulation will be addressed.

  14. Microwave-Assisted Syntheses of Benzimidazole-Containing Selenadiazole Derivatives That Induce Cell-Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Activation of the ROS/AKT Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanwei; Zhou, Yangliang; Deng, Shulin; Chen, Tianfeng

    2016-10-19

    The use of selenium-containing heterocyclic compounds as potent cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents has been well documented by a large number of clinical studies. In this study we developed a new approach to synthesize four benzimidazole-containing selenadiazole derivatives (BSeDs). The method uses a combination of peptide coupling reagents and microwave irradiation. This strategy features milder reaction conditions, higher yields, and shorter reaction times. The synthetic BSeDs were identified as potent antiproliferative agents against the human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Compounds 1 b (5-(6-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]selenadiazole), 1 c (5-(6-chloro-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]selenadiazole), and 1 d (5-(6-bromo-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]selenadiazole) were found to show greater cytotoxicity against the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 than MCF-7, and to exhibit dose-dependent inhibition of cell migration, in which a significant decrease in the zone of cell monolayer wound closure was observed relative to untreated controls. Our results demonstrate that BSeDs can cause cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells by inducing DNA damage, inhibiting protein kinase B (AKT), and activating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, the results of this study provide a facile microwave-assisted strategy for the synthesis of selenium-containing organic compounds that exhibit a high level of anticancer efficacy.

  15. Glucocorticoids play a key role in circadian cell cycle rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dickmeis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways play a pivotal role by relaying timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems. Both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms have been implicated as clock outputs; however, the relative importance and interplay between these mechanisms are poorly understood. The cell cycle represents a highly conserved regulatory target of the circadian timing system. Previously, we have demonstrated that in zebrafish, the circadian clock has the capacity to generate daily rhythms of S phase by a cell-autonomous mechanism in vitro. Here, by studying a panel of zebrafish mutants, we reveal that the pituitary-adrenal axis also plays an essential role in establishing these rhythms in the whole animal. Mutants with a reduction or a complete absence of corticotrope pituitary cells show attenuated cell-proliferation rhythms, whereas expression of circadian clock genes is not affected. We show that the corticotrope deficiency is associated with reduced cortisol levels, implicating glucocorticoids as a component of a systemic signaling pathway required for circadian cell cycle rhythmicity. Strikingly, high-amplitude rhythms can be rescued by exposing mutant larvae to a tonic concentration of a glucocorticoid agonist. Our work suggests that cell-autonomous clock mechanisms are not sufficient to establish circadian cell cycle rhythms at the whole-animal level. Instead, they act in concert with a systemic signaling environment of which glucocorticoids are an essential part.

  16. Microfluidic Cell Cycle Analysis of Spread Cells by DAPI Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell cell cycle analysis is an emerging technique that requires detailed exploration of the image analysis process. In this study, we established a microfluidic single-cell cell cycle analysis method that can analyze cells in small numbers and in situ on a microfluidic chip. In addition, factors that influenced the analysis were carefully investigated. U87 or HeLa cells were seeded and attached to microfluidic channels before measurement. Cell nucleic DNA was imaged by 4′-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining under a fluorescent microscope and subsequently fluorescent intensities of the cell nuclei DNA were converted to depict histograms for cell cycle phases. DAPI concentration, microscopic magnification, exposure time and cell number were examined for optimal cell cycle analysis conditions. The results showed that as few as a few hundred cells could be measured by DAPI staining in the range of 0.4–0.6 μg/mL to depict histograms with typical cell cycle phase distribution. Microscopic magnification during image acquisition, however, could distort the phase distribution. Exposure time did not significantly affect the cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, cell cycle inhibitor rapamycin treatment changed the cell cycle phase distribution as expected. In conclusion, a method for microfluidic single-cell cell cycle analysis of spread cells in situ was developed. Factors such as dye concentration and microscopic magnification had more influence on cell cycle phase distribution. Further studies will focus on detail differentiation of cell cycle phases and the application of such a method for biological meanings.

  17. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-28

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity.

  18. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific plan

  19. Cell signaling pathways and HIV-1 therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Johnny J

    2011-06-01

    Host-virus interactions permeate every aspect of both virus life cycle and host response and involve host cell macromolecular machinery and viral elements. It is these intimate interactions that mandate the outcomes of the infection and pathogenesis. It is also these intimate interactions that lay the foundation for the development of pharmaceutical interventions. HIV-1 is no exception in these regards. In the first two decades, HIV/AIDS research has led to the successful development of a number of antiviral inhibitors and the landmark formulation of the suppressive therapy. It has become apparent that this therapy does not offer a complete solution to cure and eradicate the virus. Meanwhile, this therapy has changed the overall landscape of HIV-associated neurological disorders to a more common and prevalent form so-called minor cognitive motor disorder. Thus, there is an important and continued need for new anti-HIV therapeutics. We believe that this is an excellent opportunity to compile and present the latest works being done during the last few years in this exciting field of HIV-host interactions, particularly cell signaling pathways. We hope that this special issue composed of one brief report, eight thematic reviews, and two original articles will serve to foster the exchange of new scientific ideas on HIV-host interactions and anti-HIV therapy and eventually contribute to HIV/AIDS eradication.

  20. Cell cycle regulation by glucosamine in human pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Lu, Chih-Shen; Kou, Yu Ru; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Airway epithelial cells play an important role against intruding pathogens. Glucosamine, a commonly used supplemental compound, has recently begun to be regarded as a potential anti-inflammatory molecule. This study aimed to uncover how glucosamine impacts on cellular proliferation in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) and bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). With trypan blue-exclusion assay, we observed that glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) caused a decrease in cell number at 24 and 48 h; with a flow cytometric analysis, we also noted an enhanced cell accumulation within the G(0)/G(1) phase at 24 h and induction of late apoptosis at 24 and 48 h by glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) in A549 cells and HBECs. Examination of phosphorylation in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, we found an inhibitory effect by glucosamine at 20 and 50 mM. Glucosamine at 50 mM was demonstrated to elevate both the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), but also caused a reduction in p21 protein expression. In addition, glucosamine attenuated p21 protein stability via the proteasomal proteolytic pathway, as well as inducing p21 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, our results suggest that a high dose of glucosamine may inhibit cell proliferation through apoptosis and disturb cell cycle progression with a halt at G(0)/G(1) phase, and that this occurs, at least in part, by a reduction in Rb phosphorylation together with modulation of p21, p53 and HO-1 expression, and nuclear p21 accumulation.

  1. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated protein induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma by activating the p53–Fbxw7 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haihe [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Yang, Zhanchun [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Liu, Chunbo; Huang, Shishun; Wang, Hongzhi; Chen, Yingli [The Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis in Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pathogenobiology, Daqing Branch of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China); Chen, Guofu, E-mail: zhangyanjie3@aliyun.com [Department of General Surgery of Fifth Clinical Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Daqing 163319 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. • RITA can significantly inhibit the in vitro growth of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. • RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC. - Abstract: Aberrant Notch signaling is observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has been associated with the modulation of cell growth. However, the role of Notch signaling in HCC and its underlying mechanism remain elusive. RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) mediates the nuclear export of RBP-J to tubulin fibers and downregulates Notch-mediated transcription. In this study, we found that RITA overexpression increased protein expression of p53 and Fbxw7 and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, Hes-1 and NF-κB p65. These changes led to growth inhibition and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that RITA exerts tumor-suppressive effects in hepatocarcinogenesis through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and suggest a therapeutic application of RITA in HCC.

  2. Comparative analysis on the key enzymes of the glycerol cycle metabolic pathway in Dunaliella salina under osmotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments.

  3. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  4. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  5. Cell cycle phase regulates glucocorticoid receptor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Matthews

    Full Text Available The glucocorticoid receptor (GR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. In contrast to many other nuclear receptors, GR is thought to be exclusively cytoplasmic in quiescent cells, and only translocate to the nucleus on ligand binding. We now demonstrate significant nuclear GR in the absence of ligand, which requires nuclear localisation signal 1 (NLS1. Live cell imaging reveals dramatic GR import into the nucleus through interphase and rapid exclusion of the GR from the nucleus at the onset of mitosis, which persists into early G(1. This suggests that the heterogeneity in GR distribution is reflective of cell cycle phase. The impact of cell cycle-driven GR trafficking on a panel of glucocorticoid actions was profiled. In G2/M-enriched cells there was marked prolongation of glucocorticoid-induced ERK activation. This was accompanied by DNA template-specific, ligand-independent GR transactivation. Using chimeric and domain-deleted receptors we demonstrate that this transactivation effect is mediated by the AF1 transactivation domain. AF-1 harbours multiple phosphorylation sites, which are consensus sequences for kinases including CDKs, whose activity changes during the cell cycle. In G2/M there was clear ligand independent induction of GR phosphorylation on residues 203 and 211, both of which are phosphorylated after ligand activation. Ligand-independent transactivation required induction of phospho-S211GR but not S203GR, thereby directly linking cell cycle driven GR modification with altered GR function. Cell cycle phase therefore regulates GR localisation and post-translational modification which selectively impacts GR activity. This suggests that cell cycle phase is an important determinant in the cellular response to Gc, and that mitotic index contributes to tissue Gc sensitivity.

  6. Cancer and deregulation of stem cells pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Correia Martins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells may have an important etiological role in cancer. Their classic regulatory pathways are deregulated in tumors, strengthening the stem cell theory of cancer. In this manuscript, we review Wnt, Notch and Hedhehog pathways, describing which of their factors may be responsible for the neoplastic development. Furthermore, we classify these elements as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, demonstrating their mutation implications in cancer. The activation of these pathways is associated with the expression of certain genes which maintain proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. Further work should be carried out in the future in order to control tumor development by controlling these signaling cascades.

  7. Viral infections and cell cycle G2/M regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Y.ZHAO; Robert T.ELDER

    2005-01-01

    Progression of cells from G2 phase of the cell cycle to mitosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that requires activation of the Cdc2 kinase, which determines onset of mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. In both human and fission yeast(Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cells, the activity of Cdc2 is regulated in part by the phosphorylation status of tyrosine 15(Tyr15) on Cdc2, which is phosphorylated by Wee1 kinase during late G2 and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the Cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase to trigger entry into mitosis. These Cdc2 regulators are the downstream targets of two well-characterized G2/M checkpoint pathways which prevent cells from entering mitosis when cellular DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is inhibited. Increasing evidence suggests that Cdc2 is also commonly targeted by viral proteins,which modulate host cell cycle machinery to benefit viral survival or replication. In this review, we describe the effect of viral protein R (Vpr) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on cell cycle G2/M regulation. Based on our current knowledge about this viral effect, we hypothesize that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a mechanism that is to some extent different from the classic G2/M checkpoints. One the unique features distinguishing Vpr-induced G2 arrest from the classic checkpoints is the role of phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Vpr-induced G2 arrest.Interestingly, PP2A is targeted by a number of other viral proteins including SV40 small T antigen, polyomavirus T antigen, HTLV Tax and adenovirus E4orf4. Thus an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Vpr-induced G2 arrest will provide additional insights into the basic biology of cell cycle G2/M regulation and into the biological significance of this effect during host-pathogen interactions.

  8. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  9. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Kwak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin. Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC.

  10. Microfluidic Cell Cycle Analysis of Spread Cells by DAPI Staining

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Sun; Jiayu Zhang; Haibo Yang; Gongzhuo Wang; Yanzhao Li; Xuxin Zhang; Qidan Chen; Ming-Fei Lang

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell cell cycle analysis is an emerging technique that requires detailed exploration of the image analysis process. In this study, we established a microfluidic single-cell cell cycle analysis method that can analyze cells in small numbers and in situ on a microfluidic chip. In addition, factors that influenced the analysis were carefully investigated. U87 or HeLa cells were seeded and attached to microfluidic channels before measurement. Cell nucleic DNA was imaged by 4′-6-diamidino-2...

  11. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death; Regulation du cycle cellulaire et de la mort cellulaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  12. K+ channels and cell cycle progression in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HALIMA eOUADID-AHIDOUCH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available K+ ions play a major role in many cellular processes. The deregulation of K+ signaling is associated with a variety of diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes. K+ ions are important for setting the membrane potential, the driving force for Ca2+ influx, and regulate volume of growing cells. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that K+ channels control cell proliferation through a novel signaling mechanisms triggered and modulated independently of ion fluxes. In cancer, aberrant expression, regulation and/or sublocalization of K+ channels can alter the downstream signals that converge on the cell cycle machinery. Various K+ channels are involved in cell cycle progression and are needed only at particular stages of the cell cycle. Consistent with this idea, the expression of Eag1 and HERG channels fluctuate along the cell cycle. Despite of acquired knowledge, our understanding of K+ channels functioning in cancer cells requires further studies. These include identifying the molecular mechanisms controling the cell cycle machinery. By understanding how K+ channels regulate cell cycle progression in cancer cells, we will gain insights into how cancer cells subvert the need for K+ signal and its downstream targets to proliferate.

  13. SAFT nickel hydrogen cell cycling status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthomieu, Yannick; Duquesne, Didier

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NiH2 cell development is given. The NiH2 SAFT system is an electrochemical (single or dual) stack (IPV). The stack is mounted in an hydroformed Inconel 718 vessel operating at high pressure, equipped with 'rabbit ears' ceramic brazed electrical feedthroughs. The cell design is described: positive electrode, negative electrode, and stack configuration. Overviews of low earth orbit and geostationary earth orbit cyclings are provided. DPA results are also provided. The cycling and DPA results demonstrate that SAFT NiH2 is characterized by high reliability and very stable performances.

  14. MAPK signal pathways in the regulation of cell proliferation in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    MAPK families play an important role in complex cellular programs like proliferation, differentiation,development, transformation, and apoptosis. At least three MAPK families have been characterized: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun kinase (JNK/SAPK) and p38 MAPK. The above effects are fulfilled by regulation of cell cycle engine and other cell proliferation related proteins. In this paper we discussed their functions and cooperation with other signal pathways in regulation of cell proliferation.

  15. Re-thinking cell cycle regulators : the cross-talk with metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluis eFajas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of genetically engineered mice deficient for cell cycle regulators, including E2F1, cdk4, or, pRB showed that the major phenotypes are metabolic perturbations. These key cell cycle regulators contribute to lipid synthesis, glucose production, insulin secretion, and glycolytic metabolism and it has been shown how deregulation of those pathways can lead to metabolic perturbations and related metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes. The cyclin-cdk-Rb-E2F1 pathway regulates adipogenesis in addition to its well-described roles in cell cycle regulation and cancer. It was also proved that E2F1 directly participates in the regulation of pancreatic growth and function. Similarly, cyclin D3, cdk4, and cdk9 are also adipogenic factors with strong effects on whole organism metabolism. These examples illustrate the growing notion that cell cycle regulatory proteins can also modulate metabolic processes. Cell cycle regulators are activated by insulin and glucose, even in non-proliferating cells. Most importantly cell cycle regulators trigger the adaptive metabolic switch that normal and cancer cells require in order to proliferate. These changes include increased lipid synthesis, decreased oxidative, and increased glycolytic metabolism. In summary, cell cycle regulators are essential in the control of anabolic, biosynthetic processes, and block at the same time oxidative and catabolic pathways, which are the metabolic hallmarks of cancer.

  16. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  17. Influence of cell cycle on responses of MCF-7 cells to benzo[a]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddings Ian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP is a widespread environmental genotoxic carcinogen that damages DNA by forming adducts. This damage along with activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR induces complex transcriptional responses in cells. To investigate whether human cells are more susceptible to BaP in a particular phase of the cell cycle, synchronised breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were exposed to BaP. Cell cycle progression was analysed by flow cytometry, DNA adduct formation was assessed by 32P-postlabeling analysis, microarrays of 44K human genome-wide oligos and RT-PCR were used to detect gene expression (mRNA changes and Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of some proteins, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1 and CYP1B1, which are involved in BaP metabolism. Results Following BaP exposure, cells evaded G1 arrest and accumulated in S-phase. Higher levels of DNA damage occurred in S- and G2/M- compared with G0/G1-enriched cultures. Genes that were found to have altered expression included those involved in xenobiotic metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed the involvement of various signalling pathways in response to BaP exposure, such as the Catenin/Wnt pathway in G1, the ERK pathway in G1 and S, the Nrf2 pathway in S and G2/M and the Akt pathway in G2/M. An important finding was that higher levels of DNA damage in S- and G2/M-enriched cultures correlated with higher levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA and proteins. Moreover, exposure of synchronised MCF-7 cells to BaP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BaP, did not result in significant changes in DNA adduct levels at different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusions This study characterised the complex gene response to BaP in MCF-7 cells and revealed a strong correlation between the varying efficiency of BaP metabolism and DNA damage in different phases of the cell

  18. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  19. The Notch pathway promotes the cancer stem cell characteristics of CD90+ cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ronghua; Wang, Jinlin; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Li, Yawen; Cheng, Bin

    2016-02-23

    CD90 has been identified as a marker for liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumorigenic activity, but it is not known how CD90+ cells contribute to tumor initiation and progression. Our data demonstrated that high expression of CD90 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) tissues correlated with venous filtration in HCC patients. CD90+ cells isolated from HCC cell lines exhibited increased tumorigenicity, chemoresistance, tumor invasion and metastasis. Notch pathway was activated in CD90+ cells and we found that inhibition of Notch pathway in CD90+ CSCs decreased tumorigenicity, cell invasion, migration and expression of stem cell related genes. Activation of Notch pathway in CD90- cells induced self-renewal, invasion and migration. Furthermore, we observed that cancer stem cell features were facilitated by stimulating G1-S transition in the cell cycle phase and inhibiting apoptosis mediated by Notch pathway. Our findings suggested CD90 could be used as a potential biomarker for HCC CSCs, and that cancer stem cell activity was elevated through up activated Notch pathway in CD90+ CSCs.

  20. Berberine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Pin Lin; Jai-Sing Yang; Jau-Hong Lee; Wen-Tsong Hsieh; Jing-Gung Chung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the inhibited growth (cytotoxic activity) of berberine and apoptotic pathway with its molecular mechanism of action.METHODS: The in vitro cytotoxic techniques were complemented by cell cycle analysis and determination of sub-G1 for apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma SNU-5 cells. Percentage of viable cells, cell cycle, and sub-G1 group (apoptosis) were examined and determined by the flow cytometric methods. The associated proteins for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were examined by Western blotting.RESULTS: For SNU-5 cell line, the IC (50) was found to be 48 μmol/L of berberine. In SNU-5 cells treated with 25-200 μmol/L berberine, G2/M cell cycle arrest was observed which was associated with a marked increment of the expression of p53, Wee1 and CDk1 proteins and decreased cyclin B. A concentration-dependent decrease of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in G2/M phase were detected. In addition, apoptosis detected as sub-G0 cell population in cell cycle measurement was proved in 25-200 μmol/L berberine-treated cells by monitoring the apoptotic pathway. Apoptosis was identified by sub-G0 cell population, and upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, release of Ca2+, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and then led to the release of mitochondrial cytochrome C into the cytoplasm and caused the activation of caspase-3, and finally led to the occurrence of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Berberine induces p53 expression and leads to the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, Cytochrome C release and activation of caspase-3 for the induction of apoptosis.

  1. Stromal interaction molecule 1 regulates growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human tongue squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaobo; Song, Laixiao; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Wang, Wei

    2017-04-30

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common type of oral carcinomas. However, the molecular mechanism by which OTSCC developed is not fully identified. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a transmembrane protein, mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). STIM1 is involved in several types of cancers. Here, we report that STIM1 contributes to the development of human OTSCC. We knocked down STIM1 in OTSCC cell line Tca-8113 with lentivirus-mediated shRNA and found that STIM1 knockdown repressed the proliferation of Tca-8113 cells. In addition, we also showed that STIM1 deficiency reduced colony number of Tca-8113 cells. Knockdown of STIM1 repressed cells to enter M phase of cell cycle and induced cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we performed microarray and bioinformatics analysis and found that STIM1 was associated with p53 and MAPK pathways, which may contribute to the effects of STIM1 on cell growth, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Finally, we confirmed that STIM1 controlled the expression of MDM2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and growth arrest and DNA damage inducible α (GADD45A) in OTSCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that STIM1 contributes to the development of OTSCC partially through regulating p53 and MAPK pathways to promote cell cycle and survival.

  2. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  3. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  4. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  5. The bacterial cell cycle checkpoint protein Obg and its role in programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselot Dewachter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD, in which cells initiate their own demise, is not restricted to multicellular organisms. Unicellular organisms, both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, also possess pathways that mediate PCD. We recently identified a PCD mechanism in Escherichia coli that is triggered by a mutant isoform of the essential GTPase ObgE (Obg of E. coli. Importantly, the PCD pathway mediated by mutant Obg (Obg* differs fundamentally from other previously described bacterial PCD pathways and thus constitutes a new mode of PCD. ObgE was previously proposed to act as a cell cycle checkpoint protein able to halt cell division. The implication of ObgE in the regulation of PCD further increases the similarity between this protein and eukaryotic cell cycle regulators that are capable of doing both. Moreover, since Obg is conserved in eukaryotes, the elucidation of this cell death mechanism might contribute to the understanding of PCD in higher organisms. Additionally, if Obg*-mediated PCD is conserved among different bacterial species, it will be a prime target for the development of innovative antibacterials that artificially induce this pathway.

  6. Dynamics of Notch pathway expression during mouse testis post-natal development and along the spermatogenic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murta, Daniel; Batista, Marta; Silva, Elisabete; Trindade, Alexandre; Henrique, Domingos; Duarte, António; Lopes-da-Costa, Luís

    2013-01-01

    The transcription and expression patterns of Notch pathway components (Notch 1-3, Delta1 and 4, Jagged1) and effectors (Hes1, Hes2, Hes5 and Nrarp) were evaluated (through RT-PCR and IHC) in the mouse testis at key moments of post-natal development, and along the adult spermatogenic cycle. Notch pathway components and effectors are transcribed in the testis and expressed in germ, Sertoli and Leydig cells, and each Notch component shows a specific cell-type and time-window expression pattern. This expression at key testis developmental events prompt for a role of Notch signaling in pre-pubertal spermatogonia quiescence, onset of spermatogenesis, and regulation of the spermatogenic cycle.

  7. Mechanisms of cell cycle control revealed by a systematic and quantitative overexpression screen in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%-94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression.

  8. Sonic hedgehog pathway contributes to gastric cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jianhua; Zhou, Ji; Zhao, Hailong; Wang, Mei; Wei, Zhuanqin; Gao, Hongyan; Wang, Yongzhong; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-04-01

    The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is commonly activated in gastrointestinal cancer. However, our understanding of the Shh pathway in gastric cancer remains limited. Here we examined the effects of cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of the Shh signaling pathway, on cell growth and proliferation in gastric primary cancer cells GAM-016 and the MKN-45 cell line. The results showed that the Shh signaling molecules SHH, PTCH, SMO, GLI1, and GLI2 were intact and activated in both types of cells. Furthermore, we observed that cyclopamine inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. An in vivo study using NOD/SCID mouse xenografts demonstrated that cyclopamine significantly prevented tumor growth and development. Our study indicated that Shh signaling pathway could promote gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumor development, and blocking this pathway may be a potential strategy in gastric cancer treatment.

  9. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  10. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  11. Boolean genetic network model for the control of C. elegans early embryonic cell cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo, cell cycles only have two phases: DNA synthesis and mitosis, which are different from the typical 4-phase cell cycle. Modeling this cell-cycle process into network can fill up the gap in C. elegans cell-cycle study and provide a thorough understanding on the cell-cycle regulations and progressions at the network level. Methods In this paper, C. elegans early embryonic cell-cycle network has been constructed based on the knowledge of key regulators and their interactions from literature studies. A discrete dynamical Boolean model has been applied in computer simulations to study dynamical properties of this network. The cell-cycle network is compared with random networks and tested under several perturbations to analyze its robustness. To investigate whether our proposed network could explain biological experiment results, we have also compared the network simulation results with gene knock down experiment data. Results With the Boolean model, this study showed that the cell-cycle network was stable with a set of attractors (fixed points). A biological pathway was observed in the simulation, which corresponded to a whole cell-cycle progression. The C. elegans network was significantly robust when compared with random networks of the same size because there were less attractors and larger basins than random networks. Moreover, the network was also robust under perturbations with no significant change of the basin size. In addition, the smaller number of attractors and the shorter biological pathway from gene knock down network simulation interpreted the shorter cell-cycle lengths in mutant from the RNAi gene knock down experiment data. Hence, we demonstrated that the results in network simulation could be verified by the RNAi gene knock down experiment data. Conclusions A C. elegans early embryonic cell cycles network was constructed and its properties were analyzed and compared with those of random networks

  12. A thermodynamic cycle for the solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Jenkins, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    A solar cell is a heat engine, but textbook treatments are not wholly satisfactory from a thermodynamic standpoint, since they present solar cells as directly converting the energy of light into electricity, and the current in the circuit as maintained by an electrostatic potential. We propose a thermodynamic cycle in which the gas of electrons in the p phase serves as the working substance. The interface between the p and n phases acts as a self-oscillating piston that modulates the absorption of heat from the photons so that it may perform a net positive work during a complete cycle of its motion, in accordance with the laws of thermodynamics. We draw a simple hydrodynamical analogy between this model and the ;putt-putt; engine of toy boats, in which the interface between the water's liquid and gas phases serves as the piston. We point out some testable consequences of this model.

  13. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  14. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Miaoxian [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Chung, Hau Yin, E-mail: anthonychung@cuhk.edu.hk [Biology Programme (Formally Biology Dept.), School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Yaolan [Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Pharmacodynamic Constituents of TCM and New Drug Research, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  15. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  16. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiman eAleem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia, and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219, pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638 as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  17. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-Paca pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Andrew M.; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V.

    2011-01-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively-active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism. PMID:21898405

  18. Glucose Signaling-Mediated Coordination of Cell Growth and Cell Cycle in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Busti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides being the favorite carbon and energy source for the budding yeast Sacchromyces cerevisiae, glucose can act as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple aspects of yeast physiology. Yeast cells have evolved several mechanisms for monitoring the level of glucose in their habitat and respond quickly to frequent changes in the sugar availability in the environment: the cAMP/PKA pathways (with its two branches comprising Ras and the Gpr1/Gpa2 module, the Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway and the main repression pathway involving the kinase Snf1. The cAMP/PKA pathway plays the prominent role in responding to changes in glucose availability and initiating the signaling processes that promote cell growth and division. Snf1 (the yeast homologous to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is primarily required for the adaptation of yeast cell to glucose limitation and for growth on alternative carbon source, but it is also involved in the cellular response to various environmental stresses. The Rgt2/Snf3-Rgt1 pathway regulates the expression of genes required for glucose uptake. Many interconnections exist between the diverse glucose sensing systems, which enables yeast cells to fine tune cell growth, cell cycle and their coordination in response to nutritional changes.

  19. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Wee Tan

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated

  20. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM,Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by cisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM,Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and without cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin...

  1. Impaired germ cell development due to compromised cell cycle progression in Skp2-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Keiko

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gonads are responsible for the production of germ cells through both mitosis and meiosis. Skp2 is the receptor subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin ligase and is a major regulator of the progression of cells into S phase of the cell cycle, which it promotes by mediating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of p27, an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However, the role of the Skp2-p27 pathway in germ cell development remains elusive. Results We now show that disruption of Skp2 in mice results in a marked impairment in the fertility of males, with the phenotypes resembling Sertoli cell-only syndrome in men. Testes of Skp2-/- mice manifested pronounced germ cell hypoplasia accompanied by massive apoptosis in spermatogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed an increased prevalence of polyploidy in spermatozoa, suggesting that the aneuploidy of these cells is responsible for the induction of apoptosis. Disruption of the p27 gene of Skp2-/- mice restored germ cell development, indicating that the testicular hypoplasia of Skp2-/- animals is attributable to the antiproliferative effect of p27 accumulation. Conclusion Our results thus suggest that compromised cell cycle progression caused by the accumulation of p27 results in aneuploidy and the induction of apoptosis in gonadal cells of Skp2-/- mice. The consequent reduction in the number of mature gametes accounts for the decreased fertility of these animals. These findings reinforce the importance of the Skp2-p27 pathway in cell cycle regulation and in germ cell development.

  2. Comparative analysis of regulatory roles of P38 signaling pathway in 8 types liver cell during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianguang; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Weiming; Shi, Yaohuang; He, Chuncui; Xu, Cunshuan

    2016-12-05

    P38MAPK signaling pathway was closely related to cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, cell survival, cell death, and so on. However, the regulatory mechanism of P38MAPK signaling pathway in liver regeneration (LR) was unclear. In order to further reveal the roles of P38MAPK signaling pathway in rat liver regeneration, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and related data sites were used to construct P38MAPK signaling pathway, and the pathway was confirmed by relevant documents literature. The expression changes of P38MAPK signaling pathway-related gene in eight type cells were further analyzed by Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array, and the results showed that 95 genes in P38MAPK signaling pathway had significant changes. H-cluster analysis showed that hepatocyte cell (HC), pit cell (PC), oval cell (OC) and biliary epithelial cell (BEC) are clustered together; and the same as Kupffer cell (KC), sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC), dendritic cell (DC) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC). IPA software and expression analysis systematic explorer (EASE) were applied to functional enrichment analysis, and the results showed that P38MAPK signaling pathway was mainly involved in apoptosis, cell death, cell proliferation, cell survival, cell viability, activation, cell cycle progression, necrosis, synthesis of DNA and other physical activity during LR. In conclusion, P38MAPK signaling pathway regulated various physiological activities of LR through multiple signaling pathways.

  3. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J.; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  4. Planar cell polarity: one or two pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Peter A; Struhl, Gary; Casal, José

    2007-07-01

    In multicellular organisms, cells are polarized in the plane of the epithelial sheet, revealed in some cell types by oriented hairs or cilia. Many of the underlying genes have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster and are conserved in vertebrates. Here we dissect the logic of planar cell polarity (PCP). We review studies of genetic mosaics in adult flies - marked cells of different genotypes help us to understand how polarizing information is generated and how it passes from one cell to another. We argue that the prevailing opinion that planar polarity depends on a single genetic pathway is wrong and conclude that there are (at least) two independently acting processes. This conclusion has major consequences for the PCP field.

  5. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  6. Mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Wen Lv; Jie-Ping Shi; Xiao-Song Hu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of ceramide on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma Bel7402 cells.Possible molecular mechanisms were explored.METHODS:[3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,plasmid transfection,reporter assay,FACS and Western blotting analyses were employed to investigate the effect and the related molecular mechanisms of C2-ceramide on the cell cycle of Bel7402 cells.RESULTS:C2-ceramide was found to inhibit the growth of Bel7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest.During the process,the expression of p21 protein increased,while that of cyclinD1,phospho-ERK1/2 and c-myc decreased.Furthermore,the level of CDK7 was downregulated,while the transcriptional activity of PPARγ was upregulated.Addition of GW9662,which is a PPARγ specific antagonist,could reserve the modulation action on CDK7.CONCLUSION:Our results support the hypothesis that cell cycle arrest induced by C2-ceramide may be mediated via accumulation of p21 and reduction of cyclinD1 and CDK7,at least partly,through PPARγ activation.The ERK signaling pathway was involved in this process.

  7. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan CX

    2015-03-01

    autophagy-inducing effects on AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Danusertib arrested AGS and NCI-N78 cells in G2/M phase, with downregulation of expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and upregulation of expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danusertib induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, with an increase in expression of proapoptotic protein and a decrease in antiapoptotic proteins in both cell lines. Danusertib induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and triggered activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Further, danusertib induced autophagy, with an increase in expression of beclin 1 and conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-I to LC3-II in both cell lines. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways as well as activation of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase contributed to the proautophagic effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. SB202191 and wortmannin enhanced the autophagy-inducing effect of danusertib in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. In addition, danusertib inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition with an increase in expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in expression of N-cadherin in both cell lines. Taken together, danusertib has potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy, but has an inhibitory effect on epithelial to mesenchymal transition, with involvement of signaling pathways mediated by PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and 5' AMP-activated protein kinase in AGS and NCI-N78 cells. Keywords: danusertib, gastric cancer, Aurora kinase, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial to mesenchymal transition

  8. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity.

  9. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1 based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs activity.

  10. Designing of Pathways and Qualification Framework focusing on Short Cycle Higher Education in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    吉本, 圭一

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the role of the qualification system on flexible learning pathways, focusing on the development of short cycle higher education in Scotland. Expansion of higher education brings the diversification of learners and, as its consequence, develops varieties of non-traditional leaning pathways and learning methods. The flexibility of an educational system is one key ingredient nowadays, but also integrity is more to be carefully and seriously designed, in order to provide adequ...

  11. Microsporidia infection impacts the host cell's cycle and reduces host cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higes, Mariano; Sagastume, Soledad; Juarranz, Ángeles; Dias-Almeida, Joyce; Budge, Giles E.; Meana, Aránzazu; Boonham, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular parasites can alter the cellular machinery of host cells to create a safe haven for their survival. In this regard, microsporidia are obligate intracellular fungal parasites with extremely reduced genomes and hence, they are strongly dependent on their host for energy and resources. To date, there are few studies into host cell manipulation by microsporidia, most of which have focused on morphological aspects. The microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are worldwide parasites of honey bees, infecting their ventricular epithelial cells. In this work, quantitative gene expression and histology were studied to investigate how these two parasites manipulate their host’s cells at the molecular level. Both these microsporidia provoke infection-induced regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and the cell cycle. The up-regulation of buffy (which encodes a pro-survival protein) and BIRC5 (belonging to the Inhibitor Apoptosis protein family) was observed after infection, shedding light on the pathways that these pathogens use to inhibit host cell apoptosis. Curiously, different routes related to cell cycle were modified after infection by each microsporidia. In the case of N. apis, cyclin B1, dacapo and E2F2 were up-regulated, whereas only cyclin E was up-regulated by N. ceranae, in both cases promoting the G1/S phase transition. This is the first report describing molecular pathways related to parasite-host interactions that are probably intended to ensure the parasite’s survival within the cell. PMID:28152065

  12. Transcriptomic profiling of human embryonic stem cells upon cell cycle manipulation during pluripotent state dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kevin Andrew Uy; Liang, Hongqing

    2015-12-01

    While distinct cell cycle structures have been known to correlate with pluripotent or differentiated cell states [1], there is no evidence on how the cell cycle machinery directly contributes to human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. We established a determinant role of cell cycle machineries on the pluripotent state by demonstrating that the specific perturbation of the S and G2 phases can prevent pluripotent state dissolution (PSD) [2]. Active mechanisms in these phases, such as the DNA damage checkpoint and Cyclin B1, promote the pluripotent state [2]. To understand the mechanisms behind the effect on PSD by these pathways in hESCs, we performed comprehensive gene expression analysis by time-course microarray experiments. From these datasets, we observed expression changes in genes involved in the TGFβ signaling pathway, which has a well-established role in hESC maintenance [3], [4], [5]. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and can be accessed through GEO Series accession numbers GSE62062 and GSE63215.

  13. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  14. Effect of sesamin on apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer mcf-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, An-Ci; Hou, Chien-Wei; Kao, Yung-Hsi; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Dietary prevention has been known to reduce breast cancer risk. Sesamin is one of the major components in sesame seeds and has been widely studied and proven to have anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenic effects on cancer cells. In this study, the influence of sesamin was tested in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line for cell viability (MTT assay) and cell cycling (flow cytometry). Results showed that sesamin dose-dependently (1, 10 and 50 μM) reduced the cell viability and increased LDH release and apoptosis (TUNEL assay). In addition, there was a significant increase of sub-G1 phase arrest in the cell cycle after sesamin treatment. Furthermore, sesamin increased the expression of apoptotic markers of Bax, caspase-3, and cell cycle control proteins, p53 and checkpoint kinase 2. Taken together, these results suggested that sesamin might be used as a dietary supplement for prevention of breast cancer by modulating apoptotic signal pathways and inhibiting tumor cell growth.

  15. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose. PMID:28072818

  16. Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures. Part I. Cycling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, P.; Haran, Bala; White, Ralph; Popov, Branko N.

    The capacity fade of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled at RT and 45 °C showed a capacity fade of 30 and 36%, respectively. The cell cycled at 55 °C showed a capacity loss of about 70% after 490 cycles. The rate capability of the cells continues to decrease with cycling. Impedance measurements showed an overall increase in the cell resistance with cycling and temperature. Impedance studies of the electrode materials showed an increased positive electrode resistance when compared to that of the negative electrode for cells cycled at RT and 45 °C. However, cells cycled at 50 and 55 °C exhibit higher negative electrode resistance. The increased capacity fade for the cells cycled at high temperatures can be explained by taking into account the repeated film formation over the surface of anode, which results in increased rate of lithium loss and also in a drastic increase in the negative electrode resistance with cycling.

  17. Comparison of Algal Biodiesel Production Pathways Using Life Cycle Assessment Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Anoop; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2013-01-01

    The consideration of algal biomass in biodiesel production increased very rapidly in the last decade. A life cycle assessment (LCA) study is presented to compare six different biodiesel production pathways (three different harvesting techniques, i.e., aluminum as flocculent, lime flocculent...

  18. ATR pathway inhibition is synthetically lethal in cancer cells with ERCC1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR and its effector kinase CHEK1 are required for cancer cells to survive oncogene-induced replication stress. ATR inhibitors exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with deficiencies in the DNA damage response enzymes ATM and XRCC1 and with overexpression of the cell cycle kinase Cyclin E. Here we report a systematic screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with ATR-pathway targeted drugs, rationalized by their predicted therapeutic utility in the oncology clinic. We found that reduced function in the ATR pathway itself provided the strongest synthetic lethal interaction. In addition, we found that loss of the structure specific-endonuclease ERCC1-XPF (ERCC4) is synthetic lethal with ATR pathway inhibitors. ERCC1-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of DNA damage, which was increased further by ATR inhibition. When treated with ATR or CHEK1 inhibitors, ERCC1-deficient cells arrested in S phase and failed to complete cell cycle transit even after drug removal. Notably, triple-negative breast cancer cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells depleted of ERCC1 exhibited increased sensitivity to ATR-pathway targeted drugs. Overall, we concluded that ATR pathway-targeted drugs may offer particular utility in cancers with reduced ATR pathway function or reduced levels of ERCC4 activity. PMID:24662920

  19. The Wnt pathway: a key network in cell signalling dysregulated by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuylen, Wendy J; Rawlinson, William D; Ford, Caroline E

    2016-09-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites dependent on host cells for survival. Viral infection of a cell activates a panel of pattern recognition receptors that mediate antiviral host responses to inhibit viral replication and dissemination. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to evade and subvert this antiviral host response, including encoding proteins that hijack, mimic and/or manipulate cellular processes such as the cell cycle, DNA damage repair, cellular metabolism and the host immune response. Currently, there is an increasing interest whether viral modulation of these cellular processes, including the cell cycle, contributes to cancer development. One cellular pathway related to cell cycle signalling is the Wnt pathway. This review focuses on the modulation of this pathway by human viruses, known to cause (or associated with) cancer development. The main mechanisms where viruses interact with the Wnt pathway appear to be through (i) epigenetic modification of Wnt genes; (ii) cellular or viral miRNAs targeting Wnt genes; (iii) altering specific Wnt pathway members, often leading to (iv) nuclear translocation of β-catenin and activation of Wnt signalling. Given that diverse viruses affect this signalling pathway, modulating Wnt signalling could be a generalised critical process for the initiation or maintenance of viral pathogenesis, with resultant dysregulation contributing to virus-induced cancers. Further study of this virus-host interaction may identify options for targeted therapy against Wnt signalling molecules as a means to reduce virus-induced pathogenesis and the downstream consequences of infection. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  1. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  2. P27 in cell cycle control and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    In order to survive, cells need tight control of cell cycle progression. The control mechanisms are often lost in human cancer cells. The cell cycle is driven forward by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The CDK inhibitors (CKIs) are important regulators of the CDKs. As the name implies, CKIs were...

  3. Exit from exit: resetting the cell cycle through Amn1 inhibition of G protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchang; Shirogane, Takahiro; Liu, Dou; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2003-03-07

    In S. cerevisiae cells undergoing anaphase, a ras-related GTPase, Tem1, is located on the spindle pole body that enters the daughter cell and activates a signal transduction pathway, MEN, to allow mitotic exit. MEN activation must be reversed after mitotic exit to reset the cell cycle in G1. We find that daughter cells activate an Antagonist of MEN pathway (AMEN) in part through induction of the Amn1 protein that binds directly to Tem1 and prevents its association with its target kinase Cdc15. Failure of Amn1 function results in defects of both the spindle assembly and nuclear orientation checkpoints and delays turning off Cdc14 in G1. Thus, Amn1 is part of a daughter-specific switch that helps cells exit from mitotic exit and reset the cell cycle.

  4. Local circadian clock gates cell cycle progression of transient amplifying cells during regenerative hair cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V; Vollmers, Christopher; de la Cruz, Damon; Chaix, Amandine; Ramos, Raul; Panda, Satchidananda; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2013-06-04

    Regenerative cycling of hair follicles offers an unique opportunity to explore the role of circadian clock in physiological tissue regeneration. We focused on the role of circadian clock in actively proliferating transient amplifying cells, as opposed to quiescent stem cells. We identified two key sites of peripheral circadian clock activity specific to regenerating anagen hair follicles, namely epithelial matrix and mesenchymal dermal papilla. We showed that peripheral circadian clock in epithelial matrix cells generates prominent daily mitotic rhythm. As a consequence of this mitotic rhythmicity, hairs grow faster in the morning than in the evening. Because cells are the most susceptible to DNA damage during mitosis, this cycle leads to a remarkable time-of-day-dependent sensitivity of growing hair follicles to genotoxic stress. Same doses of γ-radiation caused dramatic hair loss in wild-type mice when administered in the morning, during mitotic peak, compared with the evening, when hair loss is minimal. This diurnal radioprotective effect becomes lost in circadian mutants, consistent with asynchronous mitoses in their hair follicles. Clock coordinates cell cycle progression with genotoxic stress responses by synchronizing Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated G2/M checkpoint. Our results uncover diurnal mitotic gating as the essential protective mechanism in highly proliferative hair follicles and offer strategies for minimizing or maximizing cytotoxicity of radiation therapies.

  5. Change of the cell cycle after flutamide treatment in prostate cancer cells and its molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Wei-Jun Qin; He Wang; Guo-Xing Shao; Chen Shao; Chang-Hong Shi; Lei Zhang; Hong-Hong Yue; Peng-Fei Wang; Bo Yang; Yun-Tao Zhang; Fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on the expression of the cell cycle-related genes, such as CDKN1A and BTG1, in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: After AR antagonist flutamide treatment and confirmation of its effect by phase contrast microscope and flow cytometry, the differential expression of the cell cycle-related genes was analyzed by a cDNA microarray. The flutamide treated cells were set as the experimental group and the LNCaP cells as the control. We labeled cDNA probes of the experimental group and control group with Cy5 and Cy3 dyes, respectively, through reverse transcription. Then we hybridized the cDNA probes with cDNA microarrays, which contained 8 126 unique human cDNA sequences and the chip was scanned to get the fluorescent values of Cy5 and Cy3 on each spot. After primary analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) tests were carried out to confirm the results of the chips. Results:After AR antagonist flutamide treatment,three hundred and twenty-six genes (3.93 %) expressed differentially, 97 down-regulated and 219 up-regulated.Among them, eight up-regulated genes might be cell cycle-related, namely CDC10, NRAS, BTG1, Weel, CLK3,DKFZP564A122, CDKN1A and BTG2. The CDKN1A and BTG1 gene mRNA expression was confirmed to be higher in the experimental group by RT-PCR, whilep53 mRNA expression had no significant changes. Conclusion: Flutamide treatment might up-regulate CDKN1A and BTG1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The protein expressions of CDKN1A and BTG1 play an important role in inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. CDKN1A has a great impact on the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells and may play a role in the cancer cells in a p53-independent pathway. The prostate cancer cells might affect the cell cycle-related genes by activating AR and thus break the cell cycle control.

  6. Cellular plasticity enables adaptation to unforeseen cell-cycle rewiring challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Katzir

    Full Text Available The fundamental dynamics of the cell cycle, underlying cell growth and reproduction, were previously found to be robust under a wide range of environmental and internal perturbations. This property was commonly attributed to its network structure, which enables the coordinated interactions among hundreds of proteins. Despite significant advances in deciphering the components and autonomous interactions of this network, understanding the interfaces of the cell cycle with other major cellular processes is still lacking. To gain insight into these interfaces, we used the process of genome-rewiring in yeast by placing an essential metabolic gene HIS3 from the histidine biosynthesis pathway, under the exclusive regulation of different cell-cycle promoters. In a medium lacking histidine and under partial inhibition of the HIS3p, the rewired cells encountered an unforeseen multitasking challenge; the cell-cycle regulatory genes were required to regulate the essential histidine-pathway gene in concert with the other metabolic demands, while simultaneously driving the cell cycle through its proper temporal phases. We show here that chemostat cell populations with rewired cell-cycle promoters adapted within a short time to accommodate the inhibition of HIS3p and stabilized a new phenotypic state. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the population was able to adapt and grow into mature colonies on plates under such inhibiting conditions. The adapted state was shown to be stably inherited across generations. These adaptation dynamics were accompanied by a non-specific and irreproducible genome-wide transcriptional response. Adaptation of the cell-cycle attests to its multitasking capabilities and flexible interface with cellular metabolic processes and requirements. Similar adaptation features were found in our previous work when rewiring HIS3 to the GAL system and switching cells from galactose to glucose. Thus, at the basis of cellular plasticity is

  7. Cell-cycle times and the tumour control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Adrian; Lutscher, Frithjof

    2010-12-01

    Mechanistic dynamic cell population models for the tumour control probability (TCP) to date have used a simplistic representation of the cell cycle: either an exponential cell-cycle time distribution (Zaider & Minerbo, 2000, Tumour control probability: a formulation applicable to any temporal protocol of dose delivery. Phys. Med. Biol., 45, 279-293) or a two-compartment model (Dawson & Hillen, 2006, Derivation of the tumour control probability (TCP) from a cell cycle model. Comput. Math. Methods Med., 7, 121-142; Hillen, de Vries, Gong & Yurtseven, 2009, From cell population models to tumour control probability: including cell cycle effects. Acta Oncol. (submitted)). Neither of these simplifications captures realistic cell-cycle time distributions, which are rather narrowly peaked around the mean. We investigate how including such distributions affects predictions of the TCP. At first, we revisit the so-called 'active-quiescent' model that splits the cell cycle into two compartments and explore how an assumption of compartmental independence influences the predicted TCP. Then, we formulate a deterministic age-structured model and a corresponding branching process. We find that under realistic cell-cycle time distributions, lower treatment intensities are sufficient to obtain the same TCP as in the aforementioned models with simplified cell cycles, as long as the treatment is constant in time. For fractionated treatment, the situation reverses such that under realistic cell-cycle time distributions, the model requires more intense treatment to obtain the same TCP.

  8. New activators and inhibitors in the hair cycle clock: targeting stem cells' state of competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plikus, Maksim V

    2012-05-01

    The timing mechanism of the hair cycle remains poorly understood. However, it has become increasingly clear that the telogen-to-anagen transition is controlled jointly by at least the bone morphogenic protein (BMP), WNT, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathways. New research shows that Fgf18 signaling in hair follicle stem cells synergizes BMP-mediated refractivity, whereas Tgf-β2 signaling counterbalances it. Loss of Fgf18 signaling markedly accelerates anagen initiation, whereas loss of Tgf-β2 signaling significantly delays it, supporting key roles for these pathways in hair cycle timekeeping.

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny M.A. Kianian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution of this organelle into daughter cells. The genes that underlie these changes are beginning to be identified in model plants such as Arabidopsis. In animals disruption of the drp1 gene, a homolog to the plant drp3A and drp3B, delays mitochondrial division. This mutation results in increased aneuploidy due to chromosome mis-segregation. It remains to be discovered if a similar outcome is observed in plants. Alloplasmic lines provide an opportunity to understand the communication between the cytoplasmic organelles and the nucleus. Examples of studies in these lines, especially from the extensive collection in wheat, point to the role of mitochondria in chromosome movement, pollen fertility and other aspects of development. Genes involved in NM interaction also are believed to play a critical role in evolution of species and interspecific cross incompatibilities.

  10. Upregulation of Notch pathway molecules in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive activation of the Notch pathway has been demonstrated in various types of malignancies. However, it remains unclear how the Notch pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We investigated the expression of Notch pathway molecules in OSCC cell lines and biopsy specimens and examined the effect of Notch pathway inhibition. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed upregulation of Notch1, Notch2, Jagged1, HES1 and HEY1 in both...

  11. Induction of ATM/ATR pathway combined with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhances cytotoxicity of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingwei; Das, Manjusri; Kanji, Suman; Aggarwal, Reeva; Joseph, Matthew; Ray, Alo; Shapiro, Charles L; Pompili, Vincent J; Das, Hiranmoy

    2014-07-01

    Many ovarian cancer cells express stress-related molecule MICA/B on their surface that is recognized by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells through their NKG2D receptor, which is transmitted to downstream stress-signaling pathway. However, it is yet to be established how Vγ2Vδ2 T cell-mediated recognition of MICA/B signal is transmitted to downstream stress-related molecules. Identifying targeted molecules would be critical to develop a better therapy for ovarian cancer cells. It is well established that ATM/ATR signal transduction pathways, which is modulated by DNA damage, replication stress, and oxidative stress play central role in stress signaling pathway regulating cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATM/ATR and its down stream molecules affect Vγ2Vδ2 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Herein, we show that ATM/ATR pathway is modulated in ovarian cancer cells in the presence of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Furthermore, downregulation of ATM pathway resulted downregulation of MICA, and reduced Vγ2Vδ2 T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Alternately, stimulating ATM pathway enhanced expression of MICA, and sensitized ovarian cancer cells for cytotoxic lysis by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We further show that combining currently approved chemotherapeutic drugs, which induced ATM signal transduction, along with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhanced cytotoxicity of resistant ovarian cancer cells. These findings indicate that ATM/ATR pathway plays an important role in tumor recognition, and drugs promoting ATM signaling pathway might be considered as a combination therapy together with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for effectively treating resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  12. From START to FINISH: the influence of osmotic stress on the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmaneshfar, Elahe; Kaloriti, Despoina; Gustin, Michael C; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P; Grebogi, Celso; Romano, M Carmen; Thiel, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The cell cycle is a sequence of biochemical events that are controlled by complex but robust molecular machinery. This enables cells to achieve accurate self-reproduction under a broad range of different conditions. Environmental changes are transmitted by molecular signalling networks, which coordinate their action with the cell cycle. The cell cycle process and its responses to environmental stresses arise from intertwined nonlinear interactions among large numbers of simpler components. Yet, understanding of how these pieces fit together into a coherent whole requires a systems biology approach. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes the influence of osmotic stress on the entire cell cycle of S. cerevisiae for the first time. Our model incorporates all recently known and several proposed interactions between the osmotic stress response pathway and the cell cycle. This model unveils the mechanisms that emerge as a consequence of the interaction between the cell cycle and stress response networks. Furthermore, it characterises the role of individual components. Moreover, it predicts different phenotypical responses for cells depending on the phase of cells at the onset of the stress. The key predictions of the model are: (i) exposure of cells to osmotic stress during the late S and the early G2/M phase can induce DNA re-replication before cell division occurs, (ii) cells stressed at the late G2/M phase display accelerated exit from mitosis and arrest in the next cell cycle, (iii) osmotic stress delays the G1-to-S and G2-to-M transitions in a dose dependent manner, whereas it accelerates the M-to-G1 transition independently of the stress dose and (iv) the Hog MAPK network compensates the role of the MEN network during cell division of MEN mutant cells. These model predictions are supported by independent experiments in S. cerevisiae and, moreover, have recently been observed in other eukaryotes.

  13. From START to FINISH: the influence of osmotic stress on the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Radmaneshfar

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a sequence of biochemical events that are controlled by complex but robust molecular machinery. This enables cells to achieve accurate self-reproduction under a broad range of different conditions. Environmental changes are transmitted by molecular signalling networks, which coordinate their action with the cell cycle. The cell cycle process and its responses to environmental stresses arise from intertwined nonlinear interactions among large numbers of simpler components. Yet, understanding of how these pieces fit together into a coherent whole requires a systems biology approach. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes the influence of osmotic stress on the entire cell cycle of S. cerevisiae for the first time. Our model incorporates all recently known and several proposed interactions between the osmotic stress response pathway and the cell cycle. This model unveils the mechanisms that emerge as a consequence of the interaction between the cell cycle and stress response networks. Furthermore, it characterises the role of individual components. Moreover, it predicts different phenotypical responses for cells depending on the phase of cells at the onset of the stress. The key predictions of the model are: (i exposure of cells to osmotic stress during the late S and the early G2/M phase can induce DNA re-replication before cell division occurs, (ii cells stressed at the late G2/M phase display accelerated exit from mitosis and arrest in the next cell cycle, (iii osmotic stress delays the G1-to-S and G2-to-M transitions in a dose dependent manner, whereas it accelerates the M-to-G1 transition independently of the stress dose and (iv the Hog MAPK network compensates the role of the MEN network during cell division of MEN mutant cells. These model predictions are supported by independent experiments in S. cerevisiae and, moreover, have recently been observed in other eukaryotes.

  14. The pentose phosphate pathway: an antioxidant defense and a crossroad in tumor cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riganti, Chiara; Gazzano, Elena; Polimeni, Manuela; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Ghigo, Dario

    2012-08-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway, one of the main antioxidant cellular defense systems, has been related for a long time almost exclusively to its role as a provider of reducing power and ribose phosphate to the cell. In addition to this "traditional" correlation, in the past years multiple roles have emerged for this metabolic cascade, involving the cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, motility, angiogenesis, and the response to anti-tumor therapy. These findings make the pentose phosphate pathway a very interesting target in tumor cells. This review summarizes the latest discoveries relating the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway to various aspects of tumor metabolism, such as cell proliferation and death, tissue invasion, angiogenesis, and resistance to therapy, and discusses the possibility that drugs modulating the pathway could be used as potential tools in tumor therapy.

  15. Lack of telomerase activity in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells during differentiation along neural pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen-zhou; XU Ru-xiang; JIANG Xiao-dan; TENG Xiao-hua; LI Gui-tao; ZHOU Yü-xi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate telomerase activity in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) during their committed differentiation in vitro along neural pathway and the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the expression of telomerase.Methods: BMSCs were acquired from rabbit marrow and divided into control group, GDNF (10 ng/ml) group.No. ZL02134314. 4) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) was used to induce BMSCs differentiation along neural pathway. Fluorescent immunocytochemistry was employed to identify the expressions of Nestin, neuronspecific endase (NSE), and gial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The growth curves of the cells and the status of cell cycles were analyzed, respectively. During the differentiation, telomerase activitys were detected using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TRAP-ELISA).Results: BMSCs were successfully induced to differentiate along neural pathway and expressed specific markers of fetal neural epithelium, mature neuron and glial cells. Telomerase activities were undetectable in BMSCs during differentiation along neural pathway. Similar changes of cell growth curves, cell cycle status and telomerase expression were observed in the two groups.Conclusions: Rabbit BMSCs do not display telomerase activity during differentiation along neural pathway. GDNF shows little impact on proliferation and telomerase activity of BMSCs.

  16. Cell signalling pathways underlying induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kate; Hawkins; Shona; Joy; Tristan; Mc; Kay

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem(i PS) cells, somatic cells reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by forced expression of defined factors, represent a uniquely valuable resource for research and regenerative medicine. However, this methodology remains inefficient due to incomplete mechanistic understanding of the reprogramming process. In recent years, various groups have endeavoured to interrogate the cell signalling that governs the reprogramming process, including LIF/STAT3, BMP, PI3 K, FGF2, Wnt, TGFβ and MAPK pathways, with the aim of increasing our understanding and identifying new mechanisms of improving safety, reproducibility and efficiency. This has led to a unified model of reprogramming that consists of 3 stages: initiation, maturation and stabilisation. Initiation of reprogramming occurs in almost all cells that receive the reprogramming transgenes; most commonly Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c Myc, and involves a phenotypic mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The initiation stage is also characterised by increased proliferation and a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The maturation stage is considered the major bottleneck within the process, resulting in very few "stabilisation competent" cells progressing to the final stabilisation phase. To reach this stage in both mouse and human cells, pre-i PS cells must activate endogenous expression of the core circuitry of pluripotency, comprising Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, and thus reach a state of transgene independence. By the stabilisation stage, i PS cells generally use the same signalling networks that govern pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. These pathways differ between mouse and human cells although recent work has demonstrated that this is context dependent. As i PS cell generation technologies move forward, tools are being developed to interrogate the process in more detail, thus allowing a greater understanding of this intriguing biological phenomenon.

  17. DNA damage activates a spatially distinct late cytoplasmic cell-cycle checkpoint network controlled by MK2-mediated RNA stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, H Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1...

  18. DNA Damage Activates a Spatially Distinct Late Cytoplasmic Cell-Cycle Checkpoint Network Controlled by MK2-Mediated RNA Stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf; Morandell, Sandra; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Linding, Rune; Ong, Shao-En; Weaver, David; Carr, Steven A.; Yaffe, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1 pa

  19. AMPK Causes Cell Cycle Arrest in LKB1-deficient Cells via Activation of CAMKK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah; Ross, Fiona A.; Ciruelos, Diana Vara; Gray, Alexander; Gowans, Graeme J.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2017-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172, either by the tumor suppressor kinase LKB1 or by an alternate pathway involving the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase, CAMKK2. Increases in AMP:ATP and ADP:ATP ratios, signifying energy deficit, promote allosteric activation and net Thr172 phosphorylation mediated by LKB1, so that the LKB1-AMPK pathway acts as an energy sensor. Many tumor cells carry loss-of-function mutations in the STK11 gene encoding LKB1, but LKB1 re-expression in these cells causes cell cycle arrest. Therefore, it was investigated as to whether arrest by LKB1 is caused by activation of AMPK or of one of the AMPK-related kinases, which are also dependent on LKB1 but are not activated by CAMKK2. In three LKB1-null tumor cell lines, treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 caused a G1-arrest that correlated with AMPK activation and Thr172 phosphorylation. In G361 cells, expression of a truncated, CAMKK2 mutant also caused G1-arrest similar to that caused by expression of LKB1, while expression of a dominant negative AMPK mutant, or a double knockout of both AMPK-α subunits, also prevented the cell cycle arrest caused by A23187. These mechanistic findings confirm that AMPK activation triggers cell cycle arrest, and also suggest that the rapid proliferation of LKB1-null tumor cells is due to lack of the restraining influence of AMPK. However, cell cycle arrest can be restored by re-expressing LKB1 or a constitutively active CAMKK2, or by pharmacological agents that increase intracellular Ca2+ and thus activate endogenous CAMKK2. Implications Evidence here reveals that the rapid growth and proliferation of cancer cells lacking the tumor suppressor LKB1 is due to reduced activity of AMPK, and suggests a therapeutic approach by which this block might be circumvented. PMID:27141100

  20. A mutation-promotive role of nucleotide excision repair in cell cycle-arrested cell populations following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Erich; Eisler, Herfried; Lengheimer, Theresia; Dorninger, Petra; Steinboeck, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Growing attention is paid to the concept that mutations arising in stationary, non-proliferating cell populations considerably contribute to evolution, aging, and pathogenesis. If such mutations are beneficial to the affected cell, in the sense of allowing a restart of proliferation, they are called adaptive mutations. In order to identify cellular processes responsible for adaptive mutagenesis in eukaryotes, we study frameshift mutations occurring during auxotrophy-caused cell cycle arrest in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous work has shown that an exposure of cells to UV irradiation during prolonged cell cycle arrest resulted in an increased incidence of mutations. In the present work, we determined the influence of defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway on the incidence of UV-induced adaptive mutations in stationary cells. The mutation frequency was decreased in Rad16-deficient cells and further decreased in Rad16/Rad26 double-deficient cells. A knockout of the RAD14 gene, the ortholog of the human XPA gene, even resulted in a nearly complete abolishment of UV-induced mutagenesis in cell cycle-arrested cells. Thus, the NER pathway, responsible for a normally accurate repair of UV-induced DNA damage, paradoxically is required for the generation and/or fixation of UV-induced frameshift mutations specifically in non-replicating cells.

  1. PLZF mutation alters mouse hematopoietic stem cell function and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Platet, Nadine; Vandevelde, Amelle; Poplineau, Mathilde; Koubi, Myriam; Finetti, Pascal; Tiberi, Guillaume; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Bertucci, François; Duprez, Estelle

    2016-04-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood populations due to their long-term self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capacities. Because they have to persist throughout an organism's life span, HSCs tightly regulate the balance between proliferation and quiescence. Here, we investigated the role of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (plzf) in HSC fate using the Zbtb16(lu/lu)mouse model, which harbors a natural spontaneous mutation that inactivates plzf. Regenerative stress revealed that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs had a lineage-skewing potential from lymphopoiesis toward myelopoiesis, an increase in the long-term-HSC pool, and a decreased repopulation potential. Furthermore, oldplzf-mutant HSCs present an amplified aging phenotype, suggesting that plzf controls age-related pathway. We found that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs harbor a transcriptional signature associated with a loss of stemness and cell cycle deregulation. Lastly, cell cycle analyses revealed an important role for plzf in the regulation of the G1-S transition of HSCs. Our study reveals a new role for plzf in regulating HSC function that is linked to cell cycle regulation, and positions plzf as a key player in controlling HSC homeostasis.

  2. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  3. Characteristics and Behavior of Cycled Aged Lithium Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    service cycle and provide the cornerstone for safety analysis. 18650 Cells with representative chemistry of cells contained in current Army procured...their relevance to this effort warrants inclusion. 1-3 EXPERIMENTAL Representative 18650 cells were cycled at different rates and environmental...conditions. The 18650 chemistry used in this effort is a LiCoO2 lithium ion electrochemical cell. The bulk of this effort was conducted with 1.5 Amp-hr

  4. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  5. A Method to Design Synthetic Cell-Cycle Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Ke-Ke

    2009-01-01

    The interactions among proteins, DNA and RNA in an organism form elaborate cell-cycle networks which govern cell growth and proliferation. Understanding the common structure of ce11-cycle networks will be of great benefit to science research. Here, inspired by the importance of the cell-cycle regulatory network of yeast which has been studied intensively, we focus on small networks with 11 nodes, equivalent to that of the cell-cycle regulatory network used by Li et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101(2004)4781] Using a Boolean model, we study the correlation between structure and function, and a possible common structure. It is found that cascade-like networks with a great number of interactions between nodes are stable. Based on these findings, we are able to construct synthetic networks that have the same functions as the cell-cycle regulatory network.

  6. Osthole inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lintao Wang; Yanyan Peng; Kaikai Shi; Haixiao Wang; Jianlei Lu; Yanli Li; Changyan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that osthole,an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson,a traditional Chinese medicine,possesses anticancer activity.However,its effect on breast cancer cells so far has not been elucidated clearly.In the present study,we evaluated the effects of osthole on the proliferation,cell cycle and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 435.We demonstrated that osthole is effective in inhibiting the proliferation of MDA-MB 435 cells,The mitochondrion-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in apoptosis induced by osthole,as indicated by activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed by PARP degradation.The mechanism underlying its effect on the induction of G1 phase arrest was due to the up-regulation of p53 and p21 and down-regulation of Cdk2 and cyclin D1 expression.Were observed taken together,these findings suggest that the anticancer efficacy of osthole is mediated via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and osthole may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against human breast cancer.

  7. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine;

    2009-01-01

    During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  8. The puzzle of the Krebs citric acid cycle: assembling the pieces of chemically feasible reactions, and opportunism in the design of metabolic pathways during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-Hevia, E; Waddell, T G; Cascante, M

    1996-09-01

    The evolutionary origin of the Krebs citric acid cycle has been for a long time a model case in the understanding of the origin and evolution of metabolic pathways: How can the emergence of such a complex pathway be explained? A number of speculative studies have been carried out that have reached the conclusion that the Krebs cycle evolved from pathways for amino acid biosynthesis, but many important questions remain open: Why and how did the full pathway emerge from there? Are other alternative routes for the same purpose possible? Are they better or worse? Have they had any opportunity to be developed in cellular metabolism evolution? We have analyzed the Krebs cycle as a problem of chemical design to oxidize acetate yielding reduction equivalents to the respiratory chain to make ATP. Our analysis demonstrates that although there are several different chemical solutions to this problem, the design of this metabolic pathway as it occurs in living cells is the best chemical solution: It has the least possible number of steps and it also has the greatest ATP yielding. Study of the evolutionary possibilities of each one-taking the available material to build new pathways-demonstrates that the emergence of the Krebs cycle has been a typical case of opportunism in molecular evolution. Our analysis proves, therefore, that the role of opportunism in evolution has converted a problem of several possible chemical solutions into a single-solution problem, with the actual Krebs cycle demonstrated to be the best possible chemical design. Our results also allow us to derive the rules under which metabolic pathways emerged during the origin of life.

  9. Functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Yongfeng; Fu, Da; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaoming; Liao, Meilin; Lu, Shun

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is the major enzyme in the Phosphatidylcholine (PC) cycle and is involved in many long-term cellular responses such as activation, proliferation, and differentiation events. Cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) is an essential cell-cycle regulator required for the completion of mitosis. Our previous studies identified the interaction between PC-PLC and Cdc20. Through the interaction, Cdc20 could mediate the degradation of PC-PLC by Cdc20-mediated ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). In this study, we found that PC-PLC might not be involved in cancer metastasis. Inhibition of PC-PLC by D609 could cause cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis inhibition in CBRH-7919 cells. Inhibition of PC-PLC could also influence the cell cycle by arresting the cells in G1 phase, and Cdc20 might be involved in these processes. Taken together, in this report, we provided new evidence for the functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis in CBRH-7919 cells.

  10. Choreography of the transcriptome, photophysiology, and cell cycle of a minimal photoautotroph, prochlorococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Erik R; Lindell, Debbie; Johnson, Zackary I; Futschik, Matthias E; Steglich, Claudia; Coleman, Maureen L; Wright, Matthew A; Rector, Trent; Steen, Robert; McNulty, Nathan; Thompson, Luke R; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus MED4 has the smallest genome and cell size of all known photosynthetic organisms. Like all phototrophs at temperate latitudes, it experiences predictable daily variation in available light energy which leads to temporal regulation and partitioning of key cellular processes. To better understand the tempo and choreography of this minimal phototroph, we studied the entire transcriptome of the cell over a simulated daily light-dark cycle, and placed it in the context of diagnostic physiological and cell cycle parameters. All cells in the culture progressed through their cell cycles in synchrony, thus ensuring that our measurements reflected the behavior of individual cells. Ninety percent of the annotated genes were expressed, and 80% had cyclic expression over the diel cycle. For most genes, expression peaked near sunrise or sunset, although more subtle phasing of gene expression was also evident. Periodicities of the transcripts of genes involved in physiological processes such as in cell cycle progression, photosynthesis, and phosphorus metabolism tracked the timing of these activities relative to the light-dark cycle. Furthermore, the transitions between photosynthesis during the day and catabolic consumption of energy reserves at night- metabolic processes that share some of the same enzymes--appear to be tightly choreographed at the level of RNA expression. In-depth investigation of these patterns identified potential regulatory proteins involved in balancing these opposing pathways. Finally, while this analysis has not helped resolve how a cell with so little regulatory capacity, and a 'deficient' circadian mechanism, aligns its cell cycle and metabolism so tightly to a light-dark cycle, it does provide us with a valuable framework upon which to build when the Prochlorococcus proteome and metabolome become available.

  11. A computational model for the identification of biochemical pathways in the krebs cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joseph S; Bailey, Colin G; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B; Dixon, David A; Gull, Dean W; Chandler, Mary L

    2003-01-01

    We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO(2) and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH(2), is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

  12. Connecting the nucleolus to the cell cycle and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Robert Y L; Pederson, Thoru

    2014-08-01

    Long known as the center of ribosome synthesis, the nucleolus is connected to cell cycle regulation in more subtle ways. One is a surveillance system that reacts promptly when rRNA synthesis or processing is impaired, halting cell cycle progression. Conversely, the nucleolus also acts as a first-responder to growth-related stress signals. Here we review emerging concepts on how these "infraribosomal" links between the nucleolus and cell cycle progression operate in both forward and reverse gears. We offer perspectives on how new cancer therapeutic designs that target this infraribosomal mode of cell growth control may shape future clinical progress.

  13. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  14. DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest: a hallmark of apoptosis induced by Ruta graveolens in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shagun; Tandon, Simran

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of various potencies of Ruta graveolens (Ruta) on COLO-205 cell line, as evidenced by cytotoxicity, migration, clonogenecity, morphological and biochemical changes and modification in the levels of genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle. On treatment of COLO-205 cells maximal effects were seen with mother tincture (MT) and 30C potencies, wherein decrease in cell viability along with reduced clonogenecity and migration capabilities were noted. In addition morphological and biochemical alterations such as nuclear changes (fragmented nuclei with condensed chromatin) and DNA ladder-like pattern (increased amount of fragmented DNA) in COLO-205 cells indicating apoptotic related cell death were seen. The expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle related regulatory genes assessed by reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed an up-regulation of caspase 9, caspase-3, Bax, p21 and p27 expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression in treated cells. The mode of cell death was suggestive of intrinsic apoptotic pathway along with cell cycle arrest at the G2/M of the cell cycle. Our findings indicate that phytochemicals present in Ruta showed potential for natural therapeutic product development for colon carcinoma.

  15. Xanthohumol inhibits cell cycle progression and proliferation of larynx cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Stepulak, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2015-10-05

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylflavonoid derived from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.) has been found to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological properties, including anti-cancer activity. In this study, the mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity of XN in human RK33 and RK45 larynx cancer cell lines were investigated. The effect of XN on the viability of larynx cancer and normal cells (human skin fibroblasts HSF and rat oligodendroglia-derived cells, OLN-93) was compared. Additionally, the influence of XN on proliferation, cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis in larynx cancer cells, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying in these processes were analyzed. XN promoted the reduction of cell viability in cancer cells, but showed low cytotoxicity to normal cells. The decrease in cell viability in the cancer cells was coupled with induction of apoptosis via two pathways. The mechanisms involved in these effects of XN were associated with cell growth inhibition by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, increased p53 and p21/WAF1 expression levels, downregulation of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2, and activation of caspases-9, -8, and -3. Moreover, this compound inhibited phosphorylation of ERK1/2, suggesting a key role of the ERKs pathway in the XN-mediated growth suppressing effects against the studied cells. These results indicate that XN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of patients with larynx cancer.

  16. The cell cycle regulated transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Archer

    Full Text Available Progression of the eukaryotic cell cycle requires the regulation of hundreds of genes to ensure that they are expressed at the required times. Integral to cell cycle progression in yeast and animal cells are temporally controlled, progressive waves of transcription mediated by cell cycle-regulated transcription factors. However, in the kinetoplastids, a group of early-branching eukaryotes including many important pathogens, transcriptional regulation is almost completely absent, raising questions about the extent of cell-cycle regulation in these organisms and the mechanisms whereby regulation is achieved. Here, we analyse gene expression over the Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle, measuring changes in mRNA abundance on a transcriptome-wide scale. We developed a "double-cut" elutriation procedure to select unperturbed, highly synchronous cell populations from log-phase cultures, and compared this to synchronization by starvation. Transcriptome profiling over the cell cycle revealed the regulation of at least 430 genes. While only a minority were homologous to known cell cycle regulated transcripts in yeast or human, their functions correlated with the cellular processes occurring at the time of peak expression. We searched for potential target sites of RNA-binding proteins in these transcripts, which might earmark them for selective degradation or stabilization. Over-represented sequence motifs were found in several co-regulated transcript groups and were conserved in other kinetoplastids. Furthermore, we found evidence for cell-cycle regulation of a flagellar protein regulon with a highly conserved sequence motif, bearing similarity to consensus PUF-protein binding motifs. RNA sequence motifs that are functional in cell-cycle regulation were more widespread than previously expected and conserved within kinetoplastids. These findings highlight the central importance of post-transcriptional regulation in the proliferation of parasitic kinetoplastids.

  17. Fisetin and hesperetin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in chronic myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by modulation of cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-05-01

    Fisetin and hesperetin, naturally occurring flavonoids, have been reported as novel antioxidants with chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic potential against various types of cancer. However, their mechanism of action in CML is still unknown. This particular study aims to evaluate the therapeutic potentials of fisetin and hesperetin and their effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression in human K562 CML cells. The results indicated that fisetin and hesperetin inhibited cell proliferation and triggered programmed cell death in these cells. The latter was confırmed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization and an increase in caspase-3 activation. In addition to that, we have detected S and G2/M cell cycle arrests and G0/G1 arrest upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment, respectively. To identify the altered genes and genetic networks in response to fisetin and hesperetin, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. The microarray gene profiling analysis revealed some important signaling pathways including JAK/STAT pathway, KIT receptor signaling, and growth hormone receptor signaling that were altered upon fisetin and hesperetin treatment. Moreover, microarray data suggested potential candidate genes for targeted CML therapy. Fisetin and hesperetin significantly modulated the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and division, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, and other significant cellular processes such as replication, transcription, and translation. In conclusion, our results suggest that fisetin and hesperetin as potential natural agents for CML therapy.

  18. Cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in regulation of the cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Singh

    Full Text Available The cell cycle is a ubiquitous, multi-step process that is essential for growth and proliferation of cells. The role of membrane lipids in cell cycle regulation is not explored well, although a large number of cytoplasmic and nuclear regulators have been identified. We focus in this work on the role of membrane cholesterol in cell cycle regulation. In particular, we have explored the stringency of the requirement of cholesterol in the regulation of cell cycle progression. For this purpose, we utilized distal and proximal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, and monitored their effect on cell cycle progression. We show that cholesterol content increases in S phase and inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis results in cell cycle arrest in G1 phase under certain conditions. Interestingly, G1 arrest mediated by cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, our results show that the requirement of cholesterol for G1 to S transition is absolute, and even immediate biosynthetic precursors of cholesterol, differing with cholesterol merely in a double bond, could not replace cholesterol for reversing the cell cycle arrest. These results are useful in the context of diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, that are associated with impaired cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis.

  19. Cell cycling and patterned cell proliferation in the wing primordium of Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The pattern of cell proliferation in the Drosophila imaginal wing primordium is spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Direct visualization of cells in S, G2, and mitosis phases of the cell cycle reveals several features invariant throughout development. The fraction of cells in the disc in the different cell cycle stages is constant, the majority remaining in G1. Cells in the different phases of the cell cycle mainly appear in small synchronic clusters that are nonclonally derived but resul...

  20. Disconnected circadian and cell cycles in a tumor-driven cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Yeom, Mijung; Bryan A. Reyes; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Cell division occurs at a specific time of day in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian and cell cycles are coupled in vivo. By measuring the cell cycle rhythm in real-time, we recently showed that the circadian and cell cycles are not coupled in immortalized fibroblasts, resulting in a rapid rate of cell division even though the circadian rhythm is normal in these cells. Here we report that tumor-driven Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells have perfectly temperature compensated circadi...

  1. Cell cycle-dependent induction of autophagy, mitophagy and reticulophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Vitale, Ilio; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Hickman, John A; Geneste, Olivier; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-09-15

    When added to cells, a variety of autophagy inducers that operate through distinct mechanisms and target different organelles for autophagic destruction (mitochondria in mitophagy, endoplasmic reticulum in reticulophagy) rarely induce autophagic vacuolization in more than 50% or the cells. Here we show that this heterogeneity may be explained by cell cycle-specific effects. The BH3 mimetic ABT737, lithium, rapamycin, tunicamycin or nutrient depletion stereotypically induce autophagy preferentially in the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle, as determined by simultaneous monitoring of cell cycle markers and the cytoplasmic aggregation of GFP-LC3 in autophagic vacuoles. These results point to a hitherto neglected crosstalk between autophagic vacuolization and cell cycle regulation.

  2. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  3. Translation-independent circadian control of the cell cycle in a unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Sumiya, Nobuko; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Nakano, Akihiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Mami

    2014-05-08

    Circadian rhythms of cell division have been observed in several lineages of eukaryotes, especially photosynthetic unicellular eukaryotes. However, the mechanism underlying the circadian regulation of the cell cycle and the nature of the advantage conferred remain unknown. Here, using the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that the G1/S regulator RBR-E2F-DP complex links the G1/S transition to circadian rhythms. Time-dependent E2F phosphorylation promotes the G1/S transition during subjective night and this phosphorylation event occurs independently of cell cycle progression, even under continuous dark or when cytosolic translation is inhibited. Constitutive expression of a phospho-mimic of E2F or depletion of RBR unlinks cell cycle progression from circadian rhythms. These transgenic lines are exposed to higher oxidative stress than the wild type. Circadian inhibition of cell cycle progression during the daytime by RBR-E2F-DP pathway likely protects cells from photosynthetic oxidative stress by temporally compartmentalizing photosynthesis and cell cycle progression.

  4. Activation of the cell wall integrity pathway promotes escape from G2 in the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Carbó

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that MAPK activation in budding and fission yeasts is often associated with negative effects on cell cycle progression, resulting in delay or arrest at a specific stage in the cell cycle, thereby enabling cells to adapt to changing environmental conditions. For instance, activation of the Cell Wall Integrity (CWI pathway in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae signals an increase in CDK inhibitory phosphorylation, which leads cells to remain in the G2 phase. Here we characterized the CWI pathway of Ustilago maydis, a fungus evolutionarily distant from budding and fission yeasts, and show that activation of the CWI pathway forces cells to escape from G2 phase. In spite of these disparate cell cycle responses in S. cerevisiae and U. maydis, the CWI pathway in both organisms appears to respond to the same class cell wall stressors. To understand the basis of such a difference, we studied the mechanism behind the U. maydis response. We found that activation of CWI pathway in U. maydis results in a decrease in CDK inhibitory phosphorylation, which depends on the mitotic phosphatase Cdc25. Moreover, in response to activation of the CWI pathway, Cdc25 accumulates in the nucleus, providing a likely explanation for the increase in the unphosphorylated form of CDK. We also found that the extended N-terminal domain of Cdc25, which is dispensable under normal growth conditions, is required for this G2 escape as well as for resistance to cell wall stressors. We propose that the process of cell cycle adaptation to cell stress evolved differently in these two divergent organisms so that each can move towards a cell cycle phase most appropriate for responding to the environmental signals encountered.

  5. Activation of the cell wall integrity pathway promotes escape from G2 in the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbó, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2010-07-01

    It is widely accepted that MAPK activation in budding and fission yeasts is often associated with negative effects on cell cycle progression, resulting in delay or arrest at a specific stage in the cell cycle, thereby enabling cells to adapt to changing environmental conditions. For instance, activation of the Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae signals an increase in CDK inhibitory phosphorylation, which leads cells to remain in the G2 phase. Here we characterized the CWI pathway of Ustilago maydis, a fungus evolutionarily distant from budding and fission yeasts, and show that activation of the CWI pathway forces cells to escape from G2 phase. In spite of these disparate cell cycle responses in S. cerevisiae and U. maydis, the CWI pathway in both organisms appears to respond to the same class cell wall stressors. To understand the basis of such a difference, we studied the mechanism behind the U. maydis response. We found that activation of CWI pathway in U. maydis results in a decrease in CDK inhibitory phosphorylation, which depends on the mitotic phosphatase Cdc25. Moreover, in response to activation of the CWI pathway, Cdc25 accumulates in the nucleus, providing a likely explanation for the increase in the unphosphorylated form of CDK. We also found that the extended N-terminal domain of Cdc25, which is dispensable under normal growth conditions, is required for this G2 escape as well as for resistance to cell wall stressors. We propose that the process of cell cycle adaptation to cell stress evolved differently in these two divergent organisms so that each can move towards a cell cycle phase most appropriate for responding to the environmental signals encountered.

  6. Andrographolide Suppresses Proliferation of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells via Attenuating NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer due to its capacity to inactivate NF-κB pathway. Previous studies showed the therapeutic potential of targeting NF-κB pathway in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. However, the anticancer activity of Andro in NPC has not been reported. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in NPC and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our results showed that Andro significantly inhibited the proliferation and invasion of NPC cells (P<0.05, resp.. These anticancer activities were associated with cell apoptosis, cell death and induction of cell cycle arrest, and the downregulation of NF-κB target genes. This work provides evidence that NF-κB pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer activities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  7. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCHMITT Estelle; PAQUET Claudie; BEAUCHEMIN Myriam; BERTRAND Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation,cellular senescence and cell death.Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities.Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms.Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death.The intimate link between the cell cycle,cellular senescence,apoptosis regulation,cancer development and tumor responses to cancer treatment has become eminently apparent.Extensive research on tumor suppressor genes,oncogenes,the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes has revealed how the DNA damage-sensing and -signaling pathways,referred to as the DNA-damage response network,are tied to cell proliferation,cell-cycle arrest,cellular senescence and apoptosis.DNA-damage responses are complex,involving "sensor" proteins that sense the damage,and transmit signals to "transducer" proteins,which,in turn,convey the signals to numerous "effector" proteins implicated in specific cellular pathways,including DNA repair mechanisms,cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis.The Bcl-2 family of proteins stands among the most crucial regulators of apoptosis and performs vital functions in deciding whether a cell will live or die after cancer chemotherapy and irradiation.In addition,several studies have now revealed that members of the Bcl-2 family also interface with the cell cycle,DNA repair/recombination and cellular senescence,effects that are generally distinct from their function in apoptosis.In this review,we report progress in understanding the molecular networks that regulate cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis after DNA damage,and discuss the influence of some Bcl-2 family members on cell-cycle checkpoint regulation.

  8. Disconnected circadian and cell cycles in a tumor-driven cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Julie S; Yeom, Mijung; Reyes, Bryan A; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-11-01

    Cell division occurs at a specific time of day in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian and cell cycles are coupled in vivo. By measuring the cell cycle rhythm in real-time, we recently showed that the circadian and cell cycles are not coupled in immortalized fibroblasts, resulting in a rapid rate of cell division even though the circadian rhythm is normal in these cells. Here we report that tumor-driven Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells have perfectly temperature compensated circadian clocks, but the periods of their cell cycle gene expression rhythms are temperature-dependent, suggesting that their circadian and cell cycles are not connected. These data support our hypothesis that decoupling of the circadian and cell cycles may underlie aberrant cell division in tumor cells.

  9. Kaempferol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma through EGFR/p38 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenbin; Dang, Qiang; Xu, Defeng; Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Long, Qingzhi; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in several tumors, but not in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present study, we investigated the effects of kaempferol and the underlying mechanism(s) on the cell growth of RCC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to study cell growth, and flow cytometry was used to study apoptosis and cell cycles in different RCC cells treated with various doses of kaempferol. A significant inhibition on cell growth, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were observed in 786-O and 769-P cells after kaempferol treatment compared with the control group. Moreover, the results clearly showed that kaempferol causes a strong inhibition of the activation of the EGFR/p38 signaling pathways, upregulation of p21 expression and downregulation of cyclin B1 expression in human RCC cells, together with activation of PARP cleavages, induction of apoptotic death and inhibition of cell growth. Collectively, our results suggest that kaempferol may serve as a candidate for chemo-preventive or chemotherapeutic agents for RCC.

  10. Kaempferol inhibits cell proliferation and glycolysis in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma via targeting EGFR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shihua; Wang, Xiaowei; Li, Chunguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Jin, Hai; Fang, Wentao

    2016-08-01

    Antitumor activity of kaempferol has been studied in various tumor types, but its potency in esophagus squamous cell carcinoma is rarely known. Here, we reported the activity of kaempferol against esophagus squamous cell carcinoma as well as its antitumor mechanisms. Results of cell proliferation and colony formation assay showed that kaempferol substantially inhibited tumor cell proliferation and clone formation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that tumor cells were induced G0/G1 phase arrest after kaempferol treatment, and the expression of protein involved in cell cycle regulation was dramatically changed. Except the potency on cell proliferation, we also discovered that kaempferol had a significant inhibitory effect against tumor glycolysis. With the downregulation of hexokinase-2, glucose uptake and lactate production in tumor cells were dramatically declined. Mechanism studies revealed kaempferol had a direct effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity, and along with the inhibition of EGFR, its downstream signaling pathways were also markedly suppressed. Further investigations found that exogenous overexpression of EGFR in tumor cells substantially attenuated glycolysis suppression induced by kaempferol, which implied that EGFR also played an important role in kaempferol-mediated glycolysis inhibition. Finally, the antitumor activity of kaempferol was validated in xenograft model and kaempferol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, dramatic decrease of EGFR activity and hexokinase-2 expression were observed in kaempferol-treated tumor tissue, which confirmed these findings in vitro. Briefly, these studies suggested that kaempferol, or its analogues, may serve as effective candidates for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma management.

  11. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  12. Side population sorting separates subfractions of cycling and non-cycling intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. von Furstenberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here that side population (SP sorting allows for the simultaneous isolation of two intestinal stem cell (ISC subsets from wild-type (WT mice which are phenotypically different and represent cycling and non-cycling pools of cells. Following 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU injection, in the upper side population (USP the percentage of EdU+ was 36% showing this fraction to be highly proliferative. In the lower side population (LSP, only 0.4% of cells were EdU+, indicating this fraction to be predominantly non-cycling. Using Lgr5-EGFP mice, we show that Lgr5-EGFPhi cells, representing actively cycling ISCs, are essentially exclusive to the USP. In contrast, using histone 2B-YFP mice, SP analysis revealed YFP label retaining cells (LRCs in both the USP and the LSP. Correspondingly, evaluation of the SP fractions for mRNA markers by qRT-PCR showed that the USP was enriched in transcripts associated with both quiescent and active ISCs. In contrast, the LSP expressed mRNA markers of quiescent ISCs while being de-enriched for those of the active ISC. Both the USP and LSP are capable of generating enteroids in culture which include the four intestinal lineages. We conclude that sorting of USP and LSP fractions represents a novel isolation of cycling and non-cycling ISCs from WT mice.

  13. Estrogen receptor alpha is cell cycle-regulated and regulates the cell cycle in a ligand-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JavanMoghadam, Sonia; Weihua, Zhang; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-06-17

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in several cell cycle regulatory events and is an important predictive marker of disease outcome in breast cancer patients. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism through which ERα influences proliferation in breast cancer cells. Our results show that ERα protein is cell cycle-regulated in human breast cancer cells and that the presence of 17-β-estradiol (E2) in the culture medium shortened the cell cycle significantly (by 4.5 hours, P fashion. These results provide the rationale for an effective treatment strategy that includes a cell cycle inhibitor in combination with a drug that lowers estrogen levels, such as an aromatase inhibitor, and an antiestrogen that does not result in the degradation of ERα, such as tamoxifen.

  14. Hedgehog signaling acts with the temporal cascade to promote neuroblast cell cycle exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phing Chian Chai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila postembryonic neuroblasts, transition in gene expression programs of a cascade of transcription factors (also known as the temporal series acts together with the asymmetric division machinery to generate diverse neurons with distinct identities and regulate the end of neuroblast proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism of how this "temporal series" acts during development remains unclear. Here, we show that Hh signaling in the postembryonic brain is temporally regulated; excess (earlier onset of Hh signaling causes premature neuroblast cell cycle exit and under-proliferation, whereas loss of Hh signaling causes delayed cell cycle exit and excess proliferation. Moreover, the Hh pathway functions downstream of Castor but upstream of Grainyhead, two components of the temporal series, to schedule neuroblast cell cycle exit. Interestingly, hh is likely a target of Castor. Hence, Hh signaling provides a link between the temporal series and the asymmetric division machinery in scheduling the end of neurogenesis.

  15. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  16. Targeting stem cell signaling pathways for drug discovery: advances in the Notch and Wnt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Songzhu Michael; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, JingYi; Li, LingSong

    2014-06-01

    Signaling pathways transduce extracellular stimuli into cells through molecular cascades to regulate cellular functions. In stem cells, a small number of pathways, notably those of TGF-β/BMP, Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt, are responsible for the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation. During embryonic development, these pathways govern cell fate specifications as well as the formation of tissues and organs. In adulthood, their normal functions are important for tissue homeostasis and regeneration, whereas aberrations result in diseases, such as cancer and degenerative disorders. In complex biological systems, stem cell signaling pathways work in concert as a network and exhibit crosstalk, such as the negative crosstalk between Wnt and Notch. Over the past decade, genetic and genomic studies have identified a number of potential drug targets that are involved in stem cell signaling pathways. Indeed, discovery of new targets and drugs for these pathways has become one of the most active areas in both the research community and pharmaceutical industry. Remarkable progress has been made and several promising drug candidates have entered into clinical trials. This review focuses on recent advances in the discovery of novel drugs which target the Notch and Wnt pathways.

  17. Cell-Cycle Inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Claudia; Sommi, Patrizia; Pasquetto, Maria Valentina; Cappelletti, Donata; Stivala, Simona; Mignosi, Paola; Savio, Monica; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Valentini, Giovanna; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Merrell, Douglas Scott; Franchini, Silvia; Verona, Maria Luisa; Bolis, Cristina; Solcia, Enrico; Manca, Rachele; Franciotta, Diego; Casasco, Andrea; Filipazzi, Paola; Zardini, Elisabetta; Vannini, Vanio

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application. PMID:21085483

  18. Studies on regulation of the cell cycle in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Požgajová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms including plants and animals are composed of millions of cells. These cells perform different functions for the organism although they possess the same chromosomes and carry the same genetic information. Thus, to be able to understand multicellular organism we need to understand the life cycle of individual cells from which the organism comprises. The cell cycle is the life cycle of a single cell in the plant or animal body. It involves series of events in which components of the cell doubles and afterwards equally segregate into daughter cells. Such process ensures growth of the organism, and specialized reductional cell division which leads to production of gamets, assures sexual reproduction. Cell cycle is divided in the G1, S, G2 and M phase. Two gap-phases (G1 and G2 separate S phase (or synthesis and M phase which stays either for mitosis or meiosis. Essential for normal life progression and reproduction is correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Defects in the division program lead to aneuploidy, which in turn leads to birth defects, miscarriages or cancer. Even thou, researchers invented much about the regulation of the cell cycle, there is still long way to understand the complexity of the regulatory machineries that ensure proper segregation of chromosomes. In this paper we would like to describe techniques and materials we use for our studies on chromosome segregation in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  19. Cell-cycle inhibition by Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Scotti

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major human pathogen causing chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. One of the mechanisms whereby it induces damage depends on its interference with proliferation of host tissues. We here describe the discovery of a novel bacterial factor able to inhibit the cell-cycle of exposed cells, both of gastric and non-gastric origin. An integrated approach was adopted to isolate and characterise the molecule from the bacterial culture filtrate produced in a protein-free medium: size-exclusion chromatography, non-reducing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, mutant analysis, recombinant protein expression and enzymatic assays. L-asparaginase was identified as the factor responsible for cell-cycle inhibition of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. Its effect on cell-cycle was confirmed by inhibitors, a knockout strain and the action of recombinant L-asparaginase on cell lines. Interference with cell-cycle in vitro depended on cell genotype and was related to the expression levels of the concurrent enzyme asparagine synthetase. Bacterial subcellular distribution of L-asparaginase was also analysed along with its immunogenicity. H. pylori L-asparaginase is a novel antigen that functions as a cell-cycle inhibitor of fibroblasts and gastric cell lines. We give evidence supporting a role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-related diseases and discuss its potential diagnostic application.

  20. Intercellular Coupling of the Cell Cycle and Circadian Clock in Adult Stem Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu-Ura, Toru; Dovzhenok, Andrey; Aihara, Eitaro; Rood, Jill; Le, Hung; Ren, Yan; Rosselot, Andrew E; Zhang, Tongli; Lee, Choogon; Obrietan, Karl; Montrose, Marshall H; Lim, Sookkyung; Moore, Sean R; Hong, Christian I

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clock-gated cell division cycles are observed from cyanobacteria to mammals via intracellular molecular connections between these two oscillators. Here we demonstrate WNT-mediated intercellular coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clock in 3D murine intestinal organoids (enteroids). The circadian clock gates a population of cells with heterogeneous cell-cycle times that emerge as 12-hr synchronized cell division cycles. Remarkably, we observe reduced-amplitude oscillations of circadian rhythms in intestinal stem cells and progenitor cells, indicating an intercellular signal arising from differentiated cells governing circadian clock-dependent synchronized cell division cycles. Stochastic simulations and experimental validations reveal Paneth cell-secreted WNT as the key intercellular coupling component linking the circadian clock and cell cycle in enteroids.

  1. Cell cycle effects of L-sulforaphane, a major antioxidant from cruciferous vegetables: The role of the anaphase promoting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Zhaoping; Royce, Simon G; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    L-sulforaphane (LSF) is a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables particularly broccoli. LSF has been identified as a potent antioxidant and anti-cancer agent and is widely known to regulate phase II detoxifying enzymes and induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in malignant cells in vitro and in vivo. Previous studies have found significant G2/M cell cycle arrest in response to LSF in various model of cancer and results have mainly been attributed to increased cyclin B1 protein levels and increased p21expression. Using genome-wide mRNA-Seq analysis we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of LSF to identify a key pathway in cell cycle progression - the role of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) pathway. We evaluated gene expression changes in human erythroleukemic K562 cells following treatment with 15 μM LSF for 48h and compared them to immortalized human keratinocytes, human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) cells and normal human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). We identified disparate gene expression changes in response to LSF between malignant and normal cells and immortalized cell lines. The results highlight significant down-regulation of kinase CDK1 which is suggestive that the existence and activity of APC/CDC20 complex will be inhibited along with its associated down-stream degradation of key cell cycle regulators preventing cell cycle progression from mitotic exit.

  2. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxymethylation, and cell fate determination.

  3. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Gersende; Hussein, Mourad; Kulis, Marta; Delaloy, Céline; Chatonnet, Fabrice; Pignarre, Amandine; Avner, Stéphane; Lemarié, Maud; Mahé, Elise A; Verdaguer-Dot, Núria; Queirós, Ana C; Tarte, Karin; Martín-Subero, José I; Salbert, Gilles; Fest, Thierry

    2015-11-03

    Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-?1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxy)methylation, and cell fate determination.

  4. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  5. Two cell cycle blocks caused by iron chelation of neuroblastoma cells: separating cell cycle events associated with each block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardana, Gamini; Seligman, Paul A

    2013-12-01

    Studies have presented evidence that besides the well described S phase block, treatment of cancer cell lines with the iron chelator deferrioxamine (DFO) also results in an earlier block in G1 phase. In this article, measurements of cell cycle regulatory proteins define this block at a very specific point in G1. DFO treatment results in markedly decreased cyclin A protein levels. Cyclin E levels that accumulate in early to mid-G1 are increased in cells treated with DFO as compared to the resting cells. The DFO S phase block is shown after cells are arrested at G1/S by (aphidicolin) then released into DFO. The same S phase block occurs with DFO treatment of a neuroblastoma cell line relatively resistant to the G1 DFO block. These experiments clearly differentiate the S phase DFO block from the earlier block pinpointed to a point in mid-G1, before G1/S when cyclin E protein increases but before increased cyclin A synthesis. Apoptosis was observed in cells inhibited by DFO at both cell cycle arrest points.

  6. Technoeconomy of different solid oxide fuel cell based hybrid cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine, steam turbine and heat engine (Stirling engine) is used as bottoming cycle for a solid oxide fuel cell plant to compare different plants efficiencies, CO2 emissionsand plants cost in terms of $/kW. Each plant is then integrated with biomass gasification and finally six plants...... configurations are compared with each other. Technoeconomy is used when calculating the cost if the plants. It is found that when a solid oxide fuel cell plant is combined with a gas turbine cycle then the plant efficiency will be the highest one while if a biomass gasification plant is integrated...... with these hybrid cycles then integrated biomass gasification with solid oxide fuel cell and steam cycle will have the highest plant efficiency. The cost of solid oxide fuel cell with steam plant is found to be the lowest one with a value of about 1030$/kW....

  7. Cellular Clocks : Coupled Circadian Dispatch and Cell Division Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Roenneberg, Till

    2004-01-01

    Gating of cell division by the circadian clock is well known, yet its mechanism is little understood. Genetically tractable model systems have led to new hypotheses and questions concerning the coupling of these two cellular cycles.

  8. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  10. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  11. Thiocoraline alters neuroendocrine phenotype and activates the Notch pathway in MTC-TT cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfazghi, Sara; Eide, Jacob; Dammalapati, Ajitha; Korlesky, Colin; Wyche, Thomas P; Bugni, Tim S; Chen, Herbert; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata

    2013-10-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor (NET). Previous research has shown that activation of Notch signaling has a tumor suppressor role in NETs. The potential therapeutic effect of thiocoraline on the activation of the Notch pathway in an MTC cell line (TT) was investigated. Thiocoraline was isolated from a marine bacterium Verrucosispora sp. MTT assay (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) was used to determine the IC50 value and to measure cell proliferation. Western blot revealed the expression of Notch isoforms, NET, and cell cycle markers. Cell cycle progression was validated by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of Notch isoforms and downstream targets were measured using real-time PCR. The IC50 value for thiocoraline treatment in TT cells was determined to be 7.6 nmol/L. Thiocoraline treatment decreased cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The mechanism of growth inhibition was found to be cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Thiocoraline activated the Notch pathway as demonstrated by the dose-dependent increase in mRNA and protein expression of Notch isoforms. Furthermore, treatment with thiocoraline resulted in changes in the expression of downstream targets of the Notch pathway (HES1, HES2, HES6, HEY1, and HEY2) and reduced expression of NET markers, CgA, and ASCL1. Thiocoraline is a potent Notch pathway activator and an inhibitor of MTC-TT cell proliferation at low nanomolar concentrations. These results provide exciting evidence for the use of thiocoraline as a potential treatment for intractable MTC.

  12. ATM participates in the regulation of viability and cell cycle via ellipticine in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shuixiang; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Ellipticine, an alkaloid isolated from Apocyanaceae plants, has been demonstrated to exhibit antitumor activity in several cancers. However, the effect and the mechanisms underlying its action have not been investigated in human bladder cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of ellipticine on the behavior of T-24 bladder cancer cells. T-24 cells were treated with varying concentrations and durations of ellipticine. Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Cell motility was analyzed by Transwell migration assay. Flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were performed to detect the cell cycle and signaling pathways involved. The results demonstrated that ellipticine suppressed proliferation and inhibited the migration ability of T-24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and resulted in G2/M cell cycle arrest. The mechanism of this action was demonstrated to be due to ellipticine-triggered activation of the ATM serine/threonine kinase pathway. These data therefore suggest that ellipticine may be effective towards treating human bladder cancer. PMID:28138703

  13. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  14. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  15. The timing of T cell priming and cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard eObst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of specific lymphocytes is the central tenet of the clonal selection paradigm. Antigen recognition by T cells triggers a series of events that produces expanded clones of differentiated effector cells. TCR signaling events are detectable within seconds and minutes and are likely to continue for hours and days in vivo. Here, I review the work done on the importance of TCR signals in the later part of the expansion phase of the primary T cell response, primarily regarding the regulation of the cell cycle in CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The results suggest a degree of programming by early signals for effector differentiation, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment, with optimal expansion supported by persistent antigen presentation later on. Differences to CD4+ T cell expansion and new avenues towards a molecular understanding of cell cycle regulation in lymphocytes are discussed.

  16. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  17. Upregulation of Notch pathway molecules in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijioka, Hiroshi; Setoguchi, Takao; Miyawaki, Akihiko; Gao, Hui; Ishida, Takayuki; Komiya, Setsuro; Nakamura, Norifumi

    2010-04-01

    The constitutive activation of the Notch pathway has been demonstrated in various types of malignancies. However, it remains unclear how the Notch pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We investigated the expression of Notch pathway molecules in OSCC cell lines and biopsy specimens and examined the effect of Notch pathway inhibition. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed upregulation of Notch1, Notch2, Jagged1, HES1 and HEY1 in both OSCC cell lines and biopsy specimens. Immunohistochemical examination showed that the Notch intracellular domain accumulates in the nucleus of cells in OSCC cell lines and biopsy specimens. In addition, Jagged1 is expressed in the cytoplasm of cells in OSCC cell lines and biopsy specimens. Furthermore, Notch pathway inhibition using a gamma-secretase inhibitor prevented the growth of OSCC in vitro. These findings suggest that inhibition of the Notch pathway suppresses OSCC growth and may be a useful approach for the treatment of patients with OSCC.

  18. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  19. Pathway aberrations of murine melanoma cells observed in Paired-End diTag transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Edison

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the major cause of skin cancer deaths and melanoma incidence doubles every 10 to 20 years. However, little is known about melanoma pathway aberrations. Here we applied the robust Gene Identification Signature Paired End diTag (GIS-PET approach to investigate the melanoma transcriptome and characterize the global pathway aberrations. Methods GIS-PET technology directly links 5' mRNA signatures with their corresponding 3' signatures to generate, and then concatenate, PETs for efficient sequencing. We annotated PETs to pathways of KEGG database and compared the murine B16F1 melanoma transcriptome with three non-melanoma murine transcriptomes (Melan-a2 melanocytes, E14 embryonic stem cells, and E17.5 embryo. Gene expression levels as represented by PET counts were compared across melanoma and melanocyte libraries to identify the most significantly altered pathways and investigate the expression levels of crucial cancer genes. Results Melanin biosynthesis genes were solely expressed in the cells of melanocytic origin, indicating the feasibility of using the PET approach for transcriptome comparison. The most significantly altered pathways were metabolic pathways, including upregulated pathways: purine metabolism, aminophosphonate metabolism, tyrosine metabolism, selenoamino acid metabolism, galactose utilization, nitrobenzene degradation, and bisphenol A degradation; and downregulated pathways: oxidative phosphorylation, ATPase synthesis, TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and glutathione metabolism. The downregulated pathways concurrently indicated a slowdown of mitochondrial activities. Mitochondrial permeability was also significantly altered, as indicated by transcriptional activation of ATP/ADP, citrate/malate, Mg++, fatty acid and amino acid transporters, and transcriptional repression of zinc and metal ion transporters. Upregulation of cell cycle progression, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways were more limited to certain

  20. Pathway analyses implicate glial cells in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laramie E Duncan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The quest to understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ongoing with multiple lines of evidence indicating abnormalities of glia, mitochondria, and glutamate in both disorders. Despite high heritability estimates of 81% for schizophrenia and 75% for bipolar disorder, compelling links between findings from neurobiological studies, and findings from large-scale genetic analyses, are only beginning to emerge. METHOD: Ten publically available gene sets (pathways related to glia, mitochondria, and glutamate were tested for association to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using MAGENTA as the primary analysis method. To determine the robustness of associations, secondary analyses were performed with: ALIGATOR, INRICH, and Set Screen. Data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC were used for all analyses. There were 1,068,286 SNP-level p-values for schizophrenia (9,394 cases/12,462 controls, and 2,088,878 SNP-level p-values for bipolar disorder (7,481 cases/9,250 controls. RESULTS: The Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia, after correction for multiple tests, according to primary analysis (MAGENTA p = 0.0005, 75% requirement for individual gene significance and also achieved nominal levels of significance with INRICH (p = 0.0057 and ALIGATOR (p = 0.022. For bipolar disorder, Set Screen yielded nominally and method-wide significant associations to all three glial pathways, with strongest association to the Glia-Astrocyte pathway (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with findings of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia by other methods of study, the Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia in our genomic study. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of myelination observed in schizophrenia are at least in part due to inherited factors, contrasted with the alternative of purely environmental causes (e.g. medication effects or

  1. Circadian gating of the cell cycle revealed in single cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Pando, Bernardo F; Dong, Guogang; Golden, Susan S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2010-03-19

    Although major progress has been made in uncovering the machinery that underlies individual biological clocks, much less is known about how multiple clocks coordinate their oscillations. We simultaneously tracked cell division events and circadian phases of individual cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus and fit the data to a model to determine when cell cycle progression slows as a function of circadian and cell cycle phases. We infer that cell cycle progression in cyanobacteria slows during a specific circadian interval but is uniform across cell cycle phases. Our model is applicable to the quantification of the coupling between biological oscillators in other organisms.

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in the cell cycle modulation and required for effective human cytomegalovirus infection in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina, E-mail: mariacristina.arcangeletti@unipr.it [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Germini, Diego; Rodighiero, Isabella [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Mirandola, Prisco [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria-Cristina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Gatti, Rita [Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2013-05-25

    Suitable host cell metabolic conditions are fundamental for the effective development of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic cycle. Indeed, several studies have demonstrated the ability of this virus to interfere with cell cycle regulation, mainly by blocking proliferating cells in G1 or G1/S. In the present study, we demonstrate that HCMV deregulates the cell cycle of THP-1 macrophages (a cell line irreversibly arrested in G0) by pushing them into S and G2 phases. Moreover, we show that HCMV infection of THP-1 macrophages leads to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Since various studies have indicated TLR4 to be involved in promoting cell proliferation, here we investigate the possible role of TLR4 in the observed HCMV-induced cell cycle perturbation. Our data strongly support TLR4 as a mediator of HCMV-triggered cell cycle activation in THP-1 macrophages favouring, in turn, the development of an efficient viral lytic cycle. - Highlights: ► We studied HCMV infection impact on THP-1 macrophage cell cycle. ► We analysed the role played by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 upon HCMV infection. ► HCMV pushes THP-1 macrophages (i.e. resting cells) to re-enter the cell cycle. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition strongly affects the effectiveness of HCMV replication. ► TLR4 pathway inhibition significantly decreases HCMV-induced cell cycle re-entry.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields and the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, Megan A.

    Exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEFs) can cause poration of external and internal cell membranes, DNA damage, and disassociation of cytoskeletal components, all of which are capable of disrupting a cell's ability to replicate. The phase of the cell cycle at the time of exposure is linked to differential sensitivities to nsPEFs across cell lines, as DNA structure, membrane elasticity, and cytoskeletal structure change dramatically during the cell cycle. Additionally, nsPEFs are capable of activating cell cycle checkpoints, which could lead to apoptosis or slow population growth. NsPEFs are emerging as a method for treating tumors via apoptotic induction; therefore, investigating the relevance of nsPEFs and the cell cycle could translate into improved efficacy in tumor treatment. Populations of Jurkat and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were examined post-exposure (10 ns pulse trains at 150kV/cm) by analysis of DNA content via propidium iodide staining and flow cytometric analysis at various time points (1, 6, and 12h post-exposure) to determine population distribution in cell cycle phases. Additionally, CHO and Jurkat cells were synchronized in G1/S and G2/M phases, pulsed, and analyzed to evaluate the role of cell cycle phase in survival of nsPEFs. CHO populations appeared similar to sham populations post-nsPEFs but exhibited arrest in the G1 phase at 6h after exposure. Jurkat cells exhibited increased cell death after nsPEFs compared to CHO cells but did not exhibit checkpoint arrest at any observed time point. The G1/S phase checkpoint is partially controlled by the action of p53; the lack of an active p53 response in Jurkat cells could contribute to their ability to pass this checkpoint and resist cell cycle arrest. Both cell lines exhibited increased sensitivity to nsPEFs in G2/M phase. Live imaging of CHO cells after nsPEF exposure supports the theory of G1/S phase arrest, as a reduced number of cells undergo mitosis within 24 h when

  4. Cell cycle networks link gene expression dysregulation, mutation, and brain maldevelopment in autistic toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Lombardo, Michael V; Campbell, Kathleen; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Marinero, Steven; Solso, Stephanie; Young, Julia; Mayo, Maisi; Dale, Anders; Ahrens-Barbeau, Clelia; Murray, Sarah S; Lopez, Linda; Lewis, Nathan; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2015-12-14

    Genetic mechanisms underlying abnormal early neural development in toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remain uncertain due to the impossibility of direct brain gene expression measurement during critical periods of early development. Recent findings from a multi-tissue study demonstrated high expression of many of the same gene networks between blood and brain tissues, in particular with cell cycle functions. We explored relationships between blood gene expression and total brain volume (TBV) in 142 ASD and control male toddlers. In control toddlers, TBV variation significantly correlated with cell cycle and protein folding gene networks, potentially impacting neuron number and synapse development. In ASD toddlers, their correlations with brain size were lost as a result of considerable changes in network organization, while cell adhesion gene networks significantly correlated with TBV variation. Cell cycle networks detected in blood are highly preserved in the human brain and are upregulated during prenatal states of development. Overall, alterations were more pronounced in bigger brains. We identified 23 candidate genes for brain maldevelopment linked to 32 genes frequently mutated in ASD. The integrated network includes genes that are dysregulated in leukocyte and/or postmortem brain tissue of ASD subjects and belong to signaling pathways regulating cell cycle G1/S and G2/M phase transition. Finally, analyses of the CHD8 subnetwork and altered transcript levels from an independent study of CHD8 suppression further confirmed the central role of genes regulating neurogenesis and cell adhesion processes in ASD brain maldevelopment.

  5. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed K. Manesia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver (FL unlike adult bone marrow (BM proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and the citric acid cycle (TCA. We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (genotoxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  6. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesia, Javed K; Xu, Zhuofei; Broekaert, Dorien; Boon, Ruben; van Vliet, Alex; Eelen, Guy; Vanwelden, Thomas; Stegen, Steve; Van Gastel, Nick; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Carmeliet, Geert; Carmeliet, Peter; Khurana, Satish; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the fetal liver (FL) unlike adult bone marrow (BM) proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) and the citric acid cycle (TCA). We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (geno)toxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  7. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqin eMa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate re-programming.

  8. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2016-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, non-motile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  9. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Jingjing [College of Life Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002, Hubei (China); Liu, Kaiyu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: johnli2668@hotmail.com [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Bioengineering Department, Wuhan Bioengineering Institute, Wuhan 430415, Hubei (China); Yang, Yongbo, E-mail: yongboyang@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  10. Planar cell polarity pathway regulates nephrin endocytosis in developing podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayeva, Sima; Rocque, Brittany; Aoudjit, Lamine; Zilber, Yulia; Li, Jane; Baldwin, Cindy; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Takano, Tomoko; Torban, Elena

    2013-08-16

    The noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls a variety of cell behaviors such as polarized protrusive cell activity, directional cell movement, and oriented cell division and is crucial for the normal development of many tissues. Mutations in the PCP genes cause malformation in multiple organs. Recently, the PCP pathway was shown to control endocytosis of PCP and non-PCP proteins necessary for cell shape remodeling and formation of specific junctional protein complexes. During formation of the renal glomerulus, the glomerular capillary becomes enveloped by highly specialized epithelial cells, podocytes, that display unique architecture and are connected via specialized cell-cell junctions (slit diaphragms) that restrict passage of protein into the urine; podocyte differentiation requires active remodeling of cytoskeleton and junctional protein complexes. We report here that in cultured human podocytes, activation of the PCP pathway significantly stimulates endocytosis of the core slit diaphragm protein, nephrin, via a clathrin/β-arrestin-dependent endocytic route. In contrast, depletion of the PCP protein Vangl2 leads to an increase of nephrin at the cell surface; loss of Vangl2 functions in Looptail mice results in disturbed glomerular maturation. We propose that the PCP pathway contributes to podocyte development by regulating nephrin turnover during junctional remodeling as the cells differentiate.

  11. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A regulates cell growth through the p53-p21 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA inhibits normal cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA deficiency leads to an increase in p21 by enhanced p53 acetylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA causes cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway. -- Abstract: MsrA is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Although MsrA is well-characterized as an antioxidant and has been implicated in the aging process and cellular senescence, its roles in cell proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role of MsrA in normal cell proliferation and describe the regulation mechanism of cell growth by this protein. Down-regulation of MsrA inhibited cell proliferation, but MsrA overexpression did not promote it. MsrA deficiency led to an increase in p21, a major cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, thereby causing cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. While protein levels of p53 were not altered upon MsrA deficiency, its acetylation level was significantly elevated, which subsequently activated p21 transcription. The data suggest that MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway.

  12. The cell cycle-regulated genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oliva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast. The 750 genes with the most significant oscillations were identified and analyzed. There were two broad waves of cell cycle transcription, one in early/mid G2 phase, and the other near the G2/M transition. The early/mid G2 wave included many genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, possibly explaining the cell cycle oscillation in protein synthesis in S. pombe. The G2/M wave included at least three distinctly regulated clusters of genes: one large cluster including mitosis, mitotic exit, and cell separation functions, one small cluster dedicated to DNA replication, and another small cluster dedicated to cytokinesis and division. S. pombe cell cycle genes have relatively long, complex promoters containing groups of multiple DNA sequence motifs, often of two, three, or more different kinds. Many of the genes, transcription factors, and regulatory mechanisms are conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Finally, we found preliminary evidence for a nearly genome-wide oscillation in gene expression: 2,000 or more genes undergo slight oscillations in expression as a function of the cell cycle, although whether this is adaptive, or incidental to other events in the cell, such as chromatin condensation, we do not know.

  13. Plant Characteristics of an Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cycle and a Steam Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Plant characteristics of a system containing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cycle on the top of a Rankine cycle were investigated. Natural gas (NG) was used as the fuel for the plant. A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the fuel, while a pre-reformer broke down the heavier...... hydrocarbons in an adiabatic steam reformer (ASR). The pre-treated fuel then entered to the anode side of the SOFC. The remaining fuels after the SOFC stacks entered a catalytic burner for further combusting. The burned gases from the burner were then used to produce steam for the Rankine cycle in a heat...... recovery steam generator (HRSG). The remaining energy of the off-gases was recycled back to the topping cycle for further utilization. Several parameter studies were carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the suggested plant. It was shown that the operation temperature of the desulfurization unit...

  14. Cycle life characteristics of Li-TiS2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, D.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The development of lithium ambient temperature rechargeable cells is discussed. During the development process, we hope to gain a greater understanding of the materials and the properties of the Li-TiS2 cell and its components. The design will meet the requirements of 100 Wh/Kg and 1000 cycles, at 50 percent depth-of-discharge, by 1995.

  15. Silica induce cell cycle changes by mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway%石英通过丝裂素活化蛋白激酶通路引起人胚肺成纤维细胞周期的改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾效伟; 刘秉慈; 叶萌; 刘海峰; 张凤梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the roles of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) on silica-induced cell cycle changes. Methods After cells were treated with 200 μg/ml silica, Western blot and Immunofluorescence assays were utilized to detect the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2F-4, Flow cytometry was used to detect cell cycle progression, the dominant negative mutants techniques were used to investigate silica-induced signal pathway and the effects of which in silica-induced cell cycle changes. Results After cells were exposed to 200 μg/ml silica 24 h, the results of present study showed the proportion of cells in G1 phases was decreased. Silica-induced cell cycle alternation was markedly impaired by stable expression of a dominant negative mutants of ERK or JNK, but not p38. It was found that ERK and JNK were involved in silica-induced cyclin D1 and CDK4 overexpression and the decreased expression of E2F-4. Conclusion ERK and JNK, but not p38, mediated silica-induced cell cycle changes in human embryo lung fibroblasts.%目的 探讨在石英刺激的人胚肺成纤维细胞(human embryo lung fibroblasts,HELF)中细胞外信号调节蛋白激酶(ERK)、应激活化蛋白激酶(JNK),细胞周期蛋白DI(cyclin D1)通路在石英诱导的细胞周期改变中的作用.方法 建立稳定转染转录因子AP-1荧光素酶报告基冈质粒的HELF系(HELF-AP-1)及AP-1荧光素酶报告基因质粒与丝裂素活化蛋白激酶(MAPK)显性失活突变体质粒(DN-ERK、DN-JNK和DN-p38)分别共转染的HELF系(简称DN-ERK、DN-JNK和DN-p38).将HELF-AP-1、DN-ERK、DN-JNK和DN-p38细胞分为对照组和石英组(共8组),各对照组不加任何处理,石英组用200 μg/ml石英处理HELF细胞24 h.用免疫印迹(Western blot)法和免疫荧光法检测cyclin D1、细胞周期蛋白依赖激酶4(CDK4)和E2F-4蛋白表达;采用显性失活突变体技术验证MAPKs信号转导通路的上下游关系及其与细胞周期的关系;用流式细胞术

  16. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognia, J L; Sodi, S A; Chakraborty, A K; Fargnoli, M C; Pawelek, J M

    1994-10-01

    Cultured mouse Cloudman melanoma cells, EMT6 breast carcinoma cells, and 3T3 fibroblasts all accumulated in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when exposed to UVB radiation. The effects of UVB were maximal at 20-30 mJ/cm2 for all three cell lines, and could be observed by flow cytometry as early as 12 hr post irradiation. It has been known since the mid-1970s that MSH receptor binding activity is highest on Cloudman melanoma cells when they are in the G2/M phase of their cycle. Here we show that either UVB irradiation or synchronization of Cloudman cells with colchicine results in a stimulation of MSH binding within 24 hr following treatment, a time when both treatments have resulted in accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cycle. Furthermore, the two treatments performed together on the melanoma cells stimulated MSH receptor activity to the same extent as either treatment performed separately, suggesting that each may be influencing MSH receptor activity solely through a G2/M accumulation of cells. Together, these results raise the possibility that an increase in the number of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle is a generalized cellular response to injury, such as UV irradiation. However, in the case of pigment cells this response includes a mechanism for increasing melanin formation, i.e., increased MSH receptor activity. Should this be the case, similar G2/M "injury responses" of other cell types might be expected, consistent with their differentiated phenotypes.

  17. CycleBase.org - a comprehensive multi-organism online database of cell-cycle experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Larsen, Malene Erup; Wernersson, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    .org, for viewing and downloading these data. The user interface facilitates searches for genes of interest as well as downloads of genome-wide results. Individual genes are displayed with graphs of expression profiles throughout the cell cycle from all available experiments. These expression profiles...

  18. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  19. Off-pathway, oxygen-dependent thiamine radical in the Krebs cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, René A W; Kay, Christopher W M; Hirst, Judy; Luisi, Ben F

    2008-02-06

    The catalytic cofactor thiamine diphosphate is found in many enzymes of central metabolism and is essential in all extant forms of life. We demonstrate the presence of an oxygen-dependent free radical in the thiamine diphosphate-dependent Escherichia coli 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, which is a key component of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. The radical was sufficiently long-lived to be trapped by freezing in liquid nitrogen, and its electronic structure was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). Taken together, the spectroscopic results revealed a delocalized pi radical on the enamine-thiazolium intermediate within the enzyme active site. The radical is generated as an intermediate during substrate turnover by a side reaction with molecular oxygen, resulting in the continuous production of reactive oxygen species under aerobic conditions. This off-pathway reaction may account for metabolic dysfunction associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. The possibility that the on-pathway reaction may proceed via a radical mechanism is discussed.

  20. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  1. Tanshinone IIA Induces Apoptosis in Human Oral Cancer KB Cells through a Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yu Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, an active phytochemical in the dried root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has shown an antiproliferative activity on various human cancer cell lines including nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. However, the effects of Tan IIA on human oral cancer cells are still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the antiproliferative effects of Tan IIA on human oral cancer KB cells and explored the possible underlying mechanism. Treatment of KB cells with Tan IIA suppressed cell proliferation/viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner through sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay. Observation of cell morphology revealed the involvement of apoptosis in the Tan IIA-induced growth inhibition on KB cells. Cell cycle analysis showed a cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase on Tan IIA-treated cells. The dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential observed by flow cytometry and the expression of activated caspases with the cleaved poly (ADP-ribose polymerase under immunoblotting analysis indicated that Tan IIA-induced apoptosis in KB cells was mediated through the mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway. These observations suggested that Tan IIA could be a potential anticancer agent for oral cancer.

  2. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation.

  3. Glucose metabolism via the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis and Krebs cycle in an orthotopic mouse model of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Malloy, Craig R; Bachoo, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using orthotopic mouse models of human glioblastoma (GBM) and renal cell carcinoma metastatic to brain, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-(13) C(2) ]glucose. The [3-(13) C]lactate/[2,3-(13) C(2) ]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and brain metastasis and their respective surrounding brains (GBM, 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033, respectively (p = 1); metastasis: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than the PPP flux in these tumors, and that the PPP flux into the lactate pool is similar in both tumors. Remarkably, (13) C-(13) C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumor types, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal cell carcinoma, in contrast with GBM, (13) C multiplets of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. In addition, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient's primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a renal cell carcinoma tissue microarray of the same histology, suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell autonomous in at least a subset of renal cell carcinomas. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (13) C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Nuclear fuel cycle: estimation of physical impacts and monetary valuation for priority pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M.; Tort, V.; Manen, P.

    1995-02-01

    The decision-making process for setting future energy policy requires a large range of information. An important component in this process is the comparison of the various costs incurred by the different types of energy systems. Among these costs are those that the production and consumption of energy impose on society as a whole. Some of which are borne by the producers and consumers of the energy. However, other social costs have not been internalized in the costing structure of the various fuel cycle, and therefore have not been fully considered in the past. These costs are referred to as external costs. The aim of the ExternE project is the computation of these external costs using a common methodology and the design of a unified framework for the presentation of the results. For direct comparison to be made between energy options, it is necessary that a common approach is taken. Two important categories of physical impacts that potentially fall into the classification of external costs are human health effects and environmental impacts. This report presents a methodology for an assessment of the nuclear fuel cycle that could be applied anywhere in Europe, however in this report, whenever possible, site-specific information for France has been used. The first phase of this project was a joint European Community/U.S. Department of Energy effort and the final results for the priority pathways of the nuclear fuel cycle presented in this document have been compared to the preliminary results reported by the US team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Musashi2 modulates K562 leukemic cell proliferation and apoptosis involving the MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Tan, Shi; Wang, Juan; Chen, Shana; Quan, Jing; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuai shuai; He, Jingang; Zhang, Ling, E-mail: lingzhang@cqmu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Musashi2 (Msi2) has been identified as a master regulator within a variety of stem cell populations via the regulation of translational gene expression. A recent study has suggested that Msi2 is strongly expressed in leukemic cells of acute myeloid leukemia patients, and elevated Msi2 is associated with poor prognosis. However, the potential role of Msi2 in leukemogenesis is still not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of Msi2 knockdown on the biological properties of leukemic cells. High expression of Msi2 was found in K562 and KG-1a leukemic cell lines, and low expression was observed in the U937 cell line. We transduced K562 cells with two independent adenoviral shRNA vectors targeting Msi2 and confirmed knockdown of Msi2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Msi2 silencing inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21 and decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and cdk2. In addition, knockdown of Msi2 promoted cellular apoptosis via the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, Msi2 knockdown resulted in the inactivation of the ERK/MAPK and p38/MAPK pathways, but no remarkable change in p-AKT was observed. These data provide evidence that Msi2 plays an important role in leukemogenesis involving the MAPK signaling pathway, which indicates that Msi2 may be a novel target for leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Msi2 inhibited K562 cell growth and arrested cell cycle progression. • Knockdown of Msi2 induced K562 cell apoptosis via the regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. • The MAPK pathway was involved in the process of Msi2-mediated leukemogenesis. • Our data indicate that Msi2 is a potential new target for leukemia treatment.

  6. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  7. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  8. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  9. Oncogenic Ras pushes (and pulls) cell cycle progression through ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling cascade is capable of channeling a wide variety of extracellular signals into control of cell proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and death. Because aberrant regulation at all steps of this signaling axis is observed in cancer, it remains an area of great interest in the field of tumor biology. Here we present evidence of the intricate and delicate levels of control of this pathway as it pertains to cell cycle regulation and illustrate how this control is not simply a rheostat.

  10. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  11. Cell "circadian" cycle: new role for mammalian core clock genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgs, Laurence; Beukelaers, Pierre; Vandenbosch, Renaud; Belachew, Shibeshih; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2009-03-15

    In mammals, 24 hours rhythms are organized as a biochemical network of molecular clocks that are operative in all tissues, with the master clock residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The core pacemakers of these clocks consist of auto-regulatory transcriptional/post-transcriptional feedback loops. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of a crosstalk between molecules that are responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms and molecules that control the cell cycle progression. In addition, highly specialized cell cycle checkpoints involved in DNA repair after damage seem also, at least in part, mediated by clock proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted a putative connection between clock protein dysfunction and cancer progression. This review discusses the intimate relation that exists between cell cycle progression and components of the circadian machinery.

  12. Shared signaling pathways in normal and breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam K Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology have led to the identification of a subpopulation of cells within tumors that appear to be responsible for initiating and propagating the cancer. These tumor initiating cells are not only unique in their ability to generate tumors, but also share many similarities with elements of normal adult tissue stem cells, and have therefore been termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. These CSCs often inappropriately use many of the same signaling pathways utilized by their normal stem cell counterparts which may present a challenge to the development of CSC specific therapies. Here, we discuss three major stem cell signaling pathways (Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog; with a focus on their function in normal mammary gland development and their misuse in breast cancer stem cell fate determination.

  13. Platycodin D induced apoptosis and autophagy in PC-12 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Zhang, Cheng; Yao, Jun-Hua; Lai, Shang-Hai; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Tang, Bing; Wan, Dan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the in vitro cytotoxicity of platycodin D was evaluated in human PC-12, SGC-7901, BEL-7402, HeLa and A549 cancer cell lines. PC-12 cells were sensitive to platycodin D treatment, with an IC50 value of 13.5 ± 1.2 μM. Morphological and comet assays showed that platycodin D effectively induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells. Platycodin D increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Platycodin D induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in the PC-12 cell line. Platycodin D can induce autophagy. In addition, platycodin D can down-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x, and up-regulate the levels of Bid protein in the PC-12 cells. The results demonstrated that platycodin D induced PC-12 cell apoptosis through a ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  14. Coordinating cell polarity and cell cycle progression: what can we learn from flies and worms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noatynska, Anna; Tavernier, Nicolas; Gotta, Monica; Pintard, Lionel

    2013-08-07

    Spatio-temporal coordination of events during cell division is crucial for animal development. In recent years, emerging data have strengthened the notion that tight coupling of cell cycle progression and cell polarity in dividing cells is crucial for asymmetric cell division and ultimately for metazoan development. Although it is acknowledged that such coupling exists, the molecular mechanisms linking the cell cycle and cell polarity machineries are still under investigation. Key cell cycle regulators control cell polarity, and thus influence cell fate determination and/or differentiation, whereas some factors involved in cell polarity regulate cell cycle timing and proliferation potential. The scope of this review is to discuss the data linking cell polarity and cell cycle progression, and the importance of such coupling for asymmetric cell division. Because studies in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have started to reveal the molecular mechanisms of this coordination, we will concentrate on these two systems. We review examples of molecular mechanisms suggesting a coupling between cell polarity and cell cycle progression.

  15. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  16. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  17. Pathways to a New Efficiency Regime for Organic Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. Jan Anton; Shaheen, Sean E.; Hummelen, Jan C.

    2012-01-01

    Three different theoretical approaches are presented to identify pathways to organic solar cells with power conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. A radiation limit for organic solar cells is introduced that elucidates the role of charge-transfer (CT) state absorption. Provided this CT action is

  18. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  19. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth.

  20. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  1. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development.

  2. Selective loss of TGFbeta Smad-dependent signalling prevents cell cycle arrest and promotes invasion in oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Onwuegbusi

    Full Text Available In cancer, Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta increases proliferation and promotes invasion via selective loss of signalling pathways. Oesophageal adenocarcinoma arises from Barrett's oesophagus, progresses rapidly and is usually fatal. The contribution of perturbed TGFbeta signalling in the promotion of metastasis in this disease has not been elucidated. We therefore investigated the role of TGFbeta in Barrett's associated oesophageal adenocarcinoma using a panel of cell lines (OE33, TE7, SEG, BIC, FLO. 4/5 adenocarcinoma cell lines failed to cell cycle arrest, down-regulate c-Myc or induce p21 in response to TGFbeta, and modulation of a Smad3/4 specific promoter was inhibited. These hyperproliferative adenocarcinoma cell lines displayed a TGFbeta induced increase in the expression of the extracellular matrix degrading proteinases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, which correlated with an invasive cell phenotype as measured by in vitro migration, invasion and cell scattering assays. Inhibiting ERK and JNK pathways significantly reduced PAI and uPA induction and inhibited the invasive cell phenotype. These results suggest that TGFbeta Smad-dependent signalling is perturbed in Barrett's carcinogenesis, resulting in failure of growth-arrest. However, TGFbeta can promote PAI and uPA expression and invasion through MAPK pathways. These data would support a dual role for TGFbeta in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

  3. Comparison of cell cycle components, apoptosis and cytoskeleton-related molecules and therapeutic effects of flavopiridol and geldanamycin on the mouse fibroblast, lung cancer and embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktug, Huseyin; Acikgoz, Eda; Uysal, Aysegul; Oltulu, Fatih; Oktem, Gulperi; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Demir, Kenan; Yavasoglu, Altug; Bozok Cetintas, Vildan

    2016-09-01

    Similarities and differences in the cell cycle components, apoptosis and cytoskeleton-related molecules among mouse skin fibroblast cells (MSFs), mouse squamous cell lung carcinomas (SqCLCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are important determinants of the behaviour and differentiation capacity of these cells. To reveal apoptotic pathways and to examine the distribution and the role of cell cycle-cell skeleton comparatively would necessitate tumour biology and stem cell biology to be assessed together in terms of oncogenesis and embryogenesis. The primary objectives of this study are to investigate the effects of flavopiridol, a cell cycle inhibitor, and geldanamycin, a heat shock protein inhibitor on mouse somatic, tumour and embryonic stem cells, by specifically focusing on alterations in cytoskeletal proteins, cell polarity and motility as well as cell cycle regulators. To meet these objectives, expression of several genes, cell cycle analysis and immunofluorescence staining of intracellular cytoskeletal molecules were performed in untreated and flavopiridol- or geldanamycin-treated cell lines. Cytotoxicity assays showed that SqCLCs are more sensitive to flavopiridol than MSFs and mESCs. Keratin-9 and keratin-2 expressions increased dramatically whereas cell cycle regulatory genes decreased significantly in the flavopiridol-treated MSFs. Flavopiridol-treated SqCLCs displayed a slight increase in several cell cytoskeleton regulatory genes as well as cell cycle regulatory genes. However, gene expression profiles of mESCs were not affected after flavopiridol treatment except the Cdc2a. Cytotoxic concentrations of geldanamycin were close to each other for all cell lines. Cdkn1a was the most increased gene in the geldanamycin-treated MSFs. However, expression levels of cell cytoskeleton-associated genes were increased dramatically in the geldanamycin-treated SqCLCs. Our results revealing differences in molecular mechanisms between embryogenesis and

  4. Part II-mechanism of adaptation: A549 cells adapt to high concentration of nitric oxide through bypass of cell cycle checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Madeeha; Deliu, Zane; Elseth, Kim M; Shen, Grace; Xue, Jiaping; Radosevich, James A

    2014-03-01

    Previous work has shown enhanced survival capacity in high nitric oxide (HNO)-adapted tumor cells. In Part I of this series of manuscripts, we have shown that A549-HNO cells demonstrate an improved growth profile under UV and X-ray radiation treatment. These cells exhibit increased expression of proteins involved in DNA damage recognition and repair pathway, both the non-homologous end joining pathway and homologous recombination. These include Ku80, DNA-PK, XLF ligase and MRN complex proteins. Further, the A549-HNO cells show high levels of ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2, and phospho-p53. Activation of these molecules may lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis due to DNA damage. This is observed in parent A549 cells in response to NO donor treatment; however, the A549-HNO cells proliferate and inhibit apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis showed slowed progression through S phase which will allow time for DNA repair. Thus, to better understand the increased growth rate in A549-HNO when compared to the parent cell line A549, we studied molecular mechanisms involved in cell cycle regulation in A549-HNO cells. During the initial time period of NO donor treatment, we observe high levels of cyclin/Cdk complexes involved in regulating various stages of the cell cycle. This would lead to bypass of G1-S and G2-M checkpoints. The HNO cells also show much higher expression of Cdc25A. Cdc25A activates Cdk molecules involved in different phases of the cell cycle. In addition, there is enhanced phosphorylation of the Rb protein in HNO cells. This leads to inactivation of Rb/E2F checkpoint regulating G1-S transition. This may lead to faster progression in S phase. Thus, all of these perturbations in HNO cells lead to accelerated cell cycle progression and a higher growth rate. We also assessed expression of cell cycle inhibitors in HNO cells. Interestingly, the HNO cells show a significant decline in p21CIP1 at initial time points, but with prolonged exposure, the levels were much higher

  5. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  6. An apoptotic cell cycle mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid

    1996-01-01

    The simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a useful organism for elucidating the mechanisms that govern cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The excellent in vivo system permits a cell cycle study using temperature sensitive mutants. In addition, it is possible to study...... many genes and gene products from higher eukaryotes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because many genes and biological processes are homologous or similar in lower and in higher eukaryotes. The highly developed methods of genetics and molecular biology greatly facilitates studies of higher eukaryotic...... processes.Programmmed cell death with apoptosis plays a major role in development and homeostatis in most, if not all, animal cells. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct form of death, that requires the activation of a highly regulated suicide program. Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a new system...

  7. The MAP kinase pathway is required for entry into mitosis and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Yan, Shi; Zhou, Tianhua; Terada, Yasuhiko; Erikson, Raymond L

    2004-01-22

    In this communication, we examined the role of the MAP kinase pathway in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Activation of the Plk1 and MAP kinase pathways was initially evaluated in FT210 cells, which arrest at G2 phase at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C), due to a mutation in the cdc2 gene. Previous studies had shown that these cells enter mitosis at the nonpermissive temperature upon incubation with okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor. We show that treatment of FT210 cells at 39 degrees C with okadaic acid activated Plk1, as shown by hyperphosphorylation and elevated protein kinase activity, and also induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway. The specific Mek inhibitor PD98059 antagonized the okadaic acid-induced activation of both Plk1 and MAP kinases. This suggests that activation of the MAP kinase pathway may contribute to the okadaic acid-induced activation of Plk1 in FT210 cells at 39 degrees C. We also found that PD98059 strongly attenuated progression of HeLa cells through mitosis, and active Mek colocalizes with Plk1 at mitotic structures. To study the potential function of the MAP kinase pathway during mitosis, RNAi was used to specifically deplete five members of this pathway (Raf1, Mek1/2, Erk1/2). Each of these five protein kinases is required for cell proliferation and survival, and depletion of any of these proteins eventually leads to apoptosis. Treatment with Mek inhibitors also inhibited cell proliferation and caused apoptosis. A dramatic increase of Plk1 activities and a moderate increase of Cdc2 activities in Raf1-depleted cells indicate that Raf1-depleted cells arrest in the late G2 or M phase. Mek1 and Erk1 depletion also caused cell cycle arrest at G2, suggesting that these enzymes are required for the G2/M transition, whereas the loss of Mek2 or Erk2 caused arrest at G1.

  8. The microtubule cytoskeleton is required for a G2 cell cycle delay in cancer cells lacking stathmin and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Bruce K; Caruso Silva, Victoria; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2012-05-01

    In several cancer cell lines, depleting the microtubule (MT)-destabilizing protein stathmin/oncoprotein18 leads to a G2 cell cycle delay and apoptosis. These phenotypes are observed only in synergy with low levels of p53, but the pathway(s) activated by stathmin depletion to delay the cell cycle are unknown. We found that stathmin depletion caused greater MT stability in synergy with loss of p53, measured by the levels of acetylated α-tubulin and the rate of centrosomal MT nucleation. Nocodazole or vinblastine-induced MT depolymerization abrogated the stathmin-depletion induced G2 delay, measured by the percentage of cells staining positive for several markers (TPX2, CDK1 with inhibitory phosphorylation), indicating that MTs are required to lengthen G2. Live cell imaging showed that stathmin depletion increased time in G2 without an impact on the duration of mitosis, indicating that the longer interphase duration is not simply a consequence of a previous slowed mitosis. In contrast, stabilization of MTs with paclitaxel (8 nM) slowed mitosis without lengthening the duration of interphase, demonstrating that increased MT stability alone is not sufficient to delay cells in G2.

  9. E2F-dependent induction of p14ARF during cell cycle re-entry in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; El Messaoudi, Selma; Clark, Paula A

    2007-01-01

    The ARF protein, encoded by alternate exon usage within the CDKN2A locus, provides a link between the retinoblastoma (pRb) and p53 tumor suppressor pathways. Agents that disable pRb or otherwise impinge on the E2F family of transcription factors induce expression of ARF, resulting in stabilization...... of p53 and activation of p53-regulated genes. However, in some cell types ARF is not induced upon cell cycle re-entry, as expected of a conventional E2F target gene, leading to the suggestion that the ARF promoter only responds to supra-physiological or aberrant levels of E2F. These properties have...

  10. "Autophagy suite": Atg9 cycling in the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Nobuo; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2010-08-01

    Macroautophagy continues to gather increasing attention because it is connected with a wide range of human pathophysiologies, developmental processes and life span extension. It is also an interesting process from a basic cellular biology standpoint, as it involves dynamic membrane rearrangements and multiple protein-protein interactions. Although macroautophagy can be nonspecific, there are many examples of selective sequestration including pexophagy, mitophagy and the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway. At present, the Cvt pathway is unique in that it is the only example of a biosynthetic use of macroautophagy. Most of the autophagy-related (Atg) proteins are involved in the Cvt pathway, and various types of analyses have placed these proteins at particular stages of the process. For example, Atg9 is the only characterized transmembrane protein that is absolutely required for Cvt vesicle formation, and it is proposed to carry membrane from peripheral donor sites to the phagophore assembly site where the vesicle forms. Additional proteins, including Atg11, Atg23 and Atg27 are involved in this anterograde movement, whereas Atg1-Atg13 and Atg2-Atg18 are required for the retrograde return to the peripheral sites. Even when we illustrate our understanding of these events in a schematic model, however, they are by necessity flat two-dimensional representations, lacking movement and sound. Yet the cell is a living entity that is not well served by this sole method of information display. Accordingly, we decided to present the Cvt pathway as a vibrant, dynamic process by combining science, music and illustration.

  11. Identification of a dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that oscillates with the molting cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Likui; Shou, Qingyao; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    L-Rhamnose is a common component of cell-wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and some natural products in bacteria and plants, but is rare in fungi and animals. In the present study, we identify and characterize a biosynthetic pathway for dTDP-rhamnose in Caenorhabditis elegans that is highly conserved across nematode species. We show that RML-1 activates glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) in the presence of either dTTP or UTP to yield dTDP-glucose or UDP-glucose, respectively. RML-2 is a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase, converting dTDP-glucose into dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose. Using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that coincubation of dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose with RML-3 (3,5-epimerase) and RML-4 (4-keto-reductase) produces dTDP-rhamnose. RML-4 could only be expressed and purified in an active form through co-expression with a co-regulated protein, RML-5, which forms a complex with RML-4. Analysis of the sugar nucleotide pool in C. elegans established the presence of dTDP-rhamnose in vivo. Targeting the expression of the rhamnose biosynthetic genes by RNAi resulted in significant reductions in dTDP-rhamnose, but had no effect on the biosynthesis of a closely related sugar, ascarylose, found in the ascaroside pheromones. Therefore, the rhamnose and ascarylose biosynthetic pathways are distinct. We also show that transcriptional reporters for the rhamnose biosynthetic genes are expressed highly in the embryo, in the hypodermis during molting cycles and in the hypodermal seam cells specifically before the molt to the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. These expression patterns suggest that rhamnose biosynthesis may play an important role in hypodermal development or the production of the cuticle or surface coat during molting. PMID:27009306

  12. Identification of a dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that oscillates with the molting cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Likui; Shou, Qingyao; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    L-Rhamnose is a common component of cell-wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and some natural products in bacteria and plants, but is rare in fungi and animals. In the present study, we identify and characterize a biosynthetic pathway for dTDP-rhamnose in Caenorhabditis elegans that is highly conserved across nematode species. We show that RML-1 activates glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) in the presence of either dTTP or UTP to yield dTDP-glucose or UDP-glucose, respectively. RML-2 is a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase, converting dTDP-glucose into dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose. Using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that coincubation of dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose with RML-3 (3,5-epimerase) and RML-4 (4-keto-reductase) produces dTDP-rhamnose. RML-4 could only be expressed and purified in an active form through co-expression with a co-regulated protein, RML-5, which forms a complex with RML-4. Analysis of the sugar nucleotide pool in C. elegans established the presence of dTDP-rhamnose in vivo Targeting the expression of the rhamnose biosynthetic genes by RNAi resulted in significant reductions in dTDP-rhamnose, but had no effect on the biosynthesis of a closely related sugar, ascarylose, found in the ascaroside pheromones. Therefore, the rhamnose and ascarylose biosynthetic pathways are distinct. We also show that transcriptional reporters for the rhamnose biosynthetic genes are expressed highly in the embryo, in the hypodermis during molting cycles and in the hypodermal seam cells specifically before the molt to the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. These expression patterns suggest that rhamnose biosynthesis may play an important role in hypodermal development or the production of the cuticle or surface coat during molting.

  13. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  14. Impact of cell cycle delay on micronucleus frequency in TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Zhanna; Spellman, Richard A; Thiffeault, Catherine; Dobo, Krista L; Schuler, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies with TK6 cells have shown that extending the recovery period after pulse treatment allows for greater micronucleus expression for some compounds. This study explores the role of cell cycle delay in micronucleus expression after pulse treatment with three model genotoxins [mitomycin C, etoposide (ETOP), vinblastine]. Cells were treated for 4 hr and allowed to recover for 36 hr with samples removed at various time points during the recovery period and analyzed for cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and micronucleus frequency. Our results show that mitomycin C causes cell cycle delay for 20 hr after pulse treatment and cell cycle perturbation is no longer evident after 36 hr of recovery. The micronucleus frequency of cells sampled at 36 hr is doubled when compared with cells sampled at 20 hr after mitomycin C removal. When cells were treated with indirect acting genotoxins (ETOP, vinblastine), cell cycle perturbation was not observed at the 20 hr time point. Micronucleus frequency after treatment with either ETOP or vinblastine did not differ between the 20 hr and the 36 hr time point. All three compounds induced similar levels of apoptosis ranging from 4.5 to 5.6% with maximum induction occurring at the 36-hr time point. We conclude that TK6 cells exhibit extended cell cycle arrest after exposure to MMC and can go on to express micronuclei, after overcoming cell cycle arrest.

  15. Visualisation of cell cycle modifications by X-ray irradiation of single HeLa cells using fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminaga, K; Noguchi, M; Narita, A; Sakamoto, Y; Kanari, Y; Yokoya, A

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effects of X-ray irradiation on mammalian cell cycle dynamics, single cells using the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) technique were tracked. HeLa cells expressing Fucci were used to visualise cell cycle modifications induced by irradiation. After cultured HeLa-Fucci cells were exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, fluorescent cell images were captured every 20 min for 48 h using a fluorescent microscope. Time dependence of the fluorescence intensity of S/G2 cells was analysed to examine the cell cycle dynamics of irradiated and non-irradiated control cells. The results showed that irradiated cells could be divided into two populations: one with similar cell cycle dynamics to that of non-irradiated cells, and another displaying a prolonged G2 phase. Based on these findings, it is proposed in this article that an underlying switch mechanism is involved in cell cycle regulation and the G2/M checkpoint of HeLa cells.

  16. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Meachum, Sharon; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Peretz, Jackye; Yao, Humphrey H; Flaws, Jodi A

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  17. Multiple Defects of Cell Cycle Checkpoints in U937-ASPI3K, an U937 Cell Mutant Stably Expressing Anti-Sense ATM Gene cDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) functions in control of cell cycle checkpoints in responding to DNA damage and protects cells from undergoing apoptosis. Knock-out within tumor cells of endogenous ATM will achieve therapeutic benefits and nable a better understanding of the decisive mechanisms of cell death or survival in response to DNA damaging agents. ) In present paper, we sought to characterize the cell cycle checkpoint profiles in U937-ASPI3K, a U937 cell mutant that was previously established with endogenous ATM knock-out phenotype. Synchronized U937-ASPI3K was exposed to 137Cs irradiation, G1, S, G2/M cell cycle checkpoint profiles were evaluated by determining cell cycle kinetics, p53/p21 protein, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and p34CDC2 kinase activity in response to irradiation. U937-ASPI3K exhibited multiple defects in cell cycle checkpoints as defined by failing to arrest cells upon irradiation. The accumulation of cellular p53/p21 protein and inhibition of CDK kinase was also abolished in U937-ASPI3K. It was concluded that the stable expression of anti-sense PI3K cDNA fragment completely abolished multiple cell cycle checkpoints in U937-ASPI3K, and hence U937-ASPI3K with an AT-like phenotype could serves as a valuable model system for investigating the signal transduction pathway in responding to DNA damaging-based cancer therapy.

  18. Lectin from Agaricus Bisporus Suppresses Akt Phosphorylation and Arrests Cell Cycle Progression in Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Cheung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells have been implicated in the development of retinal diseases. Lectin from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus (ABL was found to inhibit growth of RPE cells. To elucidate the mechanism through which ABL inhibits RPE cell proliferation, we investigated the changes in cell proliferation-related signaling pathways and cell cycle distribution patterns. Primary human RPE cells were grown with or without the lectin (ABL supplement (20ug or 90ug/ml for three days. Phosphorylation statuses of Akt, Jnk and p38 as well as p53 expression level were investigated by Western blotting. Cellular distributions in various cell cycle phases were investigated using flow cytometry. After ABL treatment (90ug/ml, Akt was found to be hypo-phosphorylated while the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated-Jnk and phosphorylated-p38 were not altered. The amount of cells present at S phase was reduced. Our results showed that ABL hypo-phosphorylated Akt and this observation is in line with the finding that ABL could attenuate cell proliferation. As the level of p53 was not significantly altered by ABL, this suggested that the mechanism in which ABL arrested cell proliferation was independent of Akt-mediated MDM2 activation but was possibly mediated by altering G1 to S phase transition.

  19. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Zheng, Lemin [The Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences of Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Molecular Biology and Regulatory Peptides of Health Ministry, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Boda [The Department of Cardiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Wei; Lv, He [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Yuan, Yun, E-mail: yuanyun2002@sohu.com [Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  20. Quercetin suppresses HeLa cells by blocking PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tao; Fang, Yong; Wang, Shi-Xuan

    2014-10-01

    To explore the effect of quercetin on the proliferation and apoptosis of HeLa cells, HeLa cells were incubated with quercetin at different concentrations. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay, cell apoptosis was detected by Annexin-V/PI double labeled cytometry and DNA ladder assay. Cell cycle was flow cytometrically determined and the morphological changes of the cells were observed under a fluorescence microscope after Hoechst 33258 staining and the apoptosis-related proteins in the HeLa cells were assessed by Western blotting. The results showed that quercetin significantly inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and induced obvious apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, quercetin induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in cell cycle-dependent manner because quercetin could induce arrest of HeLa cells at G0/G1 phase. Quercetin treatment down-regulated the expression of the PI3K and p-Akt. In addition, quercetin could down-regulate expression of bcl-2, up-regulate Bax, but exerted no effect on the overall expression of Akt. We are led to conclude that quercetin induces apoptosis via PI3k/Akt pathways, and quercetin has potential to be used as an anti-tumor agent against human cervix cancer.

  1. 2'-Nitroflavone induces apoptosis and modulates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in human leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Mariano G; Blank, Viviana C; Marder, Mariel N; Roguin, Leonor P

    2012-09-01

    The cytotoxic activity of 2'-nitroflavone was evaluated in different haematological cancer cell lines and its mechanism of action was further studied in HL-60 cells. 2'-Nitroflavone arrested the cell cycle at the G(2)/M phase and induced an apoptotic response characterized by an increase in the sub-G1 fraction of cells, a typical DNA ladder fragmentation, chromatin condensation and the detection of cells stained with Annexin V. Apoptosis was dependent on the activation of at least caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. The involvement of the death receptor pathway was indicated by the upregulation of both the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its death receptor (DR5). We also showed that 2'-nitroflavone increased the expression levels of Bax and induced the release of cytochrome C to cytosol, suggesting the participation of the mitochondria-dependent pathway. When mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways were studied, it was found that p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways were activated by 2'-nitroflavone in HL-60 cells, whereas the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 decreased significantly. In addition, whereas both pharmacological inhibition of JNK and downregulation of JNK expression by RNA interference reduced the nitroflavone growth-inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect, contrasting results were obtained when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited, and no effect was observed in the presence of a specific inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. These findings show for the first time the antitumour action of 2'-nitroflavone in haematological cancer cell lines and suggest that both JNK and ERK1/2 cascades are involved in the apoptotic response induced by 2'-nitroflavone in HL-60 cells.

  2. Ecdysone Receptor (EcR Is Involved in the Transcription of Cell Cycle Genes in the Silkworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Qian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EcR (ecdysone receptor-mediated ecdysone signaling pathway contributes to regulate the transcription of genes involved in various processes during insect development. In this work, we detected the expression of EcR gene in silkworm ovary-derived BmN4 cells and found that EcR RNAi result in an alteration of cell shape, indicating that EcR may orchestrate cell cycle progression. EcR RNAi and EcR overexpression analysis revealed that in the cultured BmN4 cells, EcR respectively promoted and suppressed the transcription of E2F-1 and CycE, two genes controlling cell cycle progression. Further examination demonstrated that ecdysone application in BmN4 cells not only changed the transcription of these two cell cycle genes like that under EcR overexpression, but also induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. In vivo analysis confirmed that E2F-1 expression was elevated in silk gland of silkworm larvae after ecdysone application, which is same as its response to ecdysone in BmN4 cells. However, ecdysone also promotes CycE transcription in silk gland, and this is converse with the observation in BmN4 cells. These results provide new insights into understanding the roles of EcR-mediated ecdysone signaling in the regulation of cell cycle.

  3. The Effect of Spaceflight on Cartilage Cell Cycle and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Stephen B.; Stiner, Dalina; Telford, William G.

    2000-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that spaceflight results in loss of bone and muscle. In an effort to understand the mechanisms of these changes, cell cultures of cartilage, bone and muscle have been subjected to spaceflight to study the microgravity effects on differentiated cells. However it now seems possible that the cell differentiation process itself may be the event(s) most affected by spaceflight. For example, osteoblast-like cells have been shown to have reduced cellular activity in microgravity due to an underdifferentiated state (Carmeliet, et al, 1997). And reduced human lymphocyte growth in spaceflight was related to increased apoptosis (Lewis, et al, 1998). Which brings us to the question of whether reduced cellular activity in space is due to an effect on the differentiated cell, an effect on the cell cycle and cell proliferation, or an effect on cell death. This question has not been specifically addressed on previous flights and was the question behind die present study.

  4. Induction of cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, and apoptosis by nimbolide in human renal cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Lin, Chia-Liang; Tsai, Jen-Pi

    2015-09-01

    Nimbolide is a tetranortriterpenoid isolated from the leaves and flowers of Azadirachta indica which has been shown to exhibit anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-invasive properties in a variety of cancer cells. However, the anti-tumor effect on human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells is unknown. In this study, we found that nimbolide treatment had a cytotoxic effect on 786-O and A-498 RCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. According to flow cytometric analysis, nimbolide treatment resulted in G2/M arrest in 786-O and A-498 cells accompanied with an increase in the phosphorylation status of p53, cdc2, cdc25c, and decreased expressions of cyclin A, cyclin B, cdc2, and cdc25c. Nimbolide also caused DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner as determined by comet assay and measurement of γ-H2AX. In addition, apoptotic cells were observed in an Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double-stained assay. The activities of caspase-3, -9, and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were increased, and the expression of pro-caspase-8 was decreased in nimbolide-treated 786-O and A-498 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the levels of intrinsic-related apoptotic proteins Bax and extrinsic-related proteins (DR5, CHOP) were significantly increased in nimbolide-treated 786-O and A-498 cells. In addition, the expressions of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were decreased in 786-O and A-498 cells after nimbolide treatment. We conclude that nimbolide can inhibit the growth of human RCC cells by inducing G2/M phase arrest by modulating cell cycle-related proteins and cell apoptosis by regulating intrinsic and extrinsic caspase signaling pathways. Nimbolide may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RCC.

  5. The Importance of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway in the Porcine Endometrial Stromal Stem/Progenitor Cells: Implications for Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Joanna; Ziecik, Adam Janusz; Laguna, Joanna; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative ability of the endometrium is strongly associated with the presence of adult stem/progenitor cells. Purposes of the present study were (1) to establish the presence of stem/progenitor cells in porcine endometrial stroma using a clonogenic assay and (2) to investigate whether the canonical Wnt pathway affects the potential of stem/progenitor cells to undergo self-renewal or differentiation. The utility of endometrial stromal clones as a model for stem/progenitor studies was evaluated based on these cells' increased expression of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker genes, including CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, compared with primary cultured cells. Small molecules were introduced to activate (BIO) or inhibit (XAV939) the canonical Wnt pathway during stromal clone formation. Cloning efficiency assays revealed that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway promoted formation of more differentiated small clones. Moreover, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway decreased, whereas inhibition of the pathway increased MSC marker expression. Additionally, we confirmed the importance of canonical Wnt pathway stimulation in endometrial stromal cells through observing the appropriate changes in β-catenin cellular localization. These data indicate that modulation of the canonical Wnt pathway effects the process of regeneration in the porcine endometrium during the course of the estrous cycle. PMID:26414529

  6. Alanine and aspartate aminotransferase and glutamine-cycling pathway: Their roles in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Sookoian; Carlos J Pirola

    2012-01-01

    Although new research technologies are constantly used to look either for genes or biomarkers in the prediction of metabolic syndrome (MS),the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this complex disease remains a major challenge.Interestingly,Cheng et al recently investigated possible pathways underlying MS by high-throughput metabolite profiling in two large and well characterized community-based cohorts.The authors explored by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry the plasma concentrations of 45distinct metabolites and examined their relation to cardiometabolic risk,and observed that metabolic risk factors such as obesity,insulin resistance (IR),high blood pressure,and dyslipidemia were associated with several metabolites,including branched-chain amino acids,other hydrophobic amino acids,tryptophan breakdown products,and nucleotide metabolites.In addition,the authors found a significant association of IR traits with glutamine,glutamate and the glutamineto-glutamate ratio.These data provide new insight into the pathogenesis of MS-associated phenotypes and introduce a crucial role of glutamine-cycling pathway as prominently involved in the development of metabolic risk.We consider that the hypothesis about the role of abnormal glutamate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the MS is certainly challenging and suggests the critical role of the liver in the global metabolic modulation as glutamate metabolism is linked with aminotransferase reactions.We discuss here the critical role of the "liver metabolism" in the pathogenesis of the MS and IR,and postulate that before fatty liver develops,abnormal levels of liver enzymes,such as alanine and aspartate aminotransferases might reflect high levels of hepatic transamination of amino acids in the liver.

  7. Effects of cell cycle noise on excitable gene circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2016-01-01

    We assess the impact of cell cycle noise on gene circuit dynamics. For bistable genetic switches and excitable circuits, we find that transitions between metastable states most likely occur just after cell division and that this concentration effect intensifies in the presence of transcriptional delay. We explain this concentration effect with a 3-states stochastic model. For genetic oscillators, we quantify the temporal correlations between daughter cells induced by cell division. Temporal correlations must be captured properly in order to accurately quantify noise sources within gene networks.

  8. Planar Cell Polarity Pathway in Kidney Development and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Rocque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionarily conserved planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway controls tissue polarity within the plane orthogonal to the apical-basal axis. PCP was originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster where it is required for the establishment of a uniform pattern of cell structures and appendages. In vertebrates, including mammals, the PCP pathway has been adapted to control various morphogenetic processes that are critical for tissue and organ development. These include convergent extension (crucial for neural tube closure and cochlear duct development and oriented cell division (needed for tubular elongation, ciliary tilting that enables directional fluid flow, and other processes. Recently, strong evidence has emerged to implicate the PCP pathway in vertebrate kidney development. In this review, we will describe the experimental data revealing the role of PCP signaling in nephrogenesis and kidney disease.

  9. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  10. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases.

  11. Glucose Metabolism via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway, Glycolysis and Krebs Cycle in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Cho, Steve K.; Rakheja, Dinesh; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Kapur, Payal; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Jindal, Ashish; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Good, Levi B.; Raisanen, Jack; Sun, Xiankai; Mickey, Bruce; Choi, Changho; Takahashi, Masaya; Togao, Osamu; Pascual, Juan M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required to support the metabolic demands of rapid malignant cell growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM) and a brain metastatic renal tumor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) histology, we estimated the activity of the PPP relative to glycolysis by infusing [1,2-13C2]glucose. The [3-13C]lactate/[2,3-13C2]lactate ratio was similar for both the GBM and renal tumor and their respective surrounding brains (GBM: 0.197 ± 0.011 and 0.195 ± 0.033 (p=1); CCRCC: 0.126 and 0.119 ± 0.033, respectively). This suggests that the rate of glycolysis is significantly greater than PPP flux in these tumors, and that PPP flux into the lactate pool was similar in both tissues. Remarkably, 13C-13C coupling was observed in molecules derived from Krebs cycle intermediates in both tumors, denoting glucose oxidation. In the renal tumor, in contrast to GBM and surrounding brain, 13C multiplets of GABA differed from its precursor glutamate, suggesting that GABA did not derive from a common glutamate precursor pool. Additionally, the orthotopic renal tumor, the patient’s primary renal mass and brain metastasis were all strongly immunopositive for the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, as were 84% of tumors on a CCRCC tissue microarray suggesting that GABA synthesis is cell-autonomous in at least a subset of renal tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 13C-labeled glucose can be used in orthotopic mouse models to study tumor metabolism in vivo and to ascertain new metabolic targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22383401

  12. Mirk/Dyrk1B mediates G0/G1 to S phase cell cycle progression and cell survival involving MAPK/ERK signaling in human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Jingchun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mirk/Dyrk1B contributes to G0 arrest by destabilization of cyclin D1 and stabilization of p27kip1 to maintain the viability of quiescent human cancer cells, and it could be negatively regulated by mitogenic-activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling. This study was performed to investigate the effect of Mirk/Dyrk1B on cell cycle and survival of human cancer cells involving MAPK/ERK signaling. Methods The correlations between Mirk/Dyrk1B expression and active ERK1/2 detected by western blot in both ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells were analyzed by simple regression. Mirk/Dyrk1B unique phosphopeptides with sites associated with Mirk/Dyrk1B protein were isolated and quantitated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomics analysis. The human cancer cells were treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and/or U0126, an inhibitor of MEK for indicated duration, followed by investigating the alterations of cell cycle and apoptosis as well as related proteins examined by flow cytometry and Western blot, respectively. Results Our study demonstrated the widely expressed Mirk/Dyrk1B proteins in the human cancer cells were positively correlated with the levels of activated ERK1/2. Moreover, Mirk/Dyrk1B protein expressions consistent with the tyrosine autophosphorylated levels in the human cancer cells were increased by U0126 or growth factor-depleted culture. Conversely, knockdown of Mirk/Dyrk1B by siRNA led to up-regulated activation of c-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent changes in cell cycle proteins (cyclin D1, p27kip1, accompanied by increased growth rate and cells from G0/G1 into S of cell cycle which could be blocked by U0126 in a dose-dependent manner, indicating Mirk/Dyrk1B may sequester MAPK/ERK pathway, and vice versa. Whereas, combined Mirk siRNA and U0126 induced cell apoptosis in the human cancer cells

  13. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Steven A Brown

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately n...

  14. Cell cycle control by a minimal Cdk network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC. Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model's predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities.

  15. Cell-cycle radiation response: Role of intracellular factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.; Chang, P.; Lommel, L.; Bjornstad, K.; Dixon, M.; Tobias, C.; Kumar, K.; Blakely, W. F.

    We have been studying variations of radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular factors during the course of progression through the human and hamster cell cycle. After exposure to low-LET radiations, the most radiosensitive cell stages are mitosis and the G1/S interface. The increased activity of a specific antioxidant enzyme such as superoxide dismutase in G1-phase, and the variations of endogenous thiols during cell division are thought to be intracellular factors of importance to the radiation survival response. These factors may contribute to modifying the age-dependent yield of lesions or more likely, to the efficiency of the repair processes. These molecular factors have been implicated in our cellular measurements of the larger values for the radiobiological oxygen effect late in the cycle compared to earlier cell ages. Low-LET radiation also delays progression through S phase which may allow more time for repair and hence contribute to radioresistance in late-S-phase. The cytoplasmic and intranuclear milieu of the cell appears to have less significant effects on lesions produced by high-LET radiation compared to those made by low-LET radiation. High-LET radiation fails to slow progression through S phase, and there is much less repair of lesions evident at all cell ages; however, high-LET particles cause a more profound block in G2 phase than that observed after low-LET radiation. Hazards posed by the interaction of damage from sequential doses of radiations of different qualities have been evaluated and are shown to lead to a cell-cycle-dependent enhancement of radiobiological effects. A summary comparison of various cell-cycle-dependent endpoints measured with low-or high-LET radiations is given and includes a discussion of the possible additional effects introduced by microgravity.

  16. Evolution of cell cycle control: same molecular machines, different regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Ulrik; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Decades of research has together with the availability of whole genomes made it clear that many of the core components involved in the cell cycle are conserved across eukaryotes, both functionally and structurally. These proteins are organized in complexes and modules that are activated or deacti......Decades of research has together with the availability of whole genomes made it clear that many of the core components involved in the cell cycle are conserved across eukaryotes, both functionally and structurally. These proteins are organized in complexes and modules that are activated...... or deactivated at specific stages during the cell cycle through a wide variety of mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, phosphorylation, subcellular translocation and targeted degradation. In a series of integrative analyses of different genome-scale data sets, we have studied how these different...... layers of regulation together control the activity of cell cycle complexes and how this regulation has evolved. The results show surprisingly poor conservation of both the transcriptional and the post-translation regulation of individual genes and proteins; however, the changes in one layer of regulation...

  17. Refined life-cycle assessment of polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenzmann, F.; Kroon, J.; Andriessen, R.

    2011-01-01

    A refined life-cycle assessment of polymer solar cells is presented with a focus on critical components, i.e. the transparent conductive ITO layer and the encapsulation components. This present analysis gives a comprehensive sketch of the full environmental potential of polymer-OPV in comparison...

  18. Maid (GCIP) is involved in cell cycle control of hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenberg-Riethmacher, Eva; Wüstefeld, Torsten; Miehe, Michaela;

    2007-01-01

    . Therefore, we studied the role of Maid during cell cycle progression after partial hepatectomy (PH). Lack of Maid expression after PH was associated with a delay in G1/S-phase progression as evidenced by delayed cyclinA expression and DNA replication in Maid-deficient mice. However, at later time points...

  19. Cycle life status of SAFT VOS nickel-cadmium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goualard, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    The SAFT prismatic VOS Ni-Cd cells have been flown in geosynchronous orbit since 1977 and in low earth orbit since 1983. Parallel cycling tests are performed by several space agencies in order to determine the cycle life for a wide range of temperature and depth of discharge (DOD). In low Earth orbit (LEO), the ELAN program is conducted on 24 Ah cells by CNES and ESA at the European Battery Test Center at temperatures ranging from 0 to 27 C and DOD from 10 to 40 percent. Data are presented up to 37,000 cycles. One pack (X-80) has achieved 49,000 cycles at 10 C and 23 percent DOD. The geosynchronous orbit simulation of a high DOD test is conducted by ESA on 3 batteries at 10 C and 70, 90, and 100 percent DOD. Thirty-one eclipse seasons are completed, and no signs of degradation have been found. The Air Force test at CRANE on 24 Ah and 40 Ah cells at 20 C and 80 percent DOD has achieved 19 shadow periods. Life expectancy is discussed. The VOS cell technology could be used for the following: (1) in geosynchronous conditions--15 yrs at 10-15 C and 80 percent DOD; and (2) in low earth orbit--10 yrs at 5-15 C and 25-30 percent DOD.

  20. Visualizing cell-cycle kinetics after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tatsuaki; Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2015-12-10

    Hypoxia induces G1 arrest in many cancer cell types. Tumor cells are often exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation, especially under acute hypoxic conditions in vivo. In this study, we investigated cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation in HeLa cells expressing fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci). Hypoxic treatment halted cell-cycle progression during mid-S to G2 phase, as determined by the cell cycle-regulated E3 ligase activities of SCF(Skp2) and APC/C(Cdh1), which are regulators of the Fucci probes; however, the DNA content of the arrested cells was equivalent to that in G1 phase. After reoxygenation, time-lapse imaging and DNA content analysis revealed that all cells reached G2 phase, and that Fucci fluorescence was distinctly separated into two fractions 24h after reoxygenation: red cells that released from G2 arrest after repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) exhibited higher clonogenic survival, whereas most cells that stayed green contained many DSBs and exhibited lower survival. We conclude that hypoxia disrupts coordination of DNA synthesis and E3 ligase activities associated with cell-cycle progression, and that DSB repair could greatly influence cell-cycle kinetics and clonogenic survival after hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  1. Targeting the cell cycle in esophageal adenocarcinoma: an adjunct to anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibb, Martyn; Ang, Yeng S

    2011-04-28

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer death in men in the developed world. Continuing poor outcomes with conventional therapies that predominantly target apoptosis pathways have lead to increasing interest in treatments that target the cell cycle. A large international effort has led to the development of a large number of inhibitors, which target cell cycle kinases, including cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases and polo-like kinase. Initial phase I/II trials in solid tumors have often demonstrated only modest clinical benefits of monotherapy. This may relate in part to a failure to identify the patient populations that will gain the most clinical benefit. Newer compounds lacking the side effect profile of first-generation compounds may show utility as adjunctive treatments targeted to an individual's predicted response to treatment.

  2. Targeting the cell cycle in esophageal adenocarcinoma: An adjunct to anticancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martyn Dibb; Yeng S Ang

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is a major cause of cancer death in men in the developed world. Continuing poor outcomes with conventional therapies that predomi-nantly target apoptosis pathways have lead to increas-ing interest in treatments that target the cell cycle. A large international effort has led to the development of a large number of inhibitors, which target cell cycle kinases, including cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora ki-nases and polo-like kinase. Initial phaseⅠ/Ⅱtrials in solid tumors have often demonstrated only modest clinical benefits of monotherapy. This may relate in part to a failure to identify the patient populations that will gain the most clinical benefit. Newer compounds lacking the side effect profile of first-generation compounds may show utility as adjunctive treatments targeted to an in-dividual's predicted response to treatment.

  3. Effect of staurosporine on cycle of human gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Wen Ha; Ke-Zuo Hou; Yun-Peng Liu; Yuan Yuan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of staurosporine (ST) on the cell cycle of human gastriccancer cell lines MGC803 and SGC7901.METHODS: Cell proliferation was evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion method. Apoptotic morphology was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Changes of cell cycle and apoptotic peaks of cells were determined by flow cytometry. Expression of p21WAFI gene was examined using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.RESULTS: The growth of MGC803 and SGC7901 cells was inhibited by ST. The inhibitory concentrations against 50% cells (IC50) at 24 h and 48 h were 54 ng/ml and 23 ng/ml for MlGC803, and 61 ng/ml and 37 ng/ml for SGC7901. Typical apoptotic bodies and apoptotic peaks were observed 24 hafter cells were treated wth ST at a concentration of 200ng/ml. The percentage of cells at G0/G1 phase was decreased and that of cells at G2/M was increased significantly in the group treated wth ST at the concentrations of 40ng/ml,60 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml for 24 h, compared with the control group (P<0.01). The expression levels of p21WAFI gene in both MGC803 and SGC7901 cells were markedly up-regulated after treatment with ST.CONCLUSION: ST can cause arrest of gastric cancer cells at G2/M phase, which may be one of the mechanisms that inhibit cell proliferation and cause apoptosis in these cells.Effect of ST on cells at G2/M phase may be attributed to the up-regulattion of p21WAFI gene.

  4. Heat production of mammalian cells at different cell-cycle phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loesberg, C.; Miltenburg, J.C. van; Wuk, R. van

    1982-01-01

    1. 1.|Heat production of Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells and murine C1300 neuroblastoma cells at different stages of the cell cycle were measured microcalorimetrically. 2. 2.|Reuber H35 monolayer cultures of G1-phase cells and cells in S-phase were trypsinized, reincubated in suspension culture and i

  5. Down-regulation of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AP-4 belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper subgroup; it controls target gene expression, regulates growth, development and cell apoptosis and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Our previous studies indicated that AP-4 was frequently overexpressed in gastric cancers and may be associated with the poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to examine whether silencing of AP-4 can alter biological characteristics of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: Two specific siRNAs targeting AP-4 were designed, synthesized, and transfected into gastric cancer cell lines and human normal mucosa cells. AP-4 expression was measured with real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation and chemo-sensitivity were detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle assay and apoptosis assay were performed by flow cytometer, and relative expression of cell cycle regulators were detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, expression of the factors involved in the apoptosis pathway were examined in mRNA and protein level. RESULTS: The expression of AP-4 was silenced by the siRNAs transfection and the effects of AP-4 knockdown lasted 24 to 96 hrs. The siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 suppressed the cellular proliferation, induced apoptosis and sensitized cancer cells to anticancer drugs. In addition, the expression level of p21, p53 and Caspase-9 were increased when AP-4 was knockdown, but the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L was inhibited. It didn't induce cell cycle arrest when AP-4 was knockdown in p53 defect gastric cancer cell line Kato-III. CONCLUSIONS: These results illustrated that gene silencing of AP-4 can efficiently inhibited cell proliferation, triggered apoptosis and sensitized cancer cells to anticancer drugs in vitro, suggesting that AP-4 siRNAs mediated silencing has a potential value in the treatment of human gastric cancer.

  6. The NF-κB Pathway and Cancer Stem Cells.

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    Rinkenbaugh, Amanda L; Baldwin, Albert S

    2016-04-06

    The NF-κB transcription factor pathway is a crucial regulator of inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, aberrant NF-κB signaling has been identified in many types of cancer. Downstream of key oncogenic pathways, such as RAS, BCR-ABL, and Her2, NF-κB regulates transcription of target genes that promote cell survival and proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, and mediate invasion and metastasis. The cancer stem cell model posits that a subset of tumor cells (cancer stem cells) drive tumor initiation, exhibit resistance to treatment, and promote recurrence and metastasis. This review examines the evidence for a role for NF-κB signaling in cancer stem cell biology.

  7. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ming; JIA Ya; LIU Quan; ZHU Chun-Lian; YANG Li-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25△ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  8. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Jia, Ya; Liu, Quan; Zhu, Chun-Lian; Yang, Li-Jian

    2007-07-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25Δ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  9. EFFECT OF SOMATOSTATIN ON THE CELL CYCLE OF HUMAN GALLBLADDER CANCER CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李济宇; 全志伟; 张强; 刘建文

    2005-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of somatostatin on the cell cycle of human gallbladder cancer cell. Methods Growth curve of gallbladder cancer cell was measured after somatostatin treated on gradient concentration. Simultaneously, the change of gallbladder cancer cell cycle was detected using flow cytometry.Results Concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition caused by somatostatin was detected in gallbladder cancer cell(P<0.05). Cell growth was arrested in S phase since 12h after somatostatin treated, which reached its peak at 24h, then fell down. The changes in apoptosis index of gallbladder cancer cell caused by somatostatin correlated with that's in cell cycle. Conclusion Somatostatin could inhibit the cell growth of human gallbladder cancer cell in vitro on higher concentration. It might result from inducing growth arrest in S phase in early stage and inducing apoptosis in the late stage.

  10. Thyroid hormone inhibits the proliferation of piglet Sertoli cell via PI3K signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Yang, WeiRong; Luo, HongLin; Wang, XianZhong; Chen, ZhongQiong; Zhang, JiaoJiao; Wang, Yi; Li, XiaoMin

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating researches show that thyroid hormone (TH) inhibits Sertoli cells (SCs) proliferation and stimulates their functional maturation in prepubertal rat testis, confirming that TH plays a key role in testicular development. However, the mechanism under the T3 regulation of piglet SC proliferation remains unclear. In the present study, in order to investigate the possible mechanism of T3 on the suppression of SC proliferation, the expression pattern of TRα1 and cell cycle-related molecules, effect of T3 on SC proliferation, and the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway on the T3-mediated SC proliferation in piglet testis were explored. Our results demonstrated that TRα1 was expressed in all tested stages of SCs and decreased along with the ages. T3 inhibited the proliferation of SCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and T3 treatment downregulated the expressions of cell cycling molecules, such as cyclinA2, cyclinD1, cyclinE1, PCNA, and Skp2, but upregulated the p27 expression in SCs. Most importantly, the suppressive effects of T3 on SC proliferation seemed dependent on the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and pre-stimulation of PI3K could enhance such suppressive effects. Together, our findings demonstrate that TH inhibits the proliferation of piglet SCs via the suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  11. Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, and glycolysis in the uninvolved gastric mucosa of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwell, R L; Piper, D W

    1977-12-01

    Uninvolved gastric mucosa from duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer patients was incubated with [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose in order to assess the relative contributions of the pentose phosphate pathway and Krebs cycle to glucose metabolism. [14C]Glucose counts retained by the tissue, glycolysis, and pyruvate formation were also measured. Tumor tissue from the cancer patients was included in the study. Less than 1.2% of the glucose entering the tissues was metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway; suggesting that this pathway plays a minor role in energy production from glucose. The major determinant of energy production was the Krebs cycle. Its contribution to glucose metabolism was greatest in the body mucosa of duodenal ulcer patients, less in the uninvolved body mucosa of gastric ulcer patients, and lower still in the corresponding body mucosa of gastric cancer patients. The low levels of Krebs cycle activity seen in the latter tissue resembled those of uninvolved antral mucosa. The smallest Krebs cycle contribution was seen in tumor tissue. [14C]Glucose counts retained by the tissue and glycolysis both tended to vary inversely with Krebs cycle activity among the tissues studied. Thus, both were small in the body mucosa of noncancer patients and somewhat larger in the body mucosa of cancer patients, in uninvolved antral mucosa and in tumor tissue.

  12. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Tetsushi, E-mail: tiida@nig.ac.jp [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Iida, Naoko [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yasuhiro [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yamao, Fumiaki [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Kobayashi, Takehiko [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations in ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1{sup +}, the overexpression of ago1{sup +} alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1{Delta}. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1{sup +} is dependent on ptr1{sup +}. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +}, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  13. Biocompatibility, uptake and endocytosis pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles in primary human renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Daria Maria; Guarnieri, Daniela; Napolitano, Giuliana; Piccoli, Renata; Netti, Paolo; Fusco, Sabato; Arciello, Angela

    2015-01-10

    Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented growth in the number of applications—such as drug delivery, nutraceuticals and production of improved biocompatible materials—in the areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are an important tool for the development of quite a few of these applications. Despite intense research activity, mechanisms regulating the uptake of NPs into cells are not completely defined, being the phenomenon dramatically influenced by physico-chemical properties of NPs and cell-specific differences. Since the cellular uptake of NPs is a prerequisite for their use in nanomedicine, the definition of their internalization pathway is crucial. For this reason, we used 44 nm polystyrene NPs as a model to analyze the uptake and endocytosis pathways in primary human renal cortical epithelial (HRCE) cells, which play a key role in the clearance of drugs. NPs were found not to affect the viability and cell cycle progression of HRCE cells. Distinct internalization pathways were analyzed by the use of drugs known to inhibit specific endocytosis routes. Analyses, performed by confocal microscopy in combination with quantitative spectrofluorimetric assays, indicated that NPs enter HRCE cells through multiple mechanisms, either energy-dependent (endocytosis) or energy-independent.

  14. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  15. Taxol induces concentration-dependent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and cell cycle arrest in ASTC-a-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2010-02-01

    Taxol (Paclitaxel) is an important natural product for the treatment of solid tumors. Different concentrations of taxol can trigger distinct effects on both the cellular microtubule network and biochemical pathways. Apoptosis induced by low concentrations (5-30 nM) of taxol was associated with mitotic arrest, alteration of microtubule dynamics and/or G2/M cell cycle arrest, whereas high concentrations of this drug (0.2-30 μM) caused significant microtubule damage, and was found recently to induce cytoplasm vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. In present study, cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay, confocal microscope, and flow cytometry analysis were used to analyze the cell death form induced by 35 nM and 70 μM of taxol respectively in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. After treatment of 35 nM taxol for 48 h, the OD450 value was 0.80, and 35 nM taxol was found to induce dominantly cell death in apoptotic pathway such as phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, G2/M phase arrest after treatment for 24 h, and nuclear fragmentation after treatment for 48 h. After 70 μM taxol treated the cell for 24 h, the OD450 value was 1.01, and 70 μM taxol induced cytoplasm vacuolization programmed cell death (PCD) and G2/M phase as well as the polyploidy phase arrest in paraptotic-like cell death. These findings imply that the regulated signaling pathway of cell death induced by taxol is dependent on taxol concentration in ASTC-a-1 cells.

  16. Midkine-A functions upstream of Id2a to regulate cell cycle kinetics in the developing vertebrate retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Jing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Midkine is a small heparin binding growth factor expressed in numerous tissues during development. The unique midkine gene in mammals has two paralogs in zebrafish: midkine-a (mdka and midkine-b (mdkb. In the zebrafish retina, during both larval development and adult photoreceptor regeneration, mdka is expressed in retinal stem and progenitor cells and functions as a molecular component of the retina’s stem cell niche. In this study, loss-of-function and conditional overexpression were used to investigate the function of Mdka in the retina of the embryonic zebrafish. Results The results show that during early retinal development Mdka functions to regulate cell cycle kinetics. Following targeted knockdown of Mdka synthesis, retinal progenitors cycle more slowly, and this results in microphthalmia, a diminished rate of cell cycle exit and a temporal delay of cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. In contrast, Mdka overexpression results in acceleration of the cell cycle and retinal overgrowth. Mdka gain-of-function, however, does not temporally advance cell cycle exit. Experiments to identify a potential Mdka signaling pathway show that Mdka functions upstream of the HLH regulatory protein, Id2a. Gene expression analysis shows Mdka regulates id2a expression, and co-injection of Mdka morpholinos and id2a mRNA rescues the Mdka loss-of-function phenotype. Conclusions These data show that in zebrafish, Mdka resides in a shared Id2a pathway to regulate cell cycle kinetics in retinal progenitors. This is the first study to demonstrate the function of Midkine during retinal development and adds Midkine to the list of growth factors that transcriptionally regulate Id proteins.

  17. Akt1 intramitochondrial cycling is a crucial step in the redox modulation of cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gabriela Antico Arciuch

    Full Text Available Akt is a serine/threonine kinase involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. Akt is differentially activated by growth factors and oxidative stress by sequential phosphorylation of Ser(473 by mTORC2 and Thr(308 by PDK1. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of H(2O(2 yield, mitochondrial activation of Akt1 and cell cycle progression in NIH/3T3 cell line with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging, and directed mutagenesis. We demonstrate that modulation by H(2O(2 entails the entrance of cytosolic P-Akt1 Ser(473 to mitochondria, where it is further phosphorylated at Thr(308 by constitutive PDK1. Phosphorylation of Thr(308 in mitochondria determines Akt1 passage to nuclei and triggers genomic post-translational mechanisms for cell proliferation. At high H(2O(2, Akt1-PDK1 association is disrupted and P-Akt1 Ser(473 accumulates in mitochondria in detriment to nuclear translocation; accordingly, Akt1 T308A is retained in mitochondria. Low Akt1 activity increases cytochrome c release to cytosol leading to apoptosis. As assessed by mass spectra, differential H(2O(2 effects on Akt1-PDK interaction depend on the selective oxidation of Cys(310 to sulfenic or cysteic acids. These results indicate that Akt1 intramitochondrial-cycling is central for redox modulation of cell fate.

  18. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  19. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihan Lin

    Full Text Available Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS.

  20. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Anda

    Full Text Available Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  1. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  2. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Xi [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); State Key Lab of Animal Nutrition, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan West Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Shi, Taiping [Chinese National Human Genome Center, Beijing. 3-707 North YongChang Road BDA, Beijing 100176 (China); Song, Quansheng [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Hongshan, E-mail: hongshan@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Dalong [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Human Disease Genomics Center, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  3. Relation Between the Cell Volume and the Cell Cycle Dynamics in Mammalian cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, A. C. G.; Oliveira, I. L.; Hauck, J. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to add and analyze an equation that represents the volume in a dynamical model of the mammalian cell cycle proposed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2011) [1]. The cell division occurs when the cyclinB/Cdkl complex is totally degraded (Tyson and Novak, 2011)[2] and it reaches a minimum value. At this point, the cell is divided into two newborn daughter cells and each one will contain the half of the cytoplasmic content of the mother cell. The equations of our base model are only valid if the cell volume, where the reactions occur, is constant. Whether the cell volume is not constant, that is, the rate of change of its volume with respect to time is explicitly taken into account in the mathematical model, then the equations of the original model are no longer valid. Therefore, every equations were modified from the mass conservation principle for considering a volume that changes with time. Through this approach, the cell volume affects all model variables. Two different dynamic simulation methods were accomplished: deterministic and stochastic. In the stochastic simulation, the volume affects every model's parameters which have molar unit, whereas in the deterministic one, it is incorporated into the differential equations. In deterministic simulation, the biochemical species may be in concentration units, while in stochastic simulation such species must be converted to number of molecules which are directly proportional to the cell volume. In an effort to understand the influence of the new equation a stability analysis was performed. This elucidates how the growth factor impacts the stability of the model's limit cycles. In conclusion, a more precise model, in comparison to the base model, was created for the cell cycle as it now takes into consideration the cell volume variation

  4. Calotropin from Asclepias curasavica induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, En-Pan; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Tan, Qiu-Tong; Liu, Fang-Lan; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-09-16

    Calotropin (M11), an active compound isolated from Asclepias curasavica L., was found to exert strong inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity specifically against cisplatin-induced resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells (A549/CDDP). Molecular mechanism study revealed that M11 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase through down-regulating cyclins, CDK1, CDK2 and up-regulating p53 and p21. Furthermore, M11 accelerated apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was accompanied by increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in reactive oxygen species production, activations of caspases 3 and 9 as well as cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The activation and phosphorylation of JNK was also found to be involved in M11-induced apoptosis, and SP610025 (specific JNK inhibitor) partially prevented apoptosis induced by M11. In contrast, all of the effects that M11 induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/CDDP cells were not significant in A549 cells. Drugs with higher sensitivity against resistant tumor cells than the parent cells are rather rare. Results of this study supported the potential application of M11 on the non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) with cisplatin resistance.

  5. Nitrosative stress and redox-cycling agents synergize to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne R. Diers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide production by the endothelium is required for normal vascular homeostasis; however, in conditions of oxidative stress, interactions of nitric oxide with reactive oxygen species (ROS are thought to underlie endothelial dysfunction. Beyond canonical nitric oxide signaling pathways, nitric oxide production results in the post-translational modification of protein thiols, termed S-nitrosation. The potential interplay between S-nitrosation and ROS remains poorly understood and is the focus of the current study. The effects of the S-nitrosating agent S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO in combination with redox-cycling agents was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC. CysNO significantly impairs mitochondrial function and depletes the NADH/NAD+ pool; however, these changes do not result in cell death. When faced with the additional stressor of a redox-cycling agent used to generate ROS, further loss of NAD+ occurs, and cellular ATP pools are depleted. Cellular S-nitrosothiols also accumulate, and cell death is triggered. These data demonstrate that CysNO sensitizes endothelial cells to redox-cycling agent-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death and identify attenuated degradation of S-nitrosothiols as one potential mechanism for the enhanced cytotoxicity.

  6. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

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    Louise von Stechow

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Signaling pathways in failing human heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, H; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1997-07-01

    Experimental studies have delineated important signaling pathways in cardiomyocytes and their alterations in heart failure; however, there is now evidence that these observations are not necessarily applicable to human cardiac muscle cells. For example, angiotensin II (A II) does not exert positive inotropic effects in human ventricular muscle cells, in contrast to observation in rats. Thus, it is important to elucidate cardiac signaling pathways in humans in order to appreciate the functional role of neurohumoral or mechanical stimulation in human myocardium in health and disease. In the present article, we review signal pathways in the failing human heart based on studies in human cardiac tissues and in vivo physiological studies related to A II, nitric oxide, and β-adrenergic stimulation. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997; 7:151-160). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  8. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrhardt, H.; Wachter, F; Grunert, M.; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 o...

  9. p21(WAF1) Mediates Cell-Cycle Inhibition, Relevant to Cancer Suppression and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-09-15

    p21 (WAF1/CIP1; CDKN1a) is a universal cell-cycle inhibitor directly controlled by p53 and p53-independent pathways. Knowledge of the regulation and function of p21 in normal and cancer cells has opened up several areas of investigation and has led to novel therapeutic strategies. The discovery in 1993 and subsequent work on p21 has illuminated basic cellular growth control, stem cell phenotypes, the physiology of differentiation, as well as how cells respond to stress. There remain open questions in the signaling networks, the ultimate role of p21 in the p53-deficiency phenotype in the context of other p53 target defects, and therapeutic strategies continue to be a work in progress. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5189-91. ©2016 AACRSee related article by El-Deiry et al., Cancer Res 1994;54:1169-74Visit the Cancer Research 75(th) Anniversary timeline.

  10. DC-SCRIPT is a novel regulator of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ERα-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansems, Marleen; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Looman, Maaike W G; Smid, Marcel; de Graaf, Annemarie M A; de Weerd, Vanja; Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths in women. The estrogen receptor (ERα) is well known for having growth promoting effects in breast cancer. Recently, we have identified DC-SCRIPT (ZNF366) as a co-suppressor of ERα and as a strong and independent prognostic marker in ESR1 (ERα gene)-positive breast cancer patients. In this study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism on how DC-SCRIPT inhibits breast cancer cell growth. DC-SCRIPT mRNA levels from 190 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors were related to global gene expression, followed by gene ontology and pathway analysis. The effect of DC-SCRIPT on breast cancer cell growth and cell cycle arrest was investigated using novel DC-SCRIPT-inducible MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Genome-wide expression profiling of DC-SCRIPT-expressing MCF7 cells was performed to investigate the effect of DC-SCRIPT on cell cycle-related gene expression. Findings were validated by real-time PCR in a cohort of 1,132 ESR1-positive breast cancer patients. In the primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression negatively correlated with several cell cycle gene ontologies and pathways. DC-SCRIPT expression strongly reduced breast cancer cell growth in vitro, breast tumor growth in vivo, and induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, in the presence of DC-SCRIPT, multiple cell cycles related genes were differentially expressed including the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2B. Moreover, in 1,132 primary ESR1-positive breast tumors, DC-SCRIPT expression also correlated with CDKN2B expression. Collectively, these data show that DC-SCRIPT acts as a novel regulator of CDKN2B and induces cell cycle arrest in ESR1-positive breast cancer cells.

  11. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide exerts anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guohua; Yang, Lei; Zhuang, Yun; Qian, Xifeng; Shen, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo of a polysaccharide obtained from Ganoderma lucidum on HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cells, and focused on its targeting effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. It was found by the methods such as western blot and flow cytometry (FCM), that G. lucidum polysaccharide (GLP) blocked the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK signaling pathway, simultaneously activated p38 and JNK MAPK pathways, and therefore regulated their downstream genes and proteins, including p53, c-myc, c-fos, c-jun, Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and cyclin D1. As a result, cycle arrest and apoptosis of HL-60 cells were induced. Therefore, GLP exerted anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

  12. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Nevo

    Full Text Available Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  13. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  14. A novel sucrose synthase pathway for sucrose degradation in cultured sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, S C; Akazawa, T

    1986-08-01

    Enzymes of sucrose degradation and glycolysis in cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells were assayed and characterized in crude extracts and after partial purification, in an attempt to identify pathways for sucrose catabolism. Desalted cell extracts contained similar activities (20-40 nanomoles per milligram protein per minute) of sucrose synthase, neutral invertase, glucokinase, fructokinase, phosphofructokinase, and UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (assayed with 2 micromolar pyrophosphate (PPi). PPi-linked phosphofructokinase activity was virtually dependent upon fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, and the maximum activity exceeded that of ATP-linked phosphofructokinase. Hexokinase activity, with glucose as substrate, was highly specific for ATP, whereas fructokinase activity was relatively nonspecific. At 1 millimolar nucleoside triphosphate, fructokinase activity decreased in the order: UTP > ATP > CTP > GTP. We propose two pathways for sucrose degradation. One involves invertase action, followed by classical glycolysis of hexose sugars, and the other is a novel pathway initiated by sucrose synthase. The K(m) for sucrose of sucrose synthase was severalfold lower than that of neutral invertase (15 versus 65 millimolar), which may determine carbon partitioning between the two pathways. The sucrose synthase pathway proposed involves cycling of uridylates and PPi. UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase, which is shown to be an effective ;PPi-scavenger,' would consume PPi and form UTP. The UTP could be then utilized in the UTP-linked fructokinase reaction, thereby forming UDP for sucrose synthase. The source of PPi is postulated to arise from the back reaction of PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Sycamore cells contained a substantial endogenous pool of PPi (about 3 nanomoles per gram fresh weight, roughly 1/10 the amount of ATP in these cells), and sufficient fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (0.09 nanomole per gram fresh weight) to activate the PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Possible

  15. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα regulates granulosa cell tumor (GCT cell proliferation and migration through activation of multiple pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    Full Text Available Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs are the most common ovarian estrogen producing tumors, leading to symptoms of excessive estrogen such as endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial adenocarcinoma. These tumors have malignant potential and often recur. The etiology of GCT is unknown. TGFα is a potent mitogen for many different cells. However, its function in GCT initiation, progression and metastasis has not been determined. The present study aims to determine whether TGFα plays a role in the growth of GCT cells. KGN cells, which are derived from an invasive GCT and have many features of normal granulosa cells, were used as the cellular model. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and RT-PCR results showed that the ErbB family of receptors is expressed in human GCT tissues and GCT cell lines. RT-PCR results also indicated that TGFα and EGF are expressed in the human granulosa cells and the GCT cell lines, suggesting that TGFα might regulate GCT cell function in an autocrine/paracrine manner. TGFα stimulated KGN cell DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell viability, cell cycle progression, and cell migration. TGFα rapidly activated EGFR/PI3K/Akt and mTOR pathways, as indicated by rapid phosphorylation of Akt, TSC2, Rictor, mTOR, P70S6K and S6 proteins following TGFα treatment. TGFα also rapidly activated the EGFR/MEK/ERK pathway, and P38 MAPK pathways, as indicated by the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR, MEK, ERK1/2, P38, and CREB after TGFα treatment. Whereas TGFα triggered a transient activation of Akt, it induced a sustained activation of ERK1/2 in KGN cells. Long-term treatment of KGN cells with TGFα resulted in a significant increase in cyclin D2 and a decrease in p27/Kip1, two critical regulators of granulosa cell proliferation and granulosa cell tumorigenesis. In conclusion, TGFα, via multiple signaling pathways, regulates KGN cell proliferation and migration and may play an important role in the growth and metastasis of GCTs.

  16. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P; De Nisco, Nicole J; Arnold, Markus F F; Longhi, Renato; Zanda, Matteo; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes a chronic intracellular infection during the symbiosis with its legume hosts. Within specialized host cells, S. meliloti differentiates into highly polyploid, enlarged nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This differentiation is driven by host cells through the production of defensin-like peptides called "nodule-specific cysteine-rich" (NCR) peptides. Recent research has shown that synthesized NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity at high concentrations but cause bacterial endoreduplication at sublethal concentrations. We leveraged synchronized S. meliloti populations to determine how treatment with a sublethal NCR peptide affects the cell cycle and physiology of bacteria at the molecular level. We found that at sublethal levels a representative NCR peptide specifically blocks cell division and antagonizes Z-ring function. Gene-expression profiling revealed that the cell division block was produced, in part, through the substantial transcriptional response elicited by sublethal NCR treatment that affected ∼15% of the genome. Expression of critical cell-cycle regulators, including ctrA, and cell division genes, including genes required for Z-ring function, were greatly attenuated in NCR-treated cells. In addition, our experiments identified important symbiosis functions and stress responses that are induced by sublethal levels of NCR peptides and other antimicrobial peptides. Several of these stress-response pathways also are found in related α-proteobacterial pathogens and might be used by S. meliloti to sense host cues during infection. Our data suggest a model in which, in addition to provoking stress responses, NCR peptides target intracellular regulatory pathways to drive S. meliloti endoreduplication and differentiation during symbiosis.

  17. A FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module transduces extracellular matrix stiffness into mechanosensitive cell cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yong Ho; Mui, Keeley L; Hsu, Bernadette Y; Liu, Shu-Lin; Cretu, Alexandra; Razinia, Ziba; Xu, Tina; Puré, Ellen; Assoian, Richard K

    2014-06-17

    Tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness is transduced into intracellular stiffness, signaling, and changes in cellular behavior. Integrins and several of their associated focal adhesion proteins have been implicated in sensing ECM stiffness. We investigated how an initial sensing event is translated into intracellular stiffness and a biologically interpretable signal. We found that a pathway consisting of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas), and the guanosine triphosphatase Rac selectively transduced ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness, increased the abundance of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1, and promoted S-phase entry. Rac-dependent intracellular stiffening involved its binding partner lamellipodin, a protein that transmits Rac signals to the cytoskeleton during cell migration. Our findings establish that mechanotransduction by a FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module converts the external information encoded by ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness and mechanosensitive cell cycling. Thus, lamellipodin is important not only in controlling cellular migration but also for regulating the cell cycle in response to mechanical signals.

  18. Ouabain enhances ADPKD cell apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo eBlanco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Progression of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is highly influenced by factors circulating in blood. We have shown that the hormone ouabain enhances several characteristics of the ADPKD cystic phenotype, including the rate of cell proliferation, fluid secretion and the capacity of the cells to form cysts. In this work, we found that physiological levels of ouabain (3nM also promote programmed cell death of renal epithelial cells obtained from kidney cysts of patients with ADPKD (ADPKD cells. This was determined by Alexa Fluor 488 labeled-Annexin-V staining and TUNEL assay, both biochemical markers of apoptosis. Ouabain-induced apoptosis also takes place when ADPKD cell growth is blocked; suggesting that the effect is not secondary to the stimulatory actions of ouabain on cell proliferation. Ouabain alters the expression of BCL family of proteins, reducing BCL-2 and increasing BAX expression levels, anti- and pro-apoptotic mediators respectively. In addition, ouabain caused the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Moreover, ouabain activates caspase-3, a key executioner caspase in the cell apoptotic pathway, but did not affect caspase-8. This suggests that ouabain triggers ADPKD cell apoptosis by stimulating the intrinsic, but not the extrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. The apoptotic effects of ouabain are specific for ADPKD cells and do not occur in normal human kidney cells (NHK cells. Taken together with our previous observations, these results show that ouabain causes an imbalance in cell growth/death, to favor growth of the cystic cells. This event, characteristic of ADPKD, further suggests the importance of ouabain as a circulating factor that promotes ADPKD progression.

  19. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonifati, Serena [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Daly, Michele B. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Shepard, Caitlin [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kennedy, Edward M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Dong-Hyun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Schinazi, Raymond F. [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Baek, E-mail: baek.kim@emory.edu [Center for Drug Discovery, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Li, E-mail: wu.840@osu.edu [Center for Retrovirus Research, Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-08-15

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G{sub 1}/G{sub 0} phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection.

  20. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway.

  1. Boolean network model predicts cell cycle sequence of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Davidich

    Full Text Available A Boolean network model of the cell-cycle regulatory network of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe is constructed solely on the basis of the known biochemical interaction topology. Simulating the model in the computer faithfully reproduces the known activity sequence of regulatory proteins along the cell cycle of the living cell. Contrary to existing differential equation models, no parameters enter the model except the structure of the regulatory circuitry. The dynamical properties of the model indicate that the biological dynamical sequence is robustly implemented in the regulatory network, with the biological stationary state G1 corresponding to the dominant attractor in state space, and with the biological regulatory sequence being a strongly attractive trajectory. Comparing the fission yeast cell-cycle model to a similar model of the corresponding network in S. cerevisiae, a remarkable difference in circuitry, as well as dynamics is observed. While the latter operates in a strongly damped mode, driven by external excitation, the S. pombe network represents an auto-excited system with external damping.

  2. Genistein Plays Antitumor Role through Cell Cycle and Apotosis Pathways in Human Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7/ADM in vitro%三羟异黄酮对人乳腺癌MCF-7/ADM细胞体外抑瘤效应、细胞周期及凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王耕; 黄韬; 薛家鹏; 王明华; 惠震

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the antitumor effect of genistein (Genistein GEN) in cultured drug-resistant breast cancer cell line of MCF-7/ADM in vitro, and influences of genistein to cell cycle and apoptosis. Methods Inhibitory effect of GEN alone or combined with doxorubicin on the cultured MCF-7/ADM was detected by MTT assay; the accumulative effect of GEN on doxorubicin in MCF-7/ADM was detected by fluorescence spectrophotometry; and cell cycle and apoptosis rate was detecced by flow cytometry (FCM). Results Significant inhibitory effect on cultured MCF-7/ADM in vitro was not observed under GEN alone or combined with Doxorubicin 48 h later GEN treated alone, the inhibition increased gradually in time-dependent model. When the concentration of GEN reached 60 μg/ml, inhibition effect was markedly increased (P<0. 01). When Doxorubicin was added, the inhibition rate was significant increased compared with the control group (P<0. 01), and the inhibition strengthened with the increasing concentration of GEN, concentration of intracellular doxorubicin was also increased. Compared with the control group, the cell cycle were both blocked at G2/M phase, apoptosis was found to be the highest percentage in the combination group (P< 0. 01), typical hypodiploid apoptotic peak was detected before the G1 phase. Conclusion GEN alone and combined with Doxorubicin had an inhibitory and additive effect on cultured human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/ ADM in vitro, it could increase the intracellular accumulation of Doxorubicin and arrest cell cycle at phase G2/ M, as well as in inducing significant apoptosis of MCF-7/ADM cells, which may be one of its molecular mechanisms of the reversal of multidrug resistance.%目的 探讨三羟异黄酮(Genistein GEN)对体外培养人乳腺癌耐药细胞MCF-7/ADM抑瘤作用、细胞周期及细胞凋亡的影响.方法 采用MTT法检测GEN单独及联合阿霉素对体外培养人乳腺癌MCF-7/ADM细胞的抑制作用;荧光分光光

  3. Evaluation of cell cycle arrest in estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells: pitfalls of the MTS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Eileen M; Alling, Nikki; Jackson, Elise A; Yagoub, Daniel; Haass, Nikolas K; Allen, John D; Martinello-Wilks, Rosetta

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine resistance is a major problem with anti-estrogen treatments and how to overcome resistance is a major concern in the clinic. Reliable measurement of cell viability, proliferation, growth inhibition and death is important in screening for drug treatment efficacy in vitro. This report describes and compares commonly used proliferation assays for induced estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cell cycle arrest including: determination of cell number by direct counting of viable cells; or fluorescence SYBR®Green (SYBR) DNA labeling; determination of mitochondrial metabolic activity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay; assessment of newly synthesized DNA using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) nucleoside analog binding and Alexa Fluor® azide visualization by fluorescence microscopy; cell-cycle phase measurement by flow cytometry. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with ICI 182780 (Faslodex), FTY720, serum deprivation or induction of the tumor suppressor p14ARF showed inhibition of cell proliferation determined by the Trypan Blue exclusion assay and SYBR DNA labeling assay. In contrast, the effects of treatment with ICI 182780 or p14ARF-induction were not confirmed using the MTS assay. Cell cycle inhibition by ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction was further confirmed by flow cytometric analysis and EdU-DNA incorporation. To explore this discrepancy further, we showed that ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction increased MCF-7 cell mitochondrial activity by MTS assay in individual cells compared to control cells thereby providing a misleading proliferation readout. Interrogation of p14ARF-induction on MCF-7 metabolic activity using TMRE assays and high content image analysis showed that increased mitochondrial activity was concomitant with increased mitochondrial biomass with no loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, or cell death. We conclude that, whilst p14ARF and ICI 182780 stop cell cycle progression, the

  4. Evaluation of cell cycle arrest in estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells: pitfalls of the MTS assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M McGowan

    Full Text Available Endocrine resistance is a major problem with anti-estrogen treatments and how to overcome resistance is a major concern in the clinic. Reliable measurement of cell viability, proliferation, growth inhibition and death is important in screening for drug treatment efficacy in vitro. This report describes and compares commonly used proliferation assays for induced estrogen-responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cell cycle arrest including: determination of cell number by direct counting of viable cells; or fluorescence SYBR®Green (SYBR DNA labeling; determination of mitochondrial metabolic activity by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS assay; assessment of newly synthesized DNA using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU nucleoside analog binding and Alexa Fluor® azide visualization by fluorescence microscopy; cell-cycle phase measurement by flow cytometry. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with ICI 182780 (Faslodex, FTY720, serum deprivation or induction of the tumor suppressor p14ARF showed inhibition of cell proliferation determined by the Trypan Blue exclusion assay and SYBR DNA labeling assay. In contrast, the effects of treatment with ICI 182780 or p14ARF-induction were not confirmed using the MTS assay. Cell cycle inhibition by ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction was further confirmed by flow cytometric analysis and EdU-DNA incorporation. To explore this discrepancy further, we showed that ICI 182780 and p14ARF-induction increased MCF-7 cell mitochondrial activity by MTS assay in individual cells compared to control cells thereby providing a misleading proliferation readout. Interrogation of p14ARF-induction on MCF-7 metabolic activity using TMRE assays and high content image analysis showed that increased mitochondrial activity was concomitant with increased mitochondrial biomass with no loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, or cell death. We conclude that, whilst p14ARF and ICI 182780 stop cell cycle

  5. Tangeretin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through upregulation of PTEN expression in glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Li; Wang, Da-Wei; Yu, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Yan-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Tangeretin (TANG), present in peel of citrus fruits, has been shown to various medicinal properties such as chemopreventive and neuroprotective. However, the chemopreventive effect of TANG on glioblastoma cells has not been examined. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer potential of TANG in glioblastoma cells and to investigate the related mechanism. Human glioblastoma U-87MG and LN-18 cells were treated with 45μM concentration of TANG and cell growth was measured by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell death were measured by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot. The cells treated with TANG were significantly increased cell growth suppression and cell death effects than vehicle treated cells. Further, TANG treatment increases G2/M arrest and apoptosis by modulating PTEN and cell-cycle regulated genes such as cyclin-D and cdc-2 mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, the ability of TANG to decrease cell growth and to induce cell death was compromised when PTEN was knockdown by siRNA. Taken together, the chemopreventive effect of TANG is associated with regulation of cell-cycle and apoptosis in glioblastoma, thereby attenuating glioblastoma cell growth. Hence, the present findings suggest that TANG may be a therapeutic agent for glioblastoma treatment.

  6. Thermodynamic Analysis of an Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cycle with a Rankine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid systems consisting of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) on the top of a Steam Turbine (ST) are investigated. The plants are fired by natural gas (NG). A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the fuel while a pre-reformer breaks down the heavier hydrocarbons. The pre-treated fuel...... enters then into the anode side of the SOFC. The remaining fuels after the SOFC stacks enter a burner for further burning. The off-gases are then used to produce steam for a Rankine cycle in a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). Different system setups are suggested. Cyclic efficiencies up to 67......% are achieved which is considerably higher than the conventional Combined Cycles (CC). Both ASR (Adiabatic Steam Reformer) and CPO (Catalytic Partial Oxidation) fuel pre-reformer reactors are considered in this investigation....

  7. Differential expression and alternative splicing of cell cycle genes in imatinib-treated K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lin, Jin; Huang, Lin-Feng; Huang, Bo; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wei-Ming; Min, Qing-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression often involves the disorder of the cell cycle, and a number of effective chemotherapeutic drugs have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively investigate the effects of imatinib on the expression profile of cell cycle genes in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell line. In addition, we also investigated alternative splicing of the cell cycle genes affected by imatinib, since an important relationship has been shown to exist between RNA splicing and cell cycle progression. Exon array analysis was performed using total RNA purified from normal and imatinib-treated K562 cells. We identified 185 differentially expressed genes and 277 alternative splicing events between the two cell groups. A detailed analysis by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of key genes confirmed the experimental results of the exon array. These results suggested that treatment of K562 cells with imatinib shifts the expression and alternative splicing profiles of several cell cycle-related genes. Importantly, these findings may help improve imatinib treatment strategies in patients with CML and may be useful for imatinib resistance research and CML drug development.

  8. The Gonium pectorale genome demonstrates co-option of cell cycle regulation during the evolution of multicellularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Erik R; Marriage, Tara N; Ferris, Patrick J; Hamaji, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Neme, Rafik; Noguchi, Hideki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Smith, David R; Sparks, Halle; Anderson, Jaden; Bakarić, Robert; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W; Durand, Pierre M; Michod, Richard E; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-04-22

    The transition to multicellularity has occurred numerous times in all domains of life, yet its initial steps are poorly understood. The volvocine green algae are a tractable system for understanding the genetic basis of multicellularity including the initial formation of cooperative cell groups. Here we report the genome sequence of the undifferentiated colonial alga, Gonium pectorale, where group formation evolved by co-option of the retinoblastoma cell cycle regulatory pathway. Significantly, expression of the Gonium retinoblastoma cell cycle regulator in unicellular Chlamydomonas causes it to become colonial. The presence of these changes in undifferentiated Gonium indicates extensive group-level adaptation during the initial step in the evolution of multicellularity. These results emphasize an early and formative step in the evolution of multicellularity, the evolution of cell cycle regulation, one that may shed light on the evolutionary history of other multicellular innovations and evolutionary transitions.

  9. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi;

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  10. Systematic identification of yeast cell cycle transcription factors using multiple data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cell cycle is a complex process and is precisely regulated at many levels. Many genes specific to the cell cycle are regulated transcriptionally and are expressed just before they are needed. To understand the cell cycle process, it is important to identify the cell cycle transcription factors (TFs that regulate the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. Results We developed a method to identify cell cycle TFs in yeast by integrating current ChIP-chip, mutant, transcription factor binding site (TFBS, and cell cycle gene expression data. We identified 17 cell cycle TFs, 12 of which are known cell cycle TFs, while the remaining five (Ash1, Rlm1, Ste12, Stp1, Tec1 are putative novel cell cycle TFs. For each cell cycle TF, we assigned specific cell cycle phases in which the TF functions and identified the time lag for the TF to exert regulatory effects on its target genes. We also identified 178 novel cell cycle-regulated genes, among which 59 have unknown functions, but they may now be annotated as cell cycle-regulated genes. Most of our predictions are supported by previous experimental or computational studies. Furthermore, a high confidence TF-gene regulatory matrix is derived as a byproduct of our method. Each TF-gene regulatory relationship in this matrix is supported by at least three data sources: gene expression, TFBS, and ChIP-chip or/and mutant data. We show that our method performs better than four existing methods for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs. Finally, an application of our method to different cell cycle gene expression datasets suggests that our method is robust. Conclusion Our method is effective for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs and cell cycle-regulated genes. Many of our predictions are validated by the literature. Our study shows that integrating multiple data sources is a powerful approach to studying complex biological systems.

  11. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. The Retinoblastoma pathway regulates stem cell proliferation in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu Jun; Pearson, Bret J

    2013-01-15

    Freshwater planarians are flatworms of the Lophotrochozoan superphylum and are well known for their regenerative abilities, which rely on a large population of pluripotent adult stem cells. However, the mechanisms by which planarians maintain a precise population of adult stem cells while balancing proliferation and cell death, remain to be elucidated. Here we have identified, characterized, and functionally tested the core Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway components in planarian adult stem cell biology. The Rb pathway is an ancient and conserved mechanism of proliferation control from plants to animals and is composed of three core components: an Rb protein, and a transcription factor heterodimer of E2F and DP proteins. Although the planarian genome contains all components of the Rb pathway, we found that they have undergone gene loss from the ancestral state, similar to other species in their phylum. The single Rb homolog (Smed-Rb) was highly expressed in planarian stem cells and was required for stem cell maintenance, similar to the Rb-homologs p107 and p130 in vertebrates. We show that planarians and their phylum have undergone the most severe reduction in E2F genes observed thus far, and the single remaining E2F was predicted to be a repressive-type E2F (Smed-E2F4-1). Knockdown of either Smed-E2F4-1 or its dimerization partner Dp (Smed-Dp) by RNAi resulted in temporary hyper-proliferation. Finally, we showed that known Rb-interacting genes in other systems, histone deacetylase 1 and cyclinD (Smed-HDAC1; Smed-cycD), were similar to Rb in expression and phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi, suggesting that these established interactions with Rb may also be conserved in planarians. Together, these results showed that planarians use the conserved components of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway to control proliferation and cell survival.

  13. Computational analysis of mammalian cell division gated by a circadian clock: quantized cell cycles and cell size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámborszky, Judit; Hong, Christian I; Csikász Nagy, Attila

    2007-12-01

    Cell cycle and circadian rhythms are conserved from cyanobacteria to humans with robust cyclic features. Recently, molecular links between these two cyclic processes have been discovered. Core clock transcription factors, Bmal1 and Clock (Clk), directly regulate Wee1 kinase, which inhibits entry into the mitosis. We investigate the effect of this connection on the timing of mammalian cell cycle processes with computational modeling tools. We connect a minimal model of circadian rhythms, which consists of transcription-translation feedback loops, with a modified mammalian cell cycle model from Novak and Tyson (2004). As we vary the mass doubling time (MDT) of the cell cycle, stochastic simulations reveal quantized cell cycles when the activity of Wee1 is influenced by clock components. The quantized cell cycles disappear in the absence of coupling or when the strength of this link is reduced. More intriguingly, our simulations indicate that the circadian clock triggers critical size control in the mammalian cell cycle. A periodic brake on the cell cycle progress via Wee1 enforces size control when the MDT is quite different from the circadian period. No size control is observed in the absence of coupling. The issue of size control in the mammalian system is debatable, whereas it is well established in yeast. It is possible that the size control is more readily observed in cell lines that contain circadian rhythms, since not all cell types have a circadian clock. This would be analogous to an ultradian clock intertwined with quantized cell cycles (and possibly cell size control) in yeast. We present the first coupled model between the mammalian cell cycle and circadian rhythms that reveals quantized cell cycles and cell size control influenced by the clock.

  14. Role of AKT/mTORC1 pathway in pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balcazar Morales, Norman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth factors, insulin signaling and nutrients are important regulators of β-cell mass and function. The events linking these signals to regulation of β-cell mass are not completely understood. Recent findings indicate that mTOR pathway integrates signals from growth factors and nutrients with transcription, translation, cell size, cytoskeleton remodeling and mitochondrial metabolism. mTOR is a part of two distinct complexes; mTORC1 and mTORC2. The mammalian TORC1 is sensitive to rapamycin and contains Raptor, deptor, PRAS40 and the G protein β-subunit-like protein (GβL. mTORC1 activates key regulators of protein translation; ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryote initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1.This review summarizes current findings about the role of AKT/mTORC1 signaling in regulation of pancreatic β cell mass and proliferation. mTORC1 is a major regulator of β-cell cycle progression by modulation of cyclins D2, D3 and cdk4/cyclin D activity. These studies uncovered key novel pathways controlling cell cycle progression in β-cells in vivo. This information can be used to develop alternative approaches to expand β-cell mass in vivo and in vitro without the risk of oncogenic transformation. The acquisition of such knowledge is critical for the design of improved therapeutic strategies for the treatment and cure of diabetes as well as to understand the effects of mTOR inhibitors in β-cell function.

  15. NER and HR pathways act sequentially to promote UV-C-induced germ cell apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Stergiou, L.; Eberhard, R; Doukoumetzidis, K; Hengartner, M. O.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced DNA damage evokes a complex network of molecular responses, which culminate in DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the molecular pathway that mediates UV-C-induced apoptosis of meiotic germ cells in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that UV-C-induced DNA lesions are not directly pro-apoptotic. Rather, they must first be recognized and processed by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathwa...

  16. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  17. Characterization and Evolution of the Cell Cycle-Associated Mob Domain-Containing Proteins in Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Vitulo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The MOB family includes a group of cell cycle-associated proteins highly conserved throughout eukaryotes, whose founding members are implicated in mitotic exit and co-ordination of cell cycle progression with cell polarity and morphogenesis. Here we report the characterization and evolution of the MOB domain-containing proteins as inferred from the 43 eukaryotic genomes so far sequenced. We show that genes for Mob-like proteins are present in at least 41 of these genomes, confi rming the universal distribution of this protein family and suggesting its prominent biological function. The phylogenetic analysis reveals fi ve distinct MOB domain classes, showing a progressive expansion of this family from unicellular to multicellular organisms, reaching the highest number in mammals. Plant Mob genes appear to have evolved from a single ancestor, most likely after the loss of one or more genes during the early stage of Viridiplantae evolutionary history. Three of the Mob classes are widespread among most of the analyzed organisms. The possible biological and molecular function of Mob proteins and their role in conserved signaling pathways related to cell proliferation, cell death and cell polarity are also presented and critically discussed.

  18. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  19. Gene Expression Profile Reveals Abnormalities of Multiple Signaling Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and normal controls by means of cDNA microarray, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. Our results showed there were a total of 1, 905 genes which were differentially expressed by BMMSCs derived from SLE patients, of which, 652 genes were upregulated and 1, 253 were downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis showed that the majority of these genes were related to cell cycle and protein binding. Pathway analysis exhibited that differentially regulated signal pathways involved actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, tight junction, and TGF-β pathway. The high protein level of BMP-5 and low expression of Id-1 indicated that there might be dysregulation in BMP/TGF-β signaling pathway. The expression of Id-1 in SLE BMMSCs was reversely correlated with serum TNF-α levels. The protein level of cyclin E decreased in the cell cycling regulation pathway. Moreover, the MAPK signaling pathway was activated in BMMSCs from SLE patients via phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK. The actin distribution pattern of BMMSCs from SLE patients was also found disordered. Our results suggested that there were distinguished differences of BMMSCs between SLE patients and normal controls.

  20. Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abetov, Danysh; Mustapova, Zhanar; Saliev, Timur; Bulanin, Denis; Batyrbekov, Kanat; Gilman, Charles P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of oncologists worldwide is to understand and then intervene in the primary tumor initiation and propagation mechanisms. This is essential to allow targeted elimination of cancer cells without altering normal mitotic cells. Currently, there are two main rival theories describing the process of tumorigenesis. According to the Stochastic Model, potentially any cell, once defunct, is capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Alternatively the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) Model posits that only a small fraction of undifferentiated tumor cells are capable of triggering carcinogenesis. Like healthy stem cells, CSCs are also characterized by a capacity for self-renewal and the ability to generate differentiated progeny, possibly mediating treatment resistance, thus leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Moreover, molecular signaling profiles are similar between CSCs and normal stem cells, including Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways. Therefore, development of novel chemotherapeutic agents and proteins (e.g., enzymes and antibodies) specifically targeting CSCs are attractive pharmaceutical candidates. This article describes small molecule inhibitors of stem cell pathways Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, and their recent chemotherapy clinical trials.