WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell culture media

  1. ANTHOCYANIN (ACN) STABILITY IN CELL CULTURE MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are potential oxygen radical scavengers that have coronary vasoactive and vasoprotective properties. Cell or tissue culture systems have been used to examine the bioactivity and mechanisms of action of ACNs on the vascular system. However, due to their unique chemical structure, ...

  2. Stability of resazurin in buffers and mammalian cell culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva; Nicolaisen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    The utility of a ferricyanide/ferrocyanide system used in the AlamarBlue(TM) (Serotec, Oxford, UK) vital. dye to inhibit the reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media is questioned. Resazurin was found to be relatively stable when dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The use...... of HEPES resulted in a huge immediate dye reduction, which was significantly enhanced by exposure to diffuse light from fluorescent tubes in the laboratory 8 h per day. The reduction of resazurin by various cell culture media was time and temperature dependent, and it was significantly enhanced by......'s nutrient mixture F-10 and F-12. Fetal calf serum (5-20%) slightly decreased resazurin reduction during the first 2 days of incubation. The reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media do not appear to be problematic under normal culture conditions, and it is primarily dependent upon the presence...

  3. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types. PMID:1026199

  4. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  5. Statistical prediction of nanoparticle delivery: from culture media to cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Rowan; Hondow, Nicole; Brydson, Rik; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andrew P; Summers, Huw D

    2015-04-17

    The application of nanoparticles (NPs) within medicine is of great interest; their innate physicochemical characteristics provide the potential to enhance current technology, diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently a number of NP-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents have been developed for treatment of various diseases, where judicious surface functionalization is exploited to increase efficacy of administered therapeutic dose. However, quantification of heterogeneity associated with absolute dose of a nanotherapeutic (NP number), how this is trafficked across biological barriers has proven difficult to achieve. The main issue being the quantitative assessment of NP number at the spatial scale of the individual NP, data which is essential for the continued growth and development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics. Recent advances in sample preparation and the imaging fidelity of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) platforms provide information at the required spatial scale, where individual NPs can be individually identified. High spatial resolution however reduces the sample frequency and as a result dynamic biological features or processes become opaque. However, the combination of TEM data with appropriate probabilistic models provide a means to extract biophysical information that imaging alone cannot. Previously, we demonstrated that limited cell sampling via TEM can be statistically coupled to large population flow cytometry measurements to quantify exact NP dose. Here we extended this concept to link TEM measurements of NP agglomerates in cell culture media to that encapsulated within vesicles in human osteosarcoma cells. By construction and validation of a data-driven transfer function, we are able to investigate the dynamic properties of NP agglomeration through endocytosis. In particular, we statistically predict how NP agglomerates may traverse a biological barrier, detailing inter-agglomerate merging events providing the basis for

  6. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-01-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but hi...

  7. Silver nanoparticle protein corona composition in cell culture media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Shannahan

    Full Text Available The potential applications of nanomaterials as drug delivery systems and in other products continue to expand. Upon introduction into physiological environments and driven by energetics, nanomaterials readily associate proteins forming a protein corona (PC on their surface. This PC influences the nanomaterial's surface characteristics and may impact their interaction with cells. To determine the biological impact of nanomaterial exposure as well as nanotherapeutic applications, it is necessary to understand PC formation. Utilizing a label-free mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach, we examined the composition of the PC for a set of four silver nanoparticles (AgNPs including citrate-stabilized and polyvinlypyrrolidone-stabilized (PVP colloidal silver (20 or 110 nm diameter. To simulate cell culture conditions, AgNPs were incubated for 1 h in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, washed, coronal proteins solubilized, and proteins identified and quantified by label-free LC-MS/MS. To determine which attributes influence PC formation, the AgNPs were characterized in both water and cell culture media with 10% FBS. All AgNPs associated a common subset of 11 proteins including albumin, apolipoproteins, keratins, and other serum proteins. 110 nm citrate- and PVP-stabilized AgNPs were found to bind the greatest number of proteins (79 and 85 respectively compared to 20 nm citrate- and PVP-stabilized AgNPs (45 and 48 respectively, suggesting a difference in PC formation based on surface curvature. While no relationships were found for other protein parameters (isoelectric point or aliphatic index, the PC on 20 nm AgNPs (PVP and citrate consisted of more hydrophobic proteins compared to 110 nm AgNPs implying that this class of proteins are more receptive to curvature-induced folding and crowding in exchange for an increased hydration in the aqueous environment. These observations demonstrate the significance of

  8. Culture et medias (Culture and the Media).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abastado, Claude

    1982-01-01

    The traditional conception of pluralistic culture is contrasted with a new, separate form of culture: mass media culture. Its components are noted: medium, message, "mosaic," and strategy, and methodology for its study is discussed. (MSE)

  9. Miniaturized Mass-Spectrometry-Based Analysis System for Fully Automated Examination of Conditioned Cell Culture Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Bener-Aksam, E.; Vellekoop, M.J.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fully automated setup for performing in-line mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of conditioned media in cell cultures, in particular focusing on the peptides therein. The goal is to assess peptides secreted by cells in different culture conditions. The developed system is compatible with M

  10. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  11. 21 CFR 864.2220 - Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic cell and tissue culture media and components. 864.2220 Section 864.2220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue...

  12. Hemolymph analysis and evaluation of newly formulated media for culture of shrimp cells (Penaeus stylirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, C; Shike, H; Klimpel, K R; Burns, J C

    2001-06-01

    Creation of a shrimp cell line has been an elusive goal. This failure may be due to the composition of the cell culture medium, which may be inadequate to support primary cultured cells. Shrimp hemolymph should contain the nutritional components needed to support cell growth and division. We report here the comprehensive biochemical analysis of hemolymph from the blue shrimp, Penaeus stylirostris (Litopenaeus stylirostris) (see Holthuis, L. B. Shrimps and prawns of the world, in: FAO species catalog. Vol. 1. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 1980), for free amino acids (FAAs), carbohydrates, electrolytes, metals, pH, and osmolality. Levels of hemolymph components were compared to 2xL-15 with 20% fetal bovine serum, a commonly used culture medium for crustacean cells. The FAAs, taurine and proline, and the metals, strontium and zinc, were significantly higher in hemolymph than in the 2 x L-15 medium. In contrast, other FAAs were up to 50 times higher in the 2 x L-15 medium than in the hemolymph. To mimic more closely the hemolymph composition, we created two new media based on either the 0.2 x L-15 or the M199 medium. We compared the microscopic appearance of cells cultured in these media and evaluated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein synthesis by 3H-thymidine uptake and 35S-methionine uptake assays. The ovary cells of P. stylirostris cultured in either of the new media formed monolayers, while the cells cultured in 2 x L-15 medium did not. Despite these differences, there was no evidence of sustained DNA or protein synthesis with any of the media. Future studies to establish a shrimp cell line should focus on analysis of the cell cycle and on overcoming the molecular blocks to cell division. PMID:11515962

  13. Microspectroscopic investigation of the membrane clogging during the sterile filtration of the growth media for mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaolin; Loussaert, James A; Wen, Zai-qing

    2016-02-01

    Growth media for mammalian cell culture are very complex mixtures of several dozens of ingredients, and thus the preparation of qualified media is critical to viable cell density and final product titers. For liquid media prepared from powdered ingredients, sterile filtration is required prior to use to safeguard the cell culture process. Recently one batch of our prepared media failed to pass through the sterile filtration due to the membrane clogging. In this study, we report the root cause analysis of the failed sterile filtration based on the investigations of both the fouling media and the clogged membranes with multiple microspectroscopic techniques. Cellular particles or fragments were identified in the fouling media and on the surfaces of the clogged membranes, which were presumably introduced to the media from the bacterial contamination. This study demonstrated that microspectroscopic techniques may be used to rapidly identify both microbial particles and inorganic precipitates in the cell culture media. PMID:26637950

  14. A rapid fluorescence based method for the quantitative analysis of cell culture media photo-degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Amandine; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture media are very complex chemical mixtures that are one of the most important aspects in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. The complex composition of many media leads to materials that are inherently unstable and of particular concern, is media photo-damage which can adversely affect cell culture performance. This can be significant particularly with small scale transparent bioreactors and media containers are used for process development or research. Chromatographic and/or mass spectrometry based analyses are often time-consuming and expensive for routine high-throughput media analysis particularly during scale up or development processes. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with multi-way chemometrics is a robust methodology applicable for the analysis of raw materials, media, and bioprocess broths. Here we demonstrate how EEM spectroscopy was used for the rapid, quantitative analysis of media degradation caused by ambient visible light exposure. The primary degradation pathways involve riboflavin (leading to the formation of lumichrome, LmC) which also causes photo-sensitised degradation of tryptophan, which was validated using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements. The use of PARallel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC), multivariate curve resolution (MCR), and N-way partial least squares (NPLS) enabled the rapid and easy monitoring of the compositional changes in tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr), and riboflavin (Rf) concentration caused by ambient light exposure. Excellent agreement between HPLC and EEM methods was found for the change in Trp, Rf, and LmC concentrations. PMID:24356227

  15. Transparent polymeric cell culture chip with integrated temperature control and uniform media perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petronis, Sarunas; Stangegaard, Michael; Christensen, C.;

    2006-01-01

    Modern microfabrication and microfluidic technologies offer new opportunities in the design and fabrication of miniaturized cell culture systems for online monitoring of living cells. We used laser micromachining and thermal bonding to fabricate an optically transparent, low-cost polymeric chip for...... long-term online cell culture observation under controlled conditions. The chip incorporated a microfluidic flow equalization system, assuring uniform perfusion of the cell culture media throughout the cell culture chamber. The integrated indium-tin-oxide heater and miniature temperature probe linked...... to an electronic feedback system created steady and spatially uniform thermal conditions with minimal interference to the optical transparency of the chip. The fluidic and thermal performance of the chip was verified by finite element modeling and by operation tests under fluctuating ambient...

  16. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-06-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but high amino acid concentrations alone were not sufficient to ensure superior cell growth and high antibody production. However, some key amino acids that were limiting in most media could be identified. Unbalanced glucose and amino acids led to high cell-specific lactate and ammonium production rates. In some media, persistently high glucose concentrations probably induced the suppression of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, known as Crabtree effect, which resulted in high cell-specific glycolysis rates along with a continuous and high lactate production. In additional experiments, two of the eight basal media were supplemented with feeds from two different manufacturers in six combinations, in order to understand the combined impact of media and feeds on cell metabolism in a CHO fed-batch process. Cell growth, nutrient consumption and metabolite production rates, antibody production, and IgG quality were evaluated in detail. Concentrated feed supplements boosted cell concentrations almost threefold and antibody titers up to sevenfold. Depending on the fed-batch strategy, fourfold higher peak cell concentrations and eightfold increased IgG titers (up to 5.8 g/L) were achieved. The glycolytic flux was remarkably similar among the fed-batches; however, substantially different specific lactate production rates were observed in the different media and feed combinations. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the feed additives, the basal medium can make a considerable

  17. Development of plasma-on-chip: Plasma treatment for individual cells cultured in media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Chang, Chun-Yao; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    A device consisting of Si microwells and microplasma sources has been fabricated for plasma treatment of individual cells cultured in media. We named the device plasma-on-chip. The microwells have through-holes at the bottom where gas-liquid interfaces form when they are filled with media containing biological samples. The microplasma sources, which supply reactive species, are located on the back of each microwell. Through the gas-liquid interface, the reactive species are supplied to the cells. Chlorella cells were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the device and after three minutes of plasma treatment, the fluorescence intensity of Chlorella cells appeared to be decreased. Optical emission spectroscopy identified O and OH radicals in the plasma, which can affect the cells. In the analysis of biological samples such as human cells or tissues, this device raises the possibility of revealing the mechanisms of plasma medicine in more detail.

  18. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Neety; Pal, Shilpa; Sapru, Sunaina; Kundu, Joydip; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Singh, N Ibotambi; Yao, Juming; Kundu, Subhas C

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins. PMID:27517047

  19. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neety Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for attachment, growth, proliferation, and morphology of fibrosarcoma cells. The optimum sericin supplementation seems to vary with the source of sericins. The results indicate that all the sericins promote the growth of L929 cells in serum-free culture media; however, S. ricini sericin seems to promote better growth of cells amongst other non-mulberry sericins.

  20. Stability of polymer encapsulated quantum dots in cell culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique optical properties of Quantum Dots have attracted a great interest to use these nanomaterials in diverse biological applications. The synthesis of QDs by methods from the literature permits one to obtain nanocrystals coated by hydrophobic alkyl coordinating ligands and soluble in most of the cases in organic solvents. The ideal biocompatible QD must be homogeneously dispersed and colloidally stable in aqueous solvents, exhibit pH and salt stability, show low levels of nonspecific binding to biological components, maintain a high quantum yield, and have a small hydrodynamic diameter. Polymer encapsulation represents an excellent scaffold on which to build additional biological function, allowing for a wide range of grafting approaches for biological ligands. As these QD are functionalized with poly(ethylene)glycol (PEG) derivatives on their surface, they show long term stability without any significant change in the optical properties, and they are also highly stable in the most common buffer solutions such as Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) or borate. However, as biological studies are normally done in more complex biological media which contain a mixture of amino acids, salts, glucose and vitamins, it is essential to determine the stability of our synthesized QDs under these conditions before tackling biological studies.

  1. Expansion and properties of human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in different culture media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrová, Zdeňka; Glogarová, Kateřina; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, Supplement 1 (2006), s. 238-238. ISSN 1465-3249. [ ISCT 2006. 04.05.2006-07.05.2006, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Cells cultured Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. In Situ Degradation of Chitosan-Polygalacturonic Acid/Hydroxyapatite Nano composites in Cell Culture Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular and mechanical characteristics of in situ degradation behavior of chitosan-polygalacturonic acid/hydroxyapatite (Chi-PgA-HAP) nano composite films is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and modulus mapping techniques for up to 48 days of soaking in cell culture media. The surface molecular structure of media-soaked samples changes over the course of 48 days of soaking, as indicated by significant changes in phosphate vibrations (1200-900cm-1) indicating apatite formation. Chitosan-Polygalacturonic acid polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) govern structural integrity of Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites and FTIR spectra indicate that PECs remain intact until 48 days of soaking. In situ AFM experiments on media-soaked samples indicate that soaking results in a change in topography and swelling proceeds differently at the initial soaking periods of about 8 days than for longer soaking. In situ modulus mapping experiments are done on soaked samples by probing 13 nm of surface indicating elastic moduli of 4 GPa resulting from proteins adsorbed on Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites. The elastic modulus decreases by 2 GPa over a long exposure to cell culture media (48 days). Thus, as water enters the Chi-PgA-HAP sample, surface molecular interactions in Chi-PgA-HAP structure occur that result in swelling, causing small changes in nano scale mechanical properties.

  3. Photocatalytic effect of anodic titanium oxide nanotubes on various cell culture media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chun-Kang; Hu, Kan-Hung; Wang, Shing-Hoa [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, Keelung (China); Hsu, Todd [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); Tsai, Huei-Ting [National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); Chen, Chien-Chon [National United University, Department of Energy and Resources, Miaoli (China); Liu, Shiu-Mei [National Taiwan Ocean University, Center for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, Keelung (China); National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Marine Biology, Keelung (China); Lin, Tai-Yuan [National Taiwan Ocean University, Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, Keelung (China); Chen, Chin-Hsing [National Chiao Tong University, Department of Applied Chemistry, Hsinchu (China)

    2011-02-15

    The use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of cancer cells has been proposed following studies of cultured cancer cells. In this work, an ordered channel array of anodic titanium oxide (ATO) was fabricated by anodizing titanium foil. The ATO layer of nanotubes with diameters of 100 nm was made in NH{sub 4}F electrolyte by anodization. The photocatalytic effect of ATO was examined on various culture media by ultraviolet A (UV-A) (366 nm) irradiation. After UV-A irradiation of the ATO layer, redox potential of Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.5) and dilute acrylamide solution increased instantaneously. The redox potential of the serum-containing RPMI1640 medium also increased dramatically, while that of serum-containing MEM and DMEM media increased slightly. The UVA-induced high redox potential was correlated with the greater ability to break down plasmid DNA strands. These phenomena suggest that a culture medium, such as RPMI1640, with a greater ability to produce free radical may be associated with a stronger photocatalytic effect of ATO on cultured cancer cells reported previously. (orig.)

  4. Conditioned Media From Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Accelerates Healing in 3-Dimensional Skin Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collawn, Sherry S; Mobley, James A; Banerjee, N Sanjib; Chow, Louise T

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of factors that results in the production of a "closed" wound. Studies have shown, in animal models, acceleration of wound healing with the addition of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSC). The cause for the positive effect which these cells have on wound healing has not been elucidated. We have previously shown that addition of ADSC to the dermal equivalent in 3-dimensional skin cultures accelerates reepithelialization. We now demonstrate that conditioned media (CM) from cultured ADSC produced a similar rate of healing. This result suggests that a feedback from the 3-dimensional epithelial cultures to ADSC was not necessary to effect the accelerated reepithelialization. Mass spectrometry of CM from ADSC and primary human fibroblasts revealed differences in secretomes, some of which might have roles in the accelerating wound healing. Thus, the use of CM has provided some preliminary information on a possible mode of action. PMID:26954733

  5. Culture media and containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of culture media used for shoot proliferation and rooting has a tremendous influence on production costs. The type of culture vessel influences the efficiency of transfer during subculture and production of paraplegia's per unit area. Proper choice of media and containers can reduce the cost of micropropagation. The replacement of expensive imported vessels with re-usable glass jars and lids, alternatives to gelling agents, use of household sucrose, and some medium components can reduce costs of production Bulk making of media and storage as deep frozen stocks also reduces labour costs. (author)

  6. Media and cultural identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Mora

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A society’s common cultural identity is the mainstay of a society’s definition. Socialization is the joining of the individual to the group activities, realizing the norms and to act in accordance with the exceptional behaviours. The most important factor to individual’s socializing is the structure of the society itself. The society, aspires, the individual who with the traditional behaviour go into to the socialization process into its ongoing social norms. Thus, the individual enters a learning process in which he/she acquires the essential knowledge. In a media based society the most common value judgement component is again media itself. The mass culture which is improving under the control of media is begun to produce as artificial, mono character and serial by the cultural industry which is also the producer and the protector of culture. Mass culture bombardment under the control of the cultural media separates, demolishes and alienates the public to their traditional culture. Social dissolution is shown itself by distorting or by eviscerating the common values, such as; traditions, customs and practices which make the society itself.

  7. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue

  8. Stem Cell Conditioned Culture Media Attenuated Albumin-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Renal Tubular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Hu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proteinuria-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays an important role in progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic renal disease. Stem cell therapy has been used for different diseases. Stem cell conditioned culture media (SCM exhibits similar beneficial effects as stem cell therapy. The present study tested the hypothesis that SCM inhibits albumin-induced EMT in cultured renal tubular cells. Methods: Rat renal tubular cells were treated with/without albumin (20 µmg/ml plus SCM or control cell media (CCM. EMT markers and inflammatory factors were measured by Western blot and fluorescent images. Results: Albumin induced EMT as shown by significant decreases in levels of epithelial marker E-cadherin, increases in mesenchymal markers fibroblast-specific protein 1 and a-smooth muscle actin, and elevations in collagen I. SCM inhibited all these changes. Meanwhile, albumin induced NF-κB translocation from cytosol into nucleus and that SCM blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Albumin also increased the levels of pro-inflammatory factor monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 by nearly 30 fold compared with control. SCM almost abolished albumin-induced increase of MCP-1. Conclusion: These results suggest that SCM attenuated albumin-induced EMT in renal tubular cells via inhibiting activation of inflammatory factors, which may serve as a new therapeutic approach for chronic kidney diseases.

  9. Chemically differentiating ascorbate-mediated dissolution of quantum dots in cell culture media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be used to determine the degree of QD dissolution through a simple adjustment of sample acidity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to exploit PTFE tubing as a selective SPE adsorbent for the online chemical differentiation of QDs and Cd2+ ions with the goal of monitoring the phenomenon of QD dissolution in complicated biological matrices. We confirmed the analytical reliability of this system through comparison of the measured Cd-to-QD ratios to the expected values. When analyzing QDs and Cd2+ ions at picomolar levels, a temporal resolution of 8 min was required to load sufficient amounts of the analytes to meet the sensitivity requirements of the ICP mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the practicability of this developed method, we measured the dynamic variations in the Cd-to-QD705 ratio in the presence of ascorbate as a physiological stimulant to generate reactive oxygen species in cell culture media and trigger the dissolution of QDs; our results suggest that the ascorbate-induced QD dissolution was dependent on the time, treatment concentration, and nature of the biomolecule.To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be

  10. Culture of porcine hepatocytes or bile duct epithelial cells by inductive serum-free media

    Science.gov (United States)

    A serum-free, feeder-cell-dependent, selective culture system for the long-term culture of porcine hepatocytes or cholangiocytes was developed. Liver cells were isolated from 1 wk old pigs or young adult pigs (25 and 63 kg live weight) and were placed in primary culture on feeder-cell layers of mit...

  11. Physical, Thermal, and Spectroscopic Characterization of Biofield Energy Treated Murashige and Skoog Plant Cell Culture Media

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The Murashige and Skoog medium (MS media) is a chemically defined and widely used as a growth medium for plant tissue culture techniques. The present study was attempted to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the physical, thermal, and spectral properties of MS media. The study was performed in two groups; one was kept as control while another was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment and coded as treated group. Afterward, both the control and treated samp...

  12. Sensibility to X-ray irradiation of human lymphoblastoid cells cultured in media supplemented by nickel sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human leukeamic cells of the established line REH, cultured in media supplemented by nickel sulphate have been irradiated by X-rays. The nickel sulphate and the X-rays have toxic effects that appear as independent or interdependent effects according to the X-ray doses, the nickel sulphate concentration and the nickel sulphate action endurances

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF COMPOSITION CULTURE MEDIA, TECHNIQUE OF CONCENTRATING AND FREEZE DRYING CONDITIONS FOR CELL OF LACTOBACILLUS ACIDOPHILUS

    OpenAIRE

    Lysenko Y. A.; Luneva A. V.; Volkova S. A.; Nikolaenko S. N.; Petrova V. V.

    2014-01-01

    This study has investigated the relationship between culture media, technique of concentrating and freeze drying conditions for the cells of Lactobacillus aci-dophilus. The study has demonstrated that milk whey tomato juice-enriched medium has the high-growth properties. This medium allows ensuring high freeze drying survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus

  14. Culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells in different media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue - derived stromal vascular fraction cells in two different cell culture media. Five adult horses were submitted to bone marrow aspiration from the sternum, and then from the adipose tissue of the gluteal region near the base of the tail. Mononuclear fraction and stromal vascular fraction were isolated from the samples and cultivated in DMEM medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum or in AIM-V medium. The cultures were observed once a week with an inverted microscope, to perform a qualitative analysis of the morphology of the cells as well as the general appearance of the cell culture. Colony-forming units (CFU were counted on days 5, 15 and 25 of cell culture. During the first week of culture, differences were observed between the samples from the same source maintained in different culture media. The number of colonies was significantly higher in samples of bone marrow in relation to samples of adipose tissue.

  15. Social Media as Leisure Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtslund, Anne-Mette Bech; Albrechtslund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The main idea of this article is to situate social media practices in broader cultural practices. We point to certain dynamics in social media practices which we connect to the culture of 20th century mass tourism. This gives us a nuanced understanding of the activities connecting everyday life...... and social media. Further, our analysis provides new insights into the basic motivation for engaging in online sociality despite concerns about privacy, time-waste and exploitation....

  16. Social media as leisure culture

    OpenAIRE

    Albrechtslund, Anne-Mette Bech; Albrechtslund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to situate the everyday use of social media in the broader cultural practice of leisure. Whereas the use of social media has many different aims and contexts, our main idea is to emphasize how social media practices associated with leisure and playfulness rather than functionality and tasks — therefore seemingly “useless” in a strictly utilitarian sense — are practices which are meaningful. We point to certain dynamics in social media practices which we connect to...

  17. Non-Mulberry and Mulberry Silk Protein Sericins as Potential Media Supplement for Animal Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Neety; Pal, Shilpa; Sapru, Sunaina; Kundu, Joydip; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Singh, N. Ibotambi; Yao, Juming; Kundu, Subhas C.

    2016-01-01

    Silk protein sericins, in the recent years, find application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and as biomaterials. We investigate the potential of sericin, extracted from both mulberry Bombyx mori and different non-mulberry sources, namely, tropical tasar, Antheraea mylitta; muga, Antheraea assama; and eri, Samia ricini, as growth supplement in serum-free culture medium. Sericin supplemented media containing different concentrations of sericins from the different species are examined for atta...

  18. Games culture and media practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Alsina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our aim in this article is to explore the relationship between videogames and other practices related to audiovisual media in everyday life; we are specifically interested in examining how far videogames, as a cultural form that combines audiovisual narrative with the fun of a game, may be useful in understanding broader cultural transformations in relation to cultural production in the new media context opened up by information and communication technologies.

  19. Effect of fetal bovine serum in culture media on MS analysis of mesenchymal stromal cells secretome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Nonnis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of mesenchymal stromal cells secretome is fundamental to identify key players of processes involving these cells. Truly secreted proteins may be difficult to detect in MS based analysis of conditioned media (CM due to proteins supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS. We compared different growth conditions to determine the effect of varying FBS concentration on the number and quantity of truly secreted human proteins vs contaminating bovine proteins. The results suggest that to minimize interference cells should be grown in presence of FBS until confluence and transferred into a serum-free medium prior to secretome collection.

  20. Viability and proliferation of L929, tumour and hybridoma cells in the culture media containing sericin protein as a supplement or serum substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Cell cultures often require the addition of animal serum and other supplements. In this study, silk sericin, a bioactive protein, recovered from the waste of silk floss production was hydrolysed into three pepsin-degraded sericin peptides with different ranges of molecular mass. Normal animal cells, tumour cells and hybridoma cells were cultured systematically in FBS culture media containing sericin as a supplement or serum substitute. The culture test and microscopic observation of L929 cells showed that the smaller molecular weight of the degraded sericin is most suitable for cell culture. The cell culture results showed that with the degradation of sericin, for normal mouse fibroblast L929 cells, addition of 0.75 % sericin into FBS culture medium yields cell viability that is superior to FBS culture medium alone. When all serum was replaced by sericin, cell viability in the sericin medium could reach about one half of that in FBS medium. When in a medium containing a mixture of FBS: sericin (6:4, v/v), the cell culture effect is about 80 %. For the cultures of four tumour and one hybridoma cells, regardless of the molecular weight range, these degraded sericin peptides could substitute all serum in FBS media. The cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells are equivalent or superior to that in FBS medium. In other words, cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells in sericin media are more preferable to serum media. The mechanism of the sericin protein to promote cell growth and proliferation will be further investigated later. PMID:25895088

  1. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  2. Development of Animal-free, Protein-Free and Chemically-Defined Media for NS0 Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinyou; Robinson, David

    2005-01-01

    There has been a recent boom of monoclonal antibodies on the market, and a significant portion of them were produced by NS0 cell lines. As regulations become more stringent in ensuring production processes are free of potential contamination by adventitious agents, it is highly desirable to further develop serum-free media into ones that do not contain any components of animal origin, or ‘animal-free media’. Using a shake-flask batch culture system, recombinant proteins (human albumin and hum...

  3. Media in a Capitalist Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Trent, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    In her article, "Media in a Capitalist Culture," Barbara Trent looks at the negative effects that capitalism has on the media and how those effects may be overcome. Trent intertwines personal experience with socio-historical context to give the reader a genuine feel for political filmmaking in a Hollywood dominated world. She describes how her Academy Award winning film The Panama Deception was removed from a Cineplex, even after out-grossing all of the other films there, because Warner Broth...

  4. Glass and plastic photoluminescence: interaction with aqueous media and cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several types of glass and plastic materials were shown to exhibit intense photoluminescence when irradiated with UV. Water or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) contained within vessels of the respective materials when irradiated, also demonstrated relatively long-lived luminescence. A significant percentage (30%) of cultured mammalian cells were killed when exposed to UV-irradiated glass beads. The nature of the luminescence of water or PBS, or whether this or the photoluminescence of glass is directly responsible for cell toxicity, is unknown. However, we call attention to this phenomenon as a potential complicating factor in photobiological studies. (author)

  5. Postfeminist media culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Rosalind

    2007-01-01

    "The notion of postfeminism has become one of the most important in the lexicon of feminist cultural an alysis. Yet there is little agreement about what postfeminism is. This article argues that postfeminism is best understood as a distinctive sensibility, made up of a number of interrelated themes. These include the notion that femininity is a bodily property; the shift from objectification to subjectification; an emphasis upon self-surveillance, monitoring and self-discipline; a focus on in...

  6. Rethinking Popular Culture and Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Elizabeth, Ed.; Sensoy, Ozlem, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" is a provocative collection of articles that begins with the idea that the "popular" in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political. This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who…

  7. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture cells for their precious DNA. 1. Streak an a...

  8. A reliable protocol for the stable transformation of non-embryogenic cells cultures of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. and Taxus x media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Martínez-Márquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major intent of metabolic engineering in cell culture systems is to increase yields of secondary metabolites. Efficient transformation methods are a priority to successfully apply metabolic engineering to cell cultures of plants that produce bioactive or therapeutic compounds, such as Vitis vinifera and Taxus x media. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable method to transform non-embryogenic cell cultures of these species. The V. vinifera cv. Gamay/cv. Monastrell cell lines and Taxus x media were used for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using the Gateway-compatible Agrobacterium sp. binary vector system for fast reliable DNA cloning. The Taxus x media and Vitis cell lines were maintained in culture for more than 4 and 15 months, respectively, with no loss of reporter gene expression or antibiotic resistance. The introduced genes had no discernible effect on cell growth, or led to extracellular accumulation of phytoalexin trans-Resveratrol (t-R in response to elicitation with methylated cyclodextrins (MBCD and methyl jasmonate (MeJA in the grapevine transgenic cell lines compared to the parental control. The method described herein provides an excellent tool to exploit exponentially growing genomic resources to enhance, optimize or diversify the production of bioactive compounds generated by grapevine and yew cell cultures, and offers a better understanding of many grapevine and yew biology areas.

  9. A single short session of media perfusion induces osteogenesis in hBMSCs cultured in porous scaffolds, dependent on cell differentiation stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowska, Joanna; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Osyczka, Anna M

    2016-08-01

    Perfusing culture media through porous cell-seeded scaffolds is now a common approach within many tissue engineering strategies. Human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) are a clinically valuable source of osteoprogenitors that respond to mechanical stimuli. However, the optimal mechanical conditions for their osteogenic stimulation in vitro have not been defined. Whereas the effects of short durations of media fluid flow have been studied in monolayers of osteoblastic cells, in 3D culture continuous or repeated perfusion is usually applied. Here, we investigated whether a short, single perfusion session applied to hBMSCs cultured in 3D would enhance their osteogenesis in vitro. We cultured hBMSCs on gelatine-coated, porous polyurethane scaffolds with osteogenic supplements and stimulated them with a single 2-h session of unidirectional, steady, 2.5 mL/min media perfusion, at either early or late stages of culture in 3D. Some cells were pre-treated in monolayer with osteogenic supplements to advance cell differentiation, followed by 3D culture also with the osteogenic supplements. We report that this single, short session of media perfusion can markedly enhance the expression of bone-related transcription and growth factors, and matrix components, by hBMSCs but that it is more effective when cells reach the pre-osteoblast or osteoblast differentiation stage. These findings could aid in the optimization of 3D culture protocols for efficient bone tissue engineering. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1814-1824. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26806539

  10. Media Translation and Cultural Soft Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段蕾

    2015-01-01

    Media translation is a kind of applied translation,it is the symbol of a country’s development,and the demonstration of its cultural soft power.This essay mainly talks about how does media translation affect a country’s cultural soft power from three forms of media translation—news,movie and television,newspapers and magazines.

  11. Media Translation and Cultural Soft Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段蕾

    2015-01-01

    Media translation is a kind of applied translation,itis the symbol of a country’s development,and the demonstration of its cultural soft power.This essay mainly talks about how does media translation affect a country’s cultural soft power from three forms of media translation-news,movie and television,newspapers and magazines.

  12. Transformation of Culture in Creative Industries: How Media Culture Work

    OpenAIRE

    Jūratė Černevičiūtė

    2011-01-01

    The Creative Industries issues in Lithuanian cultural policy are known as tools for revival, renewal and enhancement of local culture and arts. Trying to answer these questions participants are giving answers from different points of view, reflecting positive and negative evaluations of impact of Creative Industries and media culture on local culture and arts. This paper analyzes and highlights transformation of culture and impact of media culture on individual's and communities' identities i...

  13. Distribution of AAV8 particles in cell lysates and culture media changes with time and is dependent on the recombinant vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Bryan A; Drury, Jason E; Morton, Christopher L; Spence, Yunyu; Lockey, Timothy D; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Meagher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    With clinical trials ongoing, efficient clinical production of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to treat large numbers of patients remains a challenge. We compared distribution of AAV8 packaged with Factor VIII (FVIII) in cell culture media and lysates on days 3, 5, 6, and 7 post-transfection and found increasing viral production through day 6, with the proportion of viral particles in the media increasing from 76% at day 3 to 94% by day 7. Compared to FVIII, AAV8 packaged with Factor IX and Protective Protein/Cathepsin A vectors demonstrated a greater shift from lysate towards media from day 3 to 6, implying that particle distribution is dependent on recombinant vector. Larger-scale productions showed that the ratio of full-to-empty AAV particles is similar in media and lysate, and that AAV harvested on day 6 post-transfection provides equivalent function in mice compared to AAV harvested on day 3. This demonstrates that AAV8 production can be optimized by prolonging the duration of culture post-transfection, and simplified by allowing harvest of media only, with disposal of cells that contain 10% or less of total vector yield. Additionally, the difference in particle distribution with different expression cassettes implies a recombinant vector-dependent processing mechanism which should be taken into account during process development. PMID:27069949

  14. Monitoring utilizations of amino acids and vitamins in culture media and Chinese hamster ovary cells by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jinshu; Chan, Pik Kay; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring amino acids and vitamins is important for understanding human health, food nutrition and the culture of mammalian cells used to produce therapeutic proteins in biotechnology. A method including ion pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to quantify 21 amino acids and 9 water-soluble vitamins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and culture media. By optimizing the chromatographic separation, scan time, monitoring time window, and sample preparation procedure, and using isotopically labeled (13)C, (15)N and (2)H internal standards, low limits of quantitation (≤0.054 mg/L), good precision (culture media. In a fed-batch process of manufacturing scale bioreactors, two distinguished trends for changes in amino acid concentrations were identified in response to feeding. Ten essential amino acids showed a zigzag pattern with maxima at the feeding days, and 9 non-essential amino acids displayed a smoothly changing profile as they were mainly products of cellular metabolism. Five of 9 vitamins accumulated continuously during the culture period, suggesting that they were fed in access. The method serves as an effective tool for the development and optimization of mammalian cell cultures. PMID:26355770

  15. Determination of Amino Acids in Cell Culture and Fermentation Broth Media Using Anion-Exchange Chromatography with Integrated Pulsed Amperometric Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hanko, Valoran P.; Heckenberg, Andrea; Rohrer, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection (AE-IPAD) separates and directly detects amino acids, carbohydrates, alditols, and glycols in the same injection without pre- or post-column derivatization. These separations use a combination of NaOH and NaOH/sodium acetate eluents. We previously published the successful use of this technique, also known as AAA-Direct, to determine free amino acids in cell culture and fermentation broth media. We showed that retentio...

  16. Influences of Plant Growth Regulators,Basal Media and Carbohydrate Levels on Cell Suspension Culture of Panax ginseng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TangWei; WuJiongyuan; 等

    1995-01-01

    A cell suspension culture of Panax ginseng which may be continuously subcultured has been established.Embryogenic callus derived from clutured young leaves was used to initiate the culture,Plant growth regulators,basal medium formula and carbohydrate levels were examined to determine their various effects on suspension culture cell growth and development ,The best selection of plant growth regulator,basal medium and carbohydrate level is 2mg/L 2,4-D:0.5mg/L KT,MS and 3% sucrose respectively.

  17. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion. PMID:26911671

  18. Removal of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy prion from large volumes of cell culture media supplemented with fetal bovine serum by using hollow fiber anion-exchange membrane chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li Chou

    Full Text Available Cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in people who had consumed contaminated meat products from cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy emphasize the need for measures aimed at preventing the transmission of the pathogenic prion protein (PrPSc from materials derived from cattle. Highly stringent scrutiny is required for fetal bovine serum (FBS, a growth-medium supplement used in the production of parenteral vaccines and therapeutic recombinant proteins and in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells for transplantation. One such approach is the implementation of manufacturing steps dedicated to removing PrPSc from materials containing FBS. We evaluated the use of the QyuSpeed D (QSD adsorbent hollow-fiber anion-exchange chromatographic column (Asahi Kasei Medical, Tokyo, Japan for the removal of PrPSc from cell culture media supplemented with FBS. We first established that QSD filtration had no adverse effect on the chemical composition of various types of culture media supplemented with 10% FBS or the growth and viability characteristics of human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells, baby hamster kidney (BHK-21 cells, African green monkey kidney (Vero cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-k1 cells propagated in the various culture-medium filtrates. We used a 0.6-mL QSD column for removing PrPSc from up to 1000 mL of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium containing 10% FBS previously spiked with the 263K strain of hamster-adapted scrapie. The Western blot analysis, validated alongside an infectivity assay, revealed that the level of PrPSc in the initial 200mL flow-through was reduced by 2.5 to > 3 log10, compared with that of the starting material. These results indicate that QSD filtration removes PrPSc from cell culture media containing 10% FBS, and demonstrate the ease with which QSD filtration can be implemented in at industrial-scale to improve the safety of vaccines, therapeutic recombinant proteins, and ex vivo expanded stem cells produced

  19. Personality, media preferences, and cultural participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaykamp, Gerbert; Eijck, Koen van

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, friendliness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness) on media preferences (TV programs) and cultural participation (book reading and attending museums and concerts) was examined. The analyses were carried out

  20. Children and media: a cultural studies approach

    OpenAIRE

    D av i d B u c k i n g h a m

    2012-01-01

    Defying the traditional psychology understanding on what are the effects of the media and also the researches made on the subject, the present article offers an approach to the study of the relationship between children and the media, focusing mainly on television. We retrace the Cultural Studies perspective, although the researches from the Birmingham Centre have not worked over such age group.The work includes the model of the cultural circuit, it refuses to understand meaning as something ...

  1. Influence of Temperature on the Colloidal Stability of Polymer-Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Cell Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, Mikhail V; Honold, Tobias; Carregal-Romero, Susana; Kantner, Karsten; Karg, Matthias; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2016-04-01

    The temperature-dependence of the hydrodynamic diameter and colloidal stability of gold-polymer core-shell particles with temperature-sensitive (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) and temperature-insensitive shells (polyallylaminine hydrochloride/polystyrensulfonate, poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride)-graft-dodecyl) are investigated in various aqueous media. The data demonstrate that for all nanoparticle agglomeration, i.e., increase in effective nanoparticle size, the presence of salts or proteins in the dispersion media has to be taken into account. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coated nanoparticles show a reversible temperature-dependent increase in size above the volume phase transition of the polymer shell when they are dispersed in phosphate buffered saline or in media containing protein. In contrast, the nanoparticles coated with temperature-insensitive polymers show a time-dependent increase in size in phosphate buffered saline or in medium containing protein. This is due to time-dependent agglomeration, which is particularly strong in phosphate buffered saline, and induces a time-dependent, irreversible increase in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanoparticles. This demonstrates that one has to distinguish between temperature- and time-induced agglomerations. Since the size of nanoparticles regulates their uptake by cells, temperature-dependent uptake of thermosensitive and non-thermosensitive nanoparticles by cells lines is compared. No temperature-specific difference between both types of nanoparticles could be observed. PMID:26835654

  2. Optimization of chemically defined cell culture media--replacing fetal bovine serum in mammalian in vitro methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Valk, J; Brunner, D; De Smet, K;

    2010-01-01

    Quality assurance is becoming increasingly important. Good laboratory practice (GLP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP) are now established standards. The biomedical field aims at an increasing reliance on the use of in vitro methods. Cell and tissue culture methods are generally fast, cheap, ...

  3. Cultural Journalism and Cultural Critique in a changing Media Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    “journalism” and “critique”; (2) the dialectic of globalisation’s cultural homogenisation, on the one hand, and the specificity of local/national cultures, on the other; and (3) the digital media landscape seen in terms of the need to rethink, perhaps even redefine cultural journalism and cultural critique......This special issue addresses a topic of journalism studies that has previously been somewhat neglected but which has gained increasing scholarly attention since the mid-2000s: the coverage and evaluation of art and culture, or what we term “cultural journalism and cultural critique.” In this...... introduction, we highlight three issues that serve to frame the study of cultural journalism and cultural critique more generally and the eight articles of this special issue more specifically: (1) the constant challenge of demarcating cultural journalism and cultural critique, including the interrelations of...

  4. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  5. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  6. Children and media: a cultural studies approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D av i d B u c k i n g h a m

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Defying the traditional psychology understanding on what are the effects of the media and also the researches made on the subject, the present article offers an approach to the study of the relationship between children and the media, focusing mainly on television. We retrace the Cultural Studies perspective, although the researches from the Birmingham Centre have not worked over such age group.The work includes the model of the cultural circuit, it refuses to understand meaning as something that the media distributes to a passive audience and it states that the audience has an active role but works under conditions strange to its own choice. Regarding children, their relationship with the media is structured and restrained by broader social discourses and institutions that try to define childhood in some given ways.

  7. Media evolution and ‘epi-technic’ digital media: Media as cultural selection mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    The explosive development of new digital media technologies is often described as a media evolution but hardly ever is the concept of ‘media evolution’ taken at face value. This article takes up that challenge by combining cultural evolution theories with medium theory. The article argues that...... biological selection mechanisms can provide an inroad into a new kind of historical and structural understanding of the relation between human culture and our technologies. In specific, human history is seen as a cultural evolution in which media technologies are the selection mechanisms....

  8. New Media, Networking and Phatic Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    This article will demonstrate how the notion of ‘phatic communion’ has become an increasingly significant part of digital media culture alongside the rise of online networking practices. Through a consideration of the new media objects of blogs, social networking profiles and microblogs, along with their associated practices, I will argue, that the social contexts of ‘individualization’ and ‘network sociality’, alongside the technological developments associated with pervasive communication a...

  9. Media as cultural billboard. A students’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina ROMAN; Alexandra ZBUCHEA

    2010-01-01

    Especially during the last 10 years, the Romanian cultural market increased considerably, both in terms of number and diversity of events, and types of cultu - ral operators. In this context of increased competition, organizers have to develop more complex promotional strategies in order to attract a wider public. An important problem is the reflexion of the cultural events in various media. One of the most sensitive points is the attraction of the young public, who has more available time, l...

  10. Quantification of cell surface receptor expression in live tissue culture media using a dual-tracer stain and rinse approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Sinha, Lagnojita; Singh, Aparna; Yang, Cynthia; Xiang, Jialing; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescence staining is a robust way to visualize the distribution of targeted biomolecules invasively in in fixed tissues and tissue culture. Despite the fact that these methods has been a well-established method in fixed tissue imaging for over 70 years, quantification of receptor concentration still simply assumes that the signal from the targeted fluorescent marker after incubation and sufficient rinsing is directly proportional to the concentration of targeted biomolecules, thus neglecting the experimental inconsistencies in incubation and rinsing procedures and assuming no, nonspecific binding of the fluorescent markers. This work presents the first imaging approach capable of quantifying the concentration of cell surface receptor on cancer cells grown in vitro based on compartment modeling in a nondestructive way. The approach utilizes a dual-tracer protocol where any non-specific retention or variability in incubation and rinsing of a receptor-targeted imaging agent is corrected by simultaneously imaging the retention of a chemically similar, "untargeted" imaging agent. Various different compartment models were used to analyze the data in order to find the optimal procedure for extracting estimates of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) concentration (a receptor overexpressed in many cancers and a key target for emerging molecular therapies) in tissue cultures with varying concentrations of human glioma cells (U251). Preliminary results demonstrated a need to model nonspecific binding of both the targeted and untargeted imaging agents used. The approach could be used to carry out the first repeated measures of cell surface receptor dynamics during 3D tumor mass development, in addition to the receptor response to therapies.

  11. Media and the Rise of Celebrity Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the media's role in changing the nature of heroes in the United States. Describes the changes in cultural values that resulted in statesmen and soldiers being replaced by athletes and film and television celebrities. Attributes change to the development of the consumer society, centralization of the entertainment industry, and advances…

  12. Strategies for repair of white matter: Influence of osmolarity and microglia on proliferation and apoptosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in different basal culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina eKleinsimlinghaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study has been to obtain high yields of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs in culture. This is a first step in facilitation of myelin repair. We show that, in addition to factors, known to promote proliferation, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF the choice of the basal medium exerts a significant influence on the yield of OPCs in cultures from newborn rats. During a culture period of up to 9 days we observed larger numbers of surviving cells in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM and Roswell Park Memorial Institute Medium (RPMI compared with Neurobasal Medium (NB. A larger number of A2B5-positive OPCs was found after 6 days in RPMI based media compared with NB. The percentage of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU-positive cells was largest in cultures maintained in DMEM and RPMI. The percentage of caspase-3 positive cells was largest in NB, suggesting that this medium inhibits OPC proliferation and favors apoptosis. A difference between NB and DMEM as well as RPMI is the reduced Na+-content. The addition of equiosmolar supplements of mannitol or NaCl to NB medium rescued the BrdU-incorporation rate. This suggested that the osmolarity influences the proliferation of OPCs. Plating density as well as residual microglia influence OPC survival, BrdU incorporation and caspase-3 expression. We found, that high density cultures secrete factors that inhibit BrdU incorporation whereas the presence of additional microglia induces an increase in caspase-3 positive cells, indicative of enhanced apoptosis. An enhanced number of microglia could thus also explain the stronger inhibition of OPC differentiation observed in high density cultures in response to treatment with the cytokines TNF-a and IFN-g.We conclude that a maximal yield of OPCs is obtained in a medium of an osmolarity higher than 280 mOsm plated at a relatively low density in the presence of as little microglia as technically

  13. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  14. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  15. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  16. Survival and function of phagocytes in blood culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, T K; Prag, J; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    The survival and function of human phagocytes in sterile aerobic and anaerobic blood culture media were investigated using neutrophil morphology, white blood cell count in a haemoanalyser, flow cytometry, oxidative burst response, and bactericidal effect in Colorbact and Septi-Chek blood culture...... media and Bact/Alert. When comparing agitation to stationary incubation no difference in phagocytic activity was found. The methods showed the same trends demonstrating that the phagocytes' viability and activity were prolonged by oxygen and shortened by anaerobic conditions and sodium polyethanol...... sulfonate (SPS). Best preserved activity and viability were found in the aerobic media containing less than 0.5 g/l SPS, in which significant phagocyte oxidative burst and bactericidal activity were found up to 4 days after inoculation. Considering that the majority of bacteremias are due to aerobic or...

  17. The politics of media and cultural policy

    OpenAIRE

    P. Schlesinger

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the role of academics in current debates on media and cultural policy in the UK. Although theories of the intellectuals differ widely as to what such a role might be, they point to a more general issue: the struggle for social recognition by contending forms of expertise. The policy field is one arena in which such contention occurs. Although the digital revolution is beginning to erode distinct policy regimes, broadcasting policy debate still conserves some long-stand...

  18. Media Culture 2020: Collaborative Teaching and Blended Learning Using Social Media and Cloud-Based Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Richard; Field, James; Melakoski, Cai

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 five universities from across Europe undertook an innovative project "Media Culture 2020", combining skills and forces to develop new practices that would face the challenge of the convergence of digital media, taking full advantage of social media and cloud-based technologies. The aim of the Media Culture 2020 project was to…

  19. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    . Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  20. Plant-based culture media: Efficiently support culturing rhizobacteria and correctly mirror their in-situ diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Hanan H; Hamza, Mervat A; Fayez, Mohamed; Mourad, Elhussein F; Saleh, Mohamed Y; Sarhan, Mohamed S; Suker, Ragab M; Eltahlawy, Asmaa A; Nemr, Rahma A; El-Tahan, Mahmod; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2016-03-01

    Our previous publications and the data presented here provide evidences on the ability of plant-based culture media to optimize the cultivability of rhizobacteria and to support their recovery from plant-soil environments. Compared to the tested chemically-synthetic culture media (e.g. nutrient agar and N-deficient combined-carbon sources media), slurry homogenates, crude saps, juices and powders of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) and succulent plants (Aloe vera and Aloe arborescens) were rich enough to support growth of rhizobacteria. Representative isolates of Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Bacillus spp. and Azospirillum spp. exhibited good growth on agar plates of such plant-based culture media. Cell growth and biomass production in liquid batch cultures were comparable to those reported with the synthetic culture media. In addition, the tested plant-based culture media efficiently recovered populations of rhizobacteria associated to plant roots. Culturable populations of >10(6)-10(8) cfu g(-1) were recovered from the ecto- and endo-rhizospheres of tested host plants. More than 100 endophytic culture-dependent isolates were secured and subjected to morphophysiological identification. Factor and cluster analyses indicated the unique community structure, on species, genera, class and phyla levels, of the culturable population recovered with plant-based culture media, being distinct from that obtained with the chemically-synthetic culture media. Proteobacteria were the dominant (78.8%) on plant-based agar culture medium compared to only 31% on nutrient agar, while Firmicutes prevailed on nutrient agar (69%) compared to the plant-based agar culture media (18.2%). Bacteroidetes, represented by Chryseobacterium indologenes, was only reported (3%) among the culturable rhizobacteria community of the plant-based agar culture medium. PMID:26966571

  1. Evaluation of two modified culture media for Leishmania infantum cultivation versus different culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Germano; Galante, Antonella; Lo Verde, Vincenza; Migliazzo, Antonella; Reale, Stefano; Lupo, Tiziana; Piazza, Maria; Vitale, Fabrizio; Bruno, Federica

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the cultivation of Leishmania promastigotes without the use of common, semisolid culture media such as Evans' modified Tobie's medium (EMTM), liquid RPMI 1640, and Peptone-yeast extract medium (P-Y). Although EMTM medium permits the growth of a high number of parasites, it is technically difficult to prepare as it requires the use of fresh rabbit blood from animals bred on farms, while RPMI 1640 and P-Y show lower growth rates than the EMTM. There is, therefore, a need to develop new blood-free and time-saving culture systems. The aim of this paper is to propose new modified microbiological media, named RPMI-PY and Tobie-PY, to isolate Leishmania and cultivate parasites for research and diagnostic purposes. This study compares classic culture media to the new media, RPMI-PY and Tobie-PY, and demonstrates that the new media have superior performance in terms of time and parasitic load. The growth rate of the parasite was significantly higher at 24, 48, and 72 hr cultivation, based on counts using Bürker's chambers, when compared to classic media. This study was carried out at the National References Centre for Leishmaniasis (C.Re.Na.L.) where the isolation procedures are conducted daily from a number of different biological matrices. PMID:24350586

  2. Literary Studies from Hermeneutics to Media Culture Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Siegfried J.

    2010-01-01

    In his article "Literary Studies from Hermeneutics to Media Culture Studies" Siegfried J. Schmidt discusses aspects of hermeneutics, the systemic and empirical (contextual) approach to literature and culture, radical constructivism, and his postulates for the field of media culture studies. Schmidt describes his understanding of the transformation of literary studies towards media culture studies in the context of overall developments of society. His argumentation with regard to move from her...

  3. Characterization of rPEPT2-mediated Gly-Sar transport parameters in the rat kidney proximal tubule cell line SKPT-0193 cl.2 cultured in basic growth media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo, Silvina A; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Frokjaer, Sven;

    2005-01-01

    added. The aim of the study was thus to characterize Gly-Sar transport parameters in SKPT cells cultured in basic growth media (conventional media without added agonists). Morphology was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and immunohistochemistry. Monolayer integrity was evaluated...... using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements and [(3)H]-mannitol permeabilities. Di-/tripeptide transporter activity was studied using [(14)C]-glycylsarcosine ([(14)C]-Gly-Sar). SKPT cells grown in basic media for 4 days formed confluent monolayers with a TEER of 5.03 +/- 0.33 k......Omega.cm(2) (n = 5). Apical Gly-Sar uptake peaked after 3-6 days in culture. Uptake at day 4 was 5.89 +/- 0.30 pmol.cm(-2).min(-1) (n = 3). Di-/tripeptide uptake displayed an optimum at approximately pH 6. Affinity values for cephalexin, kyotorphin, and delta-aminolevulinic acid were comparable to those...

  4. Aseptic technique for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, R J

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the ways that a laboratory can deal with the constant threat of microbial contamination in cell cultures. A protocol on aseptic technique is described first. This catch-all term universally appears in any set of instructions pertaining to procedures in which noncontaminating conditions must be maintained. In reality, aseptic technique encompasses all aspects of environmental control, personal hygiene, equipment and media sterilization, and associated quality control procedures needed to ensure that a procedure is, indeed, performed with aseptic, noncontaminating technique. Although cell culture can theoretically be carried out on an open bench in a low-traffic area, most cell culture work is carried out using a horizontal laminar-flow clean bench or a vertical laminar-flow biosafety cabinet. Both are described here. PMID:18228291

  5. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  6. Improved adipogenic in vitro differentiation: comparison of different adipogenic cell culture media on human fat and bone stroma cells for fat tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoniem, Amir-Alexander; Açil, Yahya; Wiltfang, Jörg; Gierloff, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    To date there is no sufficient in vitro fat tissue engineering and a protocol has not been well established for this purpose. Therefore, we evaluated the in vitro influence of two different adipogenic growth media for their stimulation potential on different cell lineages to clearly define the most potent adipogenic growth media for future in vitro tissue engineering approaches. The samples for differentiation were composed of human adipogenic-derived stroma cells (hADSCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stroma cells (hMSCs). A normal adipogenic medium (NAM) and a specific adipogenic medium (SAM) were tested for their adipogenic stimulation potential. After 10 days and 21 days the relative gene expression was measured for the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ2, C/EBPα, FABP4, LPL, and GLUT4 detected through real time reverse transcriptase polymease chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other study variables were the comparison between NAM and SAM and between the used cells hADSCs and hMSCs. Additionally an Oil-Red staining was performed after 21 days. Our results revealed that only SAM was significantly (Pwell was SAM superior to differentiate the used cell lineages. This was evaluated by the detected marker genes PPARγ2, C/EBPα, FABP4, LPL, and GLUT4 through real time RT-PCR and by Oil-Red staining. In addition, the hMSCs proofed to be equal donor cells for adipogenic differentiation especially when stimulated by SAM. The results suggest that the SAM should be established as a new standard medium for a more promising in vitro adipogenic differentiation. PMID:26140219

  7. Standardization and Assessment of Cell Culture Media Quantities in Roller Poly Ethylene Terephthalate Bottles Employed in the Industrial Rabies Viral Vaccine Production

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jagannathan; S. Chaansha; K. Rajesh; T. Santhiya; C Charles; K.N. Venkataramana

    2009-01-01

    Vero cells are utilized for production of rabies vaccine. This study deals with the optimize quantity media require for the rabies vaccine production in the smooth roller surface. The rabies virus (Pasteur vaccine strain) is infected to monolayer of the various experimented bottles. To analyze the optimal quantity of media for the production of rabies viral harvest during the process of Vero cell derived rabies vaccine. The trials are started from 200 to 400 mL (PTARV-1, PTARV-2, PTARV-...

  8. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  9. Brand Identity, Adaptation, and Media Franchise Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marazi Katerina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the noticeable practices within the field of Adaptation, Adaptation theory seems to be lagging behind whilst perpetuating various fallacies. Geoffrey Wagner’s types of Adaptation and Kamilla Elliott’s proposed concepts for examining adaptations have proved useful but due to their general applicability they seem to perpetuate the fallacies existing within the field of Adaptation. This article will propose a context-specific concept pertaining to Media Franchise Culture for the purpose of examining Adaptations and re-assessing long-held debates concerning the Original, the Content/Form debate and Fidelity issues that cater to the twelve fallacies discussed by Thomas Leitch.

  10. Media Literacy Art Education: Logos, Culture Jamming, and Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan; Kirby, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Critical media literacy art education teaches students to: (1) appreciate the aesthetic qualities of media; (2) critically negotiate meanings and analyze media culture as products of social struggle; and (3) use media technologies as instruments of creative expression and social activism. In concert with art education practices oriented toward…

  11. Staging, performativity and theatricality in contemporary media culture

    OpenAIRE

    Merx, S.

    2013-01-01

    The lecture focused on theatre as a perspective on contemporary media culture and starts from Chiel Kattenbelt's statement that 'all the world is a stage' is no longer a metaphor but has become reality.I use theatricality and performativity as two key concepts to characterize our media culture and argue that theatre can function as a meaningful perspective to understand that culture.

  12. Information feedback and mass media effects in cultural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Mario G. Cosenza; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of different forms of information feedback associated with mass media on an agent-agent based model of the dynamics of cultural dissemination. In addition to some processes previously considered, we also examine a model of local mass media influence in cultural dynamics. Two mechanisms of information feedback are investigated: (i) direct mass media influence, where local or global mass media act as an additional element in the network of interactions of each agent, and (i...

  13. From Ivory Tower to Cross-Media Personas: The heterogeneous Cultural Critic in the Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Unni; Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete

    2015-01-01

    and expertise: 1) the intellectual cultural critic, who is closely connected to an aesthetic tradition, bohemia and/or academia, or institutionalized cultural capital; 2) the professional cultural journal-ist, who is first and foremost embedded in a media professional logic; 3) the media-made arbiter......This article introduces a theoretical typology of four rivalling yet converging ideal types of cultural critics in contemporary media culture and in cultural journalism, more specifically, encapsulated by the term the heterogeneous cultural critic and characterized by different kinds of authority...

  14. Cross-Cultural Identity and Media Globalization, Localization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-yan

    2015-01-01

    Recent years witness the great concerns and anxieties from an increasing number of researchers upon the issue of media globalization and culture identity, or rather homogenization and heterogeneity. There, however, exists a harmonious relationship be⁃tween media globalization and culture identity, rather than a contradictive one. Media globalization can effectively represent audi⁃ence’s culture identity in its process of localization. In sense of culture, reasons to media localization and measures to achieve lo⁃calization will be discussed from the commercial, social and practical perspectives.

  15. Media and Cultural Industries: a Socioeconomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Miège

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the discussion that initiated in the 70’s about the relationship between communication and information phenomena, and decisions in the economic field. This discussion, according to Miège, has been undertaken from different perspectives that have placed economy and technology at the core of the analysis. The author proposes to study these phenomena through an interdisciplinary methodology, based on the theories of cultural industries and thepolitical economy of communication. Miège argues that with industrialization of media contents, consumer product access is no longer direct and products may be available without any cost to the consumer, since the cost of informational and cultural products is paid through advertising. However, this new environment creates certain problems, such as regulating the sale of these products, turning them and their symbolic content as marketable goods or hiring intellectual and artistic workers under an unregulated framework. He also discusses a double economic operation: the sale of products to publicists, and the sale of the same products by the publicists according to the market demand. The last part of the article is an analysis made by the author on the consequences that economic changes might have on cultural industries, because of their current need to keep cooperation relationships with technological industries, as well as connections with large financial groups.

  16. Astaxanthinogenesis in the yeast Phaffia rhodozyma - optimization of low-cost culture media and yeast cell-wall lysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, J.D.; Baron, M.; Guimaraes, M.F. [LQBB-Biomass Chemo Biotechnology Lab., Curitiba (Brazil)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Astaxanthin is a diketo-dihydroxy-carotenoid produced by Phaffia rhodozyma, a basidiomicetous yeast. A low-cost fermentation medium consisting of raw sugarcane juice and urea was developed to exploit the active sucrolytic/urelolytic enzyme apparatus inherent to the yeast. As compared to the beneficial effect of 0.1 g% urea, a ready nitrogen source, mild phosphoric pre inversion of juice sucrose to glucose and fructose, promptly fermentable carbon sources, resulted in smaller benefits. Corn steep liquor (CSL) was found to be a valuable supplement for both yeast biomass yield (9.2 g dry cells/L) and astaxanthin production (1.3 mg/g cells). Distillery effluent (vinace), despite only a slightly positive effect on yeast growth, allowed for the highest pigment productivity (1.9 mg/g cells). Trace amounts of Ni{sup 2} (1 mg/L, as a cofactor for urease) resulted in controversial effects, namely, biomass decrease and astaxanthin increase, with no effect on the release (and uptake) of ammonium ion from urea. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Healing the Split Between the Gospel and the Media Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Implores educators to help people discern between real and false paths to God as advertised in contemporary culture and mass media, and to communicate the Christian message in ways that uncover the transcendent meaning hidden in popular culture. (VWC)

  18. Overcoming Impossible Bodies: Using Media Literacy to Challenge Popular Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Shari

    1997-01-01

    Media education can be taught by analyzing the ways popular media represent the sexes. Discusses stereotyped gender images in popular culture and outlines classroom activities investigating modeling poses, images of ideal and successful males and females, gender sensitive language, sex role portrayal, and violence for a media literacy unit using…

  19. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  20. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  1. Culture in Education and Mass Media: Conformation or Confrontation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Ali Abdullah

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concept of culture in light of the technological revolution that has crossed traditional geopolitical boundaries. Topics include the function of education; the function of mass media; and a comparison of how educational and mass media institutions affect culture. (Author/LRW)

  2. Effects of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the NO{sub 2}{sup -} levels in cell culture media analysed by Griess colorimetric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Traian, E-mail: tr.popescu@gmail.com [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania); Lupu, Andreea R. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Biology (Romania); Diamandescu, Lucian; Tarabasanu-Mihaila, Doina; Teodorescu, Valentin S. [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania); Raditoiu, Valentin; Purcar, Violeta [National Research and Development Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry (ICECHIM) (Romania); Vlaicu, Aurel M. [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania)

    2013-02-15

    The Griess assay has been used to determine the possible changes in the measured NO{sub 2}{sup -} concentrations induced by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in three types of nitrite-containing samples: aqueous NaNO{sub 2} solutions with known concentrations, and two types of cell culture media-Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium (RPMI-1640) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM-F12) used either as delivered or enriched in NO{sub 2}{sup -} by NaNO{sub 2} addition. We have used three types of titania with average particle sizes between 10 and 30 nm: Degussa P25 and two other samples (undoped and Fe{sup 3+}-doped anatase TiO{sub 2}) synthesised by a hydrothermal route in our laboratory. The structural, morphological, optical and physicochemical characteristics of the used materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (EDX), Moessbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller nitrogen adsorption, UV-Vis reflectance spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. The opacity and sedimentation behaviour of the studied TiO{sub 2} suspensions have been investigated by photometric attenuance measurements at 540 nm. To account for the photocatalytic properties of titania in a biologically relevant context, multiple Griess tests have been performed under controlled exposure to laboratory natural daylight illumination. The results show significant variations of light attenuance (associated with NO{sub 2}{sup -} concentrations in the Griess test) depending on the opacity, sedimentation behaviour, NO{sub 2}{sup -} adsorption and photocatalytic properties of the tested TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials. These findings identify material characteristics recommended to be considered when analysing the results of Griess tests performed in biological studies involving TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  3. Use of gamma radiation for preparation of nutrient culture media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranskaya, I.D.; Tumanyan, M.A.; Mironova, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    A technique was developed for sterilization of nutrient culture media using ..gamma..-radiation. For this purpose, dry preparations were exposed to 3 to 6 Mrad radiation, then dissolved in sterile distilled water. The quality of media and solutions thus obtained is as good as that of preparations sterilized by filtration. The advantage of the proposed sterilization method is that liquid media can be rapidly prepared and dry sterile media can be stored at room temperature for long periods of time.

  4. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    International audience Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such a...

  5. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  6. Data Mining Cultural Aspects of Social Media Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Hochreiter, Ronald; Waldhauser, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    For marketing to function in a globalized world it must respect a diverse set of local cultures. With marketing efforts extending to social media platforms, the crossing of cultural boundaries can happen in an instant. In this paper we examine how culture influences the popularity of marketing messages in social media platforms. Text mining, automated translation and sentiment analysis contribute largely to our research. From our analysis of 400 posts on the localized Google+ pages of German ...

  7. Plant cell cultures and their biotechnological potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barz, W.; Ellis, B.E.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of plant cell suspension cultures for the biotechnological production of high-cost, plant-specific compounds is critically evaluated. The basic roles of nutrient media and phytohormones are described followed by a description of the recent progress in mass cultivation of plant cell cultures as measured by biomass and doubling time. The accumulation of secondary constituents in cell cultures is reviewed and methods for the selection of high-producing strains are described. The essential features of the selection strategy are the establishment of cell cultures from high-producing plants and a sensitive assay (e.g. radio-immunoassay) for the screening of microcolonies grown on petri dishes. The accumulation of biosynthetic intermediates of secondary constituents in cell culture strains will possibly lead to the isolation of novel compounds.

  8. Mycoplasmas detection in cells cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera-Tapia José Antonio; Castillo-Viveros Linda Valeria; Sánchez-Hernández José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Cells cultures are widely used in both biomedical and biotechnological research centers and industry, as well as for diagnostic test in hospitals. Contaminations of cells cultures with microbial organisms as well as with virus or other eukaryotic cell lines are a major problem in cell culture related research.OBJECTIVE. Mycoplasmas detection in cells cultures came from biomedical laboratories.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The cells cultures screened for mycoplasmas by using of microbiol...

  9. In vitro culture of human thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures for establishing primary cultures of human thyroid tissue are described. Tissues removed surgically from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC), follicular adenoma (FA), or hyperthyroidism were grown in culture. In addition, normal cells were separated from the margins of excised tumors and were also cultured. For each gram of thyroid tissue cultured, more than 1 x 105 cells attached to culture dishes. A mixture of 2.5 % fetal bovine serum supplemented with insulin, hydrocortisone, transferrin, glycl-1-histidyl-L-lysine acetate, somatostatin and epidermal growth factor was added to nutrient media containing equal parts of Ham's F-12 and minimum essential medium (αMEM). Complete medium selectively supported epithelial cell growth while restricting fibroblast cell growth, especially during the first two weeks of the primary culture. Cells were stimulated with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and produced raised levels of cAMP and thyroid hormone (T3). Culture conditions that affected the response of cells to X-rays were identified. During the culture period, first and second passage cells were compared for differences in their radiosensitivities. In all cases, cells showed differences in their responses to radiation depending on the cell passage number. However, results of replicate experiments of first passage cells that were exposed to X-rays showed good agreement between experiments. This technique makes it possible to quantitate the effects of chemical and physical cytotoxic agents on proliferating human thyroid epithelial cells. (author)

  10. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and ti...

  11. Advantage of combining resin with lytic BACTEC blood culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, P; Pepey, B; Auckenthaler, R

    1997-10-01

    The BACTEC 9240 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md.) automated blood culture system is based on the continuous monitoring of CO2 production by means of a fluorescent sensor attached to the bottom of a culture vial. We compared two media for this system, resin-containing Plus aerobic/F and Lytic anaerobic/F. Sets of Plus aerobic/F and Lytic anaerobic/F vials inoculated with similar volumes (9 +/- 2.5 ml) were evaluated. In the laboratory, the vials were introduced into the system in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturer and incubated at 35 degrees C for 5 days. A total of 10,914 sets consisting of two bottles each were obtained from 3,674 patients (2.97 cultures per patient). Of these, 1,233 (11%) were culture positive, including 1,074 (10%) yielding at least one pathogen, and 178 (2%) were contaminated. A total of 1,135 isolates were considered clinically relevant in 624 septic episodes; we isolated 894 from Plus aerobic/F and 852 from Lytic anaerobic/F (P = 0.06 [not significant]). More S. aureus isolates (P = 0.05), Pseudomonas spp. (P aerobic/F medium, but more streptococci (P aerobic/F vials (n = 112 versus 52, respectively). Significantly more (P aerobic/F vials (n = 210; 1.9%) than Lytic anaerobic/F vials (n = 42; 0.4%) were unconfirmed positives. Plus aerobic/F and Lytic anaerobic/F proved to be a valuable pair of blood culture media. Plus aerobic/F performs better for patients under antibiotic treatment, due to the antimicrobial-neutralizing effect of resins. For patients without antibiotic therapy, more microorganisms could be isolated from Lytic anaerobic/F due to cell lysis. PMID:9316921

  12. In vitro cartilage culture: flow, transport and reaction in fibrous porous media

    OpenAIRE

    AHMADI-SENICHAULT, Azita; Lasseux, Didier; LETELLIER, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    Flow and transport in fibrous media are encountered in a wide variety of domains ranging from biotechnology to filtration in chemical engineering. The context of this work is the in vitro cartilage cell culture on a fibrous biodegradable polymer scaffold placed in a bioreactor. A seeding process using a liquid containing cells (chondrocytes) initiates the culture and an imposed continuous flow through the scaffold allows both the transport of nutrients necessary for cell-growth and of metabol...

  13. MEDIA COMMUNICATION: UNIFORMITY OR CULTURAL DIVERSITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Wist

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the extent acquired in the recent decades, especially after the development of new communication technologies and the explosion of mass media such as press, radio, Internet and television, media communication is attaining the status of supreme power in the social hierarchy in Europe and worldwide, and its effects are felt widely by individuals.Of all mass media, television is one that is individualized by its symbolic power, having a noticeable influence, direct and undisputed upon ...

  14. Monocytes conditioned media stimulate fibronectin expression and spreading of inflammatory breast cancer cells in three-dimensional culture: A mechanism mediated by IL-8 signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mona M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most aggressive form of breast cancer characterized by invasion of carcinoma cells into dermal lymphatic vessels where they form tumor emboli over expressing adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Although invasion and metastasis are dynamic processes controlled by complex interaction between tumor cells and microenvironment the mechanisms by which soluble mediators may regulate motility and invasion of IBC cells are poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of media conditioned by human monocytes U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors on the expression of adhesion molecules E-cadherin and fibronectin of human IBC cell line SUM149. Furthermore, cytokines signaling pathway involved were also identified. Results U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors were characterized by cytokine antibody array. The major U937 secreted cytokines/chemokines were interleukin-8 (IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2. When SUM149 cells were seeded in three dimensional (3D models with media conditioned by U937 secreted cytokines, chemokines and growth factors; results showed: 1 changes in the morphology of IBC cells from epithelial to migratory spindle shape branched like structures; 2 Over-expression of adhesion molecule fibronectin and not E-cadherin. Further analysis revealed that over-expression of fibronectin may be mediated by IL-8 via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion The present results suggested that cytokines secreted by human monocytes may promote chemotactic migration and spreading of IBC cell lines. Results also indicated that IL-8 the major secreted cytokine by U937 cells may play essential role in fibronectin expression by SUM149 cells via interaction with IL-8 specific receptors and stimulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  15. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    Callus cultures of carnation, Dianthus caryophyllus L. ev. G. J. Sim, were grown on a synthetic medium of half strength Murashige and Skoog salts, 3 % sucrose, 100 mg/l of myo-inositol, 0.5 mg/l each of thiamin, HCl, pyridoxin, HCl and nicotinic acid and 10 g/l agar. Optimal concentrations of....... Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  16. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and su...

  17. Reengineering the Innovation Culture through Social media Crowdsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2012-01-01

    innovation culture using theory on organizational culture and crowdsourcing. The analysis shows that the organizational crowdsourcing event has supported an innovation culture change in the case company towards a more including approach to innovation; creating a new and different awareness of innovation......In this article we investigate how social media-based crowdsourcing systems can be used to reengineer the innovation culture in an organization. Based on a case study of a large engineering consultancy’s use of a social media crowdsourcing system we investigate the impact on the organizations...

  18. Cultural Genocide through Mainstream Media: A Brief Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olague, Rubén; Ekiaka Nzai, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    While the U.S. mainstream media continues to exercise its right of way in the American landscape, the predominant culture faces a population and popularity decrease. Diversity is slowly finding a perennial nest for growth, although minorities are still being shelled by mainstream media that consciously and unconsciously make the attack a priority…

  19. Queer Girls and Popular Culture: Reading, Resisting, and Creating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Mollie V.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews Driver's monograph, "Queer Girls and Popular Culture: Reading, Resisting, and Creating Media," reporting on queer girls' active engagement with television characters, films, lesbian magazines, online communities, and music. She explores the consequences of their engagements with these media on their lives and their…

  20. Peace process in cultural conflict: The role of the media

    OpenAIRE

    Dov Shinar

    2003-01-01

    This article explores (1) the cultural nature of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict; (2) the "intractability" of cultural conflicts; (3) conflict management models: reconciliation/"end-of-conflict" versus "conflict transformation" and their relation to cultural conflict; (4) the serious consequences of the wrong matching of models and conflicts, such as using the reconciliation model in cultural conflict; (5) the changing role of the media in international relations, and their contribution to t...

  1. RELIGIOUS COMMUNICATION IN THE CONTEXT OF CULTURE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Petrushkevych

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the work is to determine the features of media culture that bind it with mass culture and mass communications and have the most significant effect on the general principles of the religious mass communication. In addition, the objective is to identify the skills system and traits of mass human that are necessary for using media culture. Methodology. The methodological basis is related to structuring, analytical analysis and synthesis of media features; highlighting phenomena that illustrate modern communicative situation; characteristics of media trends influence for the specific functioning of religious communication. Scientific novelty. Main part of the work is devoted to the analysis of the progressive media culture, mass-media and their main features, design of religious communication in this culture. Media gradually form the appearance of religious communication quietly, especially the mass one, they adapt the modern religious discourse to rates of transfer and perception of information. Modern believer gets a lot of different kinds of religious information, on any subject, any explanation of the religious question, with respect to any religion. Such volume of religious information and the speed with which a person receives it, does not usually make it religious or spiritually advanced, but only informed. Spiritual perfection and religious development, religious communication is possible only when the customer is aware of media culture and way of seeing the ultimate goal of such communications using the Mass Media. So far these mechanisms are perfectly designed in traditional religious communication. Phenomena, that reflects the dramatic changes in the communicative environment are: mediatization of body and mind, the new practice of processing / reading information, the phenomenon of simultaneous perception of a large number of information channels – similar or different. Features of media culture that connect it with

  2. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON external standard method, before and after precipitation of serum proteins and those obtained using CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or applying post-processing filtering algorithms to remove, from the (1)H q-NMR spectra, the proteins signal contribution. For each of these approaches, the percent error in the absolute value of every measurement for all the nutrients is also plotted as accuracy assessment. PMID:27331118

  3. Mediatization: Theorizing the Interplay Between Media, Culture, and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hepp, Andreas; Hjarvard, Stig; Lundby, Knut

    2015-01-01

    with the complex relationship between changes in media and communication on the one hand and changes in various fields of culture and society on the other. We conclude that the emergence of the concept of mediatization is part of a paradigmatic shift within media and communication research.......In response to Deacon and Stanyer’s article ‘Mediatization: Key Concept or Conceptual Bandwagon?’, we argue that they build their criticism on a simplified methodology. They mistake a media-centered approach for a media-centric one, and they do not capture how mediatization research engages...

  4. Cell Culture for Production of Insecticidal Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Steven; Chan, Leslie C L; Matindoost, Leila; Pushparajan, Charlotte; Visnovsky, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    While large-scale culture of insect cells will need to be conducted using bioreactors up to 10,000 l scale, many of the main challenges for cell culture-based production of insecticidal viruses can be studied using small-scale (20-500 ml) shaker/spinner flasks, either in free suspension or using microcarrier-based systems. These challenges still relate to the development of appropriate cell lines, stability of virus strains in culture, enhancing virus yields per cell, and the development of serum-free media and feeds for the desired production systems. Hence this chapter presents mainly the methods required to work with and analyze effectively insect cell systems using small-scale cultures. Outlined are procedures for quantifying cells and virus and for establishing frozen cells and virus stocks. The approach for maintaining cell cultures and the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and time of infection (TOI) parameters that should be considered for conducting infections are discussed.The methods described relate, in particular, to the suspension culture of Helicoverpa zea and Spodoptera frugiperda cell lines to produce the baculoviruses Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus, HearNPV, and Anticarsia gemmatalis multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus, AgMNPV, respectively, and the production of the nonoccluded Oryctes nudivirus, OrNV, using an adherent coleopteran cell line. PMID:27565495

  5. Mass Society/Culture/Media: An Eclectic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, Jerry B.

    Instructors of courses in mass society, culture, and communication start out facing three types of difficulties: the historical orientation of learning, the parochialism of various disciplines, and negative intellectually elitist attitudes toward mass culture/media. Added to these problems is the fact that many instructors have little or no…

  6. Peace process in cultural conflict: The role of the media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov Shinar

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores (1 the cultural nature of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict; (2 the "intractability" of cultural conflicts; (3 conflict management models: reconciliation/"end-of-conflict" versus "conflict transformation" and their relation to cultural conflict; (4 the serious consequences of the wrong matching of models and conflicts, such as using the reconciliation model in cultural conflict; (5 the changing role of the media in international relations, and their contribution to the "crisis of expectations" that came to fruition in September 2000, with the eruption of the Intifada; (6 the possibility of the media contributing to peace processes; and (7 implications of the media adoption of the conflict transformation model. The premises are that, unlike other violent confrontations, the Middle Eastern conflict is fundamentally cultural, particularly in its Palestinian-Israeli version; that cultural conflicts are "intractable" (Lederach, 1998; Burgess&Burgess, 1996; Kraybill, 1995, in the sense that they are very difficult, perhaps impossible to resolve; that reconciliation is not the only possible or desirable outcome of conflict: transformation (Vayrynen, 1991 is another viable option; that mistaken interpretations of conflict-resolution strategies can lead to "crises of expectations" in policy-making, in the media, and in public opinion; and that the media can play important roles in these processes.

  7. Culture media used in the micropropagation of orchids hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Luzia Yuriko Miyata; Fabíola Villa

    2014-01-01

    In orchid cultivation, tissue culture has been an important and effective tool for obtaining good quality seedlings on a large scale and within a short period of time. This study aims to evaluate culture media on the in vitro growth and development of orchid hybrids. Seedlings 1-1.5 cm long, deriving from in vitro germination of seeds, were inoculated in 250 mL flasks containing 50 mL of culture medium, with salts from the media where each of them were treated. Treatments consisted of applyin...

  8. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  9. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  10. Cellular Interactions and Biological Responses to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in HepG2 and BEAS-2B Cells: Role of Cell Culture Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that the composition of the biological medium used in vitro can affect the cellular interaction and biological response of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in human lung epithelial cells. However, it is unclear if these effects are co...

  11. Youth culture, media and sexuality: What could faith communities contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Cloete

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article provided an overview of youth culture and how the media shapes youth culture today. Its specific aim was to focus on the access to sexual content that the different forms of media provide and the possible effect that they have on youth culture today. The sexual development of teenagers is one of the most important areas of their journey into adulthood and can easily be influenced by media messages on sex and sexuality. As such, the sexual behaviour of teenagers mostly seems to demonstrate a misconception on sex and sexuality. The author argued that sex and sexuality can also be viewed as theological issues and concluded by offering a few suggestions on how faith communities can become a more relevant and effective partner in fostering a theological understanding of sex and sexuality, especially to the youth.

  12. Media Culture 2020: collaborative teaching and blended learning using social media and cloud-based technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Richard; Field, James; Melakoski, Cai

    2015-01-01

    The Media Culture 2020 project was considered to be a great success by all the partners, academics and especially the students who took part. It is a true example of an intercultural, multidisciplinary, blended learning experience in higher education that achieved it goals of breaking down classroom walls and bridging geographical distance and cultural barriers. The students with different skills, coming from different countries and cultures, interacting with other enlarges the possibilities ...

  13. Uses of γ-radiation for preparing culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed for sterilizing the culture media by γ-radiation. For this purpose, dry preparations were exposed to doses of 3 to 6 Mrad and then dissolved in sterile distilled water. The quality of the preparations prepared in such a way is not inferior to that of the preparations sterilized by filtering. The advantage of the proposed technique is that it is possible to prepare liquid media quickly and to store dry sterile media for a long time at room temperature

  14. Culture of Scientific Information in Mass Media on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa 'Isa al-Yasiry

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at evaluating the quality of scientific information culture that introduce it the Arabic mass media in the internet and how it covering the reality of Arabic scientific information by using analysis content method for these websites then we most be know how these websites treating with information culture considering information systems has input, output and mutual relations between the elements of this system that include the following three components: 1- External relations that connecting between the culture and the reality. 2- Internal elements for this system. 3- Infrastructures for this system that represented in the cultural policy, informational , information resources and human resources

  15. Cultural Heritage Meets Mobile Media - and New Games Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens F.

    The paper describes and evaluates a recent project in Aalborg, Denmark, dealing with the communication of cultural heritage and industrial culture to young people via their own preferred media platform: mobile phones. The communication was based on the new cultural genre: Alternative Reality Games...... or Augmented Reality Games (ARGs), i.e. games that take place in real life and in real physical settings. The paper concludes that ARGs can be seen as an entirely new way or method of communication cultural heritage. A method that supports a participating, involving, and experience...

  16. Mass Media and Cultural Memory: Idealization of Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Siljanovska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical approach in defining the means for mass communication expressed in functionalist theory, especially in John Riley’s model, determines mass media as a social subsystem which is functionally connected with other systems in society that arises from their mutual conditionality and their causative and consequential connection with politics, economy, education, socialization and culture. The functions of articulating opinion by themselves problematize the creation of creative-thinking public because the imposition of topics, representation of individuals, values and norms of a culture, a space, a time is mediated by the ideological and functional mechanism of an organized structuring and transfer of messages simultaneously to as big an audience as possible. The vastness of the audience simply cannot by itself be understood as democratization of the culture in its broadest sense or simply because it is not a high, elite culture intended solely for a certain number of users.  It is that exact media reality, which almost always and exclusively is created through the selection of facts and values in relation to the audience and the factor of time, which simultaneously problematizes individual and collective memory. In the era of postmodernism and globalization of societies, media shaped content, in different mass media, especially on TV and the Internet, stimulate cultural development and pluralism of ideas in intercultural communication. However at the same time the setting of the stage for a media product, imposed by market logic of supply and demand erases the borders of difference, restructures the modalities of cultural identifiers and relativizes the dimensions of cultural identity through the unification of values transformed in surpassed or modern collective memories and concepts, such as – Balkanization, Americanization, Europeanization, civil society.

  17. A method for testing the growth-promoting property of tissue culture media using radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new rapid and reliable method for testing the growth-promoting capacity of tissue culture media using radionuclides is described. The method is based on measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine or 3H-uridine into human diploid embryonic lung cells (LEP 19) during cultivation in standard Earle-Parker-LAH (EPL) medium or nutritionally deficient EPL media. The results obtained proved the possibility of using this method for testing the growth activity of media with differing degrees of nutritional deficiency. (U.K.)

  18. Effect of cell-conditioned media on biomass production of Leishmania parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Bagirova, Melahat; KOÇ, Rabia ÇAKIR; ALLAHVERDİYEV, Adil; Ersöz, Melike

    2012-01-01

    A large amount of parasite biomass production necessitates a higher volume of culture media, and this further increases the overall cost. For this reason, novel and alternative culture supplementary materials have been continuously investigated. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of cell-conditioned media, collected as waste material during routine cell culture, on the growth and development of Leishmania parasites in vitro. In this study, for the first time, we show t...

  19. Digital Media and enjoyment of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ippoliti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Preserving, protecting and improving cultural heritage depend on its working role in society, which is achieved only when it is made the most of by the community. As far back as 1967 the Franceschini Commission made a statement in its official records, (the 17th declaration underlining the necessity to guarantee that cultural heritage should be made available to the public, that is, to be used for pleasure, amusement, satisfaction and personal gratification. From this point of view, our paper leads to speculation on how digital technology can be applied to cultural heritage and, furthermore, can contribute towards the creation of effective communicative means. By taking advantage of sensory and emotional involvement, these communicative techniques should be aimed at allowing an ever wider public audience to access information on cultural heritage. These forms of communication should be shaped around those rules that are at the basis of every form of amusement. Enjoying oneself is to be taken seriously and those who don’t follow the rules are to be considered spoilsports.

  20. Rhetorics and Communication Media across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in contrastive rhetoric have looked at a variety of cultural, linguistic, historical, and social factors that influence the complex acts of acquiring and demonstrating second language (L2) writing competencies. These developments, however, focus almost exclusively on writing. The present paper suggests that other communication…

  1. Gender and Asia : Why Study Media Culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Youna

    2011-01-01

    Este artículo explora la experiencia cotidiana con los media de las mujeres en los países asiáticos, en contraposición a los enormes cambios y transiciones sociales. Los medios implican los complejos procesos del cambio y la transición social, desde el comportamiento de la vida diaria a la comprensión reflexiva del mundo global, o a la construcción de una nueva identidad y una constante tensión en su expresión dentro del día a día. Este artículo proporciona un análisis crítico de las consecue...

  2. Pelagic fish hydrolysates as peptones for bacterial culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lucie; Desbiens, Michel; Thibodeau, Jacinthe; Thibault, Sharon

    2009-11-01

    For several years in the Quebec fisheries' industry, landings of pelagic fish have been calculated at over 4000 tons. These under-exploited species, rich in lipids and proteins, could be used in valuable new products. In the present study, hydrolysates of mackerel and herring were produced and utilized as sources of peptones in the formulation of new bacterial culture media. The molecular weight distribution analysis showed that molecules present in the hydrolysates were lower than 1300 Da for herring, and lower than 930 Da for mackerel. The formulated media were compared with reference media using 6 bacterial strains (3 lactic acid (LAB) and 3 non-lactic). The absorbance (OD) and carbohydrate measurements revealed that the formulated media possessed similar yields in comparison with the reference media. Finally, the inhibition of Listeria innocua by LAB bacteriocins was evaluated. Results obtained for Pediococcus acidilactici demonstrated high activities for each medium studied. Thus, the medium containing herring peptones generated the highest bacteriocin titre (32768 AU/mL), followed by both the medium containing mackerel peptones and the MRS7 medium (16384 AU/mL). Each medium containing the fish hydrolysates efficiently supported the growth of the bacterial strains. Pelagic fish peptones are promising as a novel bacterial culture media. PMID:19940932

  3. Cultural Maintenance and Promotion: The Print Media's Role in Providing Space for Knowledge and Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Thinley, Dorji

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the role of print media in Bhutan in providing public space for cultural knowledge and discourse. Increased exposure to global cultures and consumption of mass media has spawned the growth of a modern cultural trend that challenges the survival of the material and non-material contents of Bhutanese cultural identity. External threats to indigenous Bhutanese culture must be approached intelligently and wisely. The print media in Bhutan serves as an effective media...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2450 - Supplement for culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplement for culture media. 866.2450 Section 866.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2450 Supplement for...

  5. Local Collective Identity Enculturation with a Global Media Consumption Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chul-Byung

    2002-01-01

    Argues that shift from modern nation-state collective identity to postmodern globally constructed collective identify is influenced by a global electronic media and television consumption culture. Illustrates shift on three levels: socioeconomic, socialization, and the production of symbolic goods. (Contains 76 references.) (PKP)

  6. Mining the Popular Culture: The Mass Media and Freshman Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, M. W.

    The study of mass media and popular culture in a composition class allows students and teachers together to develop a critical awareness of television and advertising. Jerzy Kosinski's book, "Being There," a novel about the impact of television, is a beginning point for the study of television. Using that book as if it were a collection of events,…

  7. The Culture of Global Citizenship and Global Media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suša, Oleg

    Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars, 2011 - (Axford, B.; Huggins, R.), s. 54-62 ISBN 978-1-4438-3217-5 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : global culture * global media Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  8. Risk perception, scientific culture and communication media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The people who asked me to give a talk for the Spanish Nuclear Society's 28th Annual Meeting, at the invitation of WIN (Women in Nuclear), have challenged me, or at least that is what my colleagues believe, to tackle the difficult task of venturing into fields unfamiliar to anyone who is not involved in University teaching in communication and journalism. However, the challenge was very appealing to me, first of all because it was an invitation from WIN (Women in Nuclear), which I would like to congratulate, together with the Steering Committee, for having selected Salamanca as the meeting venue in this very important year for this city (it has been selected as European cultural city for 2002, along with the Belgian city of Bruges), If there is any place that has been immersed in scientific culture throughout the centuries it is Salamanca, where every one of its stones could tell us a history of the convergence and divergence between knowledge and society. This Universidad Pontificia of Salamanca also encloses centuries of wisdom within its walls. I have mentioned the first reason for accepting the challenge: the invitation from WIN Espana. The second reason why I accepted is that, some years ago, the world of nuclear energy, them unknown to me, started coming up in conversations with friends, one of whom works in this field. That history of discovery began in a levelly little Swiss town, in Grundenwald, not far from Eintein's Bern, whom I will mention later on

  9. On Cultural Materialism, Comics and Digital Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Priego

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1936,iWalter Benjamin (1892-1940 accounted for the paradigm shift that mechanical reproduction meant for art and politics. For Benjamin, technological change was not merely a sign of uncomplicated, forward-thinking progress; it meant a profound transformation of the realm of human experience. In this account of the era Benjamin witnessed, the German philosopher and collector was also unknowingly predicting a time he personally would not experience: four decades later, these descriptions of his time are illuminating the reality of the present. Benjamin wrote that ‘the cathedral leaves its locale to be received in the studio of a lover of art; the choral production, performed in an auditorium or in the open air, resounds in the drawing room’, but he was not describing digital 3D imaging, Wikipedia, YouTube or Google; he was writing about film photography and the phonograph, forms of technology many now consider ‘obsolete’. The fact we can identify that sense of wonder at technology’s ability to make the absent present and vice versa proves Benjamin’s point: that there is a ‘logic of form’ in art and technology, or, in other words, that the future and the present are also contained in the past, as new technologies and art forms do not simply supersede present and anterior ones, but depend on them. Benjamin's work has proven so influential because, unlike the digital media ‘pundits’ of today, he did not predict the future, but analysed the present.

  10. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  11. Production of Recombinant Adeno-associated Virus Vectors Using Suspension HEK293 Cells and Continuous Harvest of Vector From the Culture Media for GMP FIX and FLT1 Clinical Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Joshua C; Soltys, Stephen M; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2016-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has shown great promise as a gene therapy vector in multiple aspects of preclinical and clinical applications. Many developments including new serotypes as well as self-complementary vectors are now entering the clinic. With these ongoing vector developments, continued effort has been focused on scalable manufacturing processes that can efficiently generate high-titer, highly pure, and potent quantities of rAAV vectors. Utilizing the relatively simple and efficient transfection system of HEK293 cells as a starting point, we have successfully adapted an adherent HEK293 cell line from a qualified clinical master cell bank to grow in animal component-free suspension conditions in shaker flasks and WAVE bioreactors that allows for rapid and scalable rAAV production. Using the triple transfection method, the suspension HEK293 cell line generates greater than 1 × 10(5) vector genome containing particles (vg)/cell or greater than 1 × 10(14) vg/l of cell culture when harvested 48 hours post-transfection. To achieve these yields, a number of variables were optimized such as selection of a compatible serum-free suspension media that supports both growth and transfection, selection of a transfection reagent, transfection conditions and cell density. A universal purification strategy, based on ion exchange chromatography methods, was also developed that results in high-purity vector preps of AAV serotypes 1-6, 8, 9 and various chimeric capsids tested. This user-friendly process can be completed within 1 week, results in high full to empty particle ratios (>90% full particles), provides postpurification yields (>1 × 10(13) vg/l) and purity suitable for clinical applications and is universal with respect to all serotypes and chimeric particles. To date, this scalable manufacturing technology has been utilized to manufacture GMP phase 1 clinical AAV vectors for retinal neovascularization (AAV2), Hemophilia B (scAAV8), giant axonal

  12. In vitro maintenance of spermatogenesis in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spermatogenesis has been maintained for extended periods in Xenopus laevis testis explants cultured in serum-free media supplemented with bovine serum albumin, insulin, transferrin, follicle-stimulating hormone, dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, retinol, ascorbate, and tocopherol. The organization of the testis fragments was maintained for 28 days, and all stages of development were present throughout the culture period. 3H-Thymidine-labeled secondary (Type B) spermatogonia developed in 28 days into spermatids at the acrosomal vesicle stage whereas labeled zygotene spermatocytes became mature spermatids in 28 days. Spermatogonial proliferation also continued in vitro for 28 days. Germ cell differentiation was not dependent upon exogenous testosterone, ascorbate, or tocopherol since 3H-labeled spermatogonia became mature spermatids in testes cultured 35 days in media lacking these supplements. Autoradiography demonstrated that 55% of the luminal sperm present in explants cultured 10 days had differentiated in vitro. Sperm from testes cultured 10-35 days were similar to sperm from freshly dissected testes with regard to motility and fecundity, and eggs fertilized with sperm from explant cultures developed normally into swimming tadpoles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining vertebrate spermatogenesis in culture and suggest that in vitro analysis of Xenopus spermatogenesis using defined media may provide important insights into the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in spermatogenesis

  13. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  14. American Multinational Media and the Expansion of American Mass Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茜

    2011-01-01

    With the development of globalization and gradual intensification of mutual dependence of the world,"hard power" which indudes economic and military strength is no longer the primary consideration for many countries.They tend to pay more attention to the attractiveness of their "soft power",which includes values,life style,ideology and so forth.Just as Joseph S.Ny,the famous professor of Harvard who puts forward the concept of soft power,says,"only by widespread communication and diffusion can a country reinforces its soft power".This is mass media's function.Since the 1990s,tens of thousands cultural products brought in from America are exported to foreign countries,including popular music,films,TV programs,magazines,books and so forth.By making advantage of its monopoly position in media circle,the United States pursues cultural hegemonism and expands its popttlar culture all over the world.This thesis takes a general view of the great advantages of America multi-national media groups and how they push forward the American popular culture all over the world.

  15. 21 CFR 866.2480 - Quality control kit for culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control kit for culture media. 866.2480 Section 866.2480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... control kit for culture media. (a) Identification. A quality control kit for culture media is a...

  16. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota;

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioreactors (μBR) are becoming increasingly popular for cell culture, sample preparation and analysis in case of routine genetic and clinical diagnostics. We present a novel μBR for non-adherent cells designed to mimic in vivo perfusion of cells based on diffusion of media through a...... sandwiched membrane. The culture chamber and perfusion chamber are separated by a sandwiched membrane and each chamber has separate inlet/outlets for easy loading/unloading of cells and perfusion of the media. The perfusion of media and exchange of nutrients occur through the sandwiched membrane, which was...... of CFSE staining and subsequent counting in a flow cytometer. To conclude on the applicability of μBR for genetic diagnostics, we prepare chromosome spreads on glass slides from the cultured samples, which is the primary step for metaphase FISH analysis....

  17. Nudity in Japanese visual media: a cross-cultural observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J F

    1990-12-01

    The depiction of nude human beings in Japanese print, film, and electronic media is reported. Modern practices are then related to traditional Japanese culture. The various contexts in which nudes are regularly presented are described and various types of nude presentations are classified. It is suggested that the nude body evokes different responses in Japanese culture and is not always intended to convey sexual or erotic meanings. Sentiment, particularly that evoked by the family and motherhood, and nonsexual humor, are other responses that nudity is intended to elicit. The Japanese situation is compared to presentation of nudity in the United States. PMID:2082862

  18. Studying Mobile Media Cultural Technologies, Mobile Communication, and the IPhone

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth, Larissa; Richardson, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The iPhone represents an important moment in both the short history of mobile media and the long history of cultural technologies. Like the Walkman of the 1980s, it marks a juncture in which notions about identity, individualism, lifestyle and sociality require rearticulation. this book explores not only the iPhone's particular characteristics, uses and "affects," but also how the "iPhone moment" functions as a barometer for broader patterns of change. In the iPhone moment, this study considers the convergent trajectories in the evolution of digital and mobile culture, and

  19. Networking the Past: Memory Cultures of New Media Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Delić, Zlatan; Mahmutović, Mirza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we want to develop an interdisciplinary framework for a critical review of traditional theories of meaning, as well as the status, discourses, forms and practi-ces of memory (and forgetting) in digitally mediated cultures. We propose the phro-nesis approach to the analysis of fluid field of media/communication studies. We pose following question: how dynamics of new communication ecology conditions, institutionalizes and transform the practices of social construction of the past...

  20. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynariková, K.; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, F.; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, A.; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 11 (2015), s. 29635-29647. ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * bacteria * yeasts * culture media Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2014

  1. High density cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  2. The Reflection of Social Media Technologies and Popular Culture Features in Russian Academic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry Gennadievich Baluev; Dmitry Igorevich Kaminchenko

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to such phenomenon as muss culture and modern social media technologies. The authorsconsider existing approaches to investigation of modern social media in Russian science. They make the reviewof Russian scientific literature about mass culture problem. With the reference to this paper there are manyRussian works that`s connected with such mass culture issues as the problem of mass culture definition, the rolein it of media and mass culture impact on the consciousness. ...

  3. A mediação cultural na biblioteca escolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Andrés Salcedo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inúmeras são as bibliotecas escolares e muitos são os jovens estudantes que precisam frequentá-la para o auxílio em suas atividades ou para simplesmente ter um local silencioso para a concentração. Mas a biblioteca escolar pode ter muito mais a oferecer. O bibliotecário pode trabalhar como mediador e levar àquele ambiente, diversas atividades para o aperfeiçoamento do processo de aprendizagem cultural daquele público. A mediação cultural pode ser feita sob diversas formas, levando peças, pinturas, exposições das mais variadas formas a este local, tornando-se assim, um dispositivo cultural. E tão importante para o funcionamento deste dispositivo, é a interação das equipes ligadas à mediação. Um espaço físico adequado e mediadores conectados com o mundo atual são alguns dos fatores para a elaboração de uma boa mediação. A biblioteca escolar é analisada como um meio em que a cultura (seja ela qual for é encaminhada para esse público tão curioso, que possui a mente aberta para entrada de conhecimentos diversos, e consequentemente, indivíduos culturalmente ricos serão criados.

  4. Effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the NO2− levels in cell culture media analysed by Griess colorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Griess assay has been used to determine the possible changes in the measured NO2− concentrations induced by TiO2 nanoparticles in three types of nitrite-containing samples: aqueous NaNO2 solutions with known concentrations, and two types of cell culture media—Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium (RPMI-1640) and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM-F12) used either as delivered or enriched in NO2− by NaNO2 addition. We have used three types of titania with average particle sizes between 10 and 30 nm: Degussa P25 and two other samples (undoped and Fe3+-doped anatase TiO2) synthesised by a hydrothermal route in our laboratory. The structural, morphological, optical and physicochemical characteristics of the used materials have been studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (EDX), Mössbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller nitrogen adsorption, UV–Vis reflectance spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. The opacity and sedimentation behaviour of the studied TiO2 suspensions have been investigated by photometric attenuance measurements at 540 nm. To account for the photocatalytic properties of titania in a biologically relevant context, multiple Griess tests have been performed under controlled exposure to laboratory natural daylight illumination. The results show significant variations of light attenuance (associated with NO2− concentrations in the Griess test) depending on the opacity, sedimentation behaviour, NO2− adsorption and photocatalytic properties of the tested TiO2 nanomaterials. These findings identify material characteristics recommended to be considered when analysing the results of Griess tests performed in biological studies involving TiO2 nanoparticles.

  5. Comparison of BD Bactec Plus Blood Culture Media to VersaTREK Redox Blood Culture Media for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Simulated Adult Blood Cultures Containing Therapeutic Concentrations of Antibiotics▿

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nancy S.; Rogan, Dagmar; Orr, Beverley L.; Whitney, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic neutralization in blood culture media from two automated systems was evaluated by measuring the recovery of organisms and times to detection in simulated cultures. Overall, BD Bactec Plus media (Bactec FX system) outperformed TREK 80 ml Redox media (VersaTREK system), although results suggest a relative rather than an absolute increased rate of recovery for the Bactec media.

  6. A comparative study of 28 culture media for Trichomonas gallinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, L.S.

    1954-01-01

    1. 1. A study was made of the ability of 28 different culture media to support growth of 5 strains of Trichomonas gallinae with their normally associated bacteria. A standard inoculum of 50 protozoa was used, and the cultures were incubated at 35 ?C. Based upon the number of positive cultures obtained, abundance of growth, and number of strains which grew in a given medium, the most satisfactory were Ringer-Loeffler serum, saline-Loeffler serum, and saline-serum. 2. 2. Pigeon serum used alone in a simple saline solution produced abundant growth and when added to other nutrients greatly enhanced the medium. Autoclaving of the serum appeared to have no effect on its growth promoting qualities. 3. 3. Neither egg yolk nor egg albumin alone appeared capable of supporting appreciable growth of T. gallinae. 4. 4. In general, the heavier the bacterial population supported by a medium the poorer the growth of T. gallinae. 5. 5. Strains of T. gallinae differ in their culturability. One strain grew in 82% of the media tested, another only in 43%.

  7. The Cultural Erosion Metaphor and the Transcultural Impact of Media Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varan, Duane

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the transcultural impact of media systems (and draws on media effects, political economy, and cultural studies research) by applying the soil erosion metaphor to transcultural impact of television. Discusses four processes associated with this model: cultural abrasion, cultural deflation, cultural deposition, and…

  8. Translating Cuba: Diasporic writing between moving cultures and moving media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gremels

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the interrelation between transculturality and transmediality with an emphasis on processes of translation. It focuses on two examples of transcultural and transmedial writing taken from contemporary Cuban literature in Paris: Miguel Sales's recontextualization of Cuban popular music in Paris and William Navarrete's ekphrastic reinscription of his island into the realm of French romantic painting. The case studies are significant in this context because they show how cultural borders are simultaneously set and transgressed at medial crossings—between music and poetry, text, and image. Thus, cultural translations go hand in hand with medial transpositions that include forms of rewriting, recomposition, and revisualization. The connection between moving cultures and moving media also points to the question of “travelling memory” in diaspora.

  9. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture

  10. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  11. Washington Crossing the Media: American Presidential Rhetoric and Cultural Iconography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Ernst

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Revolutionary War has been of prime importance to American self-perceptions and to the formation of its national identity. As a foundational moment with a strong mythical dimension it has become a cherished point of reference for the nation’s leaders, who, in their speeches and written communications, rely on the most widely accepted cultural iconography to recall this event. A time-honored, traditional discourse might, however, go together with the use of contemporary media technology as a means of distribution, as in the case of Barack Obama. Framing Obama’s rhetorical strategies within 19th- and 20th-century artistic representations of one specific historical moment from the Revolutionary War, Washington’s crossing of the Delaware river, this paper seeks to contribute to an enlarged understanding of the intricate relations between politics, the arts, and media development and of the ways they appropriate the past

  12. Media Aid Beyond the Factual: Culture, Development, and Audiovisual Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. J. Pearson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses audiovisual assistance, a form of development aid that focuses on the production and distribution of cultural and entertainment media such as fictional films and TV shows. While the first audiovisual assistance program dates back to UNESCO’s International Fund for the Promotion of Culture in the 1970s, the past two decades have seen a proliferation of audiovisual assistance that, I argue, is related to a growing concern for culture in post-2015 global development agendas. In this paper, I examine the aims and motivations behind the EU’s audiovisual assistance programs to countries in the Global South, using data from policy documents and semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Program Managers and administrative staff in Brussels. These programs prioritize forms of audiovisual content that are locally specific, yet globally tradable. Furthermore, I argue that they have an ambivalent relationship with traditional notions of international development, one that conceptualizes media not only as a means to achieve economic development and human rights aims, but as a form of development itself.

  13. Digital Culture, New Media and The Transformation of Collective Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Başaran İnce, Gökçen

    2014-01-01

    Along with the advent of digital technologies, modern and “semimodern” societies met a new phase of temporality. Speed, mobility and globality epitomise the fundamental characteristics of this process. New media, as a form of communication that consist of “digitality, interactivity and hypertextuality”, enable the genesis of a new memory culture in which audiences act as memory “prosumers”. Yet it is dubious whether this new era will lead to a “memory boom” or a “digital amnesia” when one tak...

  14. Practicing Critical Media Literacy Education: Developing a Community of Inquiry among Teachers Using Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Koulish, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Media literacy compels us to look anew at the most mundane, that which surrounds us: the media and our popular culture. From there media literacy compels us to accept that the media are constructed and to seek various ways to analyze them, while considering our own beliefs to evaluate for ourselves an ultimate interpretation. This process has the…

  15. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  16. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  17. Dissolution and aggregation of Cu nanoparticles in culture media: effects of incubation temperature and particles size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingxiangyu [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology (China); Fernández-Cruz, María Luisa; Connolly, Mona [Spanish National Institute for Agricultural and Food Research and Technology - INIA, Department of Environment (Spain); Schuster, Michael [Technische Universität München, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Navas, José María, E-mail: jmnavas@inia.es [Spanish National Institute for Agricultural and Food Research and Technology - INIA, Department of Environment (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Here, the effects of incubation temperature and particle size on the dissolution and aggregation behavior of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in culture media were investigated over 96 h, equivalent to the time period for acute cell toxicity tests. Three CuNPs with the nominal sizes of 25, 50, and 100 nm and one type of micro-sized particles (MPs, ∼500 nm) were examined in culture media used for human and fish hepatoma cell lines acute tests. A large decrease in sizes of CuNPs in the culture media was observed in the first 24 h incubation, and subsequently the sizes of CuNPs changed slightly over the following 72 h. Moreover, the decreasing rate in size was significantly dependent on the incubation temperature; the higher the incubation temperature, the larger the decreasing rate in size. In addition to that, we also found that the release of copper ions depended on the incubation temperature. Moreover, the dissolution rate of Cu particles increased very fast in the first 24 h, with a slight increase over the following 72 h.

  18. Dissolution and aggregation of Cu nanoparticles in culture media: effects of incubation temperature and particles size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, the effects of incubation temperature and particle size on the dissolution and aggregation behavior of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in culture media were investigated over 96 h, equivalent to the time period for acute cell toxicity tests. Three CuNPs with the nominal sizes of 25, 50, and 100 nm and one type of micro-sized particles (MPs, ∼500 nm) were examined in culture media used for human and fish hepatoma cell lines acute tests. A large decrease in sizes of CuNPs in the culture media was observed in the first 24 h incubation, and subsequently the sizes of CuNPs changed slightly over the following 72 h. Moreover, the decreasing rate in size was significantly dependent on the incubation temperature; the higher the incubation temperature, the larger the decreasing rate in size. In addition to that, we also found that the release of copper ions depended on the incubation temperature. Moreover, the dissolution rate of Cu particles increased very fast in the first 24 h, with a slight increase over the following 72 h

  19. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Röder; Elena García-Gareta; Christina Theodoropoulos; Nikola Ristovski; Keith A. Blackwood; Woodruff, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D) support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface ...

  20. Birthweight distribution in ART singletons resulting from embryo culture in two different culture media compared with the national population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmen, Josephine Gabriela; Pinborg, Anja; Rasmussen, S;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is there a difference in birthweight distribution in ART singletons born after IVF culture in two different culture media? SUMMARY ANSWER: There is no effect of culture media on both crude and adjusted birthweight distributions in ART singletons from nulliparous mothers. WHAT IS...... KNOWN ALREADY: Studies on human ART singletons have reported a difference in birthweight in singletons following IVF culture in different culture media. However, other studies comparing different culture media have not shown any significant differences in birthweight. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This...... study was a retrospective comparison of birthweights in IVF/ICSI singletons conceived after fresh embryo transfer following embryo culture in Cook or Medicult medium and in a national cohort of naturally conceived singletons in nulliparous women. The study compares four independent groups consisting of...

  1. Fungi outcompete bacteria under increased uranium concentration in culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a key part of water management at the Ranger Uranium Mine (Northern Territory, Australia), stockpile (ore and waste) runoff water was applied to natural woodland on the mine lease in accordance with regulatory requirements. Consequently, the soil in these Land Application Areas (LAAs) presents a range of uranium concentrations. Soil samples were collected from LAAs with different concentrations of uranium and extracts were plated onto LB media containing no (0 ppm), low (3 ppm), medium (250 ppm), high (600 ppm) and very high (1500 ppm) uranium concentrations. These concentrations were similar to the range of measured uranium concentrations in the LAAs soils. Bacteria grew on all plates except for the very high uranium concentrations, where only fungi were recovered. Identifications based on bacterial 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the dominant cultivable bacteria belonged to the genus Bacillus. Members of the genera Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Klebsiella, Microbacterium and Chryseobacterium were also isolated from the LAAs soil samples. Fungi were identified by sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer region, and members of the genera Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Penicillium and Curvularia were dominant on plates with very high uranium concentrations. Members of the Paecilomyces and Alternaria were also present but in lower numbers. These findings indicate that fungi can tolerate very high concentrations of uranium and are more resistant than bacteria. Bacteria and fungi isolated at the Ranger LAAs from soils with high concentrations of uranium may have uranium binding capability and hence the potential for uranium bioremediation. -- Highlights: ► Fungi outcompete bacteria under increased uranium concentration in culture media. ► Soil microorganisms isolated from the Ranger Land Application Areas (LAAs) were resistant to uranium. ► Bacillus was the most abundant cultivable genus retrieved from the Ranger LAAs soils. ► Uranium in LAAs soils is

  2. Plant-based culture media: Efficiently support culturing rhizobacteria and correctly mirror their in-situ diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef, Hanan H.; Hamza, Mervat A.; Fayez, Mohamed; Mourad, Elhussein F.; Saleh, Mohamed Y.; Sarhan, Mohamed S.; Suker, Ragab M.; Eltahlawy, Asmaa A.; Nemr, Rahma A.; El-Tahan, Mahmod; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous publications and the data presented here provide evidences on the ability of plant-based culture media to optimize the cultivability of rhizobacteria and to support their recovery from plant-soil environments. Compared to the tested chemically-synthetic culture media (e.g. nutrient agar and N-deficient combined-carbon sources media), slurry homogenates, crude saps, juices and powders of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) and succulent plants (Aloe vera and Aloe arborescens) were rich ...

  3. Developmental competence and cryotolerance of caprine parthenogenetic embryos cultured in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo-Jae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Yum, Soo-Young; Lee, Song-Jeon; Lim, Chae-Woong; Jang, Goo

    2016-07-15

    In animal reproduction technologies, the in vitro embryo culture system has advanced over the past few decades. However, in vitro cultured embryos still have reduced functional and physiological abilities compared with those from in vivo conditions, and many factors of oviduct and uterine environments have not yet been revealed. Here, we demonstrated the in vitro culture of domestic goat (Capra hircus) embryos using two types of culture media, modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOF) and a two-step chemically defined medium (DI/II). To obtain parthenogenetic goat embryos, oocytes were matured in vitro in tissue culture media-199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum for 22 to 24 hours, and activated with 5 μM, Ca(2+) ionomycin for 4 minutes, followed by 1.9 mM, 6-dimethylaminopurine treatment for 4 hours. After 2 days of embryo culture in different culture media, there were no significant differences in cleavage rates (96.6% vs. 95.4% in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively). However, the DI/II group showed improved development competence to blastocysts (64.6% vs. 82.3% in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively) and the total cell number of blastocysts (144.3 ± 9.2 vs. 264.4 ± 15.2 in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively) at Day 7. After the cryopreservation of early-stage blastocysts at Day 6 via the conventional slow-freezing procedure, the surviving embryos were analyzed. The re-expansion rate after freezing and thawing was significantly higher in DI/II (39.66% vs. 67.69% in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively), but there were no statistical differences in total cell numbers (142.3 ± 12.1 vs. 172.1 ± 11.6 in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively), apoptotic index (4.9 ± 0.8% vs. 3.8 ± 0.7 in mSOF vs. DI/II, respectively), and the gene expression levels (BAX, GLUT1, MnSOD, and OCT4) among the re-expanded blastocysts. Overall, our data reported that the defined in vitro culture media for goat embryos were established with high efficiency, which will be very useful for

  4. Cell culture compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. INCREASED OSMOLARITY AND CELL CLUSTERING PRESERVES CANINE NOTOCHORDAL CELL PHENOTYPE IN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Spillekom, S; Smolders, L.A.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Arkesteijn, I.; Ito, K.; Meij, B. P.; Tryfonidou, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is associated with a loss of notochordal cells (NCs) from the nucleus pulposus (NP) and their replacement by chondrocyte-like cells. NCs are known to maintain extracellular matrix quality and stimulate the chondrocyte-like NP cells, making NCs attractive for designing new tissue engineering approaches for IVD regeneration. However, optimal conditions, such as osmolarity and other characteristics of the culture media, for long-term culture...

  6. Cultures in orbit: Satellite technologies, global media and local practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Lisa Ann

    Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, satellite technologies have had a profound impact upon cultures around the world. "Cultures in Orbit" examines these seemingly disembodied, distant relay machines in relation to situated social and cultural processes on earth. Drawing upon a range of materials including NASA and UNESCO documents, international satellite television broadcasts, satellite 'development' projects, documentary and science fiction films, remote sensing images, broadcast news footage, World Wide Web sites, and popular press articles I delineate and analyze a series of satellite mediascapes. "Cultures in Orbit" analyzes uses of satellites for live television relay, surveillance, archaeology and astronomy. The project examines such satellite media as the first live global satellite television program Our World, Elvis' Aloha from Hawaii concert, Aboriginal Australian satellite programs, and Star TV's Asian music videos. In addition, the project explores reconnaissance images of mass graves in Bosnia, archaeological satellite maps of Cleopatra's underwater palace in Egypt, and Hubble Space Telescope images. These case studies are linked by a theoretical discussion of the satellite's involvement in shifting definitions of time, space, vision, knowledge and history. The satellite fosters an aesthetic of global realism predicated on instantaneous transnational connections. It reorders linear chronologies by revealing traces of the ancient past on the earth's surface and by searching in deep space for the "edge of time." On earth, the satellite is used to modernize and develop "primitive" societies. Satellites have produced new electronic spaces of international exchange, but they also generate strategic maps that advance Western political and cultural hegemony. By technologizing human vision, the satellite also extends the epistemologies of the visible, the historical and the real. It allows us to see artifacts and activities on earth from new vantage points

  7. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Girija Kuttan; Korengath Chandran Preethi; Ramadasan Kuttan; Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The ...

  8. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  9. Popular Culture and Critical Media Literacy in Adult Education: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter introduces the volume, provides an overview of the theory and literature on popular culture and critical media literacy in education, and discusses ways to use popular culture in adult education.

  10. Culture in the Media: the Representation of Culture in "Jutarnji List"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Pavlovski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In today's picture of the widely circulated print media a famous assertion is that culture as a subject is decreasing in relevancy, as seen by the amount of pages dedicated to the cultural section and informations on cultural events, especially those of international importance, in the entire content of the most widely read newspapers. The aim of this paper is to show the presence of cultural themes in one of the most popular daily newspaper published in the Republic of Croatia, Jutarnji list. The research will cover the content of this daily for a period of one year (January 1st 2013 to 1st January 2014, to show the presence of cultural themes in it. I suppose, because of a prior knowledge of the materials, that notifications on events in culture at home and abroad will reside outside pages dedicated to the cultural section, so it will be necessary to examine the contents of whole numbers. Furthermore, I will compare the representation of various artistic genres, the presence of film art compared to the amount of articles devoted to literature, and I will devote particular attention to the content dedicated to the non-commercial aspects of a particular genre, for example the amount of information about events in the poetry scene, promotions or group exhibitions of young filmmakers at home and abroad.

  11. Von "Konsum" zu "Kultur": Medien-Padagogik und medien-Produktion im virtuellen Dialog (From "Consumption" to "Culture": A Virtual Dialogue between Media Pedagogics and Media Production).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermke, Jutta

    1998-01-01

    Argues that media pedagogics constitutes a discipline of media sciences and of media culture; however, dialog across the boundaries between various fields and branches is problematic. Sketches different phases of a virtual dialog between media pedagogics and media production to illustrate the gap and the importance of bridging it. (DSK)

  12. Original people – Mapuche - Cultural identity - Social media - Digital divide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Vicent, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects on the value of the implementation of ICT in indigenous communities in southern Chile, related to the appreciation of cultural identity. Assuming the presence of ICT in all indigenous communities in the world, and specially in the Mapuche communities, we present a training-oriented approach from the concept of digital literacy, and introduce social media as tools available to any member of these communities, in order to access, create and disseminate information, and to communicate and collaborate with their community and other communities, geographically close or distant. The results presented in this article draw from an international cooperation project that started in 2010 between the University of La Frontera (Temuco, Chile and the University of Murcia (Murcia, Spain. This article in written in Spanish

  13. Insect Cell Culture and Biotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert R.Granados; Guoxun Li; G.W.Blissard

    2007-01-01

    The continued development of new cell culture technology is essential for the future growth and application of insect cell and baculovirus biotechnology. The use of cell lines for academic research and for commercial applications is currently dominated by two cell lines; the Spodoptera frugiperda line, SF21 (and its clonal isolate, SF9), and the Trichoplusia ni line, BTI 5B1-4, commercially known as High Five cells. The long perceived prediction that the immense potential application of the baculovirus-insect cell system, as a tool in cell and molecular biology, agriculture, and animal health, has been achieved. The versatility and recent applications of this popular expression system has been demonstrated by both academia and industry and it is clear that this cell-based system has been widely accepted for biotechnological applications. Numerous small to midsize startup biotechnology companies in North America and the Europe are currently using the baculovirus-insect cell technology to produce custom recombinant proteins for research and commercial applications. The recent breakthroughs using the baculovirus-insect cell-based system for the development of several commercial products that will impact animal and human health will further enhance interest in this technology by pharma. Clearly, future progress in novel cell and engineering advances will lead to fundamental scientific discoveries and serve to enhance the utility and applications of this baculovirus-insect cell system.

  14. NMR-based metabolomics of mammalian cell and tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate growth media and the cellular metabolome in two systems of interest to biomedical research. The first of these was a Chinese hamster ovary cell line engineered to express a recombinant protein. Here, NMR spectroscopy and a quantum mechanical total line shape analysis were utilized to quantify 30 metabolites such as amino acids, Krebs cycle intermediates, activated sugars, cofactors, and others in both media and cell extracts. The impact of bioreactor scale and addition of anti-apoptotic agents to the media on the extracellular and intracellular metabolome indicated changes in metabolic pathways of energy utilization. These results shed light into culture parameters that can be manipulated to optimize growth and protein production. Second, metabolomic analysis was performed on the superfusion media in a common model used for drug metabolism and toxicology studies, in vitro liver slices. In this study, it is demonstrated that two of the 48 standard media components, choline and histidine are depleted at a faster rate than many other nutrients. Augmenting the starting media with extra choline and histidine improves the long-term liver slice viability as measured by higher tissues levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutathione and ATP, as well as lower LDH levels in the media at time points out to 94 h after initiation of incubation. In both models, media components and cellular metabolites are measured over time and correlated with currently accepted endpoint measures.

  15. Digital Media Literacy in a Sports, Popular Culture and Literature Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This article considers how media sports culture is an apt space for digital media literacy instruction. Describing a senior year high school English course that requires students to deconstruct and compose with sports media texts, the author outlines how learning modules, analysis of curated collections of texts through heuristics, and mentor…

  16. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. 113.25 Section 113.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi....

  17. Book review: postcolonial media culture in Britain by Rosalind Brunt and Rinella Cere

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Asiya

    2012-01-01

    Postcolonial Media Culture in Britain is a refreshing and interesting text that introduces readers to postcolonial theory using the context of British media culture in ethnic minority communities to explain key ideas and debates. Asiya Islam is concerned that the book lacks a detailed exploration of gender-specific issues, but applauds it for taking on important under-discussed topics.

  18. Effects of embryo culture media do not persist after implantation: a histological study in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemkemeyer, Sandra A.; Schwarzer, Caroline; Boiani, Michele; Ehmcke, Jens; Le Gac, Séverine; Schlatt, Stefan; Nordhoff, Verena

    2014-01-01

    Is post-implantation embryonic development after blastocyst transfer affected by exposure to different assisted reproduction technology (ART) culture media? Fetal development and placental histology of ART embryos cultured in vitro in different ART media was not impaired compared with embryos grow

  19. Validation and application of a highly specific and sensitive ELISA for the estimation of cortisone in saliva, urine and in vitro cell-culture media by using a novel antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Emad A S; Baghdadi, Hussam H S; Howie, Forbes; Mason, J Ian

    2012-05-01

    It is generally acknowledged that local tissue concentrations of cortisol and cortisone are modulated by site-specific actions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) isoenzymes 1 and 2. Cortisone, the inactive metabolite of cortisol is produced by 11βHSD type 2. To assess 11β-HSD types 1 and 2 activities, the cortisol/cortisone ratio has to be accurately determined. Immunoassays to measure cortisone levels are not widely available and tend to lack specificity. The aim of this project was to develop a highly specific and sensitive ELISA method for the estimation of free cortisone levels in urine, saliva and in vitro media samples without chromatographic separation. Antibodies against cortisone were raised in rabbits using cortisone-3-CMO-KLH as immunogen. HRP-goat anti-rabbit IgG conjugate was used as enzyme tracer. Cross-reactivities of the untreated cortisone antiserum with major interfering steroids were minimal except for cortisol (3.15%). However, following an immune-affinity purification of the antibodies using CNBr-activated sepharose-cortisol-3-CMO-BSA, cross-reactivity of the purified cortisone antibody with cortisol was reduced to 0.27%. The minimum detection limit of cortisone ELISA was 28 pg/mL (77.7 pM). The validity of the cortisone ELISA was confirmed by the excellent correlation obtained before and after an HPLC fractionation step (Y=1.09X-0.21, R2=0.98). Intra-assay and inter-assay imprecision were 5.5-11.7% and 8.7-12.8% CV, respectively. Using this assay, salivary cortisone levels showed a circadian rhythm in men and women (11.2±7.3 nM at 08.00 h and 5.1±3.6 nM at 18.00 h), and the levels were reduced following liquorice ingestion. In media of adrenocortical H295 cell line incubations, basal cortisone levels were 4.24±0.22 nM that increased to 8.6±1.2 nM post forskolin treatment. Urinary free cortisone excretion levels in healthy subjects were 56.66±36.9 nmol/day. In human volunteers following ingestion of green coffee bean extract

  20. The Role of Social Media in Higher Education : Case KTUAS Faculty of Business and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Mattila, Katja. 2012. The Role of Social Media in Higher Education: Case KTUAS Faculty of Business and Culture. Master’s Thesis. Kemi-Tornio University of Applied Sciences. Business and Culture. Pages 72. Appendices 1 - 3. The main objective of this thesis is to delineate the role and implications of the use of social media in educational work in higher education as well as discuss the influences social media use has on the everyday work within the case organization. The case organization ...

  1. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  2. Radiation Sterilization of Two Commonly Culture Media Used for Bacterial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sterilization of culture media used for the cultivation of bacteria by Co-60 gamma ray was investigated. Nutrient agar and tryptone glucose yeast extract (TGY) media widely used for the propagation of bacteria were sterilized with 15 kGy dose gamma radiation. Seven different bacterial species were grown as well on the radiation sterilized media as on media sterilized by autoclaving in a conventional way

  3. mRNA Fragments in In-Vitro Culture Media are Associated with Bovine Preimplantation Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna eKropp

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro production (IVP systems have been used to bypass problems of fertilization and early embryonic development. However, embryos produced by IVP are commonly selected for implantation based on morphological assessment, which is not a strong indicator of establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Thus, there is a need to identify additional indicators of embryonic developmental potential. Previous studies have identified microRNA expression in in vitro culture media to be indicative of embryo quality in both bovine and human embryos. Like microRNAs, mRNAs have been shown to be secreted from cells into the extracellular environment, but it is unknown whether or not these RNAs are secreted by embryos. Thus, the objective of the present study was to determine whether mRNAs are secreted into in vitro culture media and if their expression in the media is indicative of embryo quality. In vitro culture medium was generated and collected from both blastocyst and degenerate (those which fail to develop from the morula to blastocyst stage embryos. Small-RNA sequencing revealed that many mRNA fragments were present in the culture media. A total of 17 mRNA fragments were differentially expressed between blastocyst and degenerated conditioned media. Differential expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR for

  4. "Rape Culture" language and the news media: contested versus non-contested cases

    OpenAIRE

    Cobos, April

    2014-01-01

    The American news media has recently reported on several rape and sexual assault cases in various cultural settings, sparking public conversations about rape culture in different cultural contexts. The article is focused as a Critical Discourse Analysis that compares the language use in news articles from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal over a six months period in order to more clearly understand the way the news media uses language in regards to gender and sexual assault and c...

  5. Communication and Cultural Memory in Contemporary Tourism Media Products: Culture-specific and Cross-cultural Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Salamurović

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Communication practices which are a part of the contemporary media-culture are intrinsically tied to the processes of (recreating collective identities. One of the possible strategies in the frame of the mediated communication practice is to connect traditional ele-ments of cultural memory with new ones, which are declared as preferable and acceptable. In that way the collective identity remains, on the one hand, “homoge-neous”, offering stability to the members of communica-tion community, on the other hand, it is subject to change and dynamics, always “ready” to be reshaped in order to achieve wider acceptance. The tourism media products, especially tourism promotion videos, are the best examples for this mediated communication prac-tice. The visual images, combined with text messages, i.e. slogans, are not only some of the most important narrative mechanisms in the presentation of certain tourist destination, they are also the key elements of the mediated collective cultural memory and identity of the respective country presented in the tourism promotion videos. The main goal of this article is to examine the represen-tation and composition forms of some of the tourism promotion videos both from the Balkan countries as well as from other regions worldwide related especially to the elements of the cultural memory in order to de-fine culture-specific and cross-cultural strategies rele-vant to the creation of the collective identity. The analy-sis is based on the Critical Discourse Analysis, respec-tively the analytical framework of the “Grammar of Vis-ual Design” by Kress/van Leeuwen.

  6. Factors Influencing Social Media Marketing In Different Culture Context.

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Juwayria

    2014-01-01

    Social media has gained precedence in today‟s business environment, and consumers themselves are more receptive to this marketing media. This study aims to identify the factors affecting users‟ attitudes towards social media marketing. From the literature review, a conceptual model was proposed, and five hypotheses were developed. The model studies the effect of several independent variables on attitude towards social media marketing. A questionnaire was completed by students from Norway and ...

  7. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  8. Multiweek Cell Culture Project for Use in Upper-Level Biology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Rebecca E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Parks, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory protocol for a multiweek project piloted in a new upper-level biology laboratory (BIO 426) using cell culture techniques. Human embryonic kidney-293 cells were used, and several culture media and supplements were identified for students to design their own experiments. Treatments included amino acids, EGF,…

  9. The Mainstreamisation of Cultural Diversity: The Corporates, Media and Similarisation of Publics in India

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Mishra

    2012-01-01

    India has been known for its diverse cultures and communities. But in the contemporary economic and social setup where global cultural and economic ideologies dominate markets, media and every aspect of the social life, the paper asks if the notion of cultural diversity is intact in the contemporary India. Culture is certainly not static but what about diversity, is it transforming as well alongside as cultures around the world assimilate, as many argue? Does the profit driven market and medi...

  10. Bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus by employing alternative culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozala, Angela Faustino; Pértile, Renata Aparecida Nedel; dos Santos, Carolina Alves; de Carvalho Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Gama, Francisco Miguel; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is used in different fields as a biological material due to its unique properties. Despite there being many BC applications, there still remain many problems associated with bioprocess technology, such as increasing productivity and decreasing production cost. New technologies that use waste from the food industry as raw materials for culture media promote economic advantages because they reduce environmental pollution and stimulate new research for science sustainability. For this reason, BC production requires optimized conditions to increase its application. The main objective of this study was to evaluate BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus using industry waste, namely, rotten fruits and milk whey, as culture media. Furthermore, the structure of BC produced at different conditions was also determined. The culture media employed in this study were composed of rotten fruit collected from the disposal of free markets, milk whey from a local industrial disposal, and their combination, and Hestrin and Schramm media was used as standard culture media. Although all culture media studied produced BC, the highest BC yield-60 mg/mL-was achieved with the rotten fruit culture. Thus, the results showed that rotten fruit can be used for BC production. This culture media can be considered as a profitable alternative to generate high-value products. In addition, it combines environmental concern with sustainable processes that can promote also the reduction of production cost. PMID:25472434

  11. The Reflection of Social Media Technologies and Popular Culture Features in Russian Academic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Gennadievich Baluev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to such phenomenon as muss culture and modern social media technologies. The authorsconsider existing approaches to investigation of modern social media in Russian science. They make the reviewof Russian scientific literature about mass culture problem. With the reference to this paper there are manyRussian works that`s connected with such mass culture issues as the problem of mass culture definition, the rolein it of media and mass culture impact on the consciousness. They infer that in Russian scientific literature thereis an emphasis on entertaining and sentimental character of mass culture products, easy and quick access to it.Russian authors draw attention to consumption character of mass culture impact on the consciousness.Furthermore the essential Russian specific of the researches in this sphere is the fact that most of the works aremade using qualitative methods. The few works that used quantitative methods tended to rely on methodsimported from Western works.

  12. Schwann cell cultures from human fetal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaping Feng; Hui Zhu; Jiang Hao; Xinmin Wang; Shengping Wu; Li Bai; Xiangming Li; Yun Zha

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Previous studies have used many methods for in vitro Schwann cells (SCs) cul-tures and purification,such as single cell suspension and cytosine arabinoside.However,it has been difficult to obtain sufficient cellular density,and the procedures have been quite tedious.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the feasibility of culturing high-density SCs using fetal human dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Cell culture and immunohistochemistry were performed at the Cen-tral Laboratory of Kunming General Hospital of Chinese PLA between March 2001 and October 2008.MATERIALS:Culture media containing 10% fetal bovine serum,as well as 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin were purchased from Gibco,USA;mouse anti-human S-100 monoclonal antibody and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase were provided by Beijing Institute of Bi-ological Products,China.METHODS:Primarily cultured SCs were dissociated from dorsal root ganglia of human aborted fe-tuses at 4-6 months pregnancy.Following removal of the dorsal root ganglion perineurium,the gan-glia were dissected into tiny pieces and digested with 0.2% collagenase and 0.25% trypsin (volume ratio 1:1),then explanted and cultured.SC purification was performed with 5 mL 10% fetal bovine serum added to the culture media,followed by differential adhesion.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:SCs morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast light microscopy.SC purity was evaluated according to percentage of S-100 immunostained cells.RESULTS:SCs were primarily cultured for 5-6 days and then subcultured for 4-5 passages.The highly enriched SC population reached > 95% purity and presented with normal morphology.CONCLUSION:A high purity of SCs was obtained with culture methods using human fetal dorsal root ganglion tissue explants.

  13. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  14. Transformative Power of Digital Citizenship: Critical Perspectives on Culture, New Media and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses culture, as a source of conflict than of synergy, how affects the use of new media to build digital citizenships. It also argues that the cultural dimensions of Geert Hofstede, who demonstrates that there are national and regional cultural groupings that affect the behavior of organizations, are very persistent across time.…

  15. Digital Culture and Social Media versus the Traditional Education

    OpenAIRE

    Agim Poshka

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to reflect on the increasing momentum that social media have in the everyday life our students and to investigate the uniqueness that this media offers to the process of education. The study investigates the benefits that Facebook and Twitter have as the leading technologically mediated spaces and its application to the learning habitat of the learner in the public pedagogy. The article reflects on the opportunities that social media offers in order to avoid the self-created...

  16. Cultural Resiliency and the Rise of Indigenous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Moscato

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Valerie Alia’s book, The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication (New York: Berghahn Books, 2012, 270 pp., points the way to major communication breakthroughs for traditional communities around the world, in turn fostering a more democratic media discourse. From Canada to Japan, and Australia to Mexico, this ambitious and wide-reaching work examines a broad international movement that at once protects ancient languages and customs but also communicates to audiences across countries, oceans, and political boundaries. The publication is divided roughly into five sections: The emergence of a global vision for Indigenous communities scattered around the world; government policy obstacles and opportunities; lessons from Canada, where Indigenous media efforts have been particularly dynamic; the global surge in television, radio and other technological media advances; and finally the long-term prospects and aspirations for Indigenous media. By laying out such a comprehensive groundwork for the rise of global Indigenous media over a variety of formats, particularly over the past century, Alia shows how recent social media breakthroughs such as the highly successful #IdleNoMore movement—a sustained online protest by Canada’s First Nations peoples—have been in fact inevitable. The world’s Indigenous communities have leveraged media technologies to overcome geographic isolation, to foster new linkages with Indigenous populations globally, and ultimately to mitigate structural power imbalances exacerbated by non-Indigenous media and other institutions.

  17. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  18. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  19. Canine and Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Serum Free Media Have Altered Immunophenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kaitlin C.; Kol, Amir; Shahbenderian, Salpi; Granick, Jennifer L.; Walker, Naomi J.; Borjesson, Dori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is being increasingly used to treat dogs and horses with naturally-occurring diseases. However these animals also serve as critical large animal models for ongoing translation of cell therapy products to the human market. MSC manufacture for clinical use mandates improvement in cell culture systems to meet demands for higher MSC numbers and removal of xeno-proteins (i.e. fetal bovine serum, FBS). While serum-free media (SFM) is commercially available, its a...

  20. Differences in Valvular and Vascular Cell Responses to Strain in Osteogenic Media

    OpenAIRE

    Zannatul, Ferdous; Hanjoong, Jo; Robert M., Nerem

    2011-01-01

    Calcification is the primary cause of failure of bioprosthetic and tissue-engineered vascular and valvular grafts. We used tissue-engineered collagen gels containing human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) and human aortic valvular interstitial cells (HAVIC) as a model to investigate cell-mediated differences in early markers of calcification. The HASMCs and HAVICs were isolated from non-sclerotic human tissues. After 21 days of culture in either regular or osteogenic media with or without 1...

  1. Quantitative image analysis as a tool for Yarrowia lipolytica dimorphic growth evaluation in different culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, A; Mesquita, D P; Amaral, A L; Ferreira, E C; Belo, I

    2016-01-10

    Yarrowia lipolytica, a yeast strain with a huge biotechnological potential, capable to produce metabolites such as γ-decalactone, citric acid, intracellular lipids and enzymes, possesses the ability to change its morphology in response to environmental conditions. In the present study, a quantitative image analysis (QIA) procedure was developed for the identification and quantification of Y. lipolytica W29 and MTLY40-2P strains dimorphic growth, cultivated in batch cultures on hydrophilic (glucose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and hydrophobic (olive oil and castor oil) media. The morphological characterization of yeast cells by QIA techniques revealed that hydrophobic carbon sources, namely castor oil, should be preferred for both strains growth in the yeast single cell morphotype. On the other hand, hydrophilic sugars, namely glucose and GlcNAc caused a dimorphic transition growth towards the hyphae morphotype. Experiments for γ-decalactone production with MTLY40-2P strain in two distinct morphotypes (yeast single cells and hyphae cells) were also performed. The obtained results showed the adequacy of the proposed morphology monitoring tool in relation to each morphotype on the aroma production ability. The present work allowed establishing that QIA techniques can be a valuable tool for the identification of the best culture conditions for industrial processes implementation. PMID:26546055

  2. Application of morphological criteria of micromycetes development for estimation of quality of cultural media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana I. Bondar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality of such cultural media as PDA, Chapek and Saburo was investigated after long term preservation in dry and ready-to-use conditions on the base of morphological criteria of micromycetes.

  3. In vitro culture of Cucumis sativus L. VI. Histological analysis of leaf explants cultured on media with 2, 4-D or 2, 4, 5-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nadolska-Orczyk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The developmental sequence of callus initiation and somatic embryogenesis in leaf explants of Cucumis sativus cv. Borszczagowski was analysed and compared on media containing two different auxin phenoxy-derivatives (2,4-D and 2,4,5-T and cytokinin (BAP or 2iP. During the first 20 days of culture on media with 2,4,5-T proliferation of parenchymatic tissue occurred mainly and only small meristematic centers were observed. There was an intensive detachment of parenchymatic cells and dissociation of their cell walls near vessels and in the lower part of the explant adjacent to the medium. These cells were strongly plasmolysed. On the 2,4-D containing medium mostly meristematic tissue developed, proliferating around vascular bundles and forming meristematic centers or promeristem-like structures. After 35-50 days of culture, secondary callus was formed by separation of meristematic cells from the meristem surface in explants cultured on the 2,4-D containing medium. On medium supplemented with 2, 4, 5-T the detachment of parenchymatic and meristematic cells occurred, along with formation of a gel-like substance. The gel-like callus contained multi-cellular aggregates, proembryoids and embryoids. This type of callus tissue was initiated more intensively on medium with 2, 4, 5-T, but the frequency of somatic embryogenesis was much lower. The periferial cells of aggregates, proembryoids and embryoids showed the tendency to separate from the surface of the tissue. Many embryoids formed adventitious embryos.

  4. Biodegradable Mg corrosion and osteoblast cell culture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium (Mg) is a biodegradable metal that has significant potential advantages as an implant material. In this paper, corrosion and cell culture experiments were performed to evaluate the biocompatibility of Mg. The corrosion current and potential of a Mg disk were measured in different physiological solutions including deionized (DI) water, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and McCoy's 5A culture medium. The corrosion currents in the PBS and in the McCoy's 5A-5% FBS media were found to be higher than in DI water, which is expected because corrosion of Mg occurs faster in a chloride solution. Weight loss, open-circuit potential, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were also performed. The Mg specimens were also characterized using an environmental scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The X-ray analysis showed that in the cell culture media a passive interfacial layer containing oxygen, chloride, phosphate, and potassium formed on the samples. U2OS cells were then co-cultured with a Mg specimen for up to one week. Cytotoxicity results of magnesium using MTT assay and visual observation through cell staining were not significantly altered by the presence of the corroding Mg sample. Further, bone tissue formation study using von Kossa and alkaline phosphatase staining indicates that Mg may be suitable as a biodegradable implant material.

  5. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  6. Remote Control Childhood? Combating the Hazards of Media Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Diane E.

    Ever since television became a daily staple of U.S. family life, its influence on children has been the subject of study and debate. No aspect of the debate has been more heated than violence in the media. But a growing knowledge base has shifted the focus of the debate from whether media violence contributes to violence in real life to what can…

  7. "Rape Culture" language and the news media: contested versus non-contested cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April COBOS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The American news media has recently reported on several rape and sexual assault cases in various cultural settings, sparking public conversations about rape culture in different cultural contexts. The article is focused as a Critical Discourse Analysis that compares the language use in news articles from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal over a six months period in order to more clearly understand the way the news media uses language in regards to gender and sexual assault and creates a spectrum of valid versus contested reports of sexual assault in different cultural settings.

  8. The Impact of Social Media Enterprise Crowdsourcing on Company Innovation Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugger, Ada Scupola; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2012-01-01

    innovation culture using theory on organizational culture and crowdsourcing. The analysis shows that the organizational crowdsourcing event has supported an innovation culture change in the case company towards a more open approach to innovation; creating a new and different awareness of innovation, allowing......In this article we investigate how social media-based crowdsourcing systems can be used to reengineer the innovation culture in an organization. Based on a case study of a large engineering consultancy's use of a social media crowdsourcing system we investigate the impact on the organizations...

  9. The Impact of Social Media and Crowdsourcing on Organizational Innovation Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    innovation culture using theory on organizational culture and crowdsourcing. The analysis shows that the organizational crowdsourcing event has supported an innovation culture change in the case company towards a more open approach to innovation; creating a new and different awareness of innovation, allowing......In this article we investigate how social media-based crowdsourcing systems can be used to reengineer the innovation culture in an organization. Based on a case study of a large engineering consultancy’s use of a social media crowdsourcing system we investigate the impact on the organizations...

  10. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Domestic American and International Chinese Students' Social Media Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Mocarski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This survey of American and Chinese students at a state university in the southern United States measures Social Media (SM) use and attitudes toward SM. The purpose of this study was to investigate student perception and motivation of social media communication and the relationship between student cultural values and their social media…

  11. Developmentally Appropriate New Media Literacies: Supporting Cultural Competencies and Social Skills in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Meryl

    2013-01-01

    Young children explore their world through manipulatives, playing with "technology" that may or may not be digital. To this end, I offer an exploration into how the existing framework of the New Media Literacies (NMLs) paradigm set forth by Henry Jenkins (2006) in "Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st…

  12. Understanding Social Media Culture and its Ethical Challenges for Art Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; McNutt, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethics in the context of the participatory culture of social media as it relates to art therapy. The authors present the view that social media formats are important venues for expression that contribute to interpersonal connections and social learning via the active participation of their members. To make informed ethical…

  13. Cultural Diversity in the News Media: A Democratic or a Commercial Need?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Awad Cherit (Isabel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis paper distinguishes between laissez-faire and interventionist models used to justify and implement cultural diversity initiatives in the news media. The laissez-faire model is characteristic of U.S journalism. However, due to the convergence of media systems and the widespread adopt

  14. Hypothesis of individualism and equality? : cultural representations in American organizational media releases

    OpenAIRE

    Niskala, Niina

    2012-01-01

    According to previous research, American cultural values are reflected in the external communication of organizations. This study aimed to explore how cultural features are reflected in a specific American organization’s, the Coca-cola Company’s, web based media releases and to hypothesize what kind of effects the discourses could have on the viewers’ perceptions of the world. In this cultural studies oriented research, the notion of cultural transference was adopted to explore the way tex...

  15. The crude plant juices of desert plants as appropriate culture media for the cultivation of rhizospheric microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman H. Nour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive use of plant juices, not as a mere supplement to synthetic culture media, for culturing rhizospheric microorganisms (RMO is introduced here. Juices were prepared from desert (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L., Zygophyllum album L., Carpobrotus edulis L. as well as cultivated (Trifolium alexandrinum L., Beta vulgaris L. plants. Colonies of RMO (Azospirillum brasilense, Enterobacter agglomerans and Klebsiella pneumoniae nicely developed on surface-inoculated agar plates prepared from crude and diluted juice of M. crystallinum (ice plant. Furthermore, hundreds of RMO colonies developed on various standard culture media were replicated (>90% on agar plates of different plant juices. RMO cells grew nicely in liquid ice plant juice, with doubling times comparable to those grown in the reference culture medium. RMO populations resident in various host plants were able to develop on culture media prepared from homologous and heterologous juices. The application of a thin semi-solid overlay agar on the surfaces of inoculated agar plates significantly increased the recovery of micro-colonies on agar plates, particularly those prepared from plant juices.

  16. MicrO: an ontology of phenotypic and metabolic characters, assays, and culture media found in prokaryotic taxonomic descriptions

    OpenAIRE

    Blank, Carrine E.; Cui, Hong; Moore, Lisa R.; Ramona L Walls

    2016-01-01

    Background MicrO is an ontology of microbiological terms, including prokaryotic qualities and processes, material entities (such as cell components), chemical entities (such as microbiological culture media and medium ingredients), and assays. The ontology was built to support the ongoing development of a natural language processing algorithm, MicroPIE (or, Microbial Phenomics Information Extractor). During the MicroPIE design process, we realized there was a need for a prokaryotic ontology w...

  17. Cultured meat in western media:The disproportionate coverage of vegetarian reactions, demographic realities, and implications for cultured meat marketing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick D Hopkins

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the media coverage of the 2013 London cultured meat tasting event, particularly in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Using major news outlets, prominent magazines covering food and science issues, and advocacy websites concerning meat consumption, the paper characterizes the overal emphases of the coverage, the tenor of the coverage, and compares the media portrayal of the important issues to the demographic and psychological realities of the actual consumer market into which cultured meat wil compete. In particular, the paper argues that Western media gives a distorted picture of what obstacles are in the path of cultured meat acceptance, especial y by overemphasizing and overrepresenting the importance of the reception of cultured meat among vegetarians. Promoters of cultured meat should recognize the skewed impression that this media coverage provides and pay attention to the demographic data that suggests strict vegetarians are a demographical y negligible group. Resources for promoting cultured meat should focus on the empirical demographics of the consumer market and the empirical psychology of mainstream consumers.

  18. The action of microsecond-pulsed plasma-activated media on the inactivation of human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Park, Ji Hoon; Jeon, Su Nam; Park, Bong Sang; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have generated reactive species (RS) through microsecond-pulsed plasma (MPP) in the cell culture media using a Marx generator with point-point electrodes of approximately 0.06 J discharge energy/pulse. RS generated in culture media through MPP have a selective action between growth of the H460 lung cancer cells and L132 normal lung cells. We observed that MPP-activated media (MPP-AM) induced apoptosis on H460 lung cancer cells through an oxidative DNA damage cascade. Additionally, we studied the apoptosis-related mRNA expression, DNA oxidation and polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleaved analysis from treated cancer cells. The result proves that radicals generated through MPP play a pivotal role in the activation of media that induces the selective killing effect.

  19. Effects of Mass Media and Cultural Drift in a Nonequilibrium Model for Social Influence

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, K I; Dossetti, V; Candia, Juli\\'an; Mazzitello, Karina I.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of an extension of Axelrod's nonequilibrium model for social influence, we study the interplay and competition between the cultural drift, represented as random perturbations, and mass media, introduced by means of an external homogeneous field. Unlike previous studies [J. C. Gonz\\'alez-Avella {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 72}, 065102(R) (2005)], the mass media coupling proposed here is capable of affecting the cultural traits of any individual in the society, including those who do not share any features with the external message. A noise-driven transition is found: for large noise rates, both the ordered (culturally polarized) phase and the disordered (culturally fragmented) phase are observed, while, for lower noise rates, the ordered phase prevails. In the former case, the external field is found to induce cultural ordering, a behavior opposite to that reported in previous studies using a different prescription for the mass media interaction. We compare the predictions of this model to sta...

  20. Dose verification by OSLDs in the irradiation of cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of value of irradiation dose presents difficulties when targets are irradiated located in regions where electronic equilibrium of charged particle is not reached, as in the case of irradiation -in vitro- of cell lines monolayer-cultured, in culture dishes or flasks covered with culture medium. The present study aimed to implement a methodology for dose verification in irradiation of cells in culture media by optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry (OSLD). For the determination of the absorbed dose in terms of cell proliferation OSL dosimeters of aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al2O3:C) were used, which were calibrated to the irradiation conditions of culture medium and at doses that ranged from 0.1 to 15 Gy obtained with a linear accelerator of 6 MV photons. Intercomparison measurements were performed with an ionization chamber of 6 cm3. Different geometries were evaluated by varying the thicknesses of solid water, air and cell culture medium. The results showed deviations below 2.2% when compared with the obtained doses of OSLDs and planning system used. Also deviations were observed below 3.4% by eccentric points of the irradiation plane, finding homogeneous dose distribution. Uncertainty in the readings was less than 2%. The proposed methodology contributes a contribution in the dose verification in this type of irradiations, eliminating from the calculation uncertainties, potential errors in settling irradiation or possible equipment failure with which is radiating. It also provides certainty about the survival curves to be plotted with the experimental data. (Author)

  1. The influence of micronutrients in cell culture: a reflection on viability and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Machado, Miriana; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Bergter, Lothar; Prá, Daniel; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5-10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  2. 不同培养基培养人脐血间充质干细胞的差异★%Differences of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured in different media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵霞; 路希敬; 刘国强; 徐敏; 邢健; 王椋; 丁慧芳

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cel s are the hot spot in the field of stem cel s, and there is no simple, effective culture method for the passage and amplification of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cel s. OBJECTIVE:To explore a better culture method of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cel s in vitro with different media in the separation of mesenchymal stem cel s at a confluent status. METHODS:Human umbilical cord blood was sterilely col ected from ful-term deliveries scheduled for cesarean section. They were assigned randomly into five groups:low-glucose culture medium group, high-glucose culture medium group,α-culture medium group, low-glucose culture medium+stem cel factor group, low-glucose culture medium+human marrow mesenchymal stem cel s supernatant group. Al culture medium used was Dulbecco’s modIfied Eagle’s medium. The cord blood mononuclear cel s were isolated by lymphocyte separation medium. The monocytes of cord blood were inoculated into the culture medium containing 10%fetal bovine serum at 37 ℃ incubator with 0.05 volume fraction of CO2. Quantity and formation of cel s were observed with invert microscope, and surface antigenic features were analyzed with flow cytometry. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1) Comparison on number of adherent cel s and survival rate of mesenchymal stem cel s cultured for 48 hours:Number of adherent cel s in the low-glucose culture medium+human marrow mesenchymal stem cel s supernatant group, and low-glucose culture medium+stem cel factor group were significantly increased (P<0.05), while the survival rate of cel s was also increased compared with low-glucose culture medium group, high-glucose culture medium group andα-culture medium group (P<0.05). (2) Comparison on growth status of mesenchymal stem cel s at different culture time points:Cel proliferation in the low-glucose culture medium+human marrow mesenchymal stem cel s supernatant group, and low

  3. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  4. Ultrastructure of Single Cells, Callus-like and Monosore-like Cells in Porphyra yezoensis Ueda on Semi solid Culture Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅俊学; 沈颂东; 姜明; 费修绠

    2003-01-01

    It had been demonstrated that individual cells or protoplasts isolated from Porphyra thallus by enzyme could develop into normal leafy thalli in the same way as monospores, and that isolated cells develop in different way in liquid and on semi solid media. The authors observed the ultrastructure of isolated vegetative cells cultured on semi solid media and compared them with those of monospores and isolated cells cultured in liquid media. The results showed that subcellular structures were quite different among cells in different conditions. In their development, isolated cells on semi solid media did not show the characteristic subcellular feature of monospore formation, such as production of fibrous vesicles. Callus like cells formed on semi solid media underwent a distinctive modification in cellular organization. They developed characteristic cell inclusions and a special 2 layer cell covering. Golgi bodies, ER, starch grains, mitochondria. Vacuoles were not commonly found in them.

  5. Evaluation in media texts: a cross-cultural linguistic investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, L.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative/interpretative approach to the comparative linguistic analysis of media texts is proposed and applied to a contrastive analysis of texts from the English-language China Daily and the UK Times to look for evidence of differences in what Labov calls “evaluation.” These differences are then correlated to differences in the roles played by the media in Britain and China in their respective societies. The aim is to demonstrate that, despite reservations related to the Chinese te...

  6. Book Review: Cultural Resiliency and the Rise of Indigenous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Moscato, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Valerie Alia’s book, The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication (New York: Berghahn Books, 2012, 270 pp.), points the way to major communication breakthroughs for traditional communities around the world, in turn fostering a more democratic media discourse. From Canada to Japan, and Australia to Mexico, this ambitious and wide-reaching work examines a broad international movement that at once protects ancient languages and customs but also communicates to audiences acro...

  7. Cultural Resiliency and the Rise of Indigenous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Derek Moscato

    2016-01-01

    Valerie Alia’s book, The New Media Nation: Indigenous Peoples and Global Communication (New York: Berghahn Books, 2012, 270 pp.), points the way to major communication breakthroughs for traditional communities around the world, in turn fostering a more democratic media discourse. From Canada to Japan, and Australia to Mexico, this ambitious and wide-reaching work examines a broad international movement that at once protects ancient languages and customs but also communicates to audiences acro...

  8. Supportive Effects of Conditioned Culture Media of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Hematopoiesis In Vitro%人脐带间充质干细胞条件培养基体外支持造血的功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽娜; 韩忠朝; 韩之波; 王有为; 罗伟峰; 及月茹; 杨舟鑫; 冯莉; 戚仁斌; 李扬秋

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to explore whether the conditioned culture medium of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells( hUC-MSC) has supportive effects on hematopoiesis in vitro. hUC-MSC were cultured in 75 cm2 culture flasks at a concentration of 2×106 cells per flask. After 48 h, the conditioned culture medium was harvested. CD34+ cells were isolated with the human cord blood CD34 positive selection kit. The CD34+ cells were plated in three different culture systems; the culture supernatant from hUC-MSC added into incomplete methylcellulose without recombinant human cytokines as conditioned culture medium; the complete methylcellulose medium with recombinant human cytokines as positive control medium; incomplete methycellulose adding DMEM/F12 with 10% FBS instead of conditioned culture medium as the negative control medium. After 14 days of culture, colonies containing≥ 50 cells were scored and types of colonies were classified under inverted microscope. The immunophenotypes of cells which were collected from the colonies were detected by flow cytometry. The results showed that conditioned culture medium of hUC-MSC supported the differentiation of CD34+ cells into CFU-G(47. 67 ±0. 58) ,CFU-GM(48. 67 ±4. 73)and CFU-M (3.00 ±2.00) in vitro, while the CFU-E.BFU-E or CFU-GEMM were absent. Comparatively, in the positive control medium all kinds of CFU were observed. Interestingly, the percentage of CD45 ' cells of CFU in conditioned culture medium (97. 43 ±2. 15)% was more than CD45+ cells in positive control medium (39. 69 ± 0. 96) % (P <0. 05). It is concluded that the conditioned culture medium of hUC-MSC has been confirmed to have ability to support hematopoiesis separately in vitro. Besides, it enhances the differentiation of CD34 ' cells into myeloid cells except cells of erythroid lineage.%本研究旨在探讨单纯人脐带间充质干细胞(hUC-MSC)的条件培养基对脐血CD34+细胞体外造血支持作用.分离得到的hUC-MSC以2 × 106

  9. Advantages of embryogenic cell cultures of Gramineae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immature embryos and/or explants from very young leaves and inflorescences of 13 species and over 75 cultivars of Gramineae - including wheat, maize, rye, pearl millet, sugar-cane, Napier grass, Guinea grass, etc. - were used to initiate callus cultures. The cultures are white to yellowish white in colour, compact and contain small and thin-walled meristematic cells which are richly cytoplasmic, non-vacuolated and contain prominent starch grains. These embryogenic tissue cultures provide a long-term, highly reliable and efficient means of rapid mass clonal propagation by the formation of somatic embryos that arise from single cells. The cultures consist largely of cytologically normal diploid cells. During the process of plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis, there is strong selection in favour of normal cells, so that plants recovered from such cultures neither exhibit any morphological abnormalities nor show any evidence of cytological changes in the number or structure of chromosomes. Embryogenic callus cultures have been used successfully to establish highly dispersed and friable cell-suspension cultures. These fast-growing cultures comprise groups of 2-6 embryogenic cells, which adhere together to form larger unorganized aggregates of up to about 75 cells, but do not contain any organized meristems or callus tissues. Plants were regenerated by somatic embryogenesis from embryogenic cell-suspension cultures of pearl millet, Guinea grass, sugar-cane and maize. Finally, embryogenic cell-suspension cultures are the only current source of totipotent protoplasts in Gramineae. Protoplasts isolated from such cultures have been successfully cultured to produce somatic embryos and plants in pearl millet, Guinea grass, Napier grass and sugar-cane. (author)

  10. Foundations of Socio-Cultural Ecology: Consequences for Media Education and Mobile Learning in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rummler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper offers insights to the foundations of Socio-Cultural Ecology and relates this concept to traditional concepts of Ecology e.g. media ecology or Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model of child development. It will further discuss the term «ecology» as a relation between learners and their surrounding physical and structural world, e. g. an ecology of resources or the classroom as an ecological system. Thirdly more recent concepts in ecology will be considered e. g. Digital Media Ecology including media ecology (German: Medienökologie from a German perspective. This contribution tries to describe common principles of (media ecologies and will ask after their meaning and relation to media education and mobile learning. One of the main results is the realisation that cultural practices of school learning and cultural practices of media acquisition take place in different worlds or in different ecological spheres. The question is thus again of how to bridge these ecological spheres, and how «agency» developed outside school, can be nourished inside school. In other words: how can we bridge socio-cultural and technological structures within these cultural practices.

  11. Cell Suspension Culture of Neem Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of suspension culture system for neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) cells and the suspension culture condition was studied. It shows that the neem cell suspension culture system was best in B5 liquid medium, 2.0~4.0mg/L NAA with direct spill method. Based on the integrated analysis of cell biomass, Azadirachtin content and productivity, the optimum culture conditions were B5 liquid medium, 2.0-4.0 mg/L NAA, 3% sucrose at 25 ℃. The optimum rotating speed of the shaker and broth content d...

  12. Expression of CD44 in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongguo Li; Hong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To determine whether cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44 and to discuss their possible relationship with primary open angle glaucoma.Methods:Human trabecular meshwork cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 media. Total RNAs from the cells were extracted with Trizol reagent. Messenger RNA expression of CD44 in human trabecular meshwork cells was examined by using reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) analysis. Expression of CD44 was confirmed by Western-blotting and immunofiuorescent microscopy. Effect of CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was determined by MTT assay.Results:A single RT-PCR product whose size was 471bp was obtained.A band about 80kD was stained by Western-blot. Immunofiuorescent examination of expression of CD44 on the cell surface was positive and reactions were mainly localized in cell membranes.Adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was inhibited by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide.Conclusions: Cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44. CD44 may play a role in pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma. Eye Science 2004;20:52-56.

  13. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference...

  14. Systematic optimization of human pluripotent stem cells media using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Paulo A.; Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Muotri, Alysson R.

    2015-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) are used to study the early stages of human development in vitro and, increasingly due to somatic cell reprogramming, cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease. Cell culture medium is a critical factor for hPSC to maintain pluripotency and self-renewal. Numerous defined culture media have been empirically developed but never systematically optimized for culturing hPSC. We applied design of experiments (DOE), a powerful statistical tool, to improve the medium formulation for hPSC. Using pluripotency and cell growth as read-outs, we determined the optimal concentration of both basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and neuregulin-1 beta 1 (NRG1β1). The resulting formulation, named iDEAL, improved the maintenance and passage of hPSC in both normal and stressful conditions, and affected trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) epigenetic status after genetic reprogramming. It also enhances efficient hPSC plating as single cells. Altogether, iDEAL potentially allows scalable and controllable hPSC culture routine in translational research. Our DOE strategy could also be applied to hPSC differentiation protocols, which often require numerous and complex cell culture media.

  15. Mediação cultural, informação e ensino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Crippa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho examina algumas das implicações teóricas e práticas do conceito de mediação cultural e da informação. A partir da descrição e da análise de um evento realizado em 2007 - uma exposição artística, cultural e científica -, são observados potencialidades e desafios das atividades de mediação cultural, com ênfase em seus aspectos formativos e educacionais.

  16. Studying cell-cell communication in co-culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R.; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotypic and homotypic cellular interactions are essential for biological function, and co-culture models are versatile tools for investigating these cellular interactions in vitro. Physiologically relevant co-culture models have been used to elucidate the effects of cell-cell physical contact and/or secreted factors, as well as the influence of substrate geometry and interaction scale on cell response. Identifying the relative contribution of each cell population to co-culture is often ex...

  17. Film production, social media marketing and participatory culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waade, Anne Marit

    The Danish youth film ‘Lev Stærkt’ (Live strong) is recently shot in Aarhus, and as part of the release and marketing plan, the producers incorporate social media showing behind the scenes video clip as a way to include and engage the film’s target groups a year before the planned release. Using...... Facebook and the mobile, photo-based app Instagram as the main platforms, the producers of the movie are following the users and followers online closely to understand but also stage and direct their expectations in the relation to the movie. As such, the marketing of the movie is representing a new...... branding and marketing, and there is a boom of new handbook literature describing “Everything You Need to Know to Get Social Media Working in Your Business” (Wollan & Nick Zhou, 2010). Social media makes it easy to engage the consumers as strategic communicators, it is cheap and fast compared to print...

  18. Digital Borderlands : Identity and Interactivity in Culture, Media and Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Fornäs, Johan

    1998-01-01

    Culture and communication are closely connected. Culture is constituted by meaning-making practices, i.e. by symbolic com­mu­ni­ca­tion. Com­munication is the sharing and transmission of meanings between people, i.e. the process that con­stitutes culture. Culture as communication has double effects: it gathers people around a set of shared meanings, i.e. creates identity, but it simul­tane­ous­ly also connects selves to others, i.e. constructs difference. Original publication: Johan Fornä...

  19. Transnational Media Consumption and Cultural Negotiations: Taiwanese Youth Look at Japanese and South Korean Television Dramas

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Hsiu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    The viewing of Japanese and South Korean TV dramas in Taiwan represents an opportunity to explore foreign media popularity as a cultural phenomenon. In addition, we can also examine the relationship between youth audiences and their construction of a sense of collective social identity in relation to their cultural ‘others’. This thesis examines how Japanese and South Korean TV dramas are incorporated into the lives and cultural practices of young people in Taiwan by looking at the varying de...

  20. Mass Media Consumption in a Bilingual Culture: Implications of the Literature for Further Research in the Canadian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Deirdre

    Previous studies of mass media consumption behavior within cultural boundaries have yielded important information regarding the selection of communication channels to obtain information by members of specific cultures. However, the selection of mass media information sources in a cross-cultural setting has received little attention in the…

  1. Political economy of the Kenyan media - towards a culture of active citizen journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Ogenga

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper utilises Hall’s (1977 ‘encoding-decoding’ theory in the context of critical political economy theories of the media and cultural studies to explain the political, economic and cultural factors that influence media operation and content both at a macro and micro level. While political economy provides the setting in which the Kenyan media operates, cultural studies show how media content is not only shaped by the political and economic environments comprising those in power positions. Audiences are also actively engaged in the process of meaning construction. Considering Hall’s (1977 encoding-decoding theory, the audiences can reject, negotiate or accept media content based on their own value systems and cultural orientation. Meaning, therefore, becomes a product of continual struggle between different discourses and power cannot be located in a top down manner as to who influences meaning as seen in a propaganda model. This is due to the fact that texts are diffused in different locations in society. The 2008 Kenya Communication Bill is utilised as an example to trace briefly the political and historical developments of policy issues that have influenced the Kenyan media. The Bill, furthermore, indicates how a weak socio-economic, political and cultural environment is marred by ineffectual policies meant to safeguard and guarantee the freedom of the press as an extension of individual freedom of expression as enshrined in the Kenyan constitution. This weak policy context has ensured the Kenyan media remains subject to easy political manipulation and control. However, the paper concludes by showing how citizen journalism is growing out of a regulated mainstream media through internet technology.

  2. Cultural text mining: using text mining to map the emergence of transnational reference cultures in public media repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Toine; Verheul, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the research project Translantis, which uses innovative technologies for cultural text mining to analyze large repositories of digitized public media, such as newspapers and journals.1 The Translantis research team uses and develops the text mining tool Texcavator, which is base

  3. Digital and Media Literacy: Connecting Culture and Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Renee

    2011-01-01

    Today's students tweet, text, and navigate apps up to 12 hours each day, but they may not know how to effectively analyze a TV show or website. Award-winning author Renee Hobbs demonstrates how to incorporate media literacy into the secondary classroom, providing the tools teachers need to: (1) Effectively foster students' critical thinking,…

  4. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Media and Supplements on Initiation and Expansion of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Simone; Nielsen, Frederik Mølgaard; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine

    2016-03-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are being tested in clinical trials related to cell-based regenerative therapies. Although most of the current expansion protocols for ASCs use fetal calf serum (FCS), xenogeneic-free medium supplements are greatly desired. This study aims to compare the effect of FCS, human platelet lysate (hPL), and a fully defined medium on the initiation and maintenance of ASC cultures. ASCs obtained from five donors were cultured in five different media: StemPro, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10% hPL, or α-minimum essential medium (A-MEM) supplemented with 5% hPL, 10% hPL, or 10% FCS. The effect of media on proliferation, colony-forming units (CFUs), attachment, and morphology was assessed along with cell size, granularity, and immunophenotype. StemPro greatly compromised the initiation of ASC cultures, which could not survive more than a few passages. Cells cultured in A-MEM proliferated at a faster rate than in DMEM, and hPL significantly enhanced cell size, granularity, and proliferation compared with FCS. All media except StemPro supported CFUs equally well. Analysis of surface markers revealed higher levels of CD73 and CD105 in FCS-cultured ASCs, whereas increased levels of CD146 were found in hPL-cultured cells. Multiparametric flow cytometric analysis performed after seven passages revealed the existence of four distinct ASC subpopulations, all positive for CD73, CD90, and CD105, which mainly differed by their expression of CD146 and CD271. Analysis of the different subpopulations might represent an important biological measure when assessing different medium formulations for a particular clinical application. PMID:26838270

  6. Identification of a population of cells with hematopoietic stem cell properties in mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a primary source of definitive hematopoietic cells in the midgestation mouse embryo. In cultures of dispersed AGM regions, adherent cells containing endothelial cells are observed first, and then non-adherent hematopoietic cells are produced. Here we report on the characterization of hematopoietic cells that emerge in the AGM culture. Based on the expression profiles of CD45 and c-Kit, we defined three cell populations: CD45low c-Kit+ cells that had the ability to form hematopoietic cell colonies in methylcellulose media and in co-cultures with stromal cells; CD45low c-Kit- cells that showed a granulocyte morphology; CD45high c-Kitlow/- that exhibited a macrophage morphology. In co-cultures of OP9 stromal cells and freshly prepared AGM cultures, CD45low c-Kit+ cells from the AGM culture had the abilities to reproduce CD45low c-Kit+ cells and differentiate into CD45low c-Kit- and CD45high c-Kitlow/- cells, whereas CD45low c-Kit- and CD45high c-Kitlow/- did not produce CD45low c-Kit+ cells. Furthermore, CD45low c-Kit+ cells displayed a long-term repopulating activity in adult hematopoietic tissue when transplanted into the liver of irradiated newborn mice. These results indicate that CD45low c-Kit+ cells from the AGM culture have the potential to reconstitute multi-lineage hematopoietic cells

  7. Biosynthesis and biotransformation of lipids in plant cell cultures and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosynthesis and metabolism of lipids in plant cell cultures grown photoautotrophically, has been studied since 1970. The most prominently occuring lipids in cell cultures and whole plants are phospholipids, glycolipids, triglycerides and glycosides. Radioactively labelled lipids have been produced from soybean cell cultures incubated with 14C-linoleic acid, and the fate of the phospholipid formed was investigated. Freshwater and marine algae cultured under different conditions of light, temperature and nutrient media have also been investigated for their lipid and fatty acid content. The exploitation of biotechnological processes for producing valuable lipids is encouraged. (U.K.)

  8. IN VITRO CULTURE OF Sequoia sempervirens L. ON NUTRITIVE MEDIA STERILIZED WITH SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Martins Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The autoclaving used for sterilization of glassware, culture media and surgical materials in laboratory is a costly operation, due to the high cost of the equipment and the equally high consumption of energy. For these reasons, the substitution of this sterilization technique for another less costly one, such as chemical sterilization, would be highly desirable. The present study aimed to compare the techniques of sterilization of plant tissue culture media with sodium hypochlorite and that of autoclaving, in Sequoia sempervirens culture, in order to develop a less costly technique in the sterilization of glassware and nutrient media for plant tissue culture. In the trial with Sequoia sempervirens, the concentrations of sodium hypochlorite added to the culture media were (w/v: 0% (autoclaved; B 0.002%; C 0.003%; D 0.004% and E 0% (without autoclaving. It was observed that the concentrations equal to or higher than 0.003% of total chlorine added to the nutrient media resulted in complete sterilization, as well as in plants with larger numbers and shoots lengths.

  9. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  10. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  11. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  12. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  13. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect

  14. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation, gene expression and protein production in human platelet-rich plasma-supplemented media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Romina Amable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is increasingly used as a cell culture supplement, in order to reduce the contact of human cells with animal-derived products during in vitro expansion. The effect of supplementation changes on cell growth and protein production is not fully characterized. METHODS: Human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue and Wharton's Jelly were isolated and cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Proliferation, in vitro differentiation, expression of cell surface markers, mRNA expression of key genes and protein secretion were quantified. RESULTS: 10% PRP sustained five to tenfold increased cell proliferation as compared to 10% fetal bovine serum. Regarding cell differentiation, PRP reduced adipogenic differentiation and increased calcium deposits in bone marrow and adipose tissue-mesenchymal stromal cells. Wharton's Jelly derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of chemokines and growth factors than other mesenchymal stromal cells when cultured in PRP-supplemented media. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells secreted higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic proteins. Mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue secreted higher amounts of extracellular matrix components. CONCLUSIONS: Mesenchymal stromal cells purified from different tissues have distinct properties regarding differentiation, angiogenic, inflammatory and matrix remodeling potential when cultured in PRP supplemented media. These abilities should be further characterized in order to choose the best protocols for their therapeutic use.

  16. Cultural Mythology Analysisof Media texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article presents the cultural mythology analysis of media texts: identification and analysis of mythologizing (including in the framework of the so-called folk sources - fairy tales, urban legends, etc. plot, those types of characters, etc. in media texts. In particular, the audience (for example, students offered by critical analysis to answer the question why so many entertainment media texts so popular with a mass audience? The author thinks that the media texts relating to the mass / popular culture, have success with the audience is not due to the fact that they supposedly only target people with low aesthetic taste, subject to psychological pressure, easy to believing the lie, etc., but because their authors respect and learning needs of the audience, including - information, compensatory, hedonistic, recreational, moral, aesthetic, etc.

  17. Representation and Dissemination of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Bangladesh through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Chowdhury, MD Saiful Alam

    2016-01-01

    of strategically representing and diffusing ICH through social media, this research explores the current roles of social media in the transmission of ICH in the virtual world. The research question is: How are Baul song and Jamdani weaving as intangible cultural heritage of Bangladesh represented and disseminated......Bangladesh is one of the next eleven countries and home to more than 160 million people. The country is experiencing an exponential growth of social media users due to the increase in affordability of smartphones, literacy rate, education level, and adoption of Internet services and applications....... Bangladesh, with its digital agenda, has a favorable environment for the transformation and development of digital media and culture. There exists unexplored, assumably underutilized, and potential roles of Internet-mediated communication about the two nominated ICH of Bangladesh. Towards the goal...

  18. Detonation nanodiamonds for rapid detection of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in broth culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Po-Chi; Kung, Ching-Jen; Horng, Yu-Tze; Chang, Kai-Chih; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2012-09-18

    Routinely used molecular diagnostic methods for mycobacterium identification are expensive and time-consuming. To tackle this problem, we develop a method to streamline identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in broth culture media by using detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) as a platform to effectively capture the antigen secreted by MTBC which is cultured in BACTEC MGIT 960, followed by the analysis of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The 5 nm DNDs can capture the MTBC secretory antigen without albumin interference. With on diamond digestion, we confirm the DND captured antigen is cell filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) because its Mascot analysis shows a score of 68. The dot blotting method further verifies a positive reaction with anti-CFP-10, indicating that CFP-10 is secreted in the medium of mycobacterium growth indicator tube (MGIT) and captured by DNDs. The minimal CFP-10 protein detection limit was 0.09 μg/mL. Furthermore, our approach can avoid the false-positive identification of MTBC by immunological methods due to cross-reactivity. Five hundred consecutive clinical specimens subjected to routine mycobacteria identification in hospital were used in this study, and the sensitivity of our method is 100% and the specificity is 98%. The analysis of each MTBC sample from culture solution can be finished within 1 h and thus shortens the turnaround time of MTBC identification of gold standard culture methods. In sum, DND MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of MTBC is rapid, specific, safe, reliable, and inexpensive. PMID:22905748

  19. Media and Popular Culture and Controversies in Comatose Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Docu-Axelrad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Comatose patients may have irrevocably lost all brain function. This condition has been distinguished from other comatose states by the term brain death. Its assessment has been known as the determination of death by neurologic criteria. The clinical diagnosis of brain death implies that the person has died. When the clinical criteria of brain death are met, it allows organ donation or withdrawal of futile support. Without being unnecessarily hostile to the press, one can argue that the representation of comatose states in the media is concerning. Families confronted with this often unexpected loss of life understand this strictly defined neurological condition well. Unfortunately, the legal cases are surrounded by misinformation and reluctance to understand the implications of these comatose states. Nevertheless, many legal cases are settled in court without much attention. Exposure to the media may solicit physician opinions, and these cases may easily become a spectacle. Bioethical issues do surface under these circumstances.

  20. Playful Identities: The Ludification of Digital Media Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this edited volume, eighteen scholars examine the increasing role of digital media technologies in identity construction through play. Going beyond computer games, this interdisciplinary collection argues that present-day play and games are not only appropriate metaphors for capturing postmodern human identities, but are in fact the means by which people create their identity. From discussions of World of Warcraft and Foursquare to digital cartographies, the combined essays form a groundbr...

  1. Chemistry in the Popular Culture: Mass Media, Music and Outreach Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jergović, B.

    2011-01-01

    Science is often identified with the discipline of chemistry particularly in the popular sphere and in visual culture. The image of science or its profile is created mainly in the mass media, but also in other spheres and in many different ways. Mass media are in the focus of many research groups, as the most frequent and efficient source of scientific information to the public. Science communication research is rather intense also in the attempt to understand the non-linear interaction with ...

  2. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long......-term cultures. Support protocols describe methods for maintenance of vector-producing fibroblasts (VPF) and supernatant collection from these cells, screening medium components for the ability to support hematopoietic cell growth, and establishing colonies from long-term cultures. Other protocols provide PCR...

  3. Methods for Maintaining Insect Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Dwight E. Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes methods that are effective for maintaining various insect cell lines. The procedures are differentiated between loosely or non-attached cell strains, attached cell strains, and strongly adherent cell strains.

  4. A mediação cultural como categoria autônoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmir Perrotti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Reflexão sobre a noção de mediação cultural,  como categoria teórica e operacional autônoma, definida em articulação permanente com as  da produção e da recepção culturais, considerados processos dinâmicos e complexos que regem a ecologia simbólica.Objetivo: definir a mediação cultural como instância essencial dos processos de produção de sentidoMetodologia: estudo dos elementos constitutivos de uma experiência cultural autobiográfica,  relatada por Clarice Lispector no conto Felicidade Clandestina.Resultados: a mediação cultural não é simples recurso de transferência de dados/informações, mero “canal” ou instância de apoio visando a criação de elos entre sujeitos.Conclusão: A mediação cultural  é ato autônomo, com identidade e lógicas próprias, definidas em relação com as esferas da produção e da recepção de informação e cultura. Tal abordagem, assumindo modelo triádico (mediação-produção-recepção, rompe com compreensões dualistas e mecânicas dos campos da Informação e da Comunicação, mostrando-se heurística, posto que se compatível com a centralidade dos dispostivos de mediação cultural na atualidade.

  5. Quantifying the Economic and Cultural Biases of Social Media through Trending Topics

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Miguel Carrascosa; Ruben Cuevas; Roberto Gonzalez; Arturo Azcorra; David Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Online social media has recently irrupted as the last major venue for the propagation of news and cultural content, competing with traditional mass media and allowing citizens to access new sources of information. In this paper, we study collectively filtered news and popular content in Twitter, known as Trending Topics (TTs), to quantify the extent to which they show similar biases known for mass media. We use two datasets collected in 2013 and 2014, including more than 300.000 TTs from 62 c...

  6. "The Role ofL-arginine in Control of Apoptosis in Preimplantation Mouse Embryos Cultured in High Glucose Media "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Barbarestani

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal hyperglycemia causes delay in early stages of embryonic growth and development, higher incidence of congenital malformations and spontaneous miscarriage compared with those of non-diabetic conditions. High glucosis tratogenicity seems to be related to reduction of Nitric Oxide production (NO in hyperglycemic condition. In order to test this hypothesis, 2-cell stage embryos of normal mice were cultured with high concentration of glucose (30mM and different concentrations of L-arginine (5,10,20 mM or L-NAME, an NO syntase (NOS inhibitor. In the end of culture, blastocysts were stained by by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL technique and apoptotic cells were detected by using a Fluorescence microscope. Finally the amount of nitrite in the cultured media was assayed by Griess method. The results indicated that high glucose reduces Nitric Oxide production by preimplantation embryos and increases apoptosis of embryonic cells, but 5-20mM of L-arginine significantly increases Nitric Oxide production and decreases apoptosis. On the contrary L-NAME significantly inhibits the development of pre-implantation embryos. In conclusion, this study indicated that reduced nitric oxide production in high glucosis condition is a main factor for embryonic damage, and supplementation of high glucose media with L-arginine has an important role in prevention of high glucosis embryotoxicity

  7. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa;

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......-induced areas. The presence of dopamine in the conditioned culture medium was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, not all striatal slice cultures induced TH-expression in underlying hNS1 cells. Common to TH-inductive cultures was, however, the presence of degenerating, necrotic areas, suggesting that...... factors released during striatal degeneration were responsible for the dopaminergic induction of the hNS1 cells. Ongoing experiments aim to identify such factors by comparing protein profiles of media conditioned by degenerating (necrotic) versus healthy striatal slice cultures....

  8. Combined effect of induced mutations and media for improving genetic architecture of brassica through anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and media effect on the anther culture response of two brassica napus varieties (i.e. Pak cheen and Salam) were studied. It was observed that low doses of gamma radiation (100-250 rads) enhanced the anther callusing response of the varieties on both of the cultured media. Different genotypic response was observed in case of plant regeneration. In variety Salam Plant lets were regenerated from the calli treated up to the dose of 750 rads. However, in case of variety Pak-cheen the calli could not be differentiated beyond 100 rads. (author)

  9. Legitimacy as a Process in Political Violence, Mass Media and Peace Culture Building

    OpenAIRE

    Idaly Barreto; Henry Borja; Yeny Serrano; Wilson López-López

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the beliefs and social legitimacy as important elements in the emergence, maintenance and evolution of political violence and the role of the media and building cultures of peace. In this dynamic of armed conflict and peace, the discourses are constructed by social groups such as the structural changes that society needs to develop a culture of peace, so that the media play an important role, and functioning as a of the main tools that the armed (or out of state law) use...

  10. Teaching and Learning about Writing in the Digital Media Culture: A Subjective Academic Narrative

    OpenAIRE

    Josie Arnold

    2012-01-01

    What might we teach about/as writing in the digital media culture? In this paper, I survey some ideas of teaching and learning writing in the contemporary digital media culture. I look at how the creative possibilities presented by electronic deliveries are evident to students in their everyday lives, but have yet to be fully utilised in teaching and learning about writing. In utilising a conceptual framework following Gregory Ulmer’s ‘mystory’ (a scholarly story involving the personal, the s...

  11. Role of media in the project of cultural imperialism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivica Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Military power, combined with the economic potential and scientific and technological superiority, aims globalization on a larger scale. Confirmation of dominance and its maintenance are realized through an ideological project by imposing a model of social organization which provides the control over the positions of hegemons. The ideology matrix of neoliberal capitalism is used through globalism to maintain such positions. The conversion of cultural patterns of local communities is rightly explained as westernization of the rest of the world done by the Euro-Atlantic countries. Global multimedia networks enforce the western value system and lifestyle which leads to degradation of local cultural patterns. As a result, the collective identity of members of local communities is endangered and cultural patterns created over centuries are being destroyed and replaced by an inadequate social structure which cannot satisfy the needs of the local population.

  12. CULTURE AND SOCIAL MEDIA USAGE: ANALYSIS OF JAPANESE TWITTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Acar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Twitter, one of the most popular microblogging tools, has been used extensively all around the world. However, up to date, no study has addressed how culture influences the use of this communication platform. In order to close the literature gap and promote cross-cultural understandings, this paper content analyzed 4,000 tweets from 200 college students in Japan and the USA. The results showed that Japanese college students post more self-related messages and ask fewer questions compared to American college students. It was also found that tweets that refer to TV are more common in Japan, whereas sports and news tweets stand out in the USA. The evidence from this study suggests that there is a subtle and complicated relationship between culture and Twitter use.

  13. Comparison of fumerate-pyruvate media and beef extract media for aerobically culturing Campylobacter species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Media supplemented with fumarate, pyruvate, and a vitamin-mineral solution or with beef extract were compared for the ability to support aerobic growth of Campylobacter. Basal broth composed of tryptose, yeast extract, bicarbonate, and agar was supplemented with 30 mM fumarate, 100 mM pyruvate, and ...

  14. Culture, Constructivism, and Media: Designing a Module on Carlos Slim

    OpenAIRE

    Agudo, Roberto Rey

    2012-01-01

    Mexican tycoon Carlos Slim Helú has been a fixture on Forbes’s list of billionaires since 1991, and for the past three years, he has topped the magazine’s list of the world’s richest men. Although he is exceptionally well-known in his native Mexico, the majority of American college students have never heard of Carlos Slim. This article presents a curricular module built around this charismatic and controversial figure. The module requires students to navigate Internet-supported news media in ...

  15. Visual Media and Culture of ‘Occupy’

    OpenAIRE

    Odih, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    On 15th October 2011, hundreds of anti-capitalist protestors assembled into a spectacular carnivalesque procession towards Paternoster Square; the heartland of London’s banking district. Beginning with Althusser’s concept of ‘interpellation’, this book examines Occupy LSX St Paul’s Cathedral in relation to media spectacle. Initially focusing on arrival narratives, it asks the question: were the 15th October 2011 anti-capitalist protestors ‘hailed’ into becoming the subjects of Occupy LSX St P...

  16. Effects of Mass Media and Cultural Drift in a Model for Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián; Dossetti, Víctor

    In the context of an extension of Axelrod's model for social influence, we study the interplay and competition between the cultural drift, represented as random perturbations, and mass media, introduced by means of an external homogeneous field. Unlike previous studies [J. C. González-Avella et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 065102(R) (2005)], the mass media coupling proposed here is capable of affecting the cultural traits of any individual in the society, including those who do not share any features with the external message. A noise-driven transition is found: for large noise rates, both the ordered (culturally polarized) phase and the disordered (culturally fragmented) phase are observed, while, for lower noise rates, the ordered phase prevails. In the former case, the external field is found to induce cultural ordering, a behavior opposite to that reported in previous studies using a different prescription for the mass media interaction. We compare the predictions of this model to statistical data measuring the impact of a mass media vasectomy promotion campaign in Brazil.

  17. Development and application of a high-throughput platform for perfusion-based cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger-Oberbek, Agata; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Weichang; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-10-20

    A high-throughput (HT) cell culture model has been established for the support of perfusion-based cell culture processes operating at high cell densities. To mimic perfusion, the developed platform takes advantage of shake tubes and operates them in a batch-refeed mode with daily medium exchange to supply the cultures with nutrients and remove toxic byproducts. By adjusting the shaking parameters, such as the speed and setting angle, we have adapted the shake tubes to a semi-continuous production of a recombinant enzyme in a perfusion-like mode. We have demonstrated that the developed model can be used to select clones and cell culture media ahead of process optimization studies in bioreactors and confirmed the applicability of shake tubes to a perfusion-like cell culture reaching ∼50E6 viable cells/mL. Furthermore, through regular cell mass removal and periodic medium exchange we have successfully maintained satellite cultures of bench-top perfusion bioreactors, achieving a sustainable cell culture performance at ≥30E6 viable cells/mL and viabilities >80% for over 58 days. The established HT model is a unique and powerful tool that can be used for the development and screening of media formulations, or for testing selected process parameters during both process optimization and manufacturing support campaigns. PMID:26197419

  18. Mediação cultural, informação e ensino

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia Crippa; Marco Antonio de Almeida

    2011-01-01

    O trabalho examina algumas das implicações teóricas e práticas do conceito de mediação cultural e da informação. A partir da descrição e da análise de um evento realizado em 2007 - uma exposição artística, cultural e científica -, são observados potencialidades e desafios das atividades de mediação cultural, com ênfase em seus aspectos formativos e educacionais. The work examines some of the theoretical and practical implications of the concept of cultural and information mediation. From t...

  19. Efficient, Validated Method for Detection of Mycobacterial Growth in Liquid Culture Media by Use of Bead Beating, Magnetic-Particle-Based Nucleic Acid Isolation, and Quantitative PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Plain, Karren M.; Waldron, Anna M.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria are difficult to culture, requiring specialized media and a long incubation time, and have complex and exceedingly robust cell walls. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic wasting disease of ruminants, is a typical example. Culture of MAP from the feces and intestinal tissues is a commonly used test for confirmation of infection. Liquid medium offers greater sensitivity than solid medium for detection of MA...

  20. Chickpea protein hydrolysate as a substitute for serum in cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Pedroche, Justo; Alaiz, Manuel; Yust, María M.; Megías, Cristina; Millán, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The growth of mammalian cells in vitro requires the use of rich culture media that are prepared by combining serum with specific nutrient formulations. Serum, the most expensive component of culture media, provides a complex mixture of growth factors and nutrients. Protein hydrolysates that can support in vitro cell growth and eliminate or reduce the need to use serum have been obtained from different sources. Here we describe the use of two food grade proteases to produce a chickpea protein ...

  1. Rapid organism identification from Bactec NR blood culture media in a diagnostic microbiology laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Claxton, P M; Masterton, R G

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate rapid organism identification on positive blood culture Bactec NR media (phial types 26, 27, 42 and 17), and to assess the usefulness of these procedures in a diagnostic microbiology laboratory. METHODS--Two hundred and sixty, first positive, blood culture bottles from individual patients were tested by rapid identification methods selected on the basis of Gram film organism morphology. Tube coagulase and latex agglutination were applied to presumptive staphylococci; latex a...

  2. Media and Cultural Influences in African-American Girls' Eating Disorder Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Lakaii A.; Cook-Cottone, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate media and cultural influences in eating disorder development in African-American adolescent females. Method. Fifty-seven participants were recruited through churches and community organizations to complete a questionnaire. Results. Mainstream sociocultural identification was associated with more eating disorder behavior in African-American females; cultural ethnic identification was not significantly associated with eating disorder behavior in African-American female...

  3. Do Media News Frames Reflect a Nation’s Political Culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Floss, Daniela; Marcinkowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the question of macro-determinants of news frames and builds on the current discussion of institutional news media. The role of political culture is in the focus of the paper and it investigates the extent to which a distinct political culture is reflected in the framing of political news in consensus (Switzerland) and competitive (Germany) democracies. The empirical results support the assumption that news frames reflect a nation’s political values. Consequently, the pa...

  4. Mass media tests: socio-cultural aspect (based on advertising texts)

    OpenAIRE

    MOSHCHEVA SVETLANA

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to the social and cultural aspects of mass media texts. The ways and the principles of this research are defined. The study concludes that the social nature of advertising communication enables it to reflect all the nuances of life of society and to form an expedient paradigm of human relations in the context of various social and cultural phenomena of reality.

  5. Participation of mast cells in chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajor, Anna; Danilewicz, Marian; Jankowski, Andrzej; Durko, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media (COM), much attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms of local inflammatory reactions in which mast cells (MCs) may be involved due to their role not only in allergic but also inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the density of mast cells in chronic otitis media in relationship to different clinical courses of COM, bacterial infections and types of disease. The MCs expression was measured immunohistochemically in paraffin-embedded granulation tissue specimens taken during surgery, by staining with a monoclonal antibody against tryptase. The density of tryptase-positive mast cells was lower in tissue samples from the group with a good clinical course than in those from the group with poor healing and recurrence (p = 0.006). There were no differences between the groups of patients with granulomatous and cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (p = 0.66) or between the groups of patients with and without bacterial infection (p = 0.30), although the density of mast cells was lower for those with Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Proteus sp./ /Staphylococcus MRSA infection. In conclusion, the expression of mast cells in chronic otitis media granulation tissue was found to differ depending on the clinical course of the disease, but not on bacterial infection or type of COM. This may suggest that mast cells contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory process, but not to antibacterial defense in chronic otitis media. PMID:22038229

  6. Software startuppers took the medias paycheck Medias fightback happens through startup culture and abstraction shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Alapekkala, Outi; Risku, Juhani

    2016-01-01

    The collapse of old print media and journalism happened when the Internet, its solutions, services and communities became mature and mobile devices reached the market. The reader abandoned printed dailies for free and mobile access to information. The business of core industries of the early Internet and mobile communication, the mobile network manufacturers and operators are also in stagnation and decline. Therefore these industries may have similar interests to improve or even restructure t...

  7. Amino acid consumption in naïve and recombinant CHO cell cultures: producers of a monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo-Cocom, L. M.; Genel-Rey, T.; Araíz-Hernández, D.; López-Pacheco, F.; López-Meza, J.; Rocha-Pizaña, M. R.; Ramírez-Medrano, A.; Alvarez, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial media for mammalian cell culture are designed to satisfy the amino acid requirements for cell growth, but not necessarily those for recombinant protein production. In this study, we analyze the amino acid consumption pattern in naïve and recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures. The recombinant model we chose was a CHO-S cell line engineered to produce a monoclonal antibody. We report the cell concentration, product concentration, and amino acid concentration prof...

  8. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work. PMID:26572520

  9. Cryopreservation of Endothelial Cells in Various Cryoprotective Agents and Media – Vitrification versus Slow Freezing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bomhard, Achim; Elsässer, Alexander; Ritschl, Lucas Maximilian; Schwarz, Silke; Rotter, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Vitrification of endothelial cells (MHECT-5) has not previously been compared with controlled slow freezing methods under standardized conditions. To identify the best cryopreservation technique, we evaluated vitrification and standardized controlled-rate -1°C/minute cell freezing in a -80°C freezer and tested four cryoprotective agents (CPA), namely dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), and glycerol (GLY), and two media, namely Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium Ham’s F-12 (DMEM)and K+-modified TiProtec (K+TiP), which is a high-potassium-containing medium. Numbers of viable cells in proliferation were evaluated by the CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (Promega Corporation, Mannheim, Germany). To detect the exact frozen cell number per cryo vial, DNA content was measured by using Hoechst 33258 dye prior to analysis. Thus, results could be evaluated unconstrained by absolute cell number. Thawed cells were cultured in 25 cm2 cell culture flasks to confluence and examined daily by phase contrast imaging. With regard to cell recovery immediately after thawing, DMSO was the most suitable CPA combined with K+TiP in vitrification (99 ±0.5%) and with DMEM in slow freezing (92 ±1.6%). The most viable cells in proliferation after three days of culture were obtained in cells vitrificated by using GLY with K+TiP (308 ±34%) and PG with DMEM in slow freezing (280 ±27%). PMID:26890410

  10. Generation of parthenogenetic goat blastocysts: effects of different activation methods and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hruda Nanda; Singhal, Dinesh Kumar; Saugandhika, Shrabani; Dubey, Amit; Mukherjee, Ayan; Singhal, Raxita; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Das, Bikash Chandra; Bag, Sadhan; Bhanja, Subrata Kumar; Malakar, Dhruba

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of different activation methods and culture media on the in vitro development of parthenogenetic goat blastocysts. Calcium (Ca2+) ionophore, ethanol or a combination of the two, used as activating reagents, and embryo development medium (EDM), modified Charles Rosenkrans (mCR2a) medium and research vitro cleave (RVCL) medium were used to evaluate the developmental competence of goat blastocysts. Quantitative expression of apoptosis, stress and developmental competence-related genes were analysed in different stages of embryos. In RVCL medium, the cleavage rate of Ca2+ ionophore-treated oocytes (79.61 ± 0.86) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than in ethanol (74.90 ± 1.51) or in the combination of both Ca2+ ionophore and ethanol. In mCR2a or EDM, hatched blastocyst production rate of Ca2+ ionophore-treated oocytes (8.33 ± 1.44) was significantly higher than in ethanol (6.46 ± 0.11) or in the combined treatment (6.70 ± 0.24). In ethanol, the cleavage, blastocyst and hatched blastocyst production rates in RVCL medium (74.90 ± 1.51, 18.30 ± 1.52 and 8.24 ± 0.15, respectively) were significantly higher than in EDM (67.81 ± 3.21, 14.59 ± 0.27 and 5.59 ± 0.42) or mCR2a medium (65.09 ± 1.57, 15.36 ± 0.52 and 6.46 ± 0.11). The expression of BAX, Oct-4 and GlUT1 transcripts increased gradually from 2-cell stage to blastocyst-stage embryos, whereas the transcript levels of Bcl-2 and MnSOD were significantly lower in blastocysts. In addition, different activation methods and culture media had little effect on the pattern of variation and relative abundance of the above genes in different stages of parthenogenetic activated goat embryos. In conclusion, Ca2+ ionophore as the activating agent, and RVCL as the culture medium are better than other tested options for development of parthenogenetic activated goat blastocysts. PMID:24405529

  11. Cultural Reductionism and the Media: Polarising Discourses around Schools, Violence and Masculinity in an Age of Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin; Keddie, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a media analysis of three interrelated sets of newspaper articles dealing with youth, schooling and violence. Understanding the media as a dominant and powerful cultural text that creates the realities it describes, the paper takes a critical view of the 'standpoint' of recent media representations of the Cronulla (Sydney,…

  12. Production of bacterial cellulose using different carbon sources and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkazemi, Faranak; Azin, Mehrdad; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the effects of carbon sources and culture media on the production and structural properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) have been studied. BC nanofibers were synthesized using Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain PTCC 1734. Media used were Hestrin-Schramm (H), Yamanaka (Y), and Zhou (Z). Five different carbon sources, namely date syrup, glucose, mannitol, sucrose, and food-grade sucrose were used in these media. All the produced BC pellicles were characterized in terms of dry weight production, biomass yield, thermal stability, crystallinity and morphology by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The obtained results showed that mannitol lead to the highest yield, followed by sucrose. The highest production efficiency of mannitol might be due to the nitrogen source, which plays an important role. The maximum improvement on the thermal stability of the composites was achieved when mannitol was used in H medium. In addition, the crystallinity was higher in BC formed in H medium compared to other media. FE-SEM micrographs illustrated that the BC pellicles, synthesized in the culture media H and Z, were stable, unlike those in medium Y that were unstable. The micrographs of BC produced in media containing mannitol and sucrose provided evidence of the strong interfacial adhesion between the BC fibers without noticeable aggregates. PMID:25498666

  13. Cell Monitoring and Manipulation Systems (CMMSs based on Glass Cell-Culture Chips (GC3s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian M. Buehler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed different types of glass cell-culture chips (GC3s for culturing cells for microscopic observation in open media-containing troughs or in microfluidic structures. Platinum sensor and manipulation structures were used to monitor physiological parameters and to allocate and permeabilize cells. Electro-thermal micro pumps distributed chemical compounds in the microfluidic systems. The integrated temperature sensors showed a linear, Pt1000-like behavior. Cell adhesion and proliferation were monitored using interdigitated electrode structures (IDESs. The cell-doubling times of primary murine embryonic neuronal cells (PNCs were determined based on the IDES capacitance-peak shifts. The electrical activity of PNC networks was detected using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs. During seeding, the cells were dielectrophoretically allocated to individual MEAs to improve network structures. MEA pads with diameters of 15, 20, 25, and 35 µm were tested. After 3 weeks, the magnitudes of the determined action potentials were highest for pads of 25 µm in diameter and did not differ when the inter-pad distances were 100 or 170 µm. Using 25-µm diameter circular oxygen electrodes, the signal currents in the cell-culture media were found to range from approximately −0.08 nA (0% O2 to −2.35 nA (21% O2. It was observed that 60-nm thick silicon nitride-sensor layers were stable potentiometric pH sensors under cell-culture conditions for periods of days. Their sensitivity between pH 5 and 9 was as high as 45 mV per pH step. We concluded that sensorized GC3s are potential animal replacement systems for purposes such as toxicity pre-screening. For example, the effect of mefloquine, a medication used to treat malaria, on the electrical activity of neuronal cells was determined in this study using a GC3 system.

  14. Cell culture models for study of differentiated adipose cells

    OpenAIRE

    Clynes, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adipose cells are an important source of mesenchymal stem cells and are important for direct use in research on lipid metabolism and obesity. In addition to use of primary cultures, there is increasing interest in other sources of larger numbers of cells, using approaches including induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation and viral immortalisation.

  15. Media, Tourism, Environment, and Cultural Issues in Australia: A Case Study of a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study abroad program developed by a U.S. journalism school and cosponsored by a college of agriculture and natural resources interweaves the themes of mass media, tourism, environment, and cultural issues in Australia. This article traces the development and evolution of the faculty-led program and discusses its curriculum,…

  16. Social Critique "and" Pleasure: Critical Media Literacy with Popular Culture Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Jesse

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of opening space for young people to engage in critical media literacy learning using popular culture texts. Children's background knowledge includes a wide-variety of texts that are often ignored or excluded from school curriculum. The author shows how popular music, for example, can offer powerful…

  17. Remote Control Childhood: Combating the Hazards of Media Culture in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Background: Media culture touches most aspects of the lives of children growing up today, beginning at the earliest ages. It is profoundly the lessons children learn as well as how they learn, thereby contributing to what this article characterizes as "remote control childhood." Educators need to understand remote control childhood so they can…

  18. Children's Media Culture in the New Millennium: Mapping the Digital Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kathryn C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes technological, demographic, and market forces shaping the new digital media culture and the various Web sites being created for children and teens, explaining how heavily-promoted commercial sites overshadow educational sites. Discusses efforts to create safe Internet zones for children. Recommends actions to promote development of a…

  19. The Influence of Popular Culture and Entertainment Media on Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia M.

    2007-01-01

    The idea that popular culture and entertainment media influence us in both conscious and unconscious ways is not new. The use of alternative spaces, such as internet sites, for creating entertainment will continue to influence society and challenge educators. The importance of the internet was reflected in Time magazine's choosing YOU (meaning the…

  20. Either/or Rules: Social Studies Teachers' Talk about Media and Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangram, Jefery A.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines how 15 secondary social studies teachers made meaning of media and popular culture, and how those perspectives informed their relationships with their students. Using data from a 3-year qualitative study in which multiple in-depth interviews were conducted, this article also analyzes the discourses that circulated in the…

  1. Cultural text mining: using text mining to map the emergence of transnational reference cultures in public media repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Pieters, Toine; Verheul, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the research project Translantis, which uses innovative technologies for cultural text mining to analyze large repositories of digitized public media, such as newspapers and journals.1 The Translantis research team uses and develops the text mining tool Texcavator, which is based on the scalable open source text analysis service xTAS (developed by the Intelligent Systems Lab Amsterdam). The text analysis service xTAS has been used successfully in computational humanities ...

  2. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  3. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation for evaluating efficacy/toxicity of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Luis G.; Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Souza, Glauco; Killian, Thomas C.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    We used three dimensional cell cultures (3D) based on the magnetic levitation method (MLM) to evaluate cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT). First, we decorated Hep G2 and MDA-MB-321 cells with NanoShuttle by introducing it in the media and incubated overnight. Next day, we transferred the cells to a 6-well plate and placed a magnetic driver on the top of the plate to start levitation. We monitored the formation of the 3D cell culture by optical microscopy and after four days, we added the photosensitizer Photogem (PG) in the culture media in concentrations of 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25μg/ml. We incubated them for 24 hours, after that we washed the cultures with PBS and added fresh media. Samples were then illuminated for 600s using a 630nm LED-based device, generating light intensities of 30 mW/cm2 in a total light fluence of 18 J/cm2. Following the illumination, we added fresh media, and 30 hours later, the 3D structures were broken using a pipettor and the cells seeded in 96 well plates, 105 cells per well, with a magnetic drive placed on the bottom of the plate to create cell culture dots. After 24 hours, we used a MTT assay to evaluate PDT cytotoxicity. The PDT effect, evaluated by the half maximal effective concentration (EC50), in MDA-MB-231 cells (EC50 =3.14 μg/ml) is more aggressive compared to the effect of PDT in Hep G2 cells (EC50 = 7.48 μg/ml). It suggests that the cell culture structure and its interaction facilitated the PG uptake and consequently elevated the Photodynamic effect for MDA-MB-231.

  4. Melphalan metabolism in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are presented for the adaptation of reversed-phase-HPLC methods to accomplish separation and isolation of the cancer therapeutic drug melphalan (L-phenylalanine mustard) and its metabolic products from whole cells. Five major degradation products of melphalan were observed following its hydrolysis in phosphate buffer in vitro. The two most polar of these products (or modifications of them) were also found in the cytosol of Chinese hamster CHO cells. The amounts of these two polar products (shown not to be mono- or dihydroxymelphalan) were significantly changed by the pretreatment of cells with ZnC12, one being increased in amount while the other was reduced to an insignificant level. In ZnC12-treated cells, there was also an increased binding of melphalan (or its derivatives) to one protein fraction resolved by gel filtration-HPLC. These observations suggest that changes in polar melphalan products, and perhaps their interaction with a protein, may by involved in the reduction of melphalan cytotoxicity observed in ZnC12-treated cells. While ZnC12 is also known to increase the level of glutathione in cells, no significant amounts of glutathione-melphalan derivatives of the type formed non-enzymatically in vitro could be detected in ZnC12-treated or untreated cells. Formation of derivatives of melphalan with glutathione catabolic products in ZnC12-treated cells has not yet been eliminated, however. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R. (7290 Sayre Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Smith, Helene S. (5693 Cabot Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Hackett, Adeline J. (82 Evergreen Dr., Orinda, CA 94563)

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  6. [CO-CULTURE OF BOAR SPERMATOGONIAL CELLS WITH SERTOLI CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkova, I P; Vasil'eva, S A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed in vitro culture conditions using co-culture of boar spermatogonial cells with Sertoli cells. Testes from 60-day-old crossbred boar were used. A spermatogonia-enriched culture was achieved by enzymatic digestion method and purification by density gradient centrifugation using a discontinuous Percoll gradient and differentiated adherence technique. Lipid drops were detected in isolated Sertoli cells by Oil Red O staining. We have found that the cultivation of boar spermatogonia in the presence of Sertoli cells (up to 35 days) leads to their differentiation as well as in vivo in testis. Association of cells in groups, formation of chains and suspension clusters of the spermatogenic cells were observed on the 10th day. Spermatogonial cellular colonies were noted at the same time. These cellular colonies were analyzed for the expression of genes: Nanog and Plzf in RT PCR. The expression of the Nanog gene in the experimental cellular clones obtained by short-term culture of spermatogonial cells in the presence of Sertoli cells was 200 times higher than the expression of this gene in the freshly isolated spermatogonial cells expression was found in freshly isolated germ cells and in cellular clones derived in vitro. We have found that, in the case of longer cultivation of these cells on Sertoli cells, in vitro process of differentiation of germ cells and formation of single mobile boar spermatozoa occurs at 30-33 days. Cellular population is heterogeneous at this stage. Spermatogenic differentiation in vitro without Sertoli cells stays on the 7th day of cultivation. The results show that co-culture of boar spermatogonia-enriched cells with Sertoli cells can induce their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro and facilitate obtaining of porcine germ cell culture. PMID:27228660

  7. Systematic evaluation of sericin protein as a substitute for fetal bovine serum in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Jinhuan; Duan, Shengchang; Chen, Lei; Xiang, Hui; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) shows obvious deficiencies in cell culture, such as low batch to batch consistency, adventitious biological contaminant risk, and high cost, which severely limit the development of the cell culture industry. Sericin protein derived from the silkworm cocoon has become increasingly popular due to its diverse and beneficial cell culture characteristics. However, systematic evaluation of sericin as a substitute for FBS in cell culture medium remains limited. In this study, we conducted cellular morphological, physiological, and transcriptomic evaluation on three widely used mammalian cells. Compared with cells cultured in the control, those cultured in sericin-substitute medium showed similar cellular morphology, similar or higher cellular overall survival, lower population doubling time (PDT), and a higher percentage of S-phase with similar G2/G1 ratio, indicating comparable or better cell growth and proliferation. At the transcriptomic level, differentially expressed genes between cells in the two media were mainly enriched in function and biological processes related to cell growth and proliferation, reflecting that genes were activated to facilitate cell growth and proliferation. The results of this study suggest that cells cultured in sericin-substituted medium perform as well as, or even better than, those cultured in FBS-containing medium. PMID:27531556

  8. Different culture media containing methyldopa for melanin production by Cryptococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralciane de Paula Menezes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Melanin production by species of Cryptococcus is widely used to characterize C. neoformans complex in mycology laboratories. This study aims to test the efficacy of methyldopa from pharmaceutical tablet as a substrate for melanin production, to compare the production of melanin using different agar base added with methyldopa, and to compare the melanin produced in those media with that produced in Niger seed agar and sunflower seed agar by C. neoformans, C. laurentii, and C. albidus. Two isolates of each species, C. neoformans, C. laurentii, and C. albidus, and one of Candida albicans were used to experimentally detect conditions for melanin production. METHODS: The following media were tested: Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA, brain and heart infusion agar (BHIA, blood agar base (BAB, and minimal medium agar (MMA, all added with methyldopa, and the media Niger seed agar (NSA and sunflower seed agar (SSA. RESULTS: All isolates grew in most of the culture media after 24h. Strains planted on media BAB and BHIA showed growth only after 48h. All isolates produced melanin in MMA, MHA, SSA, and NSA media. CONCLUSIONS: Methyldopa in the form pharmaceutical tablet can be used as a substrate for melanin production by Cryptococcus species; minimal medium plus methyldopa was more efficient than the BAB, MHA, and BHIA in the melanin production; and NSA and SSA, followed by MMA added with methyldopa, were more efficient than other media studied for melanin production by all strains studied.

  9. Setting the agenda: Different strategies of a Mass Media in a model of cultural dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Sebastián; Balenzuela, Pablo; Dorso, Claudio O.

    2016-09-01

    Day by day, people exchange opinions about news with relatives, friends, and coworkers. In most cases, they get informed about a given issue by reading newspapers, listening to the radio, or watching TV, i.e., through a Mass Media (MM). However, the importance of a given new can be stimulated by the Media by assigning newspaper's pages or time in TV programs. In this sense, we say that the Media has the power to "set the agenda", i.e., it decides which new is important and which is not. On the other hand, the Media can know people's concerns through, for instance, websites or blogs where they express their opinions, and then it can use this information in order to be more appealing to an increasing number of people. In this work, we study different scenarios in an agent-based model of cultural dissemination, in which a given Mass Media has a specific purpose: To set a particular topic of discussion and impose its point of view to as many social agents as it can. We model this by making the Media has a fixed feature, representing its point of view in the topic of discussion, while it tries to attract new consumers, by taking advantage of feedback mechanisms, represented by adaptive features. We explore different strategies that the Media can adopt in order to increase the affinity with potential consumers and then the probability to be successful in imposing this particular topic.

  10. Production of DNA microarray and expression analysis of genes from Xylella fastidiosa in different culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane de Fátima Travensolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray was developed to monitor the expression of many genes from Xylella fastidiosa, allowing the side by-side comparison of two situations in a single experiment. The experiments were performed using X. fastidiosa cells grown in two culture media: BCYE and XDM2. The primers were synthesized, spotted onto glass slides and the array was hybridized against fluorescently labeled cDNAs. The emitted signals were quantified, normalized and the data were statistically analyzed to verify the differentially expressed genes. According to the data, 104 genes were differentially expressed in XDM2 and 30 genes in BCYE media. The present study showed that DNA microarray technique efficiently differentiate the expressed genes under different conditions.DNA Microarray foi desenvolvida para monitorar a expressão de muitos genes de Xylella fastidiosa, permitindo a comparação de duas situações distintas em um único experimento. Os experimentos foram feitos utilizando células de X. fastidiosa cultivada em dois meios de cultura: BCYE e XDM2. Pares de oligonucleotídeos iniciadores foram sintetizados, depositados em lâminas de vidro e o arranjo foi hibridizado contra cDNAs marcados fluorescentemente. Os sinais emitidos foram quantificados, normalizados e os dados foram estatisticamente analisados para verificar os genes diferencialmente expressos. De acordo com nossos dados, 104 genes foram diferencialmente expressos para o meio de cultura XDM2 e 30 genes para o BCYE. No presente estudo, nós demonstramos que a técnica de DNA microarrays eficientemente diferencia genes expressos sob diferentes condições de cultivo.

  11. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  12. Proteome analysis of virus-host cell interaction: rabies virus replication in Vero cells in two different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Sabine; Rourou, Samia; Vester, Diana; Majoul, Samy; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Rapp, Erdmann; Kallel, Héla; Reichl, Udo

    2013-06-01

    The use of Vero cells for rabies vaccine production was recommended from the WHO in 2005. A controlled production process is necessary to reduce the risk of contaminants in the product. One step towards this is to turn away from animal-derived components (e.g. serum, trypsin, bovine serum albumin) and face a production process in animal component-free medium. In this study, a proteomic approach was applied, using 2-D differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to compare rabies virus propagation in Vero cells under different cultivation conditions in microcarrier culture. Protein alterations were investigated for uninfected and infected Vero cells over a time span from 1 to 8 days post-infection in two different types of media (serum-free versus serum-containing media). For mock-infected cells, proteins involved in stress response, redox status, protease activity or glycolysis, and protein components in the endoplasmic reticulum were found to be differentially expressed comparing both cultivation media at all sampling points. For virus-infected cells, additionally changes in protein expression involved in general cell regulation and in calcium homeostasis were identified under both cultivation conditions. The fact that neither of these additional proteins was identified for cells during mock infection, but similar protein expression changes were found for both systems during virus propagation, indicates for a specific response of the Vero cell proteome on rabies virus infection. PMID:23674149

  13. Effect of liquid media culture systems on yam plant growth (Dioscorea alata L. 'Pacala Duclos'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jova, MC.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture system type in liquid media influences yam plant growth ('Pacala Duclos' clone. In culture systems with forced renewal of internal atmosphere in culture flasks, Temporary Immersion System (TIS and Constant Immersion System (CIS with aeration through continuous bubbling in culture medium, higher results were obtained in morphological and physiological plant indicators in comparison with plants obtained in culture systems with passive renewal of internal atmosphere in culture flasks or Static Liquid System (SLS. In Temporary Immersion System, the best results were obtained after six weeks of culture in relation to total length (20.8 cm, axillary bud number (8.6, fresh weight (2.1 g and dry weight (0.18 g per plant, as well as photosynthetic pigment content (chlorophyll a, b, and total, net photosynthesis (15.3 μmol C02.m-2.s-1, total transpiration (5.97 mmol H2O.m-2.s-1, stomatal conductance (457 μmol H2O.m-2.s-1 and leaf starch content (45.77 mg.gMF-1. Reducing sugar in culture medium with Temporary Immersion System was completely depleted, and mineral nutrients of lower contents (phosphorus, nitrogen, magnesium, calcium, iron, and manganese in culture medium from this culture system could be related with plant growing. The results of this work could contribute to develop protocol for in vitro plant propagation of this yam clone.

  14. Growth, cysts and kinetics of Borrelia garinii (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetacea in different culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela de Oliveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper was to evaluate cyst formation and growth parameters of Borrelia garinii in a range of media differing in formulation and cost. A qualitative assessment of morphology and motility of B. garinii was conducted. All media were prepared aseptically and used in test tubes or Petri dishes. For each medium, the initial spirochete concentration was standardized to 10³ spirochets/mL. The following culture media were suitable to grow B. garinii: Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly, brain heart infusion and PMR. Growth was minimal at six weeks post-inoculation and maximum spirochete density was observed between 9-12 weeks. Often, the cultures developed cysts of different sizes, isolated or in groups, with a spiraled portion of variable sizes, mainly in unfavorable culture media. Brazilian Lyme disease-like illness, also known as Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome (BYS, is a new and interesting emerging tick-borne disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes, only during its cystic forms. It has been assumed that the peculiar clinical and laboratory features of BYS are consequential to the absence of a human sucker Ixodes ricinus complex tick at risk areas in Brazil, supporting the concept that the borrelia phenotypic expression pattern is modified as it is transmitted through the host.

  15. Sulfated glycosaminoglycans in cultured endothelial cells from capillaries and large vessels of human and bovine origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (35S)glycosaminoglycans ((35S)GAG) synthesized by capillary endothelial cells were analyzed and compared to GAG synthesized by endothelial cells cultured from 4 larger vessels. Two separate cultures of endothelial cells were established from bovine fat capillaries and from 4 larger vessels of human origin (umbilical vein) and bovine origin (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein and aorta). After incubation with 35SO4 for 72 h, the (35S)glycosaminoglycans (GAG) composition of the media, pericellular and cellular fractions of each culture were determined by selective degradation with nitrous acid, chondroitinase ABC and chondroitinase AC. All endothelial cells produced large amounts of (35S)GAG with increased proportions of heparinoids (heparan sulfate and heparin) in the cellular and pericellular fractions. Each culture showed a distinct distribution of (35S)GAG in the media, pericellular and cellular fractions with several specific differences found among the 5 cultures. The differences in GAG content were confirmed in a second group of separate cultures from each of the 5 vessels indicating that, although having several features of GAG metabolism in common, each endothelial cell culture demonstrated a characteristic complement of synthesized, secreted and cell surface-sulfated glycosaminoglycans. (author)

  16. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A. K.; Petrov, V. S.; Averyanova, L. S.; Osipov, G. V.; Chen, W.; Drugova, O.; Chan, C. K.

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  17. Proteomics in Cell Culture: From Genomics to Combined ‘Omics for Cell Line Engineering and Bioprocess Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heffner, Kelley; Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kumar, Amit;

    2015-01-01

    in media development and cell line engineering to improve growth or productivity, delay the onset of apoptosis, or utilize nutrients efficiently. Mass-spectrometry based and other proteomics methods can provide for the detection of thousands of proteins from cell culture and bioinformatics analysis...... protein production has increased significantly because proteomics can track changes in protein levels for different cell lines over time, which can be advantageous for bioprocess development and optimization. Specifically, the identification of proteins that affect cell culture processes can aid efforts...

  18. Urokinase Separation from Cell Culture Broth of a Human Kidney Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Bansal, Pradip K. Roychoudhury, Ashok Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A single step ion-exchange chromatography on a sulfo-propyl (SP- Sepharose column was performed to separate both the high molecular weight (HMW- and low molecular weight (LMW- forms of enzymatically active urokinase type plasminogen activator from human kidney (HT1080 cell culture media. The level of urokinase secreted by the cell line reached to about 145 Plough units/ml culture broth within 48 h of cultivation. The conditioned cell culture media was applied directly to the column without any prior concentration steps. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the column eluates in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate showed that the cell line secretes three forms of two-chain high molecular weight (HMW urokinase of molecular weights (Mr 64,000, 60,900 and 55,000. In addition, two low molecular weight (LMW forms of Mr 22,000 and 20,000; proteolytic cleavage products of HMW, were also found. The HMW and LMW forms had intrinsic plasminogen dependent proteolytic activity as judged by zymographic analysis. The specific activity of the pooled peak fractions increased (approximately 93-fold to values as high as 1481 Plough units/ mg protein. Both HMW as well as LMW forms were obtained in significantly high yields.

  19. Chemistry in the Popular Culture: Mass Media, Music and Outreach Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jergović, B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Science is often identified with the discipline of chemistry particularly in the popular sphere and in visual culture. The image of science or its profile is created mainly in the mass media, but also in other spheres and in many different ways. Mass media are in the focus of many research groups, as the most frequent and efficient source of scientific information to the public. Science communication research is rather intense also in the attempt to understand the non-linear interaction with popular music and film. In addition, public activities of scientific institutions are being investigated, as well as the public image of science in projects where scientists are directly communicating with the general, lay audience. Notwithstanding, a link between research and the practice of science communication is non-existent. Public communication of science is more emerging than planned, there are many isolated actors and programs, and ‘hard’ sciences are not keen on using the social sciences’ knowledge and skills. In order to improve this situation, it is essential to understand how the public image of science is created, and how science interacts with its audiences. Here, the public image of science is discussed with regard to the news values and the new circumstances for mass communication, particularly the convergence of different media, which offers new possibilities for science in the public. An analysis of the media coverage of chemistry in the International Chemistry Year 2011 shows huge differences in the frequency and nature of the media coverage, particularly with regard to media convergence and the use of different media simultaneously. Outreach events are discussed in the light of the influence on their visitors. Since science communication is present in other spheres of popular culture, and in nonlinear top-down manner, we shortly discuss communication about chemistry in pop music in the attempt to suggest the need to communicate

  20. Representation and Dissemination of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Bangladesh through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Chowdhury, MD Saiful Alam

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the next eleven countries and home to more than 160 million people. The country is experiencing an exponential growth of social media users due to the increase in affordability of smartphones, literacy rate, education level, and adoption of Internet services and applications....... Bangladesh, with its digital agenda, has a favorable environment for the transformation and development of digital media and culture. There exists unexplored, assumably underutilized, and potential roles of Internet-mediated communication about the two nominated ICH of Bangladesh. Towards the goal of...

  1. The Relevance of Cultural and Media Studies to Theatre and Television in Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hobart

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA critical approach to Balinese society presents a starkly different picturefrom the representations that Balinese usually tell themselves, whichare largely myths to disguise a painful reality. Bali no longer belongsto Balinese but to international capital, a process of alienation by whichBalinese energetically commoditize their culture while claiming theopposite. Even the frames of reference for discussing what is happeningare inadequate because they predate the rise of contemporary consumercapitalism and the mass media. That is why critical media and culturalstudies, disciplines designed precisely to address such phenomena, arepotentially so relevant for Indonesian intellectuals.

  2. A biocompatible micro cell culture chamber (mu CCC) for the culturing and on-line monitoring of eukaryote cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Petronis, Sarunas; Jørgensen, Anders Michael;

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a polymeric (PMMA) chip with medium perfusion and integrated heat regulation provides sufficiently precise heat regulation, pH-control and medium exchange to support cell growth for weeks. However, it was unclear how closely the cells cultured in the chip resembled...... cells cultured in the culture flask. In the current study, gene expression profiles of cells cultured in the chip were compared with gene expression profiles of cells cultured in culture flasks. The results showed that there were only two genes that were differently expressed in cells grown in the cell...... culture chip compared to cell culture flasks. The cell culture chip could without further modification support cell growth of two other cell lines. Light coming from the microscope lamp during optical recordings of the cells was the only external factor identified, that could have a negative effect...

  3. A biocompatible micro cell culture chamber (microCCC) for the culturing and on-line monitoring of eukaryote cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Petronis, Sarunas; Jørgensen, A M;

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a polymeric (PMMA) chip with medium perfusion and integrated heat regulation provides sufficiently precise heat regulation, pH-control and medium exchange to support cell growth for weeks. However, it was unclear how closely the cells cultured in the chip resembled...... cells cultured in the culture flask. In the current study, gene expression profiles of cells cultured in the chip were compared with gene expression profiles of cells cultured in culture flasks. The results showed that there were only two genes that were differently expressed in cells grown in the cell...... culture chip compared to cell culture flasks. The cell culture chip could without further modification support cell growth of two other cell lines. Light coming from the microscope lamp during optical recordings of the cells was the only external factor identified, that could have a negative effect...

  4. Setting the Agenda: Different strategies of a Mass Media in a model of cultural dissemination

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Sebastián; Dorso, Claudio O

    2015-01-01

    Day by day, people exchange opinions about a given new with relatives, friends, and coworkers. In most cases, they get informed about a given issue by reading newspapers, listening to the radio, or watching TV, i.e., through a Mass Media (MM). However, the importance of a given new can be stimulated by the Media by assigning newspaper's pages or time in TV programs. In this sense, we say that the Media has the power to "set the agenda", i.e., it decides which new is important and which is not. On the other hand, the Media can know people's concerns through, for instance, websites or blogs where they express their opinions, and then it can use this information in order to be more appealing to an increasing number of people. In this work, we study different scenarios in an agent-based model of cultural dissemination, in which a given Mass Media has a specific purpose: To set a particular topic of discussion and impose its point of view to as many social agents as it can. We model this by making the Media has a ...

  5. Application of a nitrocellulose immunoassay for quantitation of proteins secreted in cultured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A macro immunoassay was developed to quantitate proteins (antigens) secreted in the culture media of primary rat hepatocytes. Dilutions of protein standards and undiluted spent culture media were applied to numbered sheets of nitrocellulose (NC) paper by vacuum filtration (in volumes up to 1 ml) through a specially designed macrofiltration apparatus constructed of plexiglas. Sequential incubation of the NC with bovine serum albumin blocking buffer, monospecific antibody, and 125I Protein A enabled quantitation of protein concentration by determination of NC bound radioactivity. Linear and reproducible standard curves were obtained with fibrinogen, albumin, transferrin, and haptoglobin. A high degree of coefficient of correlation between radioactivity (cmp) and protein concentration was found. Intra- and inter-test reproducibility was excellent. By using monospecific antibodies, single proteins (i.e., fibrinogen), as low as 32 ng/ml, could be quantified in heterogeneous protein mixtures and in spent culture media. The assay was sensitive to the difference of fibrinogen secretion under nonstimulatory (serum-free hormonally define medium, SFHD) and stimulatory (SFHD plus hydrocortisone) culture conditions. The procedure and techniques described are applicable to the quantitation of any protein in a suitable buffer

  6. Effects of Supplementation of Various Medium Components on Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures Producing Recombinant Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yun; Lee, Joon Chul; Chang, Ho Nam; Oh, Duk Jae

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen vitamins, twenty amino acids, hormones, inorganic salts, and other chemical agents, which constitute typical serum-free media, were evaluated for the development of fortified medium to enhance cell growth and productivity of recombinant antibody in the cultures of the recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Two different rCHO cell lines, rCHO-A producing recombinant antibodies against the human platelet and rCHO-B secreting recombinant antibodies against the S surface antigen...

  7. An animal cell culture: Advance technology for modern research

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Khare; Rajeev Nema

    2012-01-01

    At the present time animal cell culture is more significant and multifarious application tool for current research streams. A lot of field assorted from animal cell culture such: stem cell biology, IVF technology, cancer cell biology, monoclonal antibody production, recombinant protein production, gene therapy, vaccine manufacturing, novel drug selection and improvement. In this review conclude animal cell culture as well as its requirements

  8. The media and its involvement in building the culture of peace or violence. A reflectionfor peace studies.

    OpenAIRE

    María Gabriela Villar García; Ana Aurora Maldonado Reyes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to meditate about the role that the mass media have and have had building the culture of peace and symbolic violence and/or culture from the perspective of peace studies. We highlight the concepts of culture of peace, violence, cultural and symbolic violence from a dialectical perspective. We look for a reflection that make the reader understand about building a culture of peace in a historical context framed by violence worldwide.

  9. The media and its involvement in building the culture of peace or violence. A reflectionfor peace studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Villar García

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to meditate about the role that the mass media have and have had building the culture of peace and symbolic violence and/or culture from the perspective of peace studies. We highlight the concepts of culture of peace, violence, cultural and symbolic violence from a dialectical perspective. We look for a reflection that make the reader understand about building a culture of peace in a historical context framed by violence worldwide.

  10. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  11. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity in fetal calf serum: implications for cell culture research

    OpenAIRE

    Lubel, J. S.; Herath, C. B.; Velkoska, E.; Casley, D. J.; Burrell, L. M.; Angus, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture experiments often employ the use of culture media that contain fetal calf serum (FCS). The angiotensin peptides angiotensin II and angiotensin 1–7 have opposing effects with angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) being the enzyme predominantly responsible for generating angiotensin 1–7 from angiotensin II. The effect of FCS on angiotensin peptides has not previously been described. We have shown that FCS has ACE2 enzyme activity capable of degrading angiotensin II and generating ...

  12. Participation of mast cells in chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Durko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media (COM, much attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms of local inflammatory reactions in which mast cells (MCs may be involved due to their role not only in allergic but also inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the density of mast cells in chronic otitis media in relationship to different clinical courses of COM, bacterial infections and types of disease. The MCs expression was measured immunohistochemically in paraffin-embedded granulation tissue specimens taken during surgery, by staining with a monoclonal antibody against tryptase. The density of tryptase-positive mast cells was lower in tissue samples from the group with a good clinical course than in those from the group with poor healing and recurrence (p = 0.006. There were no differences between the groups of patients with granulomatous and cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media (p = 0.66 or between the groups of patients with and without bacterial infection (p = 0.30, although the density of mast cells was lower for those with Pseudomonas aeruginosa/Proteus sp./ /Staphyloccocus MRSA infection. In conclusion, the expression of mast cells in chronic otitis media granulation tissue was found to differ depending on the clinical course of the disease, but not on bacterial infection or type of COM. This may suggest that mast cells contribute to the maintenance of the inflammatory process, but not to antibacterial defense in chronic otitis media. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 3, pp. 479–485

  13. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  14. Integrated biosensors for cell culture monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    De Micheli, Giovanni; Boero, Cristina; Olivo, Jacopo; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors for endogenous compounds, such as glucose and lactate, are applied to monitor cell cultures. Cells can be cultivated for several purposes, such as understanding and modeling some biological mechanisms, the development of new drugs and therapies, and in the field of regenerative medicine. We have realized a self-contained monitoring system with remote readout. Metabolite detection is based on oxidases immobilized onto carbon nanotubes. We calibrate the system for glucose and lactate...

  15. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  16. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Li, Yuan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology CCM/CBF, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  17. The decline of natural sciences in the culture of mass media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    This study sets out to determine if the interest in and study of natural sciences is declining in western countries as scientists currently contend. Part one demonstrates how survey results reveal a decline of interest in scientific news in the EU. Part two explores the decline of interest further through examining data such as the number of students interested in scientific subjects and scientific careers. I explore the hypothesis that the lack of interest in scientific subjects is influenced by the culture of the mass media, and the manner in which the media covers scientific items. I examine a range of media outlets, from reality TV shows and TV series, to movies and the press. Many aspects of this paper have been discussed in depth in my book published in 2008: La razón estrangulada (Reason Strangled: the Crisis of Science in Contemporary Society).

  18. Cell culture from sponges: pluripotency and immortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caralt Bosch, de S.; Uriz, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Sponges are a source of compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this article, methods of sponge cell culture for production of these bioactive compounds are reviewed, and new approaches for overcoming the problem of metabolite supply are examined. The use of embryos is proposed as a

  19. THE METHODS FOR MAINTAINING INSECT CELL CULTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from a methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes techniques that are e...

  20. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... Annealing metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  1. The mass media destabilizes the cultural homogenous regime in Axelrod's model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important feature of Axelrod's model for culture dissemination or social influence is the emergence of many multicultural absorbing states, despite the fact that the local rules that specify the agents interactions are explicitly designed to decrease the cultural differences between agents. Here we re-examine the problem of introducing an external, global interaction-the mass media-in the rules of Axelrod's model: in addition to their nearest neighbors, each agent has a certain probability p to interact with a virtual neighbor whose cultural features are fixed from the outset. Most surprisingly, this apparently homogenizing effect actually increases the cultural diversity of the population. We show that, contrary to previous claims in the literature, even a vanishingly small value of p is sufficient to destabilize the homogeneous regime for very large lattice sizes.

  2. Changes in adipose tissue stromal-vascular cells in primary culture due to porcine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the response of rat stromal-vascular cells to pig sea. Sera were collected from unselected contemporary (lean) and high backfat thickness selected (obese) pigs. Sera from obese pigs were collected either by exsanguination or cannulation. sera from lean pigs during the growing phase (45 kg) and the fattening phase (100-110 kg) were collected. Stromal-vascular cells derived rom rat inguinal tissue were cultured on either 25 cm2 flasks, collagen-coated coverslips or petri dishes. Cell proliferation was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation during the fourth day of culture. Coverslip cultures were used for histochemical analysis. Petri dish cultures were used for analysis of Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. All cells were plated for 24 hours in media containing 10 fetal bovine sera. Test media contained 2.5, 5.0, 10.0% sera. Sera from obese pigs increased GPDH activity and fat cell production when compared to the lean controls. The increased concentration of sera increased esterase activity and lipid as measured with oil red O. The sera from obese pigs collected at slaughter stimulated more fat cell production than obese sera collected by cannulation. These studies show there are adipogenic factors in obese pigs sera which promote fat cell development in primary cell culture

  3. A model for cross-cultural reciprocal interactions through mass media

    CERN Document Server

    González-Avella, J C; Miguel, M San

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the problem of cross-cultural interactions through mass media in a model where two populations of social agents, each with its own internal dynamics, get information about each other through reciprocal global interactions. As the agent dynamics, we employ Axelrod's model for social influence. The global interaction fields correspond to the statistical mode of the states of the agents and represent mass media messages on the cultural trend originating in each population. Several phases are found in the collective behavior of either population depending on parameter values: two homogeneous phases, one having the state of the global field acting on that population, and the other consisting of a state different from that reached by the applied global field; and a disordered phase. In addition, the system displays nontrivial effects: (i) the emergence of a largest minority group of appreciable size sharing a state different from that of the applied global field; (ii) the appearance of localized orde...

  4. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  5. Cell-centered finite volume discretizations for deformable porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-01-01

    The development of cell-centered finite volume discretizations for deformation is motivated by the desire for a compatible approach with the discretization of fluid flow in deformable porous media. We express the conservation of momentum in the finite volume sense, and introduce three approximations methods for the cell-face stresses. The discretization method is developed for general grids in one to three spatial dimensions, and leads to a global discrete system of equations for the displace...

  6. Ethanolamine metabolism in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of extracellular ethanolamine in phospholipid synthesis was examined in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. Serine and ethanolamine were both readily accumulated by these cells and incorporated into phospholipid. Exposing cells to extracellular ethanolamine for 4-6 weeks had no effect on cell growth, yet increased the phosphatidylethanolamine content of these cells by 31% as compared to control cells. The intracellular content of ethanolamine was measured by high performance liquid chromatography, and results showed that the ethanolamine-treated cells contained a significantly greater amount of free ethanolamine compared to control cells. Ethanolamine-treated cells also had decreased accumulation and incorporation into lipid of [3H]ethanolamine throughout a 48-h incubation and increased K'm and V'max parameters of ethanolamine transport as compared to control cells. Studies were also done to examine the effect of ethanolamine on the generation of free ethanolamine from phosphatidylserine. In pulse-chase experiments with [3H]serine, a physiological concentration of ethanolamine decreased the amount of 3H-labeled phosphatidylethanolamine produced from 3H-labeled phosphatidylserine by 12 h as compared to the amount of 3H-labeled phosphatidyl-ethanolamine produced in the absence of ethanolamine in the chase incubation. Furthermore, ethanolamine-treated cells accumulated 20% less labeled ethanolamine in the aqueous pool from [3H]serine after 24 h of incubation than did control cells. These results can be explained by isotope dilution with the ethanolamine pool that accumulates in these cells with time when exposed to media supplemented with a physiological concentration of ethanolamine and by an effect of ethanolamine on ethanolamine generation from phosphatidylserine

  7. Complicit subversions: Cultural new media activism and ‘high’ theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hoofd, Ingrid Maria

    2008-01-01

    How do current technological structures change the activist landscape and its use of certain academic theories? And what, in turn, could this relationship tell us about a possible exacerbation of contemporary forms of in- and exclusion? This article will argue that the productive crossovers in the Internet between cultural new media activism and ‘high’ theory mark precisely the humanist subject’s complicity in contemporary technocratic neo-liberalism. It will do so by analyzing in detail how ...

  8. Burmese Attitude toward Chinese: Portrayal of the Chinese in Contemporary Cultural and Media Works

    OpenAIRE

    Min Zin

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that since at least the mid 1980s, there has been an observable negative attitude among the people of Burma against the Chinese. Such sentiment is not just transient public opinion, but an attitude. The author measures it by studying contemporary cultural and media works as found in legally published expressions, so as to exclude any material rejected by the regime’s censors. The causes of such sentiment are various: massive Chinese migration and purchases of real estate (es...

  9. Italianization Accomplished. Forms and Structures of Albanian Television’s Dependency on Italian Media and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    abstractAfter the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of communist regimes in 1989, national media systems of the Eastern European countries belonging to the Soviet bloc began a process of transformation along the way of liberalization and commercialization. In Albania, this process occurred in different phases, but with a common trend, that is the Italian television as a structural, economic and cultural model to inspire. In this article, I try to outline the deep influences and legacies bet...

  10. Antibiotics Susceptibility of the Microorganisms which Reproducing the Culture of Patients with Chronic Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Omer Coskun; Duran Tok

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Study; we aimed the isolation of bacteria and establishment of their susceptibility to antibiotics in patients diagnosed as Chronic Supurative Otitis Media. METHOD: Sixty-three patients were included in the study. The samples of suppurative material were cultured. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed as recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and species was identified. RESULTS: S.aureus was isolated in 36,5 % of the 63 patients enrolled in the study....

  11. Development of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from green pepper in different culture media, temperatures, and light regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Mello Alexandre Furtado Silveira; Machado Andressa Cristina Zamboni; Bedendo Ivan Paulo

    2004-01-01

    Control of anthracnose in green pepper involves the use of resistant varieties and/or fungicides. The selection of varieties and efficient products demands great amounts of conidia as inoculum. It is thus necessary to optimize the production of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia in the laboratory, establishing the best conditions for fungus development. The present study aimed at determining the most favorable culture media, temperature, and light conditions for the production of fungus i...

  12. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Charles A; Montgomery, David W; Merkle, Carrie J

    2011-10-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ± 2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ± 1.1%) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin-coated 24-well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 μm pores. Additionally, AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel(®) to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  13. Social Media and Linguistic Affirmation in Central Africa. : Between Cultural Objectification and Cultural Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Rivron, Vassili

    2014-01-01

    The success of social media among Africans and African diasporas have led to the creation of " Facebook groups " identified as ethnic groups. These networks can gather, among the five groups included in this study, up to 8,000 participants each.These spaces of community exchanges allow interesting observations on the preservation of linguistic diversity in the era of digital globalization, and on the mutations of ethnicity. On one hand, we are witnessing the " spontaneous " encoding of langua...

  14. La convergencia cultural a través de la ecología de medios Understanding Cultural Convergence through Media Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Islas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Antes de Internet cada medio de comunicación tenía funciones y mercados perfectamente definidos. Sin embargo, a consecuencia del formidable desarrollo de Internet y de las comunicaciones digitales, el mismo contenido hoy puede circular a través de distintos medios de comunicación. Esa es la convergencia cultural. El relato transmediático anticipa el advenimiento de nuevos mercados de consumo cultural. Con base en la ecología de medios y particularmente considerando las tesis de Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman y Henry Jenkins, es analizada la convergencia cultural como complejo ambiente comunicativo. La convergencia cultural modifica los procedimientos de operación de las industrias mediáticas. Los cambios más significativos, sin embargo, se presentan en las comunidades de conocimiento. Before the Internet, the different media had specifically defined functions and markets. However, since the emergence of the Internet and digital communication, the same content can be found right across the media; this is known as cultural convergence. This media crossing anticipates the coming of new markets of cultural consumption. Based on media ecology, with specific reference to the thesis developed by Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman, and Henry Jenkins, cultural convergence is studied as a complex communication environment. Cultural convergence modifies the operative procedures of media industries. However, the most significant changes can be found within the knowledge communities.

  15. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent conversion of cultured macrophages into foam cells with antiallergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Kovanen, P T

    2000-12-01

    Degranulation of isolated, rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of low density lipoprotein (LDL) induces cholesteryl ester accumulation in cocultured macrophages with ensuing foam cell formation. This event occurs when the macrophages phagocytose LDL particles that have been bound to the heparin proteoglycans of exocytosed granules. In an attempt to inhibit such foam cell formation pharmacologically, rat peritoneal mast cells that had been passively sensitized with anti-ovalbumin-IgE were treated with 2 mast cell-stabilizing antianaphylactic drugs, MY-1250 or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Both drugs were found to inhibit antigen (ovalbumin)-triggered release of histamine from the mast cells, revealing mast cell stabilization. In cocultures of rat peritoneal macrophages and passively sensitized mast cells, addition of MY-1250 before addition of the antigen resulted in parallel reductions in histamine release from mast cells, uptake of [(14)C]sucrose-LDL, and accumulation of LDL-derived cholesteryl esters in the cocultured macrophages. Similarly, when passively sensitized mast cells were stimulated with antigen in the presence of DSCG and the preconditioned media containing all substances released from the drug-treated mast cells were collected and added to macrophages cultured in LDL-containing medium, uptake and esterification of LDL cholesterol by the macrophages were inhibited. The inhibitory effects of both drugs were mast cell-specific because neither drug inhibited the ability of macrophages to take up and esterify LDL cholesterol. Analysis of heparin proteoglycan contents of the incubation media revealed that both drugs had inhibited mast cells from expelling their granule remnants. Thus, both MY-1250 and DSCG prevent mast cells from releasing the heparin proteoglycan-containing vehicles that bind LDL and carry it into macrophages. This study suggests that antiallergic pharmacological agents could be used in animal models to prevent mast cell

  16. Nephrotoxic effects of iodinated x-ray contrast media in vitro and in vivo : effects on cultured NRK 52-E cells, development of an animal model of impaired renal function and evaluation of biomarkers of nephrotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Iodinated x-ray contrast media (ICM) are used to improve the visibility of internal structures of the body in an x-ray image due to their ability to attenuate x-rays, providing enhanced contrast between regions of interest and the surrounding tissues. Unfortunately, administration of ICM is associated with adverse side effects, including contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) which remains one of the most important complications of ICM. The work reported in master’s thesis was aimed at investigat...

  17. Changes in responsiveness of rat tracheal epithelial cells to growth factors during preneoplastic transformation in cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preneoplastic rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cell lines require fewer growth factors for clonal proliferation in culture than normal cells. Serum-free media missing various combinations of growth factors (e.g., cholera toxin, serum albumin, epidermal growth factor, hydrocortisone) required for proliferation of normal, but not preneoplastic, RTE cells can be used to select for carcinogen-induced preneoplastic variants having an increased proliferative potential in culture. These results suggest that reductions in growth factor requirements are primary events in the carcinogenic process. (author)

  18. Development of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from green pepper in different culture media, temperatures, and light regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Alexandre Furtado Silveira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of anthracnose in green pepper involves the use of resistant varieties and/or fungicides. The selection of varieties and efficient products demands great amounts of conidia as inoculum. It is thus necessary to optimize the production of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia in the laboratory, establishing the best conditions for fungus development. The present study aimed at determining the most favorable culture media, temperature, and light conditions for the production of fungus inoculum. The fungus was isolated from green pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum L. and transferred to four culture media (PDA, oat, filtered pepper extract, and autoclaved pepper extract, under different temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35ºC and light conditions (24h dark, and 24h light. Colony growth was evaluated after 7 and 12 days of incubation. No differences were found between the culture media. However, the greatest number of conidia was obtained from colonies grown in oat medium at 25ºC. Temperatures of 20 and 25ºC were the most favorable for colony growth and sporulation. Higher sporulation was obtained under incubation in constant light. Cultivation of C. gloeosporioides in oat medium, at 25ºC, and constant light is recommended.

  19. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  20. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  1. Evaluation of different cryoprotective agents in maintenance of viability of Helicobacter pylori in stock culture media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Davoudi Oskouei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Four different cryoprotective supplemented stock media were evaluated for maintaining better survival and recovery of H. pylori type strain NCTC 11637 at two different maintenance temperatures of -20°C and -80°C after one month preservation as frozen stocks. The spread plate colony count method was used to investigate the recovery rate of H. pylori from equally inoculated bacterial suspensions in differently prepared stock cultures. After the preservation of H. pylori for one month in different cryoprotectant-supplemented stock media, the recovery rates for -20°C obtained for stock cultures supplemented with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, polyethylene glycol (PEG, glycerol and glycerol+sucrose, as well as controls with and without human serum alone were 7.13, 6.97, 7.93, 7.99, 6.95 and 0.0 log CFU/ml, respectively. Maintenance of bacteria at -80°C gave statistically higher recovery rates compared to preservation at -20°C with the values of 8.55, 8.24, 8.59, 8.66, 8.01 and 0.0 log CFU/ml for these above mentioned stock cultures. The stock cultures supplemented with glycerol+sucrose and glycerol showed the highest recovery rates, 7.99 and 7.93 for -20°C vs. 8.66 and 8.59 for -80°C respectively, which were statistically different from the others. Our study revealed that H. pylori type strain NCTC 11637 could be better preserved at -80°C than -20°C. The best stock media which supported viability or culturability of bacteria were brain heart infusion broth (BHI+glycerol+human serum and BHI+glycerol+sucrose+human serum, where the latter yielded the higher recovery rate.

  2. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices

    OpenAIRE

    Halldórsson, Skarphédinn; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan MT

    2015-01-01

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dis...

  3. Assessment of cultural sensitivity of cancer information in ethnic print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniela B; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2006-06-01

    Ethnic minority populations prefer cancer information that is respectful of their customs and beliefs about health and illness. Community newspapers are an important source of cancer information for ethnic groups. Our purpose is to evaluate the cultural sensitivity of cancer information in mass print media targeting ethnic minority readership. We assessed for cultural sensitivity 27 cancer articles published in English-language ethnic newspapers (Jewish, First Nations, Black/Caribbean, East Indian) in 2000 using the Cultural Sensitivity Assessment Tool (CSAT). We found that the overall average CSAT score of 27 cancer articles was 2.71. (Scorespapers. Cancer articles from East Indian newspapers had a mean CSAT score of 2.30 and were classified as culturally insensitive. Four articles were considered culturally sensitive but did not mention ethnic populations as intended readers or as high-risk groups for cancer. We found that, using the CSAT measure, overall, cancer articles in ethnic newspapers included in this study were culturally sensitive. Given limitations of this instrument, we recommend an additional checklist for evaluating the cultural sensitivity of printed cancer information. PMID:16720539

  4. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affectcell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research,industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contaminationand detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the waysin which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species incell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importanceof mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasmacontamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6.available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sourcesof mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detectionmethods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to preventmycoplasma contamination in cell culture.

  5. 'Transatlantic Print Culture, 1880-1940: Emerging Media, Emerging Modernisms', edited by Ann Ardis and Patrick Collier

    OpenAIRE

    Janet Floyd

    2009-01-01

    A review of 'Transatlantic Print Culture, 1880-1940: Emerging Media, Emerging Modernisms', edited by Ann Ardis and Patrick Collier (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). Hardback, 259 pages, £50, ISBN 9780554269.

  6. 'Transatlantic Print Culture, 1880-1940: Emerging Media, Emerging Modernisms', edited by Ann Ardis and Patrick Collier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Floyd

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A review of 'Transatlantic Print Culture, 1880-1940: Emerging Media, Emerging Modernisms', edited by Ann Ardis and Patrick Collier (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. Hardback, 259 pages, £50, ISBN 9780554269.

  7. Children's media culture in the new millennium: mapping the digital landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, K C

    2000-01-01

    A new "children's digital media culture" is swiftly moving into place on the Internet. In this article, the author describes the technological, demographic, and market forces shaping this new digital media culture and the rich array of Web sites being created for children and teens. Many nonprofit organizations, museums, educational institutions, and government agencies are playing a significant role in developing online content for children, offering them opportunities to explore the world, form communities with other children, and create their own works of art and literature. For the most part, however, the heavily promoted commercial sites, sponsored mainly by media conglomerates and toy companies, are overshadowing the educational sites. Because of the unique interactive features of the Internet, companies are able to integrate advertising and Web site content to promote "brand awareness" and "brand loyalty" among children, encouraging them to become consumers beginning at a very early age. The possibility that a child's exploration on the Internet might lead to inappropriate content, aggressive advertising, or even dangerous contact with strangers has given rise to a number of efforts to create "safe zones" for children--that is, places in cyberspace where children can be protected from both marketers and predators. Federal legislation now requires parental permission before commercial Web sites can collect personal information from children under age 13. Several companies offer filtering, blocking, and monitoring software to safeguard children from harmful content or predators. Generally lacking in debates concerning children's use of the Internet, however, is a more proactive definition of quality--one that would help ensure the creation and maintenance of Web sites that enhance children's learning and development and not merely keep them from harm. In the concluding section of this article, the author recommends actions to promote development of a quality

  8. Organizational Information-Seeking in the Digital Era: A Model of New Media Use, Uncertainty Reduction, Identification and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ran

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the role of new media in individuals' organizational socialization process across cultures. First, this study has explored individuals' use of new media in their organizational socialization process in two countries, China and the United States, to gain a general understanding of the usage patterns. Second,…

  9. Cultural products go online: Comparing the internet and print media on distributions of gender, genre and commercial success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N.M. Verboord (Marc)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines whether the attention to cultural products on the internet is more democratically structured (in terms of gender and genre distributions) than in traditional print media, and how these types of media attention affect commercial success. For the U.S. fiction book rel

  10. Franchising and Film in Japan:Transmedia Production and the Changing Roles of Film in Contemporary Japanese Media Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Denison, Rayna

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerging film franchising practices in Japan are collapsing the boundaries between media productions, as Japan’s media industries work in collaboration to create large transmedia intertexts. This article examines the promotional discourses circulating around Japanese franchise film releases in order to understand how these new franchising practices are affecting the roles and status of popular cinema within contemporary Japanese culture.

  11. Adherence and Blocking of Candida Albicans to Cultured Vaginal Epithelial Cells: Treatments to Decrease Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Larsen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pathogenesis of mucosal microorganisms depends on adherence to the tissues they colonize and infect. For Candida albicans, cell surface hydrophobicity may play a significant role in tissue binding ability. Methods. A continuous cell line of vaginal epithelial cells (VEC was grown in keratinocyte serum-free medium (KSFM with supplements and harvested by trypsinization. VEC were combined with yeast cells to evaluate adherence and inhibition of adherence. In this experimental setup, yeast stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate were allowed to attach to VEC and the resulting fluorescent VEC were detected by flow cytometry. Results. VEC were cultured and examined daily after plating and showed morphology similar to basal epithelial cells. Culture media supplemented with estradiol showed increased VEC proliferation initially (first 24 h but cell morphology was not altered. Fluorescinated Candida cells bound effectively to the cultured VEC. Using fresh cells exposed to various preparations of K-Y, we showed that all formulations of the product reduced Candida binding to VEC by 25% to 50%. While VEC were generally harvested for use in experiments when they were near confluent growth, we allowed some cultures to grow beyond that point and discovered that cells allowed to become overgrown or stressed appeared to bind yeast cells more effectively. Conclusion. Flow cytometry is a useful method for evaluating binding of stained yeast cells to cultured VEC and has demonstrated that commercially available products have the ability to interfere with the process of yeast adherence to epithelial cells.

  12. Use of alternative media and different types of recipients in a laboratory culture of Ankistrodesmus gracilis (Reinsch Korshikov (Chlorophyceae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i3.8046 Use of alternative media and different types of recipients in a laboratory culture of Ankistrodesmus gracilis (Reinsch Korshikov (Chlorophyceae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v33i3.8046

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia de Almeida Berchielli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory culture of Ankistrodesmus gracilis algae was evaluated by studying the biology of the species and its chemical composition in a traditional medium (CHU12 and in two alternative culture media, NPK (20-5-20 and macrophyte (Eichhornia crassipes + NPK, in three different types of recipients (fiberglass, carboy and plastic bag. First peak in the growth curve of Ankistrodesmus gracilis occurred on the ninth day in macrophyte + NPK medium (74.16 x 105 cells mL-1 in a fiberglass recipient. However, highest density (p 12 (122.87 x 105 cells mL-1 in a plastic bag on the twelfth day. Cell density was over 70 x 105 cells mL-1 starting on the twelfth day. Growth rate of A. gracilis was similar (p > 0.05 in culture media in the three recipients. Protein and fiber were similar (p > 0.05 in the treatments, but lipids were higher (p -1 in NPK (p A. gracilis cultured in three types of recipients. Costs are low, occupying less space when cultured in plastic bags and in the laboratory.A laboratory culture of Ankistrodesmus gracilis algae was evaluated by studying the biology of the species and its chemical composition in a traditional medium (CHU12 and in two alternative culture media, NPK (20-5-20 and macrophyte (Eichhornia crassipes + NPK, in three different types of recipients (fiberglass, carboy and plastic bag. First peak in the growth curve of Ankistrodesmus gracilis occurred on the ninth day in macrophyte + NPK medium (74.16 x 105 cells mL-1 in a fiberglass recipient. However, highest density (p 12 (122.87 x 105 cells mL-1 in a plastic bag on the twelfth day. Cell density was over 70 x 105 cells mL-1 starting on the twelfth day. Growth rate of A. gracilis was similar (p > 0.05 in culture media in the three recipients. Protein and fiber were similar (p > 0.05 in the treatments, but lipids were higher (p -1 in NPK (p A. gracilis cultured in three types of recipients. Costs are low, occupying less space when cultured in plastic bags and in the

  13. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Silkworm (Bombyx mori) hemolymph unable to substitute fetal bovine serum in insect cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparto, Irma H.; Khalam, Chandra Nur; Praira, Willy; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-03-01

    Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) in animal cell culture media is an important source of nutrients for cell growth. However, the harvest and collection of FBS cause bioethical concerns. Efforts to reduce and preferably replace FBS with synthetic or other natural alternatives are continually being explored. Hemolymph silkworm (Bombyx mori) contains many nutrients needed for the process of metamorphosis. Therefore, there is possibility as an alternative nutritional supplement for cell culture to reduce the use of FBS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrocomponent of hemolymph and the possibility as medium supplement for Spodoptera fugiperda (Sf9) cell culture. Proximate analyses showed that hemolymph contains 89.76% of water, 2.52 mg/mL carbohydrate, 2.35% fat and 55.61 mg/mL protein. Further protein analysis, it consists of 15 fractions containing molecular weight of 22 - 152 kDa. The use of hemolymph as FBS substitution in Sf9 cell culture with various concentrations was unable to maintain and support cell growth. Further research still needed by prior adaptation of the tissue culture to minimal nutrition media before introduction of the hemolymph as supplement.

  15. Mouse cell culture - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases, starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward and David Tosh provide a necessary update of the protocols currently needed. In fact, nearly half of the book is devoted to stem cells culture protocols, mainly embryonic, from a list of several organs (kidney, lung, oesophagus and intestine, pancreas and liver to mention some........

  16. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  17. Pigment cell differentiation in sea urchin blastula-derived primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageenko, Natalya V; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2014-07-01

    The quinone pigments of sea urchins, specifically echinochrome and spinochromes, are known for their effective antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities. We developed in vitro technology for inducing pigment differentiation in cell culture. The intensification of the pigment differentiation was accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in cell proliferation. The number of pigment cells was two-fold higher in the cells cultivated in the coelomic fluids of injured sea urchins than in those intact. The possible roles of the specific components of the coelomic fluids in the pigment differentiation process and the quantitative measurement of the production of naphthoquinone pigments during cultivation were examined by MALDI and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Echinochrome A and spinochrome E were produced by the cultivated cells of the sand dollar Scaphechinus mirabilis in all tested media, while only spinochromes were found in the cultivated cells of another sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The expression of genes associated with the induction of pigment differentiation was increased in cells cultivated in the presence of shikimic acid, a precursor of naphthoquinone pigments. Our results should contribute to the development of new techniques in marine biotechnology, including the generation of cell cultures producing complex bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. PMID:24979272

  18. Pigment Cell Differentiation in Sea Urchin Blastula-Derived Primary Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya V. Ageenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quinone pigments of sea urchins, specifically echinochrome and spinochromes, are known for their effective antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities. We developed in vitro technology for inducing pigment differentiation in cell culture. The intensification of the pigment differentiation was accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in cell proliferation. The number of pigment cells was two-fold higher in the cells cultivated in the coelomic fluids of injured sea urchins than in those intact. The possible roles of the specific components of the coelomic fluids in the pigment differentiation process and the quantitative measurement of the production of naphthoquinone pigments during cultivation were examined by MALDI and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Echinochrome A and spinochrome E were produced by the cultivated cells of the sand dollar Scaphechinus mirabilis in all tested media, while only spinochromes were found in the cultivated cells of another sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The expression of genes associated with the induction of pigment differentiation was increased in cells cultivated in the presence of shikimic acid, a precursor of naphthoquinone pigments. Our results should contribute to the development of new techniques in marine biotechnology, including the generation of cell cultures producing complex bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential.

  19. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue

  20. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón-Rodríguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  1. LIF and TNF alpha concentrations in embryo culture media are predictive for embryo implantation in IVF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula Zollner; Sonja Bischofs; Irena Lalic; Klaus-Peter Zollner

    2012-01-01

    Objective:There is strong evidence that the cytokines leucemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha are related to embryo development and implantation. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of LIF and TNF alpha in embryo culture media and to assess its relationship to the outcome of in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. Methods:A total of 99 patients were included in this prospective trial and underwent either IVF or ICSI procedure. A total of 865 oocytes were collected. Embryos were cultured in sequential media until day 5. A standardized morphology evaluation of all embryos, including a detailed pronuclear scoring, was performed daily during this period followed by the replacement of one or two selected embryos. Collected embryo culture fluids of days 3 and 5 were analysed for LIF and TNF alpha on days 3 and 5. Results:Mean TNF alpha concentration in culture media on day 3 was 0.54 and 0.37 pg/mL on day 5 and was significantly lower in women conceiving than in not conceiving (0.43 pg/mL versus 0.59 pg/mL on day 3). Mean LIF concentration on day 3 was 31.5 pg/mL and 35.5 pg/mL on day 5 and was significantly higher in women conceiving (56.2 pg/mL versus 22.2 pg/mL on day 3). Conclusions:The results indicate that LIF could have a function in early embryogenesis and as a factor required for embryo implantation. High TNF alpha concentrations seem to be predictive of implantation failure.

  2. Darwinian Evolution of Prions in Cell Culture*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiali; Browning, Shawn; Mahal, Sukhvir P.; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Weissmann, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins consisting mainly of PrPSc, a β sheet-rich conformer of the normal host protein PrPC, and occur in different strains. Strain identity is thought to be encoded by PrPSc conformation. We found that biologically cloned prion populations gradually became heterogeneous by accumulating “mutants”, and selective pressures resulted in the emergence of different mutants as major constituents of the evolving population. Thus, when transferred from brain to cultured cells, ...

  3. Bioactive sugar surfaces for hepatocyte cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ambury, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, develop and characterise a novel bioactive surface capable of binding hepatocytes and enabling the retention of hepatocyte-specific cell function during in-vitro culture. The materials were designed to exploit a unique characteristic of hepatocyte biology, with β-galactose moieties displayed to allow cellular adhesion via the specific asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) found on hepatocytes. Hydrogels were created by modifying a commercia...

  4. Degradation of TNT by plant cell cultures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipná, Radka; Nepovím, Aleš; Zeman, S.; Vágner, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Smolenice, 2003, s. 78-79. [Xenobiochemické sympózium /22./. Smolenice (SK), 09.06.2003-11.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P065; GA MŠk OC 837.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : degradation * plant cell cultures Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides

  5. Canine and Equine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Serum Free Media Have Altered Immunophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kaitlin C; Kol, Amir; Shahbenderian, Salpi; Granick, Jennifer L; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is being increasingly used to treat dogs and horses with naturally-occurring diseases. However these animals also serve as critical large animal models for ongoing translation of cell therapy products to the human market. MSC manufacture for clinical use mandates improvement in cell culture systems to meet demands for higher MSC numbers and removal of xeno-proteins (i.e. fetal bovine serum, FBS). While serum-free media (SFM) is commercially available, its affects on MSC phenotype and immunomodulatory functions are not fully known. The objective of this study was to determine if specific MSC culture conditions, MSC expansion in HYPERFlasks® or MSC expansion in a commercially available SFM, would alter MSC proliferation, phenotype or immunomodulatory properties in vitro. MSCs cultured in HYPERFlasks® were similar in phenotype, proliferative capacity and immunomodulatory functions to MSCs grown in standard flasks however MSC yield was markedly increased. HYPERFlasks® therefore provide a viable option to generate greater cell numbers in a streamlined manner. Canine and equine MSCs expanded in SFM displayed similar proliferation, surface phenotype and inhibitory effect on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. However, MSCs cultured in the absence of FBS secreted significantly less PGE2, and were significantly less able to inhibit IFNγ secretion by activated T-cells. Immunomodulatory functions altered by expansion in SFM were species dependent. Unlike equine MSCs, in canine adipose-derived MSCs, the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was not principally modulated by PGE2. The removal of FBS from both canine and equine MSC culture systems resulted in altered immunomodulatory properties in vitro and warrants further investigation prior to moving towards FBS-free culture conditions. PMID:26638159

  6. A Sensitive Competitive ELISA for Determination of Biotin in Transformed Yeast Culture Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGHong

    2003-01-01

    Aim To develop a sensitive competitive ELISA for the determination of biotin in transformed yeast culture media.Methods The ELISA plate was firstly coated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, and then successively incubated with rabbit ami-Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae serum and goat anti-rabbit IgG-biotin to form the solid biotin, which competed with the biotin in the solution (standard or sample) for the limited streptavidin-horse radish peroxidase conjugate. The standard calibration curve for biotin analysis was constructed in the range of 50-2000ng·L-1. Results The detection limit for biotin was found to be 83 ng·L-1 , which waa about 1000 times lower than the lowest determination concenlration in the reported ELISA for biotin analysis. The relative standard deviations for the spiked samples at biotin concerarations of 200 ng·L-1, 500 ng·L-1 , and 1000 ng·L-1 were 24.87%, 6.15%, and 7.86%, respectively, with the average recovery of 101.13%. The wild yeast and its sixty-three transformed yeast culture media were applied to the developed ELISA for the determination of biotin. It was found that the biotin concentrations in more than 85 % of the tested samples were enhanced with different increase factors after transformation. Conclusion Utilization of Mycoplasma hyopnetunoniae as the coating protein improves the precision and accmacy oftbe ELISA assay, which might be used for the biotin assay in other media.

  7. Experimental Study of Rat Beta Islet Cells Cultured under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun SONG; Xiu-Qing DUAN; Xi LI; Li-Ou HAN; Ping XU; Chun-Fang SONG; Lian-Hong JIN

    2004-01-01

    To observe the effects of simulated microgravity on beta islet cell culture, we have compared the survival rates and the insulin levels of the isolated rat islet cells cultured at micro- and normal gravity conditions. The survival rates of the cells cultured were determined by acridine orange-propidium iodide double-staining on day 3, 7 and 14. The morphology of the cells was observed by electron microscopy.Insulin levels were measured by radio immuno assays. Our results show that the cell number cultured under the microgravity condition is significantly higher than that under the routine condition (P<0.01). Some tubular structure shown by transmission electron microscopy, possibly for the transport of nutrients, were formed intercellularly in the microgravity cultured group on day 7. There were also abundant secretion particles and mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that there were holes formed between each islet, possibly connecting with the nutrient transport tubules. The microgravity cultured group also has higher insulin levels in the media as compared with the control group(P<0.01). Our results indicate that microgravity cultivation of islet cells has advantages over the routine culture methods.

  8. Experimental Study of Rat Beta Islet Cells Cultured under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunSONG; Xiu-QingDUAN; XiLI; Li-OuHAN; PingXU; Chun-FangSONG:; Lian-HongJIN

    2004-01-01

    To observe the effects of simulated microgravity on beta islet cell culture, we have compared the survival rates and the insulin levels of the isolated rat islet cells cultured at micro- and normal gravity conditions. The survival rates of the cells cultured were determined by acridine orange-propidium iodide double-staining on day 3,7 and 14. The morphology of the cells was observed by electron microscopy.Insulin levels were measured by radio immuno assays. Our results show that the cell number cultured underthe microgravity condition is significantly higher than that under the routine condition (P<0.01). Some tubular structure shown by transmission electron microscopy, possibly for the transport of nutrients, were formed intercellularly in the microgravity cultured group on day 7. There were also abundant secretion particles and mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that there were holes formed between each islet, possibly connecting with the nutrient transport tubules. The microgravity cultured group also has higher insulin levels in the media as compared with the control group (P<0.01). Our results indicate that microgravity cultivation of islet cells has advantages over the routine culture methods.

  9. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Parvaneh Farzaneh; Laleh Nikfarjam

    2011-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma conta...

  10. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  11. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  12. 论当代媒介文化的特征%On the Characteristics of Contemporary Media Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雄仕

    2012-01-01

    media as the products of culture and the main carrier of culture polymerization, spread and inheritage, it has a profound impact on the cultural development. Media culture is a new cultural form due to the influence of the mass media and the subculture system influenced by the mass media in the overall culture in modem society. Media culture has the huge impact characteristics of mixed complexity, multiple function, and business consumption.%媒介作为文化的生成物,又是文化聚合、播散、传承的主要载体,对文化的发展及走向产生着深刻的影响。媒介文化是因大众媒介的影响而产生的一种新兴的文化形态,是现代社会总体文化中,通过大众传播媒介的影响而建构起的亚文化系统。媒介文化具有混合复杂性、多重功能性、商业消费性、巨大冲击性特征。

  13. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  14. Prevention and dispersion of contrast media induced red cell aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Red cell aggregation was observed microscopically when human blood and contrast media were mixed on glass slides. Aggregation was more frequent in low-osmolal media: mainly rouleaux were formed in ioxaglate but irregular aggregates in non-ionic media. Aggregation was similar at concentrations of 150 and 300 mg I/ml. Pre-treatment of glass slides with heparinized saline reduced red cell aggregation but saline was almost as effective. Most of the irregular aggregates dispersed when saline or heparinized saline was applied to them. Saline and heparinized saline had an identical dispersing effect. After incubation of the aggregates in iopamidol in plastic tubes for one or five minutes, saline was injected into the tubes, and after mixing the solution was poured onto glass slides and examined under the microscope. Only a few small irregular aggregates were detected in 6/60 specimens. It is concluded that ionicity of a flushing medium and shear of the injection are able to disperse red cell aggregates during angiography. (orig.)

  15. Optimized exosome isolation protocol for cell culture supernatant and human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lobb

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles represent a rich source of novel biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. However, there is currently limited information elucidating the most efficient methods for obtaining high yields of pure exosomes, a subset of extracellular vesicles, from cell culture supernatant and complex biological fluids such as plasma. To this end, we comprehensively characterize a variety of exosome isolation protocols for their efficiency, yield and purity of isolated exosomes. Repeated ultracentrifugation steps can reduce the quality of exosome preparations leading to lower exosome yield. We show that concentration of cell culture conditioned media using ultrafiltration devices results in increased vesicle isolation when compared to traditional ultracentrifugation protocols. However, our data on using conditioned media isolated from the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC SK-MES-1 cell line demonstrates that the choice of concentrating device can greatly impact the yield of isolated exosomes. We find that centrifuge-based concentrating methods are more appropriate than pressure-driven concentrating devices and allow the rapid isolation of exosomes from both NSCLC cell culture conditioned media and complex biological fluids. In fact to date, no protocol detailing exosome isolation utilizing current commercial methods from both cells and patient samples has been described. Utilizing tunable resistive pulse sensing and protein analysis, we provide a comparative analysis of 4 exosome isolation techniques, indicating their efficacy and preparation purity. Our results demonstrate that current precipitation protocols for the isolation of exosomes from cell culture conditioned media and plasma provide the least pure preparations of exosomes, whereas size exclusion isolation is comparable to density gradient purification of exosomes. We have identified current shortcomings in common extracellular vesicle isolation methods and provide a

  16. Sodium 22+ washout from cultured rat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The washout of Na+ isotopes from tissues and cells is quite complex and not well defined. To further gain insight into this process, we have studied 22Na+ washout from cultured Wistar rat skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In these preparations, 22Na+ washout is described by a general three-exponential function. The exponential factor of the fastest component (k1) and the initial exchange rate constant (kie) of cultured fibroblasts decrease in magnitude in response to incubation in K+-deficient medium or in the presence of ouabain and increase in magnitude when the cells are incubated in a Ca++-deficient medium. As the magnitude of the kie declines (in the presence of ouabain) to the level of the exponential factor of the middle component (k2), 22Na+ washout is adequately described by a two-exponential function. When the kie is further diminished (in the presence of both ouabain and phloretin) to the range of the exponential factor of the slowest component (k3), the washout of 22Na+ is apparently monoexponential. Calculations of the cellular Na+ concentrations, based on the 22Na+ activity in the cells at the initiation of the washout experiments, and the medium specific activity agree with atomic absorption spectrometry measurements of the cellular concentration of this ion. Thus, all three components of 22Na+ washout from cultured rat cells are of cellular origin. Using the exponential parameters, compartmental analyses of two models (in parallel and in series) with three cellular Na+ pools were performed. The results indicate that, independent of the model chosen, the relative size of the largest Na+ pool is 92-93% in fibroblasts and approximately 96% in VSMCs. This pool is most likely to represent the cytosol

  17. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  18. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  19. Growth and sporulation of Metarhizium flavoviride var. Flavoviride on culture media and lighting regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofre Sideney Becker

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi from the genus Metarhizium are largely used for the biological control of agricultural pests by conidia spreading on the field. Although conidia production is well studied in M. anisopliae, only few research studies were done in M. flavoviride. The present work was carried out alming to evaluate the Mycelial growth and sporulation of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium flavoviride var. flavoviride growing at 27 ± 2°C on Potato-dextrose-agar (PDA, Czapek-agar (CZP and a complete agar medium (CM under three lighting regimes, (continuous illumination, light/dark cycle and an black light/dark cycle were investigated. A completely randomized 3 × 3 (culture media × lighting regime factorial design with four replicates was used. The best mycelial growth and sporulation occurred on the PDA and CM media under continuous illumination (P <= 0,05.

  20. Violence in Pop-Culture Media and The Hunger Games as a Prime Artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Benson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA methodology to analyze the meanings conveyed in relation to violence in Suzanne Collins' popular novel The Hunger Games and its film. As a representational popular­culture artifact marketed to young adults and teens, it is a primary example for the exposure of this age group to the levels of violence regularly displayed in contemporary popular media. This analysis seeks to critique the assertion that the types of violent exposure in the novel and the film are possibly inappropriate for the audience targeted. A new wave of attention and awareness on the part of producers of popular media and people of contemporary society alike is necessary.

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation, culture conditions and media composition on metallothionein production by Bacillus pantothenticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cystine rich proteins found in all living organisms and play important roles as a radical scavenger and in metal homeostasis. Their optimum culture conditions and media composition of B. pantothenticuszn and B.pantothenticuscu were 1.5 g/L maltose and 1.5 g/l lactose as media carbon sources respectively, 48 hrs incubation period, 35 degree C, ph 8, 200 r.p.m. agitation speed, 26 g/L ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate as nitrogen source, 0.5 g/L cysteine, 6% of 2.5x107 c.f.u./ml. inoculum size and exposure to a level dose of 4 kGy of gamma radiation. All the previous parameters increased the production of MT by B. pantothenticuszn and B.pantothenticuscu strains 12 and 10 times, respectively compared to the parent strains

  2. Local Political Culture and Use of Local Media: Is There a Relationship?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Jens Villiam

    This paper investigates whether there is a relationship between local political culture and use of local media; especially the internet. The investigation is done on the basis of a case study conducted in the Danish municipality of Odder between 2003 and 2006. The case study is a very thorough...... investigation of local media, local politics and local democracy. In connection with the case study a wealth of qualitative as well as quantitative data were collected, among these two surveys conducted in 2003 and 2005. On the basis of a triangulation between theoretical considerations concerning the...... differences between a representative democratic model of political governance and a network model of governance, system politics and everyday politics, and the results of 20 in-depth citizen interviews, four (ideal-) types of citizen roles are constructed: the voter, the spectator, the project maker and the...

  3. Interaction of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia and Parascaris equorum eggs in different culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Lorendane Millena; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Domingues, Rafael Reis; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Lelis, Rosane Teixeira; de Paula, Alessandra Teixeira; da Silveira, Wendeo Ferreira; de Araújo, Jackson Victor

    2014-07-01

    Research involving the use of nematophagous fungi in the biological control of parasites of interest to veterinarians has occurred over recent years, with promising results. This article reports the infection of Parascaris equorum eggs by the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia (isolates VC1 and VC4). Six groups were formed for each isolate, with six different culture media: 2% water-agar (2% WA); agar-chitin (AC); YPSSA (yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4 ·7H2O, soluble starch); AELA extract (starch + water + agar); 2% corn-meal-agar (2% CMA); and 2% potato dextrose-agar (2% PDA). A total of 1000 eggs of P. equorum were transferred to each plate containing isolates grown for a period of 7 days (treatment group). Also, 1000 eggs were added to each plate without fungus (controlgroup). The plates were kept in an environmental chamber at 25 °C in the dark for 21 days. After, we analyzed the effects on ovicidal activity: effect 1 (accession shell); effect 2 (penetration hyphae); and effect 3 (destruction of the eggs). No differences were observed in the destruction of eggs between the two isolates. The decreasing effectiveness of the different culture media was: PDA (38.9%); CMA (38.3%); WA (36.7%); YPSSA (36.45%); and AC (32.5%). The highest percentage egg destruction was observed when the strains were grown in culture medium AELA (44.9%); this was the best medium. PMID:25088293

  4. Optimization of the basal medium for improving production and secretion of taxanes from suspension cell culture of Taxus baccata L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasem Abbasi Kajani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study Taxol is one of the most effective anticancer drugs that isolated from Taxus sp. due to the slow growth of Taxus trees and low concentration of Taxol in the tissues, the biotechnological approaches especially plant cell culture have been considered to produce Taxol in commercial scale.MethodsWe investigated the effects of basal medium type used in culture media on production of Taxol and other taxane compounds from cell suspension culture of T. baccata L. Briefly, five commonly basal media including Gamborg, Murashige and Skoog, Woody Plant, Schenk and Hildebrandt, and Driver and Kuniyuki medium were used for preparing separate suspension culture media. The intra- and extra-cellular yields of taxanes were analyzed by using HPLC after 21 days period of culturing.ResultsThe yields of taxanes were significantly different for the cultures prepared by different basal media. Moreover, the effects of basal medium on the yield of products differed for varius taxane compounds. Maximum yields of Baccatin III (10.03 mgl-1 and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (4.2 mgl-1 were achieved from the DKW basal media, but the yield of Taxol was maximum (16.58 mgl-1 in the WPM basal media. Furthermore, the secretion of taxanes from the cells into medium was also considerably affected by the type of basal medium. The maximum extra-cellular yield of Taxol (7.81 mgl-1, Baccatin III (5.0 mgl-1, and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (1.45 mgl-1 were also obtained by using DKW basal medium that were significantly higher than those obtained from other culture media.

  5. Optimization of the basal medium for improving production and secretion of taxanes from suspension cell culture of Taxus baccata L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajani Abolghasem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose of the study Taxol is one of the most effective anticancer drugs that isolated from Taxus sp. due to the slow growth of Taxus trees and low concentration of Taxol in the tissues, the biotechnological approaches especially plant cell culture have been considered to produce Taxol in commercial scale. Methods We investigated the effects of basal medium type used in culture media on production of Taxol and other taxane compounds from cell suspension culture of T. baccata L. Briefly, five commonly basal media including Gamborg, Murashige and Skoog, Woody Plant, Schenk and Hildebrandt, and Driver and Kuniyuki medium were used for preparing separate suspension culture media. The intra- and extra-cellular yields of taxanes were analyzed by using HPLC after 21 days period of culturing. Results The yields of taxanes were significantly different for the cultures prepared by different basal media. Moreover, the effects of basal medium on the yield of products differed for varius taxane compounds. Maximum yields of Baccatin III (10.03 mgl-1 and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (4.2 mgl-1 were achieved from the DKW basal media, but the yield of Taxol was maximum (16.58 mgl-1 in the WPM basal media. Furthermore, the secretion of taxanes from the cells into medium was also considerably affected by the type of basal medium. The maximum extra-cellular yield of Taxol (7.81 mgl-1, Baccatin III (5.0 mgl-1, and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (1.45 mgl-1 were also obtained by using DKW basal medium that were significantly higher than those obtained from other culture media.

  6. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  7. In vitro multiplication of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) III. Culture media.

    OpenAIRE

    Casas Cendoya, Ana María; Lasa Dolhagaray, José Manuel

    1987-01-01

    [EN] Different culture media for in vitro multiplication of sugarbeet, from apical buds, were compared. In the establishment stage the highest fresh weight was obtained on basal medium supplemented with 4.4 μM BA, 0.5 μM NAA, and 0.3 μM GA3. The highest multiplication rates (up to 9 axillary shoots per bud) were achieved on the same medium with only 0.2 μM BA as hormonal complement. The best percentage of rooted shoots was obtained on basal medium, with macroelements at half-strength and a 5....

  8. Dismantling Cultural Prejudice: Responses to Huntington’s Thesis in the Indonesian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Prasetyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The ideas contained in Huntington's article, "Clash of Civilization?", are provoking. Since its publication in Foreign Affairs (summer 1993, several responses have appeared in the media world-wide. In this home country, Huntington's article was critized from various angles.  His assumptions, model, data and even his potition were scrutunized mostly by social scientists and Islamicist. These criticisms, however, highlight the article's significant importance in the debates of political and cultural problems faced in the post-cold war world.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v1i1.869

  9. EVALUATION OF CULTURE MEDIA FOR MYCELIAL AND SPORANGIAL PRODUCTION OF PHYTOPHTORA COLOCASIAE.

    OpenAIRE

    G. Padmaja; G Uma Devi; B Kanaka Mahalakshmi; Sridevi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Eight different culture media were used to determine where Phytophthora colocasiae would bet grow and reproduce. Mycelia growth of 86 mm, 79.6 mm, 80.6 mm, 72 mm and 50 mm growth of P. colocasiae were obtained in Carrot Agar, Carrot Potato Agar (CPA) medium, Papaya Sucrose Agar, Host leaf extract agar, Oat meal agar respectively. P. colocasiae grown on Carrot agar for 4-7 days gave Carrot agar was supplement the nutrients to Phytophthora spp. to enhanced production of sporangial growth.

  10. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  11. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  12. Prolonged hypoxic culture and trypsinization increase the pro-angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Pilgaard, Linda; Kastrup, Jens; Simonsen, Ulf; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), including adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC), is a promising option in the treatment of vascular disease. Short-term hypoxic culture of MSC augments secretion of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines. We hypothesized that prolonged hypoxi...... (1% and 5% oxygen) culture and trypsinization would augment ASC expression of anti-apoptotic and angiogenic cytokines and increase the angiogenic potential of ASC-conditioned media....

  13. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  14. Stem cell hype: media portrayal of therapy translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-03-11

    In this Perspective, we examine the portrayal of translational stem cell research in major daily newspapers in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2013, focusing on how timelines for stem cell therapies were represented before and after Geron terminated its pioneering stem cell program. Our content analysis reveals that press coverage has shifted from ethical, legal, and social issues to clinical translation issues, and highly optimistic timelines were provided with no substantial change in representation over time. Scientists were the dominant voice with respect to translation timelines. The findings raise questions about the degree to which the media's overly optimistic slant fosters unrealistic expectations regarding the speed of clinical translation and highlight the ethical responsibility of stem cell researchers as public communicators. PMID:25761887

  15. Secretion of hyaluronic acid by mucosal and submucosal gland epithelial cell cultures derived from human trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiratory epithelium is a target tissue for numerous airborne toxicants. We have established epithelial cell cultures form the mucosa and submucosal glands of human trachea. These epithelial cells exhibit numerous microvilli, desmosomes, and secretory granules. The objective of this study was to characterize the secretory products of these cell cultures. Neat confluent cultures at third passage were labeled with 10 μCi/ml tritiated glucosamine for 20 hours. The culture media was collected, adjusted to 5 mm DTT, and spun at 800 x g for 10 minutes to remove cellular debris. Aliquots were run on a Sepharose CL-4B column in PBS, 1 mm DTT, and 0.02% sodium azide. Void volume fractions were collected and counted by liquid scintillation. The void volume material was found to be susceptible to degradation by bovine testicular and Streptomyces Hyaluronidase. This indicates that hyaluronic acid is the major secretory product (>95%) of these cells. Submucosal gland cell secretion of hyaluronic acid was 175-200% greater than that of mucosal cells. Secretion of hyaluronic acid by the cultured cells indicates that HA may be one of the major secretory products of tracheal epithelial cells in vivo. This model provides an excellent opportunity for studying the affects of environmental agents on the target cell population

  16. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, Thomas; Rydholm, Susanna; Akpe, Victor; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derived hydrogel for use as a 3D cell culture scaffold at the microscale. Results Phenylalanine derivative hydrogel formation was seen to occur in multiple dispersion media. Cells were immobilized in situ within microchambers designed for cell analysis. Use of the highly biocompatible hydrogel components and simplistic procedures significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects seen with alternate 3D culture materials and microstructure loading methods. Cells were easily immobilized, sustained and removed from microchambers. Differences in growth morphology were seen in the cultured cells, owing to the 3-dimentional character of the gel structure. Degradation improved the removal of hydrogel from the microstructures, permitting reuse of the analysis platforms. Conclusion Self-assembling diphenylalanine derivative hydrogel provided a method to dramatically reduce the typical difficulties of microculture formation. Effective generation of patterned 3D cultures will lead to improved cell study results by better modeling in vivo growth environments and increasing efficiency and specificity of cell studies. Use of simplified growth scaffolds such as peptide-derived hydrogel should be seen as highly advantageous and will likely become more commonplace in cell culture methodology. PMID:18070345

  17. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpe Victor

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derived hydrogel for use as a 3D cell culture scaffold at the microscale. Results Phenylalanine derivative hydrogel formation was seen to occur in multiple dispersion media. Cells were immobilized in situ within microchambers designed for cell analysis. Use of the highly biocompatible hydrogel components and simplistic procedures significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects seen with alternate 3D culture materials and microstructure loading methods. Cells were easily immobilized, sustained and removed from microchambers. Differences in growth morphology were seen in the cultured cells, owing to the 3-dimentional character of the gel structure. Degradation improved the removal of hydrogel from the microstructures, permitting reuse of the analysis platforms. Conclusion Self-assembling diphenylalanine derivative hydrogel provided a method to dramatically reduce the typical difficulties of microculture formation. Effective generation of patterned 3D cultures will lead to improved cell study results by better modeling in vivo growth environments and increasing efficiency and specificity of cell studies. Use of simplified growth scaffolds such as peptide-derived hydrogel should be seen as highly advantageous and will likely become more commonplace in cell culture methodology.

  18. Renotropic stimulation in rat kidney cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circulating renotropic factor specific for renal cells has been described in rats. The addition of sera obtained from unilaterally nephrectomized (uni) rats 24h after operation compared to sham-operated (sham) rats augments 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of incubating kidney slices approximately 10% - 30%. Attempting to amplify the sensitivity of the assay for this renotropic agent, the authors replaced slices with primary rat kidney cultures. The assay system was based on one previously used for rabbits. The cultured cells were synchronized in their growth phase by a period of protein-free starvation. Compared to sera from sham rats, sera from uni rats showed significant stimulation of thymidine incorporation into DNA, 35.5% +/- 9.3 (SEM), p < .0001, at 16 h; 63.3% +/- 10.0 (SEM), p < .001, at 24 h; and 19.5% +/- 6.5 (SEM), p < .01, at 48 h post operation. Accordingly, the maximal stimulation at 24 h was greater than that previously found using the kidney slice assay. Measurable renotropic activity occurred earlier and over a shorter duration than in rabbits. Stimulation was similar when a D-valine medium, relatively specific for renal epithelial cells, replaced DME medium

  19. Glutathione peroxidase activity in cell cultures from differentregions of human epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrique Castellón; Hernán Rioseco; Juan Rojas; Michel Royer; Eduardo Salas; Héctor Contreras; Christian Huidobro

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the secretory activity and androgen regulation of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in epithelial cell cultures from human epididymis. Methods: Tissue was obtained from patients undergoing therapeutic orchidectomy for prostatic cancer. Epithelial cell cultures were obtained from the caput, corpus and cauda epididymides. Enzymatic activity was measured in conditioned media by colorimetric methods in absence or presence of 1, 10 or 100 nmol.L-1from corpus and cauda than caput epididymidis. The presence of different concentrations of testosterone increase enzyme activity in cell cultures from all epididymal regions. Addition of flutamide reverses the androgen dependent increase of GPx activity. Conclusion: GPx activity is secreted from human epididymal cells in a region dependent manner and is regulated by androgens.

  20. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  1. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Grist, Samantha M.; Lukas Chrostowski; Cheung, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternat...

  2. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  3. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  4. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  5. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  6. Variations in Humanized and Defined Culture Conditions Supporting Derivation of New Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Judy M; Ferrier, Patricia M; Gardner, John O;

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of "humanized" (i.e., free of animal sourced reagents) and ultimately chemically defined culture systems for human embryo stem cell (hESC) isolation and culture is of importance to improving their efficacy and safety in research and therapeutic applications. This can be achieved by......ESC derivation, namely the use of animal immune compliment to isolate embryo inner cell mass, and animal sourced serum products and feeder cells to sustain hESC growth and attachment. As a result we report the derivation of six new hESC lines isolated by outgrowth from whole blastocysts on an extracellular...... serum-free medium (SFM) containing only human sourced and recombinant protein. Further, outgrowth of embryonic cells from whole blastocysts in both media could be achieved for up to 1 week without reliance on feeder cells. All variant conditions sustained undifferentiated cell status, a stable karyotype...

  7. Porous Media Approach for Modeling Closed Cell Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to minimize boil off of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen and to prevent the formation of ice on its exterior surface, the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) is insulated using various low-density, closed-cell polymeric foams. Improved analysis methods for these foam materials are needed to predict the foam structural response and to help identify the foam fracture behavior in order to help minimize foam shedding occurrences. This presentation describes a continuum based approach to modeling the foam thermo-mechanical behavior that accounts for the cellular nature of the material and explicitly addresses the effect of the internal cell gas pressure. A porous media approach is implemented in a finite element frame work to model the mechanical behavior of the closed cell foam. The ABAQUS general purpose finite element program is used to simulate the continuum behavior of the foam. The soil mechanics element is implemented to account for the cell internal pressure and its effect on the stress and strain fields. The pressure variation inside the closed cells is calculated using the ideal gas laws. The soil mechanics element is compatible with an orthotropic materials model to capture the different behavior between the rise and in-plane directions of the foam. The porous media approach is applied to model the foam thermal strain and calculate the foam effective coefficient of thermal expansion. The calculated foam coefficients of thermal expansion were able to simulate the measured thermal strain during heat up from cryogenic temperature to room temperature in vacuum. The porous media approach was applied to an insulated substrate with one inch foam and compared to a simple elastic solution without pore pressure. The porous media approach is also applied to model the foam mechanical behavior during subscale laboratory experiments. In this test, a foam layer sprayed on a metal substrate is subjected to a temperature variation while the metal substrate is

  8. Various Culture Media Effect on T4 Phage Lysis and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kamran Taj

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on bacteriophage growth and its development played a vital role in the history of molecular biology which in turn helped in clarification of many points. Most of the previous studies on bacteriophage development and growth have been performed under optimal conditions for the host cell. While On the other hand these conditions may not be optimal for the T4 bacteriophage. As a matter of fact in nature E. coli faces many unfavorable growth conditions, good example are those conditions prevailing in the human gut in which E.coli manages to survive well. This study characterizes the effects and influences of well-defined physiological conditions on T4 bacteriophage growth and development. In addition to this, T4 bacteriophage interactions with its bacterial host have also been demonstrated.In our present study we observed that the maximum growth and lysis of T4 bacteriophage was on luria-bertani (LB and nutrient media (NM. Moreover the T4 bacteriophage production and lysis was also good in luria-bertani plus glucose (LB+G media but when compared with its production in luria-bertani (LB and nutrient media it was found to be less than these medium. Our study results also showed that in minimal media (MM rate of growth and lysis activity of T4 bacteriophage was lowest as compared to other mentioned medium.

  9. Development of primary cell culture from Scylla serrata: Primary cell cultures from Scylla serrata

    OpenAIRE

    Sashikumar, Anu; Desai, P. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time, the Primary cell culture of hepatopancreas from edible crab Scylla serrata using crab saline, L-15 (Leibovitz), 1 × L-15 + crab saline, 2 × L-15 + crab saline, 3 × L-15 and citrate buffer without any serum. We could isolate and maintain E (Embryonalzellen), F (Fibrenzellen), B (Blasenzellen), R (Restzellen) and G (Granular cells). Upon seeding the hepatopancreatic E, F, B, and R cells showed different survival pattern over time than granular cells. A mod...

  10. Adding Social Media to e-Learning in the Workplace: Instilling Interactive Learning Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Leino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As social media features are increasingly added to e-learning, we urgently need more case studies of their use to ground practices in actual experience rather than hype. Using ethnography-based approach, we studied five continuous pro-fessional development pilot trainings where learning largely took place at workplace through wikis, blogs, forums, chats and voice conferencing. Learners valued interactivity, peer support and abundant, instant feedback offered by synchro-nous features. Simultaneously, however, asynchronous fea-tures were often treated as chores and overall interactive learning culture failed to emerge. Instructors, while explicitly encouraging social learning approach, implicitly reinforced teacher-centered learning, leading learners to stick to conven-tional learning culture. Also, training designs often failed to engender interaction. Moreover, at general level, group sizes were too big, moderation was not used efficiently, and differ-ing skill sets of learners were not evened out. The lessons learned from these trainings offer us insight into how to design e-learning enhanced with social media and how to avoid po-tential pitfalls. Particularly, we discuss designing interactivity into the e-learning process.

  11. Burmese Attitude toward Chinese: Portrayal of the Chinese in Contemporary Cultural and Media Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that since at least the mid 1980s, there has been an observable negative attitude among the people of Burma against the Chinese. Such sentiment is not just transient public opinion, but an attitude. The author measures it by studying contemporary cultural and media works as found in legally published expressions, so as to exclude any material rejected by the regime’s censors. The causes of such sentiment are various: massive Chinese migration and purchases of real estate (especially in Upper Burma, Chinese money that is inflating the cost of everything, and cultural “intrusion.” The sentiment extends to the military, as well: the article examines a dozen memoirs of former military generals and finds that Burma’s generals do not trust the Chinese, a legacy of China’s interference in Burma’s civil war until the 1980s. The public outcry over the Myitsone dam issue, however, was the most significant expression of such sentiment since 1969, when anti-Chinese riots broke out in Burma. The relaxation of media restrictions under the new government has allowed this expression to gather steam and spread throughout the country, especially in private weekly journals that are becoming more outspoken and daring in pushing the boundaries of the state’s restrictions.

  12. Phosphatidylinositol species of suspension cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, S.; Wagner, K.G.

    Suspension cultured Nicotiana tabacum and Catharanthus roseus cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, the phospholipid fraction extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography. Three different solvent systems and reference compounds were used to assign the different /sup 3/H-labeled species by autoradiography. The ratio of (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into PI, PIP and PIP/sub 2/ was found to be 95:4:1; with some preparations a lyso-PI band was obtained which incorporated about a tenth of the label of the PIP band. With Catharanthus roseus cells a very faint band between PI and lyso-PI was detected which could not be assigned to a reference compound.

  13. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamey D

    2013-12-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in 'wasteful' glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  14. Evaluation of osteogenic cell culture and osteogenic/peripheral blood mononuclear human cell co-culture on modified titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a bioactive ceramic coating on titanium in the nanothickness range on human osteogenic cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on osteogenic cells co-cultured with PBMC without exogenous stimuli. Cell viability, proliferation, adhesion, cytokine release (IL1β, TGFβ1, IL10 and IL17) and intracellular stain for osteopontin and alkaline phosphatase were assessed. Morphologic evaluation showed smaller and less spread cell aspects in co-culture relative to osteogenic cell culture. Cell viability, proliferation and adhesion kinetics were differently influenced by surface texture/chemistry in culture versus co-culture. Cytokine release was also influenced by the interaction between mononuclear and osteogenic cells (mediators released by mononuclear cells acted on osteogenic cells and vice versa). In general, ‘multi-cell type’ interactions played a more remarkable role than the surface roughness or chemistry utilized on the in vitro cellular events related to initial stages of bone formation. (paper)

  15. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  16. Evaluation of economically feasible, natural plant extract-based microbiological media for producing biomass of the dry rot biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens P22Y05 in liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Sadia; Ali, Tasneem Adam; Skory, Chris; Slininger, Patricia J; Schisler, David A

    2016-02-01

    The production of microbial biomass in liquid media often represents an indispensable step in the research and development of bacterial and fungal strains. Costs of commercially prepared nutrient media or purified media components, however, can represent a significant hurdle to conducting research in locations where obtaining these products is difficult. A less expensive option for providing components essential to microbial growth in liquid culture is the use of extracts of fresh or dried plant products obtained by using hot water extraction techniques. A total of 13 plant extract-based media were prepared from a variety of plant fruits, pods or seeds of plant species including Allium cepa (red onion bulb), Phaseolus vulgaris (green bean pods), and Lens culinaris (lentil seeds). In shake flask tests, cell production by potato dry rot antagonist Pseudomonas fluorescens P22Y05 in plant extract-based media was generally statistically indistinguishable from that in commercially produced tryptic soy broth and nutrient broth as measured by optical density and colony forming units/ml produced (P ≤ 0.05, Fisher's protected LSD). The efficacy of biomass produced in the best plant extract-based media or commercial media was equivalent in reducing Fusarium dry rot by 50-96% compared to controls. In studies using a high-throughput microbioreactor, logarithmic growth of P22Y05 in plant extract-based media initiated in 3-5 h in most cases but specific growth rate and the time of maximum OD varied as did the maximum pH obtained in media. Nutrient analysis of selected media before and after cell growth indicated that nitrogen in the form of NH4 accumulated in culture supernatants, possibly due to unbalanced growth conditions brought on by a scarcity of simple sugars in the media tested. The potential of plant extract-based media to economically produce biomass of microbes active in reducing plant disease is considerable and deserves further research. PMID:26745985

  17. Pronounced radiosensitization of cultured human cancer cells by COX inhibitor under acidic microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the influence of pH on the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by COX (cyclooxygenase) -1 and -2 inhibitors using established human cancer cells in culture. Methods and Materials: Nonselective COX inhibitor, ibuprofen (IB), and selective COX-2 inhibitor, SC-236, were used to determine the cytotoxicity and radiosensitization at varying pH of culture media. Human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29) was exposed to the drug alone and in combination with radiation at different pH of the cell culture media. The end point was clonogenic ability of the single-plated cells after the treatment. Results: Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization of IB increased with higher drug concentration and longer exposure time. The most significant radiosensitization was seen with IB (1.5 mM) for 2-h treatment at pH 6.7 before irradiation. The dose-modifying factor as defined by the ratio of radiation doses required to achieve the same effect on cell survival was 1.8 at 10% survival level. In contrast, SC-236 (50 μM for 2-8 h) showed no pH-dependent cytotoxicity. There was modest increase in the cell killing at lower doses of radiation. Conclusion: An acidic pH was an important factor affecting the increased cytotoxicity and radiosensitization by ibuprofen. Radiation response was enhanced at shoulder portion of the cell survival curve by selective COX-2 inhibitor

  18. “Moros en la costa”: Islam in Spanish visual and media culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Beck

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Los medios de comunicación occidentales caracterizan a los musulmanes como anticuados, fanáticos belicosos que carecen de razón y que exhiben ciertos rasgos físicos. Los polemistas medievales islamificaron a los musulmanes para los lectores occidentales que tenían escaso contacto con el Islam. La islamificación es un discurso que aún domina la representación del Islam, aunque ha evolucionado durante siglos. En este artículo se examina la representación del Islam en los medios de comunicación españoles y de otros países europeos en relación con el orientalismo medieval y moderno, y la aparente fusión de los dos en los medios contemporáneos, y específicamente en los periódicos, la pintura y las viñetas políticas.Palabras clave: medios de comunicación, islam, islamificación_______________________Abstract:Muslims in western media can be portrayed as antiquated, un-modern, bellicose fanatics who lack reason and exhibit certain physical characteristics. Medieval polemics islamified Muslims for westerners who had relatively little contact with Islam. The discourse of islamification is one that still dominates the representation of Islam, although it has evolved over the centuries. This article examines the representation of Islam in Spanish and European media culture in terms of medieval and modern orientalism, and an apparent fusion of these two representational modes in contemporary media representations that include newspapers, painting and political illustration. Keywords: media, islam, islamification

  19. INTERPASSIVITY AS A SUBJECTIVE EFFECT OF MODERN MEDIA-CULTURE: TO THE STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena V. Khodus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose. In this article, research interest is fixed directly on the circumstances theming access personal / private as interpassivity practice of subjective life and creativity, which are mediated by modern media discourse. Methodology. Methodological base of research of contemporary experience of subjectivity is heuristic "ontological turn" in social theory, which allows to consider the subjectivity not as a reality (given, but as a procedural phenomenon, performativity, which exist in conditions of unstable ontologies, world without guarantees, indirect, thus, mass-media representations. Particular emphasis is placed on the deconstruction of traditional oppositions "objective/subjective", "public/private", "active/passive". As a result, a special interest in issues of privacy as "the place" in which the modern subject unstable ontology prefers to realize its self. Scientific novelty. It is proved that in the modern media culture, the subject is not so much a passive spectator, observer, collector information and events to represent relevant interested agents. He also actively reproduces itself in a form of "perceived privacy", which allows special mode of the experiences of private emotions "alone with everybody." Perceived privacy, although the individual reserves the right to individual control over personal space and personal statement (for example, through personal and individual electronic access to digital representations of reality, however, suggests certain techniques of "publication" themselves. It is the question of the interpassivity nature of such practices subjective life and creativity. Conclusions. Proposed research optics suggests that the person remains - the world-making being, who actively constructs their personal reality, however, when this reality is mediated by media representations, life world turns into a ready code, respectively, the active construction becomes superfluous. On the contrary, interpassivity as

  20. Effect of ionic and non-ionic contrast media on red cell aggregation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of solutions of the ionic contrast media diatrizoate, iocarmate, and metrizoate and the non-ionic metrizamide on red cell aggregation in vitro was examined. The aggregation was recorded by both microphotography and photometry in a counter-rotating rheoscope chamber. All the contrast media decreased the formation of red cell aggregates. This desaggregating ability increased with both increasing volume ratio (contrast media/blood) and with increasing osmolality of the contrast media. The desaggregating effect was also obtained with the contrast media solutions isotonic with blood. The iocarmate and diatrizoate solutions induced less reduction in red cell aggregation than the metrizoate and metrizamide solutions. (Auth.)

  1. System-level modeling and simulation of the cell culture microfluidic biochip ProCell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    -defined micro-channels using valves and pumps. We present an approach to the system-level modeling and simulation of a cell culture microfluidic biochip called ProCell, Programmable Cell Culture Chip. ProCell contains a cell culture chamber, which is envisioned to run 256 simultaneous experiments (viewed as a...

  2. Jaundice and wound healing: a tissue-culture study.

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, M.; Elliot, P.; Ellis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of jaundice on wound healing have been studied by growing fibroblasts, in vitro, in normal culture media, in culture media to which bilirubin has been added, and in culture media containing sera from jaundiced patients. It has been found that the addition of bilirubin to the culture media causes morphological changes in the fibroblasts, and impairs the growth of cells. The addition of jaundiced human sera to the culture also causes similar changes.

  3. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  4. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion

  5. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  6. Still and Moving Image Evidences for Mating of Echinococcus granulosus Reared in Culture Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Mohammadzadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus cultivation is very important for improvement of different aspect of medical and veterinary researches. Despite many advances in this case, there is a missing link for in vitro life cycle of adult worms and it is fertilization. Regarding the researchers' observations, self-fertilization can be done in worms living in dog intestine, but despite all sorts of experimental techniques, this phenomenon has never been observed in reared worms in culture media. Furthermore, cross fertilization has not been observed in vitro and even in parasites with dog intestinal origin; although it theoretically is possible. During a follow-up of cultivated adult worms, evidences of behaviors similar to self-mating (Type 2 and cross-mating were observed in our lab which will be presented here.Protoscoleces were aseptically removed from sheep hydatid cysts, washed twice with PBS and then cultivated in S.10E.H culture medium. The stages of parasite growth were observed using an inverted microscope for two months and all stages and behaviors were microscopically photographed. Different movies have also been made from these behavioral features.After around 55 days post cultivation, some evidences of behaviors similar to self-mating (Type 2 and cross-mating were observed in some of the mature adult worms. However, fertile eggs in these parasites have never been observed.Regarding the above observations, these parasites show tendency to unsuccessful self-mating/fertilization (type 2 which failure could be due to anatomical position and physiological maturation. Also lack of suitable conditions for self-fertilization causes the worms try to do unsuccessful cross- mating/fertilization in culture media.

  7. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  8. A method for isolating and culturing placental cells from failed early equine pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B V; Cabrera-Sharp, V; Firth, M J; Barrelet, F E; Bate, S; Cameron, I J; Crabtree, J R; Crowhurst, J; McGladdery, A J; Neal, H; Pynn, J; Pynn, O D; Smith, C; Wise, Z; Verheyen, K L P; Wathes, D C; de Mestre, A M

    2016-02-01

    Early pregnancy loss occurs in 6-10% of equine pregnancies making it the main cause of reproductive wastage. Despite this, reasons for the losses are known in only 16% of cases. Lack of viable conceptus material has inhibited investigations of many potential genetic and pathological causes. We present a method for isolating and culturing placental cells from failed early equine pregnancies. Trophoblast cells from 18/30 (60%) failed equine pregnancies of gestational ages 14-65 days were successfully cultured in three different media, with the greatest growth achieved for cells cultured in AmnioChrome™ Plus. Genomic DNA of a suitable quality for molecular assays was also isolated from 29/30 of these cases. This method will enable future investigations determining pathologies causing EPL. PMID:26907389

  9. Clinical laboratory comparison of the 10-ml isolator blood culture system with BACTEC radiometric blood culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, J A; Manzella, J P; McConville, J H

    1984-10-01

    The efficiency of the 10-ml Isolator (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.) for recovery of pathogens from blood was compared with that of BACTEC 6B and 7C media (Johnston Laboratories) by using 4,195 cultures from 1,662 patients. During the first phase of the study, BACTEC bottles were inoculated with 3 ml of blood; in the second phase, bottles were inoculated with 5 ml. The objectives were to compare results with similar blood volumes used for the detection of anaerobes as well as similar overall volumes and to determine the relative sensitivity of BACTEC media inoculated with the minimum and maximum volumes suggested by the manufacturer. From 180 patients, 391 significant isolates were recovered, 354 (91%) with the Isolator and 304 (78%) with the bottles. Isolators recovered 31 (15%) and 19 (18%) more pathogens overall than did the two-bottle system inoculated with 3 and 5 ml of blood, respectively, including 30 (36%) and 10 (34%) more Enterobacteriaceae. Recovery of anaerobes was greater in the BACTEC anaerobic medium, but only when its inoculum was increased to 5 ml. No significant differences existed between the two systems in pathogen detection times or detection of polymicrobic bacteremia. The Isolator contamination rate (8.3%) was approximately 4 times that of the bottles. The number of CFU of pathogen per milliliter of blood, blood volume sampled, and number of Isolators collected were more important than antimicrobial agent pretreatment in contributing to patient bacteremia of fungemia undetected by the Isolator. The Isolator appeared to be a practical alternative for recovery of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic pathogens from the blood. PMID:6386871

  10. Efficient, validated method for detection of mycobacterial growth in liquid culture media by use of bead beating, magnetic-particle-based nucleic acid isolation, and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plain, Karren M; Waldron, Anna M; Begg, Douglas J; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria are difficult to culture, requiring specialized media and a long incubation time, and have complex and exceedingly robust cell walls. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, a chronic wasting disease of ruminants, is a typical example. Culture of MAP from the feces and intestinal tissues is a commonly used test for confirmation of infection. Liquid medium offers greater sensitivity than solid medium for detection of MAP; however, support for the BD Bactec 460 system commonly used for this purpose has been discontinued. We previously developed a new liquid culture medium, M7H9C, to replace it, with confirmation of growth reliant on PCR. Here, we report an efficient DNA isolation and quantitative PCR methodology for the specific detection and confirmation of MAP growth in liquid culture media containing egg yolk. The analytical sensitivity was at least 10(4)-fold higher than a commonly used method involving ethanol precipitation of DNA and conventional PCR; this may be partly due to the addition of a bead-beating step to manually disrupt the cell wall of the mycobacteria. The limit of detection, determined using pure cultures of two different MAP strains, was 100 to 1,000 MAP organisms/ml. The diagnostic accuracy was confirmed using a panel of cattle fecal (n=54) and sheep fecal and tissue (n=90) culture samples. This technique is directly relevant for diagnostic laboratories that perform MAP cultures but may also be applicable to the detection of other species, including M. avium and M. tuberculosis. PMID:25609725

  11. Determining Cell Number During Cell Culture using the Scepter Cell Counter

    OpenAIRE

    Ongena, Kathleen; Das, Chandreyee; Smith, Janet L.; Gil, Sónia; Johnston, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Counting cells is often a necessary but tedious step for in vitro cell culture. Consistent cell concentrations ensure experimental reproducibility and accuracy. Cell counts are important for monitoring cell health and proliferation rate, assessing immortalization or transformation, seeding cells for subsequent experiments, transfection or infection, and preparing for cell-based assays. It is important that cell counts be accurate, consistent, and fast, particularly for quantitative measuremen...

  12. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents. PMID:27485516

  13. Isolation and Short-Term Persistence of Ehrlichia ewingii in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killmaster, Lindsay F; Levin, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    Ehrlichia ewingii is the causative agent of human and canine granulocytic ehrlichiosis. Since its discovery in 1970, little work has been done to characterize the pathogen or study the transmission dynamics due to the inability to grow the agent in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of multiple cell lines and media formulations for propagation of E. ewingii in cell culture. In this study, we present an overview of attempts to isolate E. ewingii from the buffy coat of goats naturally infected by Amblyomma americanum ticks, as well as a methodology for maintaining the pathogen for up to 16 weeks in culture. The most promising results were seen with HL-60 cells differentiated by the addition of 1.5% DMSO to the media and supplemented with 8 mM l-glutamine. Cultures were passaged multiple times, and fluorescence and morulae were observed by indirect fluorescent antibody test and Diff-Quik staining. It is our hope that this information will provide a foundation for future attempts to propagate and maintain E. ewingii in cell culture. PMID:27228133

  14. Transition or Translation?: Thinking Through Media and Cultural Studies Students’ Experiences after Graduation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Matthews

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article uses Kevin Robins and Frank Webster’s notion of ‘instrumental progressivism’ as a way of understanding the tensions between discipline-based academic staff and educational policy makers and developers within universities.  Robins and Webster argue that contemporary educational orthodoxies bring together two disparate philosophies: progressive understandings of education as student-centred and lifelong and the view that higher education should serve the economy.  While these writers see instrumental progressivism as a symptom of an ailing university system, this article argues that cultural studies as an interdiscipline with historical ties to progressivism cannot entirely step aside from the logic of these reforms.  The article interrogates Robins and Webster’s argument drawing on two small-scale qualitative research projects which traced the experiences of graduates from media and cultural studies programs, one in the UK and one in Australia.  While there are formidable political problems with progressivism and real challenges in smoothing educational transitions, the article argues that cultural studies programs can help students translate the categories, research questions, and disciplinary concentrations of their field into the languages and taxonomies of the work place.

  15. Nanoparticle dispersion in environmentally relevant culture media: a TiO2 case study and considerations for a general approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticle exposure in toxicity studies requires that nanoparticles are bioavailable by remaining highly dispersed in culture media. However, reported dispersion approaches are variable, mostly study-specific, and not transferable owing to their empirical basis. Furthermore, many published approaches employ proteinaceous dispersants in rich laboratory media, both of which represent end members in environmental scenarios. Here, a systematic approach was developed to disperse initially agglomerated TiO2 nanoparticles (Aeroxide® TiO2 P25, Evonik, NJ; primary particle size range 6.4–73.8 nm) in oligotrophic culture medium for environmentally relevant bacterial toxicity studies. Based on understanding particle–particle interactions in aqueous media and maintaining environmental relevance, the approach involves (1) quantifying the relationship between pH and zeta potential to determine the point of zero charge of select nanoparticles in water; (2) nominating, then testing and selecting, environmentally relevant stabilizing agents; and (3) dispersing via “condition and capture” whereby stock dry powder nanoparticles are sonicated in pre-conditioned (with base, or acid, plus stabilizing agent) water, then diluted into culture media. The “condition and capture” principle is transferable to other nanoparticle and media chemistries: simultaneously, mechanically and electrostatically, nanoparticles can be dispersed with surrounding stabilizers that coat and sterically hinder reagglomeration in the culture medium.

  16. Cytotoxicity evaluation of self-etching dentine bonding agents in a cell culture perfusion condition

    OpenAIRE

    Korsuwannawong, Suwanna; Srichan, Ratchaporn; Vajrabhaya, La-Ongthong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three dentine bonding agents (G-Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Clearfil SE Bond X) in cell-culture perfusion. Methods: In this experiment, 8×104 TCPC SV40 cells (bovine-pulp-derived cells transfected with simian virus 40 large T-antigen) in MEM-alpha media, 20%FCS were seeded on mesh in a 6-well plate and incubated at 37 °C with 5% CO2. After 2 days, the mesh inserts were transferred to a 24-well plate and incubated in MEM-alpha...

  17. Mucin production and mucous cell metaplasia in otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Jizhen; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Tono, Tetsuya; Zhang, Quan-An; Nakamura, Yoshihisa; Feng, Ling; Huang, Jianmin; Ye, Shengnan; Hu, Xiaohua; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    process of OM with mucoid effusion, especially disorders of mucin production resulting from middle ear bacterial infection and Eustachian tube dysfunction. In this review, we will focus on several aspects of this disorder by analyzing the cellular and molecular events such as mucin production and mucous......Otitis media (OM) with mucoid effusion, characterized by mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia in the middle ear cleft and thick fluid accumulation in the middle ear cavity, is a subtype of OM which frequently leads to chronic OM in young children. Multiple factors are involved in the developmental...... cell differentiation in the middle ear mucosa with OM. In addition, infectious agents, mucin production triggers, and relevant signaling pathways will be discussed....

  18. Modified CelliGen-packed bed bioreactors for hybridoma cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Zhang, W; Jacklin, C; Freedman, D; Eppstein, L; Kadouri, A

    1992-01-01

    This study describes two packed bed bioreactor configurations which were used to culture a mouse-mouse hybridoma cell line (ATCC HB-57) which produces an IgG1 monoclonal antibody. The first configuration consists of a packed column which is continuously perfused by recirculating oxygenated media through the column. In the second configuration, the packed bed is contained within a stationary basket which is suspended in the vessel of a CelliGen bioreactor. In this configuration, recirculation of the oxygenated media is provided by the CelliGen Cell Lift impeller. Both configurations are packed with disk carriers made from a non-woven polyester fabric. During the steady-state phase of continuous operation, a cell density of 10(8) cells per cm3 of bed volume was obtained in both bioreactor configurations. The high levels of productivity (0.5 gram MAb per 1 of packed bed per day) obtained in these systems demonstrates that the culture conditions achieved in these packed bed bioreactors are excellent for the continuous propagation of hybridomas using media which contains low levels (1%) of serum as well as serum-free media. These packed bed bioreactors allow good control of pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature. The media flows evenly over the cells and produces very low shear forces. These systems are easy to set up and operate for prolonged periods of time. The potential for scale-up using Fibra-cel carriers is enhanced due to the low pressure drop and low mass transfer resistance, which creates high void fraction approaching 90% in the packed bed. PMID:1369180

  19. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: A Breakthrough in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Antoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell culture is an important tool for biological research. Two-dimensional cell culture has been used for some time now, but growing cells in flat layers on plastic surfaces does not accurately model the in vivo state. As compared to the two-dimensional case, the three-dimensional (3D cell culture allows biological cells to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions thanks to an artificial environment. Cells grown in a 3D model have proven to be more physiologically relevant and showed improvements in several studies of biological mechanisms like: cell number monitoring, viability, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, response to stimuli, migration and invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, angiogenesis stimulation and immune system evasion, drug metabolism, gene expression and protein synthesis, general cell function and in vivo relevance. 3D culture models succeed thanks to technological advances, including materials science, cell biology and bioreactor design.

  20. Organ culture-cell culture system for studying multistage carcinogenesis in respiratory epithelium. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Vernon E.; Marchok, Ann C.; Nettesheim, Paul

    1977-01-01

    An organ culture-cell culture system was used to demonstrate carcinogen dose-dependent transformation of tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Tracheal explants were exposed to MNNG (N-methyl-N/sup 1/-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) in organ culture. Outgrowths from these explants provided epithelial cell cultures. The numbers of long term epithelial cell cultures and cell lines that were established per explant increased as MNNG exposure concentration increased. At the present time, more cell lines derived from explants exposed to the highest MNNG concentration have produced palpable tumors than cell lines derived from explants exposed to lower MNNG concentrations. No cell lines were established from primaries derived from control explants. TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), stimulates DNA synthesis in tracheal epithelium in organ culture in a manner simular to that described for mouse skin. Short exposures to TPA not only stimulated DNA synthesis earlier, but the stimulation was greater than that obtained with continuous exposure. At the present time, exposure of tracheal organ cultures to MNNG followed by TPA has resulted in an enhanced production of morphologically altered cells in primary epithelial cell cultures, than exposure to either agent alone.

  1. Electrospinning of microbial polyester for cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV), a copolymer of microbial polyester, was fabricated as a nanofibrous mat by electrospinning. The specific surface area and the porosity of electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mat were determined. When the mechanical properties of flat film and electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mats were investigated, both the tensile modulus and strength of electrospun PHBV were less than those of cast PHBV film. However, the elongation ratio of nanofiber mat was higher than that of the cast film. The structure of electrospun nanofibers using PHBV-trifluoroethanol solutions depended on the solution concentrations. When x-ray diffraction patterns of bulk PHBV before and after electrospinning were compared, the crystallinity of PHBV was not significantly affected by the electrospinning process. Chondrocytes adhered and grew on the electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mat better than on the cast PHBV film. Therefore, the electrospun PHBV was considered to be suitable for cell culture

  2. Multilineage co-culture of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yimu; Waldman, Stephen D; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell interactions through paracrine cell signalling can regulate a range of cell responses, including metabolic activity, proliferation and differentiation. Moving towards the development of optimized tissue-engineering strategies with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), the focus of this study was on developing indirect co-culture models to study the effects of mature adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts on bovine ASC multilineage differentiation. For each lineage, ASC differentiation was characterized by histology, gene expression and protein expression, in the absence of key inductive differentiation factors for the ASCs. Co-culture with each of the mature cell populations was shown to successfully induce or enhance lineage-specific differentiation of the ASCs. In general, a more homogeneous but lower-level differentiation response was observed in co-culture as compared to stimulating the bovine ASCs with inductive differentiation media. To explore the role of the Wnt canonical and non-canonical signalling pathways within the model systems, the effects of the Wnt inhibitors WIF-1 and DKK-1 on multilineage differentiation in co-culture were assessed. The data indicated that Wnt signalling may play a role in mediating ASC differentiation in co-culture with the mature cell populations. PMID:23135884

  3. Mammalian cell cultures. Part II: Genetic engineering, protein glycosylation, fermentation and process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, R G; Noé, W

    1993-11-01

    For expression of human genes in mammalian cell culture regulatory sequences such as promotor or terminator region of viral origin are required. The most widely used expression system uses dihydrofolic acid reductase (DHFR) as a selection marker in conjunction with a DHFR deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell using methotrexate as selection pressure. Alternatively the glutamine synthetase amplification system seems to be one of the most efficient expression systems using methionine sulphoximine (MSX) as selection pressure. Folding and glycosylation takes place in mammalian cell cultures at the sites of endoplasmatic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus and is comparable to synthesis in human cells. Most large scale manufacturing processes for products derived from mammalian cell cultures are fed batch suspension culture processes up to 15,000 l. Important factors for productivity are media composition and feeding strategies. Sterility of the entire system during the fermentation period is a decisive factor for success rate. Because mammalian cell cultures reacting very sensitive to small changes in temperature, pH, osmolality and agitation the fermentation system requires a reliable process control system. Validation of the entire manufacturing process is required to ensure consistent product quality which meets predetermined specifications and to provide a basis for an economic process. In a joint effort equipment qualification, process validation, in-process controls and quality controls provide the basis for product consistency from batch to batch. PMID:8292072

  4. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  5. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells in an automated culturing system during the Shenzhou-8 Space mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Jessica; Ma, Xiao; Wehland, Markus; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Schwarzwälder, Achim; Segerer, Jürgen; Birlem, Maria; Horn, Astrid; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-10-01

    Human follicular thyroid cancer cells were cultured in Space to investigate the impact of microgravity on 3D growth. For this purpose, we designed and constructed a cell container that can endure enhanced physical forces, is connected to fluid storage chambers, performs media changes and cell harvesting automatically and supports cell viability. The container consists of a cell suspension chamber, two reserve tanks for medium and fixative and a pump for fluid exchange. The selected materials proved durable, non-cytotoxic, and did not inactivate RNAlater. This container was operated automatically during the unmanned Shenzhou-8 Space mission. FTC-133 human follicular thyroid cancer cells were cultured in Space for 10 days. Culture medium was exchanged after 5 days in Space and the cells were fixed after 10 days. The experiment revealed a scaffold-free formation of extraordinary large three-dimensional aggregates by thyroid cancer cells with altered expression of EGF and CTGF genes under real microgravity. PMID:23866977

  6. Use of Media Technologies by Native American Teens and Young Adults: Evaluating Their Utility for Designing Culturally-Appropriate Sexual Health Interventions Targeting Native Youth in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Rushing, Stephanie Nicole

    2010-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are disproportionally burdened by high rates of sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy, heightening their need for sexual health interventions that are aligned to their unique culture and social context. Media technologies, including the Internet, cell phones, and video games, offer new…

  7. DESCRIPTION OF THE CULTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME LIGNICOLOUS BASIDIOMYCETES SPECIES GROWN ON THREE SYNTHETIC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRE Cristiana Virginia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of 12 species of lignicolous basidiomycetes were cultivated on potato dextrose agar and malt extract agar, incubated at 25 °C and carefully analyzed for a period of 5 weeks. Lignicolous basidiomycetes are fungi that produce potent enzymes and bioactive secondary metabolites which are successfully used in various industries: bioremediation of polluted environments, biodegradation of toxic substances, pharmacology or agriculture. The objective of this study was the description of the main characteristics of in vitro cultures of some lignicolous basidiomycetes species grown on synthetic media. The main characteristics followed were: the growth rate of the colonies, the general features of the mycelium: shape, color, surface aspect, reverse, the presence of fruiting bodies and exudates and the particular odor.

  8. TRANSMISSION, COMMUNION, COMMUNICATION James Carey — Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society is a classic text from the American school of communication. It was republished in 2009 by Routledge on the occasion of the author’s death. This new edition includes a critical foreword by G. Stuart Adam that explains Carey’s fundamental role in the establishment of communication studies in America, particularly against the American tradition of focusing only on mass communication’s function as a means of social and political control. Carey maintains that communication is not merely the transmission of information; reminding the reader of the link between the words “communication” and “community”. The collection of essays presented in this volume furnishes an important debate on the concept of communication, which at times favors the transmission of signs, and at times favors the sharing of common experiences or the synthesis of information.

  9. Recycling of waste bread as culture media for efficient biological treatment of wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of recycling of waste bread as culture media for efficient biological treatment of wastewater were investigated. In order to get the highest growth of microorganism for increased contaminants' removal efficiency of the system, different compositions of waste bread and skim milk with and without adding Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) were tested. Mixed waste bread compositions with added PAC showed relatively higher number of microorganisms than the compositions without added PAC. A composition of 40% mixed waste bread and 60% skim milk produced highest number of microorganisms with subsequent increased contaminants' removal efficiency of the system. 'Contrast' alone showed lower contaminants' removal efficiency than mixed bread compositions. Use of waste bread in the composition of skim milk reduced cost of using foreign source of nutrients in biological treatment of wastewater and also facilitated waste bread management through recycling. (author)

  10. Rising bonds: wars, media propaganda, culture of fear and ¨hedocynicism¨

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Tasio Camiñas Hernández

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a critical reflection based on the study of the events of September 11, 2001 as presented by experts in the Spanish press of reference. This analysis shows evidence of an official propagandistic discourse imposed by the global media companies as well as by the political and economic powers to promote the culture of fear and war within a society deeply rooted in two rising values: cynicism and hedonism (henceforth "hedocynicism". The September 11 events initiated a period of "war on terrorism" characterised by a new conflict between the East and the West, the clash of religionism (radical Christianity versus radical Islamism and a third phase of the globalization, this time based on global armament deterrence.

  11. Optimizing culture media for in vitro proliferation and rooting of Tetra (Prunus empyrean 3 rootstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sadeghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The enormous demand for new rootstock genotypes in Prunus spp. makes us to use micropropagation as an unavoidable propagation method. Therefore, the study on micropropagation of a new semi-dwarf vegetative rootstock namely Tetra (Prunus empyrean 3 was carried out to develop an optimized protocol. Culture establishment using nodal segments was enhanced using WPM (woody plant medium medium lacking growth regulators. From various shoot multiplication treatments, the highest number of shoots per explant (30.4 was found on ME (Media created specifically medium supplemented with 0.8 mg l−1 BAP and 0.05 mg l−1 IBA. 100% in vitro rooting was achieved on ½ strength MS medium with 0.5 mg l−1 IBA, 1.6 mg l−1 thiamine and 150 mg l−1 iron sequestrene.

  12. Evaluation of Various Culture Media for Detection of Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Clair L; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Perry, Audrey; Jones, Amanda L; Cummings, Stephen P; Perry, John D; Hogardt, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is challenging due to overgrowth by rapidly growing species that colonize the lungs of patients with CF. Extended incubation on Burkholderia cepacia selective agar (BCSA) has been recommended as an expedient culture method for the isolation of rapidly growing NTM in this setting. The aim of this study was to assess five selective media designed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex, along with two media designed for the isolation of mycobacteria (rapidly growing mycobacteria [RGM] medium and Middlebrook 7H11 agar), for their abilities to isolate NTM. All seven media were challenged with 147 isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria and 185 isolates belonging to other species. RGM medium was then compared with the most selective brand of BCSA for the isolation of NTM from 224 sputum samples from patients with CF. Different agars designed for the isolation of B. cepacia complex varied considerably in their inhibition of other bacteria and fungi. RGM medium supported the growth of all isolates of mycobacteria and was more selective than any other medium. NTM were recovered from 17 of 224 sputum samples using RGM medium, compared with only 7 samples using the most selective brand of BCSA (P = 0.023). RGM medium offers a superior option, compared to other selective agars, for the isolation of rapidly growing mycobacteria from the sputum of patients with CF. Furthermore, the convenience of using RGM medium enables routine screening for rapidly growing NTM in all submitted sputum samples from patients with CF. PMID:27098962

  13. USDA FSIS, FDA BAM, AOAC, and ISO culture methods BD BBL CHROMagar Listeria Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Vicki; Kircher, Susan; Sturm, Krista; Warns, Patty; Dick, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    BBL CHROMagar Listeria Media (CL) was evaluated for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in raw ground beef, smoked salmon, lettuce, and Brie cheese. The recovery of L. monocytogenes on CL was compared to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), AOAC, and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) reference-plated media using the recommended pre-enrichments and selective enrichments. Of the 265 food samples tested, 140 were tested using BAM, USDA, or AOAC methods and 125 were tested using ISO methods. CL produced comparable results with the reference methods on all matrixes with a sensitivity of 99.3% and a specificity of 100%. No false negatives were found in testing the food matrixes. There was no statistical difference in recovery based on Chi-square analysis. Known isolates were evaluated, and CL had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. The results of this study demonstrate that CL is an effective medium for the recovery and detection of L. monocytogenes in raw ground beef, smoked salmon, lettuce, and Brie cheese using FDA BAM, USDA FSIS, AOAC, and ISO culture methods. PMID:19714979

  14. Antibiotics Susceptibility of the Microorganisms which Reproducing the Culture of Patients with Chronic Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Study; we aimed the isolation of bacteria and establishment of their susceptibility to antibiotics in patients diagnosed as Chronic Supurative Otitis Media. METHOD: Sixty-three patients were included in the study. The samples of suppurative material were cultured. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed as recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI and species was identified. RESULTS: S.aureus was isolated in 36,5 % of the 63 patients enrolled in the study. For this bacterium, increased rates of resistance to antibiotics penicillin G, ampicillin /sulbactam, gentamicin, amicacin ve TMP/SMX are detected. The other mostly isolated bacteria are P. aeruginosa (32.69% and E. coli (23.07% in turn. P. aeruginosa showed increased ratio of resistance to ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, amicacin, gentamicin, ampicillin, TMP/SMX and amoxicillin/clavulanate and also E. coli showed increased rates of resistance to gentamicin, ampicillin, ampicillin /sulbactam and amoxicillin/clavulanate. CONCLUSION: We consider Chronic Supurative Otitis Media therapy regarding antimicrobial susceptibility rates will be more rational and satisfying. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 51-54

  15. Influence of culture media on the physical and chemical properties of Ag–TiCN coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to verify the possible physical and chemical changes that may occur on the surface of Ag–TiCN coatings after exposure to the culture media used in microbiological and cytotoxic assays, respectively tryptic soy broth (TSB) and Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM). After sample immersion for 24 h in the media, analyses were performed by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy discharge radiation (GDOES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of GDOES profile, RBS and XPS spectra, of samples immersed in TSB, demonstrated the formation of a thin layer of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen that could be due to the presence of proteins in TSB. After 24 h of immersion in DMEM, the results showed the formation of a thin layer of calcium phosphates on the surface, since the coatings displayed a highly oxidized surface in which calcium and phosphorus were detected. All these results suggested that the formation of a layer on the coating surface prevented the release of silver ions in concentrations that allow antibacterial activity. (paper)

  16. Spreading the Spirit Word: Print Media, Storytelling, and Popular Culture in Nineteenth-Century Spiritualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Natale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiritualists in the nineteenth century gave much emphasis to the collection of evidences of scientific meaning. During séances, they used instruments similar to those employed in scientific practice to substantiate their claims. However, these were not the only source of legitimization offered in support of the spiritualist claims. In fact, writers who aimed to provide beliefs in spiritualism with a reliable support relied very often on the testimonies of eyewitness that were reported in a narrative fashion. This article interrogates the role of such anecdotal testimonies in nineteenth-century spiritualism. It argues that they played a twofold role: on one side, they offered a form of evidentiary proof that was complementary to the collection of mechanical-based evidences; on the other side, they circulated in spiritualist publications, creating opportunities to reach a wide public of readers that was made available by the emergence of a mass market for print media. Able to convince, but also to entertain the reader, anecdotal testimonies were perfectly suited for publications in spiritualist books and periodicals. The proliferation of anecdotal testimonies in spiritualist texts, in this regard, hints at the relevance of storytelling in the diffusion of beliefs about religious matters as well as scientific issues within the public sphere. By reporting and disseminating narrative testimonies, print media acted as a channel through which spiritualism’s religious and scientific endeavors entered the field of a burgeoning popular culture.

  17. Usability and Applicability of Microfluidic Cell Culture Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette

    devices still lack general implementation into biological research laboratories. In this project, the usability and applicability of microfluidic cell culture systems have been investigated. The tested systems display good properties regarding optics and compatibility with standard laboratory equipment...... possibilities for, for example, precise control of the chemical environment, 3D cultures, controlled co-culture of different cell types or automated, individual control of up to 96 cell culture chambers in one integrated system. Despite the great new opportunities to perform novel experimental designs, these...... shown to be needed. This is possibly one of the reasons for the lack of implementation of microfluidic cell culture systems into biological research laboratories. Procedures to perform long-term microfluidic perfusion cell culture experiments have been established. Furthermore, successful application of...

  18. In Vitro Cultivation of ‘Unculturable’ Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores

    OpenAIRE

    Vartoukian, Sonia Rebecca; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, M.; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Wade, William Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacteri...

  19. Book review: presumed intimacy: para-social relationships in media, society and celebrity culture by Chris Rojek

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Boyce

    2016-01-01

    What kind of relationships are fostered by contemporary network society and celebrity culture? In Presumed Intimacy: Para-Social Relationships in Media, Society and Celebrity Culture, Chris Rojek explores how we form relationships with mediated others founded on the assumption of personal disclosure, ranging from online friends to celebrities, and how these can be co-opted by power structures for deeply dubious but ruthlessly effective ends. This theoretically expansive book is an indispensab...

  20. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Röder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface properties to assess whether seeding efficiencies and cell growth on 3D scaffolds were affected. Cell attachment and growth of murine calvarial osteoblast (MC3T3-E1 cells within a melt-electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold were assessed when cultured in either “low-adhesive” non-treated or corona discharged-treated well-plates. Increased cell adhesion was observed on the scaffold placed in the surface treated culture plates compared to the scaffold in the non-treated plates 24 h after seeding, although it was not significant. However, higher cell metabolic activity was observed on the bases of all well-plates than on the scaffold, except for day 21, well metabolic activity was higher in the scaffold contained in non-treated plate than the base. These results indicate that there is no advantage in using non-treated plates to improve initial cell seeding in 3D polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds, however non-treated plates may provide an improved metabolic environment for long-term studies.