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Sample records for cell culture assays

  1. New Generation of Cell Culture Assay for Smallpox Vaccine Potency

    OpenAIRE

    Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Poirier, Bertrand; El Zaouk, Annie; Tissier, Marie-Hélène; Fuchs, Florence

    2003-01-01

    The potency of smallpox vaccines produced in the 1970s was tested by titration onto chorioallantoic membranes of fertilized hen eggs (CAM assay). The potency specification commonly approved for these vaccines was a titer above 108 pock-forming units per milliliter. We developed and validated a cell culture titration assay to have a more reliable potency test. The cell titration assay and the CAM assay were tested in parallel on 34 first-generation smallpox vaccine lots. These allowed us to de...

  2. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive

  3. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew-Friedrich, Iv.; von Bredow, F.; Schoeppe, W. (Department of Nephrology, Hospital of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany))

    1991-04-01

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive.

  4. Crystal Violet Assay for Determining Viability of Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoktistova, Maria; Geserick, Peter; Leverkus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Adherent cells detach from cell culture plates during cell death. This characteristic can be used for the indirect quantification of cell death and to determine differences in proliferation upon stimulation with death-inducing agents. One simple method to detect maintained adherence of cells is the staining of attached cells with crystal violet dye, which binds to proteins and DNA. Cells that undergo cell death lose their adherence and are subsequently lost from the population of cells, reducing the amount of crystal violet staining in a culture. This protocol describes a quick and reliable screening method that is suitable for the examination of the impact of chemotherapeutics or other compounds on cell survival and growth inhibition. However, characterization of the cause of reduced crystal violet staining requires additional methods detailed elsewhere. PMID:27037069

  5. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  6. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  7. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  8. The Effect of Primary Cancer Cell Culture Models on the Results of Drug Chemosensitivity Assays: The Application of Perfusion Microbioreactor System as Cell Culture Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Hsun Hsieh; Yi-Dao Chen; Shiang-Fu Huang; Hung-Ming Wang; Min-Hsien Wu

    2015-01-01

    To precisely and faithfully perform cell-based drug chemosensitivity assays, a well-defined and biologically relevant culture condition is required. For the former, a perfusion microbioreactor system capable of providing a stable culture condition was adopted. For the latter, however, little is known about the impact of culture models on the physiology and chemosensitivity assay results of primary oral cavity cancer cells. To address the issues, experiments were performed. Results showed that...

  9. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue

  10. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay. PMID:27265376

  11. Detection of early malignant changes in tissue cultured cells using a novel tumorigenicity assay in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, R.S.; Campbell, E.W.; Holland, L.M.; Schwartzendruber, D.E.; Kraemer, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured cells were tested for tumorigenicity in nude mice using a new test involving implantation of cells grown on small gelatin sponges. The test was applied to mouse, hamster, and human cells, and the results were compared to a conventional tumorigenicity assay (injection of cell suspensions). The sponge assay was at least as sensitive as the conventional assay in all cases tested so far. In several instances the sponge assay could detect events not seen in the standard assay. Use of the sponge assay has led to interesting possibilities for studying in vitro and early in vivo cellular changes that may be associated with the ability to form tumors. In studies with two human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, the two assays yielded comparable results. Such cell lines might provide a system in which the lack of terminal differentiation within a cell population could be examined as a parameter of neoplastic change.

  12. Colorimetric growth assay for epidermal cell cultures by their crystal violet binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Jugert, F; Merk, H; Mahrle, G

    1989-01-01

    The application of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric growth assay was tested for human epidermal cells subcultured in uncoated plastic dishes. Cell layers were incubated with a crystal violet (CV) solution (0.2% with ethanol 2% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.8) for 10 min at room temperature. After rinsing with 0.5 M Tris-Cl (pH 7.8) the cell layer was dried and decolorized with a sodium-dodecylsulfate solution (0.5% with ethanol 50% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl, pH 7.8) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The extinction of the supernatant was read at the absorption maximum of 586 nm. The protein content of attached cells as classical parameter for quantifying cell growth was strongly related to CV extinction with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98. Furthermore, the subcellular protein binding qualities of CV were analyzed. The water-soluble protein fraction of cultured epidermal cells was separated by sodium-dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and stained with CV. We found a staining pattern which was qualitatively very similar to that of Coomassie blue, however less intense. Keratin electrophoresis revealed an affinity of CV to the 48, 50, and 56 kD cytokeratins. In conclusion, this CV assay is a reliable and simple method for the monitoring of epidermal cell growth in cultures. PMID:2482013

  13. Migratory properties of cultured olfactory ensheathing cells by single-cell migration assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hui Huang; Ying Wang; Li Cao; Zhi-da Su; Yan-ling Zhu; Yi-zhang Chen; Xiao-bing Yuan; Cheng He

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells that have axonal growth-promoting properties. OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising experimental therapy of axonal injuries and demyelinating diseases. However, some fundamental cellular properties of OECs remain unclear. In this study, we found that the distinct OEC subpopulations exhibited different migratory properties based on time-lapse imaging of single isolated cells, possibly due to their different cytoskeletal organizations. Moreover, OEC subpopulations displayed different attractive migratory responses to a gradient of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in single-cell migration assays. Finally, we found that OEC subpopulations transformed into each other spontaneously. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that distinct OEC subpopulations display different migratory properties in vitro and provide new evidence to support the notion of OECs as a single cell type with malleable functional phenotypes.

  14. Comparison of multiple assays for detecting human antibodies directed against antigens on normal and malignant tissue culture cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four separate assays of human antibody reactivity to four separate normal and malignant human tissue culture cells lines from two patients have been evaluated using a single highly-reactive allogeneic serum. The visual end-point cytolysis assay and the chromium-51 release assay were equally sensitive in measuring complement mediated antibody cytotoxicity and both were far more sensitive than a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The assay of antibody reactivity by hemadsorption technique was about 10 times more sensitive than any of the cytotoxicity assays. This latter assay measures only IgG antibody however. These assays showed that cell lines from different patients may differ greatly in 'reactivity' to an allogeneic serum and emphasized the importance of utilizing tumor and normal cells from the same patient when using tissue culture cells to search for tumor specific reactivity. These observations emphasize the importance of utilizing multiple assays against paired normal and malignant cells from the same patient to be certain of the specificity and magnitude of the measured antibody

  15. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  16. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: van.biologa@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S., E-mail: aurcruz@ial.sp.gov.br [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  17. The bio-oscillator: A circuit for cell-culture assays

    OpenAIRE

    Huertas, Gloria; Maldonado, Andrés; Yúfera, A.; Rueda, Adoración; Huertas-Díaz, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    A system for cell-culture real-time monitoring using an oscillation-based approach is proposed. The system transforms a cell culture under test into a suitable “biological” oscillator, without needing complex circuitry for excitation and measurement. The obtained oscillation parameters are directly related to biological test, owed to an empirically extracted cell–electrode electrical model. A discrete prototype is proposed and experimental results with living cell culture are presented, achie...

  18. Susceptibility of adherent versus suspension target cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to cell-mediated cytotoxicity in rapid 51Cr-release assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of target cells from tissue culture lines which grow adherent to tissue culture vessels is often desirable for tests of cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC). In the present study the authors used cells derived from adherent tissue culture lines to compare the merits of suspension vs. adherent target cells in short-term 51Cr-release assays. Cytotoxic activity of murine spleen cells sensitized in vitro against allogeneic spleen cells or syngeneic sarcoma cells was tested with fibroblast or sarcoma target cells. In parallel tests, aliquots of tissue culture lines were detached and used as either suspension or adherent target cells in CMC assays, matching the concentrations of suspension and adherent target cells. In both allogeneic and syngeneic combinations adherent target cells released less 51Cr spontaneously and were more susceptible to CMC than their suspension counterparts. (Auth.)

  19. A new PCR-based seroneutralization assay in cell culture for diagnosis of hepatitis E.

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, J.; Dubreuil, P; Pillot, J

    1997-01-01

    A new method for the serological diagnosis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection based on neutralization of the virus in cell culture was developed. The test involves a short incubation of the virus in the presence of the serum sample to be tested and permissive cells. With viral replication being limited and without a cytopathic effect, viral growth in cells is evaluated by reverse transcription and PCR. The specificity of the test was established by studying sera from healthy individuals and...

  20. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Supriya D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene array analysis, northern blot analysis, Ribonuclease Protection assay, Flow cytometry, ELISPOT, western blot analysis, and ELISA. No single method of analysis meets the criteria for a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines, therefore more than one assay might be necessary for correct data interpretation, a choice that is based on development of a scientific rationale for the method with emphasis on the reliability and relevance of the method.

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF GLUCOSE TRANSPORTER-1 AND ITS FUNCTIONAL ASSAY IN MOUSE GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS CULTURED IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章精; 刘志红; 刘栋; 黎磊石

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of glucose transporter-l (GLUT1) in the glucose uptake of glomerular mesangial cells. Methods. Cultured C57/SJL mouse mesangial cells were used in the study. The expression of GLUT1 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The expression of GLUT1 protein was detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. The uptake of glucose and its kinetics were determined by 2-deoxy-[3H] -D-glucose uptake. Results. Both GLUT1 mRNA and protein were found in mouse glomerular mesangial cells. 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake and kinetics assay showed that this glucose transporter had high affinity for glucose and the glucose uptake specificity was further confirmed by phloretin. Conclusion. Functional GLUT1 did present in mouse mesangial cells cultured in vitro and it might be the predominant transporter mediated the uptake of glucose into mesangial cells.

  2. Immunological assays for chemokine detection in in-vitro culture of CNS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Supriya D.; Schwartz Stanley A; Nair Madhavan P.N.

    2003-01-01

    Herein we review the various methods currently in use for determining the expression of chemokines by CNS cells in vitro. Chemokine detection assays are used in conjuction with one another to provide a comprehensive, biologically relevant assessment of the chemokines which is necessary for correct data interpretation of a specific observed biological effect. The methods described include bioassays for soluble chemokine receptors, RNA extraction, RT-PCR, Real - time quantitative PCR, gene arra...

  3. Apoptosis of human malignant glioma-derived cell cultures treated with clomipramine hydrochloride, as detected by Annexin-V assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Previous research in our laboratories has shown that Clomipramine Hydrochloride (CLOM), a tricyclic antidepressant in use for over thirty years, selectively kills neoplastic glial cells in vitro whilst leaving normal brain cells unaffected. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a range of early passage cell cultures and established cell lines, derived from a number of patients with malignant glioma, would display different sensitivities when exposed to CLOM. The particular assay of interest, following our discovery that CLOM targets the mitochondria of tumour cells and triggers Caspase 3 mitochondrially-mediated apoptosis, was Annexin-V flow cytometry. This assay was used to determine the mechanism of cell death, either necrosis or apoptosis, according to drug concentration and period of incubation. Method. Cells grown to 90% confluence in 25cm3 flasks were incubated with concentrations of CLOM from 20μM - 100μM, for up to 6 hours. Cells were harvested and resuspended in calcium binding buffer, which triggers translocation of calcium-regulated phosphatidylserine residues to the nuclear envelope, before removing 500μl of the single cell suspension to a Facs tube. Controls used in the analysis were performed by omission of the drug incubation in one flask, and addition of 1μM staurosporine to one flask. These served as negative and positive controls respectively. Annexin-V FITC and propidium iodide were added to all tubes and incubated for 15 minutes at room temperature, in the dark. Subsequent to this, binding buffer was added to each tube and analysed using a BD FACScalibur. Results. Results show that, of the five malignant gliomas tested, the two established cell lines had the lower apoptotic threshold, with a significant percentage of apoptotic cells present at 60μM and above when compared to the control sample. The three early passage cultures, developed in house from biopsy, had higher apoptotic thresholds, withstanding up to 100

  4. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  5. An improved metaphase index assay for detecting thyroid growth stimulators using FRTL-5 thyroid cells cultured on a microtitre plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealey, P A; Mitchell, S D; Rowles, P M; Marshall, N J

    1988-06-28

    The metaphase index assay (MIA) for thyroid growth stimulators, as originally described, used FRTL-5 thyroid cells cultured in Bellco culture chambers and glass microscope slides. The metaphases were observed using the nuclear strain aceto-lacto orcein. However the surface properties of the glass proved to be variable and so polystyrene microscope slides were substituted. The aceto-lacto orcein stain was found to be unsuitable for use with polystyrene because of the solvents and mountant used. Therefore combinations of various other nuclear stains and mounting media were tested. The Giemsa stain, which was found to be the most satisfactory, could be applied to FRTL-5 cells maintained on the large variety of plastic supports now available for tissue culture, e.g., 96 well microtitre plates. This permitted the design of an MIA which is much more convenient, robust and economical in its use of clinical samples. The results with seven IgG preparations derived from the sera of patients with a variety of thyroid disorders are presented. In its revised form, the metaphase index assay provides a rapid screening assay for thyroid growth stimulators, such as autoantibodies and TSH. PMID:2455750

  6. Evaluation of an in vitro cell culture assay for the potency assessment of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Francine T; Maldaner, Fernanda P S; Perobelli, Rafaela F; Xavier, Bruna; da Silva, Francielle S; de Freitas, Guilherme W; Bartolini, Paolo; Ribela, M Tereza C P; Dalmora, Sérgio L

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin is a sialoglycoprotein that stimulates erythropoiesis. To assess potency of human erythropoietin produced by recombinant technology, we investigated an in vitro TF-1 cell proliferation assay, which was applied in conjunction with a reversed-phase liquid chromatography method for the determination of the content of sialic acids. The results obtained, which were higher than 126.8ng/μg, were compared with those obtained with the in vivo normocythaemic mouse bioassay. The in vitro assay resulted in a non-significant lower mean difference of the estimated potencies (0.61% ± 0.026, p > 0.05). The use of this combination of methods represents an advance toward the establishment of alternative in vitro approaches, in the context of the Three Rs, for the potency assessment of biotechnology-derived medicines. PMID:27256453

  7. Advantages of a single-cycle production assay to study cell culture-adaptive mutations of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Rodney S; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Takikawa, Shingo; Faulk, Kristina; Engle, Ronald E; Bukh, Jens; Purcell, Robert H; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2008-01-01

    The JFH1 strain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unique among HCV isolates, in that the wild-type virus can traverse the entire replication cycle in cultured cells. However, without adaptive mutations, only low levels of infectious virus are produced. In the present study, the effects of five......, and NS2 all increased virus production. A single-cycle replication assay in CD81-deficient cells was developed to study more precisely the effect of the adaptive mutations. The E2 mutation had minimal effect on the amount of infectious virus released but probably enhanced entry into cells. In contrast......, both the p7 and NS2 mutations independently increased the amount of virus released....

  8. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T; Petersen, E L; Aagaard, M; Hansen, Dorte; Christensen, T

    2013-01-01

    expressing increased amounts of human endogenous retrovirus antigens. MS patients also have increased antibody levels to these antigens. The target cells are spontaneously growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of B cell lineage, expressing human endogenous retrovirus HERV epitopes on their...

  9. Comparison of Rapid Centrifugation Assay with Conventional Tissue Culture Method for Isolation of Dengue 2 Virus in C6/36-HT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Rosmari Rodríguez; Alvarez, Mayling; María G. Guzmán; Morier, Luis; Kourí, Gustavo

    2000-01-01

    A rapid centrifugation assay was compared with conventional tube cell culture for dengue virus isolation in both sera and autopsy samples from dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome fatal cases. The rapid centrifugation assay allowed isolation of virus from 16.6% more samples than the conventional method, and it shortened the time for dengue virus detection. Finally, it allowed the isolation of dengue 2 virus in 42.8% of tissue samples from five fatal cases. Our results sug...

  10. Cell-culture assays reveal the importance of retroviral vector design for insertional genotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Modlich, Ute; Bohne, Jens; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Knöss, Sabine; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral vectors with long terminal repeats (LTRs), which contain strong enhancer/promoter sequences at both ends of their genome, are widely used for stable gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. However, recent clinical data and mouse models point to insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes as a dose-limiting side effect of retroviral gene delivery that potentially induces leukemia. Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors do not contain the terminal repetition of the enhance...

  11. An indirect immunofluorescence assay using a cell culture-derived antigen for detection of antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W L; Comer, J A; Sumner, J W; Gingrich-Baker, C; Coughlin, R T; Magnarelli, L A; Olson, J G; Childs, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence assay for the detection of human antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) was developed and standardized. Antigen was prepared from a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) infected with a tick-derived isolate of the HGE agent (USG3). Suitable antigen presentation and preservation of cellular morphology were obtained when infected cells were applied and cultured on the slide, excess medium was removed, and cells were fixed with ac...

  12. Response of endothelial cells and pericytes to hypoxia and erythropoietin in a co-culture assay dedicated to soft tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gerrit; Bubel, Monika; Pohlemann, Tim; Oberringer, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The increasing mean life expectancy of the citizens of the western world countries leads to an increase of the age-related diseases, among them soft tissue defects exhibiting inadequate healing. In order to develop new therapeutic strategies to support disturbed soft tissue repair, there is a strong need of sophisticated in vitro assays. A new assay combining scratch wounding with co-cultures of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) and pericytes (HPC) focuses on basic characteristics of cell interaction against the background of soft tissue repair. The cell parameters proliferation, migration and differentiation, and the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were analysed in response to hypoxia (pO2 culture led to a weakened proliferation of both cell types, an increase of the percentage of myofibroblast-like pericytes and to a higher release of MCP-1. Hypoxia caused a proliferation decrease of HPC in co-culture, which was slightly attenuated by EPO. Hypoxia also reduced the MCP-1 release of co-cultured cells, when EPO had been added. In addition, EPO had a rather positive effect on HPC migration under hypoxia. These in vitro results allow new insights into the interaction of pericytes with endothelial cells in the context of soft tissue repair. PMID:26026617

  13. The Culture Repopulation Ability (CRA) Assay and Incubation in Low Oxygen to Test Antileukemic Drugs on Imatinib-Resistant CML Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Tanturli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell-driven disorder caused by the BCR/Abl oncoprotein, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase (TK). Chronic-phase CML patients are treated with impressive efficacy with TK inhibitors (TKi) such as imatinib mesylate (IM). However, rather than definitively curing CML, TKi induces a state of minimal residual disease, due to the persistence of leukemia stem cells (LSC) which are insensitive to this class of drugs. LSC persistence may be due to different reasons, including the suppression of BCR/Abl oncoprotein. It has been shown that this suppression follows incubation in low oxygen under appropriate culture conditions and incubation times.Here we describe the culture repopulation ability (CRA) assay, a non-clonogenic assay capable - together with incubation in low oxygen - to reveal in vitro stem cells endowed with marrow repopulation ability (MRA) in vivo. The CRA assay can be used, before moving to animal tests, as a simple and reliable method for the prescreening of drugs potentially active on CML and other leukemias with respect to their activity on the more immature leukemia cell subsets. PMID:27581140

  14. Cytotoxicity test of 40, 50 and 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner by using MTT assay on culture cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Khoswanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Open dentin is always covered by smear layer, therefore before restoration is performed, cavity or tooth which has been prepared should be clean from dirt. The researchers suggested that clean dentin surface would reach effective adhesion between resin and tooth structure, therefore dentin conditioner like citric acid was used to reach the condition. Even though citric acid is not strong acid but it can be very erosive to oral mucous. Several requirements should be fulfilled for dental product such as non toxic, non irritant, biocompatible and should not have negative effect against local, systemic or biological environment. Cytotoxicity test was apart of biomaterial evaluation and needed for standard screening. Purpose: This study was to know the cytotoxicity of 40, 50, 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner using MTT assay. Method: This study is an experimental research using the Post-Test Only Control Group Design. Six samples of each 40, 50 and 60% citric acid for citotoxicity test using MTT assay. The density of optic formazan indicated the number of living cells. All data were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA. Result: The percentage of living cells in 40, 50 and 60% citric acid were 95.14%, 93.42% and 93.14%. Conclusion: Citric acid is non toxic and safe to be used as dentine conditioner.

  15. Comet assay as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity of two human brain tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micronucleus assay and comet assay were compared as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity of tumors. Two human brain tumor cell lines, Becker (derived from astrocytoma) and ONS76 (derived from medulloblastoma) were used. Colony methods as the gold standard showed ONS76 as radiosensitive and Becker as radioresistant cell lines. Micronucleus assay revealed no different radiosensitivity between them. With comet assay, Becker cells received irradiation showed less damage to the DNA and faster repair of the damage than ONS76 cells did. The results correlate with those from colony methods. Comet assay is simple and rapid method for clinical use and it has an advantage not to establish the primary culture. Moreover, the results of comet assay showed not only DNA damage but also repair from the damage. It is concluded that comet assay is a superior method than micronucleus assay and has a potent candidate for clinical predictive assay. (author)

  16. Comparison of a frozen human foreskin fibroblast cell assay to an enzyme immunoassay and toxigenic culture for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Alastair J; Evans, Natalie E; Williams, O Martin; Spencer, Robert C; Greenwood, Rosemary; Probert, Chris J

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to validate the Hs27 ReadyCell assay (RCCNA) as an alternative CCNA method compared against a commonly used commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method and toxigenic culture (TC) reference standard. A total of 860 samples were identified from those submitted to the Health Protection Agency microbiology laboratories over a 30-week period. RCCNA performed much better than EIA when using TC as a gold standard, with sensitivities of 90.8% versus 78.6% and positive predictive value of 87.3% to 81.9%, respectively. The Hs27 Human Foreskin Fibroblast ReadyCells are an easy-to-use and a sensitive CCNA method for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile directly from stool. A turnaround time of up to 48 h for a negative result and possible need for repeat testing make it an unsuitable method to be used in most clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23107315

  17. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gisder

    Full Text Available Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin or presumed (surfactin or no (paromomycin activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae.

  18. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device...

  19. Time-lapse imaging assay using the BioStation CT: A sensitive drug-screening method for three-dimensional cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Ruriko; Rahman, M. Mamunur; SHIMOMURA, MANAMI; Itoh, Manabu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is beneficial for physiological studies of tumor cells, due to its potential to deliver a high quantity of cell culture information that is representative of the cancer microenvironment and predictive of drug responses in vivo. Currently, gel-associated or matrix-associated 3D cell culture is comprised of intricate procedures that often result in experimental complexity. Therefore, we developed an innovative anti-cancer drug sensitivity screening technique ...

  20. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile: comparison of the cell culture neutralization, Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholi, P; Kelly, C; Raczkowski, M; Balada-Llasat, J M

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Several laboratory techniques are available to detect C. difficile toxins or the genes that encode them in fecal samples. We evaluated the Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi (Cepheid, CA) that detect the toxin B gene (tcdB) and tcdB, cdt, and a deletion in tcdC associated with the 027/NAP1/BI strain, respectively, by real-time PCR, and the Illumigene C. difficile (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) that detects the toxin A gene (tcdA) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification in stool specimens. Toxigenic culture was used as the reference method for discrepant stool specimens. Two hundred prospective and fifty retrospective diarrheal stool specimens were tested simultaneously by the cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (CCNA) and the Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays. Of the 200 prospective stools tested, 10.5% (n = 23) were determined to be positive by CCNA, 17.5% (n = 35) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile, and 21.5% (n = 43) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 50 retrospective stools, previously determined to be positive by CCNA, 94% (n = 47) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile and 100% (n = 50) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 11 discrepant results (i.e., negative by Illumigene C. difficile but positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi), all were determined to be positive by the toxigenic culture. A total of 21% of the isolates were presumptively identified by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi as the 027/NAP1/BI strain. The Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi assays were the most sensitive, rapid, and easy-to use assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens. PMID:22278839

  1. Live-cell luciferase assay of drug resistant cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    To date, multiplexing cell-based assay is essential for high-throughput screening of molecular targets. Measuring multiple parameters of a single sample increases consistency and decrease time and cost of assay. Functional assay of living cell is useful as a first step of multiplexing assay, because live-cell assay allows following second assay using cell lysate or stained cell. However, live-cell assay of drug resistant cells that are highly activated of drug efflux mechanisms is sometimes u...

  2. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  3. Polyalkoxybenzenes from plants. 5. Parsley seed extract in synthesis of azapodophyllotoxins featuring strong tubulin destabilizing activity in the sea urchin embryo and cell culture assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Marina N; Kiselyov, Alex S; Tsyganov, Dmitry V; Konyushkin, Leonid D; Firgang, Sergei I; Semenov, Roman V; Malyshev, Oleg R; Raihstat, Mikhail M; Fuchs, Fabian; Stielow, Anne; Lantow, Margareta; Philchenkov, Alex A; Zavelevich, Michael P; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Semenov, Victor V

    2011-10-27

    A series of 4-azapodophyllotoxin derivatives with modified rings B and E have been synthesized using allylpolyalkoxybenzenes from parsley seed oil. The targeted molecules were evaluated in vivo in a phenotypic sea urchin embryo assay for antimitotic and tubulin destabilizing activity. The most active compounds identified by the in vivo sea urchin embryo assay featured myristicin-derived ring E. These molecules were determined to be more potent than podophyllotoxin. Cytotoxic effects of selected molecules were further confirmed and evaluated by conventional assays with A549 and Jurkat human leukemic T-cell lines including cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, cellular microtubule disruption, and induction of apoptosis. The ring B modification yielded 6-OMe substituted molecule as the most active compound. Finally, in Jurkat cells, compound induced caspase-dependent apoptosis mediated by the apical caspases-2 and -9 and not caspase-8, implying the involvement of the intrinsic caspase-9-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:21916509

  4. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  5. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  6. An Experiment on Standardized Cell Culture Assay in Assessing the Activities of Composite Artemisia Capillaris Tablets against Hepatitis B Virus Replication in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jin; ZHAO Yan-ling; SHAN Li-mei; HUANG Feng-jiao; XIAO Xiao-he

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To explore the activities of Composite Artemisia Capillaris Tablet (复方茵陈片,CACT) against hepatitis B virus replication in vitro. Methods: By means of radioimmunoassay (RIA), Dot blot and Southern blot, the surface and e antigen production of 2.2.15 cells, HBV DNA in 2.2.15 cell culture medium and that in 2.2.15 cells were examined respectively. Results: HBsAg, HBeAg values of 2.2.15 cells treated by CACT were lower than those of the control, the HBV DNA quantities in culture medium and in 2.2.15 cells decreased as compared with those cells with no treatment by CACT given to them. Conclusion:CACT could inhibit HBV DNA replication, showing its potential antiviral activity in hepatitis B treatment.

  7. Electrical wound-healing assay for cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Keese, Charles R.; Wegener, Joachim; Walker, Sarah R.; Giaever, Ivar

    2004-01-01

    Confluent cell monolayers in tissue culture are fragile and can easily be mechanically disrupted, often leaving an area devoid of cells. This opening in the cell sheet is then repopulated, because the cells on the fringe of the damage, which are no longer contact-inhibited, move into the available space. This mechanical disruption is often done deliberately in a “wound-healing” assay as a means to assess the migration of the cells. In such assays, a scrape is made in the cell layer followed b...

  8. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness, and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh's plane. PMID:20803548

  9. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  10. Inter-experiment variation and dependence on culture conditions in assaying the chemosensitivity of human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, H; Christensen, I B; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Hansen, H H

    1987-01-01

    Sensitivity of five human small cell lung cancer cell lines to doxorubicin was assessed by a double layer agar technique using two different bottom-layers. Neither of the bottom-layers provided proportionality between numbers of cells plated and numbers of colonies, but they were correlated by a...

  11. Novel derivatives of 1,3,4-oxadiazoles are potent mitostatic agents featuring strong microtubule depolymerizing activity in the sea urchin embryo and cell culture assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alex S; Semenova, Marina N; Chernyshova, Natalya B; Leitao, Andrei; Samet, Alexandr V; Kislyi, Konstantine A; Raihstat, Mikhail M; Oprea, Tudor; Lemcke, Heiko; Lantow, Margaréta; Weiss, Dieter G; Ikizalp, Nazli N; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Semenov, Victor V

    2010-05-01

    A series of novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives based on structural and electronic overlap with combretastatins have been designed and synthesized. Initially, we tested all new compounds in vivo using the phenotypic sea urchin embryo assay to yield a number of agents with anti-proliferative, anti-mitotic, and microtubule destabilizing activities. The experimental data led to identification of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives with isothiazole (5-8) and phenyl (9-12) pharmacophores featuring activity profiles comparable to that of combretastatins, podophyllotoxin and nocodazole. Cytotoxic effects of the two lead molecules, namely 6 and 12, were further confirmed and evaluated by conventional assays with the A549 human cancer cell line including cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, cellular microtubule distribution, and finally in vitro microtubule assembly with purified tubulin. The modeling results using 3D similarity (ROCS) and docking (FRED) correlated well with the observed activity of the molecules. Docking data suggested that the most potent molecules are likely to target the colchicine binding site. PMID:20110137

  12. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed. PMID:27087810

  13. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope Oluwasegun Cephas Faleye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25% of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1, CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32, enterovirus 71 (EV71, EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed.

  14. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleye, Temitope Oluwasegun Cephas; Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed. PMID:27087810

  15. Isolation of Treg cells and Treg cell suppression/death assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    In vitro Treg suppression assays are performed to determine the functional effect of Treg cells on CD4 T cells. They are performed by co-culturing the responding population (Tresp) with the Treg cells or control CD4 cells (Tcon cells).

  16. Shortening the culture time in cytogenetic dosimetry using PCC-R assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast assessment of the dose received by exposed persons is crucial in radiological accidents, so the 48 h of cell culture in conventional cytogenetic dosimetry in addition to some limitations after high doses becomes a disadvantage. The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay permits to analyse enough cells after high radiation exposure, and the score of PCC-R may reduce the culture time up to 40-42 h. Peripheral whole-blood samples were exposed to 1-10 Gy of gamma radiation and cultured during 40 and 42 h. No statistical difference between frequencies was obtained between 40, 42 and 48 h of culture time, and PCC index decreased with the increase of the dose and increased with the culture time. The protocol proposed allows reduce the culture time down to 40 or 42 h when using the PCC-R assay with adequate precision in dose estimation. (authors)

  17. Bacterial cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    ### Materials 1. Glass culture tubes with metal caps and labels - Growth medium, from media room or customized - Glass pipette tubes - Parafilm ### Equipment 1. Vortexer - Fireboy or Bunsen burner - Motorized pipette - Micropipettes and sterile tips ### Procedure For a typical liquid culture, use 5 ml of appropriate medium. The amount in each tube does not have to be exact if you are just trying to culture cells for their precious DNA. 1. Streak an a...

  18. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  19. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  20. Optimizing stem cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    International audience Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. In the past few years, major efforts have been made to define more precisely the medium composition in which stem cells grow or differentiate. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such a...

  1. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  2. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  3. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall...... causing significant DNA damage was 20 μM for H2O2 and 200 mg/l for acrylamide. Tertiary-treated wastewater from the outlets of three municipal wastewater-treatment plants was tested, but did not cause DNA damage. Even though it is possible to produce comets with tetraploid yeast cells, the amount of DNA...

  4. Mycoplasmas detection in cells cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera-Tapia José Antonio; Castillo-Viveros Linda Valeria; Sánchez-Hernández José Antonio

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Cells cultures are widely used in both biomedical and biotechnological research centers and industry, as well as for diagnostic test in hospitals. Contaminations of cells cultures with microbial organisms as well as with virus or other eukaryotic cell lines are a major problem in cell culture related research.OBJECTIVE. Mycoplasmas detection in cells cultures came from biomedical laboratories.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The cells cultures screened for mycoplasmas by using of microbiol...

  5. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and ti...

  6. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily;

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processe...

  7. Cultures of cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast and radiosensitivity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the radiosensitivity of normal skin tissue, the authors cultured cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast, surviving fraction experiment was employed to provide data for understanding of the different radiosensitivity among the cancer patients, Method: cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblast were cultured in vitro by the way of tar's attachment, cells were irradiated by graded doses of γ-ray , cell dose response experiment was used to test the radiosensitivity of cell. Result: Cancer patient's skin fibroblast could be propagated and passaged by the method of culture in vitro. Radiosensitivity are different among the various cancer patient's skin tissue fibroblasts

  8. Plant cell cultures and their biotechnological potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barz, W.; Ellis, B.E.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of plant cell suspension cultures for the biotechnological production of high-cost, plant-specific compounds is critically evaluated. The basic roles of nutrient media and phytohormones are described followed by a description of the recent progress in mass cultivation of plant cell cultures as measured by biomass and doubling time. The accumulation of secondary constituents in cell cultures is reviewed and methods for the selection of high-producing strains are described. The essential features of the selection strategy are the establishment of cell cultures from high-producing plants and a sensitive assay (e.g. radio-immunoassay) for the screening of microcolonies grown on petri dishes. The accumulation of biosynthetic intermediates of secondary constituents in cell culture strains will possibly lead to the isolation of novel compounds.

  9. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long......-term cultures. Support protocols describe methods for maintenance of vector-producing fibroblasts (VPF) and supernatant collection from these cells, screening medium components for the ability to support hematopoietic cell growth, and establishing colonies from long-term cultures. Other protocols provide PCR...

  10. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cel...

  11. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  12. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  13. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  14. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of trichothecenes produced by the Bioherbicide Myrothecium verrucaria in cell cultures, extracts, and plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates for trichothecene detection, possessing cross-reactivity with several trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g., verrucarin A, and J, roridin A, L-2, E, and H), were tested for their ability to detect trichothecenes produced by a strain of...

  15. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  16. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds. PMID:22820428

  17. A Modified NK Cell Degranulation Assay Applicable for Routine Evaluation of NK Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabrish, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Madkaikar, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important role in innate immunity against tumors and viral infections. Studies show that lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, CD107a) is a marker for degranulation of NK and cytotoxic T cells and its expression is a sensitive marker for the cytotoxic activity determination. The conventional methods of determination of CD107a on NK cells involve use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pure NK cells and K562 cells as stimulants. Thus, it requires large volume of blood sample which is usually difficult to obtain in pediatric patients and patients with cytopenia and also requires specialized laboratory for maintaining cell line. We have designed a flow cytometric assay to determine CD107a on NK cells using whole blood, eliminating the need for isolation of PBMC or isolate NK cells. This assay uses phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (Ca2+-ionophore) instead of K562 cells for stimulation and thus does not require specialized cell culture laboratory. CD107a expression on NK cells using modified NK cell degranulation assay compared to the conventional assay was significantly elevated (p < 0.0001). It was also validated by testing patients diagnosed with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) with defect in exocytosis. This assay is rapid, cost effective, and reproducible and requires significantly less volume of blood which is important for clinical evaluation of NK cells. PMID:27413758

  18. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  19. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  20. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of Carissa carandas Linn. fruit extract in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to electron beam radiation by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet Assay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is a well-known inducer of free radicals and compounds that can scavenge free radicals may reduce radiation-induced DNA damage. Carissa carandas commonly known as Karanda belongs to family Apocynaceae. Traditionally, whole plant and its parts were used in the treatment of various ailments. The aim of the present study was to assess the radioprotective effect of ethanolic extract of Carissa carandas fruit (ECF) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) by comet assay. The optimum protective dose of the extract was selected by treating HPBLs with 50 and 100 μg/ml ECF after exposure to 2 Gy electron beam radiation and then evaluating the frequency of DNA damage in HPBLs using Single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay). To understand the mechanism of action of ECF separate experiments were conducted to evaluate the free radical scavenging of DPPH, and Fe3+ in vitro. ECF was found to inhibit free radicals in a dose dependent manner up to a dose of 1000 μg/ml for the majority of radicals as observed by the in vitro free radical scavenging assays. The irradiation of HPBLs with 2 Gy dose of electron beam radiation caused an increase in the frequency of DNA damage while treatment of HPBLs with different concentrations of ECF reduced the frequency of DNA damage significantly with the greatest reduction being observed for 100 μg/ml when compared with the irradiated control. Our study demonstrates the potential of ECF as an effective agent against radiation induced DNA damage. (author)

  1. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  2. SPONTANEOUS TRANSFORMATION OF CULTURED PORCINE BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng;

    -term culture are transformed into malignant cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS BMSC from 6 pigs were isolated and propagated continuously. Cell morphology was observed. Transformation properties were evaluated by means of serum dependence assay, Ki- 67 immunostaining, soft agar colony assay, karyotyping, telomerase...... was increased and TGF‚ signaling pathway was upregulated. However, telomerase activity maintained negative during culture. CONCLUSION Porcine BMSC can undergo spontaneous transformation, which provides a useful model to study the mechanisms associated with the tumorigenic potential of adult stem cells....

  3. Survival response of RIF tumor cells to heat-x-radiation combinations: Parallel measurements in culture and by the excision assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxicity of heat-radiation (hX) combinations in vivo may differ from that measured in vitro. The authors have used the RIF tumor, grown in mouse feet, to compare the survival response after in situ hX-treatments with identical hX in vitro. The radiation survival curve, determined by the excision assay showed a slightly larger D/sub o/ than that measured in vitro (250, 200 rad, respective) and survival measurements appeared independent of excision time after irradiation. The 450-heat survival curve was similar in both assays, but only when the excision followed immediately after h. A 24-hr delayed excision removed the shoulder and lowered survival 30-fold after either 20 or 30 min, 450. Similar survival values were measured after 10 min, 450+X (hX) in vitro and with immediate excision, although the excision survival curve had no shoulder and a D/sub o/ of 180 rad vs. 120 rad in vitro. The survival curve with delayed excision (24 hr) also appeared as a simple exponential curve with an apparent D/sub o/ of 310 rad (n=0.02). Two fractions of combined hX, separated by 24 hr (hx+24+hX), yielded D/sub o/=90 rad, D/sub q/=230 rad in vitro but 370 and 400 rad, respectively, when measured by delayed excision. The apparent radioresistance in vivo is consistent with data by Song of increased hypoxic fractions after heating in vivo and argues against combining hx in every fraction for optimal tumor control

  4. Detection of hypoxic cells in murine tumors using the comet assay. Comparison with a conventional radiobiological assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet (single-cell electrophoresis) assay has been developed as a method for measuring DNA damage in single cells after irradiation. We have developed our own methods and image analysis system for the comet assay to identify hypoxic fractions. In vitro, we tested our system using a cultured tumor cell line (SCCVII). In vivo, we compared the hypoxic fractions detected by this assay with those determined by the in vivo-in vitro clonogenic assay using two rodent tumors (SCCVII/C3H, EMT6/KU/balb/c), which exhibit different types of hypoxia: acute and chronic. In vitro, our method could differentiate hypoxic cells from oxic cells, using the parameter of tail moment. In vivo, there were good correlations between the hypoxic fractions determined by the comet assay and by the clonogenic assay, in SCCVII/C3H (r=0.85) and in EMT6/KU/balb/c (r=0.75) tumors. By comparison of the two methods in chronically hypoxic and acutely hypoxic tumors, we further confirmed that the comet assay is clinically useful for estimating hypoxic fractions of solid tumors. (author)

  5. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Buch Karl; Peters Tanja; Nawroth Thomas; Sänger Markus; Schmidberger Heinz; Langguth Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calc...

  6. The Extended Cell Panel Assay Characterizes the Relationship of Prion Strains RML, 79A, and 139A and Reveals Conversion of 139A to 79A-Like Prions in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Ortiz-Umpierre, Shannon; Weissmann, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Three commonly used isolates of murine prions, 79A, 139A, and RML, were derived from the so-called Chandler isolate, which was obtained by propagating prions from scrapie-infected goat brain in mice. RML is widely believed to be identical with 139A; however, using the extended cell panel assay (ECPA), we here show that 139A and RML isolates are distinct, while 79A and RML could not be distinguished. We undertook to clone 79A and 139A prions by endpoint dilution in murine neuroblastoma-derived...

  7. A dual immunocytochemical assay for oestrogen and epidermal growth factor receptors in tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); J.H. Horgan; R.L. McClelland (Robyn); A.G. Douglas-Jones (A.); T. van Agthoven (Ton); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert); R.I. Nicholson (R.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA new dual immunocytochemical assay for oestrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been developed. It has been tested in a variety of conditions using cell culture lines and the results correlate well with those obtained from single immunocytochemical assays.

  8. Determining Cell Number During Cell Culture using the Scepter Cell Counter

    OpenAIRE

    Ongena, Kathleen; Das, Chandreyee; Smith, Janet L.; Gil, Sónia; Johnston, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Counting cells is often a necessary but tedious step for in vitro cell culture. Consistent cell concentrations ensure experimental reproducibility and accuracy. Cell counts are important for monitoring cell health and proliferation rate, assessing immortalization or transformation, seeding cells for subsequent experiments, transfection or infection, and preparing for cell-based assays. It is important that cell counts be accurate, consistent, and fast, particularly for quantitative measuremen...

  9. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay - A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98) were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability

  10. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials. PMID:27079322

  11. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways. PMID:27590152

  12. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis in DNA Damage Detection (Comet Assay)

    OpenAIRE

    Aysen Durmaz; Nurten Dikmen; Cumhur Gunduz

    2010-01-01

    “Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)”, also called “Comet Assay”, is a sensitive, reliable and rapid technique for quantifying and analyzing DNA damage in individual cells. The comet assay is widely used in living cells, researches and the applications on comet assay is becoming broader day by day. To date, the comet assay has been used for a variety of applications, including genotoxic and cytotoxic agent analyses, environmental toxicology, cancer research, and radiati...

  13. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  14. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  15. Ovine carotid artery-derived cells as an optimized supportive cell layer in 2-D capillary network assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Weinandy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial cell co-culture assays are differentiation assays which simulate the formation of capillary-like tubules with the aid of a supportive cell layer. Different cell types have been employed as a supportive cell layer, including human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and human mammary fibroblasts. However, these sources of human tissue-derived cells are limited, and more readily accessible human or animal tissue-derived cell sources would simplify the endothelial cell co-culture assay. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of alternative, accessible supportive cells for endothelial cell co-culture assay, including human umbilical cord and ovine carotid artery. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human umbilical artery SMCs (HUASMCs and ovine carotid artery-derived cells were seeded into 96-well plates, followed by addition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Nine days after co-culture, cells were fixed, immunostained and analysed using an in vitro angiogenesis quantification tool. Capillary-like structures were detected on ovine carotid artery-derived supportive cell layers. The initial cell number, as well as pro- and anti-angiogenic factors (VEGF, PDGF-BB and Bevacizumab, had a positive or negative influence on the number of capillary-like structures. Furthermore, HUVECs from different donors showed distinct levels of VEGF receptor-2, which correlated with the amount of capillary-like structures. In the case of HUASMC supportive cell layers, HUVECs detached almost completely from the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Cells of different origin have a varying applicability regarding the endothelial cell co-culture assay: under the conditions described here, ovine carotid artery-derived cells seem to be more suitable than HUASMCs for an endothelial co-culture assay. Furthermore, the ovine carotid artery-derived cells are easier to obtain and are in more abundant supply than the currently used dermal or breast

  16. Adapted cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMn) for mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Hamid Kalantari, Hamid Gourabi & Hossein Baharvand ### Abstract Our observation showed the addition of cytochalasin-B to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) culture for CBMn analysis led to the induction of apoptosis in these cells. On the other hand, addition of cyt-B is the most critical part of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMn) technique that cannot be omitted. Thus, modification of the traditional CBMn assay seems to be necessary. In this paper, we attempt...

  17. High density cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  18. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  19. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  20. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (psecreted IFN-γ in whole blood cultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (pexpression on plate b, and the relative-to-maximum level on this plate was significant (p<0.05) compared to plate a. Altogether these findings highlight the potential weaknesses of the IFN-γ release assay in terms of the many variables that can influence the results, including the cell culture population, the concentration of cells being cultured, and the plastic ware used for the in vitro culture. These findings stress the importance of documenting the precise assay conditions when publishing results of in vitro IFN-γ release assays. PMID:27073172

  1. Renotropic stimulation in rat kidney cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circulating renotropic factor specific for renal cells has been described in rats. The addition of sera obtained from unilaterally nephrectomized (uni) rats 24h after operation compared to sham-operated (sham) rats augments 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of incubating kidney slices approximately 10% - 30%. Attempting to amplify the sensitivity of the assay for this renotropic agent, the authors replaced slices with primary rat kidney cultures. The assay system was based on one previously used for rabbits. The cultured cells were synchronized in their growth phase by a period of protein-free starvation. Compared to sera from sham rats, sera from uni rats showed significant stimulation of thymidine incorporation into DNA, 35.5% +/- 9.3 (SEM), p < .0001, at 16 h; 63.3% +/- 10.0 (SEM), p < .001, at 24 h; and 19.5% +/- 6.5 (SEM), p < .01, at 48 h post operation. Accordingly, the maximal stimulation at 24 h was greater than that previously found using the kidney slice assay. Measurable renotropic activity occurred earlier and over a shorter duration than in rabbits. Stimulation was similar when a D-valine medium, relatively specific for renal epithelial cells, replaced DME medium

  2. Isolation, Culture, and Maintenance of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Ackerman, Sarah; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    In this protocol we describe our modifications to a method to isolate, culture and maintain mouse intestinal stem cells as crypt-villus forming organoids. These cells, isolated either from the small or large intestine, maintain self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential over time. This provides investigators a tool to culture wild type or transformed intestinal epithelium, and a robust assay for stem cell tissue homeostasis in vitro.

  3. Using a medium-throughput comet assay to evaluate the global DNA methylation status of single cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lewies, Angélique; Van Dyk, Etresia; Johannes F. Wentzel; Pieter J. Pretorius

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a simple and cost effective technique, commonly used to analyze and quantify DNA damage in individual cells. The versatility of the comet assay allows introduction of various modifications to the basic technique. The difference in the methylation sensitivity of the isoschizomeric restriction enzymes HpaII and MspI are used to demonstrate the ability of the comet assay to measure the global DNA methylation level of individual cells when using cell cultures. In the experiment...

  4. Distinct embryotoxic effects of lithium appeared in a new assessment model of the sea urchin: the whole embryo assay and the blastomere culture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomoto, Masato; Morinaga, Seiko; Ooi, Nagisa

    2010-03-01

    Early embryogenesis is one of the most sensitive and critical stages in animal development. Here we propose a new assessment model on the effect of pollutant to multicellular organism development. That is a comparison between the whole embryo assay and the blastomere culture assay. We examined the LiCl effect on the sea urchin early development in both of whole embryos and the culture of isolated blastomeres. The mesoderm and endoderm region were capable to differentiate into skeletogenic cells when they were isolated at 60-cell stage and cultured in vitro. The embryo developed to exogastrula by the vegetalizing effect of the same LiCl condition where ectodermal region changed their fate to endoderm, while the isolated blastomeres from the presumptive ectoderm region differentiated into skeletogenic cells in the culture with LiCl. The effect of LiCl to the sea urchin embryo and to the dissociated blastomere is a unique example where same cells response distinctly to the same agent depend on the condition around them. Present results show the importance of examining the process in cellular and tissue levels for the exact understanding on the morphological effect of chemicals and metals. PMID:20020201

  5. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren I. Hulkower

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  6. Assessing the DNA methylation status of single cells with the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzel, Johannes F; Gouws, Chrisna; Huysamen, Cristal; Dyk, Etresia van; Koekemoer, Gerhard; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2010-05-15

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) is a cost-effective, sensitive, and simple technique that is traditionally used for analyzing and quantifying DNA damage in individual cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the comet assay could be modified to detect changes in the levels of DNA methylation in single cells. We used the difference in methylation sensitivity of the isoschizomeric restriction endonucleases HpaII and MspI to demonstrate the feasibility of the comet assay to measure the global DNA methylation level of individual cells. The results were verified with the well-established cytosine extension assay. We were able to show variations in DNA methylation after treatment of cultured cells with 5-azacytidine and succinylacetone, an accumulating metabolite in human tyrosinemia type I. PMID:20156416

  7. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture

  8. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ronen; Gingerich, J D; Duncan, A. M.; Heddle, J A

    1984-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. We report here that resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [3H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resis...

  9. Evaluation on Sensitivity of the Human Sperm Motility Assay for Detecting Endotoxin in Culture Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI; Wen-hong ZHANG; Kang-shou YAO

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay for detecting endotoxin in culture medium Materials & Methods Motile sperm were separated and exposed to different concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, 1 000 ng/mL, 10 000 ng/mL, and 50 000 ng/mL), and sperm motility was determined after incubation. Effects of endotoxin on sperm motility in media without albumin were also examined. In addition, at the same concentrations of endotoxin (0.5 ng/mL, 1 ng/mL, and 10 ng/mL), the sensitivity of the human sperm motility assay was compared to those of 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryo bioassays.Results At levels of 0.5 ng/mL~1 000 ng/mL endotoxin in media with 2 mg/mL albumin, sperm did not show significant change in motility during 24 h of incubation when compared with the control (P>0.05). However, the sperm motility was significantly inhibited at endotoxin dosages of 10 000 and 50 000 ng/mL. In the absence of albumin supplementation, at endotoxin levels of 50 000 ng/mL, and 1 000 ng/mL, there was a marked decrease in sperm motility compared with the control after 2 h or 8 h of incubation, respectively (P<0.01). In media containing 0.5 ng/mL and 1 ng/mL endotoxin, 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryos had significantly reduced developmental rates in all developmental stages, and at the level of 10 ng/mL, the development of the embryos was arrested.Conclusion The human sperm motility assay could detect high levels of endotoxin in culture medium but its sensitivity to endotoxin would be inferior to that of the 1-cell or 2-cell mouse embryo bioassay. In the absence of albumin supplementation, the sensitivity of the sperm motility assay could be improved.

  10. Early detection of influenza virus by using a fluorometric assay of infected tissue culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Pachucki, C T; Creticos, C

    1988-01-01

    A fluorometric substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-ketoside of N-acetylneuramide, was used directly on clinical specimens and infected tissue culture 24 h after inoculation for the detection of influenza viral neuraminidase. Viral neuraminidase was detected in infected tissue culture but not in clinical specimens. The sensitivity of the assay on tissue culture was 92%, and the specificity was 96%.

  11. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B.; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis ...

  12. Mammalian cell transformation: Mechanisms of carcinogenesis and assays for carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: Molecular Changes in Cell Transformation; Differentiation, Growth Control, and Cell Transformation; Mutagenesis and Cell Transformation; Tumor Promotion and Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Transformation of Human Fibroblasts; Mechanisms of Transformation of Epithelial Cells; Mechanisms of C3H 10T12 Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Cell Transformation; and Use of Cell Transformation Assays for Carcinogen Testing

  13. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, N; Tran, T M; Abate, A R

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  14. Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) extract exhibits atropine-sensitive activity in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Satin; Long, Shannon R; Proteau, Philip J; Filtz, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) plant extract is used as a herbal alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was shown that hawthorn extract preparations caused negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay, independent of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effect of hawthorn extract to decrease the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis that hawthorn is acting via muscarinic receptors, the effect of hawthorn extract on atrial versus ventricular cardiomyocytes in culture was evaluated. As would be expected for activation of muscarinic receptors, hawthorn extract had a greater effect in atrial cells. Atrial and/or ventricular cardiomyocytes were then treated with hawthorn extract in the presence of atropine or himbacine. Changes in the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes revealed that both muscarinic antagonists significantly attenuated the negative chronotropic activity of hawthorn extract. Using quinuclidinyl benzilate, L-[benzylic-4,4'-(3)H] ([(3)H]-QNB) as a radioligand antagonist, the effect of a partially purified hawthorn extract fraction to inhibit muscarinic receptor binding was quantified. Hawthorn extract fraction 3 dose-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-QNB binding to mouse heart membranes. Taken together, these findings suggest that decreased contraction frequency by hawthorn extracts in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes may be mediated via muscarinic receptor activation. PMID:18696181

  15. An assay for transient gene expression in transfected Drosophila cells, using [3H]guanine incorporation.

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, J F; Sinclair, J H; Sang, J. H.; Ish-Horowicz, D.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an assay for transient gene expression using a dominant-selectable marker previously employed to transform Drosophila cultured cells. Drosophila hydei cells transfected with a functional Escherichia coli xanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene (gpt), under the control of the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the copia transposable element, rapidly incorporate guanine into acid-precipitable counts. Autoradiographic analysis in situ shows that approximately 20% of cells...

  16. Aseptic technique for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, R J

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the ways that a laboratory can deal with the constant threat of microbial contamination in cell cultures. A protocol on aseptic technique is described first. This catch-all term universally appears in any set of instructions pertaining to procedures in which noncontaminating conditions must be maintained. In reality, aseptic technique encompasses all aspects of environmental control, personal hygiene, equipment and media sterilization, and associated quality control procedures needed to ensure that a procedure is, indeed, performed with aseptic, noncontaminating technique. Although cell culture can theoretically be carried out on an open bench in a low-traffic area, most cell culture work is carried out using a horizontal laminar-flow clean bench or a vertical laminar-flow biosafety cabinet. Both are described here. PMID:18228291

  17. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  18. Cell culture compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Girija Kuttan; Korengath Chandran Preethi; Ramadasan Kuttan; Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The ...

  20. A simple, versatile and sensitive cell-based assay for prions from various species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira E Arellano-Anaya

    Full Text Available Detection and quantification of prion infectivity is a crucial step for various fundamental and applied aspects of prion research. Identification of cell lines highly sensitive to prion infection led to the development of cell-based titration procedures aiming at replacing animal bioassays, usually performed in mice or hamsters. However, most of these cell lines are only permissive to mouse-adapted prions strains and do not allow titration of prions from other species. In this study, we show that epithelial RK13, a cell line permissive to mouse and bank vole prion strains and to natural prion agents from sheep and cervids, enables a robust and sensitive detection of mouse and ovine-derived prions. Importantly, the cell culture work is strongly reduced as the RK13 cell assay procedure designed here does not require subcultivation of the inoculated cultures. We also show that prions effectively bind to culture plastic vessel and are quantitatively detected by the cell assay. The possibility to easily quantify a wider range of prions, including rodent experimental strains but also natural agents from sheep and cervids, should prompt the spread of cell assays for routine prion titration and lead to valuable information in fundamental and applied studies.

  1. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the comet assay, single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used - in combination with a reference curve - to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose and they are inexpensive.

  2. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of prozac (fluoxetine without and with addition of vitamins A and C by means of the comet assay in culture of CHO-K1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noélle Giacomini Lemos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluoxetine, commercially named Prozac, is efficient against depression and anxiety, with lower risk of collateral effects. However, the possible genotoxic effects are still unknown. The use of vitamins as protectors against damages on cells and DNA has been evaluated, mainly for vitamins A and C. Furthermore, the associative effect of vitamins with several medicines demands studies. The evaluations of genotoxic effect of Prozac and vitamins A and C protective effect were carried out in culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells, CHO-K1, by means of the comet test. The Prozac was used, in liquid formulation, diluted in 5µg, 1µg and 0.2 µg/mL of culture medium. The vitamins were used, in liquid formulation, at the concentrations of 3µg and 880,5 µg/mL of culture medium to vitamins A and C, respectively. The treatments were carried out during 1 hour. The obtained data demonstrated that only the highest concentration of Prozac (5 µg is genotoxic and both vitamins A and C reduced such genotoxicity. The data suggest a follow-up on patients who use Prozac and the possibility of vitamins A and C association in order to minimize the collateral genotoxic effects.

  3. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities saving method, amenable to high-throughput screens, for accurately measuring yeast cell viability. PMID:24185677

  4. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  5. Insect Cell Culture and Biotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert R.Granados; Guoxun Li; G.W.Blissard

    2007-01-01

    The continued development of new cell culture technology is essential for the future growth and application of insect cell and baculovirus biotechnology. The use of cell lines for academic research and for commercial applications is currently dominated by two cell lines; the Spodoptera frugiperda line, SF21 (and its clonal isolate, SF9), and the Trichoplusia ni line, BTI 5B1-4, commercially known as High Five cells. The long perceived prediction that the immense potential application of the baculovirus-insect cell system, as a tool in cell and molecular biology, agriculture, and animal health, has been achieved. The versatility and recent applications of this popular expression system has been demonstrated by both academia and industry and it is clear that this cell-based system has been widely accepted for biotechnological applications. Numerous small to midsize startup biotechnology companies in North America and the Europe are currently using the baculovirus-insect cell technology to produce custom recombinant proteins for research and commercial applications. The recent breakthroughs using the baculovirus-insect cell-based system for the development of several commercial products that will impact animal and human health will further enhance interest in this technology by pharma. Clearly, future progress in novel cell and engineering advances will lead to fundamental scientific discoveries and serve to enhance the utility and applications of this baculovirus-insect cell system.

  6. MicrO: an ontology of phenotypic and metabolic characters, assays, and culture media found in prokaryotic taxonomic descriptions

    OpenAIRE

    Blank, Carrine E.; Cui, Hong; Moore, Lisa R.; Ramona L Walls

    2016-01-01

    Background MicrO is an ontology of microbiological terms, including prokaryotic qualities and processes, material entities (such as cell components), chemical entities (such as microbiological culture media and medium ingredients), and assays. The ontology was built to support the ongoing development of a natural language processing algorithm, MicroPIE (or, Microbial Phenomics Information Extractor). During the MicroPIE design process, we realized there was a need for a prokaryotic ontology w...

  7. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eRojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes.Over a thirty year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been litlle employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  8. Detecting mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2011-01-01

    The detection of mycoplasmas in human and animal cell cultures is mandatory for every cell culture laboratory, because these bacteria are common contaminants, persist unrecognized in cell cultures for many years, and affect research results as well as the purity of cell culture products. The reliability of the mycoplasma detection depends on the sensitivity and specificity of the method and should also be convenient to be included in the basic routine of cell culture quality assessment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection is one of the acknowledged methodologies to detect mycoplasmas in cell cultures and cell culture products. Although the PCR offers a fast and simple technique to detect mycoplasmas, the method is also susceptible to errors and can produce false positive as well as false-negative results. Thus, the establishment and the routine application of the PCR assay require optimization and the inclusion of the appropriate control reactions. The presented protocol describes sample preparation, DNA extraction, PCR run, the analysis of the PCR products, and speciation of the contaminant. It also provides detailed information on how to avoid artifacts produced by the method. Established properly, PCR is a reliable, fast, and sensitive method and should be applied regularly to monitor the contamination status of cell cultures. PMID:21516400

  9. Epithelial cell detachment by Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lijia; van Loveren, Cor; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2016-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is present as a biofilm at the sites of periodontal infections. The detachment of gingival epithelial cells induced by P. gingivalis biofilms was examined using planktonic cultures as a comparison. Exponentially grown planktonic cultures or 40-h biofilms were co-incubated with epithelial cells in a 24-well plate for 4 h. Epithelial cell detachment was assessed using imaging. The activity of arginine-gingipain (Rgp) and gene expression profiles of P. gingivalis cultures were examined using a gingipain assay and quantitative PCR, respectively. P. gingivalis biofilms induced significantly higher cell detachment and displayed higher Rgp activity compared to the planktonic cultures. The genes involved in gingipain post-translational modification, but not rgp genes, were significantly up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilms. The results underline the importance of including biofilms in the study of bacterial and host cell interactions. PMID:26963862

  10. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays

    OpenAIRE

    N. de Lange; Tran, T. M.; Abate, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assa...

  11. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  12. Applications of single cell gel electrophoresis assay in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), also called comet assay, is a sensitive and rapid method for DNA damage detection in individual mammalian cell. Its use has increased significantly in the past few years. Applications in the field of radiation medicine are reviewed and possible future directions of the technique are briefly explored

  13. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5+ stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay. (author)

  14. The glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we briefly review our past experience and some new developments with the GPA assay. Particular emphasis will be placed on two areas that affect the utility of the GPA assay for human population monitoring. The first is our efforts to simplify the GPA assay to make it more generally available for large population studies. The second is to begin to understand some of the characteristics of human hemopoiesis which affect the accumulation and expression of mutant phenotype cells. 11 refs., 4 figs

  15. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  16. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  17. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  18. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drosten Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. Results 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2 replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2. CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. Conclusion CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  19. Comparison of culture and a novel 5' Taq nuclease assay for direct detection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in clinical specimens from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Lyle; Fordyce, Geoffry; Doogan, Vivienne J; Lew, Ala E

    2006-03-01

    A Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis-specific 5' Taq nuclease PCR assay using a 3' minor groove binder-DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) was developed based on a subspecies-specific fragment of unknown identity (S. Hum, K. Quinn, J. Brunner, and S. L. On, Aust. Vet. J. 75:827-831, 1997). The assay specifically detected four C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains with no observed cross-reaction with C. fetus subsp. fetus-related Campylobacter species or other bovine venereal microflora. The 5' Taq nuclease assay detected approximately one single cell compared to 100 and 10 cells in the conventional PCR assay and 2,500 and 25,000 cells from selective culture from inoculated smegma and mucus, respectively. The respective detection limits following the enrichments from smegma and mucus were 5,000 and 50 cells/inoculum for the conventional PCR compared to 500 and 50 cells/inoculum for the 5' Taq nuclease assay. Field sampling confirmed the sensitivity and the specificity of the 5' Taq nuclease assay by detecting an additional 40 bulls that were not detected by culture. Urine-inoculated samples demonstrated comparable detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis by both culture and the 5' Taq nuclease assay; however, urine was found to be less effective than smegma for bull sampling. Three infected bulls were tested repetitively to compare sampling tools, and the bull rasper proved to be the most suitable, as evidenced by the improved ease of specimen collection and the consistent detection of higher levels of C. fetus subsp. venerealis. The 5' Taq nuclease assay demonstrates a statistically significant association with culture (chi2 = 29.8; P < 0.001) and significant improvements for the detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis-infected animals from crude clinical extracts following prolonged transport. PMID:16517880

  20. Comparison of Culture and a Novel 5′ Taq Nuclease Assay for Direct Detection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in Clinical Specimens from Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Lyle; Fordyce, Geoffry; Doogan, Vivienne J.; Lew, Ala E.

    2006-01-01

    A Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis-specific 5′ Taq nuclease PCR assay using a 3′ minor groove binder-DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) was developed based on a subspecies-specific fragment of unknown identity (S. Hum, K. Quinn, J. Brunner, and S. L. On, Aust. Vet. J. 75:827-831, 1997). The assay specifically detected four C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains with no observed cross-reaction with C. fetus subsp. fetus-related Campylobacter species or other bovine venereal microflora. The 5′ Taq nuclease assay detected approximately one single cell compared to 100 and 10 cells in the conventional PCR assay and 2,500 and 25,000 cells from selective culture from inoculated smegma and mucus, respectively. The respective detection limits following the enrichments from smegma and mucus were 5,000 and 50 cells/inoculum for the conventional PCR compared to 500 and 50 cells/inoculum for the 5′ Taq nuclease assay. Field sampling confirmed the sensitivity and the specificity of the 5′ Taq nuclease assay by detecting an additional 40 bulls that were not detected by culture. Urine-inoculated samples demonstrated comparable detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis by both culture and the 5′ Taq nuclease assay; however, urine was found to be less effective than smegma for bull sampling. Three infected bulls were tested repetitively to compare sampling tools, and the bull rasper proved to be the most suitable, as evidenced by the improved ease of specimen collection and the consistent detection of higher levels of C. fetus subsp. venerealis. The 5′ Taq nuclease assay demonstrates a statistically significant association with culture (χ2 = 29.8; P < 0.001) and significant improvements for the detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis-infected animals from crude clinical extracts following prolonged transport. PMID:16517880

  1. Development of a PCR assay to detect mycoplasma contamination in cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Tabatabaei-Qomi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of cell lines and biological products is one of the major problems of cell culture techniques. Rapid detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture is an important part of quality control standards in related laboratories. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PCR in detection of myroplasma as contaminants in cell cultures and other biological products.PCR assays were optimized for 16 S rRNA target gene. Also the utilized PCR method was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Finally, a simple DNA extraction and PCR analysis of 164 cell culture of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells were performed.A 715 bp product was amplified and subsequently was confirmed by sequencing. The technique could detect 10 copies of the target DNA. No cross-reactivity with genomic DNA of other microorganisms was observed.The PCR technique in this study was based on 16S rRNA gene. It was highly sensitive and specific since it was able to detected Mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures.

  2. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  3. Multizone paper platform for 3D cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratmir Derda

    Full Text Available In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc. The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously ("cells-in-gels-in-paper" or CiGiP, this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, "sections" all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures.

  4. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  5. Indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for detection of monoclonal hybridoma antibodies against cell surface antigens is described. Samples of spent medium from the hybridoma cultures are incubated in microtest wells with cells, either as adherent monolayers or in suspension. Antibodies bound to surface antigens are detected by successive incubations with rabbit anti-immunoglobulin serum and 125I-labeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus, followed by autoradiography of the microtest plate or scintillation counting of the individual wells. Particular advantages of this assay for screening hybridomas are: (1) commercially available reagents are used, (2) antibodies of any species and of any immunoglobulin class or subclass can be detected, and (3) large numbers of samples can be screened rapidly and inexpensively. The assay has been used to select hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens of human melanomas and mouse sarcomas. (Auth.)

  6. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-01

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  7. Metabolism of quercetin in cell suspension culture of Nicotiana tabacum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quercetin was oxidized on a rotating glassy-carbon electrode in phosphate-methanol buffer. The half-wave potentials for several pH were determined. Oxidation of quercetin by one of Nicotiana tabacum cell suspension cultures was carried out in vitro and final products were characterized by means of UV spectra and mass-spectrophotometry. Each product of oxidation was assayed for oxygen consumption inhibiting activity, using a 3 days old cell suspension culture of Nicotiana tabacum. Dimers and polymers showed strong inhibiting activity in O-2 consumption

  8. Genotoxicity determinations of coriander drop and extract of Coriander Sativum cultured fibroblast of rat embryo by comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay is a quick, simple and sensitive technique for measuring DNA damage in cell nucleus. It is well known that medicinal herbs play an important role in the life of human beings, thus it is essential to determine their safety as public health is concerned. In this study the genotoxicity of Coriander drop, herbal pharmaceutical product, and the extract of Coriander sativum were examined in cultured fibroblast of rat embryo using comet assay. The thirteen to fifteen days old rat embryos were lysed with tripsin and after certain steps it was centrifuged and then cultured. After three to five passages, different concentrations of each product were applied to the fibroblasts. Lysing, electrophoresis, neutralization and staining were carried out. Finally the slides were analyzed with fluorescence microscope. In the test groups the results indicated that coriander drop at different doses showed some fragmentation of DNA but this damage as a result was deemed to be not significant. However, in the case of Coriander sativum extract the results showed no mutagenic effects in comparison with the positive control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, these herbal products did not show any magnetic effect according to our test, but further genotoxicity assays are recommended. (author)

  9. PDMS/glass microfluidic cell culture system for cytotoxicity tests and cells passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziolkowska, K.; Jedrych, E.; Kwapiszewski, R.; Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Skolimowski, Maciej; Chudy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, hybrid (PDMS/glass) microfluidic cell culture system (MCCS) integrated with the concentration gradient generator (CGG) is presented. PDMS gas permeability enabled cells' respiration in the fabricated microdevices and excellent glass hydrophilicity allowed successful cells' seeding....... The human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were cultured in the microdevice for several days. The growth and proliferation of cells was monitored using an inverted fluorescence microscope. After the cells' confluence was achieved in the microchambers, the novel method of cells' passaging in the designed...... microdevice was developed and successfully tested. The MCCS microdevice is fully reusable, i.e. it can be used several times for various cell culture and cytotoxic experiments. The suitability of designed MCCS for cell-based cytotoxicity assay application was verified using 1,4-dioxane as a model toxic agent...

  10. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  11. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  12. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkower, Keren I.; Herber, Renee L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screeni...

  13. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  14. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  15. Use of the 51chromium release assay to study natural killer cells in mice infected with Babesia microti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromium-51 release assay was used to measure levels of natural killer cell activity in mice infected with Babesia microti. In this microassay system serial dilutions of effector cells (natural killer cells) are mixed with a constant number of radiolabeled YAC tumor cell targets. The amount of radioactivity released into the supernate of the cultures is measured and a percent of 51Cr release is calculated. This value is an index cytotoxicity

  16. Assessment of potential anti-cancer stem cell activity of marine algal compounds using an in vitro mammosphere assay

    OpenAIRE

    de la Mare, Jo-Anne; Sterrenberg, Jason N; Sukhthankar, Mugdha G; Chiwakata, Maynard T; Denzil R. Beukes; Blatch, Gregory L.; Edkins, Adrienne L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory proposes that tumours arise from and are sustained by a subpopulation of cells with both cancer and stem cell properties. One of the key hallmarks of CSCs is the ability to grow anchorage-independently under serum-free culture conditions resulting in the formation of tumourspheres. It has further been reported that these cells are resistant to traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Methods In this study, the tumoursphere assay was validated in MCF-7 ...

  17. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  18. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  19. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment. PMID:26966937

  20. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Vandebriel, Rob J.; Hoefnagel, Marcel H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear ...

  1. In vitro culture of human thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures for establishing primary cultures of human thyroid tissue are described. Tissues removed surgically from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC), follicular adenoma (FA), or hyperthyroidism were grown in culture. In addition, normal cells were separated from the margins of excised tumors and were also cultured. For each gram of thyroid tissue cultured, more than 1 x 105 cells attached to culture dishes. A mixture of 2.5 % fetal bovine serum supplemented with insulin, hydrocortisone, transferrin, glycl-1-histidyl-L-lysine acetate, somatostatin and epidermal growth factor was added to nutrient media containing equal parts of Ham's F-12 and minimum essential medium (αMEM). Complete medium selectively supported epithelial cell growth while restricting fibroblast cell growth, especially during the first two weeks of the primary culture. Cells were stimulated with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and produced raised levels of cAMP and thyroid hormone (T3). Culture conditions that affected the response of cells to X-rays were identified. During the culture period, first and second passage cells were compared for differences in their radiosensitivities. In all cases, cells showed differences in their responses to radiation depending on the cell passage number. However, results of replicate experiments of first passage cells that were exposed to X-rays showed good agreement between experiments. This technique makes it possible to quantitate the effects of chemical and physical cytotoxic agents on proliferating human thyroid epithelial cells. (author)

  2. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to [3H]leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to γ-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with [3H]leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures

  3. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis Assay of Porcine Leydig Cell DNA Damage Induced by Zearalenone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianwei ZHEN; Qincl LIU; Jianhong GU; Yan YUAN; Xuezhong LIU; Handong WANG; Zongping LIU; Jianchun BIAN

    2012-01-01

    Abstract [Objective] This study aimed to investigate the effect of zearalenone (ZEN) on DNA damage of porcine leydig cells. [Method] Porcine leydig cells cultured in vitro were collected to determine the median lethal dose (LD~o) of ZEN with tetra- zolium-based colorimetric assay (MTT assay). Comet assay was carried out to de- tect the DNA damage of porcine leydig cells exposed to at 0 (negative group), 1, 5, 10, 20, 40 tJmol/L of ZEN. [Result] The percentage of cell tail was 16.67%, 34.00%, 40.67%. 52.00% and 64.67% under 0, 1, 5, 10 and 20 ~mo~/L o~ ZEN, respectively; the differences between the percentages of celt tail in various experimental groups had extremely significant statistical significance compared with the negative group (P〈0.01), showing a significant dose-effect relationship; Tail length in various groups was 57.60_+4.78, 57.75_+6.25, 78.97_+5.83, 100.50~6.94 and 146.83_+12.31 ~m, re- spectively; Tail DNA % in various groups was 21.29_+2.25%, 22.24_+2.43%, 31.21_+ 6.27%, 37.45_+4.33% and 60.68_+9.83%, respectively; Tail length and Tail DNA % in experimental groups with ZEN concentration above 5 ~mo~/L showed significant dif- ferences (P〈0.05) compared with the negative group, which showed an upward trend with the increase of ZEN concentration. [Conclusion] ZEN has genotoxic effect on porcine leydig cells, which can cause DNA damage, with a significant dose-effect relationship.

  4. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered. PMID:22320435

  5. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  6. Novel patient cell-based HTS assay for identification of small molecules for a lysosomal storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Geng

    Full Text Available Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS, detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC acts as "plate fluorescence quencher" in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an

  7. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  8. Assay for inorganic pyrophosphate in chondrocyte culture using anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography and radioactive orthophosphate labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for determination of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in cell culture medium and in rabbit articular chondrocytes grown in the presence of radioactive orthophosphate (32Pi). Intra- and extracellular 32PPi formed was measured using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation of the PPi from orthophosphate (Pi) and other phosphate-containing compounds. The chromatographic separation on a weak anion-exchange column is based on the extent to which various phosphate compounds form complexes with Mg2+ at low pH and the rate at which such formation occurs. These complexes are eluted more readily than the uncomplexed compounds. Best results were obtained using a simultaneous gradient of Mg2+ ions and ionic strength. In this case separation of small amounts of PPi from a large excess of Pi was possible without prior removal of Pi or extraction of the PPi fraction. The assay is also useful for measurement of inorganic pyrophosphatase activity. The sensitivity of the assay depends on the specific activity of the added 32Pi and on the culture conditions, but is comparable with the most sensitive of the enzymatic assays. Sample preparation, particularly deproteinization, proved to be of importance. The losses of PPi which occur during procedures of this sort due to hydrolysis and coprecipitation were quantitated

  9. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  10. The quantitation of human growth hormone by a radioreceptor assay using an established human cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane receptors on cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) have been shown to bind human growth hormone (hGH) in a specific manner. The aim of the present study was to develop an in vitro assay of hGH based on this binding. The binding of [125I]hGH was studied as a function of time, temperature, cell density, tracer concentration and the concentration of unlabelled hGH and other related hormones. Also, the dissociation of bound hGH and the chemical stability of hGH in the incubation medium were studied. From these studies, the conditions for an appropriate radioreceptor assay were determined. Briefly, 1.5-3.0 x 107 cells ml-1 were incubated with 5-20 x 10-12 M [125I]hGH and three different concentrations of unlabelled hGH chosen from the linear part of the [125I]hGH displacement curve. The results were analyzed according to general pharmacopoeial principles. The mean values for growth hormone activity tested by radioreceptor assay were within the fiducial limits (P = 0.05) of the corresponding activity determined by the hypophysectomized rat body-weight gain assay. The in vitro assay was found to be more precise and less resource demanding than the in vivo bioassay of hGH. It is concluded that the in vitro bioassay described here is well suited as a screening method for potency determination of hGH preparations. (author)

  11. Automated low dose assay system for survival measurements of mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that at low doses of radiation both surviving cells (S) and inactivated cells (K) should be identified to obtain accurate data. One way to achieve this is to microscopically examine individual cells attached to a culture vessel, record their positions and observe and classify subsequent cell growth. In this way most systematic errors (counting, pipetting, diluting, etc.) are eliminated and since both S and K cells are scored, statistical accuracy (binomial) is also improved. For this purpose the authors have developed a semi automatic low dose assay system (ALDAS) whereby a microscope state was modified and equipped with two stepping motors under computer control. The computer automatically scans tissue culture flasks in which cells were plated after irradiation. When a cell is observed, the operator assumes command of the stage monitor, centres the cell in the field of view using a ''joystick'' control and signals the computer to record the cell's X-Y coordinates. After one week of incubation each cell location is revisited automatically and the operator scores the cells as S or K

  12. Development of a shaker culture of Buffalo green monkey kidney cells: potential use for detection of enteroviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, G.; Guskey, L E

    1982-01-01

    Buffalo green monkey kidney cells were adapted to grow as shaker cultures. Replication of environmental and clinical isolates of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and echovirus in these cultures was analyzed by plaque assay and compared with replication in Buffalo green monkey kidney cell monolayers and HEp-2 cell shaker cultures. Dose-response tests with various concentrations of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus indicated that Buffalo green monkey kidney cell shaker cultures could detect as little as 1 P...

  13. Advantages of embryogenic cell cultures of Gramineae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immature embryos and/or explants from very young leaves and inflorescences of 13 species and over 75 cultivars of Gramineae - including wheat, maize, rye, pearl millet, sugar-cane, Napier grass, Guinea grass, etc. - were used to initiate callus cultures. The cultures are white to yellowish white in colour, compact and contain small and thin-walled meristematic cells which are richly cytoplasmic, non-vacuolated and contain prominent starch grains. These embryogenic tissue cultures provide a long-term, highly reliable and efficient means of rapid mass clonal propagation by the formation of somatic embryos that arise from single cells. The cultures consist largely of cytologically normal diploid cells. During the process of plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis, there is strong selection in favour of normal cells, so that plants recovered from such cultures neither exhibit any morphological abnormalities nor show any evidence of cytological changes in the number or structure of chromosomes. Embryogenic callus cultures have been used successfully to establish highly dispersed and friable cell-suspension cultures. These fast-growing cultures comprise groups of 2-6 embryogenic cells, which adhere together to form larger unorganized aggregates of up to about 75 cells, but do not contain any organized meristems or callus tissues. Plants were regenerated by somatic embryogenesis from embryogenic cell-suspension cultures of pearl millet, Guinea grass, sugar-cane and maize. Finally, embryogenic cell-suspension cultures are the only current source of totipotent protoplasts in Gramineae. Protoplasts isolated from such cultures have been successfully cultured to produce somatic embryos and plants in pearl millet, Guinea grass, Napier grass and sugar-cane. (author)

  14. Cell-free Assays for HIV-1 Uncoating

    OpenAIRE

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection.

  15. Cell-free assays for HIV-1 uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection. PMID:19020817

  16. Cell Suspension Culture of Neem Tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of suspension culture system for neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) cells and the suspension culture condition was studied. It shows that the neem cell suspension culture system was best in B5 liquid medium, 2.0~4.0mg/L NAA with direct spill method. Based on the integrated analysis of cell biomass, Azadirachtin content and productivity, the optimum culture conditions were B5 liquid medium, 2.0-4.0 mg/L NAA, 3% sucrose at 25 ℃. The optimum rotating speed of the shaker and broth content d...

  17. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference...

  18. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    . Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  19. In vitro BALB/3T3 cell transformation assay of nonoxynol-9 and 1,4-dioxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, C.W.; Moreland, F.M.; Lee, J.K.; Dunkel, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    The spermicidal surfactant nonoxynol-9 (Igepal CO-630, GAF Corp.) and a potential impurity, 1,4-dioxane, were tested in the in vitro cell transformation assay using BALB/3T3 cells. Two treatment periods, 48 hr and 13 days, were used. Nonoxynol-9, tested at levels up to 10 /sup +/g/ml, did not induce transformation, whereas dioxane was very active in the induction type II foci in the cultured BALB/3T3 cells.

  20. Studying cell-cell communication in co-culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R.; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotypic and homotypic cellular interactions are essential for biological function, and co-culture models are versatile tools for investigating these cellular interactions in vitro. Physiologically relevant co-culture models have been used to elucidate the effects of cell-cell physical contact and/or secreted factors, as well as the influence of substrate geometry and interaction scale on cell response. Identifying the relative contribution of each cell population to co-culture is often ex...

  1. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  2. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  3. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer

  4. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Cell-free assay measuring repair DNA synthesis in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmotic disruption of confluent cultured human fibroblasts that have been irradiated or exposed to chemical carcinogens allows the specific measurement of repair DNA synthesis using dTTP as a precursor. Fibroblasts similarly prepared from various xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines show the deficiencies of uv-induced DNA synthesis predicted from in vivo studies, while giving normal responses to methylmethanesulfonate. A pyrimidine-dimer-specific enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, stimulated the rate of uv-induced repair synthesis with normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cell lines. This system should prove useful for identifying agents that induce DNA repair, and cells that respond abnormally to such induction. It should also be applicable to an in vitro complementation assay with repair-defective cells and proteins obtained from repair-proficient cells. Finally, by using actively growing fibroblasts and thymidine in the system, DNA replication can be measured and studied in vitro

  6. Expression of CD44 in Cultured Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongguo Li; Hong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To determine whether cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44 and to discuss their possible relationship with primary open angle glaucoma.Methods:Human trabecular meshwork cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 media. Total RNAs from the cells were extracted with Trizol reagent. Messenger RNA expression of CD44 in human trabecular meshwork cells was examined by using reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR ) analysis. Expression of CD44 was confirmed by Western-blotting and immunofiuorescent microscopy. Effect of CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide on adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was determined by MTT assay.Results:A single RT-PCR product whose size was 471bp was obtained.A band about 80kD was stained by Western-blot. Immunofiuorescent examination of expression of CD44 on the cell surface was positive and reactions were mainly localized in cell membranes.Adhesion of trabecular meshwork cells to hyaluronate was inhibited by CD44-specific antisense oligonucleotide.Conclusions: Cultured human trabecular meshwork cells express CD44. CD44 may play a role in pathogenesis of primary open angle glaucoma. Eye Science 2004;20:52-56.

  7. Cell Culture for Production of Insecticidal Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Steven; Chan, Leslie C L; Matindoost, Leila; Pushparajan, Charlotte; Visnovsky, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    While large-scale culture of insect cells will need to be conducted using bioreactors up to 10,000 l scale, many of the main challenges for cell culture-based production of insecticidal viruses can be studied using small-scale (20-500 ml) shaker/spinner flasks, either in free suspension or using microcarrier-based systems. These challenges still relate to the development of appropriate cell lines, stability of virus strains in culture, enhancing virus yields per cell, and the development of serum-free media and feeds for the desired production systems. Hence this chapter presents mainly the methods required to work with and analyze effectively insect cell systems using small-scale cultures. Outlined are procedures for quantifying cells and virus and for establishing frozen cells and virus stocks. The approach for maintaining cell cultures and the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and time of infection (TOI) parameters that should be considered for conducting infections are discussed.The methods described relate, in particular, to the suspension culture of Helicoverpa zea and Spodoptera frugiperda cell lines to produce the baculoviruses Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus, HearNPV, and Anticarsia gemmatalis multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus, AgMNPV, respectively, and the production of the nonoccluded Oryctes nudivirus, OrNV, using an adherent coleopteran cell line. PMID:27565495

  8. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. PMID:26516696

  9. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  10. Development of culture-based serological assays to diagnose Babesia divergens infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Simona; Galuppi, Roberta; Marcer, Federica; Marini, Carla; Tampieri, Maria Paola; Moretti, Annabella; Pietrobelli, Mario; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2012-02-01

    Babesioses are hematic tick-borne diseases that induce malaria-like disorders in domestic, wild animals, and humans. Although indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) commercial kits are available to test the presence of antibodies against most Babesia species, no kit exists to serologically diagnose the infections due to Babesia divergens, one of the most important zoonotic species. To fill this gap and to develop assays to detect animal and human infections, in vitro cultures (microaerophilous stationary phase system) of B. divergens were organized. Infected erythrocytes were adsorbed as corpuscular antigen (CA) on IFAT slides and ELISA microwells. The supernatant medium of the cultures (metabolic antigen, MA) was collected and employed in ELISA and western blot (WB) assays. B. divergens was also used to produce positive sera in Meriones unguiculatus and to infect a calf. Serological tests were set up with sera from experimentally/naturally infected animals, and possible cross-reactions were evaluated using heterologous sera from cattle positive to other piroplasms. Sera from clinically healthy people at risk of infection were also tested. As expected, assays based on the purified MAs from in vitro cultures proved more sensitive and specific than CA-IFAT and CA-ELISA. In fact, MA-ELISA provided satisfactory performances (even if 8.4%-15.7% cross-reactions were evidenced), and the WB developed proved totally sensitive and specific. WB indicated as immunodominant antigens two major protein bands at 33 and 37 kDa, which were also evidenced in 2.2% of the human sera tested, proving the parasite transmission to humans also in Italy. PMID:21995263

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-β1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  12. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  13. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  14. White blood cell-based detection of asymptomatic scrapie infection by ex vivo assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Halliez

    Full Text Available Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods--in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays--to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages. However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease.

  15. Impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in a paper-based microchamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Recently, 3D cell culture technique was proposed to provide a more physiologically-meaningful environment for cell-based assays. With the development of microfluidics technology, cellular response can be quantified by impedance measurement technique in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, handling of these microfluidic systems requires a trained engineering personnel and the operation is not compatible to traditional biological research laboratories. In this work, we incorporated the impedance measurement technique to paper-based 3D cell culture model and demonstrated non-invasive quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel during the culture course. A cellulose filter paper was patterned with an array of circular microchambers. Cells were encapsulated in hydrogel and loaded to the microchambers for culturing cells in 3D environment. At the preset schedule during the culture course, the paper was placed on a glass substrate with measurement electrodes for the impedance measurement. Cells in each microchamber was represented by impedance magnitude and cell proliferation could be studied over time. Also, conventional bio-assay was performed to further confirm the feasibility of the impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in the paper-based microchamber. This technique provides a convenient, fast, and non-invasive approach to monitor cells cultured in 3D environment. It has potential to be developed for routine 3D cell culture protocol in biological research laboratories. PMID:26592655

  16. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Pardhanani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299 and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13. Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to

  17. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299) and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13). Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP) vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to measure cancer cell

  18. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshal, Karni S.; Ferri-Lagneau, Karine F.; Haider, Jamil; Pardhanani, Pooja; Leung, TinChung, E-mail: tleung@nccu.edu [Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina Research Campus, Nutrition Research Center, 500 Laureate Way, Kannapolis, NC 28081 (United States)

    2011-10-31

    Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299) and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13). Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP) vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to measure cancer cell

  19. Methods for Maintaining Insect Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Dwight E. Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes methods that are effective for maintaining various insect cell lines. The procedures are differentiated between loosely or non-attached cell strains, attached cell strains, and strongly adherent cell strains.

  20. Cell Culture Derived AgMNPV Bioinsecticide: Biological Constraints and Bioprocess Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Rodas, Valeria M.; Marques, Fabiano H.; Honda, Marcelo T.; Soares, Daniela M.; Soraia A. C. Jorge; Antoniazzi, Marta M.; Medugno, Claudia; Castro, Maria E. B.; Ribeiro, Bergmann M; Souza, Marlinda L.; Tonso, Aldo; Pereira, Carlos A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied parameters for optimizing the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cell culture and viral infection for the production of Anticarsia gemmatalis multiple nucleopolyhedrosis virus (AgMNPV) polyhedra inclusion bodies (PIBs) in shaker-Schott or spinner bottles and bioreactors. We have assayed the kLa of the systems, initial cell seeding, cell culture volume, dissolved oxygen (DO), multiplicity of infection (MOI), nutrients consumption, and metabolites production. The medium surface oxygen ...

  1. A rapid and robust assay for detection of S-phase cell cycle progression in plant cells and tissues by using ethynyl deoxyuridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horváth Gábor V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in plant cell cycle research is highly dependent on reliable methods for detection of cells replicating DNA. Frequency of S-phase cells (cells in DNA synthesis phase is a basic parameter in studies on the control of cell division cycle and the developmental events of plant cells. Here we extend the microscopy and flow cytometry applications of the recently developed EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-based S-phase assay to various plant species and tissues. We demonstrate that the presented protocols insure the improved preservation of cell and tissue structure and allow significant reduction in assay duration. In comparison with the frequently used detection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and tritiated-thymidine incorporation, this new methodology offers several advantages as we discuss here. Results Applications of EdU-based S-phase assay in microscopy and flow cytometry are presented by using cultured cells of alfalfa, Arabidopsis, grape, maize, rice and tobacco. We present the advantages of EdU assay as compared to BrdU-based replication assay and demonstrate that EdU assay -which does not require plant cell wall digestion or DNA denaturation steps, offers reduced assay duration and better preservation of cellular, nuclear and chromosomal morphologies. We have also shown that fast and efficient EdU assay can also be an efficient tool for dual parameter flow cytometry analysis and for quantitative assessment of replication in thick root samples of rice. Conclusions In plant cell cycle studies, EdU-based S-phase detection offers a superior alternative to the existing S-phase assays. EdU method is reliable, versatile, fast, simple and non-radioactive and it can be readily applied to many different plant systems.

  2. Spheroid-Formation (Colonosphere) Assay for in Vitro Assessment and Expansion of Stem Cells in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Sameerah; Ahmed, Mehreen; Lorenzi, Federica; Nateri, Abdolrahman S

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) form a disorganized hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations on which current chemotherapy regimens fail to exert their distinctive cytotoxicity. A small sub-population of poorly differentiated cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), also known as cancer initiating cells, may exhibit embryonic and/or adult stem-cell gene expression signatures. Self-renewal and survival signals are also dominant over differentiation in CSCs. However, inducers of differentiation exclusive to CSC may affect cellular pathways required for the formation and progression of a tumor, which are not utilized in normal adult stem-cells. Nevertheless, assays for targeting CSCs have been hindered by expanding and maintaining rare CSCs in vitro. However, CRC-CSCs are able to form floating spheroids (known as colonospheres) 3-dimentinionally (3D) in a serum-free defined medium. Therefore, great efforts have been paid to improve colonosphere forming assay as a preclinical model to study tumor biology and to conduct drug screening in cancer research. The 3D-colonosphere culture model may also represent in vivo conditions for the spontaneous aggregation of cancer cells in spheroids. This protocol describes the development of an enrichment/culture assay using CRC-CSCs to facilitate colorectal cancer research through immunofluorescence staining of colonospheres. We have developed colonospheres from HCT116 CRC cell line to compare and link CRC-CSC markers to the NANOG expression level using an immunofluorescence assay. Our data also show that the immunostaining assay of colonosphere is a useful method to explore the role and dynamics of CRC-CSCs division between self-renewal and cell lineage differentiation of cancer cells. In principle, this method is applicable to a variety of primary cells and cell lines of epithelial origin. Furthermore, this protocol may also allow screening of libraries of compounds to identify bona fide CRC-CSC differentiation inducers. PMID:27207017

  3. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture. PMID:26428408

  4. Establishment, characterization, and toxicological application of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) primary skin fibroblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sarah J; Zychowski, Gregory V; Bauman, Sandy W; Higgins, Benjamin M; Raudsepp, Terje; Gollahon, Lauren S; Wooten, Kimberly J; Cole, Jennifer M; Godard-Codding, Céline

    2014-12-16

    Pollution is a well-known threat to sea turtles but its impact is poorly understood. In vitro toxicity testing presents a promising avenue to assess and monitor the effects of environmental pollutants in these animals within the legal constraints of their endangered status. Reptilian cell cultures are rare and, in sea turtles, largely derived from animals affected by tumors. Here we describe the full characterization of primary skin fibroblast cell cultures derived from biopsies of multiple healthy loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and the subsequent optimization of traditional in vitro toxicity assays to reptilian cells. Characterization included validating fibroblast cells by morphology and immunocytochemistry, and optimizing culture conditions by use of growth curve assays with a fractional factorial experimental design. Two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and an assay measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression by quantitative PCR were optimized in the characterized cells. MTT and LDH assays confirmed cytotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid at 500 μM following 72 and 96 h exposures while CYP1A5 induction was detected after 72 h exposure to 0.1-10 μM benzo[a]pyrene. This research demonstrates the validity of in vitro toxicity testing in sea turtles and highlights the need to optimize mammalian assays to reptilian cells. PMID:25384208

  5. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of prozac (fluoxetine) without and with addition of vitamins A and C by means of the comet assay in culture of CHO-K1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noélle Giacomini Lemos; Mário Sérgio Mantovani; Veronica Elisa Pimenta Vicentini

    2005-01-01

    The fluoxetine, commercially named Prozac, is efficient against depression and anxiety, with lower risk of collateral effects. However, the possible genotoxic effects are still unknown. The use of vitamins as protectors against damages on cells and DNA has been evaluated, mainly for vitamins A and C. Furthermore, the associative effect of vitamins with several medicines demands studies. The evaluations of genotoxic effect of Prozac and vitamins A and C protective effect were carried out in cu...

  6. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novielli Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells, images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P

  7. Long term maintenance of myeloid leukemic stem cells cultured with unrelated human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa Ito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs support the growth and differentiation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Here we studied the ability of MSCs to support the growth and survival of leukemic stem cells (LSCs in vitro. Primary leukemic blasts isolated from the peripheral blood of 8 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML were co-cultured with equal numbers of irradiated MSCs derived from unrelated donor bone marrow, with or without cytokines for up to 6 weeks. Four samples showed CD34+CD38− predominance, and four were predominantly CD34+CD38+. CD34+ CD38− predominant leukemia cells maintained the CD34+ CD38− phenotype and were viable for 6 weeks when co-cultured with MSCs compared to co-cultures with cytokines or medium only, which showed rapid differentiation and loss of the LSC phenotype. In contrast, CD34+ CD38+ predominant leukemic cells maintained the CD34+CD38+ phenotype when co-cultured with MSCs alone, but no culture conditions supported survival beyond 4 weeks. Cell cycle analysis showed that MSCs maintained a higher proportion of CD34+ blasts in G0 than leukemic cells cultured with cytokines. AML blasts maintained in culture with MSCs for up to 6 weeks engrafted NSG mice with the same efficiency as their non-cultured counterparts, and the original karyotype persisted after co-culture. Chemosensitivity and transwell assays suggest that MSCs provide pro-survival benefits to leukemic blasts through cell–cell contact. We conclude that MSCs support long-term maintenance of LSCs in vitro. This simple and inexpensive approach will facilitate basic investigation of LSCs and enable screening of novel therapeutic agents targeting LSCs.

  8. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    Callus cultures of carnation, Dianthus caryophyllus L. ev. G. J. Sim, were grown on a synthetic medium of half strength Murashige and Skoog salts, 3 % sucrose, 100 mg/l of myo-inositol, 0.5 mg/l each of thiamin, HCl, pyridoxin, HCl and nicotinic acid and 10 g/l agar. Optimal concentrations of....... Cell suspension cultures worked best in media containing 2,4-D in which they had a doubling time of about 2 days. Filtered suspensions were successfully plated on agar in petri dishes, but division was never observed in single cells. The cultures initiated roots at higher concentrations of IAA or NAA...

  9. Biodegradable Mg corrosion and osteoblast cell culture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium (Mg) is a biodegradable metal that has significant potential advantages as an implant material. In this paper, corrosion and cell culture experiments were performed to evaluate the biocompatibility of Mg. The corrosion current and potential of a Mg disk were measured in different physiological solutions including deionized (DI) water, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and McCoy's 5A culture medium. The corrosion currents in the PBS and in the McCoy's 5A-5% FBS media were found to be higher than in DI water, which is expected because corrosion of Mg occurs faster in a chloride solution. Weight loss, open-circuit potential, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were also performed. The Mg specimens were also characterized using an environmental scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The X-ray analysis showed that in the cell culture media a passive interfacial layer containing oxygen, chloride, phosphate, and potassium formed on the samples. U2OS cells were then co-cultured with a Mg specimen for up to one week. Cytotoxicity results of magnesium using MTT assay and visual observation through cell staining were not significantly altered by the presence of the corroding Mg sample. Further, bone tissue formation study using von Kossa and alkaline phosphatase staining indicates that Mg may be suitable as a biodegradable implant material.

  10. Development of a shaker culture of Buffalo green monkey kidney cells: potential use for detection of enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, G; Guskey, L E

    1982-08-01

    Buffalo green monkey kidney cells were adapted to grow as shaker cultures. Replication of environmental and clinical isolates of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and echovirus in these cultures was analyzed by plaque assay and compared with replication in Buffalo green monkey kidney cell monolayers and HEp-2 cell shaker cultures. Dose-response tests with various concentrations of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus indicated that Buffalo green monkey kidney cell shaker cultures could detect as little as 1 PFU in an inoculum of 0.2 ml. These data suggest that Buffalo green monkey kidney cell shaker cultures can be effectively used for the detection of small quantities of enteroviruses from environmental sources. PMID:6289745

  11. Responses of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.G.; Howgate, S.; McBride, D.; Riach, C. (Inveresk Research International Limited, Musselburgh (Scotland)); Caspary, W.J. (National Inst. of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk{sup +}/tk{sup {minus}} mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 {mu}g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds.

  12. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  13. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  14. Cell culture models for study of differentiated adipose cells

    OpenAIRE

    Clynes, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adipose cells are an important source of mesenchymal stem cells and are important for direct use in research on lipid metabolism and obesity. In addition to use of primary cultures, there is increasing interest in other sources of larger numbers of cells, using approaches including induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation and viral immortalisation.

  15. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-like fluorescence assay to investigate the interactions of glycosaminoglycans to cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucas, Rodrigo Ippolito [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Trindade, Edvaldo S. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Tersariol, Ivarne L.S. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Bioquimica, Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes, Mogi das Cruzes, SP (Brazil); Dietrich, Carl P. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nader, Helena B. [Disciplina de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: hbnader.bioq@epm.br

    2008-06-23

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans were labeled with biotin to study their interaction with cells in culture. Thus, heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate were labeled using biotin-hydrazide, under different conditions. The structural characteristics of the biotinylated products were determined by chemical (molar ratios of hexosamine, uronic acid, sulfate and biotin) and enzymatic methods (susceptibility to degradation by chondroitinases and heparitinases). The binding of biotinylated glycosaminoglycans was investigated both in endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture, using a novel time resolved fluorometric method based on interaction of europium-labeled streptavidin with the biotin covalently linked to the compounds. The interactions of glycosaminoglycans were saturable and number of binding sites could be obtained for each individual compound. The apparent dissociation constant varied among the different glycosaminoglycans and between the two cell lines. The interactions of the biotinylated glycosaminoglycans with the cells were also evaluated using confocal microscopy. We propose a convenient and reliable method for the preparation of biotinylated glycosaminoglycans, as well as a sensitive non-competitive fluorescence-based assay for studies of the interactions and binding of these compounds to cells in culture.

  16. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-like fluorescence assay to investigate the interactions of glycosaminoglycans to cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans were labeled with biotin to study their interaction with cells in culture. Thus, heparin, heparan sulfate, chondroitin 4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate were labeled using biotin-hydrazide, under different conditions. The structural characteristics of the biotinylated products were determined by chemical (molar ratios of hexosamine, uronic acid, sulfate and biotin) and enzymatic methods (susceptibility to degradation by chondroitinases and heparitinases). The binding of biotinylated glycosaminoglycans was investigated both in endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture, using a novel time resolved fluorometric method based on interaction of europium-labeled streptavidin with the biotin covalently linked to the compounds. The interactions of glycosaminoglycans were saturable and number of binding sites could be obtained for each individual compound. The apparent dissociation constant varied among the different glycosaminoglycans and between the two cell lines. The interactions of the biotinylated glycosaminoglycans with the cells were also evaluated using confocal microscopy. We propose a convenient and reliable method for the preparation of biotinylated glycosaminoglycans, as well as a sensitive non-competitive fluorescence-based assay for studies of the interactions and binding of these compounds to cells in culture

  17. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  18. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  19. Assaying Ceramide Synthase Activity In Vitro and in Living Cells Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Xin Ying; Pickford, Russell; Don, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are one the major lipid families in eukaryotes, incorporating a diverse array of structural and signaling lipids such as sphingomyelin and gangliosides. The core lipid component for all complex sphingolipids is ceramide, a diacyl lipid consisting of a variable length fatty acid linked through an amide bond to a long chain base such as sphingosine or dihydrosphingosine. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of six ceramide synthases (CERS1-6), each of which preferentially catalyzes the synthesis of ceramides with different fatty acid chain lengths. Ceramides are themselves potent cellular and physiological signaling molecules heavily implicated in diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, making it important for researchers to have access to sensitive and accurate assays for ceramide synthase activity. This chapter describes methods for assaying ceramide synthase activity in cell or tissue lysates, or in cultured cells (in situ), using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as the readout. LC-MS/MS is a very sensitive and accurate means for assaying ceramide synthase reaction products. PMID:26552671

  20. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test. PMID:23346868

  1. Melphalan metabolism in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are presented for the adaptation of reversed-phase-HPLC methods to accomplish separation and isolation of the cancer therapeutic drug melphalan (L-phenylalanine mustard) and its metabolic products from whole cells. Five major degradation products of melphalan were observed following its hydrolysis in phosphate buffer in vitro. The two most polar of these products (or modifications of them) were also found in the cytosol of Chinese hamster CHO cells. The amounts of these two polar products (shown not to be mono- or dihydroxymelphalan) were significantly changed by the pretreatment of cells with ZnC12, one being increased in amount while the other was reduced to an insignificant level. In ZnC12-treated cells, there was also an increased binding of melphalan (or its derivatives) to one protein fraction resolved by gel filtration-HPLC. These observations suggest that changes in polar melphalan products, and perhaps their interaction with a protein, may by involved in the reduction of melphalan cytotoxicity observed in ZnC12-treated cells. While ZnC12 is also known to increase the level of glutathione in cells, no significant amounts of glutathione-melphalan derivatives of the type formed non-enzymatically in vitro could be detected in ZnC12-treated or untreated cells. Formation of derivatives of melphalan with glutathione catabolic products in ZnC12-treated cells has not yet been eliminated, however. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  3. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  4. Lethal impacts of cigarette smoke in cultured tobacco cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawano Tomonori

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to understand and generalize the toxic mechanism of cigarette smoke in living cells, comparison of the data between animal systems and other biological system such as microbial and plant systems is highly beneficial. Objective By employing the tobacco cells as model materials for cigarette smoke toxicity assay, the impacts of the combustion by-products such as nitrogen oxides could be highlighted as the toxic impacts of the plant-derived endogenous chemicals could be excluded in the plant cells. Methods Cigarette smoke-induced cell death was assessed in tobacco cell suspension cultures in the presence and absence of pharmacological inhibitors. Results Cigarette smoke was effective in induction of cell death. The smoke-induced cell death could be partially prevented by addition of nitric oxide (NO scavenger, suggesting the role for NO as the cell death mediator. Addition of NO donor to tobacco cells also resulted in development of partial cell death further confirming the role of NO as cell death mediator. Members of reactive oxygen species and calcium ion were shown to be protecting the cells from the toxic action of smoke-derived NO.

  5. High Content Imaging (HCI on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Joshi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High content imaging (HCI is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS. One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology.

  6. A cell-based high-throughput screening assay for radiation susceptibility using automated cell counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the mainstays in the treatment for cancer, but its success can be limited due to inherent or acquired resistance. Mechanisms underlying radioresistance in various cancers are poorly understood and available radiosensitizers have shown only modest clinical benefit. There is thus a need to identify new targets and drugs for more effective sensitization of cancer cells to irradiation. Compound and RNA interference high-throughput screening technologies allow comprehensive enterprises to identify new agents and targets for radiosensitization. However, the gold standard assay to investigate radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, the colony formation assay (CFA), is unsuitable for high-throughput screening. We developed a new high-throughput screening method for determining radiation susceptibility. Fast and uniform irradiation of batches up to 30 microplates was achieved using a Perspex container and a clinically employed linear accelerator. The readout was done by automated counting of fluorescently stained nuclei using the Acumen eX3 laser scanning cytometer. Assay performance was compared to that of the CFA and the CellTiter-Blue homogeneous uniform-well cell viability assay. The assay was validated in a whole-genome siRNA library screening setting using PC-3 prostate cancer cells. On 4 different cancer cell lines, the automated cell counting assay produced radiation dose response curves that followed a linear-quadratic equation and that exhibited a better correlation to the results of the CFA than did the cell viability assay. Moreover, the cell counting assay could be used to detect radiosensitization by silencing DNA-PKcs or by adding caffeine. In a high-throughput screening setting, using 4 Gy irradiated and control PC-3 cells, the effects of DNA-PKcs siRNA and non-targeting control siRNA could be clearly discriminated. We developed a simple assay for radiation susceptibility that can be used for high-throughput screening. This will aid

  7. [CO-CULTURE OF BOAR SPERMATOGONIAL CELLS WITH SERTOLI CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkova, I P; Vasil'eva, S A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed in vitro culture conditions using co-culture of boar spermatogonial cells with Sertoli cells. Testes from 60-day-old crossbred boar were used. A spermatogonia-enriched culture was achieved by enzymatic digestion method and purification by density gradient centrifugation using a discontinuous Percoll gradient and differentiated adherence technique. Lipid drops were detected in isolated Sertoli cells by Oil Red O staining. We have found that the cultivation of boar spermatogonia in the presence of Sertoli cells (up to 35 days) leads to their differentiation as well as in vivo in testis. Association of cells in groups, formation of chains and suspension clusters of the spermatogenic cells were observed on the 10th day. Spermatogonial cellular colonies were noted at the same time. These cellular colonies were analyzed for the expression of genes: Nanog and Plzf in RT PCR. The expression of the Nanog gene in the experimental cellular clones obtained by short-term culture of spermatogonial cells in the presence of Sertoli cells was 200 times higher than the expression of this gene in the freshly isolated spermatogonial cells expression was found in freshly isolated germ cells and in cellular clones derived in vitro. We have found that, in the case of longer cultivation of these cells on Sertoli cells, in vitro process of differentiation of germ cells and formation of single mobile boar spermatozoa occurs at 30-33 days. Cellular population is heterogeneous at this stage. Spermatogenic differentiation in vitro without Sertoli cells stays on the 7th day of cultivation. The results show that co-culture of boar spermatogonia-enriched cells with Sertoli cells can induce their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro and facilitate obtaining of porcine germ cell culture. PMID:27228660

  8. Inverse dose rate effect in tumour cells measured by the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the dose rate of low LET radiation from high (Gy/min) to low (Gy/h) usually leads to a reduced effect as measured by the survival methods. If the dose rate is reduced, cells are able to repair sublethal damage even during irradiation. During the last few years a comet assay has been widely used to measure DNA damage induction and repair in single cells. In our study we used the alkaline version of the comet assay for comparison of high (0.833 Gy/min) and low dose rate (0.0707 Gy/min) effects on DNA damage and repair in R1 rat rhabdomyosarcoma and Me45 human malignant melanoma cells. Cells gathered from exponential culture by trypsynization were suspended in a growth medium and irradiated at room temperature, with 5 Gy of photons X generated by linear accelerator at both dose rates. Comets were analysed automatically using self-made software for measurement of percentage DNA in the tail, and tail moment and inertia. Our results show that tail inertia is the best parameter expressing DNA damage and repair. Although the level of DNA damage induced by low dose rate was comparable with that induced by a high dose rate, the damage induced by the low dose rate are repair more slowly than after high dose rate irradiation. This inverse dose rate effect suggest that nature of damage can differ in both groups. (author)

  9. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  10. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  11. Effects of different Helicobacter pylori culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Guo Yan; Gang Zhao; Jin-Ping Ma; Shi-Rong Cai; Wen-Hua Zhan

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of different Helicobacter pylori (H py/orl) culture filtrates on growth of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: Broth culture filtrates of H pylori were prepared. Gastric epithelial cells were treated with the filtrates, and cell growth was determined by growth curve and flow cytometry. DNA damage of gastric epithelial cells was measured by single-cell microgel electrophoresis.RESULTS: Gastric epithelial cells proliferated actively when treated by CagA-gene-positive broth culture filtrates, and colony formation reached 40%. The number of cells in S phase increased compared to controls. Comet assay showed 41.2% comet cells in GES-1 cells treated with CagA-positive filtrates (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: CagA-positive filtrates enhance the changes in morphology and growth characteristics of human gastric epithelial tumor cells. DNA damage maybe one of the mechanisms involved in the growth changes.

  12. Culture of human cell lines by a pathogen-inactivated human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzina, R; Iudicone, P; Mariotti, A; Fioravanti, D; Procoli, A; Cicchetti, E; Scambia, G; Bonanno, G; Pierelli, L

    2016-08-01

    Alternatives to the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) have been investigated to ensure xeno-free growth condition. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of human platelet lysate (PL) as a substitute of FBS for the in vitro culture of some human cell lines. PL was obtained by pools of pathogen inactivated human donor platelet (PLT) concentrates. Human leukemia cell lines (KG-1, K562, JURKAT, HL-60) and epithelial tumor cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7) were cultured with either FBS or PL. Changes in cell proliferation, viability, morphology, surface markers and cell cycle were evaluated for each cell line. Functional characteristics were analysed by drug sensitivity test and cytotoxicity assay. Our results demonstrated that PL can support growth and expansion of all cell lines, although the cells cultured in presence of PL experienced a less massive proliferation compared to those grown with FBS. We found a comparable percentage of viable specific marker-expressing cells in both conditions, confirming lineage fidelity in all cultures. Functionality assays showed that cells in both FBS- and PL-supported cultures maintained their normal responsiveness to adriamycin and NK cell-mediated lysis. Our findings indicate that PL is a feasible serum substitute for supporting growth and propagation of haematopoietic and epithelial cell lines with many advantages from a perspective of process standardization, ethicality and product safety. PMID:25944665

  13. Dexamethasone Modulation on Cultured Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Liu; Yannian; Hui Yusheng Wang; Hong Wei

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Dexamethasone(DEX) was tested for its ability to modulate human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cell proliferation in cell culture. Methods: DEX in different concentrations was added to cultured hRPE cells. The effects were measured with MTT method, 3H-thymidine(3H-TdR) incorporation and flow cytometw. Results: DEX increased survival rate and DNA synthesis from 32 mg/L to 320 mg/L under hRPE culture conditions, but paradoxically reduced them at 1 000 mg/L and 3 200 mg/L in dose and time dependent fashion by both MTT assay and 3 H-TdR incorporation. The cell numbers in S phase and G2/M phase increased 28.32 % at DEX concentration 320 mg/L, in contrast, reduced 41.84 % at 1 000 mg/L. Conclusion: DEX increased proliferation from 32 mg/L to 320 mg/L, and inhibited proliferation at concentrations greater than 320 mg/L. The inhibiting effect of DEX may happen in s phase and G2/M phase. Eye Sciernce 2001; 17:27 ~ 30.

  14. Multilayer-based lab-on-a-chip systems for perfused cell-based assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzbach, Udo; Sonntag, Frank; Grünzner, Stefan; Busek, Mathias; Schmieder, Florian; Franke, Volker

    2014-12-01

    A novel integrated technology chain of laser-microstructured multilayer foils for fast, flexible, and low-cost manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices especially for complex cell and tissue culture applications, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-cells ratio, was developed and established. Initially the microfluidic system is constructively divided into individual layers, which are formed by separate foils or plates. Based on the functional boundary conditions and the necessary properties of each layer, their corresponding foils and plates are chosen. In the third step, the foils and plates are laser microstructured and functionalized from both sides. In the fourth and last manufacturing step, the multiple plates and foils are joined using different bonding techniques like adhesive bonding, welding, etc. This multilayer technology together with pneumatically driven micropumps and valves permits the manufacturing of fluidic structures and perfusion systems, which spread out above multiple planes. Based on the established lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays, a multilayer microfluidic system with two parallel connected cell culture chambers was successfully implemented.

  15. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  16. [Development of three-dimensional breast cancer cell culture drug resistance model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Hou, Liang; Lu, Ying-Jin; Chen, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Can; Feng, Di; Kong, Li; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2016-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop three-dimensional (3D) culture model, a more pathologically relevant model, of human breast cancer for drug resistance study. MCF-7 cells were embedded within collagen gel to establish 3D culture model. Cellular morphology was observed using Carmine and HE staining. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay, and cell activity was detected by Live/Dead staining kit. Drug sensitivities of the 3D culture to doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were assayed and compared with those of monolayer (2D) culture. In addition, the levels of drug resistance-related genes P-glycoprotein (P-gp), mrp2 mRNA expressions were detected by real time RT-PCR. Expression level of P-gp protein was detected by Western blot. The results showed that MCF-7 cells in 3D culture formed a number of cell aggregates, and most of them displayed good cell viability. The IC50 values of doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were all increased significantly in 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture. Moreover, compared with MCF-7 cells in 2D culture, the cells in 3D culture showed increased mRNA levels of P-gp and mrp2, as well as up-regulated protein expression of P-gp. These results suggest that in vitro collagen-embedded culture system of human breast cancer cells represents an improved pathologically relevant 3D microenvironment for breast cancer cells, providing a robust tool to explore the mechanism of drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:27108905

  17. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  18. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R. (7290 Sayre Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Smith, Helene S. (5693 Cabot Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Hackett, Adeline J. (82 Evergreen Dr., Orinda, CA 94563)

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  19. Proliferation assay of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferation assays of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been performed with cell culture media exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs), which generate reactive species in the media at room temperature. It is found that serum in cell culture media functions as a scavenger of highly reactive species and tends to protect cells in the media against cellular damage. On the other hand, if serum is not present in a cell culture medium when it is exposed to APP, the medium becomes cytotoxic and cannot be detoxified by serum added afterwards. Plasma-induced cytotoxic media hinder proliferation of mouse ES cells and may even cause cell death. It is also shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that organic compounds in cell culture media are in general not significantly modified by plasma exposure. These results indicate that if there is no serum in media when they are exposed to APPs, highly reactive species (such as OH radicals) generated in the media by the APP exposure are immediately converted to less reactive species (such as H2O2), which can no longer readily react with serum that is added to the medium after plasma exposure. This study has clearly shown that it is these less reactive species, rather than highly reactive species, that make the medium cytotoxic to mouse ES cells. (paper)

  20. A direct radioreceptor assay for human growth hormone in serum using cultured human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesniak and co-workers have developed a radioreceptor assay (RRA) for hGH by using cultured human lymphocytes containing binding sites highly specific for hGH only. Because of the relatively low affinity constant of the receptors for hGH, the experimental sensitivity of the RRA (3.5ng/ml) was distinctly better than that of the RIA (0.5ng/ml) used. This imposes limitations on the use of the assay when hGH is to be measured in serum from normal individuals - particularly in pediatrics. When, for reasons of sensitivity, relatively large amounts of serum (0.1ml=15.4%) are added to the incubate, ''unspecific displacement'' of labelled hGH occurs. This unspecific displacement could not be avoided completely by modifications of the assay conditions. Experimentally, we were able to show that sera taken at different time intervals from patients without measurable hGH (RIA) exhibit a constant unspecific displacement. Furthermore, standard curves run with different hGH-free (RIA) sera were parallel. Thus, if a series of samples from the same individual were available in which one contained hGH (RIA) below the sensitivity threshold of the RRA, the unspecific displacement could be estimated. Also, for each set of samples, an individual standard curve could be constructed whose slope would be given by the measured standard curve. With this approach, immunoassayable and receptorassayable hGH concentrations were compared in 154 samples from children. The overall RRA/RIA ratio (0.76) was below unity (p<0.05); after injection of hGH the ratio was indistinguishable from unity. (author)

  1. Nick translation - a new assay for monitoring DNA damage and repair in cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro assay has been developed to detect DNA damage and repair following chemical treatment of human diploid fibroblasts. DNA damage is measured by following the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I-catalyzed incorporation of radiolabeled deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) into the DNA of lysolecithin-permeabilized cells. DNA strand breaks with free 3' OH termini serve as template sites for incorporation, and decrease of this incorporation with time, following removal of the test chemical, indicates loss (repair) of initial damage. Inhibition of the DNA excision repair process by the addition of the repair inhibitors arabinofuranosyl cytosine (ara-C) and hydroxyurea (HU) during the incubation period gives rise to an increased number of template sites, manifesting itself in increased incorporation and indicating the induction of long-patch excision repair. Results presented demonstrate that all 14 direct-acting carcinogens tested and 8 of 14 carcinogens requiring metabolic activation give positive indication of DNA damage, repair, or both. Eleven of 14 noncarcinogens tested were scored as negative, the other 3 having previously been shown to interact with cellular DNA. This assay is shown to have predictive capability at least equal to that of UDS assays but to allow a broader spectrum of genotoxic effects to be analyzed

  2. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  3. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  4. A biocompatible micro cell culture chamber (mu CCC) for the culturing and on-line monitoring of eukaryote cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Petronis, Sarunas; Jørgensen, Anders Michael;

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a polymeric (PMMA) chip with medium perfusion and integrated heat regulation provides sufficiently precise heat regulation, pH-control and medium exchange to support cell growth for weeks. However, it was unclear how closely the cells cultured in the chip resembled...... cells cultured in the culture flask. In the current study, gene expression profiles of cells cultured in the chip were compared with gene expression profiles of cells cultured in culture flasks. The results showed that there were only two genes that were differently expressed in cells grown in the cell...... culture chip compared to cell culture flasks. The cell culture chip could without further modification support cell growth of two other cell lines. Light coming from the microscope lamp during optical recordings of the cells was the only external factor identified, that could have a negative effect...

  5. A biocompatible micro cell culture chamber (microCCC) for the culturing and on-line monitoring of eukaryote cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Petronis, Sarunas; Jørgensen, A M;

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a polymeric (PMMA) chip with medium perfusion and integrated heat regulation provides sufficiently precise heat regulation, pH-control and medium exchange to support cell growth for weeks. However, it was unclear how closely the cells cultured in the chip resembled...... cells cultured in the culture flask. In the current study, gene expression profiles of cells cultured in the chip were compared with gene expression profiles of cells cultured in culture flasks. The results showed that there were only two genes that were differently expressed in cells grown in the cell...... culture chip compared to cell culture flasks. The cell culture chip could without further modification support cell growth of two other cell lines. Light coming from the microscope lamp during optical recordings of the cells was the only external factor identified, that could have a negative effect...

  6. A new cell-based assay to evaluate myogenesis in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaka, Manami [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yang, Zeyu [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ultrasound, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Nakagawa, Kentaro; Maruyama, Junichi [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Xu, Xiaoyin [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Sarkar, Aradhan; Ichimura, Ayana [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nasu, Yusuke [Department of Breast Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou (China); Ozawa, Takeaki [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Iwasa, Hiroaki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari [Chemical Biology Screening Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Shigeru [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kagechika, Hiroyuki [Chemical Biology Screening Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2015-08-15

    The development of the efficient screening system of detecting compounds that promote myogenesis and prevent muscle atrophy is important. Mouse C2C12 cells are widely used to evaluate myogenesis but the procedures of the assay are not simple and the quantification is not easy. We established C2C12 cells expressing the N-terminal green fluorescence protein (GFP) and the C-terminal GFP (GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells). GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells do not exhibit GFP signals until they are fused. The signal intensity correlates with the expression of myogenic markers and myofusion. Myogenesis-promoting reagents, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and β-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), enhance the signals, whereas the poly-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK, suppresses it. GFP signals are observed when myotubes formed by GFP1–10 cells are fused with single nuclear GFP11 cells, and enhanced by IGF1, GPA, and IBS008738, a recently-reported myogenesis-promoting reagent. Fusion between myotubes formed by GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells is associated with the appearance of GFP signals. IGF1 and GPA augment these signals, whereas NSC23766, Rac inhibitor, decreases them. The conditioned medium of cancer cells suppresses GFP signals during myogenesis and reduces the width of GFP-positive myotubes after differentiation. Thus the novel split GFP-based assay will provide the useful method for the study of myogenesis, myofusion, and atrophy. - Highlights: • C2C12 cells expressing split GFP proteins show GFP signals when mix-cultured. • The GFP signals correlate with myogenesis and myofusion. • The GFP signals attenuate under the condition that muscle atrophy is induced.

  7. A new cell-based assay to evaluate myogenesis in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the efficient screening system of detecting compounds that promote myogenesis and prevent muscle atrophy is important. Mouse C2C12 cells are widely used to evaluate myogenesis but the procedures of the assay are not simple and the quantification is not easy. We established C2C12 cells expressing the N-terminal green fluorescence protein (GFP) and the C-terminal GFP (GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells). GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells do not exhibit GFP signals until they are fused. The signal intensity correlates with the expression of myogenic markers and myofusion. Myogenesis-promoting reagents, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and β-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), enhance the signals, whereas the poly-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK, suppresses it. GFP signals are observed when myotubes formed by GFP1–10 cells are fused with single nuclear GFP11 cells, and enhanced by IGF1, GPA, and IBS008738, a recently-reported myogenesis-promoting reagent. Fusion between myotubes formed by GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells is associated with the appearance of GFP signals. IGF1 and GPA augment these signals, whereas NSC23766, Rac inhibitor, decreases them. The conditioned medium of cancer cells suppresses GFP signals during myogenesis and reduces the width of GFP-positive myotubes after differentiation. Thus the novel split GFP-based assay will provide the useful method for the study of myogenesis, myofusion, and atrophy. - Highlights: • C2C12 cells expressing split GFP proteins show GFP signals when mix-cultured. • The GFP signals correlate with myogenesis and myofusion. • The GFP signals attenuate under the condition that muscle atrophy is induced

  8. Single cell kinase signaling assay using pinched flow coupled droplet microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wang, Ming; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Tan Shao Weng, Daniel; Thakor, Nitish V.; Teck Lim, Chwee; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has shown potential in high throughput single cell assays by encapsulating individual cells in water-in-oil emulsions. Ordering cells in a micro-channel is necessary to encapsulate individual cells into droplets further enhancing the assay efficiency. This is typically limited due to the difficulty of preparing high-density cell solutions and maintaining them without cell aggregation in long channels (>5 cm). In this study, we developed a short pinched flow channel...

  9. Real-time PCR assay is superior to other methods for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla Kazemiha, Vahid; Bonakdar, Shahin; Amanzadeh, Amir; Azari, Shahram; Memarnejadian, Arash; Shahbazi, Shirin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mahdian, Reza

    2016-08-01

    Mycoplasmas are the most important contaminants of cell cultures throughout the world. They are considered as a major problem in biological studies and biopharmaceutical economic issues. In this study, our aim was to find the best standard technique as a rapid method with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in the cell lines of the National Cell Bank of Iran. Thirty cell lines suspected to mycoplasma contamination were evaluated by five different techniques including microbial culture, indirect DNA DAPI staining, enzymatic mycoalert(®) assay, conventional PCR and real-time PCR. Five mycoplasma-contaminated cell lines were assigned as positive controls and five mycoplasma-free cell lines as negative controls. The enzymatic method was performed using the mycoalert(®) mycoplasma detection kit. Real-time PCR technique was conducted by PromoKine diagnostic kits. In the conventional PCR method, mycoplasma genus-specific primers were designed to analyze the sequences based on a fixed and common region on 16S ribosomal RNA with PCR product size of 425 bp. Mycoplasma contamination was observed in 60, 56.66, 53.33, 46.66 and 33.33 % of 30 different cell cultures by real-time PCR, PCR, enzymatic mycoalert(®), indirect DNA DAPI staining and microbial culture methods, respectively. The analysis of the results of the different methods showed that the real-time PCR assay was superior the other methods with the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, predictive value of positive and negative results of 100 %. These values were 94.44, 100, 96.77, 100 and 92.85 % for the conventional PCR method, respectively. Therefore, this study showed that real-time PCR and PCR assays based on the common sequences in the 16S ribosomal RNA are reliable methods with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures and other biological products. PMID:25742733

  10. An animal cell culture: Advance technology for modern research

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Khare; Rajeev Nema

    2012-01-01

    At the present time animal cell culture is more significant and multifarious application tool for current research streams. A lot of field assorted from animal cell culture such: stem cell biology, IVF technology, cancer cell biology, monoclonal antibody production, recombinant protein production, gene therapy, vaccine manufacturing, novel drug selection and improvement. In this review conclude animal cell culture as well as its requirements

  11. The influence of the number of cells scored on the sensitivity in the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Soussaline, Françoise; Sallette, Jerome;

    2012-01-01

    The impact on the sensitivity of the in vitro comet assay by increasing the number of cells scored has only been addressed in a few studies. The present study investigated whether the sensitivity of the assay could be improved by scoring more than 100 cells. Two cell lines and three different...

  12. Adapting Cell-Based Assays to the High Throughput Screening Platform: Problems Encountered and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Maddox, Clinton B; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, cell-based phenotypic assays have emerged as an effective and robust addition to the array of assay technologies available for drug discovery in the high throughput screening arena. Previously, biochemical target-based assays have been the technology of choice. With the emergence of stem cells as a basis for a new screening technology, it is important to keep in mind the lessons that have been learned from the adaptation of existing stable cell lines onto the high throughput ...

  13. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  14. Genetic reprogramming of human amniotic cells with episomal vectors: neural rosettes as sentinels in candidate selection for validation assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia G. Wilson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The promise of genetic reprogramming has prompted initiatives to develop banks of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from diverse sources. Sentinel assays for pluripotency could maximize available resources for generating iPSCs. Neural rosettes represent a primitive neural tissue that is unique to differentiating PSCs and commonly used to identify derivative neural/stem progenitors. Here, neural rosettes were used as a sentinel assay for pluripotency in selection of candidates to advance to validation assays. Candidate iPSCs were generated from independent populations of amniotic cells with episomal vectors. Phase imaging of living back up cultures showed neural rosettes in 2 of the 5 candidate populations. Rosettes were immunopositive for the Sox1, Sox2, Pax6 and Pax7 transcription factors that govern neural development in the earliest stage of development and for the Isl1/2 and Otx2 transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal and ventral domains, respectively, of the neural tube in vivo. Dissociation of rosettes produced cultures of differentiation competent neural/stem progenitors that generated immature neurons that were immunopositive for βIII-tubulin and glia that were immunopositive for GFAP. Subsequent validation assays of selected candidates showed induced expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, epigenetic modification of chromatin and formation of teratomas in immunodeficient mice that contained derivatives of the 3 embryonic germ layers. Validated lines were vector-free and maintained a normal karyotype for more than 60 passages. The credibility of rosette assembly as a sentinel assay for PSCs is supported by coordinate loss of nuclear-localized pluripotency factors Oct4 and Nanog in neural rosettes that emerge spontaneously in cultures of self-renewing validated lines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate value in neural rosettes as sentinels for pluripotency and selection of promising candidates for advance

  15. Thromboxane A2 receptors are influenced by cell density in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of cell density on the binding characteristics of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptors in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in culture were determined using (1S- (1α, 2β (5Z), 3a (1E, 3R*), 4α)) - (3- (3-hydroxy-4- (4'-iodophenoxy)-1-butyenyl)-7-oxabicyclo-(2.2.1)heptan-2yl)-5-heptenoic acid (125I-BOP). The Bmax for 125I-BOP was 5,430 ± 139 sites/cell (26.9 ± 5.7 fmoles/mg protein) for cells cultured in 1% fetal calf serum and 2,809 ± 830 sites/cell (13.1 ± 2.2 fmoles/mg protein) for cells cultured in 10% fetal calf serum. Cells were allowed to grow to varying densities and then harvested for assay. There was a negative correlation between the Bmax and the cell density per flask. The Kd for I-BOP did not significantly vary in any of the studies. The results demonstrate that cell density plays an important role in influencing the expression of vascular TXA2/PGH2 receptors

  16. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  17. Integrated biosensors for cell culture monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    De Micheli, Giovanni; Boero, Cristina; Olivo, Jacopo; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors for endogenous compounds, such as glucose and lactate, are applied to monitor cell cultures. Cells can be cultivated for several purposes, such as understanding and modeling some biological mechanisms, the development of new drugs and therapies, and in the field of regenerative medicine. We have realized a self-contained monitoring system with remote readout. Metabolite detection is based on oxidases immobilized onto carbon nanotubes. We calibrate the system for glucose and lactate...

  18. Cell culture from sponges: pluripotency and immortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caralt Bosch, de S.; Uriz, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    Sponges are a source of compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this article, methods of sponge cell culture for production of these bioactive compounds are reviewed, and new approaches for overcoming the problem of metabolite supply are examined. The use of embryos is proposed as a

  19. THE METHODS FOR MAINTAINING INSECT CELL CULTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from a methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes techniques that are e...

  20. ANTHOCYANIN (ACN) STABILITY IN CELL CULTURE MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are potential oxygen radical scavengers that have coronary vasoactive and vasoprotective properties. Cell or tissue culture systems have been used to examine the bioactivity and mechanisms of action of ACNs on the vascular system. However, due to their unique chemical structure, ...

  1. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... Annealing metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  2. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  3. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural

  4. Cell culture models using rat primary alveolar type I cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Charles A; Montgomery, David W; Merkle, Carrie J

    2011-10-01

    There is a lack of cell culture models using primary alveolar type I (AT I) cells. The purpose of this study was to develop cell culture models using rat AT I cells and microvascular endothelial cells from the lung (MVECL). Two types of model systems were developed: single and co-culture systems; additionally a 3-dimensional model system was developed. Pure AT I cell (96.3 ± 2.7%) and MVECL (97.9 ± 1.1%) preparations were used. AT I cell morphology, mitochondrial number and distribution, actin filament arrangement and number of apoptotic cells at confluence, and telomere attrition were characterized. AT I cells maintained their morphometric characteristics through at least population doubling (PD) 35, while demonstrating telomere attrition through at least PD 100. Furthermore, AT I cells maintained the expression of their specific markers, T1α and AQ-5, through PD 42. For the co-cultures, AT I cells were grown on the top and MVECL were grown on the bottom of fibronectin-coated 24-well Transwell Fluroblok™ filter inserts. Neither cell type transmigrated the 1 μm pores. Additionally, AT I cells were grown in a thick layer of Matrigel(®) to create a 3-dimensional model in which primary AT I cells form ring-like structures that resemble an alveolus. The development of these model systems offers the opportunities to investigate AT I cells and their interactions with MVECL in response to pharmacological interventions and in the processes of disease, repair and regeneration. PMID:21624488

  5. Detection of cell wall mannoprotein Mp1p in culture supernatants of Penicillium marneffei and in sera of penicilliosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Liang; Chan, King-Man; Chen, Daliang; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Lee, Cindy; Chan, Che-Man; Sirisanthana, Thira; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    1999-01-01

    Mannoproteins are important and abundant structural components of fungal cell walls. The MP1 gene encodes a cell wall mannoprotein of the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. In the present study, we show that Mp1p is secreted into the cell culture supernatant at a level that can be detected by Western blotting. A sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed with antibodies against Mp1p was capable of detecting this protein from the cell culture supernatant of P. marneffe...

  6. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground

  7. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle...... choice of incubation plate would interfere with the level of secreted IFN-γ in whole blood cultures from five calves. Six plates (a–f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we...... observed a significant (p < 0.05) higher background level in a flat-bottom plate from Corning® (cat# 3595) (plate d) compared to two different flat-bottom plates from Corning® (cat# 3596) (plate b) and Nunc™ (cat# 167008) (plate a). Furthermore 4 out of 5 calves had maximum specific IFN-γ expression on...

  8. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  9. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices

    OpenAIRE

    Halldórsson, Skarphédinn; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan MT

    2015-01-01

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dis...

  10. The application of single cell gel electrophoresis or comet assay to human monitoring studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde Mahara

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the search of new human genotoxic biomarkers, the single cell gel electrophoresis assay has been proposed as a sensible alternative. Material and methods. This technique detects principally single strand breaks as well as alkali-labile and repair-retarded sites. Results. Herein we present our experience using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay in human population studies, both occupationally and environmentally exposed. Conclusions. We discuss the assay feasibility as a genotoxic biomarker.

  11. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affectcell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research,industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contaminationand detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the waysin which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species incell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importanceof mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasmacontamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6.available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sourcesof mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detectionmethods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to preventmycoplasma contamination in cell culture.

  12. Sulforaphane induces DNA single strand breaks in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sestili, Piero, E-mail: piero.sestili@uniurb.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Paolillo, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Lenzi, Monia [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Colombo, Evelin; Vallorani, Luciana; Casadei, Lucia; Martinelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Fimognari, Carmela [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-07

    Sulforaphane (SFR), an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, possesses growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing activities in cancer cell lines. Recently, SFR has been shown to promote the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cell lines. The present study was undertaken to see whether SFR-derived ROS might cause DNA damage in cultured human cells, namely T limphoblastoid Jurkat and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). 1-3 h treatments with 10-30 {mu}M SFR elicited intracellular ROS formation (as assayed with dihydrorhodamine, DHR, oxidation) as well as DNA breakage (as assessed with fast halo assay, FHA). These effects lacked cell-type specificity, since could be observed in both Jurkat and HUVEC. Differential-pH FHA analysis of damaged DNA showed that SFR causes frank DNA single strand breaks (SSBs); no DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were found within the considered treatment times (up to 3 h). SFR-derived ROS were formed at the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) level: indeed rotenone or myxothiazol (MRC Complex I and III inhibitors, respectively) abrogated ROS formation. Furthermore ROS were not formed in Jurkat cells pharmacologically depleted of respiring mitochondria (MRC-/Jurkat). Formation of ROS was causally linked to the induction of SSBs: indeed all the experimental conditions capable of preventing ROS formation also prevented the damage of nuclear DNA from SFR-intoxicated cells. As to the toxicological relevance of SSBs, we found that their prevention slightly but significantly attenuated SFR cytotoxicity, suggesting that high-dose SFR toxicity is the result of a complex series of events among which GSH depletion seems to play a pivotal role. In conclusion, the present study identifies a novel mechanism contributing to SFR toxicity which - since DNA damage is a prominent mechanism underlying the cytotoxic activity of established antineoplastic agents - might help to exploit the therapeutic value

  13. Fluorescence assay for mitochondrial permeability transition in cardiomyocytes cultured in a microtiter plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Louise Muff; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Treiman, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) is a voltage-dependent, large-conductance channel of the inner mitochondrial membrane with an important role in a range of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate studies of pharmacological pore modulation, we describe an assay in a model using...... neonatal cardiomyocytes in a 96-well microtiter plate format. In the presence of mitochondrial membrane potential Delta Psi m, accumulation of rhodamine-123 in mitochondria (40,000 cells/well, 2.6 microM rhodamine-123) caused fluorescence signal quenching. Following substitution of dye-free buffer......, dequenching occurred on the distribution of rhodamine-123 into the extracellular volume. The addition of a small buffer volume containing digitonin (final concentration 10 microg/ml) and Ca(2+) (final concentrations up to 100 microM free Ca(2+)) caused dequenching (Delta F) due to Delta Psi m dissipation by...

  14. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay evolves into a 'cytome' assay of chromosomal instability, mitotic dysfunction and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was originally developed as an ideal system for measuring micronuclei (MNi) however it can also be used to measure nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), nuclear buds (NBUDs), cell death (necrosis or apoptosis) and nuclear division rate. Current evidence suggests that (a) NPBs originate from dicentric chromosomes in which the centromeres have been pulled to the opposite poles of the cell at anaphase and are therefore indicative of DNA mis-repair, chromosome rearrangement or telomere end-fusions, (b) NPBs may break to form MNi, (c) the nuclear budding process is the mechanism by which cells remove amplified and/or excess DNA and is therefore a marker of gene amplification and/or altered gene dosage, (d) cell cycle checkpoint defects result in micronucleus formation and (e) hypomethylation of DNA, induced nutritionally or by inhibition of DNA methyl transferase can lead to micronucleus formation either via chromosome loss or chromosome breakage. The strong correlation between micronucleus formation, nuclear budding and NPBs (r = 0.75-0.77, P < 0.001) induced by either folic acid deficiency or exposure to ionising radiation is supportive of the hypothesis that folic acid deficiency and/or ionising radiation cause genomic instability and gene amplification by the initiation of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. In its comprehensive mode, the CBMN assay measures all cells including necrotic and apoptotic cells as well as number of nuclei per cell to provide a measure of cytotoxicity and mitotic activity. The CBMN assay has in fact evolved into a 'cytome' method for measuring comprehensively chromosomal instability phenotype and altered cellular viability caused by genetic defects and/or nutrional deficiencies and/or exogenous genotoxins thus opening up an exciting future for the use of this methodology in the emerging fields of nutrigenomics and toxicogenomics and their combinations

  15. Survey of culture, goldengate assay, universal biosensor assay, and 16S rRNA Gene sequencing as alternative methods of bacterial pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Brianna; Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S; Paulson, Joseph N; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; Deleon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J; Hossain, M Anowar; Breiman, Robert F; Morris, J Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2013-10-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  16. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2) is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on tumor cell invasiveness

  17. Differences in the primary culture, purification and biological characteristics between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells from rat aorta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaobo Hu; Zifang Song; Qichang Zheng; Jun Nie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences of primary culture, purification and biological characteristics between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells from rat aorta. Methods: Endothelial cells were obtained using the vascular ring adherence, collagenase digestion method and an improved vascular ring adherence method, while smooth muscle cells were separated from tissue sections of rat aorta. Clones of endothelial cells were selected by limiting dilution assay. Both cell types were identified using specific cell immunofluorescent markers,and phase contrast microscopy was used to observe the morphological disparity between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells at the single cell and colony level. Cell proliferation was determined by the cell counting kit-8. Differences between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were evaluated in trypsin digestion 6me, attachment time and recovery after cryopreservation. Results: Endothelial cells were obtained by all three methods. The improved vascular ring method provided the most reproducible results. Cells were in good condition, and of high purity. Smooth muscle cells were cultured successfully by the tissue fragment culture method. Clonal expansion of singleendothelial cells was attained. The two cell types expressed their respective specific markers, and the rate of proliferation of smooth muscle cells exceeded that of endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were more sensitive to trypsin digestion than smooth muscle cells. In addition, they had a shorter adherence time and better recovery following cryopreservation than smooth muscle cells. Conclusion: The improved vascular ring method was optimal for yielding endothelial cells. Limiting dilution is a novel and valid method for purifying primary endothelial cells from rat aorta. Primary rat endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cell cultures exhibited different morphological characteristics, proliferation rate, adherence time, susceptibility to trypsin

  18. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as 51Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer

  19. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  20. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  2. Mouse cell culture - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases, starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward and David Tosh provide a necessary update of the protocols currently needed. In fact, nearly half of the book is devoted to stem cells culture protocols, mainly embryonic, from a list of several organs (kidney, lung, oesophagus and intestine, pancreas and liver to mention some........

  3. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  4. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Kim, Ceonne; Adhikari, Anima; Gray, Kayla E; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Little, Jane A; Gurkan, Umut A

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  5. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  6. Darwinian Evolution of Prions in Cell Culture*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jiali; Browning, Shawn; Mahal, Sukhvir P.; Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Weissmann, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins consisting mainly of PrPSc, a β sheet-rich conformer of the normal host protein PrPC, and occur in different strains. Strain identity is thought to be encoded by PrPSc conformation. We found that biologically cloned prion populations gradually became heterogeneous by accumulating “mutants”, and selective pressures resulted in the emergence of different mutants as major constituents of the evolving population. Thus, when transferred from brain to cultured cells, ...

  7. Bioactive sugar surfaces for hepatocyte cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ambury, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, develop and characterise a novel bioactive surface capable of binding hepatocytes and enabling the retention of hepatocyte-specific cell function during in-vitro culture. The materials were designed to exploit a unique characteristic of hepatocyte biology, with β-galactose moieties displayed to allow cellular adhesion via the specific asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) found on hepatocytes. Hydrogels were created by modifying a commercia...

  8. Degradation of TNT by plant cell cultures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipná, Radka; Nepovím, Aleš; Zeman, S.; Vágner, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Smolenice, 2003, s. 78-79. [Xenobiochemické sympózium /22./. Smolenice (SK), 09.06.2003-11.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P065; GA MŠk OC 837.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : degradation * plant cell cultures Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides

  9. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety. PMID:25975990

  10. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Parvaneh Farzaneh; Laleh Nikfarjam

    2011-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma conta...

  11. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  12. Efficient flotation of yeast cells grown in batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, M C; Greenhalf, W; Laluce, C

    1996-05-01

    A fast flotation assay was used to select new floating yeast strains. The flotation ability did not seem to be directly correlated to total extracellular protein concentration of the culture. However, the hydrophobicity of the cell was definitely correlated to the flotation capacity. The Saccharomyces strains (FLT strains) were highly hydrophobic and showed an excellent flotation performance in batch cultures without additives (flotation agents) and with no need for a special flotation chamber or flotation column. A stable and well-organized structure was evident in the dried foam as shown by scanning electron microscopy which revealed its unique structure showing mummified cells (dehydrated) attached to each other. The attachment among the cells and the high protein concentration of the foams indicated that proteins might be involved in the foam formation. The floating strains (strains FLT) which were not flocculent and showed no tendency to aggregate, were capable of growing and producing ethanol in a synthetic medium containing high glucose concentration as a carbon source. The phenomenon responsible for flotation seems to be quite different from the flocculation phenomenon. PMID:18626952

  13. Primary hemocyte culture of Penaeus monodon as an in vitro model for white spot syndrome virus titration, viral and immune related gene expression and cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Seena; Mohandas, A; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2010-11-01

    Immortal cell lines have not yet been reported from Penaeus monodon, which delimits the prospects of investigating the associated viral pathogens especially white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In this context, a method of developing primary hemocyte culture from this crustacean has been standardized by employing modified double strength Leibovitz-15 (L-15) growth medium supplemented with 2% glucose, MEM vitamins (1×), tryptose phosphate broth (2.95 gl⁻¹), 20% FBS, N-phenylthiourea (0.2 mM), 0.06 μg ml⁻¹ chloramphenicol, 100 μg ml⁻¹ streptomycin and 100 IU ml⁻¹ penicillin and hemolymph drawn from shrimp grown under a bio-secured recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). In this medium the hemocytes remained viable up to 8 days. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling assay revealed its incorporation in 22 ± 7% of cells at 24h. Susceptibility of the cells to WSSV was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay using a monoclonal antibody against 28 kDa envelope protein of WSSV. A convenient method for determining virus titer as MTT(50)/ml was standardized employing the primary hemocyte culture. Expression of viral genes and cellular immune genes were also investigated. The cell culture could be demonstrated for determining toxicity of a management chemical (benzalkonium chloride) by determining its IC(50). The primary hemocyte culture could serve as a model for WSSV titration and viral and cellular immune related gene expression and also for investigations on cytotoxicity of aquaculture drugs and chemicals. PMID:20807537

  14. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  15. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  16. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  17. Triethyllead treatment of cultured brain cells. Effect on accumulation of radioactive precursors in galactolipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundt, I.K.; Ammitzboll, T.; Clausen, J.

    1981-02-01

    Cultured cells from chick embryo brains were studied for their sensitivity to triethyllead. Triethyllead chloride (3.16 microM) was added to the nutrient medium and incubated for 48 hr with the cells. Morphological changes in light microscope and radioactive labeling of galactolipids were assayed. Triethyllead treatment reduced the number of neuronal cells with processes. Morphological changes were not observed in glial cells. The (/sup 35/S)sulfate labeling of sulfatides was reduced to 50%. The (/sup 3/H)serine labeling of cerebrosides with alpha-hydroxy fatty acids was not influenced, while the (/sup 3/H)serine labeling of cerebrosides with nonhydroxy fatty acids was inhibited 40% in one- and two- but not in three-week-old cultures. The results indicate that the nerve cell response to triethyllead in cultures is selective, since the neurons are more sensitive than the glia cells and the labeling of sulfatides is more sensitive than that of cerebrosides.

  18. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  19. Effects of deprivation of background environmental radiation on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results from an experiment aimed at investigating whether living cells are influenced by background ionizing radiation. Parallel human cell cultures were set-up in two separate laboratories and maintained for several months under identical conditions but for a 80 x different level of background ionizing radiation. Periodically, the cell cultures were monitored for the onset of divergences in biochemical behavior, using two distinct cellular biology assays, namely micronuclei induction and activity of enzymes implicated in the management of oxidative stress. To reveal any subtle modifications, responses were also amplified by subjecting cell cultures to acute stress induced by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. Compared to reference radiation background conditions, cultures maintained in a reduced background radiation environment handled the consequences of acute stress with diminished efficacy.

  20. Sodium 22+ washout from cultured rat cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The washout of Na+ isotopes from tissues and cells is quite complex and not well defined. To further gain insight into this process, we have studied 22Na+ washout from cultured Wistar rat skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In these preparations, 22Na+ washout is described by a general three-exponential function. The exponential factor of the fastest component (k1) and the initial exchange rate constant (kie) of cultured fibroblasts decrease in magnitude in response to incubation in K+-deficient medium or in the presence of ouabain and increase in magnitude when the cells are incubated in a Ca++-deficient medium. As the magnitude of the kie declines (in the presence of ouabain) to the level of the exponential factor of the middle component (k2), 22Na+ washout is adequately described by a two-exponential function. When the kie is further diminished (in the presence of both ouabain and phloretin) to the range of the exponential factor of the slowest component (k3), the washout of 22Na+ is apparently monoexponential. Calculations of the cellular Na+ concentrations, based on the 22Na+ activity in the cells at the initiation of the washout experiments, and the medium specific activity agree with atomic absorption spectrometry measurements of the cellular concentration of this ion. Thus, all three components of 22Na+ washout from cultured rat cells are of cellular origin. Using the exponential parameters, compartmental analyses of two models (in parallel and in series) with three cellular Na+ pools were performed. The results indicate that, independent of the model chosen, the relative size of the largest Na+ pool is 92-93% in fibroblasts and approximately 96% in VSMCs. This pool is most likely to represent the cytosol

  1. Medium-throughput computer aided micro-island method to assay embryonic dopaminergic neuron cultures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planken, A; Porokuokka, L L; Hänninen, A-L; Tuominen, R K; Andressoo, J-O

    2010-12-15

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons degenerate and die, causing loss of motor function. Currently no therapies exist to ameliorate neurodegeneration or to restore DA neurons, although neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are promising leads. Prior in vivo studies the NTFs are routinely assessed in vitro by quantifying the survival of DA neurons from embryonic rodent midbrain cultures. Current in vitro methods are limited in terms of assay reliability, arduous workflow, low throughput, low statistical power and may obscure detection of molecules with minor yet critically important therapeutic effects. We have developed a medium-throughput, micro-island culture method. It permits analysis of 10-12 data points from a single embryo - several fold more than any previously published method - and enables comparisons of DA neurons from a single gene knockout (KO) embryo. It is computer-aided, improves statistical power and decreases the number of animals and workload per experiment. This method enhances testing capabilities of NTFs and other factors, and enables small scale screening of chemical drug libraries. We have validated the method by confirming the known effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurturin (NRTN), and demonstrated additive effects via simultaneous addition of GDNF and heparin binding growth associated molecule (HB-GAM). We also show for the first time that DA neurons isolated from GDNF receptor RET-deficient mice are still GDNF responsive, suggesting the presence of an alternative non-RET receptor for GDNF in the DA system. Finally, the method can be adapted for analyses of other low abundance neuronal systems. PMID:20951734

  2. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLESIA O. GRYGORIEVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Grygorieva OO, Berezovsjka MA, Dacenko OI. 2015. Cell response of Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture to repeated microwave irradiation. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 38-42. Two cultures of Chlamydomonas actinochloris Deason et Bold in the lag-phase were exposed to the microwave irradiation. One of them (culture 1 was not treated beforehand, whereas the other (culture 2 was irradiated by microwaves 2 years earlier. The measurement of cell quantity as well as measurement of change of intensities and spectra of cultures photoluminescence (PL in the range of chlorophyll a emission was regularly conducted during the cell cultures development. Cell concentration of culture 1 exposed to the microwave irradiation for the first time has quickly restored while cell concentration of culture 2 which was irradiated repeatedly has fallen significantly. The following increasing of cell concentration of culture 2 is negligible. Cell concentration reaches the steady-state level that is about a half of the cell concentration of control culture. Initially the PL efficiency of cells of both cultures decreases noticeable as a result of irradiation. Then there is the monotonic increase to the values which are significantly higher than the corresponding values in the control cultures. The ratio of the intensities at the maxima of the main emission bands of chlorophyll for control samples of both cultures remained approximately at the same level. At the same time effect of irradiation on the cell PL spectrum appears as a temporary reduction of this magnitude.

  3. A dual gradient assay for the parametric analysis of cell-surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Paul M; Pedersen, Rasmus H; Riehle, Mathis O; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2012-08-20

    Cellular response to microgrooves is addressed using a new assay format, comprising orthogonal gradients of continuously varied groove pitch and depth. Dual layer etch masks are created using a combination of micropatterning and plasma polymer deposition. A silicon substrate with a constant groove width of 8 μm and with ridge width increasing from 8 μm in 0.5 μm steps across 10 mm is fabricated by photolithography. A plasma-polymerized hexane film which is 120 nm thick at one end of these grooves, and 10 nm at the other, is deposited under a diffusion mask. Reactive etching of the patterned sample transfers a gradient of groove pitch and groove depth into the silicon substrate. A silicon master with a gradient of groove depth spanning more than two orders of magnitude (less than 10 nm to over 1000 nm) is used to create an injection molding inlay for mass replication of the screening topography. Polycarbonate replicas are molded for use in cell culture studies, and the functionality of the topography as a high-throughput screening platform is investigated. The response of MDCK, h-TERT fibroblasts, and LE2 endothelial cells is examined, in terms of attachment and morphological response to the variation in topographical cues, with the aim of pinpointing the optimal combination of groove pitch and depth to elicit a tailored response from each cell type. When the range of topographical features screened on a single substrate is considered, this new assay represents a significant step forward in the parametric design and analysis of topographical cues at the biomaterial interface. PMID:22678878

  4. Evaluation of 309 environmental chemicals using a mouse embryonic stem cell adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Chandler

    Full Text Available The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7 and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™ were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC₅₀ values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500 revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26 that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation.

  5. Application of an integrated LC-UV-MS-NMR platform to the identification of secondary metabolites from cell cultures: benzophenanthridine alkaloids from elicited Eschscholzia californica (california poppy) cell cultures†

    OpenAIRE

    Gathungu, Rose M.; John T. Oldham; Bird, Susan S.; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W. T.; Vouros, Paul; Kautz, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue cultures are a scalable and controllable alternative to whole plants for obtaining natural products of medical relevance. Cultures can be optimized for high yields of desired metabolites using rapid profiling assays such as HPLC. We describe an approach to establishing a rapid assay for profiling cell culture expression systems using a novel microscale LC-UV-MS-NMR platform, designed to acquire both MS and NMR each at their optimal sensitivity, by using nanosplitter MS f...

  6. The radiosensitivity of a murine fibrosarcoma as measured by three cell survival assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, L; Urano, M; Suit, H D

    1980-04-01

    The radiation sensitivity of a weakly immunogenic spontaneous fibrosarcoma of the C3Hf/Sed mouse (designated FSa-II) was assessed by three in vivo cell survival methods: end-point dilution (TD50) assay, lung colony (LC) assay, and agar diffusion chamber (ADC) assay. The hypoxic fraction of this tumour was also determined by the ADC method. Although there was a good agreement of the cell survival data between the ADC and LC methods, the TD50 method yielded a considerably less steep cell survival curve. Beneficial aspects and limitations of each assay are discussed. In addition, the use of the ADC method for the growth of xenogeneic cell lines and a preliminary experiment with human tumour cells in non-immunosuppressed hosts suggest that this method may be a valuable adjunct for studying the growth and therapeutic responses of human tumour cells. PMID:6932931

  7. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  8. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be

  9. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu Chang; Li Chenzhong, E-mail: licz@fiu.edu [Nanobioengineering/Bioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  10. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Reverté

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs.

  11. Alternative methods for the detection of emerging marine toxins: biosensors, biochemical assays and cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  12. Experimental Study of Rat Beta Islet Cells Cultured under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun SONG; Xiu-Qing DUAN; Xi LI; Li-Ou HAN; Ping XU; Chun-Fang SONG; Lian-Hong JIN

    2004-01-01

    To observe the effects of simulated microgravity on beta islet cell culture, we have compared the survival rates and the insulin levels of the isolated rat islet cells cultured at micro- and normal gravity conditions. The survival rates of the cells cultured were determined by acridine orange-propidium iodide double-staining on day 3, 7 and 14. The morphology of the cells was observed by electron microscopy.Insulin levels were measured by radio immuno assays. Our results show that the cell number cultured under the microgravity condition is significantly higher than that under the routine condition (P<0.01). Some tubular structure shown by transmission electron microscopy, possibly for the transport of nutrients, were formed intercellularly in the microgravity cultured group on day 7. There were also abundant secretion particles and mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that there were holes formed between each islet, possibly connecting with the nutrient transport tubules. The microgravity cultured group also has higher insulin levels in the media as compared with the control group(P<0.01). Our results indicate that microgravity cultivation of islet cells has advantages over the routine culture methods.

  13. Experimental Study of Rat Beta Islet Cells Cultured under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunSONG; Xiu-QingDUAN; XiLI; Li-OuHAN; PingXU; Chun-FangSONG:; Lian-HongJIN

    2004-01-01

    To observe the effects of simulated microgravity on beta islet cell culture, we have compared the survival rates and the insulin levels of the isolated rat islet cells cultured at micro- and normal gravity conditions. The survival rates of the cells cultured were determined by acridine orange-propidium iodide double-staining on day 3,7 and 14. The morphology of the cells was observed by electron microscopy.Insulin levels were measured by radio immuno assays. Our results show that the cell number cultured underthe microgravity condition is significantly higher than that under the routine condition (P<0.01). Some tubular structure shown by transmission electron microscopy, possibly for the transport of nutrients, were formed intercellularly in the microgravity cultured group on day 7. There were also abundant secretion particles and mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that there were holes formed between each islet, possibly connecting with the nutrient transport tubules. The microgravity cultured group also has higher insulin levels in the media as compared with the control group (P<0.01). Our results indicate that microgravity cultivation of islet cells has advantages over the routine culture methods.

  14. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  15. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylo...

  16. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  17. Discarded human fetal tissue and cell cultures for transplantation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study has been performed to explore the utility of various tissues from discarded human abortuses for transplantation and related research. Specifically, aborted fetuses plus parental blood samples and all relevant clinical data were obtained through a local hospital complex. Whenever possible, pancreas, skin and skeletal muscle, heart, liver, kidney, cartilage and lung tissues were removed, dissociated and subfractionated for cryopreservation, characterization and cultivation trials in vitro. Existing protocols for these manipulations were compared and improved upon as required. Clonal culture, cell aggregate maintenance techniques and use of feeder cell populations have been utilized where appropriate to develop quantitative comparative data. Histological and biochemical assays were applied both to evaluate separation/cultivation methods and to identify optimal culture conditions for maintaining functional cells. Immunochemical and molecular biological procedures were applied to study expression of Major Histocompatibility Vomplex (MHC) class 1 and 11 molecules on cell lines derived. Tissue and cell culture populations were examined for infections with bacteria, ftingi, mycoplasma, HIV, CMV, hepatitis B and other viruses. Only 1% of the abortuses tested were virally infected. Cytogenetic analyses confin-ned the normal diploid status in the vast majority (>98%) of lines tested. A total of over 250 abortuses have been obtained and processed. Only 25 were found to be contaminated with bacteria or fungi and unsuitable for further cultivation trials. A total of over 200 cell populations were isolated, characterized and cryopreserved for further study. Included were kidney, lung, liver and epidermal epithelia: cartilage-derived cells from the spine and epiphyses plus myogenic myoblasts. Selected lines have been immortalized using HPV I 6E6/E7 sequences. Epithelia from the liver and pancreas and cardiac myocytes were the most problematic in that initial

  18. Responses of the L5178Y mouse Lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, D B; Brown, A G; Howgate, S; McBride, D; Riach, C; Caspary, W J

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk+/tk- mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay using procedures based upon those described by McGregor et al. (McGregor DB, Martin R, Cattanach P, Edwards I, McBride D, Caspary WJ (1987): Environ Mol Mutagen 9:143-160). Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 micrograms/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde, o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds. Chemical not identified as mutagens were N-4-acetylaminofluorene, chlorpheniramine maleate, chloropropamide, 1,4-dioxane, endrin, ethylene glycol, iron dextran, methapyrilene, sodium(2-ethylhexyl)alcohol PMID:1902415

  19. Theoretical basis for reducing time-lines to the determination of positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures using thymidylate kinase (TMK assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro culture of pathogens on growth media forms a "pillar" for both infectious disease diagnosis and drug sensitivity profiling. Conventional cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ medium, however, take over two months to yield observable growth, thereby delaying diagnosis and appropriate intervention. Since DNA duplication during interphase precedes microbial division, "para-DNA synthesis assays" could be used to predict impending microbial growth. Mycobacterial thymidylate kinase (TMKmyc is a phosphotransferase critical for the synthesis of the thymidine triphosphate precursor necessary for M.tb DNA synthesis. Assays based on high-affinity detection of secretory TMKmyc levels in culture using specific antibodies are considered. The aim of this study was to define algorithms for predicting positive TB cultures using antibody-based assays of TMKmyc levels in vitro. Methods and results Systems and chemical biology were used to derive parallel correlation of "M.tb growth curves" with "TMKmyc curves" theoretically in four different scenarios, showing that changes in TMKmyc levels in culture would in each case be predictive of M.tb growth through a simple quadratic curvature, |tmk| = at2+ bt + c, consistent with the "S" pattern of microbial growth curves. Two drug resistance profiling scenarios are offered: isoniazid (INH resistance and sensitivity. In the INH resistance scenario, it is shown that despite the presence of optimal doses of INH in LJ to stop M.tb proliferation, bacilli grow and the resulting phenotypic growth changes in colonies/units are predictable through the TMKmyc assay. According to our current model, the areas under TMKmyc curves (AUC, calculated as the integral ∫(at2+ bt + cdt or ~1/3 at3+ 1/2 bt2+ct could directly reveal the extent of prevailing drug resistance and thereby aid decisions about the usefulness of a resisted drug in devising "salvage combinations" within

  20. Immunophenotype of hematopoietic stem cells from placental/umbilical cord blood after culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pranke

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and enumeration of human hematopoietic stem cells remain problematic, since in vitro and in vivo stem cell assays have different outcomes. We determined if the altered expression of adhesion molecules during stem cell expansion could be a reason for the discrepancy. CD34+CD38- and CD34+CD38+ cells from umbilical cord blood were analyzed before and after culture with thrombopoietin (TPO, FLT-3 ligand (FL and kit ligand (KL; or stem cell factor in different combinations: TPO + FL + KL, TPO + FL and TPO, at concentrations of 50 ng/mL each. Cells were immunophenotyped by four-color fluorescence using antibodies against CD11c, CD31, CD49e, CD61, CD62L, CD117, and HLA-DR. Low-density cord blood contained 1.4 ± 0.9% CD34+ cells, 2.6 ± 2.1% of which were CD38-negative. CD34+ cells were isolated using immuno-magnetic beads and cultured for up to 7 days. The TPO + FL + KL combination presented the best condition for maintenance of stem cells. The total cell number increased 4.3 ± 1.8-fold, but the number of viable CD34+ cells decreased by 46 ± 25%. On the other hand, the fraction of CD34+CD38- cells became 52.0 ± 29% of all CD34+ cells. The absolute number of CD34+CD38- cells was expanded on average 15 ± 12-fold when CD34+ cells were cultured with TPO + FL + KL for 7 days. The expression of CD62L, HLA-DR and CD117 was modulated after culture, particularly with TPO + FL + KL, explaining differences between the adhesion and engraftment of primary and cultured candidate stem cells. We conclude that culture of CD34+ cells with TPO + FL + KL results in a significant increase in the number of candidate stem cells with the CD34+CD38- phenotype.

  1. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and su...

  2. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  3. EFFECTS OF PDGF-BB ON INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM CONCENTRATION AND PROLIFERATION IN CULTURED GLOMERULAR MESANGIAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Li-ping; ZHANG Chong; BIAN Fan; ZOU Jun; JIANG Geng-ru; ZHU Han-wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the alteration of intracellular calcium concentration and proliferation in cultured glomerular mesangial cells. Methods Rat mesangial cells were cultured.Intracellular calcium concentrations were measured by confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Fura-3 fluorescence dyeing techniques. Cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Results PDGF-BB increased intracellular calcium concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, and at the same time promote the proliferation of mesangial cells. After preincubation with calcium channel blocker nifedipine or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, both the increase of intracellular calcium concentrations and cell proliferations induced by PDGF-BB were inhibited. Tripterigium Wilfordii Glycosides (TMG) significantly inhibited the mesangial cell proliferations, but it had no significant effect on intracellular calcium concentrations. Conclusion There was a positive relationship between the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration and cell proliferation in glomerular mesangial cells, but the increase of in- tracellular calcium concentrations wasn't the only way for proliferation.

  4. Diversity in the applications of the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay / Cristal Huysamen

    OpenAIRE

    Huysamen, Cristal

    2005-01-01

    The development of the single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) as a powerful method for measuring DNA strand breakage and repair, has lead to a broader understanding of the impact of certain internal and external factors on DNA damage. This study describes the establishment of the Comet assay in our laboratory and its application in a diversity of studies. These studies include the monitoring of the effect of exercise on DNA damage and repair with the purpose of ...

  5. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  6. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  7. Quality Assurance in the Polio Laboratory. Cell Sensitivity and Cell Authentication Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Glynis

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of poliovirus surveillance is largely dependent on the quality of the cell lines used for virus isolation, which is the foundation of poliovirus diagnostic work. Many cell lines are available for the isolation of enteroviruses, whilst genetically modified L20B cells can be used as a diagnostic tool for the identification of polioviruses. To be confident that cells can consistently isolate the virus of interest, it is necessary to have a quality assurance system in place, which will ensure that the cells in use are not contaminated with other cell lines or microorganisms and that they remain sensitive to the viruses being studied.The sensitivity of cell lines can be assessed by the regular testing of a virus standard of known titer in the cell lines used for virus isolation. The titers obtained are compared to previously obtained titers in the same assay, so that any loss of sensitivity can be detected.However, the detection of cell line cross contamination is more difficult. DNA bar coding is a technique that uses a short DNA sequence from a standardized position in the genome as a molecular diagnostic assay for species-level identification. For almost all groups of higher animals, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of mitochondrial DNA (CO1) is emerging as the standard barcode region. This region is 648 nucleotide base pairs long in most phylogenetic groups and is flanked by regions of conserved sequences, making it relatively easy to isolate and analyze. DNA barcodes vary among individuals of the same species to a very minor degree (generally less than 1-2 %), and a growing number of studies have shown that the COI sequences of even closely related species differ by several per cent, making it possible to identify different species with high confidence. PMID:26983732

  8. Sensitivity of immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, R S; Kuo, C C; Tam, M R

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which recognize the species-specific major outer membrane protein antigen of Chlamydia trachomatis were used for immunofluorescence staining of chlamydial inclusions in cell culture. A total of 115 clinical specimens were inoculated onto replicate HeLa 229 cell monolayers and assayed for chlamydial inclusions by immunofluorescence staining and Giemsa staining. Of the isolates, 38 were detected by immunofluorescence staining on passage 1 and 1 was detected on passage 2; 2...

  9. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Salánki; Csaba Hős; Norbert Orgovan; Beatrix Péter; Noémi Sándor; Zsuzsa Bajtay; Anna Erdei; Robert Horvath; Bálint Szabó

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduc...

  10. ASBESTOS AND GASTRO-INTESTINAL CANCER: CELL CULTURE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three forms of asbestos: amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in cell clture. Using embjryonic human intestine derived and adult rat liver derived epitelial cells, the order of toxicity was chrysotile > amosite = crocidolite. ...

  11. Polyamines and the Cell Cycle of Catharanthus roseus Cells in Culture 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hisae; Ando, Satoshi; Kodama, Hiroaki; Komamine, Atsushi

    1991-01-01

    Investigation was made on the effect of partial depletion of polyamines (PAs), induced by treatment with inhibitors of the biosynthesis of PAs, on the distribution of cells at each phase of the cell cycle in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells in suspension cultures, using flow cytometry. More cells treated with inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were accumulated in the G1 phase than those in the control, while the treatment with an inhibitor of spermidine (SPD) synthase showed no effect on the distribution of cells. The endogenous levels of the PAs, putrescine (PUT), SPD, and spermine (SPM), were determined during the cell cycle in synchronous cultures of C. roseus. Two peaks of endogenous level of PAs, in particular, of PUT and SPD, were observed during the cell cycle. Levels of PAs increased markedly prior to synthesis of DNA in the S phase and prior to cytokinesis. Activities of ADC and ODC were also assayed during the cell cycle. Activities of ADC was much higher than that of ODC throughout the cell cycle, but both activities of ODC and ADC changed in concert with changes in levels of PAs. Therefore, it is suggested that these enzymes may regulate PA levels during the cell cycle. These results indicate that inhibitors of PUT biosynthesis caused the suppression of cell proliferation by prevention of the progression of the cell cycle, probably from the G1 to the S phase, and PUT may play more important roles in the progression of the cell cycle than other PAs. PMID:16668290

  12. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Grist, Samantha M.; Lukas Chrostowski; Cheung, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternat...

  13. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well

  14. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohmen, Amy J. C., E-mail: a.dohmen@nki.nl [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Swartz, Justin E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Willems, Stefan M. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Spijker, René [Medical library, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1100 DE (Netherlands); Dutch Cochrane Centre, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands); Neefjes, Jacques [Department of Cell Biology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Zuur, Charlotte L. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands)

    2015-08-28

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well.

  15. Semicontinuous Bioreactor Production of Recombinant Butyrylcholinesterase in Transgenic Rice Cell Suspension Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Jasmine M.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Kyser, Zachary R.; Wu, Liying; Roberts, Brian A.; Noe, Amy R.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.; Nandi, Somen

    2016-01-01

    An active and tetrameric form of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), a large and complex human enzyme, was produced via semicontinuous operation in a transgenic rice cell suspension culture. After transformation of rice callus and screening of transformants, the cultures were scaled up from culture flask to a lab scale bioreactor. The bioreactor was operated through two phases each of growth and expression. The cells were able to produce BChE during both expression phases, with a maximum yield of 1.6 mg BChE/L of culture during the second expression phase. Cells successfully regrew during a 5-day growth phase. A combination of activity assays and Western blot analysis indicated production of an active and fully assembled tetramer of BChE. PMID:27066048

  16. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  17. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair;

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  18. A novel mast cell co-culture microfluidic chip for the electrochemical evaluation of food allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Zhu, Pei; Pi, Fuwei; Ji, Jian; Sun, Chao; Sun, Jiadi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-09-15

    In this study a novel cell-to-cell electrochemical microfluidic chip was developed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of food allergen. Microfluidic cell culture, food allergen-induced cell morphological changes, and cell metabolism measurements were performed simultaneously using the aforementioned device. RBL-2H3 mast cells and ANA-1 macrophages have been used within a cell co-culture model to observe their allergic response when they are introduced to the antigen stimulus. Two cell cultivation microfluidic channels are located in the microfluidic chip, which is fabricated with four groups of gold electrodes, with an additional "capillary". In order to detect the allergic response, the cells were stimulated with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) without anti-DNP IgE incubation. When exocytosis occurs, the cell-secreted inflammatory cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) and cell impedance changes were detected using cell-based electrochemical assay. Results indicate that the real-time cell allergic response are accurately monitored by this electrochemical microfluidic chip, which provides a general example of rapidly prototyped low-cost biosensor technology for applications in both food allergen detection and investigation. PMID:27108255

  19. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  20. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells

  1. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  2. Comet-electrophoresis assay as a method for determining radiosensitivities of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of applying comet-electrophoresis to determining the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Methods: The residual rates of DNA damage at 30 minute after 2 Gy gamma irradiation in four human tumor cell lines (WM9839, KB, LS-T-117, PC3M) were determined with the comet assay. The cell survival fraction of tumor cell after 2 Gy gamma ray-irradiation was determined with clonogenic assay. Results: There were good correlations between cell survival fraction (SF2 ) and residual rate of DNA damage at 30 minute after 2 Gy gamma ray-irradiation in these four human tumor cell lines, separately. Conclusion: The comet-electrophoresis assay may be used as a repaid and sensitive method for determining inherent radiosensitivities of tumor cells

  3. Electrochemical sensors, MTT and immunofluorescence assays for monitoring the proliferation effects of cissus populnea extracts on Sertoli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Dennis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the development of an electrochemical sensor array for monitoring the proliferation effects of cissus populnea plant extracts on TM4 Sertoli cells. Methods The proliferation activities of the extracts on Sertoli cells were studied using a high-throughput electrochemical sensor array (DOX-96 and the analytical sensor characteristics were compared with conventional colorimetric MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results This work shows that there is a definite positive trend in the proliferation effect of the extract of Cissus populnea on the TM4 Sertoli cells. All of the three techniques confirmed that the most effective concentration for the proliferation is 10 ppm. At this concentration, the proliferation effect was established around 120% for both DOX-96 and MTT techniques, whereas fluorescence assays showed a higher level (120-150%. DOX-96 showed a lower limit of detection (1.25 × 10(4 cells/ml; whereas the LOD recorded for both MTT and fluorescence techniques was 2.5 × 10(4 cells/ml. Visual examination of the cells by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed the proliferation of Sertoli cells as was determined using the MTT assay. This investigation provides a confident interpretation of the results and proved that the most effective concentration for the proliferation using Cissus populnea plant extract is 10 ppm. Conclusions Overall, the DOX results compared well with the conventional methods of checking proliferation of cells. The fascinating feature of the sensor array is the ability to provide continuous proliferation experiments with no additional reagents including 96 simultaneous electrochemical experiments. The use of the DOX-96 could reduce a typical bioassay time by 20-fold. Thus the DOX-96 can be used as both a research tool and for practical cell culture monitoring.

  4. Direct Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay with Liquid and Solid Mycobacterial Culture for Quantification of Early Bactericidal Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kayigire, Xavier A.; Friedrich, Sven O.; Venter, Amour; Dawson, Rodney; Gillespie, Stephen Henry; Boeree, Martin J.; Heinrich, Norbert; Hoelscher, Michael; Diacon, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    The early bactericidal activity of antituberculosis agents is usually determined by measuring the reduction of the sputum mycobacterial load over time on solid agar medium or in liquid culture. This study investigated the value of a quantitative PCR assay for early bactericidal activity determination. Groups of 15 patients were treated with 6 different antituberculosis agents or regimens. Patients collected sputum for 16 h overnight at baseline and at days 7 and 14 after treatment initiation....

  5. Comparative Analysis of Cultural Isolation and Pcr Based Assay for Detection of Campylobacter Jejuni In Food and Faecal Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Harkanwaldeep; Rathore, R. S.; Singh, Satparkash; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on mapA gene of C. jejuni was tested for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in naturally infected as well as spiked faecal and food samples of human and animal origin. Simultaneously, all the samples were subjected to the cultural isolation of organism and biochemical characterization. The positive samples resulted in the amplification of a DNA fragment of size ~589 bp in PCR assay whereas the absence of such amplicon ...

  6. Comparative analysis of cultural isolation and PCR based assay for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in food and faecal samples

    OpenAIRE

    Harkanwaldeep Singh; Rathore, R. S.; Satparkash Singh; Pawanjit Singh Cheema

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on mapA gene of C. jejuni was tested for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in naturally infected as well as spiked faecal and food samples of human and animal origin. Simultaneously, all the samples were subjected to the cultural isolation of organism and biochemical characterization. The positive samples resulted in the amplification of a DNA fragment of size ~589 bp in PCR assay whereas the absence of such amplicon ...

  7. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Claudia; Pasca Maria; De Vitis Debora; Marzani Federico; Emmi Vincenzo; Marone Piero

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-fiv...

  8. Enumeration of Treponema pallidum Cells Cultivated In Vitro by an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. L.; Moeckli, R A; Keaney, K M

    1984-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to enumerate Treponema pallidum cells. The assay could detect from 2 X 10(7) to 4 X 10(8) treponemes per ml. Reactive rabbit serum and goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G (peroxidase conjugate) were used in the assay. Optimum results were obtained when 2,2'-azino-di(ethylbenzthiazolinesulfonic acid) was used as the dye for the enzyme reaction and the reactions were allowed to run for 45 min. Interestingly, assays in which in vivo-cultivated T. ...

  9. Data of a fluorescent imaging-based analysis of anti-cancer drug effects on three-dimensional cultures of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Itou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cell culture is a powerful tool to study cell growth under 3D condition. To perform a simple test for anti-cancer drugs in 3D culture, visualization of non-proliferated cells is required. We propose a fluorescent imaging-based assay to analyze cancer cell proliferation in 3D culture. We used a pulse-labeling technique with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede to identify non-proliferated cells. This assay allows us to observe change in cell proliferation in 3D culture by simple imaging. Using this assay, we obtained the data of the effects of anti-cancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil and PD0332991 in a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7.

  10. Development of primary cell culture from Scylla serrata: Primary cell cultures from Scylla serrata

    OpenAIRE

    Sashikumar, Anu; Desai, P. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports for the first time, the Primary cell culture of hepatopancreas from edible crab Scylla serrata using crab saline, L-15 (Leibovitz), 1 × L-15 + crab saline, 2 × L-15 + crab saline, 3 × L-15 and citrate buffer without any serum. We could isolate and maintain E (Embryonalzellen), F (Fibrenzellen), B (Blasenzellen), R (Restzellen) and G (Granular cells). Upon seeding the hepatopancreatic E, F, B, and R cells showed different survival pattern over time than granular cells. A mod...

  11. A specific Fc gamma receptor on cultured rat mesangial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesangial cells represent specialized pericytes in the renal glomerulus that contribute to the regulation of a variety of glomerular functions. Recently we and others have shown that cultured mesangial cells bind and take up immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner leading in turn to generation of PGE2, reactive oxygen, and platelet-activating factor. The present studies were designed to further characterize potential Fc-gamma R on mesangial cells. Binding assays with either monomeric or heat aggregated (HA) [125I] labeled rat subclass-specific IgG were performed at 4 degrees C for 2 h on subcultured rat mesangial cells. Monomeric rat IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG1 and HA IgG2a bound only nonspecifically. Saturable Fc-dependent binding occurred for HA IgG2b and HA IgG1 though maximal binding and affinity were much higher for IgG2b. The presence of an Fc-gamma R was confirmed by surface protein iodination of mesangial cells (MC) and immunoprecipitation with either a polyclonal or mAb 2.4G2 prepared against murine Fc-gamma R. Both antibodies precipitated a 45-kDa iodinated protein band from cultured rat MC that comigrated with that from murine macrophage J774 cells on SDS-PAGE. This protein band also reacted with the polyclonal anti Fc-gamma R antibody on immunoblots. In contrast rat renal papillary epithelial cells were negative. The 45-kDa protein recognized by the rat anti-Fc-gamma R antibody 2.4G2 probably represents the binding site for HA IgG2b, as the 2.4G2 antibody also blocked binding of HA IgG2b. By immunofluorescence microscopy all MC stained positively with the polyclonal anti-Fc-gamma R antibody. A cDNA probe for the Fc-gamma RII-alpha on murine macrophages hybridized to mRNA from cultured rat MC which was of the same size (though less abundant) as that from J774 macrophages

  12. A specific Fc gamma receptor on cultured rat mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, A.; Satriano, J.; DeCandido, S.; Holthofer, H.; Schreiber, R.; Unkeless, J.; Schlondorff, D. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1989-10-15

    Mesangial cells represent specialized pericytes in the renal glomerulus that contribute to the regulation of a variety of glomerular functions. Recently we and others have shown that cultured mesangial cells bind and take up immune complexes in an Fc-dependent manner leading in turn to generation of PGE2, reactive oxygen, and platelet-activating factor. The present studies were designed to further characterize potential Fc-gamma R on mesangial cells. Binding assays with either monomeric or heat aggregated (HA) (125I) labeled rat subclass-specific IgG were performed at 4 degrees C for 2 h on subcultured rat mesangial cells. Monomeric rat IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG1 and HA IgG2a bound only nonspecifically. Saturable Fc-dependent binding occurred for HA IgG2b and HA IgG1 though maximal binding and affinity were much higher for IgG2b. The presence of an Fc-gamma R was confirmed by surface protein iodination of mesangial cells (MC) and immunoprecipitation with either a polyclonal or mAb 2.4G2 prepared against murine Fc-gamma R. Both antibodies precipitated a 45-kDa iodinated protein band from cultured rat MC that comigrated with that from murine macrophage J774 cells on SDS-PAGE. This protein band also reacted with the polyclonal anti Fc-gamma R antibody on immunoblots. In contrast rat renal papillary epithelial cells were negative. The 45-kDa protein recognized by the rat anti-Fc-gamma R antibody 2.4G2 probably represents the binding site for HA IgG2b, as the 2.4G2 antibody also blocked binding of HA IgG2b. By immunofluorescence microscopy all MC stained positively with the polyclonal anti-Fc-gamma R antibody. A cDNA probe for the Fc-gamma RII-alpha on murine macrophages hybridized to mRNA from cultured rat MC which was of the same size (though less abundant) as that from J774 macrophages.

  13. Effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on proliferation of Schwann cells in culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晞棠; 陈晓翔; 熊良俭

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on the proliferation of Schwann cells in culture.Methods: Applying MTT assay and Thymidine incorporation assay, the effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on the proliferation of Schwann cells isolated from the sciatic nerve of adult rat were studied.Results: Ginsenoside Rb1 (10 μg/ml) significantly induced Schwann cell proliferation, the effect was similar to NGF (50 μg/ml). At high concentrations of Ginsenoside Rb1 (1 mg/ml), the proliferation of Schwann cells was significantly inhibited. Conclusions: Ginsenoside Rb1 at the optimal concentrations is found to be effective in inducing the proliferation of Schwann cells, but at higher concentrations the drug is cytotoxic for Schwann cells.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol species of suspension cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, S.; Wagner, K.G.

    Suspension cultured Nicotiana tabacum and Catharanthus roseus cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, the phospholipid fraction extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography. Three different solvent systems and reference compounds were used to assign the different /sup 3/H-labeled species by autoradiography. The ratio of (/sup 3/H)inositol incorporation into PI, PIP and PIP/sub 2/ was found to be 95:4:1; with some preparations a lyso-PI band was obtained which incorporated about a tenth of the label of the PIP band. With Catharanthus roseus cells a very faint band between PI and lyso-PI was detected which could not be assigned to a reference compound.

  15. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamey D

    2013-12-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in 'wasteful' glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  16. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  17. Monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for evaluating the genotoxicity of environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.; Gudi, R.D.; Athwal, R.S.

    1988-12-01

    The development and utilization of a monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for detecting aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations are described. The monochromosomal hybrid cell lines were produced by a two-step process involving transfer of a marker bacterial gene to a human chromosome and then by integration of that human chromosome into a mouse complement of chromosomes through microcell fusion. For chemically induced aneuploidy, the segregation of a single human chromosome among mouse chromosomes is used as a cytogenetic marker. The genetic assay for aneuploidy is based on the ability of the cells to grow in a medium that selects for the loss of the human chromosome. The assay for clastogenicity is based on survival of the cells after treatment with the chemicals in medium that selects for retention of the human chromosome but loss of its segment containing diphtheria toxin locus. The assays greatly simplify the detection of chromosomal aberrations induced by environmental factors at low-dose levels.

  18. Evaluation of osteogenic cell culture and osteogenic/peripheral blood mononuclear human cell co-culture on modified titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to determine the effect of a bioactive ceramic coating on titanium in the nanothickness range on human osteogenic cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on osteogenic cells co-cultured with PBMC without exogenous stimuli. Cell viability, proliferation, adhesion, cytokine release (IL1β, TGFβ1, IL10 and IL17) and intracellular stain for osteopontin and alkaline phosphatase were assessed. Morphologic evaluation showed smaller and less spread cell aspects in co-culture relative to osteogenic cell culture. Cell viability, proliferation and adhesion kinetics were differently influenced by surface texture/chemistry in culture versus co-culture. Cytokine release was also influenced by the interaction between mononuclear and osteogenic cells (mediators released by mononuclear cells acted on osteogenic cells and vice versa). In general, ‘multi-cell type’ interactions played a more remarkable role than the surface roughness or chemistry utilized on the in vitro cellular events related to initial stages of bone formation. (paper)

  19. Real-Time PCR Assay Compared to Nested PCR and Antigenemia Assays for Detecting Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ikewaki, Junji; Ohtsuka, Eiichi; Kawano, Rie; Ogata, Masao; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nasu, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the efficiency of the quantitative real-time PCR assay for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation in adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) patients and compared the results with those obtained with qualitative nested PCR and antigenemia assays. The viral load obtained by the real-time PCR assay closely paralleled the number of antigen-positive cells obtained with the antigenemia assay. Real-time PCR revealed that a large number of DNA copies could be present even in samples assessed as...

  20. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  1. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O'Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-02-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator.

  2. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  3. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N; Balázs, R;

    1994-01-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from d...

  4. Differential osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells co-cultured with human osteoblasts on polymeric microfiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozila, Ismail; Azari, Pedram; Munirah, Sha'ban; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Gan, Seng Neon; Nur Azurah, Abdul Ghani; Jahendran, Jeevanan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Chua, Kien Hui

    2016-02-01

    The osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (HADSCs) co-cultured with human osteoblasts (HOBs) using selected HADSCs/HOBs ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively, is evaluated. The HADSCs/HOBs were seeded on electrospun three-dimensional poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid] (PHB) blended with bovine-derived hydroxyapatite (BHA). Monocultures of HADSCs and HOBs were used as control groups. The effects of PHB-BHA scaffold on cell proliferation and cell morphology were assessed by AlamarBlue assay and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Cell differentiation, cell mineralization, and osteogenic-related gene expression of co-culture HADSCs/HOBs were examined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, alizarin Red S assay, and quantitative real time PCR, respectively. The results showed that co-culture of HADSCs/HOBs, 1:1 grown into PHB-BHA promoted better cell adhesion, displayed a significant higher cell proliferation, higher production of ALP, extracellular mineralization and osteogenic-related gene expression of run-related transcription factor, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin compared to other co-culture groups. This result also suggests that the use of electrospun PHB-BHA in a co-culture HADSCs/HOBs system may serve as promising approach to facilitate osteogenic differentiation activity of HADSCs through direct cell-to-cell contact with HOBs. PMID:26414782

  5. A NOVel ELISPOT assay to quantify HLA-specific B cells in HLA-immunized individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidt, S.; Roelen, D.L.; Vaal, Y.J. de; Kester, M.G.; Eijsink, C.; Thomas, S.; Besouw, N.M. van; Volk, H.D.; Weimar, W.; Claas, F.H.; Mulder, A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the humoral alloimmune response is generally achieved by measuring serum HLA antibodies, which provides no information about the cells involved in the humoral immune response. Therefore, we have developed an HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay allowing for quantification of B cells p

  6. Effect of primarily cultured human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts on radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when CAF is placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer cells. Methods: Human lung CAF was obtained from fresh human lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens by primary culture and subculture and was then identified by immunofluorescence staining. The CAF was placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells, and the effects of CAF on the radiosensitivity of A549 and H1299 cells were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Results: The human lung CAF obtained by adherent culture could stably grow and proliferate, and it had specific expression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast activation protein,but without expression of cytokeratin-18. The plating efficiency (PE, %) of A549 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.0 ± 3.9)% when cultured alone versus (32.3 ± 5.5)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=3.16, P<0.05), and the PE of H1299 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.6 ± 3.1)% when cultured alone versus (35.2 ± 2.3)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=6.55, P<0.05). The cell survival rate at 2 Gy irradiation (SF2) of A549 cells was 0.727 ±0.061 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.089 when co-cultured with CAF (t=0.88, P>0.05), and the SF2 of H1299 cells was 0.692 ±0.065 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.037 when co-cultured with CAF (t=2.08, P>0.05). The protection enhancement ratios of human lung CAF for A549 cells and H1299 cells were 1.29 and 1.25, respectively. Conclusions: Human lung CAF reduces the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when placed in direct contact co-culture with them, and the radioprotective effect may be attributed to CAF promoting the proliferation of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  7. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  8. Gelatin methacrylamide as coating material in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Michael; Tovar, Günter E M; Hoch, Eva; Southan, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Unmodified gelatin (uG) is widely used as a coating material in cell culture for improving surface properties. In this study, the authors investigated if gelatin methacrylamide (GM) with a medium degree of methacrylamide modification (GM1.5) and a high degree of methacrylamide modification (GM4) are equally suitable for this purpose. Therefore, gold surfaces were coated with uG, GM1.5, and GM4 by adsorption of the polymers on the surfaces. Coating success was confirmed by spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The authors found that upon adsorption of uG, GM1.5, a nd GM4 on gold, thin films with thicknesses of 2.95 nm, 2.50 nm, and 2.26 nm were formed. The coated surfaces showed advancing contact angles of 46° (uG and GM1.5) and 52° (GM4) without alteration of the surface roughness determined by AFM. Protein adsorption taking place on the coated surfaces was measured during contact of the surfaces with fetal calf serum by SPRS. Protein adsorption on the coated surfaces was reduced by the factor of 6.4 (uG), 5.4 (GM1.5), and 4.6 (GM4) compared to gold surfaces. Human fibroblasts cultured on the surfaces showed excellent viability shown by water soluble tetrazolium salt assay as well as live/dead staining with propidium iodide and fluorescein diacetate. No cytotoxic effects of the GM coated surfaces were observed, giving rise to the conclusion that GMs are suitable materials as coatings in cell culture. PMID:27177620

  9. System-level modeling and simulation of the cell culture microfluidic biochip ProCell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    -defined micro-channels using valves and pumps. We present an approach to the system-level modeling and simulation of a cell culture microfluidic biochip called ProCell, Programmable Cell Culture Chip. ProCell contains a cell culture chamber, which is envisioned to run 256 simultaneous experiments (viewed as a...

  10. A plasmacytoid dendritic cell (CD123+/CD11c-) based assay system to predict contact allergenicity of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A predictive allergenicity test system for assessing the contact allergenicity of chemicals is needed by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry to monitor product safety in the marketplace. Development of such non-animal alternative assay systems for skin sensitization and hazard identification has been pursued by policy makers and regulatory agencies. We investigated whether phenotypic and functional changes to a subset of dendritic cells (DC), plasmacytoid DC (pDC), could be used to identify contact allergens. To achieve this goal, normal human DC were generated from CD34+ progenitor cells and cryopreserved. Frozen DC were thawed and the pDC fraction (CD123+/CD11c-) was harvested using FACS sorting. The pDC were cultured, expanded, and exposed to chemical allergens (N = 26) or non-allergens (N = 22). Concentrations of each chemical that resulted in >50% viability was determined using FACS analysis of propidium iodide stained cells using pDC from 2 to 5 donors. Expression of the surface marker, CD86, which has been implicated in dendritic cell maturation, was used as a marker of allergenicity. CD86 expression increased (≥1.5-fold) for 25 of 26 allergens (sensitivity = 96%) but did not increase for 19 of 22 non-allergens (specificity = 86%). In a direct comparison to historical data for the regulatory approved, mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA) for 23 allergens and 22 non-allergens, the pDC method had sensitivity and specificity of 96% and 86%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the LLNA assay was 83% and 82%, respectively. In conclusion, CD86 expression in pDC appears to be a sensitive and specific indicator to identify contact allergenicity. Such an assay method utilizing normal human cells will be useful for high throughput screening of chemicals for allergenicity.

  11. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  12. The CsA washout assay to detect HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Amy E.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Uncoating is an early step of HIV-1 replication in which the viral capsid disassembles by p24 capsid (p24CA) protein dissociating from the viral complex. Although uncoating is required for HIV-1 replication, many questions remain about the mechanism of this process as well as its impact on other steps in viral replication. Here we describe a recently developed assay to study the process of uncoating in HIV-1 infected cells. The CsA washout assay is a cell based assay that utilizes the HIV-1 r...

  13. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity. PMID:27283981

  14. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity.

  15. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, JW; Lee, JK; Phillips, JW; Huang, P.; Cheng, D; J. Huang; Witte, ON

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a d...

  16. Interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with cultured epithelial cells: roles of surface structures in adhesion and invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Anne; House, Deborah; Perkins, Timothy; Baker, Stephen; Kingsley, Robert A.; Dougan, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    In this study we investigate the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) surface structures to influence invasion and adhesion in epithelial cell assay systems. In general, S. Typhi was found to be less adherent, invasive and cytotoxic than S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Culture conditions had little effect on adhesion of S. Typhi to cultured cells but had a marked influence on invasion. In contrast, bacterial growth conditions did not influence S. Typhi api...

  17. Nerve Growth Factor Modulate Proliferation of Cultured Rabbit Corneal Endothelial Cells and Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF.MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did.Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  18. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  19. RBC invasion and invasion-inhibition assays using free merozoites isolated after cold treatment of Babesia bovis in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Hayashida, Kyoko; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan hemoprotozoan that can invade bovine red blood cells (RBCs), where it multiplies asexually. RBC invasion assays using free viable merozoites are now routinely used to understand the invasion mechanism of B. bovis, and to evaluate the efficacy of chemicals and antibodies that potentially inhibit RBC invasion by the parasite. The application of high-voltage pulses (high-voltage electroporation), a commonly used method to isolate free merozoites from infected RBCs, reduces the viability of the merozoites. Recently, a cold treatment of B. bovis in vitro culture was found to induce an effective release of merozoites from the infected RBCs. In the present study, we incubated in vitro cultures of B. bovis in an ice bath to liberate merozoites from infected RBCs and then evaluated the isolated merozoites in RBC invasion and invasion-inhibitions assays. The viability of the purified merozoites (72.4%) was significantly higher than that of merozoites isolated with high-voltage electroporation (48.5%). The viable merozoites prepared with the cold treatment also invaded uninfected bovine RBCs at a higher rate (0.572%) than did merozoites prepared with high-voltage electroporation (0.251%). The invasion-blocking capacities of heparin, a polyclonal rabbit antibody directed against recombinant B. bovis rhoptry associated protein 1, and B. bovis-infected bovine serum were successfully demonstrated in an RBC invasion assay with the live merozoites prepared with the cold treatment, suggesting that the targets of these inhibitors were intact in the merozoites. These findings indicate that the cold treatment technique is a useful tool for the isolation of free, viable, invasion-competent B. bovis merozoites, which can be effectively used for RBC invasion and invasion-inhibition assays in Babesia research. PMID:26965399

  20. Analysis of three marine fish cell lines by rapd assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H R; Zhang, S C; Tong, S L; Xiang, J H

    2001-01-01

    We tested the applicability of the random amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (RAPD) analysis for identification of three marine fish cell lines FG, SPH, and RSBF, and as a possible tool to detect cross-contamination. Sixty commercial 10-mer RAPD primers were tested on the cell lines and on samples collected from individual fish. The results obtained showed that the cell lines could be identified to the correspondent species on the basis of identical patterns produced by 35-48% of the primers tested; the total mean similarity indices for cell lines versus correspondent species of individual fish ranged from 0.825 to 0.851, indicating the existence of genetic variation in these cell lines in relation to the species of their origin. Also, four primers, which gave a monomorphic band pattern within species/line, but different among the species/line, were obtained. These primers can be useful for identification of these cell lines and for characterization of the genetic variation of these cell lines in relation to the species of their origin. This supported the use of RAPD analysis as an effective tool in species identification and cross-contamination test among different cell lines. PMID:11573817

  1. Neural stem cell isolation and culture from C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Koirala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A widely used in vitro culture, the neurosphere assay (NSA has provided a means to retrospectively identify neural progenitor cells as well as to determine both their selfrenewal capacity. Objective of study was to isolate and compare growth of the embryonic neuronal stem cell and adult neuronal stem cells in presence of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and Fibroblastic Growth Factor (FGF2. MATERIALS AND METHODS Embryonic neuronal stem cell were collected from cortical plate of dorsal telencephalon of fifteen C57BL/6 transgenic mice using stereoscopic microscope on 11th gestational day (GD. Adult mammalian neuronal stem cells taken from subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were cultured. The growth for the neurosphere was then observed in interval of 24 and 72 hours. RESULT The adult stem cell culture showed few intact cells with high amount of debris and 9% heterogeneous sphere after 24 hours while only 20 % was observed at the end of 72 hours. Higher proliferation rate was observed in embryonic neurospheres than the adult stem cell culture. CONCLUSION Presence of EGF and basic FGF2 is essential for culture of neurospheres.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12946 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 1-3

  2. Radiotoxicity induced by auger electron emitters in human osteosarcoma cell line using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) was used to evaluate the radiotoxicity of Auger electron emitters in the human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603). After internal exposure to 67Ga-EDTMP, the sarcoma cell has been injured severely. The comet length was longer along with the increase of dose, the appearance of comet tail was different from that with respect to the 60Co γ-ray irradiation. DNA damage of cell was mainly due to the radiation effect of Auger electrons. The 67Ga may be a therapeutic radionuclide with good prospect for tumor treatment and palliation of bone pain induced by metastasis

  3. Radiotoxicity induced by Auger electron emitters in human osteosarcoma cell line using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yu-Jie; LI Qing-Nuan; ZHU Ran; ZHU Ben-Xing; ZHANG Yong-Ping; ZHANG Xiao-Dong; FAN Wo; HONG Cheng-Jiao; LI Wen-Xin

    2003-01-01

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) was used to evaluate the radiotoxicity of Augerelectron emitters in the human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603). After internal exposure to 67Ga-EDTMP, the sar-coma cell has been injured severely. The comet length was longer along with the increase of dose, the appearance ofcomet tail was different from that with respect to the 60Co γ-ray irradiation. DNA damage of cell was mainly due tothe radiation effect of Auger electrons. The 67Ga may be a therapeutic radionuclide with good prospect for tumortreatment and palliation of bone pain induced by metastasis.

  4. In vitro androgenetic cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L., H. albus L. and alkaloid content assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wesołwska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L. and H. albus L. anthers were initiated which resulted in obtaining androgenectic plants and callus cultures. The leaves of these pants and the callus cultures were subjected to analysis (TLC, GC for the presence of alkaloids, derivatives of tropane. In the studied material, alkaloids of different qualitative and quantitative composition from that of ground-grown plants were found.

  5. Radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis: limitations of metabolic viability based assays in measuring radiation induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many techniques based on metabolic viability of cells employing MTT and MTS assay are being widely used to measure the radiation and chemotherapeutics induced cell death, because of their high throughput capability. These assays are based on mitochondrial potential of cells to convert the substrate in to measurable products and remain dependent on this notion that all the cells untreated and treated will have equal mitochondrial content and metabolic potential. However, it is increasingly becoming clear that treatment induced changes in both mitochondrial content and metabolism can influence the metabolic viability of cells and radiation is a potential mitochondrial biogenesis inducer. Therefore, we tested if metabolic viability based assays are true measure of radiation induced cell death using the widely used cell lines like RAW264.7, HEK293, NIH3T3, J774.1, BMG-1, MDAMB231, MCF-7, A549 and HeLa. Cells were irradiated with gamma rays (60Co) and enumerated cell numbers (by hemocytometer) and metabolic viability using MTT assay at 24 and 48 hours after exposure. At all the absorbed doses (0-5 Gy), the extent of reduction in cell number was found to be larger than the decrease in formazan formation in all the cell lines tested. Further, this difference in the cell number and formazan formation varied significantly among the cell lines. To test if the increased formazan formation is due to increased mitochondrial content per cell, we analyzed the radiation induced mitochondrial biogenesis using mitochondria specific dye mitotracker red and found a 1.5 to 2 fold increase in mitochondrial content. These findings suggest that radiation induces mitochondrial biogenesis that enhances the metabolic potential leading to increased formazan formation. Therefore, conclusions drawn on radiation induced cytotoxicity based on metabolic viability assays are likely to be erroneous as it may not correlate with growth inhibition and/or loss of clonogenic survival. (author)

  6. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: A Breakthrough in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Antoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell culture is an important tool for biological research. Two-dimensional cell culture has been used for some time now, but growing cells in flat layers on plastic surfaces does not accurately model the in vivo state. As compared to the two-dimensional case, the three-dimensional (3D cell culture allows biological cells to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions thanks to an artificial environment. Cells grown in a 3D model have proven to be more physiologically relevant and showed improvements in several studies of biological mechanisms like: cell number monitoring, viability, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, response to stimuli, migration and invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, angiogenesis stimulation and immune system evasion, drug metabolism, gene expression and protein synthesis, general cell function and in vivo relevance. 3D culture models succeed thanks to technological advances, including materials science, cell biology and bioreactor design.

  7. Characterisation of the membrane transport of pilocarpine in cell suspension cultures of Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazza, Nathalia Luiza; Abreu, Ilka Nacif; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Pilocarpine is an alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus genus, with important pharmaceutical applications. Previous reports have investigated the production of pilocarpine by Pilocarpus microphyllus cell cultures and tried to establish the alkaloid biosynthetic route. However, the site of pilocarpine accumulation inside of the cell and its exchange to the medium culture is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the intracellular accumulation of pilocarpine and characterise its transport across membranes in cell suspension cultures of P. microphyllus. Histochemical analysis and toxicity assays indicated that pilocarpine is most likely stored in the vacuoles probably to avoid cell toxicity. Assays with exogenous pilocarpine supplementation to the culture medium showed that the alkaloid is promptly uptaken but it is rapidly metabolised. Treatment with specific ABC protein transporter inhibitors and substances that disturb the activity of secondary active transporters suppressed pilocarpine uptake and release suggesting that both proteins may participate in the traffic of pilocarpine to inside and outside of the cells. As bafilomicin A1, a specific V-type ATPase inhibitor, had little effect and NH4Cl (induces membrane proton gradient dissipation) had moderate effect, while cyclosporin A and nifedipine (ABC proteins inhibitors) strongly inhibited the transport of pilocarpine, it is believed that ABC proteins play a major role in the alkaloid transport across membranes but it is not the exclusive one. Kinetic studies supported these results. PMID:25474486

  8. Organ culture-cell culture system for studying multistage carcinogenesis in respiratory epithelium. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Vernon E.; Marchok, Ann C.; Nettesheim, Paul

    1977-01-01

    An organ culture-cell culture system was used to demonstrate carcinogen dose-dependent transformation of tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. Tracheal explants were exposed to MNNG (N-methyl-N/sup 1/-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) in organ culture. Outgrowths from these explants provided epithelial cell cultures. The numbers of long term epithelial cell cultures and cell lines that were established per explant increased as MNNG exposure concentration increased. At the present time, more cell lines derived from explants exposed to the highest MNNG concentration have produced palpable tumors than cell lines derived from explants exposed to lower MNNG concentrations. No cell lines were established from primaries derived from control explants. TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), stimulates DNA synthesis in tracheal epithelium in organ culture in a manner simular to that described for mouse skin. Short exposures to TPA not only stimulated DNA synthesis earlier, but the stimulation was greater than that obtained with continuous exposure. At the present time, exposure of tracheal organ cultures to MNNG followed by TPA has resulted in an enhanced production of morphologically altered cells in primary epithelial cell cultures, than exposure to either agent alone.

  9. Transfected muscle and non-muscle actins are differentially sorted by cultured smooth muscle and non-muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mounier, N.; Perriard, J. C.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Chaponnier, Christine

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed by immunolabeling the fate of exogenous epitope-tagged actin isoforms introduced into cultured smooth muscle and non-muscle (i.e. endothelial and epithelial) cells by transfecting the corresponding cDNAs in transient expression assays. Exogenous muscle actins did not produce obvious shape changes in transfected cells. In smooth muscle cells, transfected striated and smooth muscle actins were preferentially recruited into stress fibers. In non-muscle cells, exogenous striated ...

  10. Electrospinning of microbial polyester for cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV), a copolymer of microbial polyester, was fabricated as a nanofibrous mat by electrospinning. The specific surface area and the porosity of electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mat were determined. When the mechanical properties of flat film and electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mats were investigated, both the tensile modulus and strength of electrospun PHBV were less than those of cast PHBV film. However, the elongation ratio of nanofiber mat was higher than that of the cast film. The structure of electrospun nanofibers using PHBV-trifluoroethanol solutions depended on the solution concentrations. When x-ray diffraction patterns of bulk PHBV before and after electrospinning were compared, the crystallinity of PHBV was not significantly affected by the electrospinning process. Chondrocytes adhered and grew on the electrospun PHBV nanofibrous mat better than on the cast PHBV film. Therefore, the electrospun PHBV was considered to be suitable for cell culture

  11. The PCC assay can be used to predict radiosensitivity in biopsy cultures irradiated with different types of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential biomarkers for radiosensitivity using the relationship between cell killing and the yield of excess chromatin fragments detected with the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. This method was applied to primary cultured cells obtained from biopsies from patients. Six primary culture biopsies were obtained from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix before starting radiotherapy. The cultures were irradiated with two different LET carbon-ion beams (LET = 13 keV/microm, 77.1+/-2.8 keV/microm) and 200 kV X-rays. The carbon-ion beams were produced by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). PCC was performed using the polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion technique. The yield of excess chromatin fragments were measured by counting the number of unrejoined chromatin fragments detected with the PCC technique after a 24-h post-irradiation incubation period. Obtained results indicated that cultures which were more sensitive to killing were also more susceptible to the induction of excess chromatin fragments. Furthermore there was a good correlation between cell killing and excess chromatin fragments among the 6 cell cultures examined. There is also evidence that the induction of excess chromatin fragments increased with increasing LET as well as cell-killing effect in the same cell culture. The data reported here support the idea that the yield of excess chromatin fragments detected with the PCC technique might be useful for predicting the radiosensitivity of cells contained in tumor tissue, and to predict responses to different radiation types. PMID:17089052

  12. In vitro assays for predicting tumor cell response to radiation by apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We had previously shown that the rate of spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis was significantly greater in well-differentiated compared to anaplastic Dunning prostate carcinomas. The goal of this study was to define the most useful assay for quantifying radiation-induced apoptotic cell death and to determine if measured rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cell populations can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: The time course and extent of radiation-induced apoptosis after single doses of Cesium-137 gamma-rays were measured by five different assays. These included gross DNA degradation, nucleosome ladder formation, labeling of 3'-OH ends in DNA with an immunofluorescence probe, immunofluorescence vital stains (LIVE/DEAD[reg] EUKOLIGHTTM) and trypan blue. The majority of these studies were performed with DU-145 human prostate cells. Data was analyzed to determine the component of cell inactivation resulting from apoptosis with the modified linear quadratic equation, -1n (SF) = (αa + αp) D + βpD2, were αa represents cell inactivation by radiation-induced apoptosis, αp and βp represent cell death by proliferative mechanisms and D represents radiation dose. Results: These studies indicated that DU-145 cell death after radiation occurs over two distinct time periods. The first phase of death begins shortly after irradiation and plateaus within 16-24 hr. This process of cell death has properties consistent with apoptosis as determined by 3'-OH DNA end-labeling and nucleosome ladder assays. The second phase of cell death (determined by viability staining) begins approximately 48 hr after irradiation and continues until the remainder of inactivated cells express their death. This longer phase of cell inactivation probably represents proliferative cell death and other non-apoptotic mechanisms. The five different assays were performed on DU-145 cells 24 hr after irradiation with 10 Gy. Significant nucleosome ladders were

  13. A simple method to measure cell viability in proliferation and cytotoxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Carneiro Borra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resazurin dye has been broadly used as indicator of cell viability in several types of assays for evaluation of the biocompatibility of medical and dental materials. Mitochondrial enzymes, as carriers of diaphorase activities, are probably responsible for the transference of electrons from NADPH + H+ to resazurin, which is reduced to resorufin. The level of reduction can be quantified by spectrophotometers since resazurin exhibits an absorption peak at 600 ηm and resorufin at 570 ηm wavelengths. However, the requirement of a spectrophotometer and specific filters for the quantification could be a barrier to many laboratories. Digital cameras containing red, green and blue filters, which allow the capture of red (600 to 700 ηm and green (500 to 600 ηm light wavelengths in ranges bordering on resazurin and resorufin absorption bands, could be used as an alternative method for the assessment of resazurin and resorufin concentrations. Thus, our aim was to develop a simple, cheap and precise method based on a digital CCD camera to measure the reduction of resazurin. We compared the capability of the CCD-based method to distinguish different concentrations of L929 and normal Human buccal fibroblast cell lines with that of a conventional microplate reader. The correlation was analyzed through the Pearson coefficient. The results showed a strong association between the measurements of the method developed here and those made with the microplate reader (r² = 0.996; p < 0.01 and with the cellular concentrations (r² = 0.965; p < 0.01. We concluded that the developed Colorimetric Quantification System based on CCD Images allowed rapid assessment of the cultured cell concentrations with simple equipment at a reduced cost.

  14. Comparative SAXS and DSC study on stratum corneum structural organization in an epidermal cell culture model (ROC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Herre, Angela; Fahr, Alfred;

    2013-01-01

    SC barrier properties and high structural and organizational similarity to that of native human SC, ROC presents a promising alternative for in vitro studies, particularly as it can be obtained under overall rather straightforward cell culture conditions and thus low assay costs.......Cell cultured skin equivalents present an alternative for dermatological in vitro evaluations of drugs and excipients as they provide the advantage of availability, lower variability and higher assay robustness compared to native skin. For penetration/permeation studies, an adequate stratum corneum...... barrier similar to that of human stratum corneum is, however, a prerequisite. In this study, the stratum corneum lipid organization in an epidermal cell culture model based on rat epidermal keratinocytes (REK organotypic culture, ROC) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in dependence...

  15. A new microperfusion system for the cultivation of tumor-cells invitro - approach to integrate pharmacokinetic parameters in screening assays for cytostatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmel, S; Kinawi, A; Maurer, H

    1993-01-01

    By a newly introduced microperfusion system absorption and elimination rates can be simulated in vitro. This article describes the optimization of culture conditions (medium composition, membrane filters, pumping rates, and stirring speeds) of tumor cell lines (L1210, KB) maintained in suspension in an ultrafiltration-flat chamber. Viability and colony-forming ability are measured. Our results indicate that tumor cells can be cultured under serum-free conditions over a five hour incubation period with only minimal decrease in colony-forming ability. Survival of cells is independent from the pumping rate in the tested range, but is dependent of the stirring speed. Each cell line requires its own stirring speed. Ultrafiltration membranes with minimal nonspecific adsorption properties proved to be the best in terms of cell adsorption and toxicity to retain cells in the chamber. This system might improve the tumor cell colony assay for cytostatic drug screening. PMID:21573513

  16. Micronucleus assay prediction and application optimized by cytochalasin B-induced binucleated tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement in the predictive assertion of the micronucleus assay was achieved by treating human malignant melanoma cells (Mewo) with cytochalasin B (CB), generating binucleated cells (BNC) representing cells after a single karyokinesis. Optimal cell binucleation was determined by testing several cytochalasin B concentrations and different incubation times. On average, 56% binucleated cells were found after incubation with 2 to 3 μg/ml cytochalasin B for 48 h. Cells with at least one micronucleus (Mn) were defined as fraction of cells with micronuclei and describes the degree of damaged cells. We found in binucleated cells 2.2fold the fraction of cells with micronuclei than in mononucleated cells (MNC), as expected assuming that an induced micronucleus is associated with only one single daughter cell after mitosis. The mean of micronuclei per binucleated cells, however, was enhanced about 2.9fold in relation to that of micronuclei per mononucleated cells and is related to the nucelar damage per cell. The application of cytochalasin B did not enhance the fraction of damaged cells although the degree of the injury per cell is intensified. A micronuclei promoting or inhibiting effect of the experimental design due to changes in cell proliferation was excluded by cytofluorometric investigations of DNA content and synthesis after cytochalasin B application. A comparison of the modified with the conventional micronucleus assay shows the superiority of the former. (orig.)

  17. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  18. Patterning cell using Si-stencil for high-throughput assay

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    In this communication, we report a newly developed cell pattering methodology by a silicon-based stencil, which exhibited advantages such as easy handling, reusability, hydrophilic surface and mature fabrication technologies. Cell arrays obtained by this method were used to investigate cell growth under a temperature gradient, which demonstrated the possibility of studying cell behavior in a high-throughput assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  19. Automated image-based assay for evaluation of HIV neutralization and cell-to-cell fusion inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Özkaya Sahin, Gülsen; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Carpenter, Anne E.; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Standardized techniques to detect HIV-neutralizing antibody responses are of great importance in the search for an HIV vaccine. Methods Here, we present a high-throughput, high-content automated plaque reduction (APR) assay based on automated microscopy and image analysis that allows evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay. Neutralization of virus particles is measured as a reduction in the number of fluorescent plaques, and inhibition ...

  20. Applications of an improved quantitative in vitro assay for cell migration/invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A qualitative, in vitro assay of cell migration/invasion through basement membrane, a physiological barrier to normal and metastatic cells travelling to extravascular sites, has been developed. The method utilizes Indium-111-labeled cells and measures objectively (a) adherence to, (b) migration into and (c) migration through human amnion membrane. The assay was used successfully to measure human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and alveolar macrophage migration. Addition of protease inhibitors to assays of PMNL migration provided information which suggested that the protease human leukocytic elastase, plays a role in PMNL migration through physicological membranes. No consistent evidence, however, was obtained to support a direct role for oxygen radicals. Migration of peripheral blood PMNLs and alveolar macrophages of smokers and non-smokers was compared. No difference was observed. The relative invasiveness of two clones and two sublines of a murine fibrosarcoma cell line was also evaluated by the amnion assay. Differences were minimal and the reliability of the assay with the tumor cells is still uncertain. The relative invasion rates of the fibrosarcoma cells into the amnion membrane, however, were compared to the following in vivo properties of the same clones and sublines, with several other clones: (a) invasion rates of subcutaneous tumors into adjacent muscle, (b) collagenolytic activities in tumor homogenates, (c) metastatic potential, and (d) tumor growth rate. No definite conclusions could be drawn. Significant correlations between the collagenolytic activities and invasiveness supported a need for further investigation in this area

  1. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  2. Nanocrystalline diamond: In vitro biocompatibility assessment by MG63 and human bone marrow cells cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, M; Dias, A G; Gomes, P S; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Santos, J D; Fernandes, M H

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) has a great potential for prosthetic implants coating. Nevertheless, its biocompatibility still has to be better understood. To do so, we employed several materials characterization techniques (SEM, AFM, micro-Raman spectroscopy) and cell culture assays using MG63 osteoblast-like and human bone marrow cells. Biochemical routines (MTT assays, Lowry's method, ALP activity) supported by SEM and confocal microscopy characterization were carried out. We used silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates for NCD coatings based on a previous demonstration of the superior adhesion and tribological performance of these NCD coated ceramics. Results demonstrate an improved human osteoblast proliferation and the stimulation of differentiated markers, like ALP activity and matrix mineralization, compared with standard polystyrene tissue culture plates. The nanometric featuring of NCD, associated to its chemical affinity are key points for bone regeneration purposes. PMID:18085649

  3. HAIR CELL-LIKE CELL GENERATION INDUCED BY NATURE CULTURE OF ADULT RAT AUDITORY EPITHELIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hui; Zhu Hongliang; Li Shengli; Yao Xiaobao; Wang Xiaoxia

    2006-01-01

    Objective To establish adult rat auditory epithelial cell culture and try to find precursor cells of auditory hair cells in vitro. Methods With refinement of culture media and techniques, cochlear sensory epithelial cells of adult rat were cultured. Immunocytochemistry and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)labeling were used to detect properties and mitotic status of cultured cells. Results The cultured auditory epithelial cells showed a large, flat epithelial morphotype and expressed F-actin and cytokeratin, a subset of cells generated from auditory epithelium were labeled by calretinin, a specific marker of early hair cell. Conclusion Adult rat auditory epithelium can be induced to generate hair cell-like cells by nature culture, this phenomenon suggests that progenitor cells may exist in rat cochlea and they may give birth to new hair cells. Whether these progenitor cells are tissue specific stem cells is still need more study.

  4. A Systematic Comparison Identifies an ATP-Based Viability Assay as Most Suitable Read-Out for Drug Screening in Glioma Stem-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijn, A.; Kloezeman, J. J.; Balvers, R. K.; van der Kaaij, M.; Dirven, C. M. F.; Leenstra, S.; Lamfers, M. L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Serum-free culture methods for patient-derived primary glioma cultures, selecting for glioma stem-like cells (GSCs), are becoming the gold standard in neurooncology research. These GSCs can be implemented in drug screens to detect patient-specific responses, potentially bridging the translational gap to personalized medicine. Since numerous compounds are available, a rapid and reliable readout for drug efficacies is required. This can be done using approaches that measure viability, confluency, cytotoxicity, or apoptosis. To determine which assay is best suitable for drug screening, 10 different assays were systematically tested on established glioma cell lines and validated on a panel of GSCs. General applicability was assessed using distinct treatment modalities, being temozolomide, radiation, rapamycin, and the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD. The apoptosis and cytotoxicity assays did not unequivocally detect responses and were excluded from further testing. The NADH- and ATP-based viability assays revealed comparable readout for all treatments; however, the latter had smaller standard deviations and direct readout. Importantly, drugs that interfere with cell metabolism require alternative techniques such as confluency monitoring to accurately measure treatment effects. Taken together, our data suggest that the combination of ATP luminescence assays with confluency monitoring provides the most specific and reproducible readout for drug screening on primary GSCs.

  5. Usability and Applicability of Microfluidic Cell Culture Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette

    devices still lack general implementation into biological research laboratories. In this project, the usability and applicability of microfluidic cell culture systems have been investigated. The tested systems display good properties regarding optics and compatibility with standard laboratory equipment...... possibilities for, for example, precise control of the chemical environment, 3D cultures, controlled co-culture of different cell types or automated, individual control of up to 96 cell culture chambers in one integrated system. Despite the great new opportunities to perform novel experimental designs, these...... shown to be needed. This is possibly one of the reasons for the lack of implementation of microfluidic cell culture systems into biological research laboratories. Procedures to perform long-term microfluidic perfusion cell culture experiments have been established. Furthermore, successful application of...

  6. A method for isolating and culturing placental cells from failed early equine pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B V; Cabrera-Sharp, V; Firth, M J; Barrelet, F E; Bate, S; Cameron, I J; Crabtree, J R; Crowhurst, J; McGladdery, A J; Neal, H; Pynn, J; Pynn, O D; Smith, C; Wise, Z; Verheyen, K L P; Wathes, D C; de Mestre, A M

    2016-02-01

    Early pregnancy loss occurs in 6-10% of equine pregnancies making it the main cause of reproductive wastage. Despite this, reasons for the losses are known in only 16% of cases. Lack of viable conceptus material has inhibited investigations of many potential genetic and pathological causes. We present a method for isolating and culturing placental cells from failed early equine pregnancies. Trophoblast cells from 18/30 (60%) failed equine pregnancies of gestational ages 14-65 days were successfully cultured in three different media, with the greatest growth achieved for cells cultured in AmnioChrome™ Plus. Genomic DNA of a suitable quality for molecular assays was also isolated from 29/30 of these cases. This method will enable future investigations determining pathologies causing EPL. PMID:26907389

  7. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  8. The assessment of genotoxicity of carbamazepine using cytokinesis-block (CB) micronucleus assay in cultured human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ayla

    2006-01-01

    The genotoxic effect of CBZ has been investigated in few studies. There is little evidence linking carbamazepine (CBZ) with any genotoxic effects, particularly in vitro micronucleus test using cytogenesis-block technique. In this study, the genotoxicity of the antiepileptic drug, carbamazepine, was tested using cytokinesis-block (CB) micronucleus assay. In vitro analysis was performed in human blood lymphocytes from four healthy persons at five different concentrations of carbamazepine (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 microg/mL). Genotoxic potential and cytotoxic effects of carbamazepine were evaluated by using micronucleus assay and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI), called the parameter of cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures, respectively. The results of this study indicate that CBZ caused the genotoxic effect under in vitro conditions, except at the dose of 6 microg/mL, and cytotoxic effects of carbamazepine were revealed by a decrease in the cytokinesis-block proliferation index at all the concentrations. PMID:16707330

  9. Ultrastructural study of long-term canine distemper virus infection in tissue culture cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Narang, H K

    1982-01-01

    The morphogenesis of canine distemper virus was studied in Vero cell cultures for 43 days post-inoculation. Active replication of the virus was observed by electron microscopy and assay from 12 h after inoculation on, and peak production was observed on days 5, 14, and 22. From day 28 on, constant but smaller amounts of infectious virus were detected. Two ultrastructural types of intracytoplasmic nucleoprotein filaments were observed; although they first appeared at different times, their sub...

  10. Evaluation of peste des petits ruminants cell culture vaccine in sheep and goats in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors study the antibody response of a locally prepared live-attenuated peste des petits ruminants (PPR cell culture vaccine in sheep and goats. Antibodies were measured using the competitive enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. The vaccine was found to be safe and produced high serological titres within 21 days post vaccination. The serological titres remained high for one year post vaccination.

  11. A novel live cell assay to measure diacylglycerol lipase α activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Praveen K; Markwick, Rachel; Howell, Fiona V; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα) hydrolyses DAG to generate the principal endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the central nervous system. DAGLα dependent cannabinoid (CB) signalling has been implicated in numerous processes including axonal growth and guidance, adult neurogenesis and retrograde signalling at the synapse. Recent studies have implicated DAGLα as an emerging drug target for several conditions including pain and obesity. Activity assays are critical to the drug discovery process; however, measurement of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity using its native substrate generally involves low-throughput MS techniques. Some relatively high-throughput membrane based assays utilizing surrogate substrates have been reported, but these do not take into account the rate-limiting effects often associated with the ability of a drug to cross the cell membrane. In the present study, we report the development of a live cell assay to measure DAGLα activity. Two previously reported DAGLα surrogate substrates, p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl octanoate (DiFMUO), were evaluated for their ability to detect DAGLα activity in live cell assays using a human cell line stably expressing the human DAGLα transgene. Following optimization, the small molecule chromogenic substrate PNPB proved to be superior by providing lower background activity along with a larger signal window between transfected and parental cells when compared with the fluorogenic substrate DiFMUO. The assay was further validated using established DAGL inhibitors. In summary, the live cell DAGLα assay reported here offers an economical and convenient format to screen for novel inhibitors as part of drug discovery programmes and compliments previously reported high-throughput membrane based DAGL assays. PMID:27013337

  12. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  13. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  14. Mixture models for single-cell assays with applications to vaccine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finak, Greg; McDavid, Andrew; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Dominguez, Maria; De Rosa, Steve; Roederer, Mario; Gottardo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Blood and tissue are composed of many functionally distinct cell subsets. In immunological studies, these can be measured accurately only using single-cell assays. The characterization of these small cell subsets is crucial to decipher system-level biological changes. For this reason, an increasing number of studies rely on assays that provide single-cell measurements of multiple genes and proteins from bulk cell samples. A common problem in the analysis of such data is to identify biomarkers (or combinations of biomarkers) that are differentially expressed between two biological conditions (e.g. before/after stimulation), where expression is defined as the proportion of cells expressing that biomarker (or biomarker combination) in the cell subset(s) of interest. Here, we present a Bayesian hierarchical framework based on a beta-binomial mixture model for testing for differential biomarker expression using single-cell assays. Our model allows the inference to be subject specific, as is typically required when assessing vaccine responses, while borrowing strength across subjects through common prior distributions. We propose two approaches for parameter estimation: an empirical-Bayes approach using an Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a fully Bayesian one based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We compare our method against classical approaches for single-cell assays including Fisher's exact test, a likelihood ratio test, and basic log-fold changes. Using several experimental assays measuring proteins or genes at single-cell level and simulations, we show that our method has higher sensitivity and specificity than alternative methods. Additional simulations show that our framework is also robust to model misspecification. Finally, we demonstrate how our approach can be extended to testing multivariate differential expression across multiple biomarker combinations using a Dirichlet-multinomial model and illustrate this approach using single-cell gene

  15. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard E.; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C.; Zhang, Sean X.; Avornu, Gideon D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J.; Blyn, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. Disclaimer: The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States. PMID:27384540

  16. Progress in high-throughput assays of MGMT and APE1 activities in cell extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Polychronaki, Nektaria; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair activity is of interest as a potential biomarker of individual susceptibility to genotoxic agents. In view of the current trend for exploitation of large cohorts in molecular epidemiology projects, there is a pressing need for the development of phenotypic DNA repair assays that are high-throughput, very sensitive, inexpensive and reliable. Towards this goal we have developed and validated two phenotypic assays for the measurement of two DNA repair enzymes in cell extracts: (1) O(6...

  17. Improved assay for surface hydrophobic avidity of Candida albicans cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; LeMelle, W G

    1990-01-01

    A simple method that distinguishes among hydrophobic avidity levels of highly hydrophobic isolates of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is described. This method involves mixing polystyrene microspheres at different concentrations with a constant concentration of yeast cells and plotting the data in accordance with the Langmuir isotherm equation. A 10-fold difference between the C. albicans isolates with the lowest and highest avidity (KH) values was found. This method may also demonstra...

  18. Production of Genetically Engineered Biotinylated Interleukin-2 and Its Application in a Rapid Nonradioactive Assay for T-Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert A.; Preissler, Mark T.; Banas, Jeffrey A.; Gosselin, Edmund J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of reliable assay systems that can measure lymphocyte activation in vitro has been a major goal of immunodiagnostics. Traditionally, tritiated thymidine incorporation has been used to monitor T-cell activation. Other methods include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), enzyme-linked immunospot assay, and colorimetric assays. We have established a lymphocyte activation assay that utilizes fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-streptavidin bound to recombinant biotinylated hum...

  19. Hemolymph analysis and evaluation of newly formulated media for culture of shrimp cells (Penaeus stylirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, C; Shike, H; Klimpel, K R; Burns, J C

    2001-06-01

    Creation of a shrimp cell line has been an elusive goal. This failure may be due to the composition of the cell culture medium, which may be inadequate to support primary cultured cells. Shrimp hemolymph should contain the nutritional components needed to support cell growth and division. We report here the comprehensive biochemical analysis of hemolymph from the blue shrimp, Penaeus stylirostris (Litopenaeus stylirostris) (see Holthuis, L. B. Shrimps and prawns of the world, in: FAO species catalog. Vol. 1. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 1980), for free amino acids (FAAs), carbohydrates, electrolytes, metals, pH, and osmolality. Levels of hemolymph components were compared to 2xL-15 with 20% fetal bovine serum, a commonly used culture medium for crustacean cells. The FAAs, taurine and proline, and the metals, strontium and zinc, were significantly higher in hemolymph than in the 2 x L-15 medium. In contrast, other FAAs were up to 50 times higher in the 2 x L-15 medium than in the hemolymph. To mimic more closely the hemolymph composition, we created two new media based on either the 0.2 x L-15 or the M199 medium. We compared the microscopic appearance of cells cultured in these media and evaluated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein synthesis by 3H-thymidine uptake and 35S-methionine uptake assays. The ovary cells of P. stylirostris cultured in either of the new media formed monolayers, while the cells cultured in 2 x L-15 medium did not. Despite these differences, there was no evidence of sustained DNA or protein synthesis with any of the media. Future studies to establish a shrimp cell line should focus on analysis of the cell cycle and on overcoming the molecular blocks to cell division. PMID:11515962

  20. THE ALKALOID CYTISINE IN THE CELL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazaliev A.M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are vegetative establishments of complex and original structure with nitrous heterocycles in the basis. For a long time they drew researchers’ attention because of their unique and specific physiological effect on alive organisms. Not all the representatives of the globe’s flora contain these unique substances. Alkaloid cytisine is to be found mainly in the plants of the fabaceous family - Fabaceae. For the cytisine production the seeds of Thermopsis lanceolata R.Br (T. lanceolata R.Br and Cytisus laburnum (C. laburnum are used as a raw material. The object of the research is T. lanceolata cell culture. Sterile sprouts are used at the first stage of the experiment. Callus genesis is accompanied with dedifferentiation. It leads to the cellular organization simplification. Based on an important property of a plant cell, such as totipotency, there appears the formation of the “de novo” biosynthetic device. The cultivation algorithm consists of two basic stages: (i the cultivation conditions optimization of callus with a high level of the primary metabolites biosynthesis (Aspartat – lysine; (ii the research of cultivation chemical and physical factors influence on the secondary metabolite (cytisine biosynthesis and accumulation. During the cultivation the Murashige and Skoog classical recipe of nutrient medium will be used. Optimization of the cultivation conditions will concern the phytohormones, macro- and micronutrients content, as the purpose of optimization is the production of the determined high-level competence embriogenical callus. The main problem is genetic heterogeneity of a cellular population and instability of morpho-physiological processes. The correct management of higher plants cells population is possible at the synchronization of a cellular cycle phases. The references analysis has shown that it is almost impossible to synchronize cellular cycles in the culture of plant tissue. The application of chemical

  1. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced by tumor

  2. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawakami Minoru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest cells (NCCs are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA, we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  3. Inhibition on Telomerase Activity and Cytotoxic Effects by Cisplatin in Cultured Human Choroidal Melanoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Cheng; Zhongyao Wu; Jianliang Zheng; Guilan Lu; Jianhua Yan; Min Liu; Danping Huang; Jianxian Lin

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study the changes of telomerase activity and cytotoxic effects by Cisplatin;cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (CDDP) in cultured human choroidal melanoma.Material and Methods: The primary cultured human choroidal melanoma cells werecultured in the presence and absence of CDDP with different concentration and timerespectively. The toxic effects were evaluated by MTT and the level of telormarse wasdetected by PCR-ELISA assay. And the relationship between telomerase activity andcytotoxic effects were analyzed by a correlation analysis.Results: Following the increase of the concentration and the time of CDDP, graduallyrepressed telomerase activity was detected in cultured cells. Meanwhile, the restrain rateof the cells increased. The telomerase activity at 24h and 1μg/ml was repressedsignificantly compared with the control cells. However, the appearance of cell deathlagged behind the decreasing of telomerase.Conclusions: CDDP is an effective telomerase inhibitor in cultured choroidal melanomacells of human eyes, which presents concentration and time dependency and can causethe death of cultured cells.

  4. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  5. Comparison of the Binax NOW Flu A Enzyme Immunochromatographic Assay and R-Mix Shell Vial Culture for the 2003-2004 Influenza Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    The Binax NOW Flu A enzyme immunochromatographic assay was compared to viral culture with R-Mix shell vials for 455 nasal-wash or nasal-aspirate specimens. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the assay were 64.9%, 98.4%, 89.3%, and 93.2%, respectively. However, the assay sensitivity decreased significantly with increasing patient age. PMID:16333112

  6. Poly-L-lysine Prevents Senescence and Augments Growth in Culturing Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Seok Heo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess great therapeutic potential. Efficient in vitro expansion of MSCs is however necessary for their clinical application. The extracellular matrix (ECM provides structural and biochemical support to the surrounding cells, and it has been used as a coating substrate for cell culture. In this study, we have aimed to improve the functionality and stemness of MSCs during culture using poly-L-lysine (PLL. Functionality of MSCs was analysed by cell cycle analysis, differentiation assay, β-galactosidase staining, and RT-PCR. Furthermore, we assessed the global gene expression profile of MSCs on uncoated and PLL-coated plates. MSCs on PLL-coated plates exhibited a faster growth rate with increased S-phase and upregulated expression of the stemness markers. In addition, their osteogenic differentiation potential was increased, and genes involved in cell adhesion, FGF-2 signalling, cell cycle, stemness, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation were upregulated, compared to that of the MSCs cultured on uncoated plates. We also confirmed that MSCs on uncoated plates expressed higher β-galactosidase than the MSCs on PLL-coated plates. We demonstrate that PLL provides favourable microenvironment for MSC culture by reversing the replicative senescence. This method will significantly contribute to effective preparation of MSCs for cellular therapy.

  7. Uptake and Intracellular Activity of Moxifloxacin in Human Neutrophils and Tissue-Cultured Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Alvaro; García, Isabel; Ballesta, Sofía; Perea, Evelio J.

    1999-01-01

    The penetration by moxifloxacin of human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMN]) and tissue-cultured epithelial cells (McCoy cells) was evaluated by a fluorometric assay. At extracellular concentrations of 5 mg/liter, the cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratios (C/E) of moxifloxacin in PMN and McCoy cells were 10.9 ± 1.0 and 8.7 ± 1.0, respectively (20 min; 37°C). The uptake of moxifloxacin by PMN was rapid, reversible, nonsaturable (at extracellular concentrations ranging fro...

  8. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina;

    2007-01-01

    interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...... other surfaces tested. Cells cultured on Cr demonstrated reduced spreading and proliferation. In conclusion, Ta metal, as an alternative for Ti, can be considered as a promising biocompatible material, whereas further studies are needed to fully understand the role of Cr and its alloys in bone implants...

  9. Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grego, Sonia [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dougherty, Edward R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Alexander, Francis J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Auerbach, Scott S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Berridge, Brian R. [GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Bittner, Michael L. [Translational Genomics Research Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Casey, Warren [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cooley, Philip C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Dash, Ajit [HemoShear Therapeutics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Ferguson, Stephen S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fennell, Timothy R. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hawkins, Brian T. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hickey, Anthony J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kleensang, Andre [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing; Liebman, Michael N. [IPQ Analytics, Kennett Square, PA (United States); Martin, Florian [Phillip Morris International, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Maull, Elizabeth A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Paragas, Jason [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Qiao, Guilin [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Ft. Belvoir, VA (United States); Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Sumner, Susan J. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Yoon, Miyoung [The Hamner Inst. for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ScitoVation, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data. This consensus report summarizes the discussions held.

  10. Mechanism of initial attachment of cells derived from human bone to commonly used prosthetic materials during cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, C R; Evans, M D; Walsh, W R; Johnson, G; Steele, J G

    1994-02-01

    The suitability of polymeric biomaterials as surfaces for the attachment and growth of cells has often been investigated in cell culture. In this study the contribution that serum fibronectin (Fn) or vitronectin (Vn) make to the attachment and spreading of cells cultured from explanted human bone (bone-derived cells) during the first 90 min of culture was determined for metallic and ceramic surfaces. The requirement for Fn or Vn for attachment and spreading of bone-derived cells onto stainless steel 316 (SS), titanium (Ti) and alumina (Al2O3) and to polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) was directly tested by selective removal of Fn or Vn from the serum prior to addition to the culture medium. Attachment and spreading of bone-derived cells onto SS, Ti and Al2O3 surfaces were reduced by 73-83% when the cells were seeded in medium containing serum from which the Vn had been removed. Cell attachment and spreading on these surfaces when seeded in medium containing Fn-depleted serum (which contained Vn) were not reduced to the same extent as in the medium containing Vn-depleted serum. The bone-derived cells failed to attach to the surfaces to the same extent when seeded in medium containing serum depleted of both Vn and Fn. Our results show that for human bone-derived cells, the attachment and spreading of cells onto SS, Ti and Al2O3 as well as PET during the first 90 min of a cell culture attachment assay are a function of adsorption of serum Vn onto the surface. PMID:7515290

  11. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  12. Clausmarin A, Potential Immunosuppressant Revealed by Yeast-Based Assay and Interleukin-2 Production Assay in Jurkat T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitipreya Suauam

    Full Text Available Small-molecule inhibitors of Ca2+-signaling pathways are of medicinal importance, as exemplified by the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A. Using a yeast-based assay devised for the specific detection of Ca2+-signaling inhibitors, clausmarin A, a previously reported terpenoid coumarin, was identified as an active substance. Here, we investigated the likely mechanism of clausmarin A action in yeast and Jurkat T-cells. In the presence of 100 mM CaCl2 in the growth medium of Ca2+-sensitive Δzds1 strain yeast, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent alleviation of various defects due to hyperactivation of Ca2+ signaling, such as growth inhibition, polarized bud growth and G2 phase cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, clausmarin A inhibited the growth of Δmpk1 (lacking the Mpk1 MAP kinase pathway but not Δcnb1 (lacking the calcineurin pathway strain, suggesting that clausmarin A inhibited the calcineurin pathway as presumed from the synthetic lethality of these pathways. Furthermore, clausmarin A alleviated the serious defects of a strain expressing a constitutively active form of calcineurin. In the human Jurkat T-cell line, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-2 production and IL-2 gene transcription, as well as an inhibition of NFAT dephosphorylation. The effects of clausmarin A observed in both yeast and Jurkat cells are basically similar to those of FK506. Our study revealed that clausmarin A is an inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway, and that this is probably mediated via inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity. As such, clausmarin A is a potential immunosuppressant.

  13. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay. PMID:27552143

  14. Induced engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by tissue culture cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, W P; Sadoff, J C

    1988-01-01

    Engulfment of gonococci by mammalian tissue culture cells was examined as a model of the penetration of host cells in gonorrhea. Engulfment required viable organisms; killing the gonococci with heat or refrigeration abolished the process. Engulfment also required tissue culture cell microtubule- and microfilament-dependent movement; treating the cells with cytochalasin B (0.5 micrograms/ml) or demecolcine (Colcemid; Ciba-Geigy AG, Basel, Switzerland) (10 micrograms/ml) also prevented his proc...

  15. Increased exosome production from tumour cell cultures using the Integra CELLine Culture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J Paul; Court, Jacqueline; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2008-06-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted from most cell types, with documented immune-modulatory functions. Exosomes can be purified from cultured cells but to do so effectively, requires maintenance of cells at high density in order to obtain sufficient accumulation of exosomes in the culture medium, prior to purification. Whilst high density cultures can be achieved with cells in suspension, this remains difficult with adherent cells, resulting in low quantity of exosomes for subsequent study. We have used the Integra CELLine culture system, originally designed for hybridoma cultures, to achieve a significant increase in obtainable exosomes from adherent and non-adherent tumour cells. Traditional cultures of mesothelioma cells (cultured in 75 cm(2) flasks) gave an average yield of 0.78 microg+/-0.14 microg exosome/ml of conditioned medium. The CELLine Adhere 1000 (CLAD1000) flask, housing the same cell line, increased exosome yield approximately 12 fold to 10.06 microg+/-0.97 microg/ml. The morphology, phenotype and immune function of these exosomes were compared, and found to be identical in all respects. Similarly an 8 fold increase in exosome production was obtained from NKL cells (a suspension cell line) using a CELLine 1000 (CL1000) flask. The CELLine system also incurred ~5.5 fold less cost and reduced labour for cell maintenance. This simple culture system is a cost effective, useful method for significantly increasing the quantity of exosomes available from cultured cells, without detrimental effects. This tool should prove advantageous in future studies of exosome-immune modulation in cancer and other settings. PMID:18423480

  16. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  17. Inhibitory effect of mycoplasma-released arginase. Activity in mixed-lymphocyte and tumour cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Tscherning, T; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Lind, K

    1990-01-01

    inhibition can be reversed by addition of excess arginine to the culture medium. Antisera raised against non-fermenting, but not against fermenting, mycoplasma species block the inhibitory effect of MAE. SDS-PAGE separation of MAE disclosed a broad band at 60 kDa which contained arginase activity when...... assayed in MLC and cell proliferation culture. SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting and reaction with antisera raised against non-fermenting mycoplasma species demonstrated a band at 43 kDa common for these micro-organisms....

  18. Sensitivity to radiation of human normal, hyperthyroid, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of thyroid tissue removed surgically from 63 patients were cultured in vitro and X-irradiated to investigate the radiosensitivities of various types of thyroid epithelial cells. A total of 76 samples were obtained, including neoplastic cells from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) or follicular adenoma (FA), cells from hyperthyroidism (HY) patients, and normal cells from the surgical margins of PC and FA patients. Culturing of the cells was performed in a manner which has been shown to yield a predominance of epithelial cells. Results of colony formation assays indicated that cells from HY and FA patients were the least radiosensitive: when adjusted to the overall geometric mean plating efficiency of 5.5 %, the average mean lethal dose D0 was 97.6 cGy for HY cells, and 96.7 cGy and 94.3 cGy, respectively, for neoplastic and normal cells from FA patients. Cells from PC patients were more radiosensitive, normal cells having an adjusted average D0 of 85.0 cGy and PC cells a significantly (p = .001) lower average D0 of 74.4 cGy. After allowing for this variation by cell type, in vitro radiosensitivity was not significantly related to age at surgery (p = .82) or sex (p = .10). These results suggest that malignant thyroid cells may be especially radiosensitive. (author)

  19. Application of the comet assay in studies of programmed cell death (PCD in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Charzyńska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plants is an intensively investigated process. One of the main characteristics of PCD in both animal and plant organisms is the non-random, internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA, usually analysed using total DNA gel electrophoresis or TUNEL method. In this paper we present application of the "comet assay" (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis for detection of nDNA degradation in studies of PCD during plant life cycle. We analyzed three types of tissue: anther tapetum, endosperm and mesophyll which were prepared in different ways to obtain a suspension of viable cells (without cell walls. The comet assay gives a possibility of examination of the nDNA degradation in individual cell. This method is significant for studies of the plant tissue differentiation and senescence especially in the cases when it is not possible to isolate large number of cells at the same developmental stage.

  20. Observation of DNA damage of human hepatoma cells irradiated by heavy ions using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Mei Qiu; Wen-Jian Li; Xin-Yue Pang; Qing-Xiang Gao; Yan Feng; Li-Bin Zhou; Gao-Hua Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Now many countries have developed cancer therapy with heavy ions, especially in GSI (Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt, Germany),remarkable results have obtained, but due to the complexity of particle track structure, the basic theory still needs further researching. In this paper, the genotoxic effects of heavy ions irradiation on SMMC-7721 cells were measured using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). The information about the DNA damage made by other radiations such as X-ray, γ-ray, UV and fast neutron irradiation is very plentiful, while little work have been done on the heavy ions so far. Hereby we tried to detect the reaction of liver cancer cells to heavy ion using comet assay, meanwhile to establish a database for clinic therapy of cancer with the heavy ions.METHODS: The human hepatoma cells were chosen as the test cell line irradiated by 80Mev/u 20Ne10+ on HIRFL (China), the radiation-doses were 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gy,and then comet assay was used immediately to detect the DNA damages, 100-150 cells per dose-sample (30-50 cells were randomly observed at constant depth of the gel). The tail length and the quantity of the cells with the tail were put down. EXCEL was used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: We obtained clear images by comet assay and found that SMMC-7721 cells were all damaged apparently from the dose 0.5Gy to 8Gy (t-test: P<0.001, vs control).The tail length and tail moment increased as the doses increased, and the number of cells with tails increased with increasing doses. When doses were higher than 2Gy, nearly 100 % cells were damaged. Furthermore, both tail length and tail moment, showed linear equation.CONCLUSION: From the clear comet assay images, our experiment proves comet assay can be used to measure DNA damages by heavy ions. Meanwhile DNA damages have a positive correlation with the dose changes of heavy ions and SMMC-7721 cells have a great radiosensitivity to 20Ne10+.Different reactions

  1. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation for evaluating efficacy/toxicity of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Luis G.; Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Souza, Glauco; Killian, Thomas C.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    We used three dimensional cell cultures (3D) based on the magnetic levitation method (MLM) to evaluate cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT). First, we decorated Hep G2 and MDA-MB-321 cells with NanoShuttle by introducing it in the media and incubated overnight. Next day, we transferred the cells to a 6-well plate and placed a magnetic driver on the top of the plate to start levitation. We monitored the formation of the 3D cell culture by optical microscopy and after four days, we added the photosensitizer Photogem (PG) in the culture media in concentrations of 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25μg/ml. We incubated them for 24 hours, after that we washed the cultures with PBS and added fresh media. Samples were then illuminated for 600s using a 630nm LED-based device, generating light intensities of 30 mW/cm2 in a total light fluence of 18 J/cm2. Following the illumination, we added fresh media, and 30 hours later, the 3D structures were broken using a pipettor and the cells seeded in 96 well plates, 105 cells per well, with a magnetic drive placed on the bottom of the plate to create cell culture dots. After 24 hours, we used a MTT assay to evaluate PDT cytotoxicity. The PDT effect, evaluated by the half maximal effective concentration (EC50), in MDA-MB-231 cells (EC50 =3.14 μg/ml) is more aggressive compared to the effect of PDT in Hep G2 cells (EC50 = 7.48 μg/ml). It suggests that the cell culture structure and its interaction facilitated the PG uptake and consequently elevated the Photodynamic effect for MDA-MB-231.

  2. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A.; Sams, Clarence; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical rotating cell-culture vessel with thin culture-medium layer of large surface area provides exchange of nutrients and products of metabolism with minimal agitation. Rotation causes averaging of buoyant forces otherwise separating components of different densities. Vessel enables growth of cells in homogeneous distribution with little agitation and little shear stress.

  3. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    ammonium malate) or on NO3−-N alone. Dry weight yield was proportional to the amount of nitrate-N added (47 mg/mg N). Filtered suspension cultures containing single cells (plating cultures) could be grown in agar in petri dishes when NAA or 2,4-D were used as growth substances. Cells grew at densities...

  4. Batch variation between branchial cell cultures: An analysis of variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Grosell, M.; Kristensen, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present in detail how a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to sort out the effect of an unexpected batch-to-batch variation between cell cultures. Two separate cultures of rainbow trout branchial cells were grown on permeable filtersupports ("inserts"). They were supposed to be...

  5. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products §...

  6. Simultaneous Measurement of Growth and Movement of Cells Exploiting On-Chip Single-Cell Cultivation Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Senkei; Hattori, Akihiro; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yasuda, Kenji

    2004-03-01

    We have developed an on-chip single-cell microcultivation assay as a means of simultaneously observing the growth and movement of single bacterial cells during long-term cultivation. This assay enables the direct observation of single cells captured in microchambers fabricated on thin glass slides and having semipermeable membrane lids, in which the cells can swim within the space without escape for the long periods. Using this system, the relationship between the cell cycle and the tendency of movement was observed and it was found that the mean free path length did not change during the cell cycle, and that the growth and the swimming were not synchronized. The result indicates that the ability of movement of the cells was independent of the cell cycle.

  7. Comparison of defined culture systems for feeder cell free propagation of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akopian, Veronika; Andrews, Peter W.; Beil, Stephen; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brehm, Jennifer; Christie, Megan; Ford, Angela; Fox, Victoria; Gokhale, Paul J; Healy, Lyn; Holm, Frida; Hovatta, Outi; Knowles, Barbara B; Ludwig, Tenneille E; Ronald D G McKay

    2010-01-01

    There are many reports of defined culture systems for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the absence of feeder cell support, but no previous study has undertaken a multi-laboratory comparison of these diverse methodologies. In this study, five separate laboratories, each with experience in human embryonic stem cell culture, used a panel of ten embryonic stem cell lines (including WA09 as an index cell line common to all laboratories) to assess eight cell culture methods, with pr...

  8. Characterization of Berberine on Human Cancer Cells in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    SZETO, Savio

    2002-01-01

    Berberine originates from a Chinese herbal medicine and possesses a wide variety of anti-cancer activities. In this study, the killing effect of berberine on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (NPC/HK1) was investigated. The trypan blue exclusion assay was used to assess the cytotoxic effect of berberine in this cell line. Berberine, at 5-200 µM, induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with 200 µM berberine for 5 h yielded a lethal dose of 50% (LD50). The Comet Assay was...

  9. Autophagic response to cell culture stress in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Siân; Swamy, Sushma; Hewitt, Zoe; Wood, Andrew; Weightman, Richard; Moore, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is an important conserved cellular process, both constitutively as a recycling pathway for long lived proteins and as an upregulated stress response. Recent findings suggest a fundamental role for autophagic processes in the maintenance of pluripotent stem cell function. In human embryonic stem cells (hESCS), autophagy was investigated by transfection of LC3-GFP to visualize autophagosomes and with an antibody to LC3B protein. The presence of the primary cilium (PC) in hESCs as the site of recruitment of autophagy-related proteins was also assessed. HESCs (mShef11) in vitro displayed basal autophagy which was upregulated in response to deprivation of culture medium replacement. Significantly higher levels of autophagy were exhibited on spontaneous differentiation of hESCs in vitro. The PC was confirmed to be present in hESCs and therefore may serve to coordinate autophagy function. PMID:26385182

  10. Comparative genotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by a flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    Two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, and flow cytometry techniques were evaluated as tools for rapid screening of potential genotoxicity of food-related nanosilver. Comparative genotoxic potential of 20 nm silver was evaluated in HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures by a flow cytometric-based in vitro micronucleus assay. The nanosilver, characterized by the dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis, showed no agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the uptake of 20 nm silver by both cell types. The 20 nm silver exposure of HepG2 cells increased the concentration-dependent micronucleus formation sevenfold at 10 µg ml(-1) concentration in attached cell conditions and 1.3-fold in cell suspension conditions compared to the vehicle controls. However, compared to the vehicle controls, the 20 nm silver exposure of Caco2 cells increased the micronucleus formation 1.2-fold at a concentration of 10 µg ml(-1) both in the attached cell conditions as well as in the cell suspension conditions. Our results of flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay appear to suggest that the HepG2 cells are more susceptible to the nanosilver-induced micronucleus formation than the Caco2 cells compared to the vehicle controls. However, our results also suggest that the widely used in vitro models, HepG2 and Caco2 cells and the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay are valuable tools for the rapid screening of genotoxic potential of nanosilver and deserve more careful evaluation. PMID:25224830

  11. The potential value of the neutral comet assay and γH2AX foci assay in assessing the radiosensitivity of carbon beam in human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon ions (12C6+) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The assessment of tumour radiosensitivity would be particularly useful in optimizing the radiation dose during radiotherapy. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential value of the neutral comet assay and γH2AX foci assay in assessing 12C6+ radiosensitivity of tumour cells. The doses of 12C6+ and X-rays used in the present study were 2 and 4 Gy. The survival fraction, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and repair kinetics of DSB were assayed with clonogenic survival, neutral comet assay and γH2AX foci assay in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma MEC-1 cells at the time points of 0.5, 4, 16 and 24 h after 12C6+ and X-rays irradiation. The survival fraction for 12C6+ irradiation was much more inhibited than for X-rays (p < 0.05) in all three tumour cell lines tested. Substantial amounts of residual damage, assessed by the neutral comet assay, were present after irradiation (p < 0.05). The highest residual damage was observed at 0.5 or 4 h, both for 12C6+ and X-ray irradiation. However, the residual damage in HeLa and MEC-1 cells was higher for 12C6+ than X-rays (p < 0.05). The strongest induction of γH2AX foci was observed after 30 min, for all three tumour cell lines (p < 0.01). The franction of γH2AX foci persisted for at least 24 h after 12C6+ irradiation; in HeLa cells and MEC-1 was higher than after X-ray irradiation (p < 0.05). The correlation coefficients between the clonogenic survival, neutral comet assay and γH2AX foci assay were not statistically significant, except for some tumour cells at individual irradiation doses and types. Our study demonstrated that the neutral comet assay and γ-H2AX foci assay could be used to assess the radiosensitivity of 12C6+ in human tumour cells

  12. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  13. Recent developments in cell-based assays and stem cell technologies for Botulinum neurotoxin research and drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kiris, Erkan; Kota, Krishna P.; James C. Burnett; Soloveva, Veronica; Kane, Christopher D.; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are exceptionally potent inhibitors of neurotransmission, causing muscle paralysis and respiratory failure associated with the disease botulism. Currently, no drugs are available to counter intracellular BoNT poisoning. To develop effective medical treatments, cell-based assays provide a valuable system to identify novel inhibitors in a time- and cost-efficient manner. Consequently, cell-based systems including immortalized cells, primary neurons, and stem-cell d...

  14. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  15. A novel parameter, cell-cycle progression index, for radiation dose absorbed estimation in the premature chromosome condensation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) assay is a simple and useful method for assessing the cell-cycle distribution in cells, since calyculin A induces chromosome condensation in various phases of the cell cycle. In this study, a novel parameter, the cell-cycle progression index (CPI), in the PCC assay was validated as a novel bio-marker for bio-dosimetry. Peripheral blood was drawn from healthy donors after informed consent was obtained. CPI was investigated using a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) ex vivo irradiation (60Co-gamma rays: ∼0.6 Gy min-1, or X ray: 1.0 Gy min-1; 0-10 Gy) model. The calyculin A-induced PCC assay was performed for chromosome preparation. PCC cells were divided into the following five categories according to cell-cycle stage: non-PCC, G1-PCC, S-PCC, G2/M-PCC and M/A-PCC cells. CPI was calculated as the ratio of G2/M-PCC cells to G1-PCC cells. The PCC-stage distribution varied markedly with irradiation doses. The G1-PCC cell fraction was significantly reduced, and the G2/M-PCC cell fraction increased, in 10-Gy-irradiated PBL after 48 h of culture. CPI levels were fitted to an exponential dose-response curve with gamma-ray irradiation [y = 0.6729 + 0.3934 exp(0.5685D), r = 1.0000, p < 0.0001] and X-ray irradiation [y = -0.3743 + 0.9744 exp(0.3321D), r = 0.9999, p < 0.0001]. There were no significant individual (p = 0.853) or gender effects (p = 0.951) on the CPI in the human peripheral blood ex vivo irradiation model. Furthermore, CPI measurements are rapid (< 15 min per case). These results suggest that the CPI is a useful screening tool for the assessment of radiation doses received ranging from 0 to 10 Gy in radiation exposure early after a radiation event, especially after a mass-casualty radiological incident. (authors)

  16. Establishment of a high content assay for the identification and characterisation of bioactivities in crude bacterial extracts that interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Nickels A; Gerth, Klaus; Grotjohann, Tim; Kapp, Dieter; Keck, Matthias; Niehaus, Karsten

    2009-03-10

    High content microscopy as a screening tool to identify bioactive agents has provided researchers with the ability to characterise biological activities at the level of single cells. Here, we describe the development and the application of a high content screening assay for the identification and characterisation of cytostatic bioactivities from Myxobacteria extracts. In an automated microscopy assay Sf9 insect cells were visualised utilising the stains bisbenzimide Hoechst 33342, calcein AM, and propidium iodide. Imaging data were processed by the ScanR Analysis-software to determine the ploidy and vitality of each cell and to quantify cell populations. More than 98% of the Sf9 cells were viable and the culture consisted of diploid ( approximately 30%), tetraploid ( approximately 60%), polyploidic (colchicine, paclitaxel, and cytochalasin D induced changes in ploidy and vitality, which were characteristic for the respective bioactive substance. Furthermore, crude extracts from the chivosazole producing Myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 induced an increase of polyploid cells and a decrease in total cell count, while a mutant producing nearly no chivosazole triggered none of these effects. Purified chivosazole induced the same effects as the wild type extract. Similar effects have been observed for the reference compound cytochalasin D. On the basis of this assay, crude extracts of ten different Myxobacteria cultures were screened. Three extracts exhibited strong cytotoxic activities, further five extracts induced weak changes in the ploidy distribution, and two extracts showed no detectable effect within the assay. Therefore, this robust assay provides the ability to discover and characterise cytotoxic and cytostatic bioactivities in crude bacterial extracts. PMID:19111838

  17. A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens on human blood cells was developed and evaluated using sera from multitransfused nonleukemic patients sensitized against HLA antigens. The binding assay was found to be reproducible and more sensitive than conventional HLA testing. Seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and two patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia successfully treated by chemotherapy were than investigated. Sera from seven of the patients studied in partial or complete remission demonstrated significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow or peripheral blood. In two cases sera taken during the leukemic stage demonstrated the most pronounced binding to the patients' own leukemic cells. Sera from four patients with demonstrable significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells failed to bind to autochthonous remission cells when both types of target cells were tested in parallel. Differences in serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgM were not the cause of the demonstrated increased binding of leukemic sera to autochthonous target cells. We propose that the 125I-protein A-binding assay presented in this paper detects antibodies reacting selectively with acute leukemia cells. (orig.)

  18. A comparative study of Mono Mac 6 cells, isolated mononuclear cells and Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay in pyrogen testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Lise; Jensen, S; Hansen, E W;

    1999-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus was comparable to that of MNC. Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans induced IL-6 in isolated MNC, but not in MM6. The detection limit for Salmonella typhimurium in the MM6 assay was comparable to that of the LAL assay. As expected, S. aureus and C. albicans did not show any LAL activity....... A. niger and Influenza virus showed some activity in the LAL test, but could not be detected by MM6 cells. In conclusion, the MM6 assay is a good supplement to the current pyrogen assays for detection of LPS, S. aureus and S. typhimurium, but the MM6 assay could not detect A. niger, C. albicans and...

  19. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  20. PECULIARITIES OF SECONDARY METABOLITES BIOSYNTHESIS IN PLANT CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. NOSOV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available metabolites formation in plant cell cultures of Panax spp., (ginsenosides; Dioscorea deltoidea (steroid glycosides; Ajuga reptans, Serratula coronata, Rhaponticum carthamoides (ecdisteroids; Polyscias spp., (triterpene glycosides, Taxus spp. (taxoids, Stevia rebaudiana (diterpene steviol-glycosides, Stephania glabra (alkaloids. They are some regular trends of secondary metabolites synthesis in the plant cell culture:It can be noted the stable synthesis of the compound promoting cell proliferation. Indeed, cell cultures of Dioscorea deltoidea were demonstrated to accumulate only furostanol glycosides, which promoted cell division. Furostanol glycoside content of Dioscorea strain DM-0.5 was up to 6 - 12% by dry biomass.Panax ginseng and P. japonicus plant cell cultures synthesize as minimum seven triterpene glycosides (ginsenosides, the productivity of these compounds was up to 6.0 - 8.0% on dry biomass.By contrast, the detectable synthesis of diterpene steviol-glycosides in cultivated cells of Stevia rebaudiana initiated in the mixotrophic cultures during chloroplast formation only.Despite these differences, or mainly due to them, plant cell cultures have become an attractive source of phytochemicals in alternative to collecting wild plants. It provides a guideline to bioreactor-based production of isoprenoids using undifferentiated plant cell cultures

  1. Cytotoxicity assessment of antibiofouling compounds and by-products in marine bivalve cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domart-Coulon, I; Auzoux-Bordenave, S; Doumenc, D; Khalanski, M

    2000-06-01

    Short-term primary cell cultures were derived from adult marine bivalve tissues: the heart of oyster Crassostrea gigas and the gill of clam Ruditapes decussatus. These cultures were used as experimental in vitro models to assess the acute cytotoxicity of an organic molluscicide, Mexel-432, used in antibiofouling treatments in industrial cooling water systems. A microplate cell viability assay, based on the enzymatic reduction of tetrazolium dye (MTT) in living bivalve cells, was adapted to test the cytotoxicity of this compound: in both in vitro models, toxicity thresholds of Mexel-432 were compared to those determined in vivo with classic acute toxicity tests. The clam gill cell model was also used to assess the cytotoxicity of by-products of chlorination, a major strategy of biofouling control in the marine environment. The applications and limits of these new in vitro models for monitoring aquatic pollutants were discussed, in reference with the standardized Microtox test. PMID:10806375

  2. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monuki Edwin S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  3. Follicle stimulating hormone increases spermatogonial stem cell colonization during in vitro co - culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Narenji Sani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of spermatogenesis is regulated by various factors. Studies onspermatogonial stem cells(SCCshave provided very important tool to improve herd geneticand different field. 0.2 to 0.3 percent of total cells of seminiferous tubules is consist ofspermatogonial stem cells. To investigate and biomanipulation of these cells, proliferationand viability rate of cells should be increasedin vitro, at first. Follicle stimulating hormone(FSH has been suggested to play a determinant role in the survival of germ cells in additionto increasing spermatogonial proliferation. In this study, thein vitroeffects ofFSHonspermatogonial cell colony formation were investigated. Sertoli and spermatogonial cellswere isolated from 3-5 months old calves. The identity of theSertoli cells and spermatogonialstem cells were confirmed through immunocytochemistry and colony morphology,respectively. Co-cultured Sertoli and spermatogonial cells were treatedwithFSHin differentdose of10, 20 and 40 IU mL-1FSH, before colony assay.Results indicated that,FSHincreasedin vitrocolonization of spermatogonial cells in comparison with control group. In conclusion,usingFSHprovided proper bovine spermatogonial stem cell culture medium forin vitrostudy of these cells.

  4. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  5. A co-cultured skin model based on cell support membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue engineering of skin based on collagen: PCL biocomposites using a designed co-culture system is reported. The collagen: PCL biocomposites having collagen: PCL (w/w) ratios of 1:4, 1:8, and 1:20 have been proven to be biocompatible materials to support both adult normal human epidermal Keratinocyte (NHEK) and mouse 3T3 fibroblast growth in cell culture, respectively, by Dai, Coombes, et al. in 2004. Films of collagen: PCL biocomposites were prepared using non-crosslinking method by impregnation of lyophilized collagen mats with PCL/dichloromethane solutions followed by solvent evaporation. To mimic the dermal/epidermal structure of skin, the 1:20 collagen: PCL biocomposites were selected for a feasibility study of a designed co-culture technique that would subsequently be used for preparing fibroblast/biocomposite/keratinocyte skin models. A 55.3% increase in cell number was measured in the designed co-culture system when fibroblasts were seeded on both sides of a biocomposite film compared with cell culture on one surface of the biocomposite in the feasibility study. The co-culture of human keratinocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts on each side of the membrane was therefore studied using the same co-culture system by growing keratinocytes on the top surface of membrane for 3 days and 3T3 fibroblasts underneath the membrane for 6 days. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunohistochemistry assay revealed good cell attachment and proliferation of both human keratinocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts with these two types of cells isolated well on each side of the membrane. Using a modified co-culture technique, a co-cultured skin model presenting a confluent epidermal sheet on one side of the biocomposite film and fibroblasts populated on the other side of the film was developed successfully in co-culture system for 28 days under investigations by SEM and immunohistochemistry assay. Thus, the design of a co-culture system based on 1:20 (w/w) collagen: PCL biocomposite

  6. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26287450

  7. Use of sensitive, broad-spectrum molecular assays and human airway epithelium cultures for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Pyrc

    Full Text Available Rapid and accurate detection and identification of viruses causing respiratory tract infections is important for patient care and disease control. Despite the fact that several assays are available, identification of an etiological agent is not possible in ~30% of patients suffering from respiratory tract diseases. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to develop a diagnostic set for the detection of respiratory viruses with sensitivity as low as 1-10 copies per reaction. Evaluation of the assay using a training clinical sample set showed that viral nucleic acids were identified in ~76% of cases. To improve assay performance and facilitate the identification of novel species or emerging strains, cultures of fully differentiated human airway epithelium were used to pre-amplify infectious viruses. This additional step resulted in the detection of pathogens in all samples tested. Based on these results it can be hypothesized that the lack of an etiological agent in some clinical samples, both reported previously and observed in the present study, may result not only from the presence of unknown viral species, but also from imperfections in the detection methods used.

  8. Bioactivities of Culture Supernatants from Retroviral Packaging Cells Carrying the Mouse Fas Ligand Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lingbo; ZOU Ping; GUO Rong; XIAO Juan; XU Zhiliang

    2001-01-01

    The bioactivities of culture supernatants from retroviral packaging cells carrying the mouse Fas ligand (mFasL) gene was investigated. FasLcDNA was cloned into PLXIN with an internal ribosome entry site to link two cistrons through gene recombination technology, PLXIN and the recombinant vector PLFIN were separately transfected into PA317 retrovirus packing cell line by lipofectamine 2000, and the resistant clones were selected with G418 selective medium. The integration of genome DNA was assayed by genomic DNA PCR. NIH3T3 cells were transduced by the culture supernatants from PA317 carrying the mFasLcDNA gene, and were selected with G418 selective medium, so as to select the PLFIN-PA317 clone capable of producing higher titer of supernatants. The levels of mFasL protein on NIH3T3 cells membrane were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM). The biological activity of mFasL on NIH3T3 cells membrane was investigated by the inducing apoptosis of Fas+ Yac-1 cells co-cultured with NIH3T3 cells expressing Fas ligand. To explore the direct mFasL cytotoxicity of culture supernatants from retroviral packaging cells carrying the mFasL gene, the culture supernatants from PLFIN-PA317 and PLXIN-PA317 were separately co-cultured with Yac-1cells in parallel. The recombinant PLFIN was successfully constructed. The highest titer of supernatants from twelve resistant clones was 8. 5 × 105 colony-forming-unit (CFU)/ml. The NIH3T3cells transfected by above supernatants had a higher level of mFasL (53.81±6.9 %), and significantly induced the apoptosis of Fas+ Yac-1 cells (56. 78±4.5 %), as both were cocultured for 5 h at1 : 1 ratio, whereas it is 7. 08±3.4 % in control group (P<0. 01). Supernatant from PLFINPA317 could also directly induce the apoptosis of Yac-1 within 5 h of incubation. Thus, the culture supernatants from PLFIN-PA317 possessed both infectivity and cytotoxicity of mFasL.

  9. In vivo Comet assay – statistical analysis and power calculations of mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Dybdahl, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo Comet assay is a sensitive method for evaluating DNA damage. A recurrent concern is how to analyze the data appropriately and efficiently. A popular approach is to summarize the raw data into a summary statistic prior to the statistical analysis. However, consensus on which summary...... statistic to use has yet to be reached. Another important consideration concerns the assessment of proper sample sizes in the design of Comet assay studies. This study aims to identify a statistic suitably summarizing the % tail DNA of mice testicular samples in Comet assay studies. A second aim is to......-97-5, CAS no. 85-28-9, CAS no. 13674-87-8, CAS no. 43100-38-5 and CAS no. 60965-26-6. Testicular cells were examined using the alkaline version of the Comet assay and the DNA damage was quantified as % tail DNA using a fully automatic scoring system. From the raw data 23 summary statistics were examined. A...

  10. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of Euphorbia hirta in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwan Yuet Ping; Ibrahim Darah; Yeng Chen; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity activity of Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay. Methods: The cytotoxicity of E. hirta extract was investigated by employing brine shrimp lethality assay and the genotoxicity of E. hirta was assessed by using Comet assay. Results: Both toxicity tests exhibited significant toxicity result. In the comet assay, the E. hirta extract exhibited genotoxicity effects against MCF-7 DNA in a time-dependent manner by increasing mean percentage of DNA damage. The extract of E. hirta showed significant toxicity against brine shrimp with an LC50 value of 620.382 μg/mL (24 h). Comparison with positive control potassium dichromate signifies that cytotoxicity exhibited by the methanol extract might have moderate activity. Conclusion:The present work confirmed the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of E. hirta. However, the observed toxicity of E. hirta extracts needs to be confirmed in additional studies.

  11. A simple assay for agonist-regulated Cl and K conductances in salt-secreting epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venglarik, C.J.; Bridges, R.J.; Frizzell, R.A. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We developed a convenient flux assay that permits simultaneous measurement of Cl and K conductance pathways in Cl-secreting epithelial cells. Monolayers of the colonic tumor cell line T84 were preloaded with 125I and 86Rb, and isotope effluxes were monitored by a sample-replace procedure. The adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated agonists forskolin and prostaglandin E2 increased I efflux with little effect on Rb efflux, whereas the Ca-mediated agonists ionomycin, A23187, and carbachol increased both I and Rb effluxes. Simultaneous determinations of I and Cl or Rb and K effluxes indicated that I and Rb provide good measures of the effluxes of Cl and K, respectively. Forskolin- and ionomycin-stimulated I effluxes were inhibited by the Cl-channel blockers diphenylamine-2-dicarboxylate (DPC), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropyl-amino)benzoic acid (NPPB), and 2-(cyclopentyl-6,7-dichloro-2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-1-oxo-1H- inden-5-yl-oxy)acetic acid (IAA-94) and by high external K. The Rb efflux evoked by ionomycin was inhibited by the K-channel blockers Ba and charybdotoxin. These findings suggest that I and Rb effluxes provide qualitative estimates of agonist-stimulated Cl and K conductance pathways. Thus this method can provide a simple and relatively inexpensive screening assay for Cl and K conductances in cultured cells to assess the effects of agonist, blockers, or genetic manipulations.

  12. Culturing of PC12 Cells, Neuronal Cells, Astrocytes Cultures and Brain Slices in an Open Microfluidic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya; Rømer Sørensen, Ane;

    culturing PC12 cells, neuronal cells, astrocytes cultures and brain slices. The microfluidic system provides efficient nutrient delivery, waste removal, access to oxygen, fine control over the neurochemical environment and access to modern microscopy. Additionally, the setup consists of an in vitro...

  13. 3D cell cultures of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells are radiosensitized by the focal adhesion kinase inhibitor TAE226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main player in integrin signaling and survival, is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and therefore postulated as potential target in cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing potential of the FAK inhibitor TAE226 in three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell cultures. Materials and methods: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (FaDu, UT-SCC15, UT-SCC45), lung cancer cells (A549), colorectal carcinoma cells (DLD-1, HCT-116) and pancreatic tumor cells (MiaPaCa2, Panc1) were treated with different concentrations of TAE226 (0-1 μm; 1 or 24 h) without or in combination with irradiation (0-6 Gy, X-ray, single dose). Subsequently, 3D clonogenic survival assays (laminin-rich extracellular matrix) and Western blotting (expression/phosphorylation, e.g. FAK, Akt, ERK1/2) were performed. Results: All investigated 3D cell cultures showed a dose-dependent reduction in clonogenic survival by TAE226. Intriguingly, TAE226 only significantly radiosensitized 3D HNSCC cell cultures accompanied by a pronounced dephosphorylation of FAK, Akt and ERK1/2. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate TAE226 as potent FAK inhibitor that enhances the cellular radiosensitivity particularly of HNSCC cells grown in a 3D cell culture model. Future in vitro and in vivo investigations will clarify, to which extent this approach might be clinically relevant for radiotherapy of HNSCC.

  14. Effects of external radiation in a co-culture model of endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inflammatory response clinically observed after radiation has been described to correlate with elevated expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules by endothelial cells. Therapeutic compensation for this microvascular compromise could be an important approach in the treatment of irradiated wounds. Clinical reports describe the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to enhance wound healing, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were cultured in a co-culture setting and irradiated with sequential doses of 2 to 12 Gy. Cell count was determined 48 h after radiation using a semi-automated cell counting system. Levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were determined in the supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Irradiated HDMEC and ASC as well as non-irradiated co-cultures, HDMEC or ASC respectively were used as controls. Cell count was significantly reduced in irradiated co-cultures of HDMEC and ASC compared to non-irradiated controls. Levels of IL-6, FGF, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the supernatants of the co-cultures were significantly less affected by external radiation in comparison to HDMEC. The increased expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules by HDMEC after external radiation is mitigated in the co-culture setting with ASC. These in vitro changes seem to support the clinical observation that ASC may have a stabilizing effect when injected into irradiated wounds

  15. Evaluation of the GenoType Mycobacterium Assay for Identification of Mycobacterial Species from Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Elvira; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Hillemann, Doris

    2006-01-01

    A new commercially available DNA strip assay (GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS; Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) was evaluated for the ability to differentiate mycobacterial species. The test is based on a PCR technique targeting a 23S rRNA gene region, followed by reverse hybridization and line probe technology. The GenoType CM is capable of identifying 23, the GenoType AS a further 14, species either alone or in combination with one or more species. Both tests were evaluated with 156 mycobact...

  16. Flow cytometric lifetime-based cell viability assay using propidium iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.

    1999-05-01

    Assays which discriminate and enumerate dying or dead cells are important in various types of cellular studies. In many instances, there is a need to identify dead cells that interfere with fluorescent probes which are used to measure functional and physiological properties in viable cells. For example, dead cells can introduce analytical errors arising from (1) nonspecific uptake of fluorescent probes, leading to erroneous percentages of positive labeled cells, (2) increased autofluorescence, and (3) altered antigen expression. The ability to detect dead cells is also of importance in determining the effectiveness of cytotoxic agents. Propidium iodide (PPI) exclusion, which is analogous to the non- fluorescent trypan blue dye test for viability, is used extensively in flow cytometry assays. However, the use of PI can potentially limit the application of additional fluorescent probes due to spectral overlap of the probe with PI. In this report we present phase-resolved fluorescence studies on rat and murine thymus cells labeled with phycoerythrin-antiThy 1.1 and phycoerythrin/Texas Red-antiThy 1.2 immunofluorescence markers, respectively, and PI. Overlapping emission spectra are resolved based on differences in fluorescence lifetimes of the probes and PI. These studies demonstrate a new lifetime-based viability method for use in analysis of immunofluorescent probes and for assaying the dynamics of cell killing.

  17. Optimization and standardization of the ''comet assay'' for analyzing the repair of DNA damage in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human tumor cells or isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were analyzed in the experiments. The amount of DNA damage and the effectiveness of DNA repair was measured after X-irradiation using the 'comet assay' technique. Results: In this presentation the influences of different methodological factors like agarose concentration, buffer pH, electrophoresis time, electric field strength on the applicability of the 'comet assay' are described in detail and optimum conditions for 'comet assay' experiments have been evaluated. Additionally the authors will show a comparison of different fluorescent DNA dyes pointing out their advantages or disadvantages for 'comet' analysis. The usefulness of this technique and its capabilities are exemplified by showing DNA repair kinetics of human lymphocytes of different healthy or radiosensitive donors after in-vitro irradiation with 2 Gy X-rays. Conclusions: This paper presents data on the optimization and standardization of the original 'comet assay' leading to an extremely fast and practicable protocol in the field of single cell gel electrophoresis. After irradiation with 0.1 Gy an increase in the amount of DNA damage can be measured with high statistical significance and the DNA repair capacity of individual cells after X-ray doses of 2 Gy can be analyzed with high reproducibility. The results comparing DNA repair capacities of different donors point out that the 'comet assay' may have the potential for the estimation of individual radiosensitivity. (orig./MG)

  18. Microdroplet photobioreactor for the photoautotrophic culture of microalgal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Young Joon; Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Bong, Ki Wan; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    Microalgae, unicellular photoautotrophic microorganisms, have attracted great attention for the production of biofuel and high-value products, but the commercial use of microalgae has been limited by low photosynthetic productivity. To overcome this limitation, it is required to develop an efficient platform for the rapid evaluation of photoautotrophic growth performance and productivity of microalgal strains. Here we describe a droplet-based photobioreactor for high-throughput analysis of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal cells. By integrating micropillar arrays and adjusting the height of the microchamber, we could accurately monitor the growth kinetics of microalgae in an immobilized microdroplet and improve the transfer rate of CO2 into the microdroplet photobioreactor with an increased contact area between the microdroplet and PDMS surface. The improvement of CO2 transfer into the microdroplet was also confirmed by improved microalgal cell growth and a decrease in pH measured using colorimetric and fluorescence-based assays. The photoautotrophic growth kinetics of Chlorella vulgaris were measured under different CO2 concentrations (ambient, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5%) and light intensity (35, 55, 100, 150, and 200 μmol photons per m(2) per s) conditions, which are key factors for photoautotrophic growth. Chlorella vulgaris in a microdroplet showed better cell growth performance compared to a flask culture due to the reduced shading effects and improved mass transfer. Finally, we could evaluate the photoautotrophic growth performance of four microalgal strains (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella protothecoides, Chlorella sorokiniana and Neochloris oleoabundans) for 120 hours. These results demonstrate that our microdroplet system can be used as an efficient photobioreactor for the rapid evaluation of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal strains under various conditions. PMID:26673975

  19. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or κB (binding site for NFκB (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 μm by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL-1 dexamethasone, 10 ng mL-1 forskolin, or 100 ng mL-1 TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNFκB-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 104 cells per well.

  20. Establishment of a cell-based assay system for hepatitis C virus serine protease and its primary applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Mao; Shui-Yun Lan; Yun-Wen Hu; Li Xiang; Zheng-Hong Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish an efficient, sensitive, cell-based assay system for NS3 serine protease in an effort to study further the property of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and develop new antiviral agents.METHOOS: We constructed pCI-neo-NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric plasmid, in which the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) was fused in-frame to the downstream of NS4A/4B cleavage site. The protease activity of NS3 was reflected by the activity of SEAP in the culture media of transient or stable expression cells. Stably expressing cell lines were obtained by G418 selection. Pefabloc SC, a potent irreversible serine protease inhibitor, was used to treat the stably expressing cell lines to assess the system for screening NS3 inhibitors. To compare the activity of serine proteases from 1b and 1a, two chimeric clones were constructed and introduced into both transient and stable expression systems.RESULTS: The SEAP activity in the culture media could be detected in both transient and stable expression systems,and was apparently decreased after Pefabloc SC treatment.In both transient and stable systems, NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric gene from HCV genotype 1b produced higher SEAP activity in the culture media than that from 1a.CONCLUSION: The cell-based system is efficient and sensitive enough for detection and comparison of NS3 protease activity, and screening of anti-NS3 inhibitors. The functional difference between NS3/4A from 1a and 1b subtypes revealed by this system provides a clue for further investigations.

  1. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata gakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or {kappa}B (binding site for NF{kappa}B (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 {mu}m by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL{sup -1} dexamethasone, 10 ng mL{sup -1} forskolin, or 100 ng mL{sup -1} TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNF{kappa}B-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 10{sup 4} cells per well.

  2. Microglial cells in astroglial cultures: a cautionary note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saura Josep

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary rodent astroglial-enriched cultures are the most popular model to study astroglial biology in vitro. From the original methods described in the 1970's a great number of minor modifications have been incorporated into these protocols by different laboratories. These protocols result in cultures in which the astrocyte is the predominant cell type, but astrocytes are never 100% of cells in these preparations. The aim of this review is to bring attention to the presence of microglia in astroglial cultures because, in my opinion, the proportion of and the role that microglial cells play in astroglial cultures are often underestimated. The main problem with ignoring microglia in these cultures is that relatively minor amounts of microglia can be responsible for effects observed on cultures in which the astrocyte is the most abundant cell type. If the relative contributions of astrocytes and microglia are not properly assessed an observed effect can be erroneously attributed to the astrocytes. In order to illustrate this point the case of NO production in activated astroglial-enriched cultures is examined. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces nitric oxide (NO production in astroglial-enriched cultures and this effect is very often attributed to astrocytes. However, a careful review of the published data suggests that LPS-induced NO production in rodent astroglial-enriched cultures is likely to be mainly microglial in origin. This review considers cell culture protocol factors that can affect the proportion of microglial cells in astroglial cultures, strategies to minimize the proportion of microglia in these cultures, and specific markers that allow the determination of such microglial proportions.

  3. Regulation of cyclooxygenase expression in cultured vascular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arachidonic acid metabolism in vascular tissue results in synthesis of prostacylin. The key enzyme in this synthesis pathway, cyclooxygenase, is down-regulated through self-inactivation. An analogous refractory state is produced by aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. To further understand this phenomenon, the inactivation and recovery of cyclooxygenase activity was assayed in cultured ray vascular smooth muscle cells using exogenously added arachidonic acid. Self-inactivation of cyclooxygenase was observed following treatment with micromolar amounts of arachidonic acid. The recovery of cyclooxygenase activity following self-inactivation was analogous to that observed following aspirin-inactivation in that it depended on protein synthesis and required either serum or EGF. Two additional factors, TGF-β and uric acid, were found to enhance the stimulation of cyclooxygenase recovery by EGF. A defined medium containing 10 ng/mL EGF, 1 ng/mL TGFβ and 0.1 mM uric acid duplicated the cyclooxygenase recovery activity of 10% serum. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase activity by EGF and TGF-β was inhibited by cycloheximide but not by actinomycin-D, indicating a link to increased translation of pre-existing mRNA. A lack of significant effect on overall protein synthesis by EGF and TGF-β, measured by [35S]-methionine incorporation under conditions where a multi-fold increase in cyclooxygenase activity was seen, indicates that the translational regulation of a small fraction of total mRNA and possibly cyclooxygenase is occurring

  4. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Qasemi-Panahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 μL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

  5. Effects of methyl isocyanate on rat brain cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D; Goyle, S; Phillips, B J; Tee, A; Beech, L; Butler, W H

    1990-09-01

    Since the disaster in Bhopal, India, people exposed to methyl isocyanate (MIC) have complained of various disorders including neuromuscular dysfunction. In an attempt to get information about such dysfunction we have previously shown that MIC can affect muscle cells in culture. The present communication reports investigations into the effect of MIC on brain cells in culture. MIC was toxic to brain cells and the response was dose related. The observations were supported by light and electron microscopy. PMID:2207030

  6. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9μM and 3.1μ...

  7. Chemotherapy in heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells with interconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the interconversion between differentiated and stem-like cancer cells has been observed. Here, we model the in vitro growth of heterogeneous cell cultures in the presence of interconversion from differentiated cancer cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs), showing that, by targeting only CSC with cytotoxic agents, it is not always possible to eradicate cancer. We have determined the kinetic conditions under which cytotoxic agents in in vitro heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells eradicate cancer. In particular, we have shown that the chemotherapeutic elimination of in vitro cultures of heterogeneous cancer cells is effective only if it targets all cancer cell types, and if the induced death rates for the different subpopulations of cancer cell types are large enough. The quantitative results of the model are compared and validated with experimental data. (paper)

  8. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  9. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  10. A specific assay measuring binding of 125I-Gp 120 from HIV to T4+/CD4+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HIV (HTLV-III) envelope glycoprotein, Gp120, was isolated from virus-infected tissue culture cells using affinity chromatography. A radioimmunoassay was developed to determine the degree of iodinated Gp120 to target CD4+ (T4+) cells. 125I-Gp120 could be shown to selectively bind to CD4+ cells only. The Gp120 remained bound to these cells after repeated washes. Monoclonal anti-CD4 antibodies block the binding of Gp120 to CD4+ cells. Monoclonal antibodies to other cell surface components do not interfere with 125I-Gp120 binding. All IgG antibodies from HIV seropositive donors tested block 125I-GP120 binding, though with variable titers. The authors believe that this assay provides further proof for the use of CD4 (T4) as a component of the receptor for HIV. It represents a safe, objective and sensitive method for the analysis of Gp120-CD4 interactions, as well as the potential of antibodies to interfere with this binding. (Auth.)

  11. Recent developments in cell-based assays and stem cell technologies for botulinum neurotoxin research and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Erkan; Kota, Krishna P; Burnett, James C; Soloveva, Veronica; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2014-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are exceptionally potent inhibitors of neurotransmission, causing muscle paralysis and respiratory failure associated with the disease botulism. Currently, no drugs are available to counter intracellular BoNT poisoning. To develop effective medical treatments, cell-based assays provide a valuable system to identify novel inhibitors in a time- and cost-efficient manner. Consequently, cell-based systems including immortalized cells, primary neurons and stem cell-derived neurons have been established. Stem cell-derived neurons are highly sensitive to BoNT intoxication and represent an ideal model to study the biological effects of BoNTs. Robust immunoassays are used to quantify BoNT activity and play a central role during inhibitor screening. In this review, we examine recent progress in physiologically relevant cell-based assays and high-throughput screening approaches for the identification of both direct and indirect BoNT inhibitors. PMID:24450833

  12. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cells co-cultured with intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Yeun Kim; Myeong Soo Park; Geun Eog Ji

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO investigate cytokine production and cell surface phenotypes of dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of epithelial cells stimulated by probiotics.METHODS:Mouse DC were cultured alone or together with mouse epithelial cell monolayers in normal or inverted systems and were stimulated with heat-killed probiotic bacteria,Bifidobacteriumlactis AD011 (BL),Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 (BB),Lactobacillus casei IBS041 (LC),and Lactobacillus acidophilus AD031 (LA),for 12 h.Cytokine levels in the culture supernatants were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and phenotypic analysis of DC was investigated by flow cytometry.RESULTS:BB and LC in single-cultured DC increased the expression of I-Ad,CD86 and CD40 (I-Ad,18.51 vs 30.88,46.11; CD86,62.74 vs 92.7,104.12; CD40,0.67vs 6.39,3.37,P < 0.05).All of the experimental probiotics increased the production of inflammatory cytokines,interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α.However,in the normal co-culture systems,LC and LA decreased the expression of I-Ad (39.46 vs 30.32,33.26,P < 0.05),and none of the experimental probiotics increased the levels of IL-6 or TNF-α.In the inverted coculture systems,LC decreased the expression of CD40 (1.36 vs-2.27,P < 0.05),and all of the experimental probiotics decreased the levels of IL-6.In addition,BL increased the production of IL-10 (103.8 vs 166.0,P< 0.05) and LC and LA increased transforming growth factor-3 secretion (235.9 vs 618.9,607.6,P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:These results suggest that specific probiotic strains exert differential immune modulation mediated by the interaction of dendritic cells and epithelial cells in the homeostasis of gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Comparative analysis of cultural isolation and PCR based assay for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in food and faecal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkanwaldeep Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the efficacy of polymerase chain reaction (PCR based on mapA gene of C. jejuni was tested for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in naturally infected as well as spiked faecal and food samples of human and animal origin. Simultaneously, all the samples were subjected to the cultural isolation of organism and biochemical characterization. The positive samples resulted in the amplification of a DNA fragment of size ~589 bp in PCR assay whereas the absence of such amplicon in DNA extracted from E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus confirmed the specificity of the primers. Of randomly collected 143 faecal samples comprising human diarrheic stools (43, cattle diarrheic faeces (48 and poultry faecal swabs (52 only 4, 3 and 8, respectively, could be detected by isolation whereas 6, 3 and 10, respectively, were found positive by PCR. However, among food samples viz. beef (30, milk (35, cheese (30, only one beef sample was detected both by culture as well as PCR. Additionally, PCR was found to be more sensitive for C. jejuni detection in spiked faecal and food samples (96.1% each as relative to culture isolation which could detect the organism in 86.7% and 80% samples, respectively. The results depicted the superior efficacy of PCR for rapid screening of samples owing to its high sensitivity, specificity and automation potential.

  14. DNA Microarray Assay Helps to Identify Functional Genes Specific for Leukemia Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disease derived from an abnormal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC and is consistently associated with the formation of Philadelphia (Ph chromosome. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are highly effective in treating chronic phase CML but do not eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSCs, which are believed to be related to disease relapse. Therefore, one major challenge in the current CML research is to understand the biology of LSCs and to identify the molecular difference between LSCs and its normal stem cell counterparts. Comparing the gene expression profiles between LSCs and normal HSCs by DNA microarray assay is a systematic and unbiased approach to address this issue. In this paper, we present a DNA microarray dataset for CML LSCs and normal HSCs to show that the microarray assay will benefit the current and future studies of the biology of CML stem cells.

  15. The cyclosporin A washout assay to detect HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Uncoating is an early step of HIV-1 replication in which the viral capsid disassembles by p24 capsid (p24(CA)) protein dissociating from the viral complex. Although uncoating is required for HIV-1 replication, many questions remain about the mechanism of this process as well as its impact on other steps in viral replication. Here we describe a recently developed assay to study the process of uncoating in HIV-1-infected cells. The CsA washout assay is a cell-based assay that utilizes the HIV-1 restriction factor TRIM-CypA to detect and inhibit infection of coated viral complexes. Owl monkey kidney (OMK) cells are infected with a GFP reporter virus and TRIM-CypA restriction is switched on at various times postinfection allowing the kinetics of uncoating to be monitored in infected cells. This assay also can be used to examine the effect of different viral or cellular factors on the process of uncoating. PMID:24158812

  16. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne;

    2005-01-01

    discovery is described, and proof-of-concept data from a pilot screen with a CXCR4 assay are presented. This chemokine receptor is a highly relevant drug target which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease and also has been shown to be a co-receptor for entry of HIV into cells...

  17. Results of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma assay and the Balb/3t3 cell in vitro transformation assay for eight phthalate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, E D; Cifone, M; Rundell, J; Przygoda, R; Astill, B D; Moran, E; Mulholland, A; Robinson, E; Schneider, B

    2000-01-01

    Eight phthalate esters, with alcohol chain lengths of 1-11 carbon atoms and with various degrees of branching, were tested in vitro in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma mammalian cell mutation assay and in the Balb/3T3 cell transformation assay. The tests were performed as part of a voluntary testing agreement between the Chemical Manufacturers Association's Phthalate Esters Panel and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The esters tested were: dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-¿n-hexyl, n-octyl, n-decyl¿ phthalate (610P), di-isononyl phthalate (DINP), di-¿heptyl, nonyl, undecyl¿ phthalate (711P), di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) and di-undecyl phthalate (DUP). Both DMP and DBP were found to produce significant increases in the mutant frequency in the mouse lymphoma assay in the presence but not in the absence of an Aroclor-induced rat liver activation system (S-9). Ester 610P gave equivocal results in the mouse lymphoma assay in the presence and absence of rat liver S-9. There was no indication of mutagenic potential for any of the other test materials in the mouse lymphoma assay, and none of the test materials increased transformation frequency in the Balb/3T3 cell transformation assay. Aldehyde metabolites of the de-esterified alcohols are postulated to play a role in the positive results for DMP and DBP. PMID:10641018

  18. A Functional Assay for Putative Mouse and Human Definitive Endoderm using Chick Whole-Embryo Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Martina; Semb, Tor Henrik; Serup, Palle;

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a prospective cell source for treating degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Several studies have addressed the generation of definitive endoderm (DE) from this cell source by attempting to recapitulate the signaling events occurring during...... expressed in the putative DE prior to integration and endoderm-specific proteins were assessed 48 h post transplantation. Conclusions: We describe the detailed methodological procedure for transplanting putative DE derived from ESCs, and the subsequent analysis of the migration and development of the...

  19. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  20. A practical guide to hydrogels for cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari, Steven R; Burdick, Jason A

    2016-04-28

    There is growing appreciation of the role that the extracellular environment plays in regulating cell behavior. Mechanical, structural, and compositional cues, either alone or in concert, can drastically alter cell function. Biomaterials, and particularly hydrogels, have been developed and implemented to present defined subsets of these cues for investigating countless cellular processes as a means of understanding morphogenesis, aging, and disease. Although most scientists concede that standard cell culture materials (tissue culture plastic and glass) do a poor job of recapitulating native cellular milieus, there is currently a knowledge barrier for many researchers in regard to the application of hydrogels for cell culture. Here, we introduce hydrogels to those who may be unfamiliar with procedures to culture and study cells with these systems, with a particular focus on commercially available hydrogels. PMID:27123816