WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell contact dependency

  1. Contact-dependent Stimulation and Inhibition of Dendritic Cells by Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piccioli, Diego; Sbrana, Silverio; Melandri, Emiliano; Valiante, Nicholas M.

    2002-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) are two distinct cell types of innate immunity. It is known that the in vitro interaction of human NK cells with autologous DCs results in DC lysis. Here we show that contact-dependent interactions between activated human NK cells and immature DCs (iDCs) provides a “control switch” for the immune system. At low NK/DC ratios, this interaction dramatically amplifies DC responses, whereas at high ratios it completely turns off their responses. ...

  2. A role for adhesion molecules in contact-dependent T help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    . There was no correlation between the level of expression of adhesion molecules by T cells and their ability to induce B cell responses. Anti-LFA-1 abrogated T-dependent responses to IL2 which were inducible after 2 days in culture, but did not inhibit the induction of this IL2 responsiveness. These results suggest...... that continued cell contact involving adhesion/accessory molecules induces B cells to proliferate and to respond to T cell lymphokines. A signaling role for cell interaction molecules on B cells is proposed, similar to the role of these and analogous molecules on T cells....

  3. Rapamycin increases RSV RNA levels and survival of RSV-infected dendritic cell depending on T cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento de Freitas, Deise; Gassen, Rodrigo Benedetti; Fazolo, Tiago; Souza, Ana Paula Duarte de

    2016-10-01

    The macrolide rapamycin inhibits mTOR (mechanist target of rapamycin) function and has been broadly used to unveil the role of mTOR in immune responses. Inhibition of mTOR on dendritic cells (DC) can influence cellular immune response and the survival of DC. RSV is the most common cause of hospitalization in infants and is a high priority candidate to vaccine development. In this study we showed that rapamycin treatment on RSV-infected murine bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) decreases the frequency of CD8(+)CD44(high) T cells. However, inhibition of mTOR on RSV-infected BMDC did not modify the activation phenotype of these cells. RSV-RNA levels increase when infected BMDC were treated with rapamycin. Moreover, we observed that rapamycin diminishes apoptosis cell death of RSV-infected BMDC co-culture with T cells and this effect was abolished when the cells were co-cultured in a transwell system that prevents cell-to-cell contact or migration. Taken together, these data indicate that rapamycin treatment present a toxic effect on RSV-infected BMDC increasing RSV-RNA levels, affecting partially CD8 T cell differentiation and also increasing BMDC survival in a mechanism dependent on T cell contact.

  4. Regulatory T cell suppression is potentiated by target T cells in a cell contact, IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Pillai, Meenu R; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Vignali, Dario A A

    2009-05-15

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are believed to suppress conventional T cell (T(conv)) proliferation in vitro in a contact-dependent, cytokine-independent manner, based in part on experiments in which T(reg) and T(conv) are separated by a permeable membrane. We show that the production of IL-35, a novel inhibitory cytokine expressed by natural T(reg), increases substantially following contact with T(conv). Surprisingly, T(reg) were able to mediate potent suppression of T(conv) across a permeable membrane when placed in direct contact with T(conv) in the upper chamber of a Transwell plate. Suppression was IL-35 and IL-10 dependent, and T(conv) activation was required for maximal potentiation of T(reg) suppression. These data suggest that it is the induction of suppression, rather than the function of T(reg) that is obligatorily contact dependent.

  5. MICA Expression Is Regulated by Cell Adhesion and Contact in a FAK/Src-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Gerald; Lin, Da; McCarthy, Michael T.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; O’Callaghan, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    MICA is a major ligand for the NKG2D immune receptor, which plays a key role in activating natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells. We analyzed NKG2D ligand expression on a range of cell types and could demonstrate that MICA expression levels were closely linked to cellular growth mode. While the expression of other NKG2D ligands was largely independent of cell growth mode, MICA expression was mainly found on cells cultured as adherent cells. In addition, MICA surface expression was reduced through increase in cell–cell contact or loss of cell–matrix adherence. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in MICA expression was modulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src signaling and associated with increased susceptibility to NK cell-mediated killing. While the mechanisms of tumor immune evasion are not fully understood, the reduction of MICA expression following loss of attachment poises a potential way by which metastasizing tumor cells avoid immune detection. The role of FAK/Src in this process indicates a potential therapeutic approach to modulate MICA expression and immune recognition of tumor cells during metastasis. PMID:28154561

  6. HAb18G/CD147 cell-cell contacts confer resistance of a HEK293 subpopulation to anoikis in an E-cadherin-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ping

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquisition of resistance to "anoikis" facilitates the survival of cells under independent matrix-deficient conditions, such as cells in tumor progression and the production of suspension culture cells for biomedical engineering. There is evidence suggesting that CD147, an adhesion molecule associated with survival of cells in tumor metastasis and cell-cell contacts, plays an important role in resistance to anoikis. However, information regarding the functions of CD147 in mediating cell-cell contacts and anoikis-resistance remains limited and even self-contradictory. Results An anoikis-resistant clone (HEK293ar, derived from anoikis-sensitive parental Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells, survived anoikis by the formation of cell-cell contacts. The expression of HAb18G/CD147 (a member of the CD147 family was upregulated and the protein was located at cell-cell junctions. Upregulation of HAb18G/CD147 in suspended HEK293ar cells suppressed anoikis by mediating the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Anoikis resistance in HEK293ar cells also required E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts. Knock-down of HAb18G/CD147 and E-cadherin inhibited cell-cell contacts formation and increased anoikis sensitivity respectively. When HAb18G/CD147 was downregulated, E-cadherin expression in HEK293ar cells was significantly suppressed; however, knockdown of E-cadherin by E-cadherin siRNA or blocking of E-cadherin binding activity with a specific antibody and EDTA had no significant effect on HAb18G/CD147 expression. Finally, pretreatment with LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT inhibitor, disrupted cell-cell contacts and decreased cell number, but this was not the case in cells treated with the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusions Our results provide new evidence that HAb18G/CD147-mediated cell-cell contact confers anoikis resistance in an E-cadherin-dependent manner; and cell-cell contact mediated

  7. IL-1β-Dependent Activation of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells in Contact Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Lovato, Paola; Macleod, Amanda S

    2014-01-01

    in CHS. Thus, more IL-17-producing DETCs appear in the skin following exposure to DNFB in wild-type mice, and DNFB-induced ear swelling is reduced by ∼50% in TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. In accordance, DNFB-induced ear swelling was reduced by ∼50% in IL-17(-/-) mice. We show that DNFB...... responses, as measured by decreased ear swelling, inhibition of local DETC activation, and a reduction in the number of IL-17(+) γδ T cells and DETCs in the draining lymph nodes. Taken together, we show that DETCs become activated and produce IL-17 in an IL-1β-dependent manner during CHS, suggesting a key...

  8. Interleukin-15 Dendritic Cells Harness NK Cell Cytotoxic Effector Function in a Contact- and IL-15-Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Anguille

    Full Text Available The contribution of natural killer (NK cells to the treatment efficacy of dendritic cell (DC-based cancer vaccines is being increasingly recognized. Much current efforts to optimize this form of immunotherapy are therefore geared towards harnessing the NK cell-stimulatory ability of DCs. In this study, we investigated whether generation of human monocyte-derived DCs with interleukin (IL-15 followed by activation with a Toll-like receptor stimulus endows these DCs, commonly referred to as "IL-15 DCs", with the capacity to stimulate NK cells. In a head-to-head comparison with "IL-4 DCs" used routinely for clinical studies, IL-15 DCs were found to induce a more activated, cytotoxic effector phenotype in NK cells, in particular in the CD56bright NK cell subset. With the exception of GM-CSF, no significant enhancement of cytokine/chemokine secretion was observed following co-culture of NK cells with IL-15 DCs. IL-15 DCs, but not IL-4 DCs, promoted NK cell tumoricidal activity towards both NK-sensitive and NK-resistant targets. This effect was found to require cell-to-cell contact and to be mediated by DC surface-bound IL-15. This study shows that DCs can express a membrane-bound form of IL-15 through which they enhance NK cell cytotoxic function. The observed lack of membrane-bound IL-15 on "gold-standard" IL-4 DCs and their consequent inability to effectively promote NK cell cytotoxicity may have important implications for the future design of DC-based cancer vaccine studies.

  9. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  10. Manipulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cell Function by the Cell Contact-Dependent Type III Secretion Systems of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky eO'Boyle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus elicits gastroenteritis by deploying Type III Secretion Systems (TTSS to deliver effector proteins into epithelial cells of the human intestinal tract. The bacteria must adhere to the human cells to allow colonization and operation of the TTSS translocation apparatus bridging the bacterium and the host cell. This article first reviews recent advances in identifying the molecules responsible for intercellular adherence. V. parahaemolyticus possesses two TTSS, each of which delivers an exclusive set of effectors and mediates unique effects on the host cell. TTSS effectors primarily target and alter the activation status of host cell signalling proteins, thereby bringing about changes in the regulation of cellular behaviour. TTSS1 is responsible for the cytotoxicity of V. parahaemolyticus, while TTSS2 is necessary for the enterotoxicity of the pathogen. Recent publications have elucidated the function of several TTSS effectors and their importance in the virulence of the bacterium. This review will explore the ability of the TTSS to manipulate activities of human intestinal cells and how this modification of cell function favours bacterial colonization and persistence of V. parahaemolyticus in the host.

  11. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  12. In vitro infection with HIV enables human CD4+ T cell clones to induce noncognate contact-dependent polyclonal B cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, D; Parronchi, P; Piccinni, M P; Simonelli, C; Mazzetti, M; Ravina, A; Milo, D; Maggi, E; Romagnani, S

    1991-05-15

    Eleven (nine CD4+ and two CD8+) protein purified derivative-specific and eight tetanus toxoid-specific T cell clones (TCC), established from the peripheral blood of healthy persons, were cocultured in vitro with irradiated mononuclear cells from patients infected by HIV in the presence of PHA and polybrene. Two weeks post-HIV exposure, all 17 CD4+, but neither of the two CD8+, TCC exhibited integration of HIV in their genoma, as detected by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and released HIV into their supernatants, as detected by measuring both reverse transcriptase activity and p24 Ag. When co-cultured with either autologous or allogeneic B cells, all CD4+ HIV-infected TCC induced the synthesis of extraordinarily high amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA. In contrast, their noninfected counterparts could provide helper function for Ig synthesis by autologous B cells only in the presence of the specific Ag (or anti-CD3 antibody), and induced allogeneic B cells to synthesize Ig only upon stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. The supernatants of HIV-infected TCC failed to stimulate Ig synthesis in B cells. More importantly, when HIV-infected clonal T blasts and B cells were cultured in different chambers separated by a millipore membrane, permeable to molecules but not to cells, Ig synthesis did not occur. The Ig synthesis induced by HIV-infected TCC was also markedly inhibited by the addition in culture of either anti-CD4 or anti-LFA-1 antibody. In contrast, HIV-infected TCC maintained their ability to provide helper function for Ig synthesis in the absence of any stimulus, even after fixation with p-formaldehyde. These data demonstrate that in vitro infection with HIV enables human T cells to stimulate Ig synthesis by B cells by an Ag-nonspecific, MHC-unrestricted, contact-dependent mechanism. This may explain, at least in part, the hypergammaglobulinemia and other phenomena related to polyclonal B cell activation frequently seen in HIV-infected persons.

  13. Contact-dependent cytopathogenic mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, J.N.; Ravdin, J.I.; Rein, M.F.

    1985-12-01

    The cytopathogenic mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis have been debated since the 1940s. We examined the following three proposed pathogenic mechanisms: contact-dependent extracellular killing, cytophagocytosis, and extracellular cytotoxins. Serial observations of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell monolayers exposed to trichomonads revealed that (i) trichomonads form clumps, (ii) the clumps adhere to cells in culture, and (iii) monolayer destruction occurs only in areas of contact with T. vaginalis. Kinetic analysis of target cell killing by trichomonads revealed that the probability of CHO cell death was related to the probability of contact with T. vaginalis, supporting the observation by microscopy that trichomonads kill cells only by direct contact. Simultaneous studies of /sup 111/indium oxine label release from CHO cells and trypan blue dye exclusion demonstrated that T. vaginalis kills target cells without phagocytosis. Filtrates of trichomonad cultures or from media in which trichomonads were killing CHO cells had no effect on CHO cell monolayers, indicating that trichomonads do not kill cells by a cell-free or secreted cytotoxin. The microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin D (10 micrograms/ml) inhibited trichomonad killing of CHO cell monolayers by 80% (P less than 0.0001). In contrast, the microtubule inhibitor vinblastine (10(-6) M) caused only 17% inhibition of trichomonad destruction of CHO cell monolayers (P less than 0.020), whereas colchicine (10(-6) M) had no effect. T. vaginalis kills target cells by direct contact without phagocytosis. This event requires intact trichomonad microfilament function; microtubule function appears not to be essential.

  14. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  15. Solar cell with back side contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  16. Solar cell with back side contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  17. Measuring The Contact Resistances Of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple method devised to measure contact resistances of photovoltaic solar cells. Method uses readily available equipment and applicable at any time during life of cell. Enables evaluation of cell contact resistance, contact-end resistance, contact resistivity, sheet resistivity, and sheet resistivity under contact.

  18. A new model of organic solar cells reveals open circuit conditions and size dependent power loss induced by the finite conductivity of a transparent contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotleyb, Dor; Shikler, Rafi

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new approach to modelling the effect of the size of organic solar cells on their efficiency. Experimental results show a drastic deterioration in performance when scaling up organic solar cells. This reduction reflects in key parameters such as the short circuit current (Is c ) , the maximum power point (Pm ) , and the Fill Factor (F F ) . It is attributed to the transparent anode that exhibits a relatively low conductivity (σ) . Our unique approach is to account for the interplay between the two sub-domains of the solar cell. In the first domain, containing the electro-optic active materials, we solve the drift-diffusion model using a simplified model for the recombination to emphasize the role of the anode resistance. In the second domain, representing the anode, we solve only the Laplace equation. We introduce the coupling between these layers using the current of the active layer as the boundary condition for the anode and the position dependent potential of the anode as the boundary condition for the active layer. Our results reveal that as the length of the cell increases, the parts that are farther from the contact exhibit near open circuit conditions and do not contribute to the current. We found that the efficiency of the cell altered from linear to sub-linear behavior already at cell lengths of a few millimeters. The transition point strongly depends on the conductivity of the anode. The sub-linearity starts at 0.4, 0.5, and 0.7 cm for σ=100 , 200 , and 500 S /cm , respectively. Additionally, the efficiency begins to saturate sooner than both the short circuit current and the Fill-Factor. The saturation is observed at device lengths of 0.8, 1.2, and 2.1 cm for σ=100 , 200 , and 500 S /cm , respectively.

  19. Fibroblast surface-associated FGF-2 promotes contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion through FGFR-SRC signaling and integrin αvβ5-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuchel, Sarah; Anderle, Pascale; Werfelli, Patricia; Diamantis, Eva; Rüegg, Curzio

    2015-06-10

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts were reported to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) invasion by secreting motility factors and extracellular matrix processing enzymes. Less is known whether fibroblasts may induce CRC cancer cell motility by contact-dependent mechanisms. To address this question we characterized the interaction between fibroblasts and SW620 and HT29 colorectal cancer cells in 2D and 3D co-culture models in vitro. Here we show that fibroblasts induce contact-dependent cancer cell elongation, motility and invasiveness independently of deposited matrix or secreted factors. These effects depend on fibroblast cell surface-associated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) -2. Inhibition of FGF-2 or FGF receptors (FGFRs) signaling abolishes these effects. FGFRs activate SRC in cancer cells and inhibition or silencing of SRC in cancer cells, but not in fibroblasts, prevents fibroblasts-mediated effects. Using an RGD-based integrin antagonist and function-blocking antibodies we demonstrate that cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts requires integrin αvβ5. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fibroblasts induce cell-contact-dependent colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D and 3D conditions in vitro through fibroblast cell surface-associated FGF-2, FGF receptor-mediated SRC activation and αvβ5 integrin-dependent cancer cell adhesion to fibroblasts. The FGF-2-FGFRs-SRC-αvβ5 integrin loop might be explored as candidate therapeutic target to block colorectal cancer invasion.

  20. Interdigitated back contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, M. S.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1980-08-01

    The interdigitated back contact solar cell (IBC cell) was shown to possess a number of advantages for silicon solar cells, which operate at high concentration. A detailed discussion of the factors which need to be considered in the analysis of semiconducting devices which utilize heavily doped regions such as those which are found in solar cells in both the emitter and in the back surface field regions is given. This discussion covers the questions of: how to handle degeneracy, how to compute carrier concentrations in the absence of knowledge of the details of the band structure under heavily doped conditions, and how to reconcile the usual interpretation of heavy doping as a rigid shift of the bands with the band tailing and impurity level conduction models. It also discusses the reasons for the observed discrepancies between various experimental measurements of bandgap narrowing.

  1. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  2. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  3. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  4. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  5. Cell Cycle-dependent Changes in Localization and Phosphorylation of the Plasma Membrane Kv2.1 K+ Channel Impact Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Contact Sites in COS-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Melanie M; Austin, Daniel C; Sack, Jon T; Trimmer, James S

    2015-12-04

    The plasma membrane (PM) comprises distinct subcellular domains with diverse functions that need to be dynamically coordinated with intracellular events, one of the most impactful being mitosis. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is conditionally localized to large PM clusters that represent specialized PM:endoplasmic reticulum membrane contact sites (PM:ER MCS), and overexpression of Kv2.1 induces more exuberant PM:ER MCS in neurons and in certain heterologous cell types. Localization of Kv2.1 at these contact sites is dynamically regulated by changes in phosphorylation at one or more sites located on its large cytoplasmic C terminus. Here, we show that Kv2.1 expressed in COS-1 cells undergoes dramatic cell cycle-dependent changes in its PM localization, having diffuse localization in interphase cells, and robust clustering during M phase. The mitosis-specific clusters of Kv2.1 are localized to PM:ER MCS, and M phase clustering of Kv2.1 induces more extensive PM:ER MCS. These cell cycle-dependent changes in Kv2.1 localization and the induction of PM:ER MCS are accompanied by increased mitotic Kv2.1 phosphorylation at several C-terminal phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv2.1 is significantly increased upon metaphase arrest in COS-1 and CHO cells, and in a pancreatic β cell line that express endogenous Kv2.1. The M phase clustering of Kv2.1 at PM:ER MCS in COS-1 cells requires the same C-terminal targeting motif needed for conditional Kv2.1 clustering in neurons. The cell cycle-dependent changes in localization and phosphorylation of Kv2.1 were not accompanied by changes in the electrophysiological properties of Kv2.1 expressed in CHO cells. Together, these results provide novel insights into the cell cycle-dependent changes in PM protein localization and phosphorylation.

  6. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  7. Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Chryslène; Ize, Bérengère; Salcedo, Suzana P; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins, delivered into the cytoplasm of target bacterial cells, confer to host strain a significant competitive advantage. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminal region of surface-exposed CdiA protein (CdiA-CT) inhibits the growth of CDI- bacteria. CDI+ cells express a specific immunity protein, CdiI, which protects from autoinhibition by blocking the activity of cognate CdiA-CT. CdiA-CT are separated from the rest of the protein by conserved peptide motifs falling into two distinct classes, the "E. coli"- and "Burkholderia-type". CDI systems have been described in numerous species except in Pseudomonadaceae. In this study, we identified functional toxin/immunity genes linked to CDI systems in the Pseudomonas genus, which extend beyond the conventional CDI classes by the variability of the peptide motif that delimits the polymorphic CdiA-CT domain. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model, we identified the translational repressor RsmA as a negative regulator of CDI systems. Our data further suggest that under conditions of expression, P. aeruginosa CDI systems are implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and provide an advantage in competition assays. All together our data imply that CDI systems could play an important role in niche adaptation of Pseudomonadaceae.

  8. Capillary rise with velocity-dependent dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Ralston, J; Sedev, R

    2008-11-04

    The classic description of the rate of capillary rise given by the Washburn equation, which assumes that the contact angle preserves the equilibrium value at all times, has been recently questioned in the light of the known experimental dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the velocity of the contact line. For a number of such proposed functions of velocity for the dynamic contact angle, we analyze the resulting dependences of the contact angle and of the time of rise, respectively, on the height of the capillary rise. By applying our results to the particular cases of a high-viscosity silicone oil and water, respectively, in a glass capillary, we show that, in general, strong similarities arise between the various approaches and the classic theory in what concerns the time dependence of the capillary rise, which explains the lack of consistent experimental evidence for deviations in the rate of capillary rise from the Washburn equation. However, for a strong dependency of the contact angle on the velocity in the range of small velocities, as in the case of water on glass, one of the models predicts significant deviations even for the time dependence of the capillary rise. Moreover, our results show that the time or height dependence of the contact angle during the capillary rise can clearly discriminate between the various models.

  9. Bias dependent specic contact resistance of phase change material to metal contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of contact resistance of phase change materials (PCM) to metal electrodes is important for scaling, device modeling and optimization of phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells. In this article, we report the systematic determination of the speci_c contact resistance (_c) with

  10. Bias dependent specic contact resistance of phase change material to metal contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of contact resistance of phase change materials (PCM) to metal electrodes is important for scaling, device modeling and optimization of phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells. In this article, we report the systematic determination of the speci_c contact resistance (_c) with volta

  11. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T.

    1984-10-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  12. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  13. Contact Versus Noncontact Cell Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-28

    Mechanism Research of SKOV3 Cancer Cell Apoptosis Induced by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field ," 2008 30TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE...permeabilization in mammalian cells by nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF)," BIOELECTROMAGNETICS, vol. 28, Dec. 2007, pp. 655-663. [6] R. Sundararajan...and K. Schoenbach, "Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) effects on cells and tissues: Apoptosis induction and tumor growth inhibition," IEEE

  14. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-07-01

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  15. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul, E-mail: yoonchul.son@samsung.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-11

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  16. Transparent contacts for stacked compound photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2016-11-29

    A microsystems-enabled multi-junction photovoltaic (MEM-PV) cell includes a first photovoltaic cell having a first junction, the first photovoltaic cell including a first semiconductor material employed to form the first junction, the first semiconductor material having a first bandgap. The MEM-PV cell also includes a second photovoltaic cell comprising a second junction. The second photovoltaic cell comprises a second semiconductor material employed to form the second junction, the second semiconductor material having a second bandgap that is less than the first bandgap, the second photovoltaic cell further comprising a first contact layer disposed between the first junction of the first photovoltaic cell and the second junction of the second photovoltaic cell, the first contact layer composed of a third semiconductor material having a third bandgap, the third bandgap being greater than or equal to the first bandgap.

  17. Drop Size Dependence of the Contact Angle of Nanodroplets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-Kai; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The contact angle of nanosized non-polarized argon sessile droplets on a solid substrate is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations.It is found that the drop size dependence of the contact angle is sensitive to the interaction between the liquid molecules and solid molecules.The contact angle decreases with the decreasing drop size for larger interaction between the liquid molecules and the solid substrate, and vice versa.This observation is consistent with most of the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [“Orion” Research Institute (Ukraine); Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kapitanchuk, L. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Paton Electric Welding Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  19. Contact-independent cell death of human microglial cells due to pathogenic Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-12-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri leads to a fatal infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. Previously, the target cell death could be induced by phagocytic activity of N. fowleri as a contact-dependent mechanism. However, in this study we investigated the target cell death under a non-contact system using a tissue-culture insert. The human microglial cells, U87MG cells, co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites for 30 min in a non-contact system showed morphological changes such as the cell membrane destruction and a reduction in the number. By fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, U87MG cells co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells (16%) in comparison with that of the control or N. fowleri lysate. When U87MG cells were co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system for 30 min, 2 hr, and 4 hr, the cytotoxicity of amebae against target cells was 40.5, 44.2, and 45.6%, respectively. By contrast, the cytotoxicity of non-pathogenic N. gruberi trophozoites was 10.2, 12.4, and 13.2%, respectively. These results suggest that the molecules released from N. fowleri in a contact-independent manner as well as phagocytosis in a contact-dependent manner may induce the host cell death.

  20. Collective cell migration requires suppression of actomyosin at cell-cell contacts mediated by DDR1 and the cell polarity regulators Par3 and Par6

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo-Carcedo, Cristina; Hooper, Steven; Chaudhry, Shahid I.; Williamson, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Leitinger, Birgit; Sahai, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Collective cell migration occurs in a range of contexts: cancer cells frequently invade in cohorts while retaining cell-cell junctions. Here we show that collective cancer cell invasion depends on reducing actomyosin contractility at sites of cell-cell contact. When actomyosin is not down-regulated at cell-cell contacts migrating cells lose cohesion. We provide a novel molecular mechanism for this down-regulation. Depletion of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) blocks collective cancer cell i...

  1. Coplanar back contacts for thin silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storti, G.; Scheinine, A.; Whitehouse, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Wrigley, C.; Giuliano, M.

    1981-01-01

    The type of coplanar back contact solar cell described was constructed with interdigitated n(+) and p(+) type regions on the back of the cell, such that both contacts are made on the back with no metallization grid on the front. This cell construction has several potential advantages over conventional cells for space use namely, convenience of interconnects, lower operating temperatures and higher efficiency due to the elimination of grid shadowing. However, the processing is more complex, and the cell is inherently more radiation sensitive. The latter problem can be reduced substantially by making the cells very thin (approximately 50 micrometers). Two types of interdigitated back contact cells are possible, the types being dependent on the character of the front surface. The front surface field cell has a front surface region that is of the same conductivity type as the bulk but is more heavily doped. This creates an electric field at the surface which repels the minority carriers. The tandem junction cell has a front surface region of a conductivity type that is opposite to that of the bulk. The junction thus created floats to open circuit voltage on illumination and injects carriers into the bulk which then can be collected at the rear junction. For space use, the front surface field cell is potentially more radiation resistant than the tandem junction cell because the flow of minority carriers (electrons) into the bulk will be less sensitive to the production of recombination centers, particularly in the space charge region at the front surface.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Contact Resistance in Silicon Photovoltaic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Black, J. P.

    2013-10-22

    In screen-printed silicon-crystalline solar cells, the contact resistance of a thin interfacial glass layer between the silicon and the silver electrode plays a limiting role for electron transport. We analyze a simple model for electron transport across this layer, based on the driftdiffusion equations. We utilize the size of the current/Debye length to conduct asymptotic techniques to simplify the model; we solve the model numerically to find that the effective contact resistance may be a monotonic increasing, monotonic decreasing, or nonmonotonic function of the electron flux, depending on the values of the physical parameters. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Assembly of the murine leukemia virus is directed towards sites of cell-cell contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the underlying mechanism by which direct cell-cell contact enhances the efficiency of cell-to-cell transmission of retroviruses. Applying 4D imaging to a model retrovirus, the murine leukemia virus, we directly monitor and quantify sequential assembly, release, and transmission events for individual viral particles as they happen in living cells. We demonstrate that de novo assembly is highly polarized towards zones of cell-cell contact. Viruses assembled approximately 10-fold more frequently at zones of cell contact with no change in assembly kinetics. Gag proteins were drawn to adhesive zones formed by viral Env glycoprotein and its cognate receptor to promote virus assembly at cell-cell contact. This process was dependent on the cytoplasmic tail of viral Env. Env lacking the cytoplasmic tail while still allowing for contact formation, failed to direct virus assembly towards contact sites. Our data describe a novel role for the viral Env glycoprotein in establishing cell-cell adhesion and polarization of assembly prior to becoming a fusion protein to allow virus entry into cells.

  4. A DEM contact model for history-dependent powder flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashibon, Adham; Schubert, Raphael; Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder handling process chain that greatly influences the characteristic structure and properties of the final part. Predictive modelling and simulation of the die-filling process can greatly contribute to the optimization of the part and the whole production procedure, e.g. by predicting the resulting powder compaction structure as a function of filling process parameters. The rheology of powders can be very difficult to model especially if heterogeneous agglomeration or time-dependent consolidation effects occur. We present a new discrete element contact force model that enables modelling complex powder flow characteristics including direct time-dependent consolidation effects and load history-dependent cohesion to describe the filling process of complex, difficult to handle powders. The model is demonstrated for simple flow and an industrial powder flow.

  5. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  6. Heavily doped polysilicon-contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Arienzo, M.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The first use of a (silicon)/heavily doped polysilicon)/(metal) structure to replace the conventional high-low junction or back-surface-field (BSF) structure of silicon solar cells is reported. Compared with BSF and back-ohmic-contact (BOC) control samples, the polysilicon-back solar cells show improvements in red spectral response (RSR) and open-circuit voltage. Measurement reveals that a decrease in effective surface recombination velocity S is responsible for this improvement. Decreased S results for n-type (Si:As) polysilicon, consistent with past findings for bipolar transistors, and for p-type (Si:B) polysilicon, reported here for the first time. Though the present polysilicon-back solar cells are far from optimal, the results suggest a new class of designs for high efficiency silicon solar cells. Detailed technical reasons are advanced to support this view.

  7. Polysaccharide-specific memory B cells generated by conjugate vaccines in humans conform to the CD27+IgG+ isotype-switched memory B Cell phenotype and require contact-dependent signals from bystander T cells activated by bacterial proteins to differentiate into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Edward T; Williams, Neil A; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Heyderman, Robert S; Finn, Adam

    2013-12-15

    The polysaccharides (PS) surrounding encapsulated bacteria are generally unable to activate T cells and hence do not induce B cell memory (BMEM). PS conjugate vaccines recruit CD4(+) T cells via a carrier protein, such as tetanus toxoid (TT), resulting in the induction of PS-specific BMEM. However, the requirement for T cells in the subsequent activation of the BMEM at the time of bacterial encounter is poorly understood, despite having critical implications for protection. We demonstrate that the PS-specific BMEM induced in humans by a meningococcal serogroup C PS (Men C)-TT conjugate vaccine conform to the isotype-switched (IgG(+)CD27(+)) rather than the IgM memory (IgM(+)CD27(+)) phenotype. Both Men C and TT-specific BMEM require CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into plasma cells. However, noncognate bystander T cells provide such signals to PS-specific BMEM with comparable effect to the cognate T cells available to TT-specific BMEM. The interaction between the two populations is contact-dependent and is mediated in part through CD40. Meningococci drive the differentiation of the Men C-specific BMEM through the activation of bystander T cells by bacterial proteins, although these signals are enhanced by T cell-independent innate signals. An effect of the TT-specific T cells activated by the vaccine on unrelated BMEM in vivo is also demonstrated. These data highlight that any protection conferred by PS-specific BMEM at the time of bacterial encounter will depend on the effectiveness with which bacterial proteins are able to activate bystander T cells. Priming for T cell memory against bacterial proteins through their inclusion in vaccine preparations must continue to be pursued.

  8. Cytokines and Langerhans cells in allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaie, M L; Olasz, E; Jacob, S E

    2008-06-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T-cell mediated cutaneous inflammatory reaction elicited by epicutaneous exposure to reactive chemicals, known as haptens, from cosmetic products or through environmental and occupational exposures. The best-studied haptens are low molecular weight chemicals (contact dermatitis. Haptens penetrate the skin and bind to self proteins to form complete antigens which are taken by antigen presenting cells to start a cascade of actions resulting in a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Larger molecules such as proteins induce response involving the humoral immune system. The environment at the time of antigen presentation affects the innate immune system which in turn influences the expression of CHS. The subsequent immunologic response (or lack thereof) is a result of complex interaction between both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. This interaction results in either an inflammatory immune response or tolerance.

  9. Design and fabrication of wraparound contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Both dielectric insulation and etched junction contact techniques were evaluated for use in wraparound contact cell fabrication. Since a suitable process for depositing the dielectrics was not achieved, the latter approach was taken. The relationship between loss of back contact and power degradation due to increased series resistance was established and used to design a simple contact configuration for 10 ohm-cm etched wraparound junction contact N/P cells. A slightly deeper junction significantly improved cell curve shape and the associated loss of current was regained by using thinner contact grid fingers. One thousand cells with efficiencies greater than 10.5% were fabricated to demonstrate the process.

  10. Contact angle dependence of the resonant properties of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre sessile drops of glycerol/water mixtures with glycerol compositions ranging from 0% to 75%. A photodiode was used to detect time dependent variations in the intensity of laser light reflected from the droplets. The intensity variations were Fourier transformed to obtain information about the resonant properties of the drops (frequency and width of the resonance). These experiments were performed on a range of different substrates where the contact angle formed by the droplets varied between 38±2^o and 160±4^o. The measured resonant frequency values were found to be in agreement with a recently developed theory of vibrations which considers standing wave states along the profile length of the droplet. The widths of the resonances were also compared with theories which predict the influence of substrate effects, surface contamination effects and bulk viscous effects on the damping of capillary waves at the free surface of the droplets. These experiments indicate that the dominant source of damping in sessile liquid droplet is due to bulk viscous effects but that for small contact angles damping due to the droplet/substrate interaction becomes more important.

  11. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solute concentration-dependent contact angle hysteresis and evaporation stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-07-08

    The presence of nonvolatile solutes in a liquid drop on a solid surface can affect the wetting properties. Depending on the surface-activity of the solutes, the extent of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can vary with their concentration and the pattern of the evaporation stain is altered accordingly. In this work, four types of concentration-dependent CAH and evaporation stains are identified for a water drop containing polymeric additives on polycarbonate. For polymers without surface-activity such as dextran, advancing and receding contact angles (θa and θr) are independent of solute concentrations, and a concentrated stain is observed in the vicinity of the drop center after complete evaporation. For polymers with weak surface-activity such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), both θa and θr are decreased by solute addition, and the stain pattern varies with increasing PEG concentration, including a concentrated stain and a mountain-like island. For polymers with intermediate surface-activity such as sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS), θa descends slightly, but θr decreases significantly after the addition of a substantial amount of NaPSS, and a ring-like stain pattern is observed. Moreover, the size of the ring stain can be controlled by NaPSS concentration. For polymers with strong surface-activity such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), θa remains essentially a constant, but θr is significantly lowered after the addition of a small amount of PVP, and the typical ring-like stain is seen.

  13. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  14. Ink-Jet Printer Forms Solar-Cell Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Paul, Jr.; Vest, R. W.; Binford, Don A.; Tweedell, Eric P.

    1988-01-01

    Contacts formed in controllable patterns with metal-based inks. System forms upper metal contact patterns on silicon photovoltaic cells. Uses metallo-organic ink, decomposes when heated, leaving behind metallic, electrically conductive residue in printed area.

  15. Carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, F.; Simon, M.; Bivour, M.; Reichel, C.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-05-01

    Carrier-selective contacts (i.e., minority carrier mirrors) are one of the last remaining obstacles to approaching the theoretical efficiency limit of silicon solar cells. In the 1980s, it was already demonstrated that n-type polysilicon and semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon emitters form carrier-selective emitters which enabled open-circuit voltages (Voc) of up to 720 mV. Albeit promising, to date a polysilicon emitter solar cell having a high fill factor (FF) has not been demonstrated yet. In this work, we report a polysilicon emitter related solar cell achieving both a high Voc = 694 mV and FF = 81%. The passivation mechanism of these so-called tunnel oxide passivated contacts will be outlined and the impact of TCO (transparent conductive oxide) deposition on the injection-dependent lifetime characteristic of the emitter as well as its implications on FF will be discussed. Finally, possible transport paths across the tunnel oxide barrier will be discussed and it will be shown that the passivating oxide layer does not lead to a relevant resistive loss and thus does not limit the solar cell's carrier transport. Contrary to amorphous silicon-based heterojunction solar cells, this structure also shows a good thermal stability and, thus, could be a very appealing option for next generation high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  16. Inelastic cotunneling with energy-dependent contact transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, S.; Agundez Mojarro, R. R.; Maduro, L. A.; Blaauboer, M.; Van Der Molen, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate inelastic cotunneling in a model system where the charging island is connected to the leads through molecules with energy-dependent transmission functions. To study this problem, we propose two different approaches. The first is a pragmatic approach that assumes Lorentzian-like transmission functions that determine the transmission probability to the island. Using this model, we calculate current versus voltage (IV) curves for increasing resonance level positions of the molecule. We find that shifting the resonance energy of the molecule away from the Fermi energy of the contacts leads to a decreased current at low bias, but as bias increases, this difference decreases and eventually inverses. This is markedly different from IV behavior outside the cotunneling regime. The second approach involves multiple cotunneling where also the molecules are considered to be in the Coulomb blockade regime. We find here that when Ec≫eV ,kBT , the IV behavior approaches the original cotunneling behavior proposed by Averin and Nazarov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 2446-2449 (1990)].

  17. Contact-free single-cell cultivation by negative dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Magnus S; Uhlig, Katja [Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering (IBMT), Am Muehlenberg 13, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Schnelle, Thomas [Zimmermann and Partner, European Patent Attorneys, Oranienburger Strasse 90, 10178 Berlin (Germany); Mueller, Torsten [JPK Instruments AG, Aufgang C, Haus 2, Bouchestrasse 12, 12435 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: magnus.jaeger@ibmt.fraunhofer.de

    2008-09-07

    In parallel to recent progress of high-content analysis in cell biology, negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) has continuously evolved as a potent tool for contact-free manipulation and investigation of single cells. As such, it can be especially beneficial for the handling of rare and valuable cells, e.g. in stem cell research, immunology and autologous therapy. Current nDEP applications are mainly based on flow-through systems where a small volume or single cells are pumped through microfluidic channels and analysed in seconds to minutes. Such short-term electric field exposures were repeatedly shown to be physiologically harmless. Conditions, however, might change in longer experiments when damages may accumulate. Therefore, we focus on potential limits to long-term nDEP application, with yeast serving as a model organism. Cells are reported to be successfully cultivated over several hours while suspended contact-freely in cell medium by nDEP. From comparisons of the cell division in nDEP structures under different electric conditions, conclusions are drawn with respect to which parameters govern the possible stress on the cells and how to avoid it. Firstly, the observed frequency dependence hints at an influence of the membrane polarization. Secondly, the inhibition of proliferation at high voltages is found to be overcome by external cooling of the microchips. This implies thermal effects on the cells. The warming is further examined by infrared (IR) thermometry. Despite its inherent drawbacks, IR provides a quick and easy method of determining the temperature of microfluidic systems without interfering local probes or reporter substances.

  18. Optimization of Rear Local Contacts on High Efficiency PERC Solar Cells Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapila Wijekoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A local contact formation process and integration scheme have been developed for the fabrication of rear passivated point contact solar cells. Conversion efficiency of 19.6% was achieved using  mm, pseudo square, p-type single crystalline silicon wafers. This is a significant improvement when compared to unpassivated, full area aluminum back surface field solar cells, which exhibit only 18.9% conversion efficiency on the same wafer type. The effect of rear contact formation on cell efficiency was studied as a function of contact area and contact pitch, hence the metallization fraction. Contact shape and the thickness of Al-BSF layer were found to be heavily dependent on the laser ablation pattern and contact area. Simulated cell parameters as a function of metallization showed that there is a tradeoff between open circuit voltage and fill factor gains as the metallization fraction varies. The rear surface was passivated with an Al2O3 layer and a capping layer. The rear surface contact pattern was created by laser ablation and the contact geometry was optimized to obtain voids free contact filling, resulting in a uniform back surface field. The efficiency gain in rear passivated cells over the reference cells is mainly due to improved short circuit current and open circuit voltage.

  19. Dynamic behavior of polymer surface and the time dependence of contact angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinping; CHEN Zhifang; SHEN Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Time-dependent contact angles were measured by depositing sessile drops of water on the polymer surfaces and monitoring the drop shape as a function of time. It was found that contact angles decreased sharply with contact time and the equilibrium contact angle was finally attained after a certain time. Values of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe) obtained by the sessile drop method depend on polymer properties. The Wilhelmy plate technique was used to measure advancing and receding contact angles. The variations of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe), advancing (θa) and receding contact angles (θr) have been studied on the oxidized surface of polymers containing polybutadiene block to explore the cause of time-dependence in contact angle measurement and the meaning of θs and θe. The results showed the linear relationships between starting (θs) and advancing contact angles (θa), the equilibrium (θe) and receding contact angles (θr). The similar relationship was also established between the contact angle hysteresis (θa-θr) and differences (θs-θe) in starting contact angles and equilibrium contact angles. Therefore, time-dependence in contact angle measurement was mainly attributed to the surface reconstruction when water drops were deposited on polymer surfaces. The starting contact angle was contributed by the hydrophobic component on polymer surface and the equilibrium contact angle mainly by the hydrophilic component of polymer. These results not only demonstrated the interdependency between two contact angle measurements, the sessile drop method and the Wilhelmy plate technique, but also provided the experimental evidence to explain the cause of time-dependent contact angle. This may also provide a new method to study dynamic behavior of polymer surface.

  20. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Calafate

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  1. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  2. Breast cancer cells stimulate osteoprotegerin (OPG production by endothelial cells through direct cell contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holen Ingunn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the sprouting of capillaries from existing blood vessels, is central to tumour growth and progression, however the molecular regulation of this process remains to be fully elucidated. The secreted glycoprotein osteoprotegerin (OPG is one potential pro-angiogenic factor, and clinical studies have demonstrated endothelial cells within a number of tumour types to express high levels of OPG compared to those in normal tissue. Additionally, OPG can increase endothelial cell survival, proliferation and migration, as well as induce endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. This study aims to elucidate the processes involved in the pro-angiogenic effects of OPG in vitro, and also how OPG levels may be regulated within the tumour microenvironment. Results It has previously been demonstrated that OPG can induce tube formation on growth factor reduced matrigel. In this study, we demonstrate that OPG enhances the pro-angiogenic effects of VEGF and that OPG does not stimulate endothelial cell tube formation through activation of the VEGFR2 receptor. We also show that cell contact between HuDMECs and the T47D breast cancer cell line increases endothelial cell OPG mRNA and protein secretion levels in in vitro co-cultures. These increases in endothelial cell OPG secretion were dependent on ανβ3 ligation and NFκB activation. In contrast, the pro-angiogenic factors VEGF, bFGF and TGFβ had no effect on HuDMEC OPG levels. Conclusion These findings suggest that the VEGF signalling pathway is not involved in mediating the pro-angiogenic effects of OPG on endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, we show that breast cancer cells cause increased levels of OPG expression by endothelial cells, and that direct contact between endothelial cells and tumour cells is required in order to increase endothelial OPG expression and secretion. Stimulation of OPG secretion was shown to involve ανβ3 ligation and NFκB activation.

  3. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  4. Thin foil silicon solar cells with coplanar back contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.; Baraona, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    To fabricate 50 microns thick, coplanar back contact (CBC) silicon solar cells, wraparound junction design was selected and proved to be effective. The process sequence used, the cell design, and the cell performance are described. CBC cells with low solar absorptance have shown AMO efficiencies to 13%, high cells up to 14%; further improvements are projected with predictable optimization.

  5. Primary cilia utilize glycoprotein-dependent adhesion mechanisms to stabilize long-lasting cilia-cilia contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ott Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central tenet of cilia function is sensing and transmitting information. The capacity to directly contact extracellular surfaces would empower primary cilia to probe the environment for information about the nature and location of nearby surfaces. It has been well established that flagella and other motile cilia perform diverse cellular functions through adhesion. We hypothesized that mammalian primary cilia also interact with the extracellular environment through direct physical contact. Methods We identified cilia in rod photoreceptors and cholangiocytes in fixed mouse tissues and examined the structures that these cilia contact in vivo. We then utilized an MDCK cell culture model to characterize the nature of the contacts we observed. Results In retina and liver tissue, we observed that cilia from nearby cells touch one another. Using MDCK cells, we found compelling evidence that these contacts are stable adhesions that form bridges between two cells, or networks between many cells. We examined the nature and duration of the cilia-cilia contacts and discovered primary cilia movements that facilitate cilia-cilia encounters. Stable adhesions form as the area of contact expands from a single point to a stretch of tightly bound, adjacent cilia membranes. The cilia-cilia contacts persisted for hours and were resistant to several harsh treatments such as proteases and DTT. Unlike many other cell adhesion mechanisms, calcium was not required for the formation or maintenance of cilia adhesion. However, swainsonine, which blocks maturation of N-linked glycoproteins, reduced contact formation. We propose that cellular control of adhesion maintenance is active because cilia adhesion did not prevent cell division; rather, contacts dissolved during mitosis as cilia were resorbed. Conclusions The demonstration that mammalian primary cilia formed prolonged, direct, physical contacts supports a novel paradigm: that mammalian primary

  6. Numerical study on short-circuit current of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the cathode work function,carriers mobilities and temperature on the short-circuit current of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts was numerically studied,and the quantitative dependences of the short-circuit current on these quantities were obtained.The results provide the theoretical foundation for experimental study of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts.

  7. Contact resistance at ceramic interfaces and its dependence on mechanical load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Søren; Hendriksen, P.V.

    2004-01-01

    Low contact resistance between individual components is important for solid oxide fuel cell stacks if high performance is to be achieved. Several mechanisms may result in high contact resistance, e.g., current constriction due to low area of contact and formation of resistive phases between...

  8. Morphological types of epithelial-mesenchymal cell contacts in odontogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, A. M.; Katchburian, E.

    1982-01-01

    During early stages of odontogenesis, differentiating ameloblasts form cytoplasmic processes which penetrate deeply into developing uncalcified dentine. Some of these cytoplasmic protrusions form close approximations or contacts with odontoblast processes. The contacts are of a variety of morphological types, but their membranes never fuse or form any known type of cell junction. The present results, together with those derived from other studies, suggest that the approximations or contacts m...

  9. Bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinari, A.; Gutiérrez, I.; Hulea, I.N.; Russo, S.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a systematic study of the bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors with Ni, Co, Cu, Au, and Pt electrodes. They show that the reproducibility in the values of contact resistance strongly depends on the metal, ranging from a factor of 2 f

  10. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  11. Direct contact between dendritic cells and bronchial epithelial cells inhibits T cell recall responses towards mite and pollen allergen extracts in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazian, Dick; Wagtmann, Valery R; Hansen, Soren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form a polarized barrier along the respiratory tract. They are the first point of contact with airborne antigens and are able to instruct resident immune cells to mount appropriate immune responses by either soluble or contact-dependent mechanisms. Objec...

  12. Study of Back Contacts for CdTe Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    ZnTe/ZnTe∶Cu layer is used as a complex back contact. The parameters of CdTe solar cells with and without the complex back contacts are compared. The effects of un-doped layer thickness, doped concentration and post-deposition annealing temperature of the complex layer on solar cells performance are investigated.The results show that ZnTe/ZnTe∶Cu layer can improve back contacts and largely increase the conversion efficiency of CdTe solar cells. Un-doped layer and post-deposition annealing of high temperature can increase open voltage. Using the complex back contact, a small CdTe cell with fill factor of 73.14% and conversion efficiency of 12.93% is obtained.

  13. Morphological types of epithelial-mesenchymal cell contacts in odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, A M; Katchburian, E

    1982-01-01

    During early stages of odontogenesis, differentiating ameloblasts form cytoplasmic processes which penetrate deeply into developing uncalcified dentine. Some of these cytoplasmic protrusions form close approximations or contacts with odontoblast processes. The contacts are of a variety of morphological types, but their membranes never fuse or form any known type of cell junction. The present results, together with those derived from other studies, suggest that the approximations or contacts may play a role in inductive mechanisms of the cytodifferentiation of odontogenic cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7153175

  14. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Gardel, Margaret L

    2011-03-22

    Cells in tissues are mechanically coupled both to the ECM and neighboring cells, but the coordination and interdependency of forces sustained at cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that the endogenous force sustained at the cell-cell contact between a pair of epithelial cells is approximately 100 nN, directed perpendicular to the cell-cell interface and concentrated at the contact edges. This force is stably maintained over time despite significant fluctuations in cell-cell contact length and cell morphology. A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell-cell force exists, indicating that the cell-cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction. Thus, modulation of ECM properties that impact cell-ECM traction alters cell-cell tension. Finally, we show in a minimal model of a tissue that all cells experience similar forces from the surrounding microenvironment, despite differences in the extent of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion. This interdependence of cell-cell and cell-ECM forces has significant implications for the maintenance of the mechanical integrity of tissues, mechanotransduction, and tumor mechanobiology.

  15. Contact behavior modelling and its size effect on proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diankai; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Contact behavior between the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and bipolar plate (BPP) is of significant importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Most current studies on contact behavior utilize experiments and finite element modelling and focus on fuel cells with graphite BPPs, which lead to high costs and huge computational requirements. The objective of this work is to build a more effective analytical method for contact behavior in fuel cells and investigate the size effect resulting from configuration alteration of channel and rib (channel/rib). Firstly, a mathematical description of channel/rib geometry is outlined in accordance with the fabrication of metallic BPP. Based on the interface deformation characteristic and Winkler surface model, contact pressure between BPP and GDL is then calculated to predict contact resistance and GDL porosity as evaluative parameters of contact behavior. Then, experiments on BPP fabrication and contact resistance measurement are conducted to validate the model. The measured results demonstrate an obvious dependence on channel/rib size. Feasibility of the model used in graphite fuel cells is also discussed. Finally, size factor is proposed for evaluating the rule of size effect. Significant increase occurs in contact resistance and porosity for higher size factor, in which channel/rib width decrease.

  16. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  17. High efficiency interdigitated back contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, P.; van de Wiele, F.; Stehelin, G.; Floret, F.; David, J. P.

    Interdigitated back contact (IBC) silicon solar cells with 25.6 percent efficiency at 10 W/sq cm and 24.4 percent at 30 W/ sq cm were fabricated. The authors report on the technological process, which produces a high effective carrier lifetime in the bulk (780 microsec), and on the characterization of the cells. The front side of these cells is textured and has an efficient polka-dot floating tandem junction. IBC and point-contact (PC) cells are fabricated on the same substrate and their efficiencies are compared. The possiblity of reaching 29 percent efficiency at 300X is shown.

  18. Collective motion of cells crawling on a substrate: roles of cell shape and contact inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Schnyder, Simon Kaspar; Molina, John Jairo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Contact inhibition plays a crucial role in the motility of cells, the process of wound healing, and the formation of tumors. By mimicking the mechanical motion of calls crawling on a substrate using a pseudopod, we constructed a minimal model for migrating cells which gives rise to contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) naturally. The model cell consists of two disks, one in the front (a pseudopod) and the other one in the back (cell body), connected by a finitely extensible spring. Despite the simplicity of the model, the cells' collective behavior is highly nontrivial, depending on the shape of cells and whether CIL is enabled or not. Cells with a small front circle (i.e. a narrow pseudopod) form immobile colonies. In contrast, cells with a large front circle (i.e. such as a lamellipodium) exhibit coherent migration without any explicit alignment mechanism being present in the model. This suggests that crawling cells often exhibit broad fronts because it helps them avoid clustering. Upon increasing the dens...

  19. Cigarette smoke impairs airway epithelial barrier function and cell-cell contact recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Postma, D S; van Oosterhout, A J M

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), induces aberrant airway epithelial structure and function. The underlying mechanisms are unresolved so far. We studied effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on epithelial barrier function and wound regeneration in human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from COPD patients, nonsmokers and healthy smokers. We demonstrate that CSE rapidly and transiently impairs 16HBE barrier function, largely due to disruption of cell-cell contacts. CSE induced a similar, but stronger and more sustained, defect in PBECs. Application of the specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 showed that EGFR activation contributes to the CSE-induced defects in both 16HBE cells and PBECs. Furthermore, our data indicate that the endogenous protease calpain mediates these defects through tight junction protein degradation. CSE also delayed the reconstitution of 16HBE intercellular contacts during wound healing and attenuated PBEC barrier function upon wound regeneration. These findings were comparable between PBECs from smokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CSE reduces epithelial integrity, probably by EGFR and calpain-dependent disruption of intercellular contacts. This may increase susceptibility to environmental insults, e.g. inhaled pathogens. Thus, EGFR may be a promising target for therapeutic strategies to improve mucosal barrier function in cigarette smoking-related disease.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of an electrically contacted vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschner, R; Ritter, R; Kübler, H; Frühauf, N; Kurz, E; Löw, R; Pfau, T

    2012-06-15

    We demonstrate the use of electrically contacted vapor cells to switch the transmission of a probe laser. The excitation scheme makes use of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state. The cell fabrication technique involves thin-film-based electric feedthroughs, which are well suited for scaling this concept to many addressable pixels like in flat panel displays.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of an electrically contacted vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Daschner, Renate; Kübler, Harald; Frühauf, Norbert; Kurz, Eberhard; Löw, Robert; Pfau, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of electrically contacted vapor cells to switch the transmission of a probe laser. The excitation scheme makes use of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state. The cell fabrication technique involves thinfilm based electric feedthroughs which are well suited for scaling this concept to many addressable pixels like in flat panel displays.

  2. The Mast Cell, Contact, and Coagulation System Connection in Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Guilarte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction, resulting from the effect of mediators and chemotactic substances released by activated cells. Mast cells and basophils are considered key players in IgE-mediated human anaphylaxis. Beyond IgE-mediated activation of mast cells/basophils, further mechanisms are involved in the occurrence of anaphylaxis. New insights into the potential relevance of pathways other than mast cell and basophil degranulation have been unraveled, such as the activation of the contact and the coagulation systems. Mast cell heparin released upon activation provides negatively charged surfaces for factor XII (FXII binding and auto-activation. Activated FXII, the initiating serine protease in both the contact and the intrinsic coagulation system, activates factor XI and prekallikrein, respectively. FXII-mediated bradykinin (BK formation has been proven in the human plasma of anaphylactic patients as well as in experimental models of anaphylaxis. Moreover, the severity of anaphylaxis is correlated with the increase in plasma heparin, BK formation and the intensity of contact system activation. FXII also activates plasminogen in the fibrinolysis system. Mast cell tryptase has been shown to participate in fibrinolysis through plasmin activation and by facilitating the degradation of fibrinogen. Some usual clinical manifestations in anaphylaxis, such as angioedema or hypotension, or other less common, such as metrorrhagia, may be explained by the direct effect of the activation of the coagulation and contact system driven by mast cell mediators.

  3. Naegleria fowleri: contact-dependent secretion of electrondense granules (EDG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Villatoro, Lizbeth Salazar; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco Aurelio; Segovia-Gamboa, Norma; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2014-07-01

    The free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is pathogenic to humans but also to other mammalians. These amoebae may invade the nasal mucosa and migrate into the brain causing cerebral hemorrhagic necrosis, a rapidly fatal infection. Knowledge of the cytolytic mechanism involved in the destruction of brain tissues by Naegleria trophozoites is limited. In other amoebic species, such as Entamoeba histolytica, we have previously reported the possible lytic role of small cytoplasmic components endowed with proteolytic activities, known as electrondense granules (EDG). Using transmission electron microscopy we now report that EDG, seldom found in long term cultured N. fowleri, are present in abundance in trophozoites recovered from experimental mice brain lesions. Numerous EDG were also observed in amoebae incubated with collagen substrates or cultured epithelial cells. SDS-PAGE assays of concentrated supernatants of these trophozoites, containing EDG, revealed proteolytic activities. These results suggest that EDG may have a clear role in the cytopathic mechanisms of this pathogenic amoeba.

  4. Substrate Stiffness and Cell Area Predict Cellular Traction Stresses in Single Cells and Cells in Contact

    OpenAIRE

    Califano, Joseph P.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2010-01-01

    Cells generate traction stresses against their substrate during adhesion and migration, and traction stresses are used in part by the cell to sense the substrate. While it is clear that traction stresses, substrate stiffness, and cell area are related, it is unclear whether or how area and substrate stiffness affect force generation in cells. Moreover, multiple studies have investigated traction stresses of single cells, but few have focused on forces exerted by cells in contact, which more c...

  5. Mast cell synapses and exosomes: membrane contacts for information exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eCarroll-Portillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their central role in allergy, mast cells are involved in a wide variety of cellular interactions during homeostasis and disease. In this review, we discuss the ability of mast cells to extend their mechanisms for intercellular communication beyond the release of soluble mediators. These include formation of mast cell synapses on antigen presenting surfaces, as well as cell-cell contacts with dendritic cells and T cells. Release of membrane-bound exosomes also provide for the transfer of antigen, mast cell proteins and RNA to other leukocytes. With the recognition of the extended role mast cells have during immune modulation, further investigation of the processes in which mast cells are involved is necessary. This reopens mast cell research to exciting possibilities, demonstrating it to be an immunological frontier.

  6. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Robert L., E-mail: jackson@auburn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  7. Pneumococcal Competence Coordination Relies on a Cell-Contact Sensing Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Prudhomme

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved various inducible genetic programs to face many types of stress that challenge their growth and survival. Competence is one such program. It enables genetic transformation, a major horizontal gene transfer process. Competence development in liquid cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae is synchronized within the whole cell population. This collective behavior is known to depend on an exported signaling Competence Stimulating Peptide (CSP, whose action generates a positive feedback loop. However, it is unclear how this CSP-dependent population switch is coordinated. By monitoring spontaneous competence development in real time during growth of four distinct pneumococcal lineages, we have found that competence shift in the population relies on a self-activated cell fraction that arises via a growth time-dependent mechanism. We demonstrate that CSP remains bound to cells during this event, and conclude that the rate of competence development corresponds to the propagation of competence by contact between activated and quiescent cells. We validated this two-step cell-contact sensing mechanism by measuring competence development during co-cultivation of strains with altered capacity to produce or respond to CSP. Finally, we found that the membrane protein ComD retains the CSP, limiting its free diffusion in the medium. We propose that competence initiator cells originate stochastically in response to stress, to form a distinct subpopulation that then transmits the CSP by cell-cell contact.

  8. Total Internal Reflection for Effectively Transparent Solar Cell Contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Jahelka, Phillip; Atwater, Harry

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for eliminating photocurrent losses due to the metal contacts on the front of a solar cell was proposed, simulated, and tested. By placing triangular cross-section lines of low refractive index on top of the contacts, total-internal reflection at the interface of the low-index triangles and the surrounding material can direct light away from the metal and into the photoactive absorber. Simulations indicated that losses can be eliminated for any incident angle, and that yearly energy production improvements commensurate with the metallized area are possible. Proof of principle experiments were carried out to eliminate the reflective losses of a commercial solar cell's busbar contact. Spatially resolved laser beam induced current measurements demonstrated that reflection losses due to the busbar were reduced by voids with triangular cross-section.

  9. Temperature dependence of the universal contact parameter in a unitary Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnle, E D; Hoinka, S; Dyke, P; Hu, H; Hannaford, P; Vale, C J

    2011-04-29

    The contact I, introduced by Tan, has emerged as a key parameter characterizing universal properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. For ultracold Fermi gases near a Feshbach resonance, the contact depends upon two quantities: the interaction parameter 1/(k(F)a), where k(F) is the Fermi wave vector and a is the s-wave scattering length, and the temperature T/T(F), where T(F) is the Fermi temperature. We present the first measurements of the temperature dependence of the contact in a unitary Fermi gas using Bragg spectroscopy. The contact is seen to follow the predicted decay with temperature and shows how pair-correlations at high momentum persist well above the superfluid transition temperature.

  10. INKJET PRINTING OF NICKEL AND SILVER METAL SOLAR CELL CONTACTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquarelli, R.; Curtis, C.; Van Hest, M.

    2008-01-01

    With about 125,000 terawatts of solar power striking the earth at any given moment, solar energy may be the only renewable energy resource with enough capacity to meet a major portion of our future energy needs. Thin-fi lm technologies and solution deposition processes seek to reduce manufacturing costs in order to compete with conventional coal-based electricity. Inkjet printing, as a derivative of the direct-write process, offers the potential for low-cost, material-effi cient deposition of the metals for photovoltaic contacts. Advances in contact metallizations are important because they can be employed on existing silicon technology and in future-generation devices. We report on the atmospheric, non-contact deposition of nickel (Ni) and silver (Ag) metal patterns on glass, Si, and ZnO substrates at 180–220°C from metal-organic precursor inks using a Dimatix inkjet printer. Near-bulk conductivity Ag contacts were successfully printed up to 4.5 μm thick and 130 μm wide on the silicon nitride antirefl ective coating of silicon solar cells. Thin, high-resolution Ni adhesion-layer lines were printed on glass and zinc oxide at 80 μm wide and 55 nm thick with a conductivity two orders of magnitude less than the bulk metal. Additionally, the ability to print multi-layered metallizations (Ag on Ni) on transparent conducting oxides was demonstrated and is promising for contacts in copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cells. Future work will focus on further improving resolution, printing full contact devices, and investigating copper inks as a low-cost replacement for Ag contacts.

  11. Inverted Silicon Nanopencil Array Solar Cells with Enhanced Contact Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoguang; Shu, Lei; Lin, Hao; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Guofa; Yip, Senpo; Xiu, Fei; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    Although three-dimensional nanostructured solar cells have attracted extensive research attention due to their superior broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting properties, majority of them are still suffered from complicated fabrication processes as well as disappointed photovoltaic performances. Here, we employed our newly-developed, low-cost and simple wet anisotropic etching to fabricate hierarchical silicon nanostructured arrays with different solar cell contact design, followed by systematic investigations of their photovoltaic characteristics. Specifically, nano-arrays with the tapered tips (e.g. inverted nanopencils) are found to enable the more conformal top electrode deposition directly onto the nanostructures for better series and shunt conductance, but its insufficient film coverage at the basal plane would still restrict the charge carrier collection. In contrast, the low-platform contact design facilitates a substantial photovoltaic device performance enhancement of ~24%, as compared to the one of conventional top electrode design, due to the shortened current path and improved lateral conductance for the minimized carrier recombination and series resistance. This enhanced contact structure can not only maintain excellent photon-trapping behaviors of nanostructures, but also help to eliminate adverse impacts of these tapered nano-morphological features on the contact resistance, providing further insight into design consideration in optimizing the contact geometry for high-performance nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

  12. From front contact to back contact in cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide solar cells: Buffer layer and interfacial layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussillon, Yann

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) polycrystalline thin film solar cells, with their near optimum direct band-gap of 1.4 eV matching almost perfectly the sun radiation spectrum, are a strong contender as a less expensive alternative, among photovoltaic materials, than the more commonly used silicon-based cells. Polycrystalline solar cells are usually deposited over large areas. Such devices often exhibit strong fluctuations (nonuniformities) in electronic properties, which originate from deposition and post-deposition processes, and are detrimental to the device performance. Therefore their effects need to be constrained. A new approach in this work was, when a CdS/CdTe solar cell is exposed to light and immersed in a proper electrolyte, fluctuations in surface potential can drive electrochemical reactions which result in a nonuniform interfacial layer that could balance the original nonuniformity. This approach improved the device efficiency for CdS/CdTe photovoltaic devices from 1--3% to 11--12%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS), used as a window layer and heterojunction partner to CdTe, is electrically inactive and absorb light energies above its band-gap of 2.4 eV. Therefore, to maximize the device efficiency, a thin US layer needs to be used. However, more defects, such as pinholes, are likely to be present in the film, leading to shunts. A resistive transparent layer, called buffer layer, is therefore deposited before CdS. A key observation was that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for cells made using a buffer layer was high, around 800 mV, similar to cells without buffer layer after Cu doping. The standard p-n junction theory cannot explain this phenomena, therefore an alternative junction mechanism, similar to metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, was developed. Furthermore, alternative Cu-free back-contacts were used in conjunction with a buffer layer. The Voc of the devices was found to be dependent of the back contact used. This change occurs as the back-contact junction

  13. Dual Role of a Biosynthetic Enzyme, CysK, in Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Kaundal

    Full Text Available Contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI is the phenomenon where CDI+ bacterial strain (inhibitor inhibits the growth of CDI-strain (target by direct cell to cell contact. CDI is mediated by cdiBAI gene cluster where CdiB facilitates the export of CdiA, an exotoxin, on the cell surface and CdiI acts as an immunity protein to protect CDI+ cells from autoinhibition. CdiA-CT, the C-terminal region of the toxin CdiA, from uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (UPEC536 is a latent tRNase that requires binding of a biosynthetic enzyme CysK (O-acetylserine sulfyhydrylase for activation in the target cells. CdiA-CT can also interact simultaneously with CysK and immunity protein, CdiI, to form a ternary complex in UPEC536. But the role of CysK in the ternary complex is not clear. We studied the hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of binary and ternary complexes using AUC, ITC and SPR respectively, to investigate the role of CysK in UPEC536. We report that CdiA-CT binds CdiI and CysK with nanomolar range affinity. We further report that binding of CysK to CdiA-CT improves its affinity towards CdiI by ~40 fold resulting in the formation of a more stable complex with over ~130 fold decrease in dissociation rate. Thermal melting experiments also suggest the role of CysK in stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex as Tm of the binary complex shifts ~10°C upon binding CysK. Hence, CysK acts a modulator of CdiA-CT/CdiI interactions by stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex and may play a crucial role in preventing autoinhibition in UPEC536. This study reports a new moonlighting function of a biosynthetic enzyme, CysK, as a modulator of toxin/immunity interactions in UPEC536 inhibitor cells.

  14. Optimization of tapered busses for solar cell contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    Some fraction of the power produced by a solar cell is necessarily lost by series resistance associated with the metallized contact grid and by shadowing of cell active area by the grid. There are several approaches to reducing these losses, such as choosing a more efficient pattern, optimizing line spacing, and using tapered buses. The present paper analyzes tapered lines and derives from this analysis a theoretical lower bound to metallization power loss, independent of pattern chosen.

  15. DSA template optimization for contact layer in 1D standard cell design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zigang; Du, Yuelin; Tian, Haitong; Wong, Martin D. F.; Yi, He; Wong, H.-S. Philip

    2014-03-01

    At the 7 nm technology node, the contact layers of integrated circuits (IC) are too dense to be printed by single exposure lithography. Block copolymer directed self-assembly (DSA) has shown its advantage in contact/via patterning with high throughput and low cost. To pattern contacts with DSA, guiding templates are usually printed first with conventional lithography, e.g., 193 nm immersion lithography (193i) that has a coarser pitch resolution. Contact holes are then patterned with DSA process. The guiding templates play the role of controlling the DSA patterns inside, which have a finer resolution than the templates. The DSA contact pitch depends on the chemical property of block copolymer and it can be adjusted within a certain range under strong lateral confinement to deviate from the natural pitch. As a result, different patterns can be obtained through different parameters. Although the guiding template shapes can be arbitrary, the overlay accuracy of the contact holes patterned are different and largely depend on the templates. Thus, the guiding templates that have tolerable variations are considered as feasible, and those have large overlays are considered as infeasible. To pattern the contact layer in a layout with DSA technology, we must ensure that all the DSA templates in the layout are feasible. However, the original layout may not be designed in a DSA-friendly way. Moreover, the routing process may introduce contacts that can only be patterned by infeasible templates. In this paper, we propose an optimization algorithm that optimize the contact layer for DSA patterning in 1D standard cell design. In particular, the algorithm modifies the layout via wire permutation technique to redistribute the contacts such that the use of infeasible templates is avoided and the feasible patterns that with better overlay control are favored. The experimental result demonstrate the ability of the proposed algorithm in helping to reduce the design and manufacturing

  16. Effect of contact with titanium alloys on the proliferation of mouse osteoblastic cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Hiroyuki; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Hibino, Yasushi; Yokote, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed at studying the effect of contact with titanium alloy plates of different surface textures on the proliferative capability of mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. First, the proliferation characteristics of MC3T3-E1 cells were investigated. MC3T3-E1 cells showed a high capacity for proliferation and survived for a long period even under nutritionally starved conditions. During logarithmic cell growth, the consumption of Ser, Gln, Val, Ile and Leu increased time-dependently. Contact with an hydoxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium alloy plate resulted in the increase in the recovery of cells from the plate by trypsin, and an increase in the consumption of these amino acids, suggesting enhanced cell proliferation. On the contrary, contact with the sandblasted and anodized titanium alloy plates resulted in the reduction of the recovery of the cells from the plate, but a slight increase in the amino acid consumption, suggesting the tight adhesion of the cells to the plates. This study demonstrates that the present method, based on the amino acid consumption of the cells, is useful for monitoring the cell proliferative capability, without detachment of the cells from the plate. This method may be applicable to the study of the interaction between cells and metal plates.

  17. Statistical model of rough surface contact accounting for size-dependent plasticity and asperity interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Vakis, A. I.; Liu, X.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2017-09-01

    The work by Greenwood and Williamson (GW) has initiated a simple but effective method of contact mechanics: statistical modeling based on the mechanical response of a single asperity. Two main assumptions of the original GW model are that the asperity response is purely elastic and that there is no interaction between asperities. However, as asperities lie on a continuous substrate, the deformation of one asperity will change the height of all other asperities through deformation of the substrate and will thus influence subsequent contact evolution. Moreover, a high asperity contact pressure will result in plasticity, which below tens of microns is size dependent, with smaller being harder. In this paper, the asperity interaction effect is taken into account through substrate deformation, while a size-dependent plasticity model is adopted for individual asperities. The intrinsic length in the strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theory is obtained by fitting to two-dimensional discrete dislocation plasticity simulations of the flattening of a single asperity. By utilizing the single asperity response in three dimensions and taking asperity interaction into account, a statistical calculation of rough surface contact is performed. The effectiveness of the statistical model is addressed by comparison with full-detail finite element simulations of rough surface contact using SGP. Throughout the paper, our focus is on the difference of contact predictions based on size-dependent plasticity as compared to conventional size-independent plasticity.

  18. Sliding contact loading enhances the tensile properties of mesenchymal stem cell-seeded hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Huang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of cartilage tissue engineering is to recapitulate the functional properties and structural features of native articular cartilage. While there has been some success in generating near-native compressive properties, the tensile properties of cell-seeded constructs remain poor, and key features of cartilage, including inhomogeneity and anisotropy, are generally absent in these engineered constructs. Therefore, in an attempt to instill these hallmark properties of cartilage in engineered cell-seeded constructs, we designed and characterized a novel sliding contact bioreactor to recapitulate the mechanical stimuli arising from physiologic joint loading (two contacting cartilage layers. Finite element modeling of this bioreactor system showed that tensile strains were direction-dependent, while both tensile strains and fluid motion were depth-dependent and highest in the region closest to the contact surface. Short-term sliding contact of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-seeded agarose improved chondrogenic gene expression in a manner dependent on both the axial strain applied and transforming growth factor-β supplementation. Using the optimized loading parameters derived from these short-term studies, long-term sliding contact was applied to MSC-seeded agarose constructs for 21 d. After 21 d, sliding contact significantly improved the tensile properties of MSC-seeded constructs and elicited alterations in type II collagen and proteoglycan accumulation as a function of depth; staining for these matrix molecules showed intense localization in the surface regions. These findings point to the potential of sliding contact to produce engineered cartilage constructs that begin to recapitulate the complex mechanical features of the native tissue.

  19. Simple processing of back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells using selective-area crystalline growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Andrea; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Jeangros, Quentin; Haschke, Jan; Christmann, Gabriel; Barraud, Loris; Descoeudres, Antoine; Seif, Johannes Peter; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; de Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    For crystalline-silicon solar cells, voltages close to the theoretical limit are nowadays readily achievable when using passivating contacts. Conversely, maximal current generation requires the integration of the electron and hole contacts at the back of the solar cell to liberate its front from any shadowing loss. Recently, the world-record efficiency for crystalline-silicon single-junction solar cells was achieved by merging these two approaches in a single device; however, the complexity of fabricating this class of devices raises concerns about their commercial potential. Here we show a contacting method that substantially simplifies the architecture and fabrication of back-contacted silicon solar cells. We exploit the surface-dependent growth of silicon thin films, deposited by plasma processes, to eliminate the patterning of one of the doped carrier-collecting layers. Then, using only one alignment step for electrode definition, we fabricate a proof-of-concept 9-cm2 tunnel-interdigitated back-contact solar cell with a certified conversion efficiency >22.5%.

  20. Simple processing of back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells using selective-area crystalline growth

    KAUST Repository

    Tomasi, Andrea

    2017-04-24

    For crystalline-silicon solar cells, voltages close to the theoretical limit are nowadays readily achievable when using passivating contacts. Conversely, maximal current generation requires the integration of the electron and hole contacts at the back of the solar cell to liberate its front from any shadowing loss. Recently, the world-record efficiency for crystalline-silicon single-junction solar cells was achieved by merging these two approaches in a single device; however, the complexity of fabricating this class of devices raises concerns about their commercial potential. Here we show a contacting method that substantially simplifies the architecture and fabrication of back-contacted silicon solar cells. We exploit the surface-dependent growth of silicon thin films, deposited by plasma processes, to eliminate the patterning of one of the doped carrier-collecting layers. Then, using only one alignment step for electrode definition, we fabricate a proof-of-concept 9-cm2 tunnel-interdigitated back-contact solar cell with a certified conversion efficiency >22.5%.

  1. Thermometry in dielectrophoresis chips for contact-free cell handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, M. S.; Mueller, T.; Schnelle, T.

    2007-01-01

    Cell biology applications, protocols in immunology and stem cell research, require that individual cells are handled under strict control of their contacts to other cells or synthetic surfaces. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic chips is an established technique to investigate, group, wash, cultivate and sort cells contact-free under physiological conditions: microelectrode octode cages, versatile dielectrophoretic elements energized with radio frequency electric fields, stably trap single cells or cellular aggregates. For medical applications and cell cultivation, possible side effects of the dielectrophoretic manipulation, such as membrane polarization and Joule heating, have to be quantified. Therefore, we characterized the electric field-induced warming in dielectrophoretic cages using ohmic resistance measurements, fluorometry, liquid crystal beads, infra-red thermography and bubble size thermometry. We compare the results of these techniques with respect to the influences of voltage, electric conductivity of buffer, frequency, cage size and electrode surface. We conclude that in the culture medium thermal effects may be neglected if low voltages and an electric field-reducing phase pattern are used. Our experimental results provide explicit values for estimating the thermal effect on dielectrophoretically caged cells and show that Joule heating is best minimized by optimizing the cage geometry and reducing the buffer conductivity. The results may additionally serve to evaluate and improve theoretical predictions on field-induced effects. Based on present-day chip processing possibilities, DEP is well suited for the manipulation of cells.

  2. History-Dependent Problems with Applications to Contact Models for Elastic Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosz, Krzysztof; Kalita, Piotr; Migórski, Stanisław; Ochal, Anna, E-mail: ochal@ii.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science (Poland); Sofonea, Mircea [Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique (France)

    2016-02-15

    We prove an existence and uniqueness result for a class of subdifferential inclusions which involve a history-dependent operator. Then we specialize this result in the study of a class of history-dependent hemivariational inequalities. Problems of such kind arise in a large number of mathematical models which describe quasistatic processes of contact. To provide an example we consider an elastic beam in contact with a reactive obstacle. The contact is modeled with a new and nonstandard condition which involves both the subdifferential of a nonconvex and nonsmooth function and a Volterra-type integral term. We derive a variational formulation of the problem which is in the form of a history-dependent hemivariational inequality for the displacement field. Then, we use our abstract result to prove its unique weak solvability. Finally, we consider a numerical approximation of the model, solve effectively the approximate problems and provide numerical simulations.

  3. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  4. Better Back Contacts for Solar Cells on Flexible Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lawrence M.; Ribelin, Rosine M.

    2006-01-01

    Improved low-resistance, semitransparent back contacts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed for solar photovoltaic cells that are made from thin films of I-III-VI2 semiconductor materials on flexible, high-temperatureresistant polyimide substrates or superstrates. The innovative aspect of the present development lies in the extension, to polyimide substrates or superstrates, of a similar prior development of improved low-resistance, semitransparent back contacts for I-III-VI2 solar cells on glass substrates or superstrates. A cell incorporating this innovation can be used either as a stand-alone photovoltaic device or as part of a monolithic stack containing another photovoltaic device that utilizes light of longer wavelengths.

  5. Behavior of interdigitated back-contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L. J.; Leung, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data concerning operation mechanisms of two versions of interdigitated back-contact solar cells: the tandem junction cell and the front-surface field cell. It is shown that a photogenerated forward bias at the front junction of a tandem junction cell is a critical parameter for cell performance which not only causes photogenerated carriers to migrate to the back junction, but also eliminates the reduction in photoresponse over back p(+) metallization regions. However, no similar light effects are observed in the performance of front-surface field cells. Finally, a discussion on mechanisms concerning the performance of front-surface field and tandem junction cells along with their merits is given.

  6. Modeling of InGaN/Si tandem cells: comparison between 2-contacts/4-contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Huni, Walid; Migan, Anne; Alamarguy, David; Djebbour, Zakaria

    2017-03-01

    Due to its electrical and optical interesting properties, InGaN alloy is being intensively studied to be combined with silicon in order to achieve low-cost high-efficiency solar cell. However, a relatively thick monophasic layer of InGaN is difficult to grow due to the relaxation issue in material. This issue can be avoided by semibulk structure. In this work, we present an InGaN/Si double-junction solar cell modeled using Silvaco-ATLAS TCAD software. We have taken into account polarization effect in III-N materials. We have shown that 50% of indium is needed to ensure the current matching between the top cell and the bottom cell in 2-terminal configuration. Such high indium composition is technologically challenging to grow. Thus, we have modeled a 4-terminals solar cell with relatively low indium composition (In = 25%) where current matching is not needed. With technologically feasible structural parameters, we have shown that an efficiency near to 30% can be achieved with InGaN/Si 4-contact tandem cell.

  7. Asymmetric and speed-dependent contact angle hysteresis and relaxation of a suddenly stopped moving contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi; Wang, Yong Jian; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    We report direct atomic-force-microscope measurements of capillary force hysteresis and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (CL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic fiber intersecting a water-air interface. The measured capillary force hysteresis and CL relaxation show a strong asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier-crossing is utilized to find the underlying energy barrier Eb and size λ associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic frame-work, and the advancing and receding CLs are influenced by two different sets of relatively wetting and non-wetting defects on the fiber surface. Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  8. Fuel cell electrode interconnect contact material encapsulation and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derose, Anthony J.; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Gudyka, Russell A.; Bonadies, Joseph V.; Silvis, Thomas W.

    2016-05-31

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cell cassettes each including a fuel cell with an anode and a cathode. Each fuel cell cassette also includes an electrode interconnect adjacent to the anode or the cathode for providing electrical communication between an adjacent fuel cell cassette and the anode or the cathode. The interconnect includes a plurality of electrode interconnect protrusions defining a flow passage along the anode or the cathode for communicating oxidant or fuel to the anode or the cathode. An electrically conductive material is disposed between at least one of the electrode interconnect protrusions and the anode or the cathode in order to provide a stable electrical contact between the electrode interconnect and the anode or cathode. An encapsulating arrangement segregates the electrically conductive material from the flow passage thereby, preventing volatilization of the electrically conductive material in use of the fuel cell stack.

  9. Time dependent FTIR spectra of mineral waters after contact with air

    CERN Document Server

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    FTIR spectra of mineral waters of Slavyanovskaya, Aqua Montana, Bad Harzburger and Christinen with time from first contact of water with open air were analysed. The kinetic of spectral changes of Slavyanovskaya mineral water in the regions of stretch, deformation and intermolecular vibrations was measured. The spectral changes do not correlate with chemical contamination of mineral water and degassing process. The observed spectral changes could be due to different structure of mineral water in liquid state, which is destroyed after air contact. The observed spectral behaviour of Slavyanovskaya is correlated with the catalytic activity of mineral water, which was saved without contact with air. The characteristic time of spectral dependence (669 seconds) is close to the characteristic time of catalytic activity loss (600 seconds) of mineral water at air contact. The spectra results support the medical studies that show the activity of mineral water near spring, and the loosing activity of water after long tim...

  10. Dynamic history-dependent variational-hemivariational inequalities with applications to contact mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migórski, Stanislaw; Ogorzaly, Justyna

    2017-02-01

    In the paper we deliver a new existence and uniqueness result for a class of abstract nonlinear variational-hemivariational inequalities which are governed by two operators depending on the history of the solution, and include two nondifferentiable functionals, a convex and a nonconvex one. Then, we consider an initial boundary value problem which describes a model of evolution of a viscoelastic body in contact with a foundation. The contact process is assumed to be dynamic, and the friction is described by subdifferential boundary conditions. Both the constitutive law and the contact condition involve memory operators. As an application of the abstract theory, we provide a result on the unique weak solvability of the contact problem.

  11. Molar volume and adsorption isotherm dependence of capillary forces in nanoasperity contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, David B; Kim, Seong H

    2007-11-20

    The magnitude of the capillary force at any given temperature and adsorbate partial pressure depends primarily on four factors: the surface tension of the adsorbate, its liquid molar volume, its isothermal behavior, and the contact geometry. At large contacting radii, the adsorbate surface tension and the contact geometry are dominating. This is the case of surface force apparatus measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments with micrometer-size spheres. However, as the size of contacting asperities decreases to the nanoscale as in AFM experiments with sharp tips, the molar volume and isotherm of the adsorbate become very important to capillary formation as well as capillary adhesion. This effect is experimentally and theoretically explored with simple alcohol molecules (ethanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol) which have comparable surface tensions but differing liquid molar volumes. Adsorption isotherms for these alcohols on silicon oxide are also reported.

  12. Regulation of retinoid receptors by retinoic acid and axonal contact in Schwann cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Jesus Latasa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schwann cells (SCs are the cell type responsible for the formation of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system (PNS. As retinoic acid (RA and other retinoids have a profound effect as regulators of the myelination program, we sought to investigate how their nuclear receptors levels were regulated in this cell type. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, by using Schwann cells primary cultures from neonatal Wistar rat pups, as well as myelinating cocultures of Schwann cells with embryonic rat dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, we have found that sustained expression of RXR-γ depends on the continuous presence of a labile activator, while axonal contact mimickers produced an increase in RXR-γ mRNA and protein levels, increment that could be prevented by RA. The upregulation by axonal contact mimickers and the transcriptional downregulation by RA were dependent on de novo protein synthesis and did not involve changes in mRNA stability. On the other hand, RAR-β mRNA levels were only slightly modulated by axonal contact mimickers, while RA produced a strong transcriptional upregulation that was independent of de novo protein synthesis without changes in mRNA stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All together, our results show that retinoid receptors are regulated in a complex manner in Schwann cells, suggesting that they could have a prominent role as regulators of Schwann cell physiology.

  13. High-temperature stability of molybdenum (Mo) back contacts for CIGS solar cells: a route towards more robust back contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ju-Heon; Yoon, Kwan-Hee; Jeong, Jeung-hyun [Solar Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Mok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Tae-Yeon, E-mail: jhjeong@kist.re.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-26

    The thermal stability of Mo thin films is indispensable to Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells: CIGS films are deposited above 500 deg. C. The thermal stabilities of Mo thin films with dense to porous Mo microstructures, which are varied by controlling the sputtering pressure, are investigated. Interface failures are found to occur in buckling mode in denser Mo films, whereas cracking arises in less dense films. The failure modes are apparently dependent on the sign of the residual stress: the former is due to compressive stress, whereas the latter is due to tensile stress. Interestingly, the softening of soda-lime glass at high temperatures reconfigures the film stresses to be more compressive after annealing, which in turn triggers buckling even in films that are tensile-stressed in the as-deposited states. We conclude that the appropriate processing conditions for thermally stable back contacts cannot be obtained with the simple single layer approach. On the basis of this relationship between microstructure, residual stress and the failure modes, it is shown that improvements in film adhesion can widen the processing window for the preparation of robust back contacts, i.e. with a conventional bilayer approach and substrate roughening. Since the bilayer approach employed more compliant porous structures in the bottom layer, back contacts that are better suited to higher stress and temperature can be produced. Furthermore, substrate roughening might make the back contact more conductive as well as more stable because adhesion can be enhanced without the use of an electrically resistive buffer layer.

  14. The evolution of contact-dependent inhibition in non-growing populations of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonnier, Marc; Levin, Bruce R; Romeo, Tony; Garner, Kim; Baquero, María-Rosario; Mercante, Jeff; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Baquero, Fernando; Blázquez, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    In the course of liquid culture, serial passage experiments with Escherichia coli K-12 bearing a mutator gene deletion (DeltamutS) we observed the evolution of strains that appeared to kill or inhibit the growth of the bacteria from where they were derived, their ancestors. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurs after the cells stop growing and requires physical contact between the evolved and ancestral bacteria. Thereby, it is referred to as stationary phase contact-dependent inhibition (SCDI). The evolution of this antagonistic relationship is not anticipated from existing theory and experiments of competition in mass (liquid) culture. Nevertheless, it occurred in the same way (parallel evolution) in the eight independent serial transfer cultures, through different single base substitutions in a gene in the glycogen synthesis pathway, glgC. We demonstrate that the observed mutations in glgC, which codes for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, are responsible for both the ability of the evolved bacteria to inhibit or kill their ancestors and their immunity to that inhibition or killing. We present evidence that without additional evolution, mutator genes, or known mutations in glgC, other strains of E. coli K-12 are also capable of SCDI or sensitive to this inhibition. We interpret this, in part, as support for the generality of SCDI and also as suggesting that the glgC mutations responsible for the SCDI, which evolved in our experiments, may suppress the action of one or more genes responsible for the sensitivity of E. coli to SCDI. Using numerical solutions to a mathematical model and in vitro experiments, we explore the population dynamics of SCDI and postulate the conditions responsible for its evolution in mass culture. We conclude with a brief discussion of the potential ecological significance of SCDI and its possible utility for the development of antimicrobial agents, which unlike existing antibiotics, can kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria that are

  15. Substrate Stiffness and Cell Area Predict Cellular Traction Stresses in Single Cells and Cells in Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Joseph P; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2010-03-01

    Cells generate traction stresses against their substrate during adhesion and migration, and traction stresses are used in part by the cell to sense the substrate. While it is clear that traction stresses, substrate stiffness, and cell area are related, it is unclear whether or how area and substrate stiffness affect force generation in cells. Moreover, multiple studies have investigated traction stresses of single cells, but few have focused on forces exerted by cells in contact, which more closely mimics the in vivo environment. Here, cellular traction forces were measured where cell area was modulated by ligand density or substrate stiffness. We coupled these measurements with a multilinear regression model to show that both projected cell area and underlying substrate stiffness are significant predictors of traction forces in endothelial cells, and interestingly, substrate ligand density is not. We further explored the effect of cell-cell contact on the interplay between cell area, substrate stiffness, and force generation and found that again both area and stiffness play a significant role in cell force generation. These data indicate that cellular traction force cannot be determined by cell area alone and that underlying substrate stiffness is a significant contributor to traction force generation.

  16. A revisited concept: Contact inhibition of growth. From cell biology to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    In cell biology, contact inhibition refers to two different but closely related phenomena, contact inhibition of locomotion and contact inhibition of proliferation, exhibited by fibroblasts when in contact with one another. Normal fibroblasts migrate across the surface of a culture dish until they make contact with a neighboring cell. Further cell migration is then inhibited, and normal cells adhere to each other, forming an orderly array of cells on the culture dish surface. Tumor cells, in contrast, continue moving after contact with their neighbors, migrating over adjacent cells, and growing in disordered, multilayered patterns. Not only the movement but also the proliferation of many normal cells is inhibited by cell-cell contact, and cancer cells are characteristically insensitive to such contact inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Back-Contacted Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells With Efficiency >21%

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasi, Andrea; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand Yves Paul; Lachenal, Damien; Martin de Nicolas Agut, Silvia; Descoeudres, Antoine; Geissbühler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells with conversion efficiencies above 21%. Our process technology relies solely on simple and size-scalable patterning methods, with no high-temperature steps. Using in situ shadow masks, doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers are patterned into two interdigitated combs. Transparent conductive oxide and metal layers, forming the back electrodes, are patterned by hot melt inkjet printing. With this process, we ...

  18. Analysis of high efficiency back point contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Antonio

    1988-01-01

    A model has been developed for the analysis of Back Point-Contact (BPC) cells under variable injection level. The analysis has been applied to an experimental cell from Stanford University to allow the extraction of the recombination parameters of this cell. While the bulk SRH recombination and the recombination in the surface and in the emitters are those expected, the Auger constant takes a higher value (2.1 × 10 -30 cm 6/s), than the one usually accepted, and in agreement with the measurements by the Stanford group, for the carrier density involved here. The analysis indicates that best efficiency results are obtained with cells with finely designed emitter dots and well passivated surfaces, made on high resistivity substrates, leading to an upper limit of efficiency obtained at 20 W/cm 2 of about 30.4%. If our technology prevents us from a fine dot delineation (below 5-10 μm) then the highest efficiency is to be expected from the more conventional Interdigitated Back Contact cells with a limit (with our fitted Auger constant) of about 30%. Finally, if the commonly accepted value of the Auger constant (3.8 × 10 -31 cm 6/s) is used this limit is obtained at 50 W/cm 2 and is of 33.1% with a strongly idealized cell. All the efficiencies are at 25°C.

  19. Interdigitated back contact solar cell with high-current collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, C. M.; Nasby, R. D.; Sexton, F. W.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Norwood, D. P.

    Internal current collection efficiencies greater than 90% and energy conversion efficiencies of 18 % at 30 suns were measured on a laboratory version of the interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell. A phosphorous gettering diffusion was performed on the front surface and then etched off to achieve these high current collection efficiencies. Thermal oxides were grown on the front and back of the cell to passivate the silicon surfaces. Although the internal collection efficiencies of the cell were high, series resistance caused the fill factor (FF) to decrease at concentrations above 30 suns. Dark current measurements on cells with a new grid spacing indicate that the series resistance is much lower than in the previous cell design. It is suggested that this should result in higher efficiencies at high concentration.

  20. The debate on the dependence of apparent contact angles on drop contact area or three-phase contact line: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2014-12-01

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by the three-phase contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Although, wetting has been studied using contact angles of drops on solids for more than 200 years, the question remains unanswered: Is wetting of a rough and chemically heterogeneous surface controlled by the interactions within the solid/liquid contact area beneath the droplet or only at the three-phase contact line? After the publications of Pease in 1945, Extrand in 1997, 2003 and Gao and McCarthy in 2007 and 2009, it was proposed that advancing, receding contact angles, and contact angle hysteresis of rough and chemically heterogeneous surfaces are determined by interactions of the liquid and the solid at the three-phase contact line alone and the interfacial area within the contact perimeter is irrelevant. As a consequence of this statement, the well-known Wenzel (1934) and Cassie (1945) equations which were derived using the contact area approach are proposed to be invalid and should be abandoned. A hot debate started in the field of surface science after 2007, between the three-phase contact line and interfacial contact area approach defenders. This paper presents a review of the published articles on contact angles and summarizes the views of the both sides. After presenting a brief history of the contact angles and their measurement methods, we discussed the basic contact angle theory and applications of contact angles on the characterization of flat, rough and micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces. The weak and strong sides of both three-phase contact line and contact area approaches were discussed in detail and some practical conclusions were drawn.

  1. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  2. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  3. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  4. Contact-dependent regulation of a Tannerella forsythia virulence factor, BspA, in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Satoru; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2005-08-15

    Tannerella forsythia is one of the periodontal organisms implicated in the development of periodontal diseases. The surface associated and secreted protein, BspA (encoded by the bspA gene), of this bacterium is an important virulence factor. The present study was carried out to examine the regulation of the bspA gene during biofilm growth and contact stimuli encountered in interbacterial interactions. The expression levels of the bspA transcript were determined by real-time RT-PCR approach. The levels of bspA transcript were found to be significantly reduced as a result of contact stimulus and in biofilm cells relative to planktonic cells. The results of our study suggest that the likely downregulation of the BspA protein in biofilms and following contact may have implications in pathogenesis as a plausible mechanism of evasion of host immune responses.

  5. Three-dimensional numerical analysis of hybrid heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells with heterojunction rear point contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Peng Ling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional numerical analysis of homojunction/heterojunction hybrid silicon wafer solar cells, featuring front-side full-area diffused homojunction contacts and rear-side heterojunction point contacts. Their device performance is compared with conventional full-area heterojunction solar cells as well as conventional diffused solar cells featuring locally diffused rear point contacts, for both front-emitter and rear-emitter configurations. A consistent set of simulation input parameters is obtained by calibrating the simulation program with intensity dependent lifetime measurements of the passivated regions and the contact regions of the various types of solar cells. We show that the best efficiency is obtained when a-Si:H is used for rear-side heterojunction point-contact formation. An optimization of the rear contact area fraction is required to balance between the gains in current and voltage and the loss in fill factor with shrinking rear contact area fraction. However, the corresponding optimal range for the rear-contact area fraction is found to be quite large (e.g. 20-60 % for hybrid front-emitter cells. Hybrid rear-emitter cells show a faster drop in the fill factor with decreasing rear contact area fraction compared to front-emitter cells, stemming from a higher series resistance contribution of the rear-side a-Si:H(p+ emitter compared to the rear-side a-Si:H(n+ back surface field layer. Overall, we show that hybrid silicon solar cells in a front-emitter configuration can outperform conventional heterojunction silicon solar cells as well as diffused solar cells with rear-side locally diffused point contacts.

  6. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T(2), which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T(n) with n = 2 and higher.

  7. Dependence of Ohmic Contact Resistance on Barrier Thickness of AlN/GaN HEMT Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    thickness of AlN/ GaN HEMT structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...Electronics journal homepage: www.elsevier .com/locate /sseLetter Dependence of ohmic contact resistance on barrier thickness of AlN/ GaN HEMT ...Available online x The review of this paper was arranged by Prof. E. Calleja Keywords: AlN GaN HEMT Ohmic contact Heterostructure0038-1101/$ - see

  8. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  9. Direct contact with endoderm-like cells efficiently induces cardiac progenitors from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Uosaki

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs have emerged as a powerful tool to study cardiogenesis in vitro and a potential cell source for cardiac regenerative medicine. However, available methods to induce CPCs are not efficient or require high-cost cytokines with extensive optimization due to cell line variations. OBJECTIVE: Based on our in-vivo observation that early endodermal cells maintain contact with nascent pre-cardiac mesoderm, we hypothesized that direct physical contact with endoderm promotes induction of CPCs from pluripotent cells. METHOD AND RESULT: To test the hypothesis, we cocultured mouse embryonic stem (ES cells with the endodermal cell line End2 by co-aggregation or End2-conditioned medium. Co-aggregation resulted in strong induction of Flk1(+ PDGFRa(+ CPCs in a dose-dependent manner, but the conditioned medium did not, indicating that direct contact is necessary for this process. To determine if direct contact with End2 cells also promotes the induction of committed cardiac progenitors, we utilized several mouse ES and induced pluripotent (iPS cell lines expressing fluorescent proteins under regulation of the CPC lineage markers Nkx2.5 or Isl1. In agreement with earlier data, co-aggregation with End2 cells potently induces both Nkx2.5(+ and Isl1(+ CPCs, leading to a sheet of beating cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, co-aggregation with End2 cells greatly promotes the induction of KDR(+ PDGFRa(+ CPCs from human ES cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our co-aggregation method provides an efficient, simple and cost-effective way to induce CPCs from mouse and human pluripotent cells.

  10. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell–cell contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Margaret L Gardel

    2011-01-01

    Cells in tissues are mechanically coupled both to the ECM and neighboring cells, but the coordination and interdependency of forces sustained at cell-ECM and cell–cell adhesions are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that the endogenous force sustained at the cell–cell contact between a pair of epithelial cells is approximately 100 nN, directed perpendicular to the cell–cell interface and concentrated at the contact edges. This force is stably maintained over time despite significant fluc...

  11. Optical modeling of graphene contacted CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldosari, Marouf; Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied on CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with graphene front or back contact. Graphene is highly conductive and is as thin as a single atom which reduces the light reflection and absorption, and thus enhances the light transmission to CdTe layer for a wide range of wavelengths including IR. Graphene as front electrode of CdTe devices led to loss in short circuit current density of 10% ΔJsc ≤ 15% compared to the conventional electrodes of TCO and ITO at CdS thickness of dCdS = 100 nm. In addition, all the multilayer graphene electrodes with 2, 4, and 7 graphene layers led to Jsc ≤ 20 mA/cm2. Therefore, we conclude that a single monolayer graphene with hexagonal carbon network reduces optical losses and enhances the carrier collection measured as Jsc. In another structure design, we applied the optical model to graphene back contacted CdS/CdTe device. This scheme allows double side irradiation of the cell which is expected to enhance the Jsc. We obtained 1 ∼ 6 , 23, and 38 mA/cm2 for back, front and bifacial illumination of graphene contacted CdTe cell with CdS = 100 nm. The bifacial irradiated cell, to be efficient, requires an ultrathin CdTe film with dCdTe ≤ 1 μm. In this case, the junction electric field extends to the back region and collects out the generated carriers efficiently. This was modelled by absorptivity rather than transmission rate and optical losses. Since the literature suggest that ZnO can increase the graphene conductivity and enhance the Jsc, we performed our simulations for a graphene/ZnO electrode (ZnO = 100 nm) instead of a single graphene layer.

  12. Simulations of impinging droplets with surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Sashikumaar

    2015-11-01

    An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element scheme for computations of soluble surfactant droplet impingement on a horizontal surface is presented. The numerical scheme solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid flow, scalar convection-diffusion equation for the surfactant transport in the bulk phase, and simultaneously, surface evolution equations for the surfactants on the free surface and on the liquid-solid interface. The effects of surfactants on the flow dynamics are included into the model through the surface tension and surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle. In particular, the dynamic contact angle (θd) of the droplet is defined as a function of the surfactant concentration at the contact line and the equilibrium contact angle (θe0) of the clean surface using the nonlinear equation of state for surface tension. Further, the surface forces are included into the model as surface divergence of the surface stress tensor that allows to incorporate the Marangoni effects without calculating the surface gradient of the surfactant concentration on the free surface. In addition to a mesh convergence study and validation of the numerical results with experiments, the effects of adsorption and desorption surfactant coefficients on the flow dynamics in wetting, partially wetting and non-wetting droplets are studied in detail. It is observed that the effects of surfactants are more in wetting droplets than in the non-wetting droplets. Further, the presence of surfactants at the contact line reduces the equilibrium contact angle further when θe0 is less than 90°, and increases it further when θe0 is greater than 90°. Nevertheless, the presence of surfactants has no effect on the contact angle when θe0 = 90 °. The numerical study clearly demonstrates that the surfactant-dependent contact angle has to be considered, in addition to the Marangoni effect, in order to study the flow dynamics and the equilibrium states of surfactant

  13. Efficient interdigitated back-contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingirulli, Nicola; Haschke, Jan; Schulze, Tim F.; Duesterhoeft, J.; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Institute of Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekulestrasse 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gogolin, Ralf; Ferre, Rafel; Harder, Nils-Peter; Brendel, Rolf [Institute for Solar Energy Research Hameln (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    We present back-contacted amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells (IBC-SHJ) on n-type substrates with fill factors exceeding 78% and high current densities, the latter enabled by a SiN{sub x} /SiO{sub 2} passivated phosphorus-diffused front surface field. V{sub oc} calculations based on carrier lifetime data of reference samples indicate that for the IBC architecture and the given amorphous silicon layer qualities an emitter buffer layer is crucial to reach a high V{sub oc}, as known for both-side contacted silicon heterojunction solar cells. A back surface field buffer layer has a minor influence. We observe a boost in solar cell V{sub oc} of 40 mV and a simultaneous fill factor reduction introducing the buffer layer. The aperture-area efficiency increases from 19.8 {+-} 0.4% to 20.2 {+-} 0.4%. Both, efficiencies and fill factors constitute a significant improvement over previously reported values. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Simulation of interdigitated back contact solar cell with trench structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Lee, Jong-Han; Boo, Hyunpil; Bae, Soohyun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-02-01

    We performed two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulations for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells with rear trench structures (TS), denoted here as TS-IBC solar cells. First, we calculated a reference simulation model for conventional IBC solar cells. We then assumed a trench structure at the rear surface of the IBC solar cell. For this structure, we analyzed solar cell performance as a function of various trench depths and type. It was found that emitter trench formation affects minority carrier collection, such that the short-circuit current density increases with increasing trench depth. However, the back-surface field (BSF) trench exhibited poor minority carrier collection, which reduced the conversion efficiency of the TS-IBC solar cells. It was also found that for the same trench depth (30 μm), the difference in conversion efficiencies of an IBC solar cell with an emitter trench and that with a BSF trench was 0.6%. We are thus convinced that the emitter trench structure is more important than the BSF trench structure.

  15. Review of Back Contact Silicon Solar Cells for Low-Cost Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David D.

    1999-08-04

    Back contact solar cells hold significant promise for increased performance in photovoltaics for the near future. Two major advantages which these cells possess are a lack of grid shading loss and coplanar interconnection. Front contacted cells can have up to 10% shading loss when using screen printed metal grids. A front contact cell must also use solder connections which run from the front of one cell to the back of the next for series interconnection. This procedure is more difficult to automate than the case of co-planar contacts. The back contact cell design is not a recent concept. The earliest silicon solar cell developed by Bell Labs was a back contact device. There have been many design modifications to the basic concept over the years. To name a few, there is the Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) cell, the Stanford Point contact solar cell, the Emitter Wrap Through (EWT), and its many variations. A number of these design concepts have demonstrated high efficiency. The SunPower back contact solar cell holds the efficiency record for silicon concentrator cells. The challenge is to produce a high efficiency cell at low cost using high throughput techniques. This has yet to be achieved with a back contact cell design. The focus of this paper will be to review the relevant features of back contact cells and progress made toward the goal of a low cost version of this device.

  16. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell–cell contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells in tissues are mechanically coupled both to the ECM and neighboring cells, but the coordination and interdependency of forces sustained at cell-ECM and cell–cell adhesions are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that the endogenous force sustained at the cell–cell contact between a pair of epithelial cells is approximately 100 nN, directed perpendicular to the cell–cell interface and concentrated at the contact edges. This force is stably maintained over time despite significant fluctuations in cell–cell contact length and cell morphology. A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell–cell force exists, indicating that the cell–cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction. Thus, modulation of ECM properties that impact cell-ECM traction alters cell–cell tension. Finally, we show in a minimal model of a tissue that all cells experience similar forces from the surrounding microenvironment, despite differences in the extent of cell-ECM and cell–cell adhesion. This interdependence of cell–cell and cell-ECM forces has significant implications for the maintenance of the mechanical integrity of tissues, mechanotransduction, and tumor mechanobiology. PMID:21383129

  17. Particle-cell contact enhances antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesja Bondarenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is generally accepted that antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs are dictated by their dissolved fraction. However, dissolution-based concept alone does not fully explain the toxic potency of nanoparticulate silver compared to silver ions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we demonstrated that the direct contact between bacterial cell and AgNPs' surface enhanced the toxicity of nanosilver. More specifically, cell-NP contact increased the cellular uptake of particle-associated Ag ions - the single and ultimate cause of toxicity. To prove that, we evaluated the toxicity of three different AgNPs (uncoated, PVP-coated and protein-coated to six bacterial strains: Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and P. aeruginosa and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. While the toxicity of AgNO3 to these bacteria varied only slightly (the 4-h EC50 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 mg Ag/l, the 4-h EC50 values of protein-coated AgNPs for various bacterial strains differed remarkably, from 0.35 to 46 mg Ag/l. By systematically comparing the intracellular and extracellular free Ag(+ liberated from AgNPs, we demonstrated that not only extracellular dissolution in the bacterial test environment but also additional dissolution taking place at the particle-cell interface played an essential role in antibacterial action of AgNPs. The role of the NP-cell contact in dictating the antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs was additionally proven by the following observations: (i separation of bacterial cells from AgNPs by particle-impermeable membrane (cut-off 20 kDa, ∼4 nm significantly reduced the toxicity of AgNPs and (ii P. aeruginosa cells which tended to attach onto AgNPs, exhibited the highest sensitivity to all forms of nanoparticulate Ag. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide new insights into the mode of antibacterial action of nanosilver and explain some discrepancies in this field

  18. The role of adhesion energy in controlling cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in microscopy techniques and biophysical measurements have provided novel insight into the molecular, cellular and biophysical basis of cell adhesion. However, comparably little is known about a core element of cell-cell adhesion--the energy of adhesion at the cell-cell contact. In this review, we discuss approaches to understand the nature and regulation of adhesion energy, and propose strategies to determine adhesion energy between cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  20. Direct contact between dendritic cells and bronchial epithelial cells inhibits T cell recall responses towards mite and pollen allergen extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, D; Wagtmann, V R; Hansen, S; Würtzen, P A

    2015-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form a polarized barrier along the respiratory tract. They are the first point of contact with airborne antigens and are able to instruct resident immune cells to mount appropriate immune responses by either soluble or contact-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesize that a healthy, polarized epithelial cell layer inhibits inflammatory responses towards allergens to uphold homeostasis. Using an in-vitro co-culture model of the airway epithelium, where a polarized cell layer of bronchial epithelial cells can interact with dendritic cells (DCs), we have investigated recall T cell responses in allergic patients sensitized to house dust mite, grass and birch pollen. Using allergen extract-loaded DCs to stimulate autologous allergen-specific T cell lines, we show that AEC-imprinted DCs inhibit T cell proliferation significantly of Bet v 1-specific T cell lines as well as decrease interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 production, whereas inhibition of Phl p 5-specific T cells varied between different donors. Stimulating autologous CD4(+) T cells from allergic patients with AEC-imprinted DCs also inhibited proliferation significantly and decreased production of both T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines upon rechallenge. The inhibitory effects of AECs' contact with DCs were absent when allergen extract-loaded DCs had been exposed only to AECs supernatants, but present after direct contact with AECs. We conclude that direct contact between DCs and AECs inhibits T cell recall responses towards birch, grass and house dust mite allergens in vitro, suggesting that AECs-DC contact in vivo constitute a key element in mucosal homeostasis in relation to allergic sensitisation.

  1. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation.

  2. Interdigitated back contact solar cell with high-current collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, C. M.; Nasby, R. D.; Sexton, F. W.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Norwood, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Internal current-collection efficiencies greater than 90 percent and energy-conversion efficiencies of 18 percent at 30 suns have been measured on a laboratory version of the interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell. The quantum efficiency at 600 nm was greater than 90 percent which implies a minority carrier lifetime of greater than 350 ..mu..sec and a front surface recombination velocity of less than 30 cm/sec on the better devices. To achieve these high-current collection efficiencies, a phosphorous gettering diffusion was performed on the front surface and then etched off. Also, thermal oxides were grown on the front and back of the cell to passivate the silicon surfaces. Although the internal collection efficiencies of the cell were high, series resistance caused the fill factor (FF) to decrease at concentrations above 30 suns. Dark current measurements on cells with a new grid spacing indicate that the series resistance is much lower than in the previous cell design. This should result in higher efficiencies at high concentration.

  3. Laser fired back contact for silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, M. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: mario.tucci@casaccia.enea.it; Talgorn, E.; Serenelli, L.; Salza, E.; Izzi, M.; Mangiapane, P. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy)

    2008-08-30

    To get high efficiency c-Si solar cells reduction of surface recombination losses and good surface passivation and/or Back Surface Field (BSF) formation are needed. Most industrial solar cells are made covering the back area with screen-printed Al, forming an Al-BSF upon firing step, with a Back Reflectance of 65% and a Back Surface Recombination Velocity (BSRV) of 1000 cm/s on 1 {omega}cm Si wafer. Simulations reveal that PV efficiency can increase up to 18% after improving the BSRV to {<=} 200 cm/s and the BR to > 95%. The aim of this work is to get these goals by a laser fired back contact with low temperature passivation of the remainder of the back. This can be obtained by a double layer of PECVD Amorphous Silicon and Silicon Nitride, on which a spin-on Boron dopant layer is deposited. The structure is completed by 2 {mu}m thick e-beam evaporated Al. The formation of an improved local BSF is obtained using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, which promotes an Al and B simultaneous diffusion trough the passivation layers. Several cells, using this structure, have been fabricated on different substrates. By fitting procedure of cell Internal Quantum Efficiency we have extracted several parameters as surface recombination velocity, diffusion length and internal reflection that are comparable with the state of art of the cells having effective back surface field.

  4. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  5. A scale-dependent model for direct computation of dynamic contact lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, S.; Afkhami, S.; Guion, A.; Buongiorno, J.

    2016-11-01

    When using numerical schemes for the simulation of moving contact lines with the classical "no-slip" boundary condition, the numerical solutions become dependent on grid spacing. Numerical approaches that account for the slip of the contact line avoid this difficulty; a numerically feasible slip length however can often be much larger than the physically "true" one. Afkhami et al. addressed this issue, where they proposed a numerical model for the implementation of contact angle based on the mesh size that resulted in mesh independent solutions. Here we refine and apply their numerical observation by studying the problem of coating a plate withdrawn from a viscous liquid reservoir. We consider a partially wetting liquid and show that depending on the capillary number, either a stationary meniscus is formed or a liquid film is deposited on the substrate, known as the transition to a Landau-Levich-Derjaguin film. We derive an effective numerical boundary condition model for the computation of the transition capillary number. The model can be thought of as a large scale solution in an asymptotic matching procedure.

  6. Analysis of Cohesive Microsized Particle Packing Structure Using History-Dependent Contact Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tayeb, Raihan; Mao, Yijin; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    Granular packing structures of cohesive micro-sized particles with different sizes and size distributions, including mono-sized, uniform and Gaussian distribution, are investigated by using two different history dependent contact models with Discrete Element Method (DEM). The simulation is carried out in the framework of LIGGGHTS which is a DEM simulation package extended based on branch of granular package of widely used open-source code LAMMPS. Contact force caused by translation and rotation, frictional and damping forces due to collision with other particles or container boundaries, cohesive force, van der Waals force, and gravity are considered. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), force distributions, porosities, and coordination numbers under cohesive and non-cohesive conditions are reported. The results indicate that particle size and size distributions have great influences on the packing density for particle packing under cohesive effect: particles with Gaussian distribution have the lowest pac...

  7. Dose dependence of endotoxin-induced activation of the plasma contact system: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeise, O; Bouma, B N; Stadaas, J O; Aasen, A O

    1988-12-01

    The dose and time dependence of endotoxin-induced activation of the plasma contact system have been studied. Citrated pool plasma was incubated at 37 degrees C with endotoxin doses of 2.10(5), 2.10(6), 2.10(7), and 2.10(9) ng/l (lipopolysaccharide B, E. coli 026: B6, Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI) for 24 hr. Samples for determination of components of the contact system were obtained prior to incubation and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hr. Plasma kallikrein (KK) activity markedly increased at 12 hr in test plasma containing the highest dose of endotoxin (2.10(9) ng/l). Coincident with the elevated KK activity, reductions of both plasma prekallikrein (PKK) and functional kallikrein inhibition (KKI) were seen as assayed by chromogenic peptide substrate analyses. Also, functionally determined alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2-M) and C1 inhibitor (C1INH) values were decreased, confirming the reduction of KKI values. Changes of Hageman factor (FXII), PKK, and high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) values were also found at the same time point when assayed by immunochemical techniques. The same pattern of changes was seen in test plasma containing 2.10(7) and 2.10(6) ng/l of endotoxin. These changes, however, were less pronounced and not seen until 24 hr after beginning incubation. In control plasma and in plasma containing the lowest dose of endotoxin (2.10(5) ng/l), no changes were seen in any factors of the contact system. Our study shows that in vitro endotoxin-induced activation of the contact system is a slow process that is both time and dose dependent.

  8. Solar LBIC scanning of high-efficiency point-contact silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorster, F.J.; Dyk, E.E. van [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    The induced current response from a High Efficiency Concentrator (HECO) monocrystaline Si solar cell was mapped as a function of surface position and cell bias by using a solar light beam induced current (S-LBIC) mapping system while at the same time dynamically biasing the whole cell with an external voltage. Recombination accounts for a major portion of the reduction in quantum efficiency in these cells. This paper examines the spatial distribution of defect mechanisms causing a reduction of collected photocurrent of the backside point-contact device structure while under spot illumination. By examining the bias dependence of the S-LBIC maps, the identification of current loss mechanisms of solar cells under concentrated solar irradiance may be improved. The techniques employed to interpret the spatially distributed I-V curves are discussed and results presented. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Ni/Cu/Ag plated contacts: A study of resistivity and contact adhesion for crystalline-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Lee, Sang Hee; Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-07-01

    Ni/Cu/Ag plated contacts were examined as an alternate to Ag screen printed contacts for silicon (Si) solar cell metallization. To realize a reliable contact for industrial applications, the contact resistance and its adhesion to Si substrates were evaluated. Si surface roughness by picosecond (ps) laser ablation of silicon-nitride (SiNx) antireflection coating (ARC) was done in order to prepare the patterns. The sintering process after Ni/Cu/Ag full metallization in the form of the post-annealing process was applied to investigate the contact resistivity and adhesion. A very low contact resistivity of approximately 0.5 mΩcm2 has been achieved with measurements made by the transfer length method (TLM). Thin finger lines of about 26 μm wide and a line resistance of 0.51 Ω/cm have been realized by plating technology. Improved contact adhesion by combining the ps-laser-ablation and post-annealing process has been achieved. We have shown the peel-off strengths >1 N/mm with a higher average adhesion of 1.9 N/mm. Our pull-tab adhesion tests demonstrate excellent strength well above the wafer breakage force. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. BEHIND (Back Enhanced Heterostructure with Interdigitated contact) Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, M.; Serenelli, L.; Salza, E.; Pirozzi, L. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy); De Cesare, G.; Caputo, D.; Ceccarelli, M.; Martufi, P. [Electronic Engineering University of Rome ' Sapienza' , via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma (Italy); De Iuliis, S.; Geerligs, L.J. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    In this paper we investigate in detail how the heterostructure concept can be implemented in an interdigitated back contact solar cell, in which both the emitters are formed on the back side of the c-Si wafer by amorphous/crystalline silicon heterostructure, and at the same time the grid-less front surface is passivated by a double layer of amorphous silicon and silicon nitride, which also provides an anti-reflection coating. The entire process, held at temperature below 300C, is photolithography-free, using a metallic self-aligned mask to create the interdigitated pattern. An open-circuit voltage of 695 mV has been measured on this device fabricated. The mask assisted deposition process does not influence the uniformity of the deposited amorphous silicon layers. Several technological aspects that limit the fill factor are considered and discussed.

  11. Back contact to film silicon on metal for photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branz, Howard M.; Teplin, Charles; Stradins, Pauls

    2013-06-18

    A crystal oriented metal back contact for solar cells is disclosed herein. In one embodiment, a photovoltaic device and methods for making the photovoltaic device are disclosed. The photovoltaic device includes a metal substrate with a crystalline orientation and a heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer having the same crystal orientation of the metal substrate. A heteroepitaxial buffer layer having the crystal orientation of the metal substrate is positioned between the substrate and the crystal silicon layer to reduce diffusion of metal from the metal foil into the crystal silicon layer and provide chemical compatibility with the heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer. Additionally, the buffer layer includes one or more electrically conductive pathways to electrically couple the crystal silicon layer and the metal substrate.

  12. Passivation of the surface of rear contact solar cells by porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporuk, O. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine) and Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: oleksiy.nichiporuk@insa-lyon.fr; Kaminski, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lemiti, M. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Fave, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Litvinenko, S. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine); Skryshevsky, V. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2006-07-26

    In this paper we analyse the passivation of the front surface of p-Si interdigitated rear contacts solar cell (IBC) by a thin porous silicon (PS) layer. Effectively, an efficiency improvement of 87% in relative was observed after porous silicon layer formation on the front surface of the IBC cell. The origin of surface passivation by the PS layer was studied by Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) method. The front surface of rear contacts cell with thin porous silicon layer was scanned by a modulated red laser beam in presence of a permanent light with different wavelengths and intensities. It was shown that without permanent illumination, the photocurrent of the cell with PS layer is very low, even lower than for a cell with unpassivated surface. However with short permanent wavelength illumination a strong increase of photocurrent was observed (8-10 times{exclamation_point}). The light-dependent porous silicon passivation phenomenon is explained by a significant negative charge accumulation at the PS/p-Si interface traps under illumination. This leads to the formation of a hi-low (p{sup +}/p) junction at the front surface of the cell and to the reduction of the front surface recombination rate, like in Front Surface Field Solar Cell.

  13. Cosymplectic and contact structures for time-dependent and dissipative Hamiltonian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León, M.; Sardón, C.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we apply the geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory to obtain solutions of classical hamiltonian systems that are either compatible with a cosymplectic or a contact structure. As it is well known, the first structure plays a central role in the theory of time-dependent hamiltonians, whilst the second is here used to treat classical hamiltonians including dissipation terms. The interest of a geometric Hamilton-Jacobi equation is the primordial observation that if a hamiltonian vector field X H can be projected into a configuration manifold by means of a 1-form dW , then the integral curves of the projected vector field X_HdW can be transformed into integral curves of X H provided that W is a solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. In this way, we use the geometric Hamilton-Jacobi theory to derive solutions of physical systems with a time-dependent hamiltonian formulation or including dissipative terms. Explicit, new expressions for a geometric Hamilton-Jacobi equation are obtained on a cosymplectic and a contact manifold. These equations are later used to solve physical examples containing explicit time dependence, as it is the case of a unidimensional trigonometric system, and two dimensional nonlinear oscillators as Winternitz-Smorodinsky oscillators and for explicit dissipative behavior, we solve the example of a unidimensional damped oscillator.

  14. Process and structures for fabrication of solar cells with laser ablation steps to form contact holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-11-19

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accomodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thickness.

  15. A novel cell force sensor for quantification of traction during cell spreading and contact guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchenko, N; Wallentin, J; Petronis, S; Bjursten, L M; Kasemo, B; Gold, J

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we present a ridged, microfabricated, force sensor that can be used to investigate mechanical interactions between cells exhibiting contact guidance and the underlying cell culture substrate, and a proof-of-function evaluation of the force sensor performance. The substrates contain arrays of vertical pillars between solid ridges that were microfabricated in silicon wafers using photolithography and deep reactive ion etching. The spring constant of the pillars was measured by atomic force microscopy. For time-lapse experiments, cells were seeded on the pillared substrates and cultured in an on-stage incubator on a microscope equipped with reflected differential interference contrast optics. Endothelial cells (ECs) and fibroblasts were observed during attachment, spreading, and migration. Custom image analysis software was developed to resolve cell borders, cell alignment to the pillars and migration, displacements of individual pillars, and to quantify cell traction forces. Contact guidance classification was based on cell alignment and movement angles with respect to microfabricated ridges, as well as cell elongation. In initial investigations made with the ridged cell force sensor, we have observed contact guidance in ECs but not in fibroblast cells. A difference in maximal amplitude of mechanical forces was observed between a contact-guided and non-contact-guided, but mobile, EC. However, further experiments are required to determine the statistical significance of this observation. By chance, we observed another feature of cell behavior, namely a reversion of cell force direction. The direction of forces measured under rounded fibroblast cells changed from outwards during early cell attachment to inwards during further observation of the spreading phase. The range of forces measured under fibroblasts (up to 138 nN) was greater than that measured in EC (up to 57 nN), showing that the rigid silicon sensor is capable of resolving a large range of

  16. Requirement of interaction between mast cells and skin dendritic cells to establish contact hypersensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Otsuka

    Full Text Available The role of mast cells (MCs in contact hypersensitivity (CHS remains controversial. This is due in part to the use of the MC-deficient Kit (W/Wv mouse model, since Kit (W/Wv mice congenitally lack other types of cells as a result of a point mutation in c-kit. A recent study indicated that the intronic enhancer (IE for Il4 gene transcription is essential for MCs but not in other cell types. The aim of this study is to re-evaluate the roles of MCs in CHS using mice in which MCs can be conditionally and specifically depleted. Transgenic Mas-TRECK mice in which MCs are depleted conditionally were newly generated using cell-type specific gene regulation by IE. Using this mouse, CHS and FITC-induced cutaneous DC migration were analyzed. Chemotaxis assay and cytoplasmic Ca²⁺ imaging were performed by co-culture of bone marrow-derived MCs (BMMCs and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In Mas-TRECK mice, CHS was attenuated when MCs were depleted during the sensitization phase. In addition, both maturation and migration of skin DCs were abrogated by MC depletion. Consistently, BMMCs enhanced maturation and chemotaxis of BMDC in ICAM-1 and TNF-α dependent manners Furthermore, stimulated BMDCs increased intracellular Ca²⁺ of MC upon direct interaction and up-regulated membrane-bound TNF-α on BMMCs. These results suggest that MCs enhance DC functions by interacting with DCs in the skin to establish the sensitization phase of CHS.

  17. Strong temperature dependence of extraordinary magnetoresistance correlated to mobility in a two-contact device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-02-21

    A two-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device has been fabricated and characterized at various temperatures under magnetic fields applied in different directions. Large performance variations across the temperature range have been found, which are due to the strong dependence of the EMR effect on the mobility. The device shows the highest sensitivity of 562ω/T at 75 K with the field applied perpendicularly. Due to the overlap between the semiconductor and the metal shunt, the device is also sensitive to planar fields but with a lower sensitivity of about 20 to 25% of the one to perpendicular fields. © 2012 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  18. "It's important, but…": Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies to Social Contact Preferences of Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Katherine M; Bangerter, Lauren R; Humes, Sarah; Klumpp, Rachel; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2017-06-22

    U.S. Nursing homes (NH) are shifting toward a person-centered philosophy of care, where staff understand each residents preferences, goals and values, and seek to honor them throughout the care delivery process. Social interactions are a major component of life and while low rates of social interactions are typically found among NH residents, little research has examined resident preferences for specific types of social interactions. The purpose of this study is to explore, from the perspective of the NH resident, barriers to social contact preferences and situations when social preferences change. Two interviews were conducted with 255 NH residents 3 months apart, recruited from 32 NHs using 13 social-contact items from the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory-NH. Content analysis of 1,461 spontaneous comments identified perceived barriers to preference fulfillment along with reasons why residents would change their mind about the importance of a preference (situational dependencies). Nearly 50% of social preferences for choosing a roommate, having regular contact with friends, giving gifts, and volunteering were associated with barriers. Social preferences were likely to change based upon the quality of the social interaction and the resident's level of interest. Knowledge of barriers regarding social preferences can inform care efforts vital to advancing the delivery of person-centered care. In addition, understanding the reasons why NH resident preferences change based upon context can help providers with staff training leading to individualized care and develop meaningful social programs that are in line with resident preferences.

  19. Contact metal-dependent electrical transport in carbon nanotubes and fabrication of graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perello, David

    In this thesis, we fabricate and characterize carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based field effect transistor devices. The CNT-based work centers around the physics of metal contacts to CNT, particularly relating the work function of contact metals to carrier transport across the junction. The graphene work is motivated by the desire to utilize the high carrier mobility of graphene in field effect transistors. CNT have excellent electrical properties including high carrier mobility, large field effect switching capabilities, and a long mean free path. Absent, however is an experimentally-backed model explaining contact-metal work function, device layout, and environment effects. To fill this void, we introduce a surface-inversion channel (SIC) model based on low temperature and electrical measurements of a distinct single-walled semiconducting CNT contacted by Hf, Cr, Ti and Pd electrodes. Anomalous barrier heights and metal-contact dependent band-to-band tunneling phenomena are utilized to show that dependent upon contact work function and gate field, transport occurs either directly between the metal and CNT channel or indirectly via injection of carriers from the metal-covered CNT region to the CNT channel. The model is consistent with previously contradictory experimental results, and the methodology is simple enough to apply in other contact-dominant systems. In agreement with the initial contact theory above, we further develop a model explain Isd-Vsd tendencies in CNT FETs. Using experimental and analytical analysis, we demonstrate a relationship between the contact metal work function and electrical transport properties saturation current (Isat) and differential conductance ssd=6Isd 6Vsd in ambient exposed CNT. A single chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown 6 millimeter long semiconducting single-walled CNT is electrically contacted with a statistically significant number of Hf, Cr, Ti, Pd, and Ti, Au electrodes, respectively. The observed exponentially

  20. Adherens junction distribution mechanisms during cell-cell contact elongation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Goldenberg

    Full Text Available During Drosophila gastrulation, amnioserosa (AS cells flatten and spread as an epithelial sheet. We used AS morphogenesis as a model to investigate how adherens junctions (AJs distribute along elongating cell-cell contacts in vivo. As the contacts elongated, total AJ protein levels increased along their length. However, genetically blocking this AJ addition indicated that it was not essential for maintaining AJ continuity. Implicating other remodeling mechanisms, AJ photobleaching revealed non-directional lateral mobility of AJs along the elongating contacts, as well as local AJ removal from the membranes. Actin stabilization with jasplakinolide reduced AJ redistribution, and live imaging of myosin II along elongating contacts revealed fragmented, expanding and contracting actomyosin networks, suggesting a mechanism for lateral AJ mobility. Actin stabilization also increased total AJ levels, suggesting an inhibition of AJ removal. Implicating AJ removal by endocytosis, clathrin endocytic machinery accumulated at AJs. However, dynamin disruption had no apparent effect on AJs, suggesting the involvement of redundant or dynamin-independent mechanisms. Overall, we propose that new synthesis, lateral diffusion, and endocytosis play overlapping roles to populate elongating cell-cell contacts with evenly distributed AJs in this in vivo system.

  1. Characterization of Time-Dependent Contact Angles for Oleic Acid Mixed Sands with Different Particle Size Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijewardana, Y. N. S.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    ) mixed sands representing four different particle size fractions ranging from 0.105 to 0.84 mm. Initial soil-water contact angle (αi), and the time dependence of contact angle were measured by the sessile drop method. Results showed that the αi value for fine and middle sand fractions increased rapidly...

  2. Development of LASER fired contacts on silicon heterojunction solar cells for the application to rear contact structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D.; Desrues, T.; Ribeyron, P.J. [INES-CEA, Le Bourget du Lac (France); Orpella, A.; Martin, I.; Voz, C.; Alcubilla, R. [Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we present our progress in contacting both doped and undoped a-Si:H layers using a LASER tool and show some applications for three different HJ solar cell designs: standard (p-type), rear emitter (n-type) and back contact (n-type). First, we have fabricated 25 cm{sup 2} standard and rear emitter double heterojunction (DHJ) solar cells on planar 1-5 {omega}.cm n-type FZ c-Si wafers using intrinsic instead of the p-doped a-Si:H layers. The influence of the different parameters of the LASER firing (pitch, number of pulses and energy) has been deeply studied to find optimized conditions. Solar cells have been obtained systematically with reasonable efficiencies although we have observed that the V{sub oc} is limiting the efficiency. Finally, we have also performed the Laser Fired Contacts (LFC) on lowly-doped (p) a-Si:H layers to compare the results obtained. We have observed that the LFC of the rear emitter contact enhances both short circuit current and fill factor while keeping the same V{sub oc} (646 mV). This leads to a 0.8% absolute increase of the cell efficiency. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes a calcium-independent loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sobolewski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4 and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1 or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM. Contact with 50-150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα, with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease.

  4. A Low Resistance Calcium/Reduced Titania Passivated Contact for High Efficiency Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Thomas G.

    2017-02-04

    Recent advances in the efficiency of crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have come through the implementation of passivated contacts that simultaneously reduce recombination and resistive losses within the contact structure. In this contribution, low resistivity passivated contacts are demonstrated based on reduced titania (TiOx) contacted with the low work function metal, calcium (Ca). By using Ca as the overlying metal in the contact structure we are able to achieve a reduction in the contact resistivity of TiOx passivated contacts of up to two orders of magnitude compared to previously reported data on Al/TiOx contacts, allowing for the application of the Ca/TiOx contact to n-type c-Si solar cells with partial rear contacts. Implementing this contact structure on the cell level results in a power conversion efficiency of 21.8% where the Ca/TiOx contact comprises only ≈6% of the rear surface of the solar cell, an increase of 1.5% absolute compared to a similar device fabricated without the TiOx interlayer.

  5. Analysis of initial cell spreading using mechanistic contact formulations for a deformable cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Odenthal

    Full Text Available Adhesion governs to a large extent the mechanical interaction between a cell and its microenvironment. As initial cell spreading is purely adhesion driven, understanding this phenomenon leads to profound insight in both cell adhesion and cell-substrate interaction. It has been found that across a wide variety of cell types, initial spreading behavior universally follows the same power laws. The simplest cell type providing this scaling of the radius of the spreading area with time are modified red blood cells (RBCs, whose elastic responses are well characterized. Using a mechanistic description of the contact interaction between a cell and its substrate in combination with a deformable RBC model, we are now able to investigate in detail the mechanisms behind this universal power law. The presented model suggests that the initial slope of the spreading curve with time results from a purely geometrical effect facilitated mainly by dissipation upon contact. Later on, the spreading rate decreases due to increasing tension and dissipation in the cell's cortex as the cell spreads more and more. To reproduce this observed initial spreading, no irreversible deformations are required. Since the model created in this effort is extensible to more complex cell types and can cope with arbitrarily shaped, smooth mechanical microenvironments of the cells, it can be useful for a wide range of investigations where forces at the cell boundary play a decisive role.

  6. Sustained centrosome-cortical contact ensures robust polarization of the one-cell C. elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Dominique M; Castanzo, Dominic T; Williams, Margaret; Parikh, Devayu A; Jaeger, Eva C; Lyczak, Rebecca

    2017-02-15

    In C. elegans, the anterior-posterior axis is established at the one-cell stage when the embryo polarizes along its long axis. One model suggests that a cue from the centrosome triggers symmetry breaking and is then dispensable for further steps in the process. In the absence of the initial centrosome cue, a redundant mechanism, reliant on the centrosome's microtubules, can polarize the cell. Despite this model, data from multiple sources suggest that direct centrosome-contact with the cortex may play a role in ensuring robust polarization. Some of this past work includes analysis of pam-1 mutants, which lack a functional puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase and have aberrant centrosome positioning and variable polarization defects. To better understand the role of centrosome dynamics in polarization, we looked in detail at centrosome behavior in relation to key polarity landmarks in pam-1 mutants as well as those lacking cortical flows. We provide evidence for a model in which sustained direct contact between the centrosome and the cortex acts to reinforce both the actomyosin and the microtubule-dependent pathways. This contact is necessary for polarization when flows are inhibited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CdS/CdTe solar cells with MoOx as back contact buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao; Xia, Wei; Wu, Hsiang N.; Tang, Ching W.

    2010-09-01

    Ohmic back contacts for CdS/CdTe solar cells with MoOx as the contact buffer have been demonstrated. With contacts such as MoOx/Ni and MoOx/Al, cell efficiencies comparable to those with conventional back contacts have been produced. Thermal stress tests indicate that MoOx is effective in suppressing metal diffusion into p-CdTe. The usefulness of MoOx is attributed to its unusually high work function which is needed to match that of p-type CdTe in producing contacts of low resistance.

  8. Aluminum–Titanium Alloy Back Contact Reducing Production Cost of Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yu Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, metal films are fabricated by using an in-line reactive direct current magnetron sputtering system. The aluminum–titanium (AlTi back contacts are prepared by changing the pressure from 10 mTorr to 25 mTorr. The optical, electrical and structural properties of the metal back contacts are investigated. The solar cells with the AlTi had lower contact resistance than those with the silver (Ag back contact, resulting in a higher fill factor. The AlTi contact can achieve a solar cell conversion efficiency as high as that obtained from the Ag contact. These findings encourage the potential adoption of AlTi films as an alternative back contact to silver for silicon thin-film solar cells.

  9. DLG1 is an anchor for the E3 ligase MARCH2 at sites of cell-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhifang; Huett, Alan; Kuballa, Petric; Giallourakis, Cosmas; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2008-01-01

    PDZ domain containing molecular scaffolds plays a central role in organizing synaptic junctions. Observations in Drosophila and mammalian cells have implicated that ubiquitination and endosomal trafficking, of molecular scaffolds are critical to the development and maintenance of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity. To elucidate if there is a connection between these pathways, we applied an integrative genomic strategy, which combined comparative genomics and proteomics with cell biological assays. Given the importance of ubiquitin in regulating endocytic processes, we first identified the subset of E3 ligases with conserved PDZ binding motifs. Among this subset, the MARCH family ubiquitin ligases account for the largest family and MARCH2 has been previously implicated in endosomal trafficking. Next, we tested in an unbiased fashion, if MARCH2 binds PDZ proteins in vivo using a modified tandem affinity purification strategy followed by mass spectrometry. Of note, DLG1 was co-purified from MARCH2, with subsequent confirmation that MARCH2 interacts with full-length DLG1 in a PDZ domain dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MARCH2 co-localized with DLG1 at sites of cell-cell contact. In addition, loss of the MARCH2 PDZ binding motif led to loss of MARCH2 localization at cell-cell contact sites and MARCH2 appeared to localize away from cell-cell junctions. In in vivo ubiquitination assays we show that MARCH2 promotes DLG1 ubiquitination. Overall, these results suggest that PDZ ligands with E3 ligase activity may link PDZ domain containing tumor suppressors to endocytic pathways and cell polarity determination.

  10. Time-dep endent Calculations for Two-proton Decay Width with Schematic Density-dependent Contact Pairing Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oishi Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the two-proton decay width of the 6 Be nucleus employing the schematic density-dependent contact potential for the proton-proton pairing interaction. The decay width is calculated with a time-dependent method, in which the two-proton emission is described as a time-evolution of a three-body meta-stable state. Model-dependence of the two-proton decay width has been shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different pairing models, schematic density-dependent contact and Minnesota interactions, which have zero and finite ranges, respectively.

  11. Optimization of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cells by two-dimensional numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Meijun; Das, Ujjwal; Bowden, Stuart; Hegedus, Steven; Birmire, Robert

    2009-06-09

    In this paper, two-dimensional (2D) simulation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells is presented using Sentaurus Device, a software package of Synopsys TCAD. A model is established incorporating a distribution of trap states of amorphous-silicon material and thermionic emission across the amorphous-silicon / crystalline-silicon heterointerface. The 2D nature of IBC-SHJ device is evaluated and current density-voltage (J-V) curves are generated. Optimization of IBC-SHJ solar cells is then discussed through simulation. It is shown that the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC) of IBC-SHJ solar cells increase with decreasing front surface recombination velocity. The JSC improves further with the increase of relative coverage of p-type emitter contacts, which is explained by the simulated and measured position dependent laser beam induced current (LBIC) line scan. The S-shaped J-V curves with low fill factor (FF) observed in experiments are also simulated, and three methods to improve FF by modifying the intrinsic a-Si buffer layer are suggested: (i) decreased thickness, (ii) increased conductivity, and (iii) reduced band gap. With all these optimizations, an efficiency of 26% for IBC-SHJ solar cells is potentially achievable.

  12. Contact resistance of ceramic interfaces between materials used for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, S.

    2002-01-01

    The contact resistance can be divided into two main contributions. The small area of contact between ceramic components results in resistance due to current constriction. Resistive phases or potential barriers at the interface result in an interface contribution to the contact resistance, which may be smaller or larger than the constriction resistance. The contact resistance between pairs of three different materials were analysed (strontium doped lanthanum manganite, yttria stabilised zirconia and strontium and nickel doped lanthanum cobaltite), and the effects of temperature, atmosphere, polarisation and mechanical load on the contact resistance were investigated. The investigations revealed that the mechanical load of a ceramic contact has a high influence on the contact resistance, and generally power law dependence between the contact resistance and the mechanical load was found. The influence of the mechanical load on the contact resistance was ascribed to an area effect. The contact resistance of the investigated materials was dominated by current constriction at high temperatures. The measured contact resistance was comparable to the resistance calculated on basis of the contact areas found by optical and electron microscopy. At low temperatures, the interface contribution to the contact resistance was dominating. The cobaltite interface could be described by one potential barrier at the contact interface, whereas the manganite interfaces required several consecutive potential barriers to model the observed behaviour. The current-voltage behaviour of the YSZ contact interfaces was only weakly non-linear, and could be described by 22{+-}1 barriers in series. Contact interfaces with sinterable contact layers were also investigated, and the measured contact resistance for these interfaces were more than 10 times less than for the other interfaces. (au)

  13. Back-Contacted Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Optical-Loss Analysis and Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Tomasi, Andrea; Descoeudres, Antoine; Barraud, Loris; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the optical losses that occur in interdigitated back-contacted amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. We show that in our devices, the main loss mechanisms are similar to those of two-side contacted heterojunction solar cells. These include reflection and escape-light losses, as well as parasitic absorption in the front passivation layers and rear contact stacks. We then provide practical guidelines to mitigate such reflection and parasitic absorption losses at t...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte interactions under defined contact modes on laser-patterned biochips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how stem cells interact with cardiomyocytes is crucial for cell-based therapies to restore the cardiomyocyte loss that occurs during myocardial infarction and other cardiac diseases. It has been thought that functional myocardial repair and regeneration could be regulated by stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact. However, because various contact modes (junction formation, cell fusion, partial cell fusion, and tunneling nanotube formation occur randomly in a conventional coculture system, the particular regulation corresponding to a specific contact mode could not be analyzed. In this study, we used laser-patterned biochips to define cell-cell contact modes for systematic study of contact-mediated cellular interactions at the single-cell level. The results showed that the biochip design allows defined stem cell-cardiomyocyte contact-mode formation, which can be used to determine specific cellular interactions, including electrical coupling, mechanical coupling, and mitochondria transfer. The biochips will help us gain knowledge of contact-mediated interactions between stem cells and cardiomyocytes, which are fundamental for formulating a strategy to achieve stem cell-based cardiac tissue regeneration.

  15. Aid for electrical contacting of high-temperature fuel cells and method for production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ines; Schillig, Cora

    2014-03-18

    A double-sided adhesive metal-based tape for use as contacting aid for SOFC fuel cells is provided. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is suitable for simplifying the construction of cell bundles. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is used for electrical contacting of the cell connector with the anode and for electrical contacting of the interconnector of the fuel cells with the cell connector. A method for producing the double-sided adhesive metal-base tape is also provided.

  16. Aid for electrical contacting of high-temperature fuel cells and method for production thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Ines; Schillig, Cora

    2014-03-18

    A double-sided adhesive metal-based tape for use as contacting aid for SOFC fuel cells is provided. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is suitable for simplifying the construction of cell bundles. The double-sided metal-based adhesive tape is used for electrical contacting of the cell connector with the anode and for electrical contacting of the interconnector of the fuel cells with the cell connector. A method for producing the double-sided adhesive metal-base tape is also provided.

  17. Three dimensionally structured interdigitated back contact thin film heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangarter, C. M.; Hamadani, B. H.; Guyer, J. E.; Xu, H.; Need, R.; Josell, D.

    2011-04-01

    Three dimensionally structured thin film photovoltaic devices based on interdigitated arrays of microscale electrodes are examined by external quantum efficiency simulations, indicating considerable JSC enhancement is possible through elimination of the front contact and window layer required in planar geometry devices. Electrode parameters including, pitch, width, height, and material are modeled and experimentally probed, demonstrating experimentally and capturing in models dependence on intrinsic material properties and electrode dimensions. In contrast to analogous silicon wafer back contact solar cells where the electrodes are placed on the silicon absorber at the end of processing, in this design the semiconductor is deposited on the electrodes, taking advantage of the thin film processing already required. Electrodeposited CdS/CdTe heterojunction devices approach 1% efficiencies with simulations as well as optical measurements indicating significant potential for improvement. Suboptimal performance is attributed to unintended materials reactions that preclude annealing at the temperatures required for absorber optimization as well as the Schottky barrier formation on the nonoptimal electrode materials. The test bed structures and absorber synthesis processes are amenable to an array of deposition techniques for fabrication and measurements of three dimensionally structured semiconductors, contact materials, and photovoltaic devices subject to processing feasibility and materials compatibility.

  18. Ion implantation into amorphous Si layers to form carrier-selective contacts for Si solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, Frank; Mueller, Ralph; Reichel, Christian; Hermle, Martin [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports our findings on the boron and phosphorus doping of very thin amorphous silicon layers by low energy ion implantation. These doped layers are implemented into a so-called tunnel oxide passivated contact structure for Si solar cells. They act as carrier-selective contacts and, thereby, lead to a significant reduction of the cell's recombination current. In this paper we address the influence of ion energy and ion dose in conjunction with the obligatory high-temperature anneal needed for the realization of the passivation quality of the carrier-selective contacts. The good results on the phosphorus-doped (implied V{sub oc} = 725 mV) and boron-doped passivated contacts (iV{sub oc} = 694 mV) open a promising route to a simplified interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cell featuring passivated contacts. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2015-11-01

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiOx/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF2), the ion implantation dose (5 × 1014 cm-2 to 1 × 1016 cm-2), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iVoc) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF2 implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iVoc of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iVoc of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved Voc of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF2 implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with Voc of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  20. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  1. Cu{sub 2}S as ohmic back contact for CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Türck, Johannes; Siol, Sebastian; Mayer, Thomas; Klein, Andreas; Jaegermann, Wolfram, E-mail: jaegermann@surface.tu-darmstadt.de

    2015-05-01

    We prepared a back contact for CdTe solar cells with Cu{sub 2}S as primary contact. Cu{sub 2}S was evaporated on CdCl{sub 2} treated CdTe solar cells in superstrate configuration. The CdTe and CdS layers were deposited by Closed Space Sublimation. Direct interface studies with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have revealed a strongly reactive interface between CdTe and Cu{sub 2}S. A valence band offset of 0.4-0.6 eV has been determined. The performance of solar cells with Cu{sub 2}S back contacts was studied in comparison to cells with an Au contact that deposited onto a CdCl{sub 2}-treated CdTe surface that was chemically etched using a nitric-phosphoric etch. The solar cells were analyzed by current-voltage curves and external quantum efficiency measurements. After several post deposition annealing steps, 13% efficiency was reached with the Cu{sub 2}S back contact, which was significantly higher than the ones obtained for the NP-etched back contacts. - Highlights: • A new back contact for CdTe solar out of Cu{sub 2}S has been tested. • With a direct interface experiment the valence band offset was determined. • Post deposition heat treatment has been carried out for the solar cells. • 13% efficiency has been reached with the Cu{sub 2}S back contact.

  2. Nickel Silicide Metallization for Passivated Tunneling Contacts for Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Alexander; Florent, Karine; Tapriya, Astha; Lee, Benjamin G.; Kurinec, Santosh K.; Young, David L.

    2016-11-21

    Passivated tunneling contacts offer promise for applications in Interdigitated Back Passivated Contact (IBPC) high efficiency silicon solar cells. Metallization of these contacts remains a key research topic. This paper investigates NiSi/poly-Si/SiO2/c-Si passivated contacts using photoluminescence and contact resistivity measurements. An amorphous Si interlayer between the NiSi and poly-Si is observed to improve passivation, decreasing recombination. The overall recombination loss has a linear trend with the NiSi thickness. Implied Voc values close to 700 mV and contact resistivities below 10 mohm-cm2 have been achieved in NiSi/poly-Si:P/SiO2/c-Si contacts.

  3. Contact-dependent performance variability of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gyuchull; Yoon, Youngki, E-mail: youngki.yoon@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-11-24

    Using self-consistent quantum transport simulations, we investigate the performance variability of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) with various contact properties. Varying the Schottky barrier in MoS{sub 2} FETs affects the output characteristics more significantly than the transfer characteristics. If doped contacts are realized, the performance variation due to non-ideal contacts becomes negligible; otherwise, channel doping can effectively suppress the performance variability in metal-contact devices. Our scaling study also reveals that for sub-10-nm channels, doped-contact devices can be more robust in terms of switching, while metal-contact MoS{sub 2} FETs can undergo the smaller penalty in output conductance.

  4. Yes-associated protein regulates endothelial cell contact-mediated expression of angiopoietin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Zhang, Haiying; Park, Hongryeol; Choi, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Heon-Woo; Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2015-05-12

    Angiogenesis is regulated by the dynamic interaction between endothelial cells (ECs). Hippo-Yes-associated protein (YAP) signalling has emerged as a key pathway that controls organ size and tissue growth by mediating cell contact inhibition. However, the role of YAP in EC has not been defined yet. Here, we show expression of YAP in the developing front of mouse retinal vessels. YAP subcellular localization, phosphorylation and activity are regulated by VE-cadherin-mediated-EC contacts. This VE-cadherin-dependent YAP phosphorylation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt activation. We further identify angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) as a potential transcriptional target of YAP in regulating angiogenic activity of EC in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of YAP-active form in EC enhances angiogenic sprouting, and this effect is blocked by ANG-2 depletion or soluble Tie-2 treatment. These findings implicate YAP as a critical regulator in angiogenesis and provide new insights into the mechanism coordinating junctional stability and angiogenic activation of ECs.

  5. Industrially feasible, dopant-free, carrier-selective contacts for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xinbo

    2017-05-31

    Dopant-free, carrier-selective contacts (CSCs) on high efficiency silicon solar cells combine ease of deposition with potential optical benefits. Electron-selective titanium dioxide (TiO) contacts, one of the most promising dopant-free CSC technologies, have been successfully implemented into silicon solar cells with an efficiency over 21%. Here, we report further progress of TiO contacts for silicon solar cells and present an assessment of their industrial feasibility. With improved TiO contact quality and cell processing, a remarkable efficiency of 22.1% has been achieved using an n-type silicon solar cell featuring a full-area TiO contact. Next, we demonstrate the compatibility of TiO contacts with an industrial contact-firing process, its low performance sensitivity to the wafer resistivity, its applicability to ultrathin substrates as well as its long-term stability. Our findings underscore the great appeal of TiO contacts for industrial implementation with their combination of high efficiency with robust fabrication at low cost.

  6. Determination of the specific shunt resistances under and away from the front contacts of solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    New structure of front contacts was devised and fabricated for accurately measuring the resistances under and away from the front contacts of silicon solar cell with the results showing that the former was much worse. The sample preparing sequence was completely compatible with the conventional solar cell manufacturing process, which demonstrated the convenience of this approach. With the aid of this characterization technique, detailed information can be obtained on the solar cell structure, material ingredients and process parameters, especially the sintering process.

  7. Electroplated contacts and porous silicon for silicon based solar cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholostov, Konstantin, E-mail: kholostov@diet.uniroma1.it [Department of information engineering, electronics and telecommunications, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Serenelli, Luca; Izzi, Massimo; Tucci, Mario [Enea Casaccia Research Centre Rome, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Balucani, Marco [Department of information engineering, electronics and telecommunications, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Rise Technology S.r.l., Lungomare Paolo Toscanelli 170, 00121 Rome (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Uniformity of the Ni–Si interface is crucial for performance of Cu–Ni contacts on Si. • Uniformly filled PS is the key to obtain the best performance of Cu–Ni contacts on Si. • Optimization of anodization and electroplating allows complete filling of PS layer. • Highly adhesive and low contact resistance Cu–Ni contacts are obtained on Si. - Abstract: In this paper, a two-layer metallization for silicon based solar cells is presented. The metallization consists of thin nickel barrier and thick copper conductive layers, both obtained by electrodeposition technique suitable for phosphorus-doped 70–90 Ω/sq solar cell emitter formed on p-type silicon substrate. To ensure the adhesion between metal contact and emitter a very thin layer of mesoporous silicon is introduced on the emitter surface before metal deposition. This approach allows metal anchoring inside pores and improves silicon–nickel interface uniformity. Optimization of metal contact parameters is achieved varying the anodization and electrodeposition conditions. Characterization of contacts between metal and emitter is carried out by scanning electron microscopy, specific contact resistance and current–voltage measurements. Mechanical strength of nickel–copper contacts is evaluated by the peel test. Adhesion strength of more than 4.5 N/mm and contact resistance of 350 μΩ cm{sup 2} on 80 Ω/sq emitter are achieved.

  8. Cell-Cell Contact-Mediated Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Transfer, Productive Infection, and Replication and Their Requirement for HCV Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ziqing; He, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is believed to begin with interactions between cell-free HCV and cell receptors that include CD81, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), claudin-1 (CLDN1), and occludin (OCLN). In this study, we have demonstrated that HCV spreading from infected hepatocytes to uninfected hepatocytes leads to the transfer of HCV and the formation of infection foci and is cell density dependent. This cell-cell contact-mediated (CCCM) HCV transfer occurs readily and requires all these ...

  9. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  10. Nickel Phosphide as a Copper Free Back Contact for CdTe-Based Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Brian; Gupta, Akhlesh; Compaan, Alvin D.

    2002-03-01

    Nickel phosphide back contacts were deposited onto polycrystalline, thin-film, CdS/CdTe solar cells using DC magnetron sputtering. The effects of the etching procedure, substrate temperature, deposition duration, post-deposition diffusion temperature, and ambient on the initial performance and on the long term stability of the devices were studied. We found that the initial performance of nickel phosphide contacts was lower than typical Cu-based back contacts. However, the stability of the cells at open circuit under one-sun light soak for several months is better than for our standard contact with evaporated Cu and Au. The use of sputtered graphite as an interfacial layer improved the performance. Average efficiencies of over 8.6were achieved. The excellent stability makes Ni2P an attractive candidate for a Cu-free back contact to CdTe-based solar cells. Work supported by NREL and by NSF-REU.

  11. Application of time-dependent sessile drop contact angles on compacts to characterise the surface energetics of sulfathiazole crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2002-03-02

    The time-dependent wetting of sulfathiazole compacts with sessile water drops was evaluated using video microscopy. The influence of sulfathiazole crystalline form, particle size, pre-saturation with water, humidity and compaction pressure on the droplet spreading kinetics and contact angles are reported. The rate and extent of droplet spreading decreased for compact surfaces of high microscopic roughness; this was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Pre-saturation of powder compacts with water (pre-saturated with sulfathiazole) enhanced droplet spreading and enabled pseudo-equilibrium contact angles to be determined for up to 10 min. Sessile-drop contact angles on both sulfathiazole powder compacts and single crystals are compared with particle contact angles determined by liquid penetration. This study has led to an improved understanding of the influence of physical heterogeneities and the face-specific surface chemistry of individual crystals on the wetting characteristics of pharmaceutical compacts.

  12. Conductance of single-atom platinum contacts: Voltage dependence of the conductance histogram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.K.; Noat, Y.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2003-01-01

    The conductance of a single-atom contact is sensitive to the coupling of this contact atom to the atoms in the leads. Notably for the transition metals this gives rise to a considerable spread in the observed conductance values. The mean conductance value and spread can be obtained from the first...

  13. Skin irritants and contact sensitizers induce Langerhans cell migration and maturation at irritant concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.J.L.; Lehé, C.L.; Hasegawa, H.; Elliott, G.R.; Das, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Skin irritants and contact allergens reduce the number of Langerhans cells (LCs). It has been assumed that this reduction is due their migration to the draining lymph node (LN) for initiating immune sensitization in a host. Skin irritation, however, as opposed to contact allergy is not considered to

  14. Multi-Material Front Contact for 19% Thin Film Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Tezsevin, Y.; Barink, M.

    2016-01-01

    The trade-off between transmittance and conductivity of the front contact material poses abottleneck for thin film solar panels. Normally, the front contact material is a metal oxide and the optimal cell configuration and panel efficiency were determined for various band gap materials, representing

  15. Fabrication of back-contacted silicon solar cells using thermomigration to create conductive vias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James M; Schmit, Russell R.

    2007-01-30

    Methods of manufacturing back-contacted silicon solar cells fabricated using a gradient-driven solute transport process, such as thermomigration or electromigration, to create n-type conductive vias connecting the n-type emitter layer on the front side to n-type ohmic contacts located on the back side.

  16. Multi-Material Front Contact for 19% Thin Film Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Tezsevin, Y.; Barink, M.

    2016-01-01

    The trade-off between transmittance and conductivity of the front contact material poses abottleneck for thin film solar panels. Normally, the front contact material is a metal oxide and the optimal cell configuration and panel efficiency were determined for various band gap materials, representing

  17. Kind discrimination and competitive exclusion mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition systems shape biofilm community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa S; Garcia, Erin C; Cotter, Peggy A

    2014-04-01

    Contact-Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) is a phenomenon in which bacteria use the toxic C-terminus of a large exoprotein (called BcpA in Burkholderia species) to inhibit the growth of neighboring bacteria upon cell-cell contact. CDI systems are present in a wide range of Gram-negative proteobacteria and a hallmark feature is polymorphism amongst the exoprotein C-termini (BcpA-CT in Burkholderia) and amongst the small immunity proteins (BcpI) that protect against CDI in an allele-specific manner. In addition to CDI, the BcpAIOB proteins of Burkholderia thailandensis mediate biofilm formation, and they do so independent of BcpA-mediated interbacterial competition, suggesting a cooperative role for CDI system proteins in this process. CDI has previously only been demonstrated between CDI+ and CDI- bacteria, leaving the roles of CDI system-mediated interbacterial competition and of CDI system diversity in nature unknown. We constructed B. thailandensis strains that differed only in the BcpA-CT and BcpI proteins they produced. When co-cultured on agar, these strains each participated in CDI and the outcome of the competition depended on both CDI system efficiency and relative bacterial numbers initially. Strains also participated in CDI during biofilm development, resulting in pillar structures that were composed of only a single BcpA-CT/BcpI type. Moreover, a strain producing BcpA-CT/BcpI proteins of one type was prevented from joining a pre-established biofilm community composed of bacteria producing BcpA-CT/BcpI proteins of a different type, unless it also produced the BcpI protein of the established strain. Bacteria can therefore use CDI systems for kind recognition and competitive exclusion of 'non-self' bacteria from a pre-established biofilm. Our data indicate that CDI systems function in both cooperative and competitive behaviors to build microbial communities that are composed of only bacteria that are related via their CDI system alleles.

  18. Hemolytic activity in Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a contact-dependent, two-step mechanism and differently expressed in smooth and rough phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högfors-Rönnholm, Eva; Wiklund, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hemolytic activity of cells of smooth and rough phenotypic variants of the Gram-negative fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum was investigated in two different assays, a microplate and an agarose hemolysis assay, using rainbow trout erythrocytes. The smooth cells showed a high and the rough cells a negligible, concentration dependent, hemolytic activity in the microplate assay. Both smooth and rough cells showed a rather weak hemolytic activity, with two distinct hemolytic patterns, in the agarose assay. The hemolytic activity of the cells was not regulated by iron availability and cell-free extracellular products did not show any hemolytic activity. The smooth cells, in contrast to the rough cells, showed a high ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and both hemagglutination and hemolytic activity was impaired by treatment of the cells with sialic acid. The hemolytic activity was furthermore reduced after proteolytic and heat treatment of the cells. The results from the present study suggest that the hemolytic activity in F. psychrophilum is highly expressed in the smooth phenotype, and that it is a contact-dependent and two-step mechanism that is initiated by the binding of the bacterial cells to the erythrocytes through sialic acid-binding lectins and then executed by thermolabile proteinaceous hemolysins.

  19. Evaluation of transition metal oxide as carrier-selective contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Boccard, Matthieu [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bertoni, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    passivation. In complement, we construct full device structures incorporating in some cases surface passivation schemes, with measured initial conversion efficiency over 15% and evaluate the carrier transport properties using temperature-dependent current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. With this detailed characterization study, we aim at providing the framework to assess the potential of a material as a carrier selective contact and the understanding of how each of the aforementioned parameters on the metal oxide films influence the full solar cell operating performances.

  20. T cell lymphomatoid contact dermatitis: a challenging case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackstedt, Thomas J; Zug, Kathryn A

    2015-02-01

    Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis is a pseudolymphoma with clinical and histological features of allergic contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Incorrect diagnosis may lead to unnecessary testing, unnecessary treatment, or patient harm. The objective of this study is to present a case to demonstrate the diagnostic challenge and overlap between allergic contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma in a patient with lymphomatoid contact dermatitis caused by methylchoroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and paraben mix, and to review the existing literature in order to summarize the demographics, clinical features, allergens and treatments reported for lymphomatoid contact dermatitis. A search of major scientific databases was conducted for English-language articles reporting cases of lymphomatoid contact dermatitis or additional synonymous search headings. Nineteen articles with a total of 23 patients were analysed. Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis was more common in men, with an average age of 58.5 years. Fourteen unique allergens were identified and confirmed by patch testing. However, no single test or study was diagnostic of lymphomatoid contact dermatitis. Allergen avoidance was the most useful management tool, but selected patients required topical or systemic immunosuppression. In conclusion, without specific diagnostic features, evaluation for lymphomatoid contact dermatitis should include a thorough history and examination, patch testing, and biopsy with immunohistochemistry and clonality studies.

  1. Thermal calculation of ground contact structures: Correction factors of environment- and structure-dependent effects on the heat transfer coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    The heat loss at ground contact structures is taken into consideration in building heat loss calculations. However, the heat loss through the ground depends not only the soil and the building structure, but the environment as well. New calculation methods based on parametrized transient finite element thermal modelling are introduced in the preceding research article [3]. This paper is the further demonstration of the methods’ environment- or structure-depending correction factors which descr...

  2. Cell-cell contacts confine public goods diffusion inside Pseudomonas aeruginosa clonal microcolonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julou, Thomas; Mora, Thierry; Guillon, Laurent; Croquette, Vincent; Schalk, Isabelle J; Bensimon, David; Desprat, Nicolas

    2013-07-30

    The maintenance of cooperation in populations where public goods are equally accessible to all but inflict a fitness cost on individual producers is a long-standing puzzle of evolutionary biology. An example of such a scenario is the secretion of siderophores by bacteria into their environment to fetch soluble iron. In a planktonic culture, these molecules diffuse rapidly, such that the same concentration is experienced by all bacteria. However, on solid substrates, bacteria form dense and packed colonies that may alter the diffusion dynamics through cell-cell contact interactions. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa microcolonies growing on solid substrate, we found that the concentration of pyoverdine, a secreted iron chelator, is heterogeneous, with a maximum at the center of the colony. We quantitatively explain the formation of this gradient by local exchange between contacting cells rather than by global diffusion of pyoverdine. In addition, we show that this local trafficking modulates the growth rate of individual cells. Taken together, these data provide a physical basis that explains the stability of public goods production in packed colonies.

  3. Target cell-dependent normalization of transmitter release at neocortical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Helmut J; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy and short-term modification of neocortical synaptic connections vary with the type of target neuron. We investigated presynaptic Ca2+ and release probability at single synaptic contacts between pairs of neurons in layer 2/3 of the rat neocortex. The amplitude of Ca2+ signals in boutons of pyramids contacting bitufted or multipolar interneurons or other pyramids was dependent on the target cell type. Optical quantal analysis at single synaptic contacts suggested that release probabilities are also target cell-specific. Both the Ca2+ signal and the release probability of different boutons of a pyramid contacting the same target cell varied little. We propose that the mechanisms that regulate the functional properties of boutons of a pyramid normalize the presynaptic Ca2+ influx and release probability for all those boutons that innervate the same target cell.

  4. Disruption of contact inhibition in rat liver epithelial cells by various types of AhR ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondracek, J.; Chramostova, K.; Kozubik, A. [Institute of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Krcmar, P.; Machala, M. [Veterinary Research Institute, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2004-09-15

    The maintenance of a balance between cell gain and cell loss is essential for proper liver function. The exact role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis of liver cells remains unclear, since ligand-dependent activation of AhR has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest, proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis, depending on the cellular model used. AhR can directly interact with retinoblastoma protein in hepatic cells, forming protein complexes that can efficiently block cell cycle progression by inducing G1 arrest, or to induce the expression of inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, such as p271. On the other hand, it has been suggested that AhR could play a stimulatory role in cell proliferation, either directly or by mediating a release from contact inhibition. It is now generally accepted that progenitor cells exist in the liver, are activated in various liver diseases and can form a potential target cell population for both tumor initiating and tumor promoting chemicals4. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD) has been found to release rat liver epithelial cells from contact inhibition by upregulating cyclin A expression and cyclin A/cdk2 activity. Our previous studies have shown that a number of AhR ligands5,6 can stimulate proliferation of confluent of rat liver epithelial ''stem-like'' WB-F344 cells. Such mechanism could play a role in liver tumor promotion. In the present study, we used flavonoid compounds that have been reported to act either as pure agonists, such as beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), or as partial/complete antagonists of AhR - alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF) and 3'-methoxy-4'-nitroflavone (3'M4'NF), in order to investigate effects of AhR agonists/antagonists on confluent rat liver epithelial cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of model flavonoids on the release of rat liver epithelial cells from contact inhibition, and on inducibility of

  5. Design parameters dependences on contact stress distribution in gait and jogging phases after total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixrath, E; Wendling-Mansuy, S; Flecher, X; Chabrand, P; Argenson, J N

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model to calculate the contact stress distribution in total hip arthroplasty (THA) prosthesis between the articulating surfaces. The model uses the clearance between bearing surfaces as well as the inclination and thickness of the Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly-Ethylene (UHMWPE) cup to achieve this. We have used this mathematical model to contrast the maximal force during normal gait and during jogging. This is based on the assumption that the contact stress is proportional to the radial deformation of the cup. The results show that the magnitude of the maximal contact stress remains constant for inclination values in the range of [0-35 degrees ] and increase significantly with the cup clearance and liner thickness for inclination values in the range of [35-65 degrees ]. A major use for this model would be the calculation of spatial contact stress distribution during normal gait or jogging for different couples of bearing surfaces.

  6. a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction front- and back contacts for silicon solar cells with p-type base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostan, Philipp Johannes

    2010-07-01

    internal quantum efficiency shows that both types of back contacts lead to effective diffusion lengths in excess of 600 {mu}m. An extended fill factor analysis shows that fill factor limitations for the full-area a-Si:H/c-Si contacts result from non-ideal diode behavior, ascribed to the injection dependence of the heterojunction interface recombination velocity. Analysis of the external quantum efficiency under back side illumination with different bias light intensities delivers the effective surface recombination S{sub eff}({phi}) in dependance of the illumination intensity {phi}. The front contact (emitter) uses a sequence of intrinsic and phosphorous doped amorphous silicon layers together with a ZnO:Al or a SnO{sub 2}:In layer and an Al front contact grid. The emitter is prepared at a maximum temperature of 220 C. Measurements of the minority carrier lifetime on symmetric i/n-a-Si:H coated wafers judge the emitter passivation quality. The best solar cells that use a thermal oxide back side passivation with Al-point contacts and flat a-Si:H emitters have open circuit voltages up to 683 mV and efficiencies up to 17.4 %. The efficiency of such devices is limited by a low short circuit current due to the flat front side. Using the same back contact structure with random pyramid textured wafer front sides and a-Si:H emitters yields open circuit voltages up to 660 mV and efficiencies up to 18.5 %, so far limited by a relatively low fill factor FF {<=} 74.3 %. Analysis of the external quantum efficiency underlines the excellent surface passivation properties of the amorphous emitter. Combining both, amorphous front- and back contacts yields p-type heterojunction solar cells completely fabricated at temperatures below 220 C. The best devices reach an open circuit voltage V{sub oc} = 678 mV and an efficiency {eta} = 18.1 % with random textured wafers, limited by low fill factors FF {approx} 75 %. Besides the cell fabrication and characterization, this thesis reveals that the

  7. Combinatorial sputtering of Ga-doped (Zn,Mg)O for contact applications in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajbhandari, Pravakar P.; Bikowski, André; Perkins, John D.; Dhakal, Tara P.; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2017-01-01

    Development of tunable contact materials based on environmentally friendly chemical elements using scalable deposition approaches is necessary for existing and emerging solar energy conversion technologies. In this paper, the properties of ZnO alloyed with magnesium (Mg), and doped with gallium (Ga) are studied using combinatorial thin film experiments. As a result of these studies, the optical band gap of the sputtered Zn1-xMgxO thin films was determined to vary from 3.3 to 3.6 eV for a compositional spread of Mg content in the 0.04 < x < 0.17 range. Depending on whether or not Ga dopants were added, the electron concentrations were on the order of 1017 cm-3 or 1020 cm-3, respectively. Based on these results and on the Kelvin Probe work function measurements, a band diagram was derived using basic semiconductor physics equations. The quantitative determination of how the energy levels of Ga-doped (Zn, Mg)O thin films change as a function of Mg composition presented here, will facilitate their use as optimized contact layers for both Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and other solar cell absorbers.

  8. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell-cell contacts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venkat Maruthamuthu; Benedikt Sabass; Ulrich S. Schwarz; Margaret L. Gardel; Shu Chien

    2011-01-01

    .... A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell-cell force exists, indicating that the cell-cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction...

  9. Interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell and the effect of front surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meijun; Bowden, Stuart; Das, Ujjwal; Birkmire, Robert

    2007-08-01

    This letter reports interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells which combine the performance benefits of both back contact and heterojunction technologies while reducing their limitations. Low temperature (interdigitated heteroemitter and contacts in the rear preserves substrate lifetime while minimizes optical losses in the front. The IBC-SHJ structure is ideal for diagnosing surface passivation quality, which is analyzed and measured by internal quantum efficiency and minority carrier lifetime measurements. Initial cells have independently confirmed efficiency of 11.8% under AM1.5 illumination. Simulations indicate efficiencies greater than 20% after optimization.

  10. Two-dimensional analysis of the interdigited back-contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D. J.; Navon, D. H.

    1981-02-01

    The behavior of the interdigited back-contact solar cell (IBC) under high illuminating levels has been analyzed by two-dimensional numerical techniques. The effects of cell geometry and surface recombination on efficiency are examined. The IBC cell with a doping gradient at the front surface is also considered.

  11. Mast cell synapses and exosomes: membrane contacts for information exchange.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carroll-Portillo, A.; Surviladze, Z.; Cambi, A.; Lidke, D.S.; Wilson, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their central role in allergy, mast cells are involved in a wide variety of cellular interactions during homeostasis and disease. In this review, we discuss the ability of mast cells to extend their mechanisms for intercellular communication beyond the release of soluble mediators. Th

  12. High resolution, low cost solar cell contact development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.

    1981-01-01

    The MIDFILM cell fabrication and encapsulation processes were demonstrated as a means of applying low-cost solar cell collector metallization. The average cell efficiency of 12.0 percent (AM1, 28 C) was achieved with fritted silver metallization with a demonstration run of 500 starting wafers. A 98 percent mechanical yield and 80 percent electrical yield were achieved through the MIDFILM process. High series resistance was responsible for over 90 percent of the electrical failures and was the major factor causing the low average cell efficiency. Environmental evaluations suggest that the MIDFILM cells do not degrade. A slight degradation in power was experienced in the MIDFILM minimodules when the AMP Solarlok connector delaminated during the environmental testing.

  13. Study of copper-free back contacts to thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    The goals of this project are to study Cu free back contact alternatives for CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells, and to research dry etching for CdTe surface preparation before contact application. In addition, an attempt has been made to evaluate the stability of some of the contacts researched. The contacts studied in this work include ZnTe/Cu2Te, Sb2Te 3, and Ni-P alloys. The ZnTe/Cu2Te contact system is studied as basically an extension of the earlier work done on Cu2Te at USF. RF sputtering from a compound target of ZnTe and Cu2Te respectively deposits these layers on etched CdTe surface. The effect of Cu2Te thickness and deposition temperature on contact and cell performance will be studied with the ZnTe depositions conditions kept constant. C-V measurements to study the effect of contact deposition conditions on CdTe doping will also be performed. These contacts will then be stressed to high temperatures (70--100°C) and their stability with stress time is analyzed. Sb2Te3 will be deposited on glass using RF sputtering, to study film properties with deposition temperature. The Sb2Te 3 contact performance will also be studied as a function of the Sb 2Te3 deposition temperature and thickness. The suitability of Ni-P alloys for back contacts to CdTe solar cells was studied by forming a colloidal mixture of Ni2P in graphite paste. The Ni-P contacts, painted on Br-methanol etched CdTe surface, will be studied as a function of Ni-P concentration (in the graphite paste), annealing temperature and time. Some of these cells will undergo temperature stress testing to determine contact behavior with time. Dry etching of CdTe will be studied as an alternative for wet etching processes currently used for CdTe solar cells. The CdTe surface is isotropically etched in a barrel reactor in N2, Ar or Ar:O 2 ambient. The effect of etching ambient, pressure, plasma power and etch time on contact performance will be studied.

  14. Fluid epitaxialization effect on velocity dependence of dynamic contact angle in molecular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Hirata, Yosuke; Kukita, Yutaka

    2010-02-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effect of epitaxial ordering of the fluid molecules on the microscopic dynamic contact angle. The simulations were performed in a Couette-flow-like geometry where two immiscible fluids were confined between two parallel walls moving in opposite directions. The extent of ordering was varied by changing the number density of the wall particles. As the ordering becomes more evident, the change in the dynamic contact angle tends to be more sensitive to the increase in the relative velocity of the contact line to the wall. Stress components around the contact line is evaluated in order to examine the stress balance among the hydrodynamic stresses (viscous stress and pressure), the deviation of Young's stress from the static equilibrium condition, and the fluid-wall shear stress induced by the relative motion between them. It is shown that the magnitude of the shear stress on the fluid-wall surface is the primary contribution to the sensitivity of the dynamic contact angle and that the sensitivity is intensified by the fluid ordering near the wall surface.

  15. A study of nickel silicide in a conventional furnace for Ni/Cu contact monocrystalline-silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-01-01

    High-conductivity contacts in place of screen-printed contacts are in demand for commercial solar cells. Also, simplifying the process steps is required for commercial solar cells. In addition, very expensive metals are necessary improved efficiency without using scarce. In this research, we replaced screen-printed contacts with Ni/Cu contacts in passivated emitter solar cells. A layer of nickel was used as the seed and the adhesion layer. The main contact was formed by plating with copper. Firing conditions in a conventional furnace were varied so as to form nickel silicide. The best cell showed a solar cell efficiency of 18.76%.

  16. [The role of regulatory T cells in allergic contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecisz, Beata; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulatory mechanisms of immune system. They are responsible for the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. They are also involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and allergic diseases and implicated in transplant rejection and immunopathology of cancers. Treg cells constitute the population of lymphocytes heterogeneous in their phenotype. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells are most important among Treg subsets. Modification of Treg actvity may be useful in the therapy of different diseases, including allergic disorders.

  17. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chun Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS with direct injection (DI/GC or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC. In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial. An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases.

  18. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Hu, S. Jack

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells.

  19. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hu, S. Jack [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells. (author)

  20. Tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by ion implantation for applications in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Christian, E-mail: christian.reichel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Feldmann, Frank; Müller, Ralph; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Reedy, Robert C.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    Passivated contacts (poly-Si/SiO{sub x}/c-Si) doped by shallow ion implantation are an appealing technology for high efficiency silicon solar cells, especially for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells where a masked ion implantation facilitates their fabrication. This paper presents a study on tunnel oxide passivated contacts formed by low-energy ion implantation into amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers and examines the influence of the ion species (P, B, or BF{sub 2}), the ion implantation dose (5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} to 1 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}), and the subsequent high-temperature anneal (800 °C or 900 °C) on the passivation quality and junction characteristics using double-sided contacted silicon solar cells. Excellent passivation quality is achieved for n-type passivated contacts by P implantations into either intrinsic (undoped) or in-situ B-doped a-Si layers with implied open-circuit voltages (iV{sub oc}) of 725 and 720 mV, respectively. For p-type passivated contacts, BF{sub 2} implantations into intrinsic a-Si yield well passivated contacts and allow for iV{sub oc} of 690 mV, whereas implanted B gives poor passivation with iV{sub oc} of only 640 mV. While solar cells featuring in-situ B-doped selective hole contacts and selective electron contacts with P implanted into intrinsic a-Si layers achieved V{sub oc} of 690 mV and fill factor (FF) of 79.1%, selective hole contacts realized by BF{sub 2} implantation into intrinsic a-Si suffer from drastically reduced FF which is caused by a non-Ohmic Schottky contact. Finally, implanting P into in-situ B-doped a-Si layers for the purpose of overcompensation (counterdoping) allowed for solar cells with V{sub oc} of 680 mV and FF of 80.4%, providing a simplified and promising fabrication process for IBC solar cells featuring passivated contacts.

  1. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... these results suggest an important role for Irf4 dependent DCs in T cell driven colitis....

  2. On-chip cell analysis platform: Implementation of contact fluorescence microscopy in microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Kazutaka, Osawa; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy is the gold standard tool for biomedical research and clinical applications, their use beyond well-established laboratory infrastructures remains limited. The present study investigated a novel on-chip cell analysis platform based on contact fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics. Combined use of a contact fluorescence imager based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-thin glass bottom microfluidic chip enabled both to observe living cells with minimal image distortion and to ease controlling and handling of biological samples (e.g. cells and biological molecules) in the imaged area. A proof-of-concept experiment of on-chip detection of cellular response to endothelial growth factor demonstrated promising use for the recently developed on-chip cell analysis platform. Contact fluorescence microscopy has numerous desirable features including compatibility with plastic microfluidic chips and compatibility with the electrical control system, and thus will fulfill the requirements of a fully automated cell analysis system.

  3. Dynamics of intramolecular contact formation in polypeptides: distance dependence of quenching rates in a room-temperature glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, L J; Eaton, W A; Hofrichter, J

    2001-12-17

    Quenching of the triplet state of tryptophan by cysteine is an important new tool for measuring the rate of forming a specific contact between amino acids in a polypeptide chain. To determine the length scale associated with this contact, tryptophan was embedded in a room-temperature glass containing a high concentration of cysteine. The decay of the triplet population is extended in time, consistent with a rate coefficient that decreases exponentially with distance. Solving the diffusion equation with this distant-dependent rate reproduces the observed bimolecular rates in water and shows that quenching at low viscosities takes place less than or similar to A from van der Waals contact between the tryptophan and cysteine.

  4. Stiffness of sphere–plate contacts at MHz frequencies: dependence on normal load, oscillation amplitude, and ambient medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vlachová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The stiffness of micron-sized sphere–plate contacts was studied by employing high frequency, tangential excitation of variable amplitude (0–20 nm. The contacts were established between glass spheres and the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, where the resonator surface had been coated with either sputtered SiO2 or a spin-cast layer of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The results from experiments undertaken in the dry state and in water are compared. Building on the shifts in the resonance frequency and resonance bandwidth, the instrument determines the real and the imaginary part of the contact stiffness, where the imaginary part quantifies dissipative processes. The method is closely analogous to related procedures in AFM-based metrology. The real part of the contact stiffness as a function of normal load can be fitted with the Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR model. The contact stiffness was found to increase in the presence of liquid water. This finding is tentatively explained by the rocking motion of the spheres, which couples to a squeeze flow of the water close to the contact. The loss tangent of the contact stiffness is on the order of 0.1, where the energy losses are associated with interfacial processes. At high amplitudes partial slip was found to occur. The apparent contact stiffness at large amplitude depends linearly on the amplitude, as predicted by the Cattaneo–Mindlin model. This finding is remarkable insofar, as the Cattaneo–Mindlin model assumes Coulomb friction inside the sliding region. Coulomb friction is typically viewed as a macroscopic concept, related to surface roughness. An alternative model (formulated by Savkoor, which assumes a constant frictional stress in the sliding zone independent of the normal pressure, is inconsistent with the experimental data. The apparent friction coefficients slightly increase with normal force, which can be explained by nanoroughness. In other words, contact splitting

  5. Exploiting metallic glasses for 19.6% efficient back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk Jun; Kim, Se Yun; Park, Jin Man; Heo, Jung Na; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Sang Mock; Kim, Do Hyang; Kim, Won Tae; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Donghwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Hyoeng Ki; Song, Min Chul; Park, Jucheol; Jee, Sang Soo; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2012-08-01

    An interdigitated back contact silicon solar cell with conversion efficiency of 19.6% was fabricated by screen-printing the Ag paste. In the Ag paste, oxide glass frits were totally replaced by Al85Ni5Y8Co2, Al-based metallic glass (MG) ones. The thermoplastic forming of the MG in the super cooled liquid region led to large contact area at the interface between Ag electrodes and Si layers and thus to specific contact resistance (ρc) as low as 0.86 mΩ cm2. The specific contact resistance was a function of both contact area and thickness of the interlayer formed at the interface working as a tunneling barrier.

  6. Multi-Material Front Contact for 19% Thin Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop van Deelen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The trade-off between transmittance and conductivity of the front contact material poses a bottleneck for thin film solar panels. Normally, the front contact material is a metal oxide and the optimal cell configuration and panel efficiency were determined for various band gap materials, representing Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS, CdTe and high band gap perovskites. Supplementing the metal oxide with a metallic copper grid improves the performance of the front contact and aims to increase the efficiency. Various front contact designs with and without a metallic finger grid were calculated with a variation of the transparent conductive oxide (TCO sheet resistance, scribing area, cell length, and finger dimensions. In addition, the contact resistance and illumination power were also assessed and the optimal thin film solar panel design was determined. Adding a metallic finger grid on a TCO gives a higher solar cell efficiency and this also enables longer cell lengths. However, contact resistance between the metal and the TCO material can reduce the efficiency benefit somewhat.

  7. Wnt11 controls cell contact persistence by local accumulation of Frizzled 7 at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Sabine; Zimyanin, Vitaly; Carreira-Barbosa, Filipa; Tada, Masazumi; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-12-04

    Wnt11 is a key signal, determining cell polarization and migration during vertebrate gastrulation. It is known that Wnt11 functionally interacts with several signaling components, the homologues of which control planar cell polarity in Drosophila melanogaster. Although in D. melanogaster these components are thought to polarize cells by asymmetrically localizing at the plasma membrane, it is not yet clear whether their subcellular localization plays a similarly important role in vertebrates. We show that in zebrafish embryonic cells, Wnt11 locally functions at the plasma membrane by accumulating its receptor, Frizzled 7, on adjacent sites of cell contacts. Wnt11-induced Frizzled 7 accumulations recruit the intracellular Wnt signaling mediator Dishevelled, as well as Wnt11 itself, and locally increase cell contact persistence. This increase in cell contact persistence is mediated by the local interaction of Wnt11, Frizzled 7, and the atypical cadherin Flamingo at the plasma membrane, and it does not require the activity of further downstream effectors of Wnt11 signaling, such as RhoA and Rok2. We propose that Wnt11, by interacting with Frizzled 7 and Flamingo, modulates local cell contact persistence to coordinate cell movements during gastrulation.

  8. Robust Load Cell Cell for Discrete Contact Force Measurements of Sampling Systems and/or Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bear Engineering proposes to develop a simple, robust, extreme environment compatible, mechanical load cell to enable the control of contact forces for placement of...

  9. The role of adhesion energy in controlling cell–cell contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy techniques and biophysical measurements have provided novel insight into the molecular, cellular and biophysical basis of cell adhesion. However, comparably little is known about a core element of cell–cell adhesion—the energy of adhesion at the cell–cell contact. In this review, we discuss approaches to understand the nature and regulation of adhesion energy, and propose strategies to determine adhesion energy between cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21807491

  10. Interdigitated back-surface-contact solar cell modeling using Silvaco Atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Shawn E.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Silvaco Atlas semiconductor modeling software was used to simulate an interdigitated back-surface-contact solar cell. The cell is modeled after the silicon-based Sunpower Corporation A-300 solar cell, which contains a number of unique features that give it advantages over conventional solar cells. This simulation attempted to match as closely as possible the results measured by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory from the A-30...

  11. A reference guide to microbial cell surface hydrophobicity based on contact angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Acid-base interactions form the origin of the hydrophobicity of microbial cell-surfaces and can be quantitated from contact angle measurements on microbial lawns with water, formamide, methyleneiodide and/or alpha-bromonaphthalene. This review provides a reference guide to microbial cell surface hyd

  12. The dependence of the Schottky barrier height on carbon nanotube diameter for Pd-carbon nanotube contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Johannes; Sourab, Abdelrahim A; Campbell, Eleanor E B [Department of Physics, Goeteborg University, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Tarakanov, Yury [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Lee, Dong Su [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Park, Seung Joo; Baek, Seung Jae; Park, Yung Woo [School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ywpark@phya.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: eleanor.campbell@ed.ac.uk

    2009-04-29

    Direct measurements are presented of the Schottky barrier (SB) heights of carbon nanotube devices contacted with Pd electrodes. The SB barrier heights were determined from the activation energy of the temperature-dependent thermionic emission current in the off-state of the devices. The barrier heights generally decrease with increasing diameter of the nanotubes and they are in agreement with the values expected when assuming little or no influence of Fermi level pinning.

  13. The dependence of the Schottky barrier height on carbon nanotube diameter for Pd-carbon nanotube contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Johannes; Sourab, Abdelrahim A.; Tarakanov, Yury; Lee, Dong Su; Park, Seung Joo; Baek, Seung Jae; Park, Yung Woo; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurements are presented of the Schottky barrier (SB) heights of carbon nanotube devices contacted with Pd electrodes. The SB barrier heights were determined from the activation energy of the temperature-dependent thermionic emission current in the off-state of the devices. The barrier heights generally decrease with increasing diameter of the nanotubes and they are in agreement with the values expected when assuming little or no influence of Fermi level pinning.

  14. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1985-01-01

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  15. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1985-01-01

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  16. Buried contact multijunction thin film silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M. [Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    1995-08-01

    In early 1994, the Center for Photovoltaic Devices and Systems announced the filing of patent applications on an improved silicon thin film photovoltaic module approach. With material costs estimated to be about 20 times lower than those in present silicon solar cell modules along with other production advantages, this technology appears likely to make low cost, high performance solar modules available for the first time. This paper describes steps involved in making a module and module performance.

  17. Communication is key: Reducing DEK1 activity reveals a link between cell-cell contacts and epidermal cell differentiation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, Roberta; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2015-01-01

    Plant epidermis development requires not only the initial acquisition of tissue identity, but also the ability to differentiate specific cell types over time and to maintain these differentiated states throughout the plant life. To set-up and maintain differentiation, plants activate specific transcriptional programs. Interfering with these programs can prevent differentiation and/or force differentiated cells to lose their identity and re-enter a proliferative state. We have recently shown that the Arabidopsis Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) protein is required both for the differentiation of epidermal cells and for the maintenance of their fully differentiated state. Defects in DEK1 activity lead to a deregulation of the expression of epidermis-specific differentiation-promoting HD-ZIP IV transcription factors. Here we propose a working model in which DEK1, by maintaining cell-cell contacts, and thus communication between neighboring cells, influences HD-ZIP IV gene expression and epidermis differentiation.

  18. Distance-dependent hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts in protein folding simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; Punzi, Giuseppe; Todisco, Simona; Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Bossis, Fabrizio; Turi, Antonio; De Grassi, Anna; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo

    2014-09-21

    Successful prediction of protein folding from an amino acid sequence is a challenge in computational biology. In order to reveal the geometric constraints that drive protein folding, highlight those constraints kept or missed by distinct lattices and for establishing which class of intra- and inter-secondary structure element interactions is the most relevant for the correct folding of proteins, we have calculated inter-alpha carbon distances in a set of 42 crystal structures consisting of mainly helix, sheet or mixed conformations. The inter-alpha carbon distances were also calculated in several lattice "hydrophobic-polar" models built from the same protein set. We found that helix structures are more prone to form "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts than beta-sheet structures. At a distance lower than or equal to 3.8 Å (very short-range interactions), "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts are almost absent in the native structures, while they are frequent in all the analyzed lattice models. At distances in-between 3.8 and 9.5 Å (short-/medium-range interactions), the best performing lattice for reproducing mainly helix structures is the body-centered-cubic lattice. If protein structures contain sheet portions, lattice performances get worse, with few exceptions observed for double-tetrahedral and body-centered-cubic lattices. Finally, we can observe that ab initio protein folding algorithms, i.e. those based on the employment of lattices and Monte Carlo simulated annealings, can be improved simply and effectively by preventing the generation of "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts shorter than 3.8 Å, by monitoring the "hydrophobic-hydrophobic/polar-polar" contact ratio in short-/medium distance ranges and by using preferentially a body-centered-cubic lattice.

  19. Persistence of livestock associated MRSA CC398 in humans is dependent on intensity of animal contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitske Graveland

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The presence of Livestock Associated MRSA (LA-MRSA in humans is associated with intensity of animal contact. It is unknown whether the presence of LA-MRSA is a result of carriage or retention of MRSA-contaminated dust. We conducted a longitudinal study among 155 veal farmers in which repeated nasal and throat swabs were taken for MRSA detection. Periods with and without animal exposure were covered. METHODS: Randomly, 51 veal calf farms were visited from June-December 2008. Participants were asked to fill in questionnaires (n = 155 to identify potential risk factors for MRSA colonisation. Nasal and throat swabs were repeatedly taken from each participant for approximately 2 months. Swabs were analysed for MRSA and MSSA by selective bacteriological culturing. Spa-types of the isolates were identified and a ST398 specific PCR was performed. Data were analyzed using generalized estimation equations (GEE to allow for correlated observations within individuals. RESULTS: Mean MRSA prevalence was 38% in farmers and 16% in family members. Presence of MRSA in farmers was strongly related to duration of animal contact and was strongly reduced in periods with absence of animal contact (-58%. Family members, especially children, were more often carriers when the farmer was a carrier (OR = 2, P<0.05. Only 7% (n = 11 of the participants appeared to be persistent carriers. A large heterogeneity in spa-types was detected, however 92.7% belonged to LA-MRSA CC398. A surprisingly high fraction of the spa-types (7.3% did not belong to CC398. CONCLUSION: The presence of LA-MRSA in farmers is strongly animal-exposure related. The rapidly decreasing MRSA prevalence during absence of animal contact suggests that LA-MRSA is a poor persistent colonizer in most humans. These results are of relevance for MRSA control strategies.

  20. Identification of functional toxin/immunity genes linked to contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI and rearrangement hotspot (Rhs systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Poole

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI is mediated by the CdiA/CdiB family of two-partner secretion proteins. Each CdiA protein exhibits a distinct growth inhibition activity, which resides in the polymorphic C-terminal region (CdiA-CT. CDI(+ cells also express unique CdiI immunity proteins that specifically block the activity of cognate CdiA-CT, thereby protecting the cell from autoinhibition. Here we show that many CDI systems contain multiple cdiA gene fragments that encode CdiA-CT sequences. These "orphan" cdiA-CT genes are almost always associated with downstream cdiI genes to form cdiA-CT/cdiI modules. Comparative genome analyses suggest that cdiA-CT/cdiI modules are mobile and exchanged between the CDI systems of different bacteria. In many instances, orphan cdiA-CT/cdiI modules are fused to full-length cdiA genes in other bacterial species. Examination of cdiA-CT/cdiI modules from Escherichia coli EC93, E. coli EC869, and Dickeya dadantii 3937 confirmed that these genes encode functional toxin/immunity pairs. Moreover, the orphan module from EC93 was functional in cell-mediated CDI when fused to the N-terminal portion of the EC93 CdiA protein. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the genetic organization of CDI systems shares features with rhs (rearrangement hotspot loci. Rhs proteins also contain polymorphic C-terminal regions (Rhs-CTs, some of which share significant sequence identity with CdiA-CTs. All rhs genes are followed by small ORFs representing possible rhsI immunity genes, and several Rhs systems encode orphan rhs-CT/rhsI modules. Analysis of rhs-CT/rhsI modules from D. dadantii 3937 demonstrated that Rhs-CTs have growth inhibitory activity, which is specifically blocked by cognate RhsI immunity proteins. Together, these results suggest that Rhs plays a role in intercellular competition and that orphan gene modules expand the diversity of toxic activities deployed by both CDI and Rhs systems.

  1. Electrical contacts between cathodes and metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    In this work, simulated cathode/interconnect structures were used to investigate the effects of different contact materials on the contact resistance between a strontium doped lanthanum ferrite cathode and a Crofer22 APU interconnect. Among the materials studied, Pt, which has a prohibitive cost for the application, demonstrated the best performance as a contact paste. For the relatively cost-effective perovskites, the contact ASR was found to depend on their electrical conductivity, scale growth on the metallic interconnect, and interactions between the contact material and the metallic interconnect or particularly the scale grown on the interconnect. Manganites appeared to promote manganese-containing spinel interlayer formation that helped minimize the increase of contact ASR. Chromium from the interconnects reacted with strontium in the perovskites to form SrCrO 4. An improved performance was achieved by application of a thermally grown (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel protection layer on Crofer22 APU that dramatically minimized the contact resistance between the cathodes and interconnects.

  2. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-03

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements.

  3. Dependence of Characteristic Diode Parameters in Ni/n-GaAs Contacts on Thermal Annealing and Sample Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, N.; Dogan, H.; Korkut, H.; Turut, A.

    We have prepared the sputtered Ni/n-GaAs Schottky diodes which consist of as-deposited, and diodes annealed at 200 and 400°C for 2 min. The effect of thermal annealing on the temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the diodes has been experimentally investigated. Their I-V characteristics have been measured in the temperature range of 60-320 K with steps of 20 K. It has been seen that the barrier height (BH) slightly increased from 0.84 (as-deposited sample) to 0.88 eV at 300 K when the contact has been annealed at 400°C. The SBH increased whereas the ideality factor decreased with increasing annealing temperature for each sample temperature. The I-V measurements showed a dependence of ideality factor n and BH on the measuring temperature that cannot be explained by the classical thermionic emission theory. The experimental data are consistent with the presence of an inhomogeneity of the SBHs. Therefore, the temperature dependent I-V characteristics of the diodes have been discussed in terms of the multi-Gaussian distribution model. The experimental data good have agree with the fitting curves over whole measurement temperature range indicating that the SBH inhomogeneity of our as-deposited and annealed Ni/n-GaAs SBDs can be well-described by a double-Gaussian distribution. The slope of the nT versus T plot for the samples has approached to unity with increasing annealing temperature and becomes parallel to that of the ideal Schottky contact behavior for the 400°C annealed diode. Thus, it has been concluded that the thermal annealing process translates the metal-semiconductor contacts into thermally stable Schottky contacts.

  4. Cell-cell contact-mediated hepatitis C virus (HCV) transfer, productive infection, and replication and their requirement for HCV receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziqing; He, Johnny J

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is believed to begin with interactions between cell-free HCV and cell receptors that include CD81, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), claudin-1 (CLDN1), and occludin (OCLN). In this study, we have demonstrated that HCV spreading from infected hepatocytes to uninfected hepatocytes leads to the transfer of HCV and the formation of infection foci and is cell density dependent. This cell-cell contact-mediated (CCCM) HCV transfer occurs readily and requires all these known HCV receptors and an intact actin cytoskeleton. With a fluorescently labeled replication-competent HCV system, the CCCM transfer process was further dissected by live-cell imaging into four steps: donor cell-target cell contact, formation of viral puncta-target cell conjugation, transfer of viral puncta, and posttransfer. Importantly, the CCCM HCV transfer leads to productive infection of target cells. Taken together, these results show that CCCM HCV transfer constitutes an important and effective route for HCV infection and dissemination. These findings will aid in the development of new and novel strategies for preventing and treating HCV infection.

  5. a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction front- and back contacts for silicon solar cells with p-type base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostan, Philipp Johannes

    2010-07-01

    internal quantum efficiency shows that both types of back contacts lead to effective diffusion lengths in excess of 600 {mu}m. An extended fill factor analysis shows that fill factor limitations for the full-area a-Si:H/c-Si contacts result from non-ideal diode behavior, ascribed to the injection dependence of the heterojunction interface recombination velocity. Analysis of the external quantum efficiency under back side illumination with different bias light intensities delivers the effective surface recombination S{sub eff}({phi}) in dependance of the illumination intensity {phi}. The front contact (emitter) uses a sequence of intrinsic and phosphorous doped amorphous silicon layers together with a ZnO:Al or a SnO{sub 2}:In layer and an Al front contact grid. The emitter is prepared at a maximum temperature of 220 C. Measurements of the minority carrier lifetime on symmetric i/n-a-Si:H coated wafers judge the emitter passivation quality. The best solar cells that use a thermal oxide back side passivation with Al-point contacts and flat a-Si:H emitters have open circuit voltages up to 683 mV and efficiencies up to 17.4 %. The efficiency of such devices is limited by a low short circuit current due to the flat front side. Using the same back contact structure with random pyramid textured wafer front sides and a-Si:H emitters yields open circuit voltages up to 660 mV and efficiencies up to 18.5 %, so far limited by a relatively low fill factor FF {<=} 74.3 %. Analysis of the external quantum efficiency underlines the excellent surface passivation properties of the amorphous emitter. Combining both, amorphous front- and back contacts yields p-type heterojunction solar cells completely fabricated at temperatures below 220 C. The best devices reach an open circuit voltage V{sub oc} = 678 mV and an efficiency {eta} = 18.1 % with random textured wafers, limited by low fill factors FF {approx} 75 %. Besides the cell fabrication and characterization, this thesis reveals that the

  6. Simulation, elaboration and analysis of inter-digitated back-contacts photovoltaic cells; Simulation, fabrication et analyse de cellules photovoltaiques a contacts arrieres interdigites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporuk, O

    2005-05-15

    Solar energy is the most promising and powerful energy source among renewable energies. Photovoltaic electricity is obtained by direct transformation of the sunlight into electricity by means of photovoltaic cells. The objective of this work is to develop photovoltaic cells with back inter-digitated contacts. In the first chapter, we recall the principle of operation and the fundamental parameters of a photovoltaic cell. In a second part, we explain specificities of the inter-digitated back-contact solar cells, as well as the advantages and the disadvantages of such cells. In the second chapter we study the operation of inter-digitated back-contacts solar cells by two dimensional numerical simulation in order to optimize the geometry and doping profiles of the cell. The third chapter relates to the techniques and the methods of characterization of photovoltaic devices and components. In the fourth chapter, we describe the elaboration of inter-digitated back-contact cells. Three technological processes are presented in order to develop a simple technology for cells realization. In particular, we develop the auto-aligned technological process, which enables to elaborate the cells by using only one lithography step. In the last chapter we examine various approaches to reduce the surface recombination: SiO{sub 2}, silicon nitride deposited by UVCVD, hydrogen annealing, etc... (author)

  7. Simulation, elaboration and analysis of inter-digitated back contacts photovoltaic cells; Simulation, fabrication et analyse de cellules photovoltaiques a contacts arrieres interdigites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporuk, O

    2005-05-15

    Solar energy is the most promising and powerful energy source among renewable energies. Photovoltaic electricity is obtained by direct transformation of the sunlight into electricity by means of photovoltaic cells. The objective of this work is to develop photovoltaic cells with back inter-digitated contacts. In the first chapter, we recall the principle of operation and the fundamental parameters of a photovoltaic cell. In a second part, we explain specificities of the inter-digitated back-contact solar cells, as well as the advantages and the disadvantages of such cells. In the second chapter we study the operation of inter-digitated back-contacts solar cells by two dimensional numerical simulation in order to optimize the geometry and doping profiles of the cell. The third chapter relates to the techniques and the methods of characterization of photovoltaic devices and components. In the fourth chapter, we describe the elaboration of inter-digitated back-contact cells. Three technological processes are presented in order to develop a simple technology for cells realization. In particular, we develop the auto-aligned technological process, which enables to elaborate the cells by using only one lithography step. In the last chapter we examine various approaches to reduce the surface recombination: SiO{sub 2}, silicon nitride deposited by UVCVD, hydrogen annealing, etc.. (author)

  8. Capillary pressure overshoot for unstable wetting fronts is explained by Hoffman's velocity-dependent contact-angle relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Christine E.; Parlange, J.-Yves; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; DiCarlo, David A.; Wallach, Rony; Durnford, Deanna S.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2014-06-01

    Pore velocity-dependent dynamic contact angles provide a mechanism for explaining the formation of fingers/columns in porous media. To study those dynamic contact angles when gravity is present, rectangular capillary tubes were used to facilitate observation of the complete interface without geometric distortion. Results show that the Hoffman (1975) relationship between dynamic contact angle and water velocity applies to gravity-affected flow fields, and that it (when adjusted for nonzero static contact angles) can be used to model dynamic capillary pressures for unstable wettings fronts in porous media by assuming that (1) pressure at the wetting front is discontinuous, (2) the flow field behind the fingertip is highly heterogeneous, and (3) the front line advances one or a few pores at the time. We demonstrate the utility of the Hoffman relationship for porous media with a published infiltration experiment by calculating the capillary pressure successfully at the unstable wetting front as a function of the flux of water in the finger and the grain size diameter.

  9. Analysis of a Dynamic Viscoelastic Contact Problem with Normal Compliance, Normal Damped Response, and Nonmonotone Slip Rate Dependent Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Barboteu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical model which describes the dynamic evolution of a viscoelastic body in frictional contact with an obstacle. The contact is modelled with a combination of a normal compliance and a normal damped response law associated with a slip rate-dependent version of Coulomb’s law of dry friction. We derive a variational formulation and an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution of the problem is presented. Next, we introduce a fully discrete approximation of the variational problem based on a finite element method and on an implicit time integration scheme. We study this fully discrete approximation schemes and bound the errors of the approximate solutions. Under regularity assumptions imposed on the exact solution, optimal order error estimates are derived for the fully discrete solution. Finally, after recalling the solution of the frictional contact problem, some numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate both the behavior of the solution related to the frictional contact conditions and the theoretical error estimate result.

  10. Control of back surface reflectance from aluminum alloyed contacts on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cudzinovic, M.; Sopori, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A process for forming highly reflective aluminum back contacts with low contact resistance to silicon solar cells is described. By controlling the process conditions, it is possible to vary the silicon/aluminum interface from a specular to a diffuse reflector while maintaining a high interface reflectance. The specular interface is found to be a uniform silicon/aluminum alloy layer a few angstroms thick that has epitaxially regrown on the silicon. The diffuse interface consists of randomly distributed (111) pyramids produced by crystallographic out-diffusion of the bulk silicon. The light trapping ability of the diffuse contact is found to be close to the theoretical limit. Both types of contacts are found to have specific contact resistivities of 10{sup {minus}5} {Omega}-cm{sup 2}. The process for forming the contacts involves illuminating the devices with tungsten halogen lamps. The process is rapid (under 100 s) and low temperature (peak temperature < 580{degrees}C), making it favorable for commercial solar cell fabrication.

  11. Logarithmic contact time dependence of adhesion force and its dominant role among the effects of AFM experimental parameters under low humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tianmao; Meng, Yonggang

    2017-10-01

    The influences of contact time, normal load, piezo velocity, and measurement number of times on the adhesion force between two silicon surfaces were studied with an atomic force microscope (AFM) at low humidity (17-15%). Results show that the adhesion force is time-dependent and increases logarithmically with contact time until saturation is reached, which is related with the growing size of a water bridge between them. The contact time plays a dominant role among these parameters. The adhesion forces with different normal loads and piezo velocities can be quantitatively obtained just by figuring out the length of contact time, provided that the contact time dependence is known. The time-dependent adhesion force with repeated contacts at one location usually increases first sharply and then slowly with measurement number of times until saturation is reached, which is in accordance with the contact time dependence. The behavior of the adhesion force with repeated contacts can be adjusted by the lengths of contact time and non-contact time. These results may help facilitate the anti-adhesion design of silicon-based microscale systems working under low humidity.

  12. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2016-08-02

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  13. Characterizing time-dependent contact angles for sands hydrophobized with oleic and stearic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, S; Kawamoto, K; Jayarathna, L

    2012-01-01

    -frequency precipitation. A potential solution is to alter soil grain surfaces to become water repellent by mixing or coating the soil cover material with hydrophobic agents (HAs). In this study, hydrophobic CBs comprised of sands mixed with environmentally friendly HAs (oleic acid [OA] and stearic acid [SA]) were studied....... Water repellency (WR) characteristics for hydrophobized sand samples with different HA contents and representing different coating methods (mixing in and solvent aided) were measured. Initial contact angles (αi) for OA-coated samples sharply increased with increasing HA content and reached peak values...

  14. Cloaking of solar cell contacts at the onset of Rayleigh scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Etor; Vitrey, Alan; Buencuerpo, Jerónimo; Prieto, Iván; Llorens, José M.; García-Martín, Antonio; Alén, Benito; Chaudhuri, Anabil; Neumann, Alexander; Brueck, S. R. J.; Ripalda, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical contacts on the top surface of solar cells and light emitting diodes cause shadow losses. The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission through arrays of subwavelength holes suggests the possibility of engineering such contacts to reduce the shadow using plasmonics, but resonance effects occur only at specific wavelengths. Here we describe instead a broadband effect of enhanced light transmission through arrays of subwavelength metallic wires, due to the fact that, in the absence of resonances, metal wires asymptotically tend to invisibility in the small size limit regardless of the fraction of the device area taken up by the contacts. The effect occurs for wires more than an order of magnitude thicker than the transparency limit for metal thin films. Finite difference in time domain calculations predict that it is possible to have high cloaking efficiencies in a broadband wavelength range, and we experimentally demonstrate contact shadow losses less than half of the geometric shadow. PMID:27339390

  15. Data dependent random forest applied to screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation: acoustic versus contact microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verikas, A; Gelzinis, A; Vaiciukynas, E; Bacauskiene, M; Minelga, J; Hållander, M; Uloza, V; Padervinskis, E

    2015-02-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of results obtained using acoustic and contact microphones in screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation is the main objective of this study. Aiming to obtain a versatile characterization of voice samples recorded using microphones of both types, 14 different sets of features are extracted and used to build an accurate classifier to distinguish between normal and pathological cases. We propose a new, data dependent random forests-based, way to combine information available from the different feature sets. An approach to exploring data and decisions made by a random forest is also presented. Experimental investigations using a mixed gender database of 273 subjects have shown that the perceptual linear predictive cepstral coefficients (PLPCC) was the best feature set for both microphones. However, the linear predictive coefficients (LPC) and linear predictive cosine transform coefficients (LPCTC) exhibited good performance in the acoustic microphone case only. Models designed using the acoustic microphone data significantly outperformed the ones built using data recorded by the contact microphone. The contact microphone did not bring any additional information useful for the classification. The proposed data dependent random forest significantly outperformed the traditional random forest.

  16. An experimental and computational study of size-dependent contact-angle of dewetted metal nanodroplets below its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Bruno P.; Yeratapally, Saikumar R.; Kacher, Josh; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Decorating 1D nanostructures (e.g., wires and tubes) with metal nanoparticles serves as a hierarchical approach to integrate the functionalities of metal oxides, semiconductors, and metals. This paper examines a simple and low-temperature approach to self-assembling gold nanoparticles (Au-np)—a common catalytic material—onto silicon nanowires (SiNWs). A conformal ultra-thin film (i.e., contact angle. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging, it is found that annealing temperature profile has a strong effect on the particle size. Additionally, the contact angle is found to be dependent on particle size and temperature even below the eutectic temperature of the Au-Si alloy. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate potential explanations for such experimental observation. In this temperature regime, the simulations reveal the formation of an amorphous phase at the interface between the catalyst and SiNW that is sensitive to temperature. This amorphous layer increases the adhesion energy at the interface and explains the contact angle dependence on temperature.

  17. Towards time-dependent, non-equilibrium charge-transfer force fields: Contact electrification and history-dependent dissociation limits

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Force fields uniquely assign interatomic forces for a given set of atomic coordinates. The underlying assumption is that electrons are in their quantum-mechanical ground state or in thermal equilibrium. However, there is an abundance of cases where this is unjustified because the system is only locally in equilibrium. In particular, the fractional charges of atoms, clusters, or solids tend to not only depend on atomic positions but also on how the system reached its state. For example, the ch...

  18. Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport through Individually Contacted DNA Origami-Based Au Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschome, Bezu; Facsko, Stefan; Schönherr, Tommy; Kerbusch, Jochen; Keller, Adrian; Erbe, Artur

    2016-10-11

    DNA origami nanostructures have been used extensively as scaffolds for numerous applications such as for organizing both organic and inorganic nanomaterials, studying single molecule reactions, and fabricating photonic devices. Yet, little has been done toward the integration of DNA origami nanostructures into nanoelectronic devices. Among other challenges, the technical difficulties in producing well-defined electrical contacts between macroscopic electrodes and individual DNA origami-based nanodevices represent a serious bottleneck that hinders the thorough characterization of such devices. Therefore, in this work, we have developed a method to electrically contact individual DNA origami-based metallic nanowires using electron beam lithography. We then characterize the charge transport of such nanowires in the temperature range from room temperature down to 4.2 K. The room temperature charge transport measurements exhibit ohmic behavior, whereas at lower temperatures, multiple charge transport mechanisms such as tunneling and thermally assisted transport start to dominate. Our results confirm that charge transport along metallized DNA origami nanostructures may deviate from pure metallic behavior due to several factors including partial metallization, seed inhomogeneities, impurities, and weak electronic coupling among AuNPs. Besides, this study further elucidates the importance of variable temperature measurements for determining the dominant charge transport mechanisms for conductive nanostructures made by self-assembly approaches.

  19. Role of very-late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in myelin basic protein-primed T cell contact-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-06-20

    The presence of neuroantigen-primed T cells recognizing self-myelin antigens within the CNS is necessary for the development of demyelinating autoimmune disease like multiple sclerosis. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in microglial cells. MBP-primed T cells alone induced specifically the microglial expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-1alpha tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6, proinflammatory cytokines that are primarily involved in the pathogenesis of MS. This induction was primarily dependent on the contact between MBP-primed T cells and microglia. The activation of microglial NF-kappaB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) by MBP-primed T cell contact and inhibition of contact-mediated microglial expression of proinflammatory cytokines by dominant-negative mutants of p65 and C/EBPbeta suggest that MBP-primed T cells induce microglial expression of cytokines through the activation of NF-kappaB and C/EBPbeta. In addition, we show that MBP-primed T cells express very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), and functional blocking antibodies to alpha4 chain of VLA-4 (CD49d) inhibited the ability of MBP-primed T cells to induce microglial proinflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, the blocking of VLA-4 impaired the ability of MBP-primed T cells to induce microglial activation of only C/EBPbeta but not that of NF-kappaB. This study illustrates a novel role of VLA-4 in regulating neuroantigen-primed T cell-induced activation of microglia through C/EBPbeta

  20. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  1. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  2. Contact force and impedance decrease during ablation depends on catheter location and orientation: insights from pulmonary vein isolation using a contact force-sensing catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sven; Reichlin, Tobias; Pavlovic, Nikola; Schaer, Beat; Osswald, Stefan; Sticherling, Christian; Kühne, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Contact force (CF) sensing during radiofrequency (RF) ablation allows controlling lesion size. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of catheter tip location and orientation on the association of CF and impedance decrease. We retrospectively analyzed RF applications from 32 patients undergoing catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation using a force-sensing catheter and 3D mapping system. CF, catheter location and orientation relative to the tissue during ablation as well as the absolute impedance decrease during the first 20 s of ablation as a surrogate for lesion effectiveness were analyzed for 791 RF applications. While a higher CF was achieved around the right pulmonary veins (12.5 vs. 11.4 g, p = 0.045), a lower median absolute impedance decrease within the first 20 s was seen around the right veins compared to the left veins (9.3 vs. 10.2 Ω, p = 0.02). With different catheter orientations relative to the tissue, higher CF and impedance decrease was seen when the catheter was orientated parallel or oblique to the tissue (30°-145°) as compared perpendicularly (0-30°) with a median CF of 13.2 vs. 8.0 g (p decrease during the first 20 s of 11 vs. 7 Ω (p decrease in a multivariable linear regression model (p decrease, is not only dependent on the achieved catheter CF but also on catheter orientation and location.

  3. Physical model of back line-contact front-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Andres

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of advanced front-junction solar cells where the metal contact to the base region is locally formed on the back surface in the shape of lines usually requires numerical simulations. Here, we describe an approach based on a geometric formulation of carrier crowding towards the localized contact, in conjunction with a partition of the device in two distinct regions. This permits a one dimensional analysis of carrier flow, both in the region immediately adjacent to the contact and in the peripheral region surrounding it. The resulting model is simple enough to provide insight into the physics of device operation and reasonably accurate in cases of practical interest. By applying it to different cases, we identify unexpected anomalies and explain them in terms of the peculiar interplay between carrier transport and recombination that takes place in this type of solar cell.

  4. Nitrogen Doped Zinc Telluride Back Contact to CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, J.; Makhratchev, K.; Price, K. J.; Ma, X.; Simmons, D. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gupta, A.; Bohn, R. G.; Compaan, A. D.

    2000-10-01

    We describe the development of the Nitrogen doped ZnTe for the back contacts of CdS/CdTe solar cell. Reproducible p-ZnTe films were obtained using RF magnetron sputtering technique with Ar/N2 gas mixture. Both, intrinsic and nitrogen doped, ZnTe films were investigated for electronic properties. The conductivity of the N:ZnTe films was about five orders of magnitude higher than that of intrinsic ones. A bilayer of intrinsic and doped ZnTe films were used in back contact structure of CdS/CdTe solar cells. The ZnTe/N:ZnTe/Ni structure showed slightly lower initial performance but better stability in comparison to evaporated Cu/Au back contacts.

  5. Implementation of Tunneling Passivated Contacts into Industrially Relevant n-Cz Si Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Page, Matthew R.; Warren, Emily L.; Dameron, Arrelaine; Norman, Andrew G.; Lee, Benjamin G.; Young, David L.; Stradins, Paul

    2015-06-14

    We identify bottlenecks, and propose solutions, to implement a B-diffused front emitter and a backside pc-Si/SiO2 pasivated tunneling contact into high efficiency n-Cz Si cells in an industrially relevant way. We apply an O-precipitate dissolution treatment to make n-Cz wafers immune to bulk lifetime process degradation, enabling robust, passivated B front emitters with J0 <; 20fA/cm2. Adding ultralow recombination n+ pc-Si/SiO2 back contacts enables pre-metallized cells with iVoc=720 mV and J0=8.6 fA/cm2. However, metallization significantly degrades performance of these contacts due to pinholes and possibly, grain boundary diffusion of primary metal and source contaminates such as Cu. An intermediate, doped a-Si:H capping layer is found to significantly block the harmful metal penetration into pc-Si.

  6. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Robert S., E-mail: Robert.Krauss@mssm.edu [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  7. Shape-dependent regulation of proliferation in normal and malignant human cells and its alteration by interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesh, D.A.; Greene, J.J.

    1986-06-01

    The relationship between cell morphology, proliferation, and contact inhibition was studied in normal and malignant human cells which varied in their sensitivity to contact inhibition. Their ability to proliferate was examined under conditions where the cells were constrained into different shapes by plating onto plastic surfaces coated with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) can precisely vary the shape of cells without toxicity. Cell proliferation was quantitated by cell counts and labeling indices were determined by autoradiography. The normal JHU-1 foreskin fibroblasts and IMR-90 lung fibroblasts exhibited contact-inhibited growth with a saturation density of 2.9 X 10(5) and 2.0 X 10(5) cells/cm2, respectively. These cells also exhibited stringent dependency on cell shape with a mitotic index of less than 3% at poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) concentrations at which the cells were rounded versus a labeling index of 75-90% when the cells were flat. The malignant bladder carcinoma line RT-4 exhibited partial contact-inhibited growth. Its dependency on cell shape was less stringent than that of normal cells with a mitotic index of 37-40% when rounded and 79% when flat. The malignant fibrosarcoma line, HT1080, was not contact inhibited and was entirely shape independent with a mitotic index of 70-90% regardless of cell shape. Treatment of HT1080 cells with low concentration of human fibroblast interferon (less than 40 units/ml) restored shape-dependent proliferation while having little effect on normal cells. Subantiproliferative doses of interferon were also shown to restore contact-inhibited proliferation control to malignant cells previously lacking it.

  8. Plasma contact system activation drives anaphylaxis in severe mast cell-mediated allergic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala-Cunill, Anna; Björkqvist, Jenny; Senter, Riccardo; Guilarte, Mar; Cardona, Victoria; Labrador, Moises; Nickel, Katrin F; Butler, Lynn; Luengo, Olga; Kumar, Parvin; Labberton, Linda; Long, Andy; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Kenne, Ellinor; Jämsä, Anne; Krieger, Thorsten; Schlüter, Hartmut; Fuchs, Tobias; Flohr, Stefanie; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Cumin, Frederic; McCrae, Keith; Maas, Coen; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially lethal, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mast cell-derived mediators into the circulation. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We report here that a plasma protease cascade, the factor XII-driven contact system, critically contributes to

  9. Tuning back contact property via artificial interface dipoles in Si/organic hybrid solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Sheng, Jiang; Wu, Sudong; Zhu, Juye; Chen, Shaojie; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-01

    Back contact property plays a key role in the charge collection efficiency of c-Si/poly(3,4-ethylthiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells (Si-HSCs), as an alternative for the high-efficiency and low-cost photovoltaic devices. In this letter, we utilize the water soluble poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) to modify the Al/Si interface to be an Ohmic contact via interface dipole tuning, decreasing the work function of the Al film. This Ohmic contact improves the electron collection efficiency of the rear electrode, increasing the short circuit current density (Jsc). Furthermore, the interface dipoles make the band bending downward to increase the total barrier height of built-in electric field of the solar cell, enhancing the open circuit voltage (Voc). The PEO solar cell exhibits an excellent performance, 12.29% power conversion efficiency, a 25.28% increase from the reference solar cell without a PEO interlayer. The simple and water soluble method as a promising alternative is used to develop the interfacial contact quality of the rear electrode for the high photovoltaic performance of Si-HSCs.

  10. Post passivation light trapping back contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, M; Bittkau, K; Lentz, F; Richter, A; Ding, K; Carius, R; Rau, U; Paetzold, U W

    2016-11-10

    Light trapping in crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells is an essential building block for high efficiency solar cells targeting low material consumption and low costs. In this study, we present the successful implementation of highly efficient light-trapping back contacts, subsequent to the passivation of Si heterojunction solar cells. The back contacts are realized by texturing an amorphous silicon layer with a refractive index close to the one of crystalline silicon at the back side of the silicon wafer. As a result, decoupling of optically active and electrically active layers is introduced. In the long run, the presented concept has the potential to improve light trapping in monolithic Si multijunction solar cells as well as solar cell configurations where texturing of the Si absorber surfaces usually results in a deterioration of the electrical properties. As part of this study, different light-trapping textures were applied to prototype silicon heterojunction solar cells. The best path length enhancement factors, at high passivation quality, were obtained with light-trapping textures based on randomly distributed craters. Comparing a planar reference solar cell with an absorber thickness of 280 μm and additional anti-reflection coating, the short-circuit current density (JSC) improves for a similar solar cell with light-trapping back contact. Due to the light trapping back contact, the JSC is enhanced around 1.8 mA cm(-2) to 38.5 mA cm(-2) due to light trapping in the wavelength range between 1000 nm and 1150 nm.

  11. Optimisation of interdigitated back contacts solar cells by two-dimensional numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporuk, O.; Kaminski, A.; Lemiti, M.; Fave, A. [Instituit National des Sciences Appliquees Lyon, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere; Skryshevsky, V. [National Taras Shevchenko Univ., Kiev (Ukraine). Radiophysics Dept.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of the simulation of interdigitated back contacts solar cell on thin-film ({approx}{mu}m) silicon layer. The influence of several parameters (surface recombination rate, substrate thickness and type, diffusion length, device geometry, doping levels) on device characteristics are simulated using the accurate two-dimensional numerical simulator DESSIS that allows to optimise the cell design. (Author)

  12. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  13. The control of neural cell-to-cell interactions through non-contact electrical field stimulation using graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Chaejeong; Yoo, Jeongwan; Lee, Siyoung; Jo, Areum; Jung, Susie; Yoo, Hyosun; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2011-01-01

    Electric field stimulation has become one of the most promising therapies for a variety of neurological diseases. However, the safety and effectiveness of the stimulator are critical in determining the outcome. Because there are few safe and effective in vivo and/or in vitro stimulator devices, we demonstrate a method that allows for non-contact electric field stimulation with a specific strength that is able to control cell-to-cell interaction in vitro. Graphene, a form of graphite, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was used to create a non-cytotoxic in vitro graphene/PET film stimulator. A transient non-contact electric field was produced by charge-balanced biphasic stimuli through the graphene/PET film electrodes and applied to cultured neural cells. We found that weak electric field stimulation (pulse duration of 10 s) as low as 4.5 mV/mm for 32 min was particularly effective in shaping cell-to-cell interaction. Under weak electric field stimulation, we observed a significant increase in the number of cells forming new cell-to-cell couplings and in the number of cells strengthening existing cell-to-cell couplings. The underlying mechanism of the altered cellular interactions may be related to an altered regulation of the endogenous cytoskeletal proteins fibronectin, actin, and vinculin. In conclusion, this technique may open a new therapeutic approach for augmenting cell-to-cell coupling in cell transplantation therapy in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Low resistivity molybdenum thin film towards the back contact of dye-sensitized solar cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vuong Son; Tran Thi Ha; Luong T Thu Thuy; Nguyen Ngoc Ha; Nguyen Duc Chien; Mai Anh Tuan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the optimization of the molybdenum thin film electrode as the back contact of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The molybdenum thin film was grown on the glass substrate by direct current sputtering techniques of which the sputtering power was 150Wat 18 sccm flow rate of Ar. At such sputtering parameters, the Mo film can reach the lowest resistivity of 1.28E−6 cm at 400 nm thick. And the reflection of Mo membrane was 82%. This value is considered as a very good result for preparation of the back contact of DSSC.

  15. Silicon Based Photovoltaic Cells For Concentration-Research And Development Progress In Laser Grooved Buried Contact Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A.; Baistow, I.; Brown, L.; Devenport, S.; Drew, K.; Heasman, K. C.; Morrison, D.; Bruton, T. M.; Serenelli, L.; De Iuliis, S.; Izzi, M.; Tucci, M.; Salza, E.; Pirozzi, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Laser grooved buried contact silicon solar cell (LGBC) process employed by Narec currently produces LGBC cells designed to operate at concentrations ranging from 1-100 suns and has demonstrated efficiencies at 50X of over 19% and at 100X of over 18.2% using 300 μm CZ silicon[1] wafers. As part of the LAB2LINE[1], APOLLON[2] and ASPIS[3] projects funded under the European Commission Framework Programs (FP6 and FP7) we have made improvements to the LGBC process to improve efficiency or make the cell technology more suitable for industrial CPV receiver manufacturing processes. We describe a process which hybridizes LGBC and more standard screen printing technologies which yields at least a 6% relative improvement at concentration when using more readily available 200 μm thick CZ wafers. We describe a pioneering front dicing technique (FDT). The FDT process is important in small cells where edge recombination effects are detrimental to the performance. We show that by using this new technique we can produce cells that perform better at concentration and improve the positioning of the front contact of the cell. We also describe a busbar technology that uses laser processing and electroless chemical plating to allow not only soldering to the front contact of the cell but also wire bonding. The advances in research and development of LGBC cells leading to improved cell performance may provide significant reductions in levilised cost of energy (LCOE) for low to medium CPV systems.

  16. Field Dependence of π-Band Superconducting Gap in MgB2 Thin Films from Point-Contact Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan; XI Xiao-Xing; WANG Yong-Lei; SHAN Lei; JIA Ying; YANG Huan; WEN Hai-Hu; ZHUANG Cheng-Gang; LI Qi; CUI Yi

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of point-contact spectroscopy measurements on high-quality epitaxial MgB2 thin films with injected current along the c-axis. The temperature and field dependences of л-band properties with the field parallel to (H‖) or perpendicular to (H┴ ) the c-axis are investigated in detail. When a magnetic field is applied, either parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, the density of the quasiparticle state (DOS) of the л-band proliferates quickly with increasing field, while the gap amplitude of the л-band decreases slowly, which is different from the recent theoretical calculations, showing a field dependent competition between the interband scattering and the pair-breaking effects.

  17. Shielding effects in polymer-polymer reactions. V. Concentration dependence of contact formation between star-branched and linear chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardai, Michael M; Zifferer, Gerhard

    2013-07-19

    By use of the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique mixtures of star-branched (arm number F = 4) and linear chains in athermal (good) solvent are analyzed regarding probabilities for intermolecular contacts of various reactive sites within different polymer coils. The accompanying sterical hindrances are described in the framework of shielding factors in order to investigate reactions and side reactions in radical polymerization and other techniques that involve polymer-polymer coupling. The shielding factors are studied as a function of total concentration from high dilution up to the bulk for different chain lengths of star-shaped and linear chains. Results indicate that their concentration dependence can be described by a power law for systems above the overlap concentration, whereas the chain length dependence vanishes when extrapolating to infinite chain lengths in that concentration range. Also the influence of the ratio of star chains and linear chains is studied for various concentrations.

  18. Interdigitated back contact silicon solar cell analysis and design recommendations for space use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Dean C.; Froedge, Sharon L.

    1989-09-01

    The Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cell is a relatively new design which has shown unprecedentedly high efficiencies. Silicon Interdigitated Back Contact cells have been fabricated that show greater than 25 percent efficiency at 100 suns Air Mass 1.5. This is far superior to conventional silicon concentrator cells which are approximately 18 percent efficient. The purpose of this report is to describe briefly the differences between this technology and conventional cells, demonstrate a near optimum design achieved by two-dimensional numerical simulation, and assess the utility of these cells for space application. The end of life (EOL) performance of this cell design in the radiation environment of space is a critical issue since the high efficiency of the design is predicated on the use of very high quality, long-diffusion length silicon. The radiation-induced degradation of this material is expected to lead to severe efficiency losses. The optimization of cell design to minimize these losses was carried out using a modified version of the two-dimensional PISCES semiconductor simulator. The final designs presented here show that the performance of IBC cells in space can significantly exceed that of conventional cells.

  19. Admittance spectroscopy characterize graphite paste for back contact of CdTe thin film solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CdTe thin film solar cells with a doped-graphite paste back contact layer were studied using admittance spectroscopy technology.The positions and the capture cross sections of energy level in the forbidden band were calculated,which are the important parameters to affect solar cell performance.The results showed that there were three defects in the CdTe thin films solar cells with the doped-graphite paste back contact layer,whose positions in the forbidden band were close to 0.34,0.46 and 0.51 eV,respectively above the valence band,and capture cross sections were 2.23×10-16,2.41×10-14,4.38×10-13 cm2,respectively.

  20. Genome-Derived Cytosolic DNA Mediates Type I Interferon-Dependent Rejection of B Cell Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu J. Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR induces the expression of type I interferons (IFNs, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show the presence of cytosolic DNA in different mouse and human tumor cells. Treatment of cells with genotoxic agents increased the levels of cytosolic DNA in a DDR-dependent manner. Cloning of cytosolic DNA molecules from mouse lymphoma cells suggests that cytosolic DNA is derived from unique genomic loci and has the potential to form non-B DNA structures, including R-loops. Overexpression of Rnaseh1, which resolves R-loops, reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA, type I Ifn transcripts, and type I IFN-dependent rejection of lymphoma cells. Live-cell imaging showed a dynamic contact of cytosolic DNA with mitochondria, an important organelle for innate immune recognition of cytosolic nucleotides. In summary, we found that cytosolic DNA is present in many tumor cells and contributes to the immunogenicity of tumor cells.

  1. Phenomenon of "contact guidance" on the surface with nano-micro-groove-like pattern and cell physiological effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feng; YUAN Lin; HUANG He; CHEN Hong

    2009-01-01

    The topography of material surface has important influence on cell behavior and physiological functions. Groove-like pattern has drawn much attention among various patterns,due to the phenomenon of "contact guidance" induced by this kind of topography. This review mainly focuses on "contact guidance" formation as well as its influence on cell behavior and physiological effects. The possible mechanisms of "contact guidance" formation were discussed. The research trend and the potential applications were also suggested.

  2. Fabrication and Analysis of Micro Contact Based Probe Cell for IC Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Idzdihar Idris

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the fabrication process and analysis of micro contact probe cell for IC testing deposited by dc sputtering technique on a glass substrate. It is designed to solve and replace pogo pins in IC testing process. In previous study, the new model of test socket with new materials in different shapes were designed by using ANSYS as Finite Element Analysis (FEA software and the best parameter were obtained. According to the optimized parameters, prototype structures of the micro-contacts are fabricated using DC Sputtering with materials like copper and tungsten on base copper on glass substrates. Micro contact with thickness of 2800-7000 nm were successively deposited on glass substrate at sputtering power of 125 W in argon ambient gas with pressure of 10-15multiply 10-3 Torr at a room temperature. The structural and electrical properties of micro contact were investigated by using profilometer, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM and four point probes. Results show that the film thickness increased as the deposition the time getting longer. The Root Mean Square (RMS roughnesses obtained are all in a good quality. On the other hand, the resistivity of micro contacts was less than 4 u&Omega-cm, which has good conductive properties. Consequently, this design is appropriate for replacing the conventional pogo pin based testing tools.

  3. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    in genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation...... of chronic intestinal inflammation remains unclear. In the current study we used the CD45RBhi T cell transfer model of colitis to determine the role of IRF4 dependent DCs in intestinal inflammation. In this model naïve CD4+ T cells when transferred into RAG-/- mice, proliferate and expand in response...... to bacterial derived luminal antigen, localize to the intestinal mucosa and induce colitis. Adoptive transfer of naïve T cells into CD11cCre.IRF4fl/fl.RAG-1-/- mice resulted in reduced monocyte recruitment to the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) compared to Cre- controls. Inflammatory cytokines...

  4. Contact sensitizers decrease 33D1 expression on mature Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; Galanaud, P; Leclaire, J; Rousset, F

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cells play a critical role in allergic contact hypersensitivity. In vivo, these cells capture xenobiotics that penetrate the skin and transport them through the lymphatic vessels into regional lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. During this migration step, Langerhans cells become mature dendritic cells according to their phenotype and their high immunostimulatory capacity. In vitro, when isolated from the skin and cultured for 3 days, Langerhans cells undergo similar phenotypic and functional maturation. In this study, the capacity of sensitizers, irritants and neutral chemicals to modulate the surface marker expression and morphology of pure mature murine Langerhans cells in vitro was examined. Contact with 4 sensitizers (2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfate, 4-ethoxymethylene-2-phenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one, p-phenylenediamine, mercaptobenzo-thiazole) resulted in a rapid, specific, marked fall in 33D1 expression, a murine specific dendritic cell marker. No effect was observed with 2 neutral chemicals (sodium chloride, methyl nicotinate) or 2 irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide, benzalkonium chloride). Nevertheless, sodium lauryl sulfate, a very irritant detergent, altered morphology and down-regulated all membrane markers. These preliminary data suggest that in vitro modulation of 33D1 expression by strong sensitizers may be an approach to the development of an in vitro model for the identification of chemicals that have the potential to cause skin sensitization and to distinguish them as far as possible from irritants.

  5. Localized plasmonic losses at metal back contacts of thin-film silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, U. W.; Hallermann, F.; Pieters, B. E.; Rau, U.; Carius, R.; von Plessen, G.

    2010-05-01

    Investigations of optical losses induced by localized plasmons in protrusions on silver back contacts of thin-film silicon solar cells are presented. The interaction of electromagnetic waves with nanoprotrusions on flat silver layers is simulated with a three-dimensional numerical solver of Maxwell's equations. Spatial absorption profiles and spatial electric field profiles as well as the absorption inside the protrusions are calculated. The results presented here show that the absorption of irradiated light at nanorough silver layers can be strongly enhanced by localized plasmonic resonances in Ag nanoprotrusions. Especially, localized plasmons in protrusions with a radius below 60 nm induce strong absorption, which can be several times the energy irradiated on the protrusion's cross section. The localized plasmonic resonances in single protrusions on Ag layers are observed to shift to longer wavelengths with increasing refractive index of the surrounding material. At wavelengths above 500 nm localized plasmonic resonances will increase the absorption of nanorough μc-Si:H/Ag interfaces. The localized plasmon induced absorption at nanorough ZnO/Ag interfaces lies at shorter wavelengths due to the lower refractive index of ZnO. For wavelengths above 500 nm, a high reflectivity of the silver back contacts is essential for the light-trapping of thin-film silicon solar cells. Localized-plasmon induced losses at silver back contacts can explain the experimentally observed increase of the solar cell performance when applying a ZnO/Ag back contact in comparison to a μc-Si:H/Ag back contact.

  6. Contact assembly of cell-laden hollow microtubes through automated micromanipulator tip locating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Shi, Qing; Guo, Yanan; Li, Yanan; Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an automated contact assembly method to fabricate a cell-laden microtube based on accurate locating of the micromanipulator tip. Essential for delivering nutrients in thick engineered tissues, a vessel-mimetic microtube can be precisely assembled through microrobotic contact biomanipulation. The biomanipulation is a technique to spatially order and immobilize cellular targets with high precision. However, due to image occlusion during contact, it is challenging to locate the micromanipulator tip for fully automated assembly. To achieve pixel-wise tracking and locating of the tip in contact, a particle filter algorithm integrated with a determined level set model is employed here. The model ensures precise convergence of the micromanipulator’s contour during occlusion. With the converged active contour, the algorithm is able to pixel-wisely separate the micromanipulator from the low-contrast background and precisely locate the tip with error around 1 pixel (2 µm at 4  ×  magnification). As a result, the cell-laden microtube is automatically assembled at six layers/min, which is effective enough to fabricate vessel-mimetic constructs for vascularization in tissue engineering.

  7. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation for Interdigitated Back Passivated Contact (IBPC) Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Page, Matthew R.; Theingi, San; Young, Matthew; Aguiar, Jeffery; Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul

    2016-11-21

    We present progress to develop low-cost interdigitated back contact solar cells with pc-Si/SiO2/c-Si passivated contacts formed by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). PIII is a lower-cost implantation technique than traditional beam-line implantation due to its simpler design, lower operating costs, and ability to run high doses (1E14-1E18 cm-2) at low ion energies (20 eV-10 keV). These benefits make PIII ideal for high throughput production of patterned passivated contacts, where high-dose, low-energy implantations are made into thin (20-200 nm) a-Si layers instead of into the wafer itself. For this work symmetric passivated contact test structures grown on n-Cz wafers with PH3 PIII doping gave implied open circuit voltage (iVoc) values of 730 mV with Jo values of 2 fA/cm2. Samples doped with B2H6 gave iVoc values of 690 mV and Jo values of 24 fA/cm2, outperforming BF3 doping, which gave iVoc values in the 660-680 mV range. Samples were further characterized by photoluminescence and SIMS depth profiles. Initial IBPC cell results are presented.

  8. Loss analysis of back-contact back-junction thin-film monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, F.; Eidelloth, S.; Horbelt, R.; Bothe, K.; Garralaga Rojas, E.; Brendel, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate power losses in back-contact back-junction monocrystalline thin-film silicon solar cells fabricated using the porous silicon layer transfer process. Our loss analysis combines two-dimensional finite element modeling and resistance network simulations. The input parameters of the finite element modeling are determined experimentally by measuring saturation current densities and sheet resistances on test samples prepared identically to the solar cells. Characteristic solar cell parameters such as short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and efficiency of measured and network simulated current voltage characteristics investigated in this study match within an uncertainty of 5%. Free energy loss analysis serves as comparison of all losses in units of power per area at the maximum power point. The largest loss is bulk recombination due to a carrier lifetime of 2 μs in the epitaxial Si layer. Further significant losses result from recombination at the base contacts characterized by a diode saturation current density of 50 000 fA cm-2 as well as resistive losses due to lateral majority carrier current flows within the solar cell base and contact resistance losses.

  9. Behaviour of moderately differentiated osteoblast-like cells cultured in contact with bioactive glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattar S.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses have been shown to stimulate osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the behaviour of osteoblast-like cells (MG63, cultured in the presence of bioglass particles. Three types of granules were used: 45S5registered bioactive glass, 45S5registered granules preincubated in tris buffer and 60S non-reactive glass, used as control. Phase contrast microscopy permitted step-by-step visualization of cell cultures in contact with the particles. Ultrastructural observations of undecalcified sections revealed direct contacts of the cells and an electron-dense layer located at the periphery of the material. Protein synthesis was evaluated biochemically and showed a gradual increase throughout the culture time in the three types of cultures. Alkaline phosphatase was detected in situ, in clusters of packed cells either in contact with the material or in the background cell layer. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the main osteoblastic markers showed that gene expression was maintained in all three cultures. The fact that osteocalcin was not detected, supports the fact that the MG63 cell line is composed of less differentiated osteogenic cells rather than mature osteoblasts. We also demonstrated for the first time in this cell line, the expression of Msx-2, Dlx-3 and Dlx-7 homeogenes, known to regulate in vivo foetal skeletogenesis as well as adult skeletal regeneration. However, no significant differences could be recognised in the expression pattern of bone markers between the three types of cultures. Yet these preliminary results indicate that bioactive glasses provided a suitable environment for the growth and proliferation of osteoblasts in vitro, since no drastic changes in phenotype expression of pre-osteoblasts was noted.

  10. Differential regulation of cell-cell contact, invasion and anoikis by hScrib and hDlg in keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Massimi

    Full Text Available The components of the Scrib/Dlg tumour suppressor complex have complementary roles in Drosophila and loss of both proteins is a common event in many different human tumours. However no studies have directly addressed the respective contributions of loss of hScrib and hDlg in the same human cell background to cellular phenotypes associated with cell transformation. In human HaCaT keratinocytes we show that removal of hScrib greatly reduces cell-cell contact and cell-matrix interactions, and promotes an invasive phenotype. Conversely, in cells lacking hDlg1 cell-cell contacts are maintained and there are decreases in both cell growth and invasion. However, hDlg-depleted cells show increased resistance to a specialized form of apoptosis known as anoikis, to which cells lacking hScrib are highly susceptible. Thus whilst it has been widely assumed that hScrib and hDlg have complementary roles, these studies in fact demonstrate that hScrib and hDlg1 have distinct and opposing functions in human keratinocytes.

  11. Role of metal/silicon semiconductor contact engineering for enhanced output current in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-11-25

    We show that contact engineering plays an important role to extract the maximum performance from energy harvesters like microbial fuel cells (MFCs). We experimented with Schottky and Ohmic methods of fabricating contact areas on silicon in an MFC contact material study. We utilized the industry standard contact material, aluminum, as well as a metal, whose silicide has recently been recognized for its improved performance in smallest scale integration requirements, cobalt. Our study shows that improvements in contact engineering are not only important for device engineering but also for microsystems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies by contact inhibition of locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Alert, Ricard; Pešek, Jiří; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Ramon, Herman; Vincent, Romaric

    2016-12-20

    Cells in tissues can organize into a broad spectrum of structures according to their function. Drastic changes of organization, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transitions or the formation of spheroidal aggregates, are often associated either to tissue morphogenesis or to cancer progression. Here, we study the organization of cell colonies by means of simulations of self-propelled particles with generic cell-like interactions. The interplay between cell softness, cell-cell adhesion, and contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) yields structures and collective dynamics observed in several existing tissue phenotypes. These include regular distributions of cells, dynamic cell clusters, gel-like networks, collectively migrating monolayers, and 3D aggregates. We give analytical predictions for transitions between noncohesive, cohesive, and 3D cell arrangements. We explicitly show how CIL yields an effective repulsion that promotes cell dispersal, thereby hindering the formation of cohesive tissues. Yet, in continuous monolayers, CIL leads to collective cell motion, ensures tensile intercellular stresses, and opposes cell extrusion. Thus, our work highlights the prominent role of CIL in determining the emergent structures and dynamics of cell colonies.

  13. Design and application of ion-implanted polySi passivating contacts for interdigitated back contact c-Si solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangtao; Ingenito, Andrea; Hameren, Nienke van; Isabella, Olindo; Zeman, Miro [PVMD, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-01-18

    Ion-implanted passivating contacts based on poly-crystalline silicon (polySi) are enabled by tunneling oxide, optimized, and used to fabricate interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells. Both n-type (phosphorous doped) and p-type (boron doped) passivating contacts are fabricated by ion-implantation of intrinsic polySi layers deposited via low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and subsequently annealed. The impact of doping profile on the passivation quality of the polySi doped contacts is studied for both polarities. It was found that an excellent surface passivation could be obtained by confining as much as possible the implanted-and-activated dopants within the polySi layers. The doping profile in the polySi was controlled by modifying the polySi thickness, the energy and dose of ion-implantation, and the temperature and time of annealing. An implied open-circuit voltage of 721 mV for n-type and 692 mV for p-type passivating contacts was achieved. Besides the high passivating quality, the developed passivating contacts exhibit reasonable high conductivity (R{sub sh n-type} = 95 Ω/□ and R{sub sh p-type} = 120 Ω/□). An efficiency of 19.2% (V{sub oc} = 673 mV, J{sub sc} = 38.0 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 75.2%, and pseudo-FF = 83.2%) was achieved on a front-textured IBC solar cell with polySi passivating contacts as both back surface field and emitter. By improving the front-side passivation, a V{sub OC} of 696 mV was also measured.

  14. Design and application of ion-implanted polySi passivating contacts for interdigitated back contact c-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangtao; Ingenito, Andrea; van Hameren, Nienke; Isabella, Olindo; Zeman, Miro

    2016-01-01

    Ion-implanted passivating contacts based on poly-crystalline silicon (polySi) are enabled by tunneling oxide, optimized, and used to fabricate interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells. Both n-type (phosphorous doped) and p-type (boron doped) passivating contacts are fabricated by ion-implantation of intrinsic polySi layers deposited via low-pressure chemical vapor deposition and subsequently annealed. The impact of doping profile on the passivation quality of the polySi doped contacts is studied for both polarities. It was found that an excellent surface passivation could be obtained by confining as much as possible the implanted-and-activated dopants within the polySi layers. The doping profile in the polySi was controlled by modifying the polySi thickness, the energy and dose of ion-implantation, and the temperature and time of annealing. An implied open-circuit voltage of 721 mV for n-type and 692 mV for p-type passivating contacts was achieved. Besides the high passivating quality, the developed passivating contacts exhibit reasonable high conductivity (Rsh n-type = 95 Ω/□ and Rsh p-type = 120 Ω/□). An efficiency of 19.2% (Voc = 673 mV, Jsc = 38.0 mA/cm2, FF = 75.2%, and pseudo-FF = 83.2%) was achieved on a front-textured IBC solar cell with polySi passivating contacts as both back surface field and emitter. By improving the front-side passivation, a VOC of 696 mV was also measured.

  15. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-06-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  16. Selective emitters in buried contact silicon solar cells. Some low-cost solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirozzi, L.; Arabito, G.; Artuso, F.; Barbarossa, V.; Besi-Vetrella, U.; Loreti, S.; Mangiapane, P.; Salza, E. [ENEA Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Roma (Italy)

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of our study on the formation of selective emitter structures in buried contact cells. In particular, our attention has been focused on those processes that seem to be scalable to industry. To this aim, specific dopant sources and fabrication steps have been selected.Two different kinds of dopants have been considered: the P-doped SOD and the screen-printed dopant paste. For both sources we have tested the feasibility of the selective diffusion formation in a single step, together with the application of suitable techniques to get selective doping, such as laser enhanced diffusion into the grooves, or selective deposition of screen printed paste in buried grid pattern. SEM and SEM-EBIC analyses have been used to investigate the occurrence of doping. Several batches of buried contact, mechanically grooved cells have prepared and tested.

  17. Chemical Degradation of the Cathodic Electrical Contact Between Carbon and Cast Iron in Aluminum Production Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Martin; Désilets, Martin; Soucy, Gervais; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Forté, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The cathodic carbon to cast iron electrical contact degradation is one of the factors to consider in the cathode voltage drop (CVD) increase over the lifetime of aluminum production cells. Lab-scale experiments were carried out to study the cast iron to carbon interface chemical degradation and the impact of important cell parameters like temperature and bath chemistry. Laboratory degradation results were compared with industrial samples. A thermoelectric Ansys numerical model was then used to predict the effect of cast iron surface degradation over CVD. Results show that the aluminum formation on the cast iron surface and its subsequent diffusion creates an immiscible mixture of Fe-Al metal alloy and electrolytic bath. Disparities were also observed between industrial samples taken from two different technologies, suggesting that the degradation can be slowed down. Thermoelectric calculations finally revealed that the impact of the contact resistance augmentation is by far greater than the cast iron degradation.

  18. Nucleus and cell size changes in human bulbar conjunctival cells after soft contact lens wear, as assessed by impression cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J; Naase, Taher

    2008-06-01

    To specifically assess the nucleus size and its relationship to cell size for human bulbar conjunctival cells. Impression cytology samples were taken from the nasal side of the intra-palpebral zone of the bulbar conjunctival surface from 20 young adult white European males, half of whom were successful daily soft contact lens wearers. A Millcell-CM filter was used, after topical anaesthesia with oxybuprocaine 0.4%, which was stained with Giemsa and colour images taken at 400x magnification by light microscopy. The images were graded and also a 35mm was prepared. From the projected image, an overlay method was used to outline the borders such that the cell and nucleus areas could be measured by planimetry. The group mean cell area values were 267+/-59microm(2) (n=10, +/-S.D.) and 1028+/-357microm(2) for the non-contact lens wearers and contact lens wearers, respectively. The cell nucleus areas were 64+/-11microm(2) and 99+/-19microm(2), respectively. Both the cell areas and nucleus area values were statistically different between the two groups (pnucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio also changes, but the nucleus size generally increases (rather than decreases).

  19. Thickness dependence of surface energy and contact angle of water droplets on ultrathin MoS2 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanhua; Wang, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lizhi; Shen, Xiaodong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a systematic density functional study of surface energy of MoS2 films as a function of thickness from one to twelve layers with the consideration of van der Waals (vdW) interactions using the vdW-DF and DFT-D2 methods. Both vdW schemes show that the surface energy will increase with the increase of the number of atomic layers and converge to a constant value at about six layers. Based on the calculated surface energies, we further analyze the surface contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface using Young's equation as a function of thickness in comparison with experiments, from which the water-MoS2 interfacial energy is derived to be independent of MoS2 thickness. Our calculations indicate that the vdW interactions between the MoS2 layers play an important role in determining surface energy, and results in the thickness dependence of the contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface. Our results explain well the recent wetting experiment [Nano Lett., 2014, 14(8), 4314], and will be useful for future studies of physical and chemical properties of ultrathin MoS2 films.

  20. Human IgA inhibits adherence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga to epithelial cells and contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Oliver-Aguillón, Gabriela; Vega-Pérez, Luz M; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Hernández-Martínez, Dolores; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; González-Robles, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Specific anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies have been detected in the serum and tears of patients and healthy individuals. However, the role of human secretory IgA antibodies in inhibiting the adherence of Acanthamoeba had not been previously investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to purify secretory IgA from human colostrum and analyze its effect on the adherence of Acanthamoeba trophozoites to contact lenses and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. IgA antibodies to Acanthamoeba polyphaga in colostrum of healthy women as well as in saliva and serum of healthy subjects were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. In serum, saliva, and colostrum, we detected IgA antibodies that recognized several antigens of A. polyphaga. In addition, colostrum and IgA antibodies purified from it inhibited adherence of A. polyphaga trophozoites to contact lenses and MDCK cells. These results suggest that IgA antibodies may participate in the resistance to the amoebic infection, probably by inhibiting the adherence of the trophozoites to contact lenses and corneal epithelial cells.

  1. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  2. Series Resistance Analysis of Passivated Emitter Rear Contact Cells Patterned Using Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha A. T. Lenio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For higher-efficiency solar cell structures, such as the Passivated Emitter Rear Contact (PERC cells, to be fabricated in a manufacturing environment, potentially low-cost techniques such as inkjet printing and metal plating are desirable. A common problem that is experienced when fabricating PERC cells is low fill factors due to high series resistance. This paper identifies and attempts to quantify sources of series resistance in inkjet-patterned PERC cells that employ electroless or light-induced nickel-plating techniques followed by copper light-induced plating. Photoluminescence imaging is used to determine locations of series resistance losses in these inkjet-patterned and plated PERC cells.

  3. Optimized Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cell for high concentrated sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, P.; van de Wiele, F.; Stehelin, G.; David, J. P.

    A one-dimensional analytical model for Interdigitated Back Contact solar cells (IBC), also applicable to Front Surface Field (FSF) and Tandem Junction (TJ) solar cells, is presented. The quantum efficiency, generation current, dark current, and conversion efficiency are calculated as a function of the physical parameters of the cell (doping levels, junction depths, thickness, and lifetime). The proposed model simulates the response of FSF and TJ solar cells more accurately than models using the concept of effective surface recombination velocity. The optimization of parameters (doping level and dimension of each region) is discussed. It is shown that a conversion efficiency of 24.8 percent can be reached under 50 suns. IBC solar cells were fabricated with different substrate resistivities and thicknesses. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical predictions.

  4. Effect of electroless nickel on the series resistance of high-efficiency inkjet printed passivated emitter rear contacted solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenio, Martha A.T. [REC Technology US, Inc., 1159 Triton Dr., Foster City, CA 94301 (United States); Lennon, A.J.; Ho-Baillie, A.; Wenham, S.R. [ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    Many existing and emerging solar cell technologies rely on plated metal to form the front surface contacts, and aluminium to form the rear contact. Interactions between the metal plating solutions and the aluminium rear can have a significant impact on cell performance. This paper describes non-uniform nickel deposition on the sintered aluminium rear surface of passivated emitter and rear contacted (PERC) cells patterned using an inkjet printing technique. Rather than being plated homogeneously over the entire rear surface as is observed on an alloyed aluminium rear, the nickel is plated only in the vicinity of the point openings in the rear surface silicon dioxide dielectric layer. Furthermore, this non-uniform nickel deposition was shown to increase the contact resistance of the rear point contacts by an order of magnitude, resulting in higher series resistance values for these fabricated PERC cells. (author)

  5. Low-cost plasma immersion ion implantation doping for Interdigitated back passivated contact (IBPC) solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Page, Matthew R.; Theingi, San; Aguiar, Jeffery; Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We present progress to develop low-cost interdigitated back contact solar cells with pc-Si/SiO2/c-Si passivated contacts formed by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). PIII is a lower-cost implantation technique than traditional beam line implantation due to its simpler design, lower operating costs, and ability to run high doses (1E14-1E18 cm-2) at low ion energies (20 eV-10 keV). These benefits make PIII ideal for high throughput production of patterned passivated contacts, where high-dose, low-energy implantations are made into thin (20-200 nm) a-Si layers instead of into the wafer itself. For this work symmetric passivated contact test structures (~100 nm thick) grown on n-Cz wafers with pH3 PIII doping gave implied open circuit voltage (iVoc) values of 730 mV with Jo values of 2 fA/cm2. Samples doped with B2H6 gave iVoc values of 690 mV and Jo values of 24 fA/cm2, outperforming BF3 doping, which gave iVoc values in the 660-680 mV range. Samples were further characterized by SIMS, photoluminescence, TEM, EELS, and post-metallization TLM to reveal micro- and macro-scopic structural, chemical and electrical information.

  6. Characterization of cell cultures in contact with different orthopedic implants biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouenzerfi, G.; Hannoun, A.; Hassler, M.; Brizuela, L.; Youjil, S.; Bougault, C.; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the role of biological and mechanical constraints (at the cellular level) surrounding living tissues (cartilage and bone) in the presence of different joint implant biomaterials. In this fact, cells cultures in the presence of different types of biomaterials (pyrolytic carbon, cobalt-Chromium, titanium) has been performed. These cell cultures were subjected to biological characterization tests and mechanical characterization. The obtained results correlate with the in vivo observations (a promotion of the creation of a neocartilagical tissue in contact with the Pyrolytic Carbon implants).

  7. Back-contacted and small form factor GaAs solar cell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clews, Peggy Jane; Wanlass, Mark W. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Sanchez, Carlos A.; Pluym, Tammy; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul James

    2010-07-01

    We present a newly developed microsystem enabled, back-contacted, shade-free GaAs solar cell. Using microsystem tools, we created sturdy 3 {micro}m thick devices with lateral dimensions of 250 {micro}m, 500 {micro}m, 1 mm, and 2 mm. The fabrication procedure and the results of characterization tests are discussed. The highest efficiency cell had a lateral size of 500 {micro}m and a conversion efficiency of 10%, open circuit voltage of 0.9 V and a current density of 14.9 mA/cm{sup 2} under one-sun illumination.

  8. Sugar-fiber Imprinting to Generate Microgrooves on Polymeric Film Surfaces for Contact Guidance of Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈泽华; 丁建东

    2012-01-01

    Anisotropic surface topography is known to induce the contact guidance of cells, and facile and biocompatible approaches of the physical modification of the pertinent matrix surfaces are thus meaningful for biomaterials. Herein, we put forward a sugar-fiber imprinting technique to generate microgrooves on hydrophobic polymers demonstrated by the poly(lactic-eo-glycolic acid) (PLGA) films. Microgrooves were conveniently generated after removing sugar fibers simply by water. The resulting locally anisotropic microgrooves were confirmed to elongate the cells cultured on the surface.

  9. Photoinduced superhydrophilicity: a kinetic study of time dependent photoinduced contact angle changes on TiO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Philip S; Boxall, Colin; Denison, Kieth R

    2012-12-21

    Transparent TiO(2) thin films were prepared on quartz substrates via a reverse micelle, sol-gel, spin-coating technique. The time dependence of the TiO(2) film photoinduced superhydrophilicity (PISH) was measured by goniometric observation of the contact angle, θ, of sessile water drops at the film surfaces. In these measurements, the TiO(2) substrate was illuminated by 315 nm light and drops were sequentially applied at a range of illumination times. Using a model for the wetting of heterogeneous surfaces derived by Israelachvili and Gee, these measurements were used to calculate the time dependence of f(2), the fractional surface coverage of the TiO(2) surface by adventitious contaminating organics (Israelachvili, J. N.; Gee, M. L. Contact angles on chemically heterogeneous surfaces. Langmuir 1989, 5, 288). Extending this model to include a Langmuir-Hinshelwood based kinetic analysis of f(2) as a function of time allowed for calculation of an expected value for θ immediately prior to illumination, that is, at illumination time t = 0. Such expected values of θ at t = 0 were calculated using two possible values of θ(1), the contact angle on a pristine unilluminated homogeneous TiO(2) surface: (i) θ(1) = 4° as suggested by, inter alia, Zubkov et al. (Zubkov, T.; Stahl, D.; Thompson, T. L.; Panayotov, D.; Diwald, O.; Yates, J. T. Ultraviolet Light-Induced Hydrophilicity Effect on TiO(2)(110)(1 × 1). Dominant Role of the Photooxidation of Adsorbed Hydrocarbons Causing Wetting by Water Droplets. J. Phys. Chem. B2005, 109, 15454); and (ii) where θ(1) = 25°, as suggested by Fujishima et al., representative of a more hydrophobic homogeneous TiO(2) surface that reconstructs upon exposure to ultraband gap illumination into a hydrophilic surface where θ(1) → 0° (Fujishima, A.; Zhang, X.; Tryk, D. A. TiO(2) photocatalysis and related surface phenomena Surf. Sci. Rep.2008, 63, 515). Analysis of data from our experiments and from selected literature sources

  10. Two-dimensional simulation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cells having overlapped p/i and n/i a-Si:H layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noge, Hiroshi; Saito, Kimihiko; Sato, Aiko; Kaneko, Tetsuya; Kondo, Michio

    2015-08-01

    The performance of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cells having overlapped p/i and n/i a-Si:H layers on the back has been investigated by two-dimensional simulation in comparison with the conventional cell structure having a gap between p/i and n/i layers. The results show that narrower overlap width leads to higher short circuit current and conversion efficiency, especially for poor heterojunction interface and thinner silicon substrate of the cells in addition to narrower uncovered width of p/i layer by a metal electrode. This is similar to the gap width dependence in the conventional cells, since both overlap and gap act as dead area for diffused excess carriers in the back contacts.

  11. SrGAP2-Dependent Integration of Membrane Geometry and Slit-Robo-Repulsive Cues Regulates Fibroblast Contact Inhibition of Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Rafael Dominik; Menshykau, Denis; Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Pontelli, Valeria; Pertz, Olivier

    2015-10-12

    Migrating fibroblasts undergo contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), a process that was discovered five decades ago and still is not fully understood at the molecular level. We identify the Slit2-Robo4-srGAP2 signaling network as a key regulator of CIL in fibroblasts. CIL involves highly dynamic contact protrusions with a specialized actin cytoskeleton that stochastically explore cell-cell overlaps between colliding fibroblasts. A membrane curvature-sensing F-BAR domain pre-localizes srGAP2 to protruding edges and terminates their extension phase in response to cell collision. A FRET-based biosensor reveals that Rac1 activity is focused in a band at the tip of contact protrusions, in contrast to the broad activation gradient in contact-free protrusions. SrGAP2 specifically controls the duration of Rac1 activity in contact protrusions, but not in contact-free protrusions. We propose that srGAP2 integrates cell edge curvature and Slit-Robo-mediated repulsive cues to fine-tune Rac1 activation dynamics in contact protrusions to spatiotemporally coordinate CIL.

  12. A novel IL-10-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILC10) in a contact hypersensitivity mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuk Soon; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Min Bum; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2016-01-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine Interleukin 10 (IL-10) protein is produced by various cells during the course of inflammatory disorders. Mainly, it downregulates pro-inflammatory cytokines, antigen presentation, and helper T cell activation. In this study, we show that the ratio of IL-10-producing cells was significantly increased in lineage negative (i.e., not T, B, or leukocyte cell lineages) cells than in lineage positive cells in lymphoid and peripheral tissues. We further observed that IL-10-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), here called firstly ILC10, were increased in number in oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) mice. In detail, IL-10-producing lineage negative cells were elevated in the axillary, inguinal lymph node, and ear tissues of CHS mice. Notably, the cells expressed classical ILC marker proteins such as CD45, CD127, and Sca-1. Altogether, our findings suggest for the first time that ILC10s are present in various physiological settings and could be involved in numerous immune responses as regulatory cells. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 293-296] PMID:26949018

  13. An instructive role for C. elegans E-cadherin in translating cell contact cues into cortical polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C; Yeh, Justin Y; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that the E-cadherin HMR-1, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with the α-catenin HMP-1, the p120 catenin JAC-1, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1 (human CCDC85A-C) to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex.

  14. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  15. Low temperature deposition of bifacial CIGS solar cells on Al-doped Zinc Oxide back contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Nicholas; Pattini, Francesco; Rampino, Stefano; Annoni, Filippo; Barozzi, Mario; Bronzoni, Matteo; Gilioli, Edmondo; Gombia, Enos; Maragliano, Carlo; Mazzer, Massimo; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Spaggiari, Giulia; Fornari, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based thin film bifacial solar cells using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as cost-effective and non-toxic transparent back contact. We show that, by depositing both CIGS and AZO by Low Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition at a maximum temperature of 250 °C, a good ohmic contact is formed between the two layers and good quality solar cells can be fabricated as a result. Photovoltaic efficiencies as high as 9.3% (front illumination), 5.1% (backside illumination) and 11.6% (bifacial illumination) have been obtained so far. These values are remarkably higher than those previously reported in the literature. We demonstrate that this improvement is ascribed to the low-temperature deposition process that avoids the formation of Ga2O3 at the CIGS/AZO interface and favours the formation of a low-resistivity contact in agreement with device simulations.

  16. Numerical investigation of flow field configuration and contact resistance for PEM fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Mohammad Hadi; Rismanchi, Behzad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran)

    2008-08-15

    A steady-state three-dimensional non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is presented. Conservation of mass, momentum, species, energy, and charge, as well as electrochemical kinetics are considered. In this model, the effect of interfacial contact resistance is also included. The numerical solution is based on a finite-volume method. In this study the effects of flow channel dimensions on the cell performance are investigated. Simulation results indicate that increasing the channel width will improve the limiting current density. However, it is observed that an optimum shoulder size of the flow channels exists for which the cell performance is the highest. Polarization curves are obtained for different operating conditions which, in general, compare favorably with the corresponding experimental data. Such a CFD model can be used as a tool in the development and optimization of PEM fuel cells. (author)

  17. Laser assisted patterning of hydrogenated amorphous silicon for interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchi, S.; Desrues, T.; Souche, F.; Muñoz, D.; Lemiti, M.

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the elaboration of a new industrial process based on laser selective ablation of dielectric layers for Interdigitated Back Contact Silicon Heterojunction (IBC Si-HJ) solar cells fabrication. Choice of the process is discussed and cells are processed to validate its performance. A pulsed green laser (515nm) with 10-20ns pulse duration is used for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers patterning steps, whereas metallization is made by screen printed. High Open-Circuit Voltage (Voc=699mV) and Fill Factor (FF=78.5%) values are obtained simultaneously on IBC Si-HJ cells, indicating a high surface passivation level and reduced resistive losses. An efficiency of 19% on non textured 26 cm² solar cells has been reached with this new industrial process.

  18. Effects of contact electrode size on the characteristics of polycrystalline-Si p-i-n solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. H. Juang; H. Y. Huang; S. L. Jang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of contact electrode size on the photo-voltaic characteristics of polycrystalline-Si p-i-n solar cells have been studied,with respect to a unit-cell pitch size of 1 μm width.For the non-transparent A1 contact electrode with a contact width of 0.05-0.2 μm,the short-circuit current is obviously reduced with increasing contact width,due to a larger area of optical reflection by the electrode.On the other hand,even when using a transparent ITO (indium-tin-oxide) electrode,a larger width of contact electrode may also cause a smaller short-circuit current,due to a larger area of optical absorption by the electrode.However,for this ITO electrode,the contact electrode of 0.05 μm width causes a smaller short-circuit current than that of 0.1 μm width,primarily ascribed to a smaller area for collecting carrier and a larger contact resistance.As a result,while using the ITO contact electrode to enhance the conversion efficiency of the solar cell,a proper width of contact electrode should be employed to optimize the photo-voltaic characteristics.

  19. Simulation of interdigitated back-contact silicon heterojunction solar cells with quantum transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Takefumi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kyotaro; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    A simulation of interdigitated back-contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells was performed using a quantum transport model to consider the quantum effect at the crystalline/amorphous (c/a) heterojunction interface. It was found that the impact of the quantum effect on the open-circuit voltage is comparable to that of the interface defect density at the c/a interface, indicating the importance of implementation of the quantum model. The optimal back-contact design was also discussed from the viewpoint of mass production, in which the design rule is relaxed. The degradation of the conversion efficiency by widening the gap between the p- and n-aSi:H layers can be compensated by improving passivation quality at the c/a interface.

  20. RF Sputtered ZnTe:N as CdS/CdTe Solar Cell Back-Contact Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.

    1999-04-01

    The most frequently used electrical contact to CdTe thin-film polycrystalline solar cells on glass involves the use of copper. However, Cu is known to be a fast diffuser in many semiconductors and is suspected of leading to some deterioration of performance of CdTe solar cells under extreme conditions. In this work we report on the development of a reactively sputtered ZnTe:N back contact on solar cells. Promising low-resistive nitrogen-doped ZnTe films were obtained. Efficiencies up to 10.8 percent were obtained for solar cells fabricated with a ZnTe:N/Au back contact scheme. Comparison of cell performances using ZnTe:N and Cu/Au back-contacts is presented.

  1. Laser Induced Forward Transfer for front contact improvement in silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, M., E-mail: monicacolinb@gmail.com; Morales-Vilches, A.; Voz, C.; Martín, I.; Ortega, P.; Orpella, A.; López, G.; Alcubilla, R.

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • LIFT technique is investigated to improve heterojunction HJ solar cells. • Doped silicon films are adequate precursors for LIFT application in HJ cells. • LIFT leads to a reduction of the series resistance of a-Si HJ diodes. • LIFT allows the improvement of the front contact resistance in a-Si HJ solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique is investigated to create n-doped regions on p-type c-Si substrates. The precursor source of LIFT consisted in a phosphorous-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer grown by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) onto a transparent substrate. Transfer of the doping atoms occurs when a sequence of laser pulses impinging onto the doped layer propels the material toward the substrate. The laser irradiation not only transfers the doping material but also produces a local heating that promotes its diffusion into the substrate. The laser employed was a 1064 nm, lamp-pumped system, working at pulse durations of 100 and 400 ns. In order to obtain a good electrical performance a comprehensive optimization of the applied laser fluency and number of pulses was carried out. Subsequently, arrays of n + p local junctions were created by LIFT and the resulting J–V curves demonstrated the formation of good quality n+ regions. These structures were finally incorporated to enhance the front contact in conventional silicon heterojunction solar cells leading to an improvement of conversion efficiency.

  2. Nanowire CdS-CdTe Solar Cells with Molybdenum Oxide as Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongmei; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-10-01

    Using a 10 nm thick molybdenum oxide (MoO3-x) layer as a transparent and low barrier contact to p-CdTe, we demonstrate nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 11% under front side illumination. Annealing the as-deposited MoO3 film in N2 resulted in a reduction of the cell’s series resistance, from 9.97 Ω/cm2 to 7.69 Ω/cm2, and increase in efficiency from 9.9% to 11%. Under illumination from the back, the MoO3-x/Au side, the nanowire solar cells yielded Jsc of 21 mA/cm2 and efficiency of 8.67%. Our results demonstrate use of a thin layer transition metal oxide as a potential way for a transparent back contact to nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells. This work has implications toward enabling a novel superstrate structure nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cell on Al foil substrate by a low cost roll-to roll fabrication process.

  3. Optimization of multi-layer front-contact grid patterns for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flat, A.; Milnes, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    In a front-contact grid pattern for a solar cell there is a trade-off necessary between shadowing loss and excessive power loss due to voltage drop in the metalization itself. If the metalization is too little there may be excessive contact resistance to the underlying semiconductor and insufficient coverage to control losses in the thin front-surface layer of the solar cell. Optimization of grid pattern area and geometry is considered analytically to minimize total losses. Worthwhile performance advantages are shown to be possible, particularly in concentrator systems, if multi-layer grid patterns are used. The current carrying fingers should be approximately square in metal cross section and the main current feedout bars should not only be wider but also thicker than the primary collecting fingers. This is termed multi-level metalization. Effective use of multi-level grid metalization allows much greater concentration-to-loss ratio for a cell of large area and permits good performance from cells of high front-layer sheet resistance.

  4. The Emitter Having Microcrystalline Surface in Silicon Heterojunction Interdigitated Back Contact Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kwang-sun; Syn, Hojung; Choi, Junghoon; Lee, Heon-Min; Kim, Donghwan

    2012-10-01

    In producing the Si heterojunction interdigitated backcontact solar cells, we investigated the feasibility of applying amorphous Si emitter having considerable crystalline Si phase at the facing to transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer. Prior to evaluating electrical property, we characterized material nature of hydrogenated microcrystalline p-type silicon (µc-p-Si:H) as crystallized fraction, surface morphology, bonding kinds in thin films and then surface passivation quality finally. The diode and interface contact characteristics were induced by the simple test device and then current-voltage (I-V) curve showed more linearity in µc/hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) emitter case. We fabricated heterojunction back contact (HBC) solar cells using p/n interdigitated structure and acquired the 23.4% efficiency in cell size with performance parameters as open-circuit voltage (Voc) 723 mV, short-circuit current density (Jsc) 41.8 mA/cm2, fill factor (FF) 0.774, in the cell size (at 2×2 cm2).

  5. Comparison of two in vitro dendritic cell maturation models for screening contact sensitizers using a panel of methacrylates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustemeyer, T.; Preuss, M; Blomberg - van der Flier, von B.M.E.; Das, PK; Scheper, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Allergen-induced emigration and maturation of dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal steps in sparking off allergic contact dermatitis. In vitro models, reflecting these steps, may provide tools for assessment of sensitizing capacities of putative contact allergens. Here, we evaluated the applicability of

  6. Dependence of ohmic contact properties on AlGaN layer thickness for AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yusuke; Tsutsui, Kazuo; Saito, Wataru; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of ohmic contact resistance on the AlGaN layer thickness was evaluated for AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) structures. Mo/Al/Ti contacts were formed on AlGaN layers with various thicknesses. The observed resistance characteristics are discussed on the basis of a model in which the overall contact resistance is composed of a series of three resistance components. Different dependences on the AlGaN layer thickness was observed after annealing at low temperatures (800-850 °C) and at high temperatures (900-950 °C). It was determined that lowering the resistance at the metal/AlGaN interface and that of the AlGaN layer is important for obtaining low-resistance ohmic contacts.

  7. CD1d knockout mice exhibit aggravated contact hypersensitivity responses due to reduced interleukin-10 production predominantly by regulatory B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelbye, Jonas; Antvorskov, Julie C; Buschard, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting observations have been reported concerning the role of CD1d-dependent natural killer T (NKT) cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS), supporting either a disease-promoting or downregulatory function. We studied the role of NKT cells in CHS by comparing the immune response in CD1d.......5% DNCB (w/v) on the ears fifteen days later. We demonstrate that CD1d KO mice, as compared with Wt littermates, have more pronounced infiltration of mononuclear cells in the skin (29.1% increase; P

  8. ITO/p{sup +}nc-Si:H contact barrier effects on n-i-p′-p silicon solar cell performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belfar, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Matériaux Conducteurs et leurs Applications, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d’Oran, Mohamed Boudiaf, Boite Postale 1505 El-M’naouer, Oran 31000 (Algeria); Aït-kaci, H., E-mail: h.aitkaci@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Matériaux Conducteurs et leurs Applications, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d’Oran, Mohamed Boudiaf, Boite Postale 1505 El-M’naouer, Oran 31000 (Algeria)

    2013-04-20

    Highlights: ► Effect of the front contact barrier height for electrons (φ{sub b0}) or holes (φ{sub h}) on n-i-p′-p based solar cell performances. ► Current–voltage characteristics (J–V), under dark and illumination conditions, for the studied structure are calculated. ► The reverse bias currents do not depend on the front contact barrier heights. ► In forward direction, the contact barrier influences strongly the J–V characteristic in the dark and under illumination. ► Output cell parameters are improved, when φ{sub b0} increases. -- Abstract: The computer program AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures) has been used to explore the effect of front contact barrier heights for electrons (φ{sub b0}) or holes (φ{sub h}) on the performances of n-i-p′-p amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon based solar cell, with a p type hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon double layer and with no back reflector. φ{sub b0} is the result of band bending at the indium tin oxide (ITO)/p{sup +}doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (p nc-Si:H) interface. This paper presents results for a n-i-p′-p device, when the p nc-Si:H layer is used as a window and the p′-nc-Si:H layer as a buffer. Band diagram at thermodynamic equilibrium and current–voltage characteristics (J–V), under dark and illumination conditions, for the considered solar cell structure, are calculated. The modeling showed that the reverse bias currents do not depend on the front contact barrier heights. However, in the forward direction, this contact barrier influences strongly the J–V characteristic in the dark and under illumination. As a result, when φ{sub b0} increases, output cell parameters, like open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), fill factor (FF) and efficiency (E{sub ff}) increase. The best values obtained are 0.893 V, 0.757 and 8.04%, respectively. These values correspond to a front contact barrier height (φ{sub b0}) equal to 1.65 eV. Such a value of φ{sub b0

  9. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera; Shilo, Ben-Zion; VijayRaghavan, K; Schejter, Eyal D

    2015-10-12

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell-cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast-myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell-cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process.

  10. Cytotoxicity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in direct contact with odontoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebling, J; Bianchi, L; Basso, F G; Scheffel, D L; Soares, D G; Carrilho, M R O; Pashley, D H; Tjäderhane, L; de Souza Costa, C A

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on the repair-related activity of cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. Solutions with different concentrations of DMSO (0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 1.0 mM), diluted in culture medium (DMEM), were placed in contact with MDPC-23 cells (5 × 104 cells/cm(2)) for 24 h. Eight replicates (n = 8) were prepared for each solutions for the following methods of analysis: violet crystal dye for cell adhesion (CA), quantification of total protein (TP), alizarin red for mineralization nodules formation (MN) and cell death by necrosis (flow cytometry); while twelve replicates (n = 12) were prepared for viable cell number (Trypan Blue) and cell viability (MTT assay). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney's tests (p DMSO at any concentration, with no statistical significant difference among the groups. A significant reduction in total protein production was observed for 0.5 and 1.0 mM of DMSO compared to the control while increased mineralized nodules formation was seen only for 1.0 mM DMSO. DMSO caused no or minor cytotoxic effects on the pulp tissue repair-related activity of odontoblast-like cells. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of the Au/CdTe back contact on IV and CV characteristics of Au/CdTe/CdS/TCO solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemegeers, Alex; Burgelman, Marc

    1997-03-01

    A simple analytical theory is presented to explain the measured roll over and cross over behaviour of the IV characteristics of thin film CdTe solar cells. It involves a classical description of the CdS/CdTe junction and the CdTe/back contact structure and is extended with a new description of minority carrier current in the CdTe contact region. This extension is crucial in describing the light dependence of the forward IV curves, and hence cross over. The same model also explains the measured CV curves. It is shown that analysis of the capacitance measurement can yield additional information about the doping density of CdTe in the vicinity of the contact. A relationship between the fill factor of the solar cell and the barrier height of the back contact is derived; this relation is useful as a new, practical criterion for the quality of the back contact. The results of this simple analytical model are confirmed by full numerical calculations of the dc and ac characteristics.

  12. Influence of CuxS back contact on CdTe thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Lei; Lianghuan, Feng; Guanggen, Zeng; Wei, Li; Jingquan, Zhang; Lili, Wu; Wenwu, Wang

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study on CuxS polycrystalline thin films prepared by chemical bath method and utilized as back contact material for CdTe solar cells. The characteristics of the films deposited on Si-substrate are studied by XRD. The results show that as-deposited CuxS thin film is in an amorphous phase while after annealing, samples are in polycrystalline phases with increasing temperature. The thickness of CuxS thin films has great impact on the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells. When the thickness of the film is about 75 nm the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells is found to be the best. The energy conversion efficiency can be higher than 12.19%, the filling factor is higher than 68.82% and the open-circuit voltage is more than 820 mV.

  13. Influence of CuxS back contact on CdTe thin film solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhi; Feng Lianghuan; Zeng Guanggen; Li Wei; Zhang Jingquan; Wu Lili; Wang Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study on CuxS polycrystalline thin films prepared by chemical bath method and utilized as back contact material for CdTe solar cells.The characteristics of the films deposited on Si-substrate are studied by XRD.The results show that as-deposited CuxS thin film is in an amorphous phase while after annealing,samples are in polycrystalline phases with increasing temperature.The thickness of CuxS thin films has great impact on the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells.When the thickness of the film is about 75 nm the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells is found to be the best.The energy conversion efficiency can be higher than 12.19%,the filling factor is higher than 68.82% and the open-circuit voltage is more than 820 mV.

  14. Surface lipoproteome of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 and differential expression after contact with human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goret, Julien; Le Roy, Chloé; Touati, Arabella; Mesureur, Jennifer; Renaudin, Hélène; Claverol, Stéphane; Bébéar, Cécile; Béven, Laure; Pereyre, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    To assess the lipoproteins that are involved in the interaction between Mycoplasma hominis and human dendritic cells. The surface lipoproteome of M. hominis PG21 was characterized by using Triton X-114 extraction and LC-MS/MS identification. The transcriptional changes in lipoprotein genes upon contact with human dendritic cells were determined by using reverse transcription quantitative PCR after identification of reference genes suitable for normalization. A large-scale overexpression of lipoprotein genes was observed with 21 upregulated transcripts. Seven genes of unknown function were M. hominis species specific and six genes were putatively associated with increased nutrient capture from the host cell and adhesion. M. hominis regulates lipoprotein gene expression and may use species-specific mechanisms during the host colonization process.

  15. Optimization of substrate thickness for interdigitated back contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, P.; van de Wiele, F.

    1983-08-01

    A computer model for the computation of the optimum substrate thickness of interdigitated-back-contact (IBC) Si solar cells is developed and demonstrated. The one-dimensional model assumes that solar-cell quantum efficiency is fully determined by minority-carrier diffusion length, surface recombination velocity, and substrate thickness, and hence unaffected by back-diffused layers. The maximum thickness allowable for a 10-percent reduction in short-circuit current density can also be determined. Optimum and maximum-allowable thicknesses are plotted as functions of diffusion length for different recombination velocities, using input parameters typical of lightly doped n-type and p-type backlit IBC cells under AM 1.5 illumination at 300 K. Good agreement is found with empirical parameter values determined by curve fitting.

  16. Removal of sialic acid from the surface of human MCF-7 mammary cancer cells abolishes E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion in an aggregation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deman, J J; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; Bracke, M E; Vermeulen, S J; Vennekens, K M; Mareel, M M

    1995-09-01

    MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express E-cadherin and show, at least in some circumstances, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion (Bracke et al., 1993). The MCF-7/AZ variant spontaneously displays E-cadherin-dependent fast aggregation; in the MCF-7/6 variant, E-cadherin appeared not to be spontaneously functional in the conditions of the fast aggregation assay, but function could be induced by incubation of the suspended cells in the presence of insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) (Bracke et al., 1993). E-cadherin from MCF-7 cells was shown to contain sialic acid. Treatment with neuraminidase was shown to remove this sialic acid, as well as most of the sialic acid present at the cell surface. Applied to MCF-7/AZ, and MCF-7/6 cells, pretreatment with neuraminidase abolished spontaneous as well as IGF-I induced, E-cadherin-dependent fast cell-cell adhesion of cells in suspension, as measured in the fast aggregation assay. Treatment with neuraminidase did not, however, inhibit the possibly different, but equally E-cadherin-mediated, process of cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 cells on a flat plastic substrate as assessed by determining the percentage of cells remaining isolated (without contact with other cells) 24 h after plating.

  17. Involvement of YAP, TAZ and HSP90 in contact guidance and intercellular junction formation in corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Krishna Raghunathan

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment possesses a rich milieu of biophysical and biochemical signaling cues that are simultaneously integrated by cells and influence cellular phenotype. Yes-associated protein (YAP and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (WWTR1; TAZ, two important signaling molecules of the Hippo pathway, have been recently implicated as nuclear relays of cytoskeletal changes mediated by substratum rigidity and topography. These proteins intersect with other important intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt and TGFβ. In the cornea, epithelial cells adhere to the stroma through a 3-dimensional topography-rich basement membrane, with features in the nano-submicron size-scale that are capable of profoundly modulating a wide range of fundamental cell behaviors. The influences of substratum-topography, YAP/TAZ knockdown, and HSP90 inhibition on cell morphology, YAP/TAZ localization, and the expression of TGFβ2 and CTGF, were investigated. The results demonstrate (a that knockdown of TAZ enhances contact guidance in a YAP dependent manner, (b that CTGF is predominantly regulated by YAP and not TAZ, and (c that TGFβ2 is regulated by both YAP and TAZ in these cells. Additionally, inhibition of HSP90 resulted in nuclear localization and subsequent transcriptional-activation of YAP, formation of cell-cell junctions and co-localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin at adherens junctions. Results presented in this study reflect the complexities underlying the molecular relationships between the cytoskeleton, growth factors, heat shock proteins, and co-activators of transcription that impact mechanotransduction. The data reveal the importance of YAP/TAZ on the cell behaviors, and gene and protein expression.

  18. Optimization of Metal Coverage on the Emitter in n-Type Interdigitated Back Contact Solar Cells Using a PC2D Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Chen; Jia, Rui; Janssen, G. J. M.; Zhang, Dai-Sheng; Xing, Zhao; Bronsveld, P. C. P.; Weeber, A. W.; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xin-Yu

    2013-07-01

    In interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells, the metal-electrode coverage on a p-type emitter is optimized by a PC2D simulation. The result shows that the variation of the metal coverage ratio (MCR) will affect both the surface passivation and the electrode-contact properties for the p-type emitter in IBC solar cells. We find that when Rc ranges from 0.08 to 0.16Ω·cm2, the MCR is optimized with a value of 25% and 33%, resulting in a highest energy-conversion efficiency. The dependences of both Voc and fill factor on MCR are simulated in order to explore the mechanism of the IBC solar cells.

  19. Impact of built-in fields and contact configuration on the characteristics of ultra-thin GaAs solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Aeberhard, Urs

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effects of built-in fields and contact configuration on the photovoltaic characteristics of ultrathin GaAs solar cells. The investigation is based on advanced quantum-kinetic simulations reaching beyond the standard semi-classical bulk picture concerning the consideration of charge carrier states and dynamics in complex potential profiles. The thickness dependence of dark and photocurrent in the ultra-scaled regime is related to the corresponding variation of both, the built-in electric fields and associated modification of the density of states, and the optical intensity in the films. Losses in open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current due to leakage of electronically and optically injected carriers at minority carrier contacts are investigated for different contact configurations including electron and hole blocking barrier layers. The microscopic picture of leakage currents is connected to the effect of finite surface recombination velocities in the semi-classical description, and the i...

  20. Molybdenum oxide and molybdenum oxide-nitride back contacts for CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drayton, Jennifer A., E-mail: drjadrayton@yahoo.com; Geisthardt, Russell M., E-mail: Russell.Geisthardt@gmail.com; Sites, James R., E-mail: james.sites@colostate.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Williams, Desiree D., E-mail: daisyw@rams.colostate.edu; Cramer, Corson L., E-mail: clcramer@rams.colostate.edu; Williams, John D., E-mail: john.d.williams@colostate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) and molybdenum oxynitride (MoON) thin film back contacts were formed by a unique ion-beam sputtering and ion-beam-assisted deposition process onto CdTe solar cells and compared to back contacts made using carbon–nickel (C/Ni) paint. Glancing-incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that partially crystalline MoO{sub x} films are created with a mixture of Mo, MoO{sub 2}, and MoO{sub 3} components. Lower crystallinity content is observed in the MoON films, with an additional component of molybdenum nitride present. Three different film thicknesses of MoO{sub x} and MoON were investigated that were capped in situ in Ni. Small area devices were delineated and characterized using current–voltage (J-V), capacitance–frequency, capacitance–voltage, electroluminescence, and light beam-induced current techniques. In addition, J-V data measured as a function of temperature (JVT) were used to estimate back barrier heights for each thickness of MoO{sub x} and MoON and for the C/Ni paint. Characterization prior to stressing indicated the devices were similar in performance. Characterization after stress testing indicated little change to cells with 120 and 180-nm thick MoO{sub x} and MoON films. However, moderate-to-large cell degradation was observed for 60-nm thick MoO{sub x} and MoON films and for C/Ni painted back contacts.

  1. High efficiency back-contact back-junction thin-film monocrystalline silicon solar cells from the porous silicon process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, F.; Kajari-Schröder, S.; Brendel, R.

    2013-11-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of a 45 μm thick back-contact back-junction thin-film monocrystalline silicon solar cell from the porous silicon process with an energy conversion efficiency of 18.9%. We demonstrate an efficiency improvement of 5.4% absolute compared to our prior record of 13.5% for back-contact back-junction thin-film monocrystalline silicon solar cells. This increase in efficiency is achieved by reducing the recombination at the base contact using a back surface field and by increasing the generation with a front texture. We investigate the loss mechanisms in the cell using finite element simulations. A free energy loss analysis based on experiments and simulations determines the dominating loss mechanisms. The efficiency loss by base recombination is 0.8% absolute and the loss by base contact recombination is 0.5% absolute in the 18.9% efficiency cell.

  2. T cells induce extended class II MHC compartments in dendritic cells in a Toll-like receptor-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Bertho, Nicolas; Cerny, Jan; Op den Brouw, Marjolein; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Ploegh, Hidde

    2003-10-15

    Interaction of Ag-loaded dendritic cells with Ag-specific CD4 T cells induces the formation of long tubular class II MHC-positive compartments that polarize toward the T cell. We show involvement of a Toll-like receptor-mediated signal in this unusual form of intracellular class II MHC trafficking. First, wild-type dendritic cells loaded with LPS-free Ag failed to show formation of class II-positive tubules upon Ag-specific T cell engagement, but did so upon supplementation of the Ag with low concentrations of LPS. Second, Ag-loaded myeloid differentiation factor 88 -deficient dendritic cells failed to form these tubules upon interaction with T cells, regardless of the presence of LPS. Finally, inclusion of a cell-permeable peptide that blocks TNFR-associated factor 6 function, downstream of myeloid differentiation factor 88, blocked T cell-dependent tubulation. A Toll-like receptor-dependent signal is thus required to allow Ag-loaded dendritic cells to respond to T cell contact by formation of extended endosomal compartments. This activation does not result in massive translocation of class II MHC molecules to the cell surface.

  3. Contact sensitizers specifically increase MHC class II expression on murine immature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herouet, C; Cottin, M; LeClaire, J; Enk, A; Rousset, F

    2000-01-01

    Contact sensitivity is a T-cell-mediated immune disease that can occur when low-molecular-weight chemicals penetrate the skin. In vivo topical application of chemical sensitizers results in morphological modification of Langerhans cells (LC). Moreover, within 18 h, LC increase their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expression and migrate to lymph nodes where they present the sensitizer to T lymphocytes. We wanted to determine if such an effect could also be observed in vitro. However, because of the high genetic diversity encountered in humans, assays were performed with dendritic cells (DC) obtained from a Balb/c mouse strain. The capacity of a strong sensitizer, DNBS (2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid), to modulate the phenotype of bone marrow-derived DC in vitro, was investigated. A specific and marked increase of MHC class II molecules expression was observed within 18 h. To eliminate the use of animals in sensitization studies, the XS52 DC line was tested at an immature stage. A 30-min contact with the strong sensitizers DNBS and oxazolone, or the moderate mercaptobenzothiazole, resulted in upregulation of MHC class II molecules expression, analyzed after 18-h incubation. This effect was not observed with irritants (dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium lauryl sulfate) nor with a neutral molecule (sodium chloride). These data suggested the possibility of developing an in vitro model for the identification of the sensitizing potential of chemicals, using a constant and non animal-consuming material.

  4. A Nonlocal Model for Contact Attraction and Repulsion in Heterogeneous Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, K J; Bloomfield, J M; Sherratt, J A; Gerisch, A

    2015-06-01

    Instructing others to move is fundamental for many populations, whether animal or cellular. In many instances, these commands are transmitted by contact, such that an instruction is relayed directly (e.g. by touch) from signaller to receiver: for cells, this can occur via receptor-ligand mediated interactions at their membranes, potentially at a distance if a cell extends long filopodia. Given that commands ranging from attractive to repelling can be transmitted over variable distances and between cells of the same (homotypic) or different (heterotypic) type, these mechanisms can clearly have a significant impact on the organisation of a tissue. In this paper, we extend a system of nonlocal partial differential equations (integrodifferential equations) to provide a general modelling framework to explore these processes, performing linear stability and numerical analyses to reveal its capacity to trigger the self-organisation of tissues. We demonstrate the potential of the framework via two illustrative applications: the contact-mediated dispersal of neural crest populations and the self-organisation of pigmentation patterns in zebrafish.

  5. Glass-containing composite cathode contact materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cheng, Lei; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-10-01

    The feasibility of adding glass to conventional SOFC cathode contact materials in order to improve bonding to adjacent materials in the cell stack is assessed. A variety of candidate glass compositions are added to LSM and SSC. The important properties of the resulting composites, including conductivity, sintering behavior, coefficient of thermal expansion, and adhesion to LSCF and Mn1.5Co1.5O4-coated 441 stainless steel are used as screening parameters. Adhesion of LSM to LSCF improved from 3.9 to 5.3 MPa upon addition of SCZ-8 glass. Adhesion of LSM to coated stainless steel improved from 1.8 to 3.9 MPa upon addition of Schott GM31107 glass. The most promising cathode contact material/glass composites are coated onto Mn1.5Co1.5O4-coated 441 stainless steel substrates and subjected to area-specific resistance testing at 800 °C. In all cases, area-specific resistance is found to be in the range 2.5-7.5 mOhm cm2 and therefore acceptable. Indeed, addition of glass is found to improve bonding of the cathode contact material layer without sacrificing acceptable conductivity.

  6. Influences of Contact Pressure on the Performances of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash C. Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells face major challenges in sustaining the laboratory-scale performance during the scale up. The contact resistance mainly arises from the dimensional mismatch between gasket and gas diffusion layer during scale up, which may cause diminution in performance. In the present work, experiment as well as modelling is carried out for different combinations of clamping force and gasket thickness. The polarisation behaviours of PEFCs configured under different clamping torques and gasket thicknesses are analysed. The combination of 0.3 mm gasket and 0.3 mm GDL under 3 Nm and 5 Nm clamping forces offers 480 mΩ cm2 and 148 mΩ cm2 contact resistances, respectively. The configurations under 3 Nm and 5 Nm clamping torques with 0.2 mm thick gasket offer contact resistances as low as 23 mΩ cm2 and 11 mΩ cm2, respectively. The polarisation behaviour obtained from the experiment of such configurations is found to be in good agreement with the modelling results.

  7. Black silicon solar cells with interdigitated back-contacts achieve 22.1% efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Hele; Repo, Päivikki; von Gastrow, Guillaume; Ortega, Pablo; Calle, Eric; Garín, Moises; Alcubilla, Ramon

    2015-07-01

    The nanostructuring of silicon surfaces—known as black silicon—is a promising approach to eliminate front-surface reflection in photovoltaic devices without the need for a conventional antireflection coating. This might lead to both an increase in efficiency and a reduction in the manufacturing costs of solar cells. However, all previous attempts to integrate black silicon into solar cells have resulted in cell efficiencies well below 20% due to the increased charge carrier recombination at the nanostructured surface. Here, we show that a conformal alumina film can solve the issue of surface recombination in black silicon solar cells by providing excellent chemical and electrical passivation. We demonstrate that efficiencies above 22% can be reached, even in thick interdigitated back-contacted cells, where carrier transport is very sensitive to front surface passivation. This means that the surface recombination issue has truly been solved and black silicon solar cells have real potential for industrial production. Furthermore, we show that the use of black silicon can result in a 3% increase in daily energy production when compared with a reference cell with the same efficiency, due to its better angular acceptance.

  8. Black silicon solar cells with interdigitated back-contacts achieve 22.1% efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Hele; Repo, Päivikki; von Gastrow, Guillaume; Ortega, Pablo; Calle, Eric; Garín, Moises; Alcubilla, Ramon

    2015-07-01

    The nanostructuring of silicon surfaces--known as black silicon--is a promising approach to eliminate front-surface reflection in photovoltaic devices without the need for a conventional antireflection coating. This might lead to both an increase in efficiency and a reduction in the manufacturing costs of solar cells. However, all previous attempts to integrate black silicon into solar cells have resulted in cell efficiencies well below 20% due to the increased charge carrier recombination at the nanostructured surface. Here, we show that a conformal alumina film can solve the issue of surface recombination in black silicon solar cells by providing excellent chemical and electrical passivation. We demonstrate that efficiencies above 22% can be reached, even in thick interdigitated back-contacted cells, where carrier transport is very sensitive to front surface passivation. This means that the surface recombination issue has truly been solved and black silicon solar cells have real potential for industrial production. Furthermore, we show that the use of black silicon can result in a 3% increase in daily energy production when compared with a reference cell with the same efficiency, due to its better angular acceptance.

  9. Three-dimensional culture of dental pulp stem cells in direct contact to tricalcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widbiller, M; Lindner, S R; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G; Galler, K M

    2016-03-01

    Calcium silicate cements are biocompatible dental materials applicable in contact with vital tissue. The novel tricalcium silicate cement Biodentine™ offers properties superior to commonly used mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Objective of this study was to evaluate its cytocompatibility and ability to induce differentiation and mineralization in three-dimensional cultures of dental pulp stem cells after direct contact with the material. Test materials included a new tricalcium silicate (Biodentine™, Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), MTA (ProRoot® MTA, DENSPLY Tulsa Dental Specialities, Johnson City, TN, USA), glass ionomer (Ketac™ Molar Aplicap™, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), human dentin disks and polystyrene. Magnetic activated cell sorting for to the surface antigen STRO-1 was performed to gain a fraction enriched with mesenchymal stem cells. Samples were allowed to set and dental pulp stem cells in collagen carriers were placed on top. Scanning electron microscopy of tricalcium silicate cement surfaces with and without cells was conducted. Cell viability was measured for 14 days by MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evaluated (days 3, 7, and 14) and expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, DSPP, and RUNX2) was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase data was performed to compare different materials as well as time points (Mann-Whitney U test, α = 0.05). Cell viability was highest on tricalcium silicate cement, followed by MTA. Viability on glass ionomer cement and dentin disks was significantly lower. Alkaline phosphatase activity was lower in cells on new tricalcium silicate cement compared to MTA, whereas expression patterns of marker genes were alike. Increased cell viability and similar levels of mineralization-associated gene expression in three-dimensional cell cultures on the novel tricalcium silicate cement and mineral

  10. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The structure of a contact-dependent growth-inhibition (CDI) immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Johnson, Parker M.; Stols, Lucy; Boubion, Bryan; Eschenfeldt, William; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Goulding, Celia W.

    2015-06-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of intercellular competition between neighboring Gram-negative bacteria. CDI systems encode large surface-exposed CdiA effector proteins that carry a variety of C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CTs). All CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins that specifically bind to the cognate CdiA-CT and neutralize its toxin activity to prevent auto-inhibition. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a CdiI immunity protein from Neisseria meningitidis MC58 is presented at 1.45 angstrom resolution. The CdiI protein has structural homology to the Whirly family of RNA-binding proteins, but appears to lack the characteristic nucleic acid-binding motif of this family. Sequence homology suggests that the cognate CdiA-CT is related to the eukaryotic EndoU family of RNA-processing enzymes. A homology model is presented of the CdiA-CT based on the structure of the XendoU nuclease from Xenopus laevis. Molecular-docking simulations predict that the CdiA-CT toxin active site is occluded upon binding to the CdiI immunity protein. Together, these observations suggest that the immunity protein neutralizes toxin activity by preventing access to RNA substrates.

  12. Reggies/flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell contact formation by affecting EGFR trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Schrock, Yvonne; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Wiechers, Marianne; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2012-05-01

    The reggie/flotillin proteins are implicated in membrane trafficking and, together with the cellular prion protein (PrP), in the recruitment of E-cadherin to cell contact sites. Here, we demonstrate that reggies, as well as PrP down-regulation, in epithelial A431 cells cause overlapping processes and abnormal formation of adherens junctions (AJs). This defect in cell adhesion results from reggie effects on Src tyrosine kinases and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): loss of reggies reduces Src activation and EGFR phosphorylation at residues targeted by Src and c-cbl and leads to increased surface exposure of EGFR by blocking its internalization. The prolonged EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane enhances cell motility and macropinocytosis, by which junction-associated E-cadherin is internalized and recycled back to AJs. Accordingly, blockage of EGFR signaling or macropinocytosis in reggie-deficient cells restores normal AJ formation. Thus, by promoting EGFR internalization, reggies restrict the EGFR signaling involved in E-cadherin macropinocytosis and recycling and regulate AJ formation and dynamics and thereby cell adhesion.

  13. Statistical analysis of the correlations between cell performance and its initial states in contact resistive random access memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yun Feng; Hsieh, Wei Ting; Che Chen, Chun; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2017-04-01

    Variability has been one of the critical challenges in the implementation of large resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays. Wide variations in set/reset, read and cycling characteristics can significantly reduce the design margin and feasibility of a memory array. Predicting the characteristics of RRAM cells is constructive to provide insights and to adjust the memory operations accordingly. In this study, a strong correlation between the cell performance and its initial state is found in contact RRAM (CRRAM) cells by 28 nm CMOS logic technology. Furthermore, a verify-reset operation is proposed to identify the type of conductive filament (CF) in a cell. Distinctive CRRAM characteristics are found to be linked directly to initial CFs, enabling preliminary screening and adaptive resets to address the large variability problems in sizable CRRAM arrays.

  14. Homologous chromosomes make contact at the sites of double-strand breaks in genes in somatic G0/G1-phase human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Manoj; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; T.Cuenco, Karen; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Kelly, Lindsey M.; Stringer, James R.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2012-01-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) are continuously induced in cells by endogenously generated free radicals and exogenous genotoxic agents such as ionizing radiation. DSBs activate the kinase activity in sensor proteins such as ATM and DNA-PK, initiating a complex DNA damage response that coordinates various DNA repair pathways to restore genomic integrity. In this study, we report the unexpected finding that homologous chromosomes contact each other at the sites of DSBs induced by either radiation or the endonuclease I-PpoI in human somatic cells. Contact involves short segments of homologous chromosomes and is centered on a DSB in active genes but does not occur at I-PpoI sites in intergenic DNA. I-PpoI-induced contact between homologous genes is abrogated by the transcriptional inhibitors actinomycin D and α-amanitin and requires the kinase activity of ATM but not DNA-PK. Our findings provide documentation of a common transcription-related and ATM kinase-dependent mechanism that induces contact between allelic regions of homologous chromosomes at sites of DSBs in human somatic cells. PMID:22645362

  15. On/off TLR segnaling decides immunogenic or tolerogenic dendritic cell maturation upon NKT cell contact

    OpenAIRE

    Caielli,

    2009-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer (iNK)T cells play opposite immune functions. They participate in the innate immune response to promote anti-microbial and anti-tumor immunity and they are crucial to maintain T cell tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases. While it is well known that the adjuvant function of iNKT cells is mediated through maturation of dendritic cells (DC), the mechanism underlying the tolerogenic function of iNKT cells remains unclear. We performed co-culture experiments with immat...

  16. Analysis of the back contact properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells employing the thermionic emission model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugebohrn, Nils, E-mail: nils.neugebohrn@uni-oldenburg.de; Hammer, Maria S.; Neerken, Janet; Parisi, Jürgen; Riedel, Ingo

    2015-05-01

    Despite 20 years of research on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) solar cells there is still no conclusive model to explain the electronic properties of the back contact between the CIGSe absorber and the molybdenum electrode. For this interface, Schottky-type as well as ohmic behavior has been reported previously. In particular, the intermediate MoSe{sub 2} layer which forms between the absorber and the metal during growth of the CIGSe layer determines the contact characteristics and might be critical for the device performance. In this study two types of samples were prepared from complete solar cells: MoSe{sub 2}/Mo samples by lift-off of the CIGSe layer and CIGSe/MoSe{sub 2}/Mo samples either via etch-removal of ZnO/CdS or etching including thickness reduction of the CIGSe layer. Au contacts were deposited on top of the CIGSe layer. To study a potential barrier-induced current limitation we performed temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements between 80 K and 300 K on both samples. We observed a limitation of the injection current following the thermionic emission model only for the latter sample, indicating the presence of a contact barrier with a barrier height between 0.21 eV and 0.24 eV at the CIGSe/MoSe{sub 2} interface. On the basis of a qualitative simulation a band diagram for the CIGSe/MoSe{sub 2} interface is proposed. - Highlights: • An analysis of properties of the back contact of CIGSe solar cells is presented. • An injection barrier at the CIGSe/MoSe{sub 2} interface can be concluded. • A band diagram for the CIGSe/MoSe{sub 2} on the basis of simulations is proposed. • The back contact barrier is unlikely to impact device performance negatively.

  17. Histamine suppresses regulatory T cells mediated by TGF-β in murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaka, Kyoko; Seike, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Tamio; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T cells and ameliorate contact hypersensitivity (CH); however, the role of Tregs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) has not been assessed. Repeated elicitation of CH has been used to produce CACD models in mice. We previously showed that the presence of histamine facilitates the creation of eczematous lesions in this model using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) (-/-) mice. Therefore, the effects of histamine on Tregs in the CACD model were investigated in this study. CACD was developed by repeated epicutaneous application of 2, 4, 6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on HDC (+/+) and HDC (-/-) murine skin to assess the effects of histamine in CACD. Histamine aggravated CACD in the murine model and suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin. Histamine also suppressed the level of TGF-β1 in this model. Recombinant TGF-β1 or anti-TGF-β1 antibody was injected into the dorsal dermis of HDC (+/+) mice daily just before TNCB challenge to determine the effects of histamine-regulated TGF-β on the Treg population in CACD. Recombinant TGF-β1 injection promoted the infiltration of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10; however, anti-TGF-β1 antibody injection suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10. Histamine suppresses the number of Tregs in CACD, and this effect is mediated by TGF-β.

  18. Amorphous silicon passivation for 23.3% laser processed back contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Kai; Dahlinger, Morris; Hoffmann, Erik; Zapf-Gottwick, Renate; Werner, Jürgen H.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents amorphous silicon deposited at temperatures below 200 °C, leading to an excellent passivation layer for boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field areas in interdigitated back contact solar cells. A higher deposition temperature degrades the passivation of the boron emitter by an increased hydrogen effusion due to lower silicon hydrogen bond energy, proved by hydrogen effusion measurements. The high boron surface doping in crystalline silicon causes a band bending in the amorphous silicon. Under these conditions, at the interface, the intentionally undoped amorphous silicon becomes p-type conducting, with the consequence of an increased dangling bond defect density. For bulk amorphous silicon this effect is described by the defect pool model. We demonstrate, that the defect pool model is also applicable to the interface between amorphous and crystalline silicon. Our simulation shows the shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band edge to be more pronounced for high temperature deposited amorphous silicon having a small bandgap. Application of optimized amorphous silicon as passivation layer for the boron doped emitter and phosphorus doped back surface field on the rear side of laser processed back contact solar cells, fabricated using four laser processing steps, yields an efficiency of 23.3%.

  19. Fabrication of back contacts using laser writer and photolithography for inscribing textured solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Murugaiya Sridar Ilango; Vijay Monterio; Sheela K Ramasesha

    2015-02-01

    Semiconductor fabrication process begins with photolithography. Preparing a photo mask is the key process step in photolithography. The photo mask was fabricated by inscribing patterns directly onto a soda lime glass with the help of a laser beam, as it is easily controllable. Laser writer LW405-A was used for preparing the mask in this study. Exposure wavelength of 405 nm was used, with which 1.2 m feature size can be written in direct write-mode over the soda lime glass plate. The advantage of using the fabricated mask is that it can be used to design back contacts for thin film Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. To investigate the process capability of LW405-A, same pattern with different line widths was written on soda lime glass samples at different writing speeds. The pattern was inscribed without proximity effect and stitching errors, which was characterized using optical microscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). It was proven that writing speed of a mask-writer is decided according to the intended feature size and line width. As the writing speed increases, the edges of the patterns become rougher due to uneven scattering of the laser beam. From the fabricated mask, the solar cell can be developed embedding both the contacts at the bottom layer, to increase the absorption of solar radiation on the top surface effectively by increasing light absorption area.

  20. Al-Si alloy point contact formation and rear surface passivation for silicon solar cells using double layer porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Besma; Ben Jaballah, Abdelkader; Bessais, Brahim

    2012-10-01

    Lowering the rear surface recombination velocities by a dielectric layer has fascinating advantages compared with the standard fully covered Al back-contact silicon solar cells. In this work the passivation effect by double layer porous silicon (PS) (wide band gap) and the formation of Al-Si alloy in narrow p-type Si point contact areas for rear passivated solar cells are analysed. As revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we found that a thin passivating aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer is formed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis performed in cross sections shows that with bilayer PS, liquid Al penetrates into the openings, alloying with the Si substrate at depth and decreasing the contact resistivity. At the solar cell level, the reduction in the contact area and resistivity leads to a minimization of the fill factor losses.

  1. Adhesion protein networks reveal functions proximal and distal to cell-matrix contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Frame, Margaret C

    2016-04-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is generally mediated by integrin receptors, which bind to intracellular adhesion proteins that form multi-molecular scaffolding and signalling complexes. The networks of proteins, and their interactions, are dynamic, mechanosensitive and extremely complex. Recent efforts to characterise adhesions using a variety of technologies, including imaging, proteomics and bioinformatics, have provided new insights into their composition, organisation and how they are regulated, and have also begun to reveal unexpected roles for so-called adhesion proteins in other cellular compartments (for example, the nucleus or centrosomes) in diseases such as cancer. We believe this is opening a new chapter on understanding the wider functions of adhesion proteins, both proximal and distal to cell-matrix contacts.

  2. Nanowire CdS-CdTe Solar Cells with Molybdenum Oxide as Contact

    OpenAIRE

    Hongmei Dang; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-01-01

    Using a 10 nm thick molybdenum oxide (MoO3−x) layer as a transparent and low barrier contact to p-CdTe, we demonstrate nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells with a power conversion efficiency of 11% under front side illumination. Annealing the as-deposited MoO3 film in N2 resulted in a reduction of the cell’s series resistance, from 9.97 Ω/cm2 to 7.69 Ω/cm2, and increase in efficiency from 9.9% to 11%. Under illumination from the back, the MoO3−x/Au side, the nanowire solar cells yielded Jsc of 21 mA...

  3. Metabolic cleavage of cell-penetrating peptides in contact with epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the metabolic degradation kinetics and cleavage patterns of some selected CPP (cell-penetrating peptides) after incubation with confluent epithelial models. Synthesis of N-terminal CF [5(6)-carboxyfluorescein]-labelled CPP, namely hCT (human calcitonin)-derived sequences, Tat(47......-57) and penetratin(43-58), was through Fmoc (fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Metabolic degradation kinetics of the tested CPP in contact with three cell-cultured epithelial models, MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney), Calu-3 and TR146, was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC. Identification of the resulting...... metabolites of CF-hCT(9-32) was through reversed-phase HPLC fractionation and peak allocation by MALDI-TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry) or direct MALDI-TOF-MS of incubates. Levels of proteolytic activity varied highly between the investigated epithelial...

  4. Wnt-Dependent Control of Cell Polarity in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, Kristin B; Witze, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    The secreted ligand Wnt5a regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movement during development by signaling through the poorly defined noncanonical Wnt pathway. Cell polarity regulates most aspects of cell behavior including the organization of apical/basolateral membrane domains of epithelial cells, polarized cell divisions along a directional plane, and front rear polarity during cell migration. These characteristics of cell polarity allow coordinated cell movements required for tissue formation and organogenesis during embryonic development. Genetic model organisms have been used to identify multiple signaling pathways including Wnt5a that are required to establish cell polarity and regulate polarized cell behavior. However, the downstream signaling events that regulate these complex cellular processes are still poorly understood. The methods below describe assays to study Wnt5a-induced cell polarity in cultured cells, which may facilitate our understanding of these complex signaling pathways.

  5. CDH1 and IL1-beta expression dictates FAK and MAPKK-dependent cross-talk between cancer cells and human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-toub, Mashael; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Hamam, Rimi;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tumor microenvironment conferred by stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) plays a key role in tumor development, progression, and response to therapy. Defining the role of MSCs in tumorigenesis is crucial for their safe utilization in regenerative medicine. Herein, we conducted...... was dependent on direct cell-cell contact. Our data also revealed transfer of cellular components between cancer cells and hMSCs as one possible mechanism for intercellular communication. Global gene expression analysis of sorted hMSCs following co-culturing with MCF7 and BT-20 cells revealed enrichment...... in signaling pathways related to bone formation, FAK and MAPKK signaling. Co-culturing hMSCs with MCF7 cells increased their growth evidenced by increase in Ki67 and PCNA staining in tumor cells in direct contact with hMSCs niche. On the other hand, co-culturing hMSCs with FaDu, HT-29 or MDA-MB-231 cells led...

  6. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... activation through coculture with T cells activated by anti-T-cell receptor or anti-CD3 antibodies suggest that cellular interaction with T cells, independent of antigen presentation or lymphokine secretion, induces or triggers B cells to become responsive to T-derived lymphokines, and that this may...

  7. A simulation study of the micro-grooved electrode structure for back-contact back-junction silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    A micro-grooved electrode structure is investigated to illustrate its advantages when applied to the back-contact back-junction (BC-BJ) silicon solar cell. The finite element analysis shows that the micro-grooved electrodes enhances the photo-carrier collection and weakens the dependence of collection ability on pitch distance. The geometries of micro-groove are found to have little impact on the cell performance. These advantages open possibilities for the implementation of low cost fabrication methods. As a demonstration, a process involving laser doping and screen printing techniques are proposed and analyzed. The simulation results show that the laser induced lattice damage causes negligible deterioration of device electrical properties and the presence of parasitic metal insulator semiconductor structure near the screen printed electrodes actually leads to a performance improvement rather than degradation. Our preliminary results indicate that the micro-grooved electrode structure is promising for fabricating low cost high efficiency BC-BJ silicon solar cells.

  8. Increasing light capture in silicon solar cells with encapsulants incorporating air prisms to reduce metallic contact losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Hao; Pathreeker, Shreyas; Kaur, Jaspreet; Hosein, Ian D

    2016-10-31

    Silicon solar cells are the most widely deployed modules owing to their low-cost manufacture, large market, and suitable efficiencies for residential and commercial use. Methods to increase their solar energy collection must be easily integrated into module fabrication. We perform a theoretical and experimental study on the light collection properties of an encapsulant that incorporates a periodic array of air prisms, which overlay the metallic front contacts of silicon solar cells. We show that the light collection efficiency induced by the encapsulant depends on both the shape of the prisms and angle of incidence of incoming light. We elucidate the changes in collection efficiency in terms of the ray paths and reflection mechanisms in the encapsulant. We fabricated the encapsulant from a commercial silicone and studied the change in the external quantum efficiency (EQE) on an encapsulated, standard silicon solar cell. We observe efficiency enhancements, as compared to a uniform encapsulant, over the visible to near infrared region for a range of incident angles. This work demonstrates exactly how a periodic air prism architecture increases light collection, and how it may be designed to maximize light collection over the widest range of incident angles.

  9. Optical Evaluation of the Rear Contacts of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells by Coupled Electromagnetic and Statistical Ray-Optics Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Dabirian, Ali

    2017-02-15

    High-efficiency crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells increasingly feature sophisticated electron and hole contacts aimed at minimizing electronic losses. At the rear of photovoltaic devices, such contacts—usually consisting of stacks of functional layers—offer opportunities to enhance the infrared response of the solar cells. Here, we propose an accurate and simple modeling procedure to evaluate the infrared performance of rear contacts in c-Si solar cells. Our method combines full-wave electromagnetic modeling of the rear contact with a statistical ray optics model to obtain the fraction of optical energy dissipated from the rear contact relative to that absorbed by the Si wafer. Using this technique, we study the impact of the refractive index, extinction coefficient, and thickness of the rear-passivating layer and establish basic design rules. In addition, we evaluate novel optical structures, including stratified thin films, nanoparticle composites, and conductive nanowires embedded in a low-index dielectric matrix, for integration into advanced rear contacts in c-Si photovoltaic devices. From an optical perspective, nanowire structures preserving low contact resistance appear to be the most effective approach to mitigating dissipation losses from the rear contact.

  10. Segregated mathematical model for growth of anchorage-dependent MDCK cells in microcarrier culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Lars; Bock, Andreas; Reichl, Udo

    2008-01-01

    To describe the growth behavior of anchorage-dependent mammalian cells in microcarrier systems, various approaches comprising deterministic and stochastic single cell models as well as automaton-based models have been presented in the past. The growth restriction of these often contact-inhibited cells by spatial effects is described at levels with different complexity but for the most part not taking into account their metabolic background. Compared to suspension cell lines these cells have a comparatively long lag phase required for attachment and start of proliferation on the microcarrier. After an initial phase of exponential growth only a moderate specific growth rate is achieved due to restrictions in space available for cell growth, limiting medium components, and accumulation of growth inhibitors. Here, a basic deterministic unstructured segregated cell model for growth of Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells used in influenza vaccine production is described. Four classes of cells are considered: cells on microcarriers, cells in suspension, dead cells, and lysed cells. Based on experimental data, cell attachment and detachment is taken explicitly into account. The model allows simulation of the overall growth behavior in microcarrier culture, including the lag phase. In addition, it describes the time course of uptake and release of key metabolites and the identification of parameters relevant for the design and optimization of vaccine manufacturing processes.

  11. Influence of black silicon surfaces on the performance of back-contacted back silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Johannes; Haschke, Jan; Käsebier, Thomas; Korte, Lars; Sprafke, Alexander N; Wehrspohn, Ralf B

    2014-10-20

    The influence of different black silicon (b-Si) front side textures prepared by inductively coupled reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) on the performance of back-contacted back silicon heterojunction (BCB-SHJ) solar cells is investigated in detail regarding their optical performance, black silicon surface passivation and internal quantum efficiency. Under optimized conditions the effective minority carrier lifetime measured on black silicon surfaces passivated with Al(2)O(3) can be higher than lifetimes measured for the SiO(2)/SiN(x) passivation stack used in the reference cells with standard KOH textures. However, to outperform the electrical current of silicon back-contact cells, the black silicon back-contact cell process needs to be optimized with aspect to chemical and thermal stability of the used dielectric layer combination on the cell.

  12. Interactions of primary neuroepithelial progenitor and brain endothelial cells: distinct effect on neural progenitor maintenance and differentiation by soluble factors and direct contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel A Gama Sosa; Rita De Gasperi; Anne B Rocher; Gissel M Perez; Keila Simons; Daniel E Cruz; Patrick R Hof; Gregory A Elder

    2007-01-01

    Neurovascular interactions are crucial for the normal development of the central nervous system. To study such interactions in primary cultures, we developed a procedure to simultaneously isolate neural progenitor and endothelial cell fractions from embryonic mouse brains. Depending on the culture conditions endothelial cells were found to favor maintenance of the neuroprogenitor phenotype through the production of soluble factors, or to promote neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors through direct contact. These apparently opposing effects could reflect differential cellular interactions needed for the proper development of the brain.

  13. Contact size scaling of a W-contact phase-change memory cell based on numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yiqun; Lin Xinnan; Jia Yuchao; Cui Xiaole; Zhang Xing; Song Zhitang

    2012-01-01

    In the design of phase-change memory (PCM),it is important to perform numerical simulations to predict the performances of different device structures.This work presents a numerical simulation using a coupled system including Poisson's equation,the current continuity equation,the thermal conductivity equation,and phase-change dynamics to simulate the thermal and electric characteristics of phase-change memory.This method discriminates the common numerical simulation of PCM cells,from which it applies Possion's equation and current continuity equations instead of the Laplace equation to depict the electric characteristics of PCM cells,which is more adoptable for the semiconductor characteristics of phase-change materials.The results show that the simulation agrees with the measurement,and the scalability of PCM is predicted.

  14. Platelets induce apoptosis during sepsis in a contact-dependent manner that is inhibited by GPIIb/IIIa blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Sharron

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: End-organ apoptosis is well-described in progressive sepsis and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS, especially where platelets accumulate (e.g. spleen and lung. We previously reported an acute sepsis-induced cytotoxic platelet phenotype expressing serine protease granzyme B. We now aim to define the site(s of and mechanism(s by which platelet granzyme B induces end-organ apoptosis in sepsis. METHODS: End-organ apoptosis in murine sepsis (i.e. polymicrobial peritonitis was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Platelet cytotoxicity was measured by flow cytometry following 90 minute ex vivo co-incubation with healthy murine splenocytes. Sepsis progression was measured via validated preclinical murine sepsis score. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was evident apoptosis in spleen, lung, and kidney sections from septic wild type mice. In contrast, there was a lack of TUNEL staining in spleens and lungs from septic granzyme B null mice and these mice survived longer following induction of sepsis than wild type mice. In co-incubation experiments, physical separation of septic platelets from splenocytes by a semi-permeable membrane reduced splenocyte apoptosis to a rate indistinguishable from negative controls. Chemical separation by the platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor eptifibatide decreased apoptosis by 66.6±10.6% (p = 0.008. Mice treated with eptifibatide in vivo survived longer following induction of sepsis than vehicle control mice. CONCLUSIONS: In sepsis, platelet granzyme B-mediated apoptosis occurs in spleen and lung, and absence of granzyme B slows sepsis progression. This process proceeds in a contact-dependent manner that is inhibited ex vivo and in vivo by the platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor eptifibatide. The GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors and other classes of anti-platelet drugs may be protective in sepsis.

  15. Iron and contact with host cells induce expression of adhesins on surface of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana F; Chang, Te-Hung; Benchimol, Marlene; Klumpp, David Jichael; Lehker, Michael W; Alderete, John F

    2003-03-01

    The proteins AP65, AP51, AP33 and AP23 synthesized by Trichomonas vaginalis organisms in high iron play a role in adherence. Multigene families encode enzymes of the hydrogenosome organelles, which have identity to adhesins. This fact raises questions regarding the compartmentalization of the proteins outside the organelle and about the interactions of adhesins with host cells. Data here demonstrate the presence of the proteins outside the organelle under high-iron conditions. Fluorescence and immuno-cytochemical experiments show that high-iron-grown organisms coexpressed adhesins on the surface and intracellularly in contrast with low-iron parasites. Furthermore, the AP65 epitopes seen by rabbit anti-AP65 serum that blocks adherence and detects surface proteins were identified, and a mAb reacting to those epitopes recognized the trichomonal surface. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot of adhesins from surface-labelled parasites provided evidence that all members of the multigene family were co-ordinately expressed and placed on the trichomonal surface. Similar two-dimensional analysis of proteins from purified hydrogenosomes obtained from iodinated trichomonads confirmed the specific surface labelling of proteins. Contact of trichomonads with vaginal epithelial cells increased the amount of surface-expressed adhesins. Moreover, we found a direct relationship between the levels of adherence and amount of adhesins bound to immortalized vaginal and ureter epithelial cells, further reinforcing specific associations. Finally, trichomonads of MR100, a drug-resistant isolate absent in hydrogenosome proteins and adhesins, were non-adherent. Overall, the results confirm an important role for iron and contact in the surface expression of adhesins of T. vaginalis organisms.

  16. Low-density subculture: a technical note on the importance of avoiding cell-to-cell contact during mesenchymal stromal cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Richardson, Stephen M; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2015-10-01

    Numerous scientific studies and clinical trials are carried out each year exploring the use of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the effective and reliable expansion of this very important cell type remains a challenge. In this study the importance of cell-to-cell contact during expansion has been explored on the proliferation and differentiation potential of the produced cells. Cells were cultured up to passage 5 under conditions where cell-to-cell contact was either probable (40-70% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol A) or where it was unlikely (10-50% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol B). The effect of the two different conditions on expansion efficiency; proliferation rate and tri-lineage differentiation potential was assessed. Differences in immunophenotype, cell size and senescence were also investigated. Protocol B cultures expanded twice as fast as those cultured with Protocol A. In passage 5 experiments low confluence expanded cells displayed a 10% higher overall proliferation rate, and produced 23% more cells in growth, 12% more in osteogenic, 77% more in adipogenic, but 27% less in chondrogenic medium. Differentiation potential wasn't decisively affected at the mRNA level. However, Protocol B favoured bone and cartilage differentiation at the secretional level. Protocol A populations showed reduced purity, expressing CD105 in only 76% compared to the 96.7% in Protocol B cultures. Protocol A populations also contained significantly more (+4.2%) senescent cells, however, no difference was found in cell size between the two protocols. The findings of this study suggest that cell-to-cell contact, and therefore high confluence levels, is detrimental to MSC quality.

  17. A simulation study on the electrical structure of interdigitated back-contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-eun; Kim, Soo Min; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a simulation for interdigitated back-contact (IBC) silicon solar cells was performed by using Silvaco TCAD ATLAS to investigate the cell's electrical properties. The impacts of various parameters, including the depth of the front surface field(FSF), the FSF peak doping concentration, the depths of the emitter and the back surface field(BSF), the peak doping concentrations of the emitter and BSF, the base doping, and the bulk lifetime on the output characteristics like the light current-voltage curves and the internal quantum efficiency of the IBC solar cell, were investigated. The light absorption was determined by adjusting the antireflection coating and the Al thickness. The FSF must be thin and have a low doping concentration for high-efficiency IBC cells. If the conversion efficiency is to be improved, a thick emitter and a high doping concentration are needed. Because of the low resistivity of the Si substrate, the series resistance was reduced, but recombination was increased. With a high-resistivity Si substrate, the opposite trends were observed. By counter-balancing the series resistance and the recombination, we determined by simulation that the optimized resistivity for the IBC cells was 1 Ω·cm. Because all metal electrodes in the IBC cells are located on the back side, a higher minority carrier lifetime showed a higher efficiency. After the various parameters had been optimized, texturing and surface recombination were added into the simulation. The simulated IBC cells showed a short-circuit current density of 42.89 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 714.8 mV, a fill factor of 84.04%, and a conversion efficiency of 25.77%.

  18. ER-mitochondria contacts control surface glycan expression and sensitivity to killer lymphocytes in glioma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Kasahara, Atsuko; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Boydell, Emma; Zamorano, Sebastian; Riccadonna, Cristina; Pellegatta, Serena; Hulo, Nicolas; Dutoit, Valérie; Derouazi, Madiha; Dietrich, Pierre Yves; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly heterogeneous aggressive primary brain tumor, with the glioma stem-like cells (GSC) being more sensitive to cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing than glioma differentiated cells (GDC). However, the mechanism behind this higher sensitivity is unclear. Here, we found that the mitochondrial morphology of GSCs modulates the ER-mitochondria contacts that regulate the surface expression of sialylated glycans and their recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. GSCs displayed diminished ER-mitochondria contacts compared to GDCs. Forced ER-mitochondria contacts in GSCs increased their cell surface expression of sialylated glycans and reduced their susceptibility to cytotoxic lymphocytes. Therefore, mitochondrial morphology and dynamism dictate the ER-mitochondria contacts in order to regulate the surface expression of certain glycans and thus play a role in GSC recognition and elimination by immune effector cells. Targeting the mitochondrial morphology, dynamism, and contacts with the ER could be an innovative strategy to deplete the cancer stem cell compartment to successfully treat glioblastoma. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  20. Simplified module assembly using back-contact crystalline-silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, J.M.; Garrett, S.E.; Morgan, W.P.

    1997-11-01

    The authors are developing new module concepts that encapsulate and electrically connect all the crystalline-silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) cells in a module in a single step. The new assembly process (1) uses back-contact c-Si cells, (2) uses a module backplane that has both the electrical circuit, encapsulant, and backsheet in a single piece, and (3) uses a single-step process for assembly of these components into a module. This new process reduces module assembly cost by using planar processes that are easy to automate, by reducing the number of steps, and by eliminating low-throughput (e.g., individual cell tabbing, cell stringing, etc.) steps. The authors refer to this process as monolithic module assembly since it translates many of the advantages of monolithic module construction of thin-film PV modules to wafered c-Si PV modules. Preliminary development of the new module assembly process, and some estimations of the cost potential of the new process, are presented.

  1. Efficient and stable solution-processed planar perovskite solar cells via contact passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Hairen

    2017-02-03

    Planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) made entirely via solution processing at low temperatures (<150°C) offer promise for simple manufacturing, compatibility with flexible substrates, and perovskite-based tandem devices. However, these PSCs require an electron-selective layer that performs well with similar processing. We report a contact-passivation strategy using chlorine-capped TiO2 colloidal nanocrystal film that mitigates interfacial recombination and improves interface binding in low-temperature planar solar cells. We fabricated solar cells with certified efficiencies of 20.1 and 19.5% for active areas of 0.049 and 1.1 square centimeters, respectively, achieved via low-temperature solution processing. Solar cells with efficiency greater than 20% retained 90% (97% after dark recovery) of their initial performance after 500 hours of continuous room-temperature operation at their maximum power point under 1-sun illumination (where 1 sun is defined as the standard illumination at AM1.5, or 1 kilowatt/square meter).

  2. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  3. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-11

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  4. Transparent Ohmic Contacts for Solution-Processed, Ultrathin CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurley, J. Matthew; Panthani, Matthew G.; Crisp, Ryan W.; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Pach, Gregory F.; Reese, Matthew O.; Hudson, Margaret H.; Dolzhnikov, Dmitriy S.; Tanygin, Vadim; Luther, Joseph M.; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-01-13

    Recently, solution-processing became a viable route for depositing CdTe for use in photovoltaics. Ultrathin (~500 nm) solar cells have been made using colloidal CdTe nanocrystals with efficiencies exceeding 12% power conversion efficiency (PCE) demonstrated by using very simple device stacks. Further progress requires an effective method for extracting charge carriers generated during light harvesting. Here, we explored solution-based methods for creating transparent Ohmic contacts to the solution-deposited CdTe absorber layer and demonstrated molecular and nanocrystal approaches to Ohmic hole-extracting contacts at the ITO/CdTe interface. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to further show how the above approaches improved carrier collection by reducing the potential drop under reverse bias across the ITO/CdTe interface. Other methods, such as spin-coating CdTe/A2CdTe2 (A = Na, K, Cs, N2H5), can be used in conjunction with current/light soaking to improve PCE further.

  5. Thermal decomposition of silver acetate in silver paste for solar cell metallization: An effective route to reduce contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Kim, Suk; Yun Kim, Se; Man Park, Jin; Hwan Park, Keum; Ho Lee, Jun; Mock Lee, Sang; Taek Han, In; Hyang Kim, Do; Ram Lim, Ka; Tae Kim, Won; Cheol Park, Ju; Soo Jee, Sang; Lee, Eun-Sung

    2013-08-01

    A screen printed silver/metallic glass (MG) paste formulated with Ag acetate resulted in a specific contact resistance in the range of 0.6-0.7 mΩ.cm2 on both the n- and p-type Si emitters of interdigitated back-contact solar cells. Silver nanocrystallites resulting from thermally decomposed Ag acetate prevented the Al MG frits from directly interacting with the Si emitter, thus reducing the amount of Al diffused into the Si emitters, and subsequently, the contact resistance. A photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 20.3% was achieved using this technique.

  6. Material- and feature-dependent effects on cell adhesion to micro injection moulded medical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ying; Habimana, Olivier; Flood, Peter; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rodriguez, Brian J; Zhang, Nan; Casey, Eoin; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Two polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), containing a range of nano- to micron- roughness surfaces (Ra 0.01, 0.1, 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, 3.2 and 5.0μm) were fabricated using electrical discharge machining (EDM) and replicated using micro injection moulding (μIM). Polymer samples were characterized using optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water surface contact angle. Cell adhesion tests were carried out using bacterial Pseudomonas fluorescens and mammalian Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells to determine the effect of surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness and stiffness. It is found that there are features which gave insignificant differences (feature-dependent effect) in cell adhesion, albeit a significant difference in the physicochemical properties (material-dependent effect) of substrata. In bacterial cell adhesion, the strongest feature-dependence is found at Ra 0.4μm surfaces, with material-dependent effects strongest at Ra 0.01μm. Ra 0.1μm surfaces exhibited strongest feature-dependent effects and Ra 5.0μm has strongest material-dependent effects on mammalian cell adhesion. Bacterial cell adhesion is found to be favourable to hydrophobic surfaces (COC), with the lowest adhesion at Ra 0.4μm for both materials. Mammalian cell adhesion is lowest in Ra 0.1μm and highest in Ra 1.0μm, and generally favours hydrophilic surfaces (PMMA). These findings can be used as a basis for developing medical implants or microfluidic devices using micro injection moulding for diagnostic purposes, by tuning the cell adhesion on different areas containing different surface roughnesses on the diagnostic microfluidic devices or medical implants.

  7. Chronic psychological stress suppresses contact hypersensitivity: potential roles of dysregulated cell trafficking and decreased IFN-γ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica M F; Witter, Alexandra R; Racine, Ronny R; Berg, Rance E; Podawiltz, Alan; Jones, Harlan; Mummert, Mark E

    2014-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that psychological stress can have dramatic impacts on the immune system, particularly the cutaneous immune response in dermatological disorders. While there have been many studies examining the impact of acute psychological stress on contact hypersensitivity there are relatively few studies concerning the impact of chronic psychological stress. Furthermore, the local immunological mechanisms by which chronic psychological stress impacts contact hypersensitivity still remain to be explored. Here we show that restraint-induced chronic psychological stress stimulates activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and delays weight gain in female BALB/c mice. We observed that chronic psychological stress reduces the cutaneous immune response as evidence by reduced ear swelling. This correlated with a significant decrease in the inflammatory cell infiltrate. On the other hand, chronic psychological stress does not influence T cell proliferation, activation, or sensitivity to corticosterone but does increase CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell percentages in draining lymph nodes during a contact hypersensitivity reaction. Chronic psychological stress induces a decrease in overall circulating white blood cells, lymphocytes, and monocytes during a contact hypersensitivity reaction suggesting extravasation from the circulation. Finally, we found markedly reduced local IFN-γ production in chronically stressed animals. Based on these findings we propose that chronic psychological stress reduces contact hypersensitivity due to dysregulated cell trafficking and reduced production of IFN-γ.

  8. GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure point-contact concentrator cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R. P.; Zavracky, P. M.; Mcclelland, R. W.; Fan, John C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Point-contact cells fabricated in silicon have recently achieved very high efficiencies. Applying this structure to GaAs is difficult as it requires both surface passivation of the GaAs and a film of GaAs with thickness less than 10 microns. The authors propose to overcome these difficulties by (1) using AlGaAs layers grown by OMCVD to act as front- and back-surface fields in order to confine the photogenerated minority carriers away from the surfaces, and (2) using the CLEFT technology to produce thin, separated films of this structure. It has been found that much of the necessary technologies have been developed and that the primary problem remaining to be solved is localized junction formation.

  9. Photodynamic therapy of nodular basal cell carcinoma with multifiber contact light delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Marcelo Soto; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune; Johansson, T; Palsson, Sara; Bendsoe, Niels; Derjabo, A; Kapostins, J; Stenram, Unne; Spigulis, J; Svanberg, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    To overcome the limited treatment depth of superficial photodynamic therapy we investigate interstitial light delivery. In the present work the treatment light was delivered using a system in which three or six clear-cut fibers were placed in direct contact with the tumor area. This placement was thought to represent a step toward general purpose interstitial PDT. Twelve nodular basal cell carcinomas were treated employing delta-aminolevulinic acid and 635 nm laser irradiation. Fluorescence measurements were performed monitoring the buildup and subsequent bleaching of the produced sensitizer protoporphyrin IX. The treatment efficacy, judged at a 28-month follow-up, showed a 100% complete response. Two punch excisions at 7 months converted two partial responses to complete responses. One patient failed to appear at all follow-up sessions. The outcome of the treatments was comparable to superficial photodynamic therapy in terms of histological, clinical, and cosmetic results.

  10. Asymmetric Receptor Contact is Required for Tyrosine Autophosphorylation of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor in Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, J.; Boggon, T; Tomé, F; Mandiyan, V; Lax, I; Schlessinge, J

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in regulation of kinase activity and in recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Autophosphorylation is mediated by a sequential and precisely ordered intermolecular (trans) reaction. In this report we present structural and biochemical experiments demonstrating that formation of an asymmetric dimer between activated FGFR1 kinase domains is required for transphosphorylation of FGFR1 in FGF-stimulated cells. Transphosphorylation is mediated by specific asymmetric contacts between the N-lobe of one kinase molecule, which serves as an active enzyme, and specific docking sites on the C-lobe of a second kinase molecule, which serves a substrate. Pathological loss-of-function mutations or oncogenic activating mutations in this interface may hinder or facilitate asymmetric dimer formation and transphosphorylation, respectively. The experiments presented in this report provide the molecular basis underlying the control of transphosphorylation of FGF receptors and other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  11. Back Enhanced Heterostructure with InterDigitated contact - BEHIND - solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, M.; Serenelli, L.; Salza, E.; Pirozzi, L. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy); De Cesare, G.; Caputo, D.; Ceccarelli, M.; Martufi, P. [Electronic Engineering University of Rome ' Sapienza' , via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma (Italy); De Iuliis, S.; Geerligs, L.J. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    In this paper we investigate in detail how the heterostructure concept can be implemented in an interdigitated back contact solar cell, in which both the emitters are formed on the back side of the c-Si wafer by amorphous/crystalline silicon heterostructure, and at the same time the grid-less front surface is passivated by a double layer of amorphous silicon and silicon nitride, which also provides an anti-reflection coating. The entire process, held at temperature below 300C, is photolithographyfree, using a metallic self-aligned mask to create the interdigitated pattern. An open-circuit voltage of 695 mV has been measured on this device fabricated. The mask-assisted deposition process does not influence the uniformity of the deposited amorphous silicon layers. Several technological aspects that limit the fill factor are considered and discussed.

  12. Degradation of some ceria electrolytes under hydrogen contact nearby anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malta Luiz Fernando Brum

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with thermodynamic analysis of the stability of some ceria electrolytes under contact with hydrogen gas nearby anode in fuel cells. It was considered the following types of ceria-electrolytes: pure ceria, strontium-doped ceria, calcium-doped ceria and calcium-bismuth-doped ceria. The equilibrium Log (pH2O/pH2 vs. T diagrams were constructed for x = 0.1 and 0.01, where x is the fraction of initial ceria converted to Ce2O3 (proportional to the ratio between activities of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the ceria electrolyte, which is proportional to the fraction of electronic conduction in the electrolyte at a given temperature. The predictions of the diagrams are as follows: (a Ce1.9Ca0.1Bi0.8O5.1 and Ce0.9Sr0.1O1.9 are less stable than pure ceria for the whole temperature range (from 0 to 1000 °C; (b Ce0.9Ca0.1O1.9 is more stable than pure ceria below about 650 °C for x = 0.1 and below about 400 °C for x = 0.01; (c at each temperature in the considered range the pressure ratio pH2O(g/pH2(g has to be higher than thermodynamically predicted in order to keep CeO2 stable in the electrolyte contacting hydrogen gas. Thermodynamic predictions are entirely capable of explaining experimental data published on the subject (irreversible cell degradation in the case of SrO-doped ceria; weight loss from doped-ceria electrolyte above 700 °C; oxygen gas release during sintering of ceria.

  13. Direct measurement of through-plane thermal conductivity and contact resistance in fuel cell materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Manish; Mench, M. M.

    An experimental study to determine the through-plane thermal conductivity of dry Nafion ®, various diffusion media, catalyst layer, and the thermal contact resistance between diffusion media and a metal plate as a function of temperature and pressure was performed. Dry Nafion ® thermal conductivity was determined to be 0.16 ± 0.03 W m -1 K -1 at room temperature, which decreases to 0.13 ± 0.02 W m -1 K -1 at 65 °C. Diffusion media thermal conductivity was found to be function of PTFE content and manufacturer, and was 0.48 ± 0.09 W m -1 K -1 for untreated and 0.22 ± 0.04 W m -1 K -1 for 20 wt.% PTFE treated SIGRACET ® diffusion media, respectively. Toray diffusion media thermal conductivity was measured to be 1.80 ± 0.27 W m -1 K -1 at 26 °C and decreases to 1.24 ± 0.19 W m -1 K at 73 °C. The thermal contact resistance between Toray carbon paper and aluminium bronze material was determined to vary from 6.7 × 10 -4 to 2.0 × 10 -4 m 2 K W -1 for an increase in compression pressure from 0.4 to 2.2 MPa. The equivalent thermal conductivity of a 0.5 mg cm -2 platinum loaded catalyst layer was estimated to be 0.27 ± 0.05 W m -1 K -1. A one-dimensional analytical model was also used to estimate the temperature drop in the fuel cell components. A maximum of 3-4 °C temperature drop can be expected for a 200 μm thick SIGRACET ® diffusion media at 1 A cm -2. The thermal properties characterized should be useful to help modelers accurately predict the temperature distribution in a fuel cell.

  14. Crafting semiconductor organic-inorganic nanocomposites via placing conjugated polymers in intimate contact with nanocrystals for hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lin, Zhiqun

    2012-08-22

    Semiconductor organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells incorporating conjugated polymers (CPs) and nanocrystals (NCs) offer the potential to deliver efficient energy conversion with low-cost fabrication. The CP-based photovoltaic devices are complimented by an extensive set of advantageous characteristics from CPs and NCs, such as lightweight, flexibility, and solution-processability of CPs, combined with high electron mobility and size-dependent optical properties of NCs. Recent research has witnessed rapid advances in an emerging field of directly tethering CPs on the NC surface to yield an intimately contacted CP-NC nanocomposite possessing a well-defined interface that markedly promotes the dispersion of NCs within the CP matrix, facilitates the photoinduced charge transfer between these two semiconductor components, and provides an effective platform for studying the interfacial charge separation and transport. In this Review, we aim to highlight the recent developments in CP-NC nanocomposite materials, critically examine the viable preparative strategies geared to craft intimate CP-NC nanocomposites and their photovoltaic performance in hybrid solar cells, and finally provide an outlook for future directions of this extraordinarily rich field. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Semitransparent organic solar cells with organic wavelength dependent reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Debije, M.G.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Semitransparent organic solar cells employing solution-processable organic wavelength dependent reflectors of chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystals are demonstrated. The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflects only in a narrow band of the solar spectrum and remains transparent for the

  16. Efficient Regular Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Pristine [70]Fullerene as Electron-Selective Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collavini, Silvia; Kosta, Ivet; Völker, Sebastian F; Cabanero, German; Grande, Hans J; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Delgado, Juan Luis

    2016-06-08

    [70]Fullerene is presented as an efficient alternative electron-selective contact (ESC) for regular-architecture perovskite solar cells (PSCs). A smart and simple, well-described solution processing protocol for the preparation of [70]- and [60]fullerene-based solar cells, namely the fullerene saturation approach (FSA), allowed us to obtain similar power conversion efficiencies for both fullerene materials (i.e., 10.4 and 11.4 % for [70]- and [60]fullerene-based devices, respectively). Importantly, despite the low electron mobility and significant visible-light absorption of [70]fullerene, the presented protocol allows the employment of [70]fullerene as an efficient ESC. The [70]fullerene film thickness and its solubility in the perovskite processing solutions are crucial parameters, which can be controlled by the use of this simple solution processing protocol. The damage to the [70]fullerene film through dissolution during the perovskite deposition is avoided through the saturation of the perovskite processing solution with [70]fullerene. Additionally, this fullerene-saturation strategy improves the performance of the perovskite film significantly and enhances the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on different ESCs (i.e., [60]fullerene, [70]fullerene, and TiO2 ). Therefore, this universal solution processing protocol widens the opportunities for the further development of PSCs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. III-V/Si Tandem Cells Utilizing Interdigitated Back Contact Si Cells and Varying Terminal Configurations: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Manuel; Klein, Talysa R.; Jain, Nikhil; Essig, Stephanie; Schulte-Huxel, Henning; Warren, Emily; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Geisz, John; Stradins, Paul; Tamboli, Adele; Rienacker, Michael; Merkle, Agnes; Schmidt, Jan; Brendel, Rolf; Peibst, Robby

    2017-07-11

    Solar cells made from bulk crystalline silicon (c-Si) dominate the market, but laboratory efficiencies have stagnated because the current record efficiency of 26.3% is already very close to the theoretical limit of 29.4% for a single-junction c-Si cell. In order to substantially boost the efficiency of Si solar cells we have been developing stacked III-V/Si tandem cells, recently attaining efficiencies above 32% in four-terminal configuration. In this contribution, we use state-of-the-art III-V cells coupled with equivalent circuit simulations to compare four-terminal (4T) to three- and two-terminal (3T, 2T) operation. Equivalent circuit simulations are used to show that tandem cells can be operated just as efficiently using three terminals as with four terminals. However, care must be taken not to overestimate 3T efficiency, as the two circuits used to extract current interact, and a method is described to accurately determine this efficiency. Experimentally, a 4T GaInP/Si tandem cell utilizing an interdigitated back contact cell is shown, exhibiting a 4T efficiency of 31.5% and a 2T efficiency of 28.1%. In 3T configuration, it is used to verify the finding from simulation that 3T efficiency is overestimated when interactions between the two circuits are neglected. Considering these, a 3T efficiency approaching the 4T efficiency is found, showing that 3T operation is efficient, and an outlook on fully integrated high-efficiency 3T and 2T tandem cells is given.

  18. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we...... review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides...... a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors....

  19. Analytical Model for Voltage-Dependent Photo and Dark Currents in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesbahus Saleheen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A physics-based explicit mathematical model for the external voltage-dependent forward dark current in bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic solar cells is developed by considering Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH recombination and solving the continuity equations for both electrons and holes. An analytical model for the external voltage-dependent photocurrent in BHJ organic solar cells is also proposed by incorporating exponential photon absorption, dissociation efficiency of bound electron-hole pairs (EHPs, carrier trapping, and carrier drift and diffusion in the photon absorption layer. Modified Braun’s model is used to compute the electric field-dependent dissociation efficiency of the bound EHPs. The overall net current is calculated considering the actual solar spectrum. The mathematical models are verified by comparing the model calculations with various published experimental results. We analyze the effects of the contact properties, blend compositions, charge carrier transport properties (carrier mobility and lifetime, and cell design on the current-voltage characteristics. The power conversion efficiency of BHJ organic solar cells mostly depends on electron transport properties of the acceptor layer. The results of this paper indicate that improvement of charge carrier transport (both mobility and lifetime and dissociation of bound EHPs in organic blend are critically important to increase the power conversion efficiency of the BHJ solar cells.

  20. HIV-Envelope–Dependent Cell-Cell Fusion: Quantitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Huerta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction in vitro between cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and surrounding, uninfected, target cells often leads to cell fusion and the formation of multinucleated cells, called syncytia. The presence in HIV-infected individuals of virus strains able to induce syncytia in cultures of T cells is associated with disease progression and AIDS. Even in the asymptomatic stage of infection, multinucleated cells have been observed in different organs, indicating that fused cells may be generated and remain viable in the tissues of patients. We used lymphocytic cells transfected for the expression of the HIV-envelope (Env glycoproteins to develop a method for the direct quantification of fusion events by flow cytometry (Huerta et al., 2006, J. Virol. Methods 138, 17–23; López-Balderas et al., 2007, Virus Res. 123, 138–146. The method involves the staining of fusion partners with lipophilic probes and the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET to distinguish between fused and aggregated cells. We have shown that such a flow-cytometry assay is appropriate for the screening of compounds that have the potential to modulate HIV-Env–mediated cell fusion. Even those syncytia that are small or few in numbers can be detected. Quantitative analysis of the fusion products was performed with this technique; the results indicated that the time of reaction and initial proportion of fusion partners determine the number, relative size, and average cellular composition of syncytia. Heterogeneity of syncytia generated by HIV-Env–mediated cell-cell fusion may result in a variety of possible outcomes that, in turn, may influence the biological properties of the syncytia and surrounding cells, as well as replication of virus. Given the myriad immune abnormalities leading to AIDS, the full understanding of the extent, diverse composition, and role of fused cells in the pathogenesis of, and immune response to, HIV infection is an

  1. HIV-envelope-dependent cell-cell fusion: quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Leonor; López-Balderas, Nayali; Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Sandoval, Guadalupe; Gómez-Icazbalceta, Guillermo; Villarreal, Carlos; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Larralde, Carlos

    2009-08-11

    Interaction in vitro between cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and surrounding, uninfected, target cells often leads to cell fusion and the formation of multinucleated cells, called syncytia. The presence in HIV-infected individuals of virus strains able to induce syncytia in cultures of T cells is associated with disease progression and AIDS. Even in the asymptomatic stage of infection, multinucleated cells have been observed in different organs, indicating that fused cells may be generated and remain viable in the tissues of patients. We used lymphocytic cells transfected for the expression of the HIV-envelope (Env) glycoproteins to develop a method for the direct quantification of fusion events by flow cytometry (Huerta et al., 2006, J. Virol. Methods 138, 17-23; López-Balderas et al., 2007, Virus Res. 123, 138-146). The method involves the staining of fusion partners with lipophilic probes and the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to distinguish between fused and aggregated cells. We have shown that such a flow-cytometry assay is appropriate for the screening of compounds that have the potential to modulate HIV-Env-mediated cell fusion. Even those syncytia that are small or few in numbers can be detected. Quantitative analysis of the fusion products was performed with this technique; the results indicated that the time of reaction and initial proportion of fusion partners determine the number, relative size, and average cellular composition of syncytia. Heterogeneity of syncytia generated by HIV-Env-mediated cell-cell fusion may result in a variety of possible outcomes that, in turn, may influence the biological properties of the syncytia and surrounding cells, as well as replication of virus. Given the myriad immune abnormalities leading to AIDS, the full understanding of the extent, diverse composition, and role of fused cells in the pathogenesis of, and immune response to, HIV infection is an important, pending issue.

  2. Optimization of solar cell contacts by system cost-per-watt minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, D.

    1977-01-01

    New, and considerably altered, optimum dimensions for solar-cell metallization patterns are found using the recently developed procedure whose optimization criterion is the minimum cost-per-watt effect on the entire photovoltaic system. It is also found that the optimum shadow fraction by the fine grid is independent of metal cost and resistivity as well as cell size. The optimum thickness of the fine grid metal depends on all these factors, and in familiar cases it should be appreciably greater than that found by less complete analyses. The optimum bus bar thickness is much greater than those generally used. The cost-per-watt penalty due to the need for increased amounts of metal per unit area on larger cells is determined quantitatively and thereby provides a criterion for the minimum benefits that must be obtained in other process steps to make larger cells cost effective.

  3. Passivated Tunneling Contacts to N-Type Wafer Silicon and Their Implementation into High Performance Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stradins, P.; Essig, S.; Nemeth, W.; Lee, B. G.; Young, D.; Norman, A.; Liu, Y.; Luo, J.-W.; Warren, E.; Dameron, A.; LaSalvia, V.; Page, M.; Rohatgi, A.; Upadhyaya, A.; Rounsaville, B.; Ok, Y.-W.; Glunz, S.; Benick, J.; Feldmann, F.; Hermle, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a case that passivated contacts based on a thin tunneling oxide layer, combined with a transport layer with properly selected work function and band offsets, can lead to high efficiency c-Si solar cells. Passivated contacts contribute to cell efficiency as well as design flexibility, process robustness, and a simplified process flow. Material choices for the transport layer are examined, including transparent n-type oxides and n+-doped poly-Si. SiO2/n+-poly-Si full-area, induced-junction back surface field contacts to n-FZ and n-Cz Si are incorporated into high efficiency cells with deep, passivated boron emitters.

  4. Interaction between x-irradiated plateau-phase bone marrow stromal cell lines and co-cultivated factor-dependent cell lines leading to leukemogenesis in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naparstek, E.; Anklesaria, P.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Sakakeeny, M.A.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    Plateau-phase mouse clonal bone marrow stromal cell lines D2XRII and C3H cl 11 produce decreasing levels of M-CSF (CSF-1), a specific macrophage progenitor cell humoral regulator, following X-irradiation in vitro. The decrease did not go below 40% of control levels, even after irradiation doses of 50,000 rad (500 Gy). In contrast, a distinct humoral regulator stimulating growth of GM-CSF/IL-3 factor-dependent (FD) hematopoietic progenitor cell lines was detected following radiation to doses above 2000 rad. This humoral factor was not detectable in conditioned medium from irradiated cells, weakly detected using factor-dependent target cell populations in agar overlay, and was prominently detected by liquid co-cultivation of factor-dependent cells with irradiated stromal cell cultures. Subclonal lines of FD cells, derived after co-cultivation revealed karyotypic abnormalities and induced myeloblastic tumors in syngeneic mice. Five-eight weeks co-cultivation was required for induction of factor independence and malignancy and was associated with dense cell to cell contact between FD cells and stromal cells demonstrated by light and electron microscopy. Increases in hematopoietic to stromal cell surface area, total number of adherent cells per flask, total non-adherent cell colonies per flask, and cumulative non-adherent cell production were observed after irradiation. The present data may prove very relevant to an understanding of the cell to cell interactions during X-irradiation-induced leukemia.

  5. Tunnel oxide passivated rear contact for large area n-type front junction silicon solar cells providing excellent carrier selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-selective contact with low minority carrier recombination and efficient majority carrier transport is mandatory to eliminate metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon (Si solar cells. In the present study, the carrier-selective contact consists of an ultra-thin tunnel oxide and a phosphorus-doped polycrystalline Si (poly-Si thin film formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD and subsequent thermal crystallization. It is shown that the poly-Si film properties (doping level, crystallization and dopant activation anneal temperature are crucial for achieving excellent contact passivation quality. It is also demonstrated quantitatively that the tunnel oxide plays a critical role in this tunnel oxide passivated contact (TOPCON scheme to realize desired carrier selectivity. Presence of tunnel oxide increases the implied Voc (iVoc by ~ 125 mV. The iVoc value as high as 728 mV is achieved on symmetric structure with TOPCON on both sides. Large area (239 cm2 n-type Czochralski (Cz Si solar cells are fabricated with homogeneous implanted boron emitter and screen-printed contact on the front and TOPCON on the back, achieving 21.2% cell efficiency. Detailed analysis shows that the performance of these cells is mainly limited by boron emitter recombination on the front side.

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  7. Influence of the ARC patterning method and annealing on the contact adhesion of Ni/Cu-plated solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Jong Wook; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-05-01

    Ni/Cu two-step plating is a promising metallization technique because low contact resistance and improved contact adhesion can be achieved after the Ni annealing process. Also, narrow fingers, which are required for high-efficiency solar cells, can be formed by plating. However, the reliability of contact adhesion is still considered one obstacle to industrializing solar cells with plated metal contacts. In this experiment, the influence of ARC opening methods on plated contact adhesion was investigated because the roughnesses of the Si surfaces produced by using pico-second laser ablation and photolithography may be different. Also, the annealing process was conducted before and after plating Cu/Ag metal stacks. The sequence of the annealing can be significant for efficient production because plating is a wet process while annealing is a dry process. The contact adhesion was measured by using a peel-off test. The test was conducted on a 1.5-mm-wide by a 60 ~ 70- mm-long bus bar area. A 3.2-N/mm adhesion force was recorded as a highest average value along the bus bar.

  8. Frequency- dependent cell responses to an electromagnetic stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    External electric field (EF) acting on cells in the ionic environment can trigger a variety of mechanical and chemical cell responses that regulate cell functions, such as adhesion, migration and cell signaling; thus manipulation of EF can be used in therapeutic applications. To optimize this process, realistic studies of EF interaction with cells are essential. We have developed a combined theoretical-experimental approach to study cell response to the external EF in the native configuration. The cell is modeled as a membrane-enclosed hemisphere which is cultured on a substrate and is surrounded by electrolyte. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically (ANSYS-HFSS) to obtain 3D EF distribution inside and near the cell subjected to an external EF. Theoretical results indicate that the cell response is frequency dependent, where at low frequency EF is excluded from the cell interior while EF penetration into the cell increases for higher frequencies. In both regimes the spatial distribution and strength of induced EF in membrane varies with frequency. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical predictions and show frequency-dependent cell response, including both membrane-initiated and intracellular pathway activation and growth factor release. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  9. Operando XPS Characterization of Selective Contacts: The Case of Molybdenum Oxide for Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Laura; Harvey, Stephen P.; Teeter, Glenn; Bertoni, Mariana I.

    2016-11-21

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize new carrier-selective contacts (CSC) for solar cell application. We show that XPS not only provides information about the surface chemical properties of the CSC material, but that operando XPS, i.e. under light bias condition, can also directly measure the photovoltage that develops at the CSC/absorber interface, revealing device relevant information without the need of assembling a full solar cell. We present the application of the technique to molybdenum oxide hole-selective contact films on a crystalline silicon absorber.

  10. Localization of the contacts between Kenyon cells and aminergic neurons in the Drosophila melanogaster brain using SplitGFP reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Ulrike; Pooryasin, Atefeh; Birman, Serge; Fiala, André

    2013-12-01

    The mushroom body of the insect brain represents a neuronal circuit involved in the control of adaptive behavior, e.g., associative learning. Its function relies on the modulation of Kenyon cell activity or synaptic transmitter release by biogenic amines, e.g., octopamine, dopamine, or serotonin. Therefore, for a comprehensive understanding of the mushroom body, it is of interest not only to determine which modulatory neurons interact with Kenyon cells but also to pinpoint where exactly in the mushroom body they do so. To accomplish the latter, we made use of the GRASP technique and created transgenic Drosophila melanogaster that carry one part of a membrane-bound splitGFP in Kenyon cells, along with a cytosolic red fluorescent marker. The second part of the splitGFP is expressed in distinct neuronal populations using cell-specific Gal4 drivers. GFP is reconstituted only if these neurons interact with Kenyon cells in close proximity, which, in combination with two-photon microscopy, provides a very high spatial resolution. We characterize spatially and microstructurally distinct contact regions between Kenyon cells and dopaminergic, serotonergic, and octopaminergic/tyraminergic neurons in all subdivisions of the mushroom body. Subpopulations of dopaminergic neurons contact complementary lobe regions densely. Octopaminergic/tyraminergic neurons contact Kenyon cells sparsely and are restricted mainly to the calyx, the α'-lobes, and the γ-lobes. Contacts of Kenyon cells with serotonergic neurons are heterogeneously distributed over the entire mushroom body. In summary, the technique enables us to localize precisely a segmentation of the mushroom body by differential contacts with aminergic neurons.

  11. Development of an Insert Co-culture System of Two Cellular Types in the Absence of Cell-Cell Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Justine; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-07-17

    The role of secreted soluble factors in the modification of cellular responses is a recurrent theme in the study of all tissues and systems. In an attempt to make straightforward the very complex relationships between the several cellular subtypes that compose multicellular organisms, in vitro techniques have been developed to help researchers acquire a detailed understanding of single cell populations. One of these techniques uses inserts with a permeable membrane allowing secreted soluble factors to diffuse. Thus, a population of cells grown in inserts can be co-cultured in a well or dish containing a different cell type for evaluating cellular changes following paracrine signaling in the absence of cell-cell contact. Such insert co-culture systems offer various advantages over other co-culture techniques, namely bidirectional signaling, conserved cell polarity and population-specific detection of cellular changes. In addition to being utilized in the field of inflammation, cancer, angiogenesis and differentiation, these co-culture systems are of prime importance in the study of the intricate relationships that exist between the different cellular subtypes present in the central nervous system, particularly in the context of neuroinflammation. This article offers general methodological guidelines in order to set up an experiment in order to evaluating cellular changes mediated by secreted soluble factors using an insert co-culture system. Moreover, a specific protocol to measure the neuroinflammatory effects of cytokines secreted by lipopolysaccharide-activated N9 microglia on neuronal PC12 cells will be detailed, offering a concrete understanding of insert co-culture methodology.

  12. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  13. Pressure Dependent Wall Relaxation in Polarized $^3$He Gaseous Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C; Chu, P -H; Gao, H; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time (T$_1$) due to the cell wall was observed previously at both room temperature and low temperature in valved Rb-coated refillable $^3$He gaseous cells in \\cite{Zheng2}. The diffusion of $^3$He from measurement cell through a capillary tube to the valve and the subsequent depolarization on the surface of the valve was proposed to possibly explain such a pressure dependence at room temperature \\cite{Saam}. In this paper, we investigate this diffusion effect through measurements of T$_1$ with newly designed Rb-coated Pyrex glass cells at 295 K as well as finite element analysis (FEA) studies. Both the experimental results and FEA studies show that the diffusion effect is insufficient to explain the observed linear pressure-dependent behavior of T$_1$.

  14. Combinatorial solar cell libraries for the investigation of different metal back contacts for TiO2-Cu2O hetero-junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, S; Barad, H N; Bouhadana, Y; Keller, D A; Ginsburg, A; Shimanovich, K; Majhi, K; Lovrincic, R; Anderson, A Y; Zaban, A

    2014-04-21

    Here we present a comprehensive investigation of TiO2-Cu2O hetero-junction solar cells with different back contacts (Au, ITO, Cu or Ag). Combinatorial hetero-junction libraries consisting of a linear TiO2 thickness gradient produced by spray pyrolysis and a bell shaped Cu2O profile synthesized by pulsed laser deposition were chosen to investigate the impact of the two metal oxide layer thicknesses. The back contacts were deposited as round patches onto a grid of 13 × 13 points, 169 contacts for each contact material, forming a library containing 4 × 13 × 13 = 676 back contacts. Each back contact represented a solar cell with an individual TiO2 and Cu2O thickness. I-V measurements show that all four materials provide an ohmic contact and that the open circuit voltage of ∼300 mV is rather independent of both layer thicknesses and contact material. The size of the Cu2O crystals drastically decreases with distance from the center of deposition, which leads to a drastic increase of series resistance when the crystal size is <50 nm.

  15. Size-dependent contact angle and the wetting and drying transition of a droplet adsorbed onto a spherical substrate: Line-tension effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-10-01

    The size-dependent contact angle and the drying and wetting morphological transition are studied with respect to the volume change for a spherical cap-shaped droplet placed on a spherical substrate. The line-tension effect is included using the rigorous formula for the Helmholtz free energy in the droplet capillary model. A morphological drying transition from a cap-shaped to a spherical droplet occurs when the substrate is hydrophobic and the droplet volume is small, similar to the transition predicted on a flat substrate. In addition, a morphological wetting transition from a cap-shaped to a wrapped spherical droplet occurs for a hydrophilic substrate and a large droplet volume. The contact angle depends on the droplet size: it decreases as the droplet volume increases when the line tension is positive, whereas it increases when the line tension is negative. The spherical droplets and wrapped droplets are stable when the line tension is positive and large.

  16. Perovskite/silicon-based heterojunction tandem solar cells with 14.8% conversion efficiency via adopting ultrathin Au contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Wang, Fengyou; Liang, Junhui; Yao, Xin; Fang, Jia; Zhang, Dekun; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    A rising candidate for upgrading the performance of an established narrow-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to construct the tandem solar cells from a crystalline silicon bottom cell and a high open-circuit voltage top cell. Here, we present a four-terminal tandem solar cell architecture consisting of a self-filtered planar architecture perovskite top cell and a silicon heterojunction bottom cell. A transparent ultrathin gold electrode has been used in perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. The transparent ultrathin gold contact could provide a better electrical conductivity and optical reflectance-scattering to maintain the performance of the top cell compared with the traditional metal oxide contact. The four-terminal tandem solar cell yields an efficiency of 14.8%, with contributions of the top (8.98%) and the bottom cell (5.82%), respectively. We also point out that in terms of optical losses, the intermediate contact of self-filtered tandem architecture is the uppermost problem, which has been addressed in this communication, and the results show that reducing the parasitic light absorption and improving the long wavelength range transmittance without scarifying the electrical properties of the intermediate hole contact layer are the key issues towards further improving the efficiency of this architecture device. Project supported by the International Cooperation Projects of the Ministry of Science and Technology (No. 2014DFE60170), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474065, 61674084), the Tianjin Research Key Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology (No. 15JCZDJC31300), the Key Project in the Science & Technology Pillar Program of Jiangsu Province (No. BE2014147-3), and the 111 Project (No. B16027).

  17. In vivo CNS infection model of Acanthamoeba genotype T4: the early stages of infection lack presence of host inflammatory response and are a slow and contact-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Sanchez-Rocha, Raquel; Cardenas-Lemus, Ulises; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Mendez-Cruz, Adolfo Rene; Colin-Barenque, Laura; Aley-Medina, Patricia; Espinosa-Villanueva, Jesus; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    This study was developed in order to describe the early morphological events observed during the invasion of two pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4); A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni, at the olfactory meatus and cerebral, pulmonary, renal, hepatic and splenic tissues levels, an in vivo invasion study. Histological and immunohistochemical description of the events at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h postintranasal inoculations of BALB/c mice was performed. A. castellanii showed a higher invasion rate than A. culbertsoni, which was only able to reach lung and brain tissue in the in vivo model. The current study supports previous evidence of lack of inflammatory response during the early stages of infection. Acanthamoeba invasion of the CNS and other organs is a slow and contact-dependent process. The early morphological events during the invasion of amoebae include the penetration of trophozoites into different epithelia: olfactory, respiratory, alveolar space, and renal tubule, which resemble the process of amoebae invasion described in corneal tissue. The data suggest that after reaching the nasal epithelium, trophozoites continued invasion, separating and lifting the most superficial cells, then migrating and penetrating between the cell junctions without causing a cytolytic effect on adjacent cells. These results reaffirm the idea that contact-dependent mechanisms are relevant for amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus regardless of the invasion site.

  18. Ultraviolet laser ablation of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films for dye-sensitized back-contact solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Fu, Dongchuan [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Department of Materials Engineering and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Jiang, Ming [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Zhang, Fei; Zeng, Xiaoyan [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Bach, Udo [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Department of Materials Engineering and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2013-03-01

    In this study, laser ablation of a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin film on a glass substrate was conducted using a 355 nm Nd:YVO{sub 4} ultraviolet (UV) laser to obtain a 4 × 4 mm microstructure. The microstructure contains a symmetric set of interdigitated FTO finger electrodes of a monolithic back-contact dye-sensitized solar cell (BC-DSC) on a common substrate. The effects of UV laser ablation parameters (such as laser fluence, repetition frequency, and scanning speed) on the size precision and quality of the microstructure were investigated using a 4 × 4 orthogonal design and an assistant experimental design. The incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and the current–voltage characteristics of the BC-DSC base of the interdigitated FTO finger electrodes were also determined. The experimental results show that an FTO film microstructure with high precision and good quality can be produced on a glass substrate via laser ablation with high scanning speed, high repetition frequency, and appropriate laser fluence. - Highlights: ► The ablation width and depth generally depend on the laser fluence. ► The scanning speed and the repetition frequency must match each other. ► Slight ablation of the glass substrate can completely remove F-doped tin oxide.

  19. Cell-size dependent progression of the cell cycle creates homeostasis and flexibility of plant cell size

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Jones, Angharad; Forero-Vargas, Manuel; Withers, Simon P.; Smith, Richard S.; Traas, Jan; Dewitte, Walter; Murray, James A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Mean cell size at division is generally constant for specific conditions and cell types, but the mechanisms coupling cell growth and cell cycle control with cell size regulation are poorly understood in intact tissues. Here we show that the continuously dividing fields of cells within the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis show dynamic regulation of mean cell size dependent on developmental stage, genotype and environmental signals. We show cell size at division and cell cycle length is effectively predicted using a two-stage cell cycle model linking cell growth and two sequential cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) activities, and experimental results concur in showing that progression through both G1/S and G2/M is size dependent. This work shows that cell-autonomous co-ordination of cell growth and cell division previously observed in unicellular organisms also exists in intact plant tissues, and that cell size may be an emergent rather than directly determined property of cells. PMID:28447614

  20. The optimization of molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells by the cathodic arc ion plating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Ki, E-mail: choyk@kitech.re.kr [Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering R and D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gang Sam; Song, Young Sik; Lim, Tae Hong [Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering R and D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02

    Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells have been deposited using DC magnetron sputtering methods. The electronic pathway properties of the molybdenum film have been highly dependent on the working gas pressure in magnetron sputtering, which should be carefully controlled to obtain high conductivity and adhesion. A coating method, cathodic arc ion plating, was used for molybdenum back contact electrode fabrication. The aim of this work was to find a metallization method for CIGS solar cells, which has less sensitivity on the working pressure. The resistivity, grain size, growth structures, stress, and efficiency of the films in CIGS solar cells were investigated. The results reveal that the growth structures of the molybdenum films mainly affect the conductivity. The lowest electrical resistivity of the ion-plated molybdenum films was 6.9 μΩ-cm at a pressure of 0.7 Pa. The electrical resistivity variation showed a gently increasing slope with linearity under a working gas pressure of 13.3 Pa. However, a high value of the residual stress of over 1.3 GPa was measured. In order to reduce stress, titanium film was selected as the buffer layer material, and the back contact films were optimized by double-layer coating of two kinds of hetero-materials with arc ion plating. CIGS solar cells prepared molybdenum films to measure the efficiency and to examine the effects of the back contact electrode. The resistivity, grain size, and surface morphology of molybdenum films were measured by four-point probe, X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. The residual stress of the films was calculated from differences in bending curvatures measured using a laser beam. - Highlights: • Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells were prepared by the cathodic arc ion plating. • The lowest electrical resistivity of molybdenum film was 6.9 μΩ-cm. • Titanium buffer layer reduced the compressive residual stress

  1. Charge-carrier selective electrodes for organic bulk heterojunction solar cell by contact-printed siloxane oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Khang, Dahl-Young, E-mail: dykhang@yonsei.ac.kr

    2015-08-31

    ‘Smart’ (or selective) electrode for charge carriers, both electrons and holes, in organic bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells using insertion layers made of hydrophobically-recovered and contact-printed siloxane oligomers between electrodes and active material has been demonstrated. The siloxane oligomer insertion layer has been formed at a given interface simply by conformally-contacting a cured slab of polydimethylsiloxane stamp for less than 100 s. All the devices, either siloxane oligomer printed at one interface only or printed at both interfaces, showed efficiency enhancement when compared to non-printed ones. The possible mechanism that is responsible for the observed efficiency enhancement has been discussed based on the point of optimum symmetry and photocurrent analysis. Besides its simplicity and large-area applicability, the demonstrated contact-printing technique does not involve any vacuum or wet processing steps and thus can be very useful for the roll-based, continuous production scheme for organic BHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • Carrier-selective insertion layer in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells • Simple contact-printing of siloxane oligomers improves cell efficiency. • Printed siloxane layer reduces carrier recombination at electrode surfaces. • Siloxane insertion layer works equally well at both electrode surfaces. • Patterned PDMS stamp shortens the printing time within 100 s.

  2. IFATS collection: Adipose stromal cell differentiation is reduced by endothelial cell contact and paracrine communication: role of canonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Roell, William C; Johnstone, Brian H; Merfeld-Clauss, Stephanie; Van Natta, Bruce; Rosen, Elliot D; March, Keith L; Clauss, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are multipotential mesenchymal progenitor cells that are readily induced to undergo adipogenic differentiation, and we have recently demonstrated them to have functional and phenotypic overlap with pericytes lining microvessels in adipose tissues. In this study we addressed the hypothesis that modulation of ASC fate within this perivascular niche can occur via interaction with endothelial cells (EC), which serve to modulate the adipogenic potential of ASC. To this end, we investigated contact as well as paracrine effects of EC on ASC adipogenesis, in two-dimensional coculture and via conditioned medium and analyzed mutual gene expression changes by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A significant decrease in adipogenic differentiation was observed in ASC when they were cocultured with EC but not control fibroblasts. This endothelial cell-specific effect was accompanied by increased expression of factors involved in Wnt signaling, most prominently Wnt1, Wnt4, and Wnt10a, which are well-known inhibitors of adipogenesis. Suppression of Wnt1 but not Wnt 10a or scrambled control short interfering RNA in cocultures partially reversed the endothelial cell effect, thus increasing adipogenic differentiation, suggesting a plausible role of Wnt1 ligand in modulation of adipogenesis by the vasculature. Furthermore, addition of recombinant Wnt ligand or the Wnt signaling agonist inhibited adipogenic differentiation of ASC in the absence of EC. In conclusion, these data define the relationship in adipose tissue between ASC and EC in the perivascular niche, in which the latter act to repress adipogenesis, thereby stabilizing vasculature. It is tempting to speculate that abnormal endothelial function may be associated with pathologic derepression of adipogenesis. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  3. Impact of DC-power during Mo back contact sputtering on the alkali distribution in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, T., E-mail: thomas.lepetit@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502 CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Mangin, D. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS — Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, 54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Gautron, E.; Tomassini, M.; Harel, S.; Arzel, L.; Barreau, N. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502 CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-05-01

    DC-sputtered Mo back contact layers were deposited on soda-lime glass (SLG) with different power densities applied on the Mo target to study its influence on the photovoltaic performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based (CIGSe) solar cell. CIGSe absorber was then deposited simultaneously on these SLG/Mo, following the 3-stage process. These devices have good but different photovoltaic performance (> 16% efficiency without MgF{sub 2} coating). To find a material origin, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles were carried out on complete cells, revealing that Na and K content and distribution in each layer depend on the deposition conditions of the back contact. Even before the CIGSe deposition and despite similar morphologies, Na content can vary 10-fold from one Mo layer to another. The same applies to the absorber; when grown on a different Mo they present the same grain boundary density but different alkali contents in bulk or at interfaces. This has an influence on the compositional grading in absorber, confirmed by X-ray diffraction and SIMS. - Highlights: • Mo films synthesized at different DC-power applied on the target during sputtering. • Similar macroscopic properties of Mo back contacts • The lowest alkali content in absorber with the highest DC-power applied during Mo sputtering.

  4. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Sugimoto, Noriaki [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, Yuya [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corp., 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  5. Measurement of diffusion length and surface recombination velocity in Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) and Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Pierre; Van de Wiele, Fernand

    1985-03-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the diffusion length and surface recombination velocity of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) solar cells by means of a simple linear regression on experimental quantum efficiency values versus the inverse of the absorption coefficient. This method is extended to the case of Front Surface Field (FSF) solar cells. Under certain conditions, the real or the effective surface recombination velocity may be measured.

  6. Evaluation of Salmonella biofilm cell transfer from contact surfaces to beef products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Meat contamination by Salmonella enterica is a serious food safety concern. One common transmission route that leads to cross contamination in meat plants is bacteria transfer from biofilms on contact surfaces to meat products via direct contact. Many factors could affect biofilm tra...

  7. Changes in homologous and heterologous gap junction contacts during maturation-inducing hormone-dependent meiotic resumption in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolamba, D.; Patino, R.; Yoshizaki, G.; Thomas, P.

    2003-01-01

    Homologous (granulosa cell-granulosa cell) gap junction (GJ) contacts increase in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) during the early (first) stage of maturation, but their profile during the second stage [i.e., during maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-mediated meiotic resumption] is unknown. The profile of homologous GJ contacts during the second stage of maturation in croaker follicles was examined in this study and compared to that of heterologous (granulosa cell-oocyte) GJ, for which changes have been previously documented. Follicles were incubated with human chorionic gonadotropin to induce maturational competence (first stage), and then with MIH to induce meiotic resumption. The follicles were collected for examination immediately before and after different durations of MIH exposure until the oocyte had reached the stage of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD; index of meiotic resumption). Ultrathin sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy, and homologous and heterologous GJ contacts were quantified along a 100-??m segment of granulosa cell-zona radiata complex per follicle (three follicles/time/fish, n=3 fish). Relatively high numbers of both types of GJ were observed before and after the first few hours of MIH exposure (up to the stage of oil droplet coalescence). GJ numbers declined during partial yolk globule coalescence (at or near GVBD) and were just under 50% of starting values after the completion of GVBD (Pobservations that GVBD temporally correlates with declining heterologous GJ contacts, and for the first time in teleosts show that there is a parallel decline in homologous GJ. The significance of the changes in homologous and heterologous GJ is uncertain and deserves further study. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  8. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) has never been shown to be localized to these specialized membrane structures. Using microscopical techniques, we here report that FXII binds to specific patches of the HUVEC plasma membrane with a high density of caveolae. Further investigations of FXII...... lipid rafts. Accordingly, cholesterol-depleted cells were found to bind significantly reduced amounts of FXII. These observations, combined with the presence of a minority of u-PAR in caveolae concomitant with FXII binding, indicate that FXII binding to u-PAR may be secondary and depends upon...... the structural elements within caveolae. Thus, FXII binding to HUVEC depends on intact caveolae on the cellular surface....

  9. Contact dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps and detergents , ...

  10. Sputtered CdTe thin film solar cells with Cu{sub 2}Te/Au back contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yongseob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Pilmudaero 309-1, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suho; Yi, Junsin; Choi, Byung-Duck [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoung [School of Electricity and Electronics, Ulsan College, Daehak-ro 57, Nam-gu, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    In this work, Cu{sub 2}Te/Au back contact for CdTe thin film solar cells were prepared by vacuum evaporation. Influence of annealing temperature on the structure and electrical properties of Cu{sub 2}Te films were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and Hall effect measurement. Also, CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells were fabricated by magnetron sputtering process, which is favorable for large area deposition and mass production, and the photovoltaic characteristics were studied. As the annealing temperature was increased, the crystal structure transformed from Cu{sub 2}Te for as-deposited film to Cu{sub 2−x}Te hexagonal phase, and the grains in the film became bigger. The electrical resistivity was slightly higher by the annealing. The cell efficiency was significantly improved by the heat treatment, and showed a maximum value of 9.14% at 180 °C. From these results, Cu{sub 2}Te/Au contact acts as the proper pseudo-ohmic contact onto CdTe film. However, further increase of annealing temperature caused the deterioration of cell performance. - Highlights: • Annealing effects of the vacuum evaporated Cu{sub 2}Te films were investigated. • The transformation from Cu{sub 2}Te to Cu{sub 2−x}Te hexagonal phase occurred by annealing. • The performance of the solar cell was highly increased by annealing at 180 °C. • Cu{sub 2}Te/Au contact acts as the proper pseudo-ohmic contact onto CdTe film.

  11. Silicon-Rich Silicon Carbide Hole-Selective Rear Contacts for Crystalline-Silicon-Based Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Josua; Wyss, Philippe; Jeangros, Quentin; Allebé, Christophe; Niquille, Xavier; Debrot, Fabien; Despeisse, Matthieu; Haug, Franz-Josef; Löper, Philipp; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-12-28

    The use of passivating contacts compatible with typical homojunction thermal processes is one of the most promising approaches to realizing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In this work, we investigate an alternative rear-passivating contact targeting facile implementation to industrial p-type solar cells. The contact structure consists of a chemically grown thin silicon oxide layer, which is capped with a boron-doped silicon-rich silicon carbide [SiCx(p)] layer and then annealed at 800-900 °C. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the thin chemical oxide layer disappears upon thermal annealing up to 900 °C, leading to degraded surface passivation. We interpret this in terms of a chemical reaction between carbon atoms in the SiCx(p) layer and the adjacent chemical oxide layer. To prevent this reaction, an intrinsic silicon interlayer was introduced between the chemical oxide and the SiCx(p) layer. We show that this intrinsic silicon interlayer is beneficial for surface passivation. Optimized passivation is obtained with a 10-nm-thick intrinsic silicon interlayer, yielding an emitter saturation current density of 17 fA cm(-2) on p-type wafers, which translates into an implied open-circuit voltage of 708 mV. The potential of the developed contact at the rear side is further investigated by realizing a proof-of-concept hybrid solar cell, featuring a heterojunction front-side contact made of intrinsic amorphous silicon and phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon. Even though the presented cells are limited by front-side reflection and front-side parasitic absorption, the obtained cell with a Voc of 694.7 mV, a FF of 79.1%, and an efficiency of 20.44% demonstrates the potential of the p(+)/p-wafer full-side-passivated rear-side scheme shown here.

  12. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  13. Differential effects of peptidoglycan recognition proteins on experimental atopic and contact dermatitis mediated by Treg and Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Yong; Gupta, Dipika; Kim, Chang H; Dziarski, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Skin protects the body from the environment and is an important component of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis are among the most frequent inflammatory skin diseases and are both determined by multigenic predisposition, environmental factors, and aberrant immune response. Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (Pglyrps) are expressed in the skin and we report here that they modulate sensitivity to experimentally-induced atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis. Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice (but not Pglyrp2(-/-) mice) develop more severe oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis than wild type (WT) mice. The common mechanism underlying this increased sensitivity of Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice to atopic dermatitis is reduced recruitment of Treg cells to the skin and enhanced production and activation Th17 cells in Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice, which results in more severe inflammation and keratinocyte proliferation. This mechanism is supported by decreased inflammation in Pglyrp3(-/-) mice following in vivo induction of Treg cells by vitamin D or after neutralization of IL-17. By contrast, Pglyrp1(-/-) mice develop less severe oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis and also oxazolone-induced contact dermatitis than WT mice. Thus, Pglyrp3 and Pglyrp4 limit over-activation of Th17 cells by promoting accumulation of Treg cells at the site of chronic inflammation, which protects the skin from exaggerated inflammatory response to cell activators and allergens, whereas Pglyrp1 has an opposite pro-inflammatory effect in the skin.

  14. Plasma-induced TCO texture of ZnO:Ga back contacts on silicon thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Kuang-Chieh; Houng, Mau-Phon [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, Dasyue Rd., East District, Tainan City 701 (China); Wang, Jen-Hung; Lu, Chun-hsiung; Tsai, Fu-Ji; Yeh, Chih-Hung [NexPower Technology Corporation, Taichung County 421 (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper considers texturing of ZnO:Ga (GZO) films used as back contacts in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film solar cells. GZO thin films are first prepared by conventional methods. The as-deposited GZO surface properties are modified so that their use as back contacts on a-Si solar cells is enhanced. Texturing is performed by simple dry plasma etching in a CVD process chamber,at power=100 W, substrate temperature=190 C (temperature is held at 190 C because thin film solar cells are damaged above 200 C), pressure=400 Pa and process gas H{sub 2} flow=700 sccm. Conventional a-Si solar cells are fabricated with and without GZO back contact surface treatment. Comparison of the with/without texturing GZO films shows that plasma etching increases optical scattering reflectance and reflection haze. SEM and TEM are used to evaluate the morphological treatment-induced changes in the films. Comparison of the a-Si solar cells with/without texturing shows that the plasma treatment increases both the short-circuit current density and fill factor. Consequently, a-Si solar cell efficiency is relatively improved by 4.6%. (author)

  15. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-12

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion-induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  16. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Kumagai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  17. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  18. Adhesion of alkane as a functional group on muscovite and quartz: dependence on pH and contact time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, K M S; Pedersen, C S; Bovet, N; Dalby, K N; Hassenkam, T; Andersson, M P; Okhrimenko, D; Stipp, S L S

    2014-12-09

    The interactions between mineral surfaces and organic molecules in water control many processes in nature and in the production of modern materials. To improve the understanding of fluid-surface interactions, we investigated the interface behavior of quartz and muscovite, a model for clay minerals, in aqueous solutions where the pH and composition were controlled. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to measure adhesion using tips functionalized with alkyl, -CH3. By combining adhesion forces measured as a function of pH, with data from streaming potential experiments and DLVO calculations, we were able to determine the surface charge density. We observed increased adhesion between the mineral surface and the hydrophobic tips as the contact time increased from 7 ms to ∼2 s. The diffusion of dissolved ions takes time, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations did not indicate a strong hydration of the mineral surfaces. Therefore, we interpret that the loss of ions from the confined space between the tip and sample is a likely explanation of the correlation between the dwell time and adhesion. The maximum adhesion increase with dwell time for muscovite, i.e., 400 ± 77 pN, was considerably larger than for quartz, 84 ± 15 pN, which fits with the different surface structure and composition of the two minerals. We propose two mechanisms to explain these results: (1) cations that are structured in the solution and on the surface remain associated at the tip-sample interface initially but diffuse away during extended contact time and (2) adventitious carbon, the organic material that comes spontaneously from air and solution, can diffuse to the tip-sample interface during contact. This material decreases the surface energy by aggregating near the alkyl tip and increases adhesion between the tip and sample.

  19. JAM-A and aPKC: A close pair during cell-cell contact maturation and tight junction formation in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnet, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion plays a critical role in the formation of barrier-forming epithelia. The molecules which mediate cell-cell adhesion frequently act as signaling molecules by recruiting and/or assembling cytoplasmic protein complexes. Junctional Adhesion Molecule (JAM)-A interacts with the cell polarity protein PAR-3, a member of the PAR-3-aPKC-PAR-6 complex, which regulates the formation of cell-cell contacts and the development of tight junctions (TJs). In our recent study we found that JAM-A is localized at primordial, spot-like cell-cell junctions (pAJs) in a non-phosphorylated form. After the recruitment of the PAR-aPKC complex and its activation at pAJs, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote the maturation of immature junctions. In polarized epithelial cells, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A selectively at the TJs to maintain the barrier function of TJs. Thus, through mutual regulation, JAM-A and aPKC form a functional unit that regulates the establishment of barrier-forming junctions in vertebrate epithelial cells.

  20. Coral contact dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson, Julie; Thompson, Curtis; Hinshaw, Molly; Rich, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    Corals can elicit both toxic and allergic reactions upon contact with the skin. Clinical presentations vary depending on whether the reaction is acute, delayed, or chronic. Literature concerning cutaneous reactions to corals and other Cnidarians is scarce. Herein we report a case of delayed contact hypersensitivity reaction to coral and review the clinical and histopathological features of coral contact dermatitis.

  1. Coral contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Julie; Thompson, Curtis; Hinshaw, Molly; Rich, Phoebe

    2015-04-16

    Corals can elicit both toxic and allergic reactions upon contact with the skin. Clinical presentations vary depending on whether the reaction is acute, delayed, or chronic. Literature concerning cutaneous reactions to corals and other Cnidarians is scarce. Herein we report a case of delayed contact hypersensitivity reaction to coral and review the clinical and histopathological features of coral contact dermatitis.

  2. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohaebuddin, Syed K; Thevenot, Paul T; Baker, David; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2010-08-21

    Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs]) with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 microm) to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT) bronchiolar epithelial cells. Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the target cell type are critical determinants of

  3. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  4. Creation of a completely helper cell-dependent recombinant morbillivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Jana; Baron, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We have created a completely helper cell-dependent morbillivirus by modifying the genome to remove the coding sequence of the phosphoprotein (P) and recovering the recombinant virus in a cell line constitutively expressing the P protein. The P protein-deleted virus (P−) grew very inefficiently unless both of the viral accessory proteins (V and C) were also expressed. Growth of the virus was restricted to the P-expressing cell line. The P− virus grew more slowly than the parental virus and exp...

  5. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  6. AM fungal exudates activate MAP kinases in plant cells in dependence from cytosolic Ca(2+) increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Doriana; Chiltz, Annick; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Pugin, Alain; Bonfante, Paola; Cardinale, Francesca

    2011-09-01

    The molecular dialogue occurring prior to direct contact between the fungal and plant partners of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses begins with the release of fungal elicitors, so far only partially identified chemically, which can activate specific signaling pathways in the host plant. We show here that the activation of MAPK is also induced by exudates of germinating spores of Gigaspora margarita in cultured cells of the non-leguminous species tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as well as in those of the model legume Lotus japonicus. MAPK activity peaked about 15 min after the exposure of the host cells to the fungal exudates (FE). FE were also responsible for a rapid and transient increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and tobacco cells, and pre-treatment with a Ca(2+)-channel blocker (La(3+)) showed that in these cells, MAPK activation was dependent on the cytosolic Ca(2+) increase. A partial dependence of MAPK activity on the common Sym pathway could be demonstrated for a cell line of L. japonicus defective for LjSym4 and hence unable to establish an AM symbiosis. Our results show that MAPK activation is triggered by an FE-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) transient, and that a Sym genetic determinant acts to modulate the intensity and duration of this activity.

  7. Application Of Artificial Neural Networks In Modeling Of Manufactured Front Metallization Contact Resistance For Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musztyfaga-Staszuk M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of artificial neural networks for prediction contact resistance of front metallization for silicon solar cells. The influence of the obtained front electrode features on electrical properties of solar cells was estimated. The front electrode of photovoltaic cells was deposited using screen printing (SP method and next to manufactured by two methods: convectional (1. co-fired in an infrared belt furnace and unconventional (2. Selective Laser Sintering. Resistance of front electrodes solar cells was investigated using Transmission Line Model (TLM. Artificial neural networks were obtained with the use of Statistica Neural Network by Statsoft. Created artificial neural networks makes possible the easy modelling of contact resistance of manufactured front metallization and allows the better selection of production parameters. The following technological recommendations for the screen printing connected with co-firing and selective laser sintering technology such as optimal paste composition, morphology of the silicon substrate, co-firing temperature and the power and scanning speed of the laser beam to manufacture the front electrode of silicon solar cells were experimentally selected in order to obtain uniformly melted structure well adhered to substrate, of a small front electrode substrate joint resistance value. The prediction possibility of contact resistance of manufactured front metallization is valuable for manufacturers and constructors. It allows preserving the customers’ quality requirements and bringing also measurable financial advantages.

  8. Development of low cost contacts to silicon solar cells. Final report, 15 October 1978-30 April 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, D.P.; Iles, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of work done on the development of a copper based contact system for silicon solar cells is presented. The work has proceeded in three phases: (1) Development of a copper based contact system using plated Pd-Cr-Cu. Good cells were made but cells degraded under low temperature (300/sup 0/C) heat treatments. (2) The degradation in Phase I was identified as copper migration into the cells junction region. A paper study was conducted to find a proper barrier to the copper migration problem. Nickel was identified as the best candidate barrier and this was verified in a heat treatment study using evaporated metal layers. (3) An electroless nickel solution was substituted for the electroless chrominum solution in the original process. Efforts were made to replace the palladium bath with an appropriate nickel layer, but these were unsuccessful. 150 cells using the Pd-Ni-Cu contact system were delivered to JPL. Also a cost study was made on the plating process to assess the chance of reaching 5 cents/watt.

  9. SIRT1-mediated downregulation of p27Kip1 is essential for overcoming contact inhibition of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meilan; Yuan, Hongfeng; Tan, Brandon; Bai, Rosemary; Kim, Heon Seok; Bae, Sangsu; Che, Lu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-11-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a malignancy commonly found in AIDS patients. Despite intensive studies in the last two decades, the mechanism of KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of SIRT1, a metabolic sensor, was upregulated in a variety of KSHV-infected cells. In a model of KSHV-induced cellular transformation, SIRT1 knockdown with shRNAs or knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar of KSHV-transformed cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and contact inhibition. SIRT1 knockdown or knockout induced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1). Consequently, p27 knockdown rescued the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 knockdown or knockout on cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of KSHV-transformed cells with a SIRT1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NAM), had the same effect as SIRT1 knockdown and knockout. NAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation in culture and colony formation in soft agar, and induced cell cycle arrest. Significantly, NAM inhibited the progression of tumors and extended the survival of mice in a KSHV-induced tumor model. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SIRT1 suppression of p27 is required for KSHV-induced tumorigenesis and identify a potential therapeutic target for KS.

  10. Semitransparent organic solar cells with organic wavelength dependent reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Debije, M.G.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Semitransparent organic solar cells employing solution-processable organic wavelength dependent reflectors of chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystals are demonstrated. The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflects only in a narrow band of the solar spectrum and remains transparent for the remai

  11. Semitransparent organic solar cells with organic wavelength dependent reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Debije, M.G.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Semitransparent organic solar cells employing solution-processable organic wavelength dependent reflectors of chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystals are demonstrated. The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflects only in a narrow band of the solar spectrum and remains transparent for the remai

  12. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  13. Cell contact as an independent factor modulating cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and survival in long-term primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W. A.; Decker, M. L.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Janes, D. M.; Decker, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes maintained in cell culture develop hypertrophy both in response to mechanical loading as well as to receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms. However, it has been shown that the hypertrophic response to these stimuli may be modulated through effects of intercellular contact achieved by maintaining cells at different plating densities. In this study, we show that the myocyte plating density affects not only the hypertrophic response and features of the differentiated phenotype of isolated adult myocytes, but also plays a significant role influencing myocyte survival in vitro. The native rod-shaped phenotype of freshly isolated adult myocytes persists in an environment which minimizes myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum. However, these conditions are not optimal for long-term maintenance of cultured adult cardiac myocytes. Conditions which promote myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum, on the other hand, also promote the re-establishment of new intercellular contacts between myocytes. These contacts appear to play a significant role in the development of spontaneous activity, which enhances the redevelopment of highly differentiated contractile, junctional, and sarcoplasmic reticulum structures in the cultured adult cardiomyocyte. Although it has previously been shown that adult cardiac myocytes are typically quiescent in culture, the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists stimulates beating and myocyte hypertrophy, and thereby serves to increase the level of intercellular contact as well. However, in densely-plated cultures with intrinsically high levels of intercellular contact, spontaneous contractile activity develops without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists. In this study, we compare the function, morphology, and natural history of adult feline cardiomyocytes which have been maintained in cultures with different levels of intercellular contact, with and without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists

  14. Are endothelial cell bioeffects from acoustic droplet vaporization proximity dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) produces gas microbubbles that provide a means of selective occlusion in gas embolotherapy. Vaporization and subsequent occlusion occur inside blood vessels supplying the targeted tissue, such as tumors. Theoretical and computational studies showed that ADV within a vessel can impart high fluid mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at an endothelial layer may affect cell attachment and viability. The current study is aimed at investigating the role of vaporization distance away from the endothelial layer. HUVECs were cultured in OptiCell™ chambers until reaching confluence. Dodecafluoropentane microdroplets were added, attaining a 10:1 droplet to cell ratio. A single ultrasound pulse (7.5 MHz) consisting of 16 cycles (~ 2 μs) and a 5 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to produce ADV while varying the vaporization distance from the endothelial layer (0 μm, 500 μm, 1000 μm). Results indicated that cell attachment and viability was significantly different if the distance was 0 μm (at the endothelial layer). Other distances were not significantly different from the control. ADV will significantly affect the endothelium if droplets are in direct contact with the cells. Droplet concentration and flow conditions inside blood vessels may play an important role. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  15. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  16. Density-dependent expression of keratins in transformed rat liver cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanovsky, S M; Bannikov, G A; Montesano, R; Vasiliev, J M

    1986-04-01

    Immunomorphological examination of the distribution of three keratins in cultured rat liver-derived epithelial cell lines of the IAR series was performed in order to find out the effects of neoplastic evolution on the expression of these epithelium-specific markers. Specific monoclonal antibodies were used to reveal various intermediate filament proteins: keratins with molecular masses of 55, 49 or 40 kD (K55, K49 or K40), and vimentin. The expression of keratins was negligible in sparse and dense cultures of non-transformed lines, which had typical epithelial morphology. The examined keratins were also absent in the sparse cultures of transformed lines, which have lost partially or completely the morphological features of epithelia. However, cells in dense cultures of most transformed lines contained numerous keratin filaments. It is suggested that the paradoxical increase of keratin expression after transformation is due to increased saturation density of transformed cultures; this high density favours the expression. As shown by the experiments with culture wounding, the effects of density are local and reversible. While K55 was present in all the cells of dense cultures, the expression of the other two keratins was dependent on the cell position within these cultures. It is suggested that the expression of the latter two keratins, besides high cell density, also requires the presence (K40) or the absence (K49) of cell-substratum contacts. Possible mechanisms of the effects of cell density on the expression of keratins are discussed.

  17. Contact lens in keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha M Rathi; Preeji S Mandathara; Srikanth Dumpati

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the En...

  18. Degradation mechanisms studies in CdS/CdTe solar cells with ZnTe:Cu/Au back contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D.; Tang, J.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T. R.; Trefny, J. U.

    1999-03-01

    CdS/CdTe/ZnTe:Cu/Au solar cells were fabricated and tested under stressed conditions including enhanced temperature, forward and reverse bias, open circuit, dark and light. Discussion of results was focused mostly on the development of the back contact Schottky diode (increase in series resistance). Changes in the cell parameters were detected based on the analysis of the dynamic resistance of a cell (dV/dJ) at forward biases. A possible role of electromigration of the Cu dopant was discussed.

  19. Degradation mechanisms studies in CdS/CdTe solar cells with ZnTe:Cu/Au back contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.; Tang, J.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.R.; Trefny, J.U. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    CdS/CdTe/ZnTe:Cu/Au solar cells were fabricated and tested under stressed conditions including enhanced temperature, forward and reverse bias, open circuit, dark and light. Discussion of results was focused mostly on the development of the back contact Schottky diode (increase in series resistance). Changes in the cell parameters were detected based on the analysis of the dynamic resistance of a cell (dV/dJ) at forward biases. A possible role of electromigration of the Cu dopant was discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Regulatory network modelling of iron acquisition by a fungal pathogen in contact with epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthke Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks can be used to predict regulatory interactions of an organism faced with environmental changes, but can prove problematic, especially when focusing on complicated multi-factorial processes. Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen. During the infection process, this fungus is able to adapt to conditions of very low iron availability. Such adaptation is an important virulence attribute of virtually all pathogenic microbes. Understanding the regulation of iron acquisition genes will extend our knowledge of the complex regulatory changes during the infection process and might identify new potential drug targets. Thus, there is a need for efficient modelling approaches predicting key regulatory events of iron acquisition genes during the infection process. Results This study deals with the regulation of C. albicans iron uptake genes during adhesion to and invasion into human oral epithelial cells. A reverse engineering strategy is presented, which is able to infer regulatory networks on the basis of gene expression data, making use of relevant selection criteria such as sparseness and robustness. An exhaustive use of available knowledge from different data sources improved the network prediction. The predicted regulatory network proposes a number of new target genes for the transcriptional regulators Rim101, Hap3, Sef1 and Tup1. Furthermore, the molecular mode of action for Tup1 is clarified. Finally, regulatory interactions between the transcription factors themselves are proposed. This study presents a model describing how C. albicans may regulate iron acquisition during contact with and invasion of human oral epithelial cells. There is evidence that some of the proposed regulatory interactions might also occur during oral infection. Conclusions This study focuses on a typical problem in Systems Biology where an interesting biological phenomenon is studied using a small

  1. An Isotope Study of Hydrogenation of poly-Si/SiOx Passivated Contacts for Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Manuel; Nemeth, William; van de Loo, Bas, W.H.; Macco, Bart; Kessels, Wilhelmus, M.M.; Stradins, Paul; Young, David, L.

    2017-06-26

    For many years, the record Si solar cell efficiency stood at 25.0%. Only recently have several companies and institutes managed to produce more efficient cells, using passivated contacts of made doped poly-Si or a-Si:H and a passivating intrinsic interlayer in all cases. Common to these designs is the need to passivate the layer stack with hydrogen. In this contribution, we perform a systematic study of passivated contact passivation by hydrogen, using poly-Si/SiOx passivated contacts on n-Cz-Si, and ALD Al2O3 followed by a forming gas anneal (FGA) as the hydrogen source. We study p-type and n-type passivated contacts with implied Voc exceeding 690 and 720 mV, respectively, and perform either the ALD step or the FGA with deuterium instead of hydrogen in order to separate the two processes via SIMS. By examining the deuterium concentration at the SiOx in both types of samples, we demonstrate that the FGA supplies negligible hydrogen species to the SiOx, regardless of whether the FGA is hydrogenated or deuterated. Instead, it supplies the thermal energy needed for hydrogen species in the Al2O3 to diffuse there. Furthermore, the concentration of hydrogen species at the SiOx can saturate while implied Voc continues to increase, showing that the energy from the FGA is also required for hydrogen species already at the SiOx to find recombination-active defects to passivate.

  2. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadik, T., E-mail: taavi.raadik@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J.; Josepson, R.; Hiie, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Potlog, T.; Spalatu, N. [Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were E{sub g} = 1.499 eV and E{sub g} = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe{sub 1−x}S{sub x} solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe{sub 1−} {sub x}S{sub x} solid solution layer in the junction area.

  3. Prospects of novel front and back contacts for high efficiency cadmium telluride thin film solar cells from numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, M.A. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (CUET), Chittagong (Bangladesh); Mannir Aliyu, M.; Quadery, Abrar H. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Nowshad [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials (CEREM), College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-09-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film solar cell has long been recognized as a leading photovoltaic candidate for its high efficiency and low cost. A numerical simulation has been performed using AMPS-1D simulator to explore the possibility of higher efficiency and stable CdS/CdTe cell among several cell structures with indium tin oxide (ITO) and cadmium stannate (Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as front contact material, tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}), zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc stannate (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as buffer layer, and silver (Ag) or antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with molybdenum (Mo) or zinc telluride (ZnTe) with aluminium (Al) as back contact material. The cell structure ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}/CdTe/Ag has shown the best conversion efficiency of 16.9% (Voc=0.9 V, Jsc=26.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF=0.783). This analysis has shown that ITO as front contact material, ZnO as buffer layer and ZnTe or Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back surface reflector (BSR) are suitable material system for high efficiency (>15%) and stable CdS/CdTe cells. The cell normalized efficiency linearly decreased at a temperature gradient of -0.25%/ C for ZnTe based cells, and at -0.40%/ C for other cells. (author)

  4. Universal Features of Electron Dynamics in Solar Cells with TiO2 Contact: From Dye Solar Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todinova, Anna; Idígoras, Jesús; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Anta, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    The electron dynamics of solar cells with mesoporous TiO2 contact is studied by electrochemical small-perturbation techniques. The study involved dye solar cells (DSC), solid-state perovskite solar cells (SSPSC), and devices where the perovskite acts as sensitizer in a liquid-junction device. Using a transport-recombination continuity equation we found that mid-frequency time constants are proper lifetimes that determine the current-voltage curve. This is not the case for the SSPSC, where a lifetime of ∼1 μs, 1 order of magnitude longer, is required to reproduce the current-voltage curve. This mismatch is attributed to the dielectric response on the mid-frequency component. Correcting for this effect, lifetimes lie on a common exponential trend with respect to open-circuit voltage. Electron transport times share a common trend line too. This universal behavior of lifetimes and transport times suggests that the main difference between the cells is the power to populate the mesoporous TiO2 contact with electrons.

  5. RAS-RAF-MEK-dependent oxidative cell death involving voltage-dependent anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoda, Nicholas; von Rechenberg, Moritz; Zaganjor, Elma; Bauer, Andras J; Yang, Wan Seok; Fridman, Daniel J; Wolpaw, Adam J; Smukste, Inese; Peltier, John M; Boniface, J Jay; Smith, Richard; Lessnick, Stephen L; Sahasrabudhe, Sudhir; Stockwell, Brent R

    2007-06-14

    Therapeutics that discriminate between the genetic makeup of normal cells and tumour cells are valuable for treating and understanding cancer. Small molecules with oncogene-selective lethality may reveal novel functions of oncoproteins and enable the creation of more selective drugs. Here we describe the mechanism of action of the selective anti-tumour agent erastin, involving the RAS-RAF-MEK signalling pathway functioning in cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Erastin exhibits greater lethality in human tumour cells harbouring mutations in the oncogenes HRAS, KRAS or BRAF. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we discovered that erastin acts through mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs)--a novel target for anti-cancer drugs. We show that erastin treatment of cells harbouring oncogenic RAS causes the appearance of oxidative species and subsequent death through an oxidative, non-apoptotic mechanism. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of VDAC2 or VDAC3 caused resistance to erastin, implicating these two VDAC isoforms in the mechanism of action of erastin. Moreover, using purified mitochondria expressing a single VDAC isoform, we found that erastin alters the permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Finally, using a radiolabelled analogue and a filter-binding assay, we show that erastin binds directly to VDAC2. These results demonstrate that ligands to VDAC proteins can induce non-apoptotic cell death selectively in some tumour cells harbouring activating mutations in the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway.

  6. Granule-Dependent Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity to Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbomo, Henry; Mody, Christopher H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill or inhibit the growth of a number of fungi including Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, and Paracoccidioides. Although many fungi are not dangerous, invasive fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, cause life-threatening disease in individuals with impaired cell-mediated immunity. While there are similarities to cell-mediated killing of tumor cells, there are also important differences. Similar to tumor killing, NK cells directly kill fungi in a receptor-mediated and cytotoxic granule-dependent manner. Unlike tumor cell killing where multiple NK cell-activating receptors cooperate and signal events that mediate cytotoxicity, only the NKp30 receptor has been described to mediate signaling events that trigger the NK cell to mobilize its cytolytic payload to the site of interaction with C. neoformans and Candida albicans, subsequently leading to granule exocytosis and fungal killing. More recently, the NKp46 receptor was reported to bind Candida glabrata adhesins Epa1, 6, and 7 and directly mediate fungal clearance. A number of unanswered questions remain. For example, is only one NK cell-activating receptor sufficient for signaling leading to fungal killing? Are the signaling pathways activated by fungi similar to those activated by tumor cells during NK cell killing? How do the cytolytic granules traffic to the site of interaction with fungi, and how does this process compare with tumor killing? Recent insights into receptor use, intracellular signaling and cytolytic granule trafficking during NK cell-mediated fungal killing will be compared to tumor killing, and the implications for therapeutic approaches will be discussed. PMID:28123389

  7. Influence of Electrode Design and Contacting Layers on Performance of Electrolyte Supported SOFC/SOEC Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihails Kusnezoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The solid oxide cell is a basis for highly efficient and reversible electrochemical energy conversion. A single cell based on a planar electrolyte substrate as support (ESC is often utilized for SOFC/SOEC stack manufacturing and fulfills necessary requirements for application in small, medium and large scale fuel cell and electrolysis systems. Thickness of the electrolyte substrate, and its ionic conductivity limits the power density of the ESC. To improve the performance of this cell type in SOFC/SOEC mode, alternative fuel electrodes, on the basis of Ni/CGO as well as electrolytes with reduced thickness, have been applied. Furthermore, different interlayers on the air side have been tested to avoid the electrode delamination and to reduce the cell degradation in electrolysis mode. Finally, the influence of the contacting layer on cell performance, especially for cells with an ultrathin electrolyte and thin electrode layers, has been investigated. It has been found that Ni/CGO outperform traditional Ni/8YSZ electrodes and the introduction of a ScSZ interlayer substantially reduces the degradation rate of ESC in electrolysis mode. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that, for thin electrodes, the application of contacting layers with good conductivity and adhesion to current collectors improves performance significantly.

  8. Crizotinib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingnan; He, Kan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Oncogenic alterations in MET or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified in a variety of human cancers. Crizotinib (PF02341066) is a dual MET and ALK inhibitor and approved for the treatment of a subset of non-small cell lung carcinoma and in clinical development for other malignancies. Crizotinib can induce apoptosis in cancer cells, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we found that crizotinib induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through the BH3-only protein PUMA. In cells with wild-type p53, crizotinib induces rapid induction of PUMA and Bim accompanied by p53 stabilization and DNA damage response. The induction of PUMA and Bim is mediated largely by p53, and deficiency in PUMA or p53, but not Bim, blocks crizotinib-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, MET knockdown led to selective induction of PUMA, but not Bim or p53. Crizotinib also induced PUMA-dependent apoptosis in p53-deficient colon cancer cells and synergized with gefitinib or sorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and therapeutic responses to crizotinib in xenograft models. These results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating apoptotic responses of colon cancer cells to crizotinib and suggest that mechanisms of oncogenic addiction to MET/ALK-mediated survival may be cell type-specific. These findings have important implications for future clinical development of crizotinib.

  9. A multiwell platform for studying stiffness-dependent cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Mih

    Full Text Available Adherent cells are typically cultured on rigid substrates that are orders of magnitude stiffer than their tissue of origin. Here, we describe a method to rapidly fabricate 96 and 384 well platforms for routine screening of cells in tissue-relevant stiffness contexts. Briefly, polyacrylamide (PA hydrogels are cast in glass-bottom plates, functionalized with collagen, and sterilized for cell culture. The Young's modulus of each substrate can be specified from 0.3 to 55 kPa, with collagen surface density held constant over the stiffness range. Using automated fluorescence microscopy, we captured the morphological variations of 7 cell types cultured across a physiological range of stiffness within a 384 well plate. We performed assays of cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis in 96 wells and resolved distinct profiles of cell growth as a function of stiffness among primary and immortalized cell lines. We found that the stiffness-dependent growth of normal human lung fibroblasts is largely invariant with collagen density, and that differences in their accumulation are amplified by increasing serum concentration. Further, we performed a screen of 18 bioactive small molecules and identified compounds with enhanced or reduced effects on soft versus rigid substrates, including blebbistatin, which abolished the suppression of lung fibroblast growth at 1 kPa. The ability to deploy PA gels in multiwell plates for high throughput analysis of cells in tissue-relevant environments opens new opportunities for the discovery of cellular responses that operate in specific stiffness regimes.

  10. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2015-09-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation.

  11. Low temperature back-surface-field contacts deposited by hot-wire CVD for heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Villar, F.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [CeRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Roca-i-Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-30

    The growing interest in using thinner wafers (< 200 {mu}m) requires the development of low temperature passivation strategies for the back contact of heterojunction solar cells. In this work, we investigate low temperature deposited back contacts based on boron-doped amorphous silicon films obtained by Hot-Wire CVD. The influence of the deposition parameters and the use of an intrinsic buffer layer have been considered. The microstructure of the deposited thin films has been comprehensively studied by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the UV-visible range. The effective recombination velocity at the back surface has been measured by the Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance technique. Complete double-side heterojunction solar cells (1 cm{sup 2}) have been fabricated and characterized by External Quantum Efficiency and current-voltage measurements. Total-area conversion efficiencies up to 14.5% were achieved in a fully low temperature process (< 200 deg. C)

  12. Evaluation of back contact in spray deposited SnS thin film solar cells by impedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Ray, Abhijit

    2014-07-09

    The role of back metal (M) contact in sprayed SnS thin film solar cells with a configuration Glass/F:SnO2/In2S3/SnS/M (M = Graphite, Cu, Mo, and Ni) was analyzed and discussed in the present study. Impedance spectroscopy was employed by incorporating constant phase elements (CPE) in the equivalent circuit to investigate the degree of inhomogeneity associated with the heterojunction and M/SnS interfaces. A best fit to Nyquist plot revealed a CPE exponent close to unity for thermally evaporated Cu, making it an ideal back contact. The Bode phase plot also exhibited a higher degree of disorders associated with other M/SnS interfaces. The evaluation scheme is useful for other emerging solar cells developed from low cost processing schemes like spray deposition, spin coating, slurry casting, electrodeposition, etc.

  13. Novel CD47: SIRPα dependent mechanism for the activation of STAT3 in antigen-presenting cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natan Toledano

    Full Text Available Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This "don't eat me" signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasmic ITIM motifs and the recruitment of the phosphatase, SHP-1. We previously revealed a novel mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 pathway and the regulation of human APC maturation and function that is based on cell:cell interaction. In this study, we present evidence supporting the notion that CD47:SIRPα serves as a cell surface receptor: ligand pair involved in this contact-dependent STAT3 activation and regulation of APC maturation. We show that upon co-culturing APC with various primary and tumor cell lines STAT3 phosphorylation and IL-10 expression are induced, and such regulation could be suppressed by specific CD47 siRNAs and shRNAs. Significantly, >50% reduction in CD47 expression abolished the contact-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical association between SIRPα and STAT3. Thus, we suggest that in addition to signaling through the ITIM-SHP-1 complex that transmit an anti-phagocytotic, CD47:SIRPα also triggers STAT3 signaling that is linked to an immature APC phenotype and peripheral tolerance under steady state and pathological conditions.

  14. The enhancement of neuronal cells wound healing with non-contact electric field stimulation by graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Lee, Si Young; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2013-05-01

    Electrical stimulation affects cellular behaviors including division, migration and wound healing [1-3]. Cellular injury often occurs due to the imbalance of the endogenous electric field [3]. In order to recover from the injury, wound healing process requires various cellular changes such as regeneration, migration, and the enhancement of cytoskeletal proteins and growth factors. In previous reports, a weak non-contact electric field stimulation (nEFS) accelerates the cell migration as well as cell-to-cell coupling between neuronal cell junction which are accompanied by increasing of cytoskeletal proteins [4, 5]. In this paper, we further investigated the wound healing effect of the nEFS in the neuronal cells (SHSY5Y cells) with live cell optical imaging. Cells were cultured over the optically transparent graphenen EF stimulator. Cellular behavioral changes upon nEFS were recorded with live optical imaging during stimulation of 120 minutes. The ability of wound healing was significantly enhanced with the nEFS. In particular, nEFS significantly shorten the duration of wound healing process. Moreover, after treating cells with cytochalasin D, a block polymerization of the actin filaments, the nEFS significantly enhanced wound healing process of cytochalasin D treated neural cells as compared to the control neural cells. This study suggests that nEFS may provide an effective way to control neural cells repairing process from cellular injury. Further mechanism study about the effect of nEFS on the wound healing may shed new light on cellular behavior.

  15. SGLT1-mediated transport in Caco-2 cells is highly dependent on cell bank origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, B; Pedersen, Maria; Laghmoch, A M

    2017-01-01

    The Caco-2 cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, for substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression and limited knowledge about...... permeability (PSGLT1). Here, the objective was to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, α-MDG, in Caco-2 cells was shown to be highly dependent on cell bank origin. The most robust and reliable...

  16. Tungsten effects on phosphate-dependent biochemical pathways are species and liver cell line dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David R; Ang, Chooyaw; Bednar, Anthony J; Inouye, Laura S

    2010-08-01

    Tungsten, in the form of tungstate, polymerizes with phosphate, and as extensive polymerization occurs, cellular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions may be disrupted, resulting in negative effects on cellular functions. A series of studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of tungsten on several phosphate-dependent intracellular functions, including energy cycling (ATP), regulation of enzyme activity (cytosolic protein tyrosine kinase [cytPTK] and tyrosine phosphatase), and intracellular secondary messengers (cyclic adenosine monophosphate [cAMP]). Rat noncancerous hepatocyte (Clone-9), rat cancerous hepatocyte (H4IIE), and human cancerous hepatocyte (HepG2) cells were exposed to 1-1000 mg/l tungsten (in the form of sodium tungstate) for 24 h, lysed, and analyzed for the above biochemical parameters. Cellular ATP levels were not significantly affected in any cell line. After 4 h, tungsten significantly decreased cytPTK activity in Clone-9 cells at >or= 18 mg/l, had no effect in H4IIE cells, and significantly increased cytPTK activity by 70% in HepG2 cells at >or= 2 mg/l. CytPTK displayed a slight hormetic response to tungsten after 24-h exposure yet returned to normal after 48-h exposure. Tungsten significantly increased cAMP by over 60% in Clone-9 cells at >or= 100 mg/l, significantly increased cAMP in H4IIE cells at only 100 mg/l, and significantly increased cAMP in HepG2 cells between 1-100 mg/l but at much more modest levels (8-20%). In conclusion, these data indicate that tungsten produces complex results that must be carefully interpreted in the context of their respective animal models, as well as the phenotype of the cell lines (i.e., normal vs. cancerous).

  17. The effects of cell compressibility, motility and contact inhibition on the growth of tumor cell clusters using the Cellular Potts Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jonathan F; Lowengrub, John

    2014-02-21

    There are numerous biological examples where genes associated with migratory ability of cells also confer the cells with an increased fitness even though these genes may not have any known effect on the cell mitosis rates. Here, we provide insight into these observations by analyzing the effects of cell migration, compression, and contact inhibition on the growth of tumor cell clusters using the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) in a monolayer geometry. This is a follow-up of a previous study (Thalhauser et al. 2010) in which a Moran-type model was used to study the interaction of cell proliferation, migratory potential and death on the emergence of invasive phenotypes. Here, we extend the study to include the effects of cell size and shape. In particular, we investigate the interplay between cell motility and compressibility within the CPM and find that the CPM predicts that increased cell motility leads to smaller cells. This is an artifact in the CPM. An analysis of the CPM reveals an explicit inverse-relationship between the cell stiffness and motility parameters. We use this relationship to compensate for motility-induced changes in cell size in the CPM so that in the corrected CPM, cell size is independent of the cell motility. We find that subject to comparable levels of compression, clusters of motile cells grow faster than clusters of less motile cells, in qualitative agreement with biological observations and our previous study. Increasing compression tends to reduce growth rates. Contact inhibition penalizes clumped cells by halting their growth and gives motile cells an even greater advantage. Finally, our model predicts cell size distributions that are consistent with those observed in clusters of neuroblastoma cells cultured in low and high density conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Mo Back-Contact Oxidation on Properties of CIGSe(2) Thin Film Solar Cells on Glass Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Rissom, T.; Kaufmann, C.A.; Caballero, R.; J. Schniebs; H. W. Schock; Michael Wiedenbeck

    2012-01-01

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGSe) solar cells grown on glass substrates have reached an efficiency of 20.3%. Their industrial production is becoming increasingly relevant. While various deposition techniques for the fabrication of the absorber are used by different groups and corporations, molybdenum (Mo) has become the back contact material of choice. Oxidation of the bare Mo layer prior to absorber deposition is a phenomenon that is generally hard to control or to avoid. Since the in...

  19. Photo-assisted electrodeposition of polypyrrole back contact to CdS/CdTe solar cell structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarkov, A., E-mail: aleksjarkov@gmail.com [Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Bereznev, S.; Volobujeva, O. [Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Traksmaa, R. [Tallinn University of Technology, Materials Research Center, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Tverjanovich, A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, 198503 Saint-Petersburg, Staryj Petergof, Ulyanovskaya 5 (Russian Federation); Öpik, A.; Mellikov, E. [Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2013-05-01

    Glass/indium tin oxide/CdS/CdTe photovoltaic structures were prepared using the high vacuum evaporation method, followed by a typical activation procedure, which involves annealing of the structures at 415–430 °C in the presence of CdCl{sub 2} in air. The main purpose of this work was to prepare and evaluate the performance of complete CdS/CdTe solar cell structures with polypyrrole (PPy) back contact and compare it to the structures with standard, copper containing back contact. Back contact layers of PPy doped with ß-naphthalene sulfonate were deposited onto activated CdTe layers by photo-assisted electrodeposition technique in a three-electrode electrochemical cell. It was found that intensive white light illumination from a xenon lamp facilitates PPy deposition at a lower applied potential range and improves quality of obtained polymer films. Applied technique gives the possibility to deposit the PPy layer strictly onto illuminated photoactive CdTe surface eliminating possible short-circuiting through pinholes and cracks in CdTe photoabsorber layer. Furthermore, relatively low deposition potential values give the possibility to reduce electrochemical degradation of CdS/CdTe photovoltaic structure in an electrochemical cell. - Highlights: ► Polypyrrole (PPy) conductive polymer back contact (BC) to CdTe semiconductor. ► Hybrid organic/inorganic photovoltaic structures. ► PPy layer to CdTe by photo-assisted electrodeposition technique ► Comparable efficiency of cells with PPy and conventional inorganic Cu{sub x}Te BC.

  20. Ultrastructural studies of allergic contact dermatitis in man. Infiltrating cells at the earliest phase of spongiotic bulla formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, J; Oguchi, M; Aoshima, T; Ofuji, S

    1980-01-01

    The kind and fine structure of mononuclear cells appearing in the epidermis at about 6 h of allergic contact dermatitis were examined by electron microscopy. They were monocytes and lymphocytes, the number being about equal. The ultrastructure of monocytes was that described for normal ones in blood, and apparently actively moving, streching the intercellular connections of the keratinocytes. Lymphocytes displayed a round or oval nucleus with some electron-dense cytoplasm which contained ribosomes and polysomes but only occasional mitochondria and Golgi complexes.

  1. Protein kinase c-β-dependent activation of NF-κB in stromal cells is indispensable for the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzny, Gloria; Kocher, Thomas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rudelius, Martina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Finch, Andrew J; Dürig, Jan; Wagner, Michaela; Haferlach, Claudia; Kohlmann, Alexander; Schnittger, Susanne; Seifert, Marc; Wanninger, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Oostendorp, Robert; Ruland, Jürgen; Leitges, Michael; Kuhnt, Toni; Schäfer, Yvonne; Lampl, Benedikt; Peschel, Christian; Egle, Alexander; Ringshausen, Ingo

    2013-01-14

    Tumor cell survival critically depends on heterotypic communication with benign cells in the microenvironment. Here, we describe a survival signaling pathway activated in stromal cells by contact to B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The expression of protein kinase C (PKC)-βII and the subsequent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells are prerequisites to support the survival of malignant B cells. PKC-β knockout mice are insusceptible to CLL transplantations, underscoring the in vivo significance of the PKC-βII-NF-κB signaling pathway in the tumor microenvironment. Upregulated stromal PKC-βII in biopsies from patients with CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and mantle cell lymphoma suggests that this pathway may commonly be activated in a variety of hematological malignancies.

  2. Characterization of laser doped silicon and overcoming adhesion challenges of solar cells with nickel-copper plated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The combination of localized laser patterning and metal plating allows to replace conventional silver screen printing with nickel-copper plating to form inexpensive front contacts for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this work, a focus is put on effects that could cause inhomogeneous metal deposition and low metal contact adhesion. A descriptive model of the silicon nitride ablation mechanism is derived from SEM imaging and a precise recombination analysis using QSSPC measurements. Surface sensitive XPS measurements are conducted to prove the existence of a parasitic surface layer, identified as SiO{sub x}N{sub y}. The dense SiO{sub x}N{sub y} layer is an effective diffusion barrier, hindering the formation of a nickel silicide interlayer. After removal of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} layer, cells show severe degradation caused by metal-induced shunting. These shunts are imaged using reverse biased electroluminescence imaging. A shunting mechanism is proposed and experimentally verified. New laser process sequences are devised and proven to produce cells with adhering Ni-Cu contacts. Conclusively the developed processes are assessed based on their industrial feasibility as well as on their efficiency potential.

  3. Performance of Graphite Pastes Doped with Various Materials as Back Contact for CdS/CdTe Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, Akira; Aramoto, Tetsuya; Morita, Akikatsu

    2001-12-01

    To date the problem of developing a suitable back contact for CdS/CdTe solar cells has yet to be resolved. The Cu-doped graphite paste that is widely used as a back contact is associated with degradation problems due to possible Cu diffusion across the CdS/CdTe junction. This study was designed to find ways to improve the graphite paste for superior electrical contacts. Mixtures of graphite paste with various material constituents and dopants consisting of silver-, lead-, nickel-, antimony-, bismuth-, or phosphor-based compounds, were studied. Results show that the performances of solar cells fabricated from these graphite pastes vary with the change in the composition. In the cases of Ag2Te and Ni2P, we studied their relationship with the solar cell characteristics with regard to dopant quantity, and furthermore in the case of Ag2Te, with regard to the sintering temperature of the graphite electrode. A fill factor (F.F.) of over 0.65 and efficiencies over 13% were obtained with Ag2Te, Ag3PO4, Ag2MoO4, and NiTe, and efficiencies over 12% were obtained with AgF, AgCl, Ni2P, and Ni3P.

  4. aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote cell contact maturation and tight junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Sandra; Misselwitz, Steve; Peddibhotla, Swetha S D; Tuncay, Hüseyin; Rehder, Daniela; Gerke, Volker; Robenek, Horst; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ebnet, Klaus

    2012-03-05

    The PAR-3-atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)-PAR-6 complex has been implicated in the development of apicobasal polarity and the formation of tight junctions (TJs) in vertebrate epithelial cells. It is recruited by junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to primordial junctions where aPKC is activated by Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases. In this paper, we show that aPKC can interact directly with JAM-A in a PAR-3-independent manner. Upon recruitment to primordial junctions, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to promote the maturation of immature cell-cell contacts. In fully polarized cells, S285-phosphorylated JAM-A is localized exclusively at the TJs, and S285 phosphorylation of JAM-A is required for the development of a functional epithelial barrier. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates JAM-A at S285, suggesting that it antagonizes the activity of aPKC. Expression of nonphosphorylatable JAM-A/S285A interferes with single lumen specification during cyst development in three-dimensional culture. Our data suggest that aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to regulate cell-cell contact maturation, TJ formation, and single lumen specification.