WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell commercialization roadmap

  1. Roadmap Toward a Predictive Performance-based Commercial Energy Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.

    2014-10-01

    Energy codes have provided significant increases in building efficiency over the last 38 years, since the first national energy model code was published in late 1975. The most commonly used path in energy codes, the prescriptive path, appears to be reaching a point of diminishing returns. The current focus on prescriptive codes has limitations including significant variation in actual energy performance depending on which prescriptive options are chosen, a lack of flexibility for designers and developers, and the inability to handle control optimization that is specific to building type and use. This paper provides a high level review of different options for energy codes, including prescriptive, prescriptive packages, EUI Target, outcome-based, and predictive performance approaches. This paper also explores a next generation commercial energy code approach that places a greater emphasis on performance-based criteria. A vision is outlined to serve as a roadmap for future commercial code development. That vision is based on code development being led by a specific approach to predictive energy performance combined with building specific prescriptive packages that are designed to be both cost-effective and to achieve a desired level of performance. Compliance with this new approach can be achieved by either meeting the performance target as demonstrated by whole building energy modeling, or by choosing one of the prescriptive packages.

  2. Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Cell Technical Team promotes the development of a fuel cell power system for an automotive powertrain that meets the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) goals.

  3. Roadmap for the Future of Commercial Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.

    2015-01-26

    Building energy codes have significantly increased building efficiency over the last 38 years, since the first national energy code was published in 1975. The most commonly used path in energy codes, the prescriptive path, appears to be reaching a point of diminishing returns. The current focus on prescriptive codes has limitations including significant variation in actual energy performance depending on which prescriptive options are chosen, a lack of flexibility for designers and developers, the inability to handle optimization that is specific to building type and use, the inability to account for project-specific energy costs, and the lack of follow-through or accountability after a certificate of occupancy is granted. It is likely that an approach that considers the building as an integrated system will be necessary to achieve the next real gains in building efficiency. This report provides a high-level review of different formats for commercial building energy codes, including prescriptive, prescriptive packages, capacity constrained, outcome based, and predictive performance approaches. This report also explores a next generation commercial energy code approach that places a greater emphasis on performance-based criteria. For commercial building energy codes to continue to progress as they have over the last 40 years, the next generation of building codes will need to provide a path that is led by energy performance, ensuring a measurable trajectory toward net zero energy buildings. This report outlines a vision to serve as a roadmap for future commercial code development. That vision is based on code development being led by a specific approach to predictive energy performance combined with building-specific prescriptive packages that are designed both to be cost-effective and to achieve a desired level of performance. Compliance with this new approach can be achieved by either meeting the performance target, as demonstrated by whole building energy

  4. Hydrogen energy and fuel cells. Strategic Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 2010, the ADEME (The French Environment and Energy Management Agency) has been managing four programmes within the scope of 'Future Investments'. Groups of experts from research from various industrial fields, research organisms and research programming and financing agencies are responsible, within the scope of collective works, for producing strategic road-maps. These are used to launch Calls for Expressions of Interest (CEI). The purpose of these road-maps is to: - highlight the industrial, technological, environmental and societal issues; - draw up coherent, shared visions of technologies and the socio-technical system in question; - identify the technological, organisational and socio-economic locks to be overcome; - associate time-based objectives with the priority research topics in terms of technological availability and deployment; - prioritise needs of the industrial research, research demonstrator, pre-industrial experimentation and technology test platform, which then act as a basis for: - drawing up CEIs; - programming research within the ADEME and other institutions such as the French National Research Agency (ANR), the French national strategic committee for energy research (Comite strategique national sur la recherche energie) or the French national alliance for the coordination of energy research (ANCRE). These research and experimentation priorities originate from the junction of the visions and locks, and they also take into account French capacities in the fields of research and industry. Road-maps can also refer to exemplary experiments conducted abroad and make recommendations in terms of industrial policy. This road-map shall be regularly updated. In order to draw up this road-map, the ADEME consulted with a group of experts from major private contractors, a contaminated wasteland developer, stakeholders involved in pollution control and public research and finally the ADEME

  5. planSOEC. R and D and commercialization roadmap for SOEC electrolysis. R and D of SOEC stacks with improved durability. Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, A.; Friis Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik [Topsoe Fuel Cells A/S, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mogensen, M.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Ming Chen [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Div., DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Sloth, M. [H2 Logic A/S, Herning (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    The project has been divided into two parts: PART 1: Formulation of a R and D and commercialization roadmap for SOEC electrolysis. PART 2: Conducting R and D of SOEC stacks with improved durability. The purpose of Part 1 has been to develop a R and D and commercialisation roadmap for hydrogen and CO production plants based on the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) technology. SOEC technology is still on an early R and D stage but years of extensive R and D within SOFC technology provides a strong platform for an accelerated commercialisation. However, in order to guide the future SOEC R and D activities towards reaching commercial market requirements a detailed roadmap is necessary. An overall strategy for R and D of various electrolysis technologies in Denmark already exists{sup 2}, formulated in the Hydrogen Production working group in the Danish Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Partnership. The SOEC roadmap developed as part of the planSOEC project supplements the overall strategy, by conducting an updated analysis of state-of-the-art. Also planSOEC provides a detailed analysis of requirements for different market applications for SOEC, which enables formulation of precise and detailed R and D targets. The objectives of Part 2 in this project were multiple: 1) To investigate durability of solid oxide cells (SOCs) and stack components under industrially relevant (''harsh'') electrolysis operating conditions; 2) to investigate performance of standard TOFC (Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S) SOC stacks (based on state-of-the-art solid oxide cells) under mild electrolysis operating conditions ({<=}0.75 A/cm{sup 2}); 3) to further develop SOEC stack computer models available at Riso DTU and TOFC. Accordingly four lines of work were carried out in the here reported project: 1) Investigation of corrosion resistance of interconnect alloys. 2) Cell and stack element testing. 3) SOEC stack testing. 4) SOEC stack modeling. (LN)

  6. Non-Hardware ("Soft") Cost-Reduction Roadmap for Residential and Small Commercial Solar Photovoltaics, 2013-2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, K.; Seif, D.; Margolis, R.; Morris, J.; Davidson, C.; Truitt, S.; Torbert, R.

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this analysis is to roadmap the cost reductions and innovations necessary to achieve the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative's total soft-cost targets by 2020. The roadmap focuses on advances in four soft-cost areas: (1) customer acquisition; (2) permitting, inspection, and interconnection (PII); (3) installation labor; and (4) financing. Financing cost reductions are in terms of the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) for financing PV system installations, with real-percent targets of 3.0% (residential) and 3.4% (commercial).

  7. A Cost Roadmap for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, A.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Schropp, Ruud; Faaij, A.

    2016-01-01

    Research and development of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells has seen a marked increase since the recent expiry of core patents describing SHJ technology. SHJ solar cells are expected to offer various cost benefits compared to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells. This paper analyses

  8. Parabolic-trough technology roadmap: A pathway for sustained commercial development and deployment of parabolic-trough technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology roadmapping is a needs-driven technology planning process to help identify, select, and develop technology alternatives to satisfy a set of market needs. The DOE's Office of Power Technologies' Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program recently sponsored a technology roadmapping workshop for parabolic trough technology. The workshop was attended by an impressive cross section of industry and research experts. The goals of the workshop were to evaluate the market potential for trough power projects, develop a better understanding of the current state of the technology, and to develop a conceptual plan for advancing the state of parabolic trough technology. This report documents and extends the roadmap that was conceptually developed during the workshop

  9. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Grant Hussey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms.

  10. Scientific Assessment in support of the Materials Roadmap enabling Low Carbon Energy Technologies: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerri, I.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Holtappels, Peter;

    A group of experts from European research organisations and industry have assessed the state of the art and future needs for materials' R&D for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The work was performed as input to the European Commission's roadmapping exercise on materials for the European...

  11. Review of UK fuel cell. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    The advancement of fuel cell technology in recent years has made commercial viability a reality in many disciplines in the UK. The Carbon Trust and the Department of Trade and Industry have jointly undertaken a study to facilitate and encourage the penetration of fuel cells into the commercial market both at home and overseas. This document summarises the findings of the study and concludes that stationary fuel cells have the greatest potential for market stimulation.

  12. Vehicle Battery Safety Roadmap Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, D. H.

    2012-10-01

    The safety of electrified vehicles with high capacity energy storage devices creates challenges that must be met to assure commercial acceptance of EVs and HEVs. High performance vehicular traction energy storage systems must be intrinsically tolerant of abusive conditions: overcharge, short circuit, crush, fire exposure, overdischarge, and mechanical shock and vibration. Fail-safe responses to these conditions must be designed into the system, at the materials and the system level, through selection of materials and safety devices that will further reduce the probability of single cell failure and preclude propagation of failure to adjacent cells. One of the most important objectives of DOE's Office of Vehicle Technologies is to support the development of lithium ion batteries that are safe and abuse tolerant in electric drive vehicles. This Roadmap analyzes battery safety and failure modes of state-of-the-art cells and batteries and makes recommendations on future investments that would further DOE's mission.

  13. Research of commercial bifacial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tiantian; Li, Hongbo [Shanghai Solar Energy Research Center (China); Li, Wennan; Guo, Wenlin [Shanghai Perfect Energy (China); Chen, Mingbo [Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources (China)

    2008-07-01

    Because of the special finger shape and junction structure, bifacial silicon solar cells could receive sunlight from both sides. So the cells can absorb much sunlight, have less strict require for installation, and have higher conversion efficiency. We have done research in commercial bifacial silicon solar cells. We designed the bifacial silicon solar cells with realizable structure and high conversion efficiency. We designed and realized proper technics path, which are used to fabricate these bifacial solar cells. The boron backfield is used. The anti-reflection coating and finger contact are fabricated on both surfaces of the solar cells, so the cells have different contact structure. Meanwhile, we realized ohmic contact between finger contacts and surface of solar cells on both sides. We successfully produced the bifacial silicon solar cells with the front and rear efficiencies exceed 15% and 9%(AM1.5, 25 C), respectively, and which can be produced in large-scale. (orig.)

  14. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, John [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Sarisky-Reed, Valerie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  15. Stationary power fuel cell commercialization status worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M.C. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell technologies for stationary power are set to play a role in power generation applications worldwide. The worldwide fuel cell vision is to provide powerplants for the emerging distributed generation and on-site markets. Progress towards commercialization has occurred in all fuel cell development areas. Around 100 ONSI phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) units have been sold, with significant foreign sales in Europe and Japan. Fuji has apparently overcome its PAFC decay problems. Industry-driven molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) programs in Japan and the U.S. are conducting megawatt (MW)-class demonstrations, which are bringing the MCFC to the verge of commercialization. Westinghouse Electric, the acknowledged world leader in tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, continues to set performance records and has completed construction of a 4-MW/year manufacturing facility in the U.S. Fuel cells have also taken a major step forward with the conceptual development of ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine plants. Many SOFC developers in Japan, Europe, and North America continue to make significant advances.

  16. Exploration and Mining Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-09-01

    This Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap represents the third roadmap for the Mining Industry of the Future. It is based upon the results of the Exploration and Mining Roadmap Workshop held May 10 ñ 11, 2001.

  17. Codes & standards research, development & demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-07-22

    This Roadmap is a guide to the Research, Development & Demonstration activities that will provide data required for SDOs to develop performance-based codes and standards for a commercial hydrogen fueled transportation sector in the U.S.

  18. Pressure Garment Subsystem Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Constellation program pressure garment subsystem (PGS) team has created a technical roadmap that communicates major technical questions and how and when the questions are being answered in support of major project milestones. The roadmap is a living document that guides the team priorities. The roadmap also communicates technical reactions to changes in project priorities and funding. This paper presents the roadmap and discusses specific roadmap elements in detail as representative examples to provide insight into the meaning and use of the roadmap.

  19. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response. PMID:26791483

  20. A molecular roadmap of reprogramming somatic cells into iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Jose M; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M; Schwarz, Benjamin A; Nefzger, Christian M; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy; Natesan, Sridaran; Melnick, Ari; Zhu, Jinfang; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2012-12-21

    Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we examined defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcriptional wave and can be rescued by elevated expression of all four factors. The establishment of bivalent domains occurs gradually after the first wave, whereas changes in DNA methylation take place after the second wave when cells acquire stable pluripotency. This integrative analysis allowed us to identify genes that act as roadblocks during reprogramming and surface markers that further enrich for cells prone to forming iPSCs. Collectively, our data offer new mechanistic insights into the nature and sequence of molecular events inherent to cellular reprogramming. PMID:23260147

  1. Characterization of a Commercial Silicon Beta Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hayes, James C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mayer, Michael F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McIntyre, Justin I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sivels, Ciara B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suarez, Rey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Silicon detectors are of interest for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) due to their enhanced energy resolution compared to plastic scintillators beta cells. Previous work developing a figure-of-merit (FOM) for comparison of beta cells suggests that the minimum detectable activity (MDA) could be reduced by a factor of two to three with the use of silicon detectors. Silicon beta cells have been developed by CEA (France) and Lares Ltd. (Russia), with the PIPSBox developed by CEA being commercially available from Canberra for approximately $35k, but there is still uncertainty about the reproducibility of the capabilities in the field. PNNL is developing a high-resolution beta-gamma detector system in the shallow underground laboratory, which will utilize and characterize the operation of the PIPSBox detector. Throughout this report, we examine the capabilities of the PIPSBox as developed by CEA. The lessons learned through the testing and use of the PIPSBox will allow PNNL to strategically develop a silicon detector optimized to better suit the communities needs in the future.

  2. Research & Development Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Sutherland, Timothy [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); Foley, Kevin [Navigant Consulting, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Appliances present an attractive opportunity for near-term energy savings in existing building, because they are less expensive and replaced more regularly than heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems or building envelope components. This roadmap targets high-priority research and development (R&D), demonstration and commercialization activities that could significantly reduce residential appliance energy consumption. The main objective of the roadmap is to seek activities that accelerate the commercialization of high-efficiency appliance technologies while maintaining the competitiveness of American industry. The roadmap identified and evaluated potential technical innovations, defined research needs, created preliminary research and development roadmaps, and obtained stakeholder feedback on the proposed initiatives.

  3. Status of commercial fuel cell powerplant system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshay, Marvin

    The primary focus is on the development of commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) powerplant systems because the PAFC, which has undergone extensive development, is currently the closest fuel cell system to commercialization. Shorter discussions are included on the high temperature fuel cell systems which are not as mature in their development, such as the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The alkaline and the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell systems, are also included, but their discussions are limited to their prospects for commercial development. Currently, although the alkaline fuel cell continues to be used for important space applications there are no commercial development programs of significant size in the USA and only small efforts outside. The market place for fuel cells and the status of fuel cell programs in the USA receive extensive treatment. The fuel cell efforts outside the USA, especially the large Japanese programs, are also discussed.

  4. Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-02-01

    This roadmap describes the industry's R&D strategy, priorities, milestones, and performance targets for achieving its long-term goals. It accounts for changes in the industry and the global marketplace since the first roadmap was published in 1997. An updated roadmap was published November 2001. (PDF 1.1 MB).

  5. Strategies for the commercial introduction of modular low power fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, H.V.; Laufer, A. [EnergiaH, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Miranda, P.E.V. [Coppe-Federal Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Hydrogen Lab.

    2010-07-01

    The reality of the infrastructure in emerging economies brings the opportunity to build up a hydrogen compatible economy. For the Brazilian case, the fast development in many fields coexists with a considerable amount of potential renewable fuels available. Costs of energy distribution and of power grid maintenance throughout a continental size country may lead to a distributed generation system based in a diversified fuels matrix. This pathway drives attention to simpler low power fuel cell devices, with easier maintenance procedures, friendly integration with small power demands, and the capability of being applied separately or integrated to deliver higher power demands. Big cities and small distant agriculture based locations, such as Rio de Janeiro or rain forest extractive communities, could be able to produce fuel and energy in their own infrastructure projects. This article presents a market roadmap for the commercial introduction of direct oxidation type solid oxide fuel cells in Brazil, specifying fuel cell technological features and the specificities for each type of application, either in grid connected or in stand alone low power electric energy generation. (orig.)

  6. Codes and standards research, development and demonstration roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-07-22

    C&S RD&D Roadmap - 2008: This Roadmap is a guide to the Research, Development & Demonstration activities that will provide data required for Standards Development Organizations (SDOs) to develop performance-based codes and standards for a commercial hydrogen fueled transportation sector in the U.S.

  7. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-11-01

    This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and commercialization.

  8. Commercialization of fuel cells: myth or reality?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junye

    2014-01-01

    Despite huge investment and efforts in the last decades, fuel cells are still known as a fledgling industry after 170 years of the first fuel cell. It becomes clear that these investment and efforts did not address the critical questions. Why upscaling of fuel cells failed often when many researchers stated their successes in small scale? Why the fuel cells with simpler structure still lag far from the internal combustion (IC) engines and gas turbines? Could the current investment of the hydrogen infrastructure reduce substantially the fuel cell cost and make a breakthrough to the key issues of durability, reliability and robustness? In this paper, we study these fundamental questions and point out a must-way possible to reduce cost of fuel cells and to substantially improve durability and reliability.

  9. Roadmap on optical security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Bahram; Carnicer, Artur; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Nomura, Takanori; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Millán, María S.; Nishchal, Naveen K.; Torroba, Roberto; Fredy Barrera, John; He, Wenqi; Peng, Xiang; Stern, Adrian; Rivenson, Yair; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Guo, Changliang; Sheridan, John T.; Situ, Guohai; Naruse, Makoto; Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Juvells, Ignasi; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Lancis, Jesús; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Mosk, Allard P.; Markman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Information security and authentication are important challenges facing society. Recent attacks by hackers on the databases of large commercial and financial companies have demonstrated that more research and development of advanced approaches are necessary to deny unauthorized access to critical data. Free space optical technology has been investigated by many researchers in information security, encryption, and authentication. The main motivation for using optics and photonics for information security is that optical waveforms possess many complex degrees of freedom such as amplitude, phase, polarization, large bandwidth, nonlinear transformations, quantum properties of photons, and multiplexing that can be combined in many ways to make information encryption more secure and more difficult to attack. This roadmap article presents an overview of the potential, recent advances, and challenges of optical security and encryption using free space optics. The roadmap on optical security is comprised of six categories that together include 16 short sections written by authors who have made relevant contributions in this field. The first category of this roadmap describes novel encryption approaches, including secure optical sensing which summarizes double random phase encryption applications and flaws [Yamaguchi], the digital holographic encryption in free space optical technique which describes encryption using multidimensional digital holography [Nomura], simultaneous encryption of multiple signals [Pérez-Cabré], asymmetric methods based on information truncation [Nishchal], and dynamic encryption of video sequences [Torroba]. Asymmetric and one-way cryptosystems are analyzed by Peng. The second category is on compression for encryption. In their respective contributions, Alfalou and Stern propose similar goals involving compressed data and compressive sensing encryption. The very important area of cryptanalysis is the topic of the third category with two sections

  10. A molecular roadmap of cellular reprogramming into iPS cells

    OpenAIRE

    Polo, Jose M.; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M.; Schwarz, Benjamin A.; Nefzger, Christian M.; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy

    2012-01-01

    Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we studied defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcri...

  11. Roadmapping as a Tool for Renewing Regulatory Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Kristian; Norus, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore technological roadmaps to identify key issuesconcerning the development and utilization of stem cells. From a review of the politicaldecision making processes in three countries, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Germanywe suggest that technological roadmapping in...... practices based on the content and visions of the technologies inquestion. In the conclusion we discuss that the positive side effect of such a shift in theregulatory paradigm is that technological roadmapping can be used as a planning tool todeal with priorities in the health care system when the...... technologies are in its embryonicstage.Key words: Stem cell technologies, Roadmap, S&T policy....

  12. Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Robert; McCabe, Mary; Paulick, Paul; Ruffner, Tim; Some, Rafi; Chen, Yuan; Vitalpur, Sharada; Hughes, Mark; Ling, Kuok; Redifer, Matt; Wallace, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    As part of NASA's Avionics Steering Committee's stated goal to advance the avionics discipline ahead of program and project needs, the committee initiated a multi-Center technology roadmapping activity to create a comprehensive avionics roadmap. The roadmap is intended to strategically guide avionics technology development to effectively meet future NASA missions needs. The scope of the roadmap aligns with the twelve avionics elements defined in the ASC charter, but is subdivided into the following five areas: Foundational Technology (including devices and components), Command and Data Handling, Spaceflight Instrumentation, Communication and Tracking, and Human Interfaces.

  13. Enterprise Architecture (EA) Roadmap

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Enterprise Roadmap reflects the information technology (IT) investment priorities established in agency PortfolioStat reviews, as well as IT program decisions...

  14. The Epigenetic Reprogramming Roadmap in Generation of iPSCs from Somatic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Zhou, Yan; Luo, Yonglun

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a comprehensive epigenetic process involving genome-wide modifications of histones and DNA methylation. This process is often incomplete, which subsequently affects iPSC reprograming, pluripotency, and differentiation...... capacity. Here we review the epigenetic changes with a focus on histone modification (methylation and acetylation) and DNA modification (methylation) during iPSC induction. We look at changes in specific epigenetic signatures, aberrations and epigenetic memory during reprogramming and small molecules...... influencing the epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells. Finally, we discuss how to improve iPSC generation and pluripotency through epigenetic manipulations....

  15. A molecular roadmap of cellular reprogramming into iPS cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Jose M.; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M.; Schwarz, Benjamin A.; Nefzger, Christian M.; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy; Natesan, Sridaran; Melnick, Ari; Zhu, Jinfang; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Summary Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we studied defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcriptional wave and can be rescued by elevated expression of all four factors. The establishment of bivalent domains occurs gradually after the first wave, while changes in DNA methylation take place after the second wave when cells acquire stable pluripotency. This integrative analysis allowed us to identify genes that act as roadblocks during reprogramming and surface markers that further enrich for cells prone to forming iPSCs. Collectively, our data offer new mechanistic insights into the nature and sequence of molecular events inherent to cellular reprogramming. PMID:23260147

  16. Commercialization of Fuel Cell Bipolar Plate Manufacturing by Electromagnetic Forming

    OpenAIRE

    Daehn, G. S.; Hatkevich, S.; Shang, J.; Wilkerson, L.

    2010-01-01

    The cost of manufacturing bipolar plates is a major component to the overall cost structure of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack. To achieve the commercialization of PEM fuel cells, a high volume and low cost manufacturing process for the bipolar plate must be developed. American Trim has identified high velocity electromagnetic forming as a suitable technology to manufacture metallic fuel cell bipolar plates, because of its low capital cost, flexible tooling and rapid prototyp...

  17. Commercialization and Stem Cell Research: A Review of Emerging Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Burningham, Sarah; Ollenberger, Adam; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell researchers face pressure to develop therapies that will reach the clinic within a short period of time. Yet, this pressure may be unrealistic, as bringing stem cell innovations to the clinic will likely require significant time and financial investment. In a variety of biomedical fields, some evidence suggests that commercialization pressures and strategies may negatively impact research. These negative impacts may also be felt in the field of stem cell research, unless the challen...

  18. SSIP Phase I Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Megan; Lucas, Anne; Taylor, Cornelia; Kelley, Grace; Kasprzak, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This roadmap provides a description of the activities involved in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) (SPP/APR Indicators C11 and B17) due to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) on April 1, 2015. The roadmap is intended to support states with completing Phase I of the SSIP process. This document provides…

  19. Software engineering: a roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, A.; Kramer, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a roadmap for software engineering. It identifies the principal research challenges being faced by the discipline and brings together the threads derived from the key research specialisations within software engineering. The paper draws heavily on the roadmaps covering specific areas of software engineering research collected in this volume.

  20. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  1. Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some, Raphael; Goforth, Monte; Chen, Yuan; Powell, Wes; Paulick, Paul; Vitalpur, Sharada; Buscher, Deborah; Wade, Ray; West, John; Redifer, Matt; Partridge, Harry; Sherman, Aaron; McCabe, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The Avionics Technology Roadmap takes an 80% approach to technology investment in spacecraft avionics. It delineates a suite of technologies covering foundational, component, and subsystem-levels, which directly support 80% of future NASA space mission needs. The roadmap eschews high cost, limited utility technologies in favor of lower cost, and broadly applicable technologies with high return on investment. The roadmap is also phased to support future NASA mission needs and desires, with a view towards creating an optimized investment portfolio that matures specific, high impact technologies on a schedule that matches optimum insertion points of these technologies into NASA missions. The roadmap looks out over 15+ years and covers some 114 technologies, 58 of which are targeted for TRL6 within 5 years, with 23 additional technologies to be at TRL6 by 2020. Of that number, only a few are recommended for near term investment: 1. Rad Hard High Performance Computing 2. Extreme temperature capable electronics and packaging 3. RFID/SAW-based spacecraft sensors and instruments 4. Lightweight, low power 2D displays suitable for crewed missions 5. Radiation tolerant Graphics Processing Unit to drive crew displays 6. Distributed/reconfigurable, extreme temperature and radiation tolerant, spacecraft sensor controller and sensor modules 7. Spacecraft to spacecraft, long link data communication protocols 8. High performance and extreme temperature capable C&DH subsystem In addition, the roadmap team recommends several other activities that it believes are necessary to advance avionics technology across NASA: center dot Engage the OCT roadmap teams to coordinate avionics technology advances and infusion into these roadmaps and their mission set center dot Charter a team to develop a set of use cases for future avionics capabilities in order to decouple this roadmap from specific missions center dot Partner with the Software Steering Committee to coordinate computing hardware

  2. Energy Roadmap 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    On 15 December 2011, the European Commission adopted the Communication 'Energy Roadmap 2050'. The EU is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80-95% below 1990 levels by 2050 in the context of necessary reductions by developed countries as a group. In the Energy Roadmap 2050 the Commission explores the challenges posed by delivering the EU's decarbonisation objective while at the same time ensuring security of energy supply and competitiveness. The Energy Roadmap 2050 is the basis for developing a long-term European framework together with all stakeholders.

  3. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-01

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light–matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. It is our hope that the

  4. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-24

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. It is our hope that the roadmap

  5. Performance Characterization of High Energy Commercial Lithium-ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidegger, Brianne T.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch performed characterization of commercial lithium-ion cells to determine the cells' performance against Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Key Performance Parameters (KPP). The goals of the ETDP Energy Storage Project require significant improvements in the specific energy of lithium-ion technology over the state-of-the-art. This work supports the high energy cell development for the Constellation customer Lunar Surface Systems (LSS). In support of these goals, testing was initiated in September 2009 with high energy cylindrical cells obtained from Panasonic and E-One Moli. Both manufacturers indicated the capability of their cells to deliver specific energy of at least 180 Wh/kg or higher. Testing is being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to evaluate the performance of these cells under temperature, rate, and cycling conditions relevant to the ETDP goals for high energy cells. The cell-level specific energy goal for high energy technology is 180 Wh/kg at a C/10 rate and 0 C. The threshold value is 165 Wh/kg. The goal is to operate for at least 2000 cycles at 100 percent DOD with greater than 80 percent capacity retention. The Panasonic NCR18650 cells were able to deliver nearly 200 Wh/kg at the aforementioned conditions. The E-One Moli ICR18650J cells also met the specific energy goal by delivering 183 Wh/kg. Though both cells met the goal for specific energy, this testing was only one portion of the testing required to determine the suitability of commercial cells for the ETDP. The cells must also meet goals for cycle life and safety. The results of this characterization are summarized in this report.

  6. IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cells progress toward commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

    1995-08-01

    The overall goal of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. More specifically, MCFC`s based upon the Internally Manifolded. Heat EXchange (IMHEX{reg_sign}) plate design created by the Institute of Technology. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, M-C Power assembled a formidible team of industry leaders. This group, referred to as the IMHEX{reg_sign} Team, has developed a strategy to move decisively through the stages of Technology Development and Product Design and Improvement through commercialization. This paper is to review the status of the overall commercialization program and activities. It will also provide an overview of the market entry product. Furthermore, we will evaluate the opportunities and benefits this product brings to a competive power industry.

  7. Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-01-01

    The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap outlines key goals for products and markets, materials technology, manufacturing technology, environmental technology, human resources, and industry health programs. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry. The Roadmap sets out the strategy for pursuing near-, mid-, and long-term goals set out by industry and for carrying out the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and industry.

  8. Assessment of commercial prospects of molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Andrew; Siddle, Angie

    The commercial prospects of molten carbonate fuel cells have been evaluated. Market applications, and the commercial criteria that the MCFC will need to satisfy for these applications, were identified through interviews with leading MCFC developers. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analyses were carried out to critically evaluate the prospects for commercialisation. There are many competing technologies, but it is anticipated that MCFCs can make significant penetration into markets where their attributes, such as quality of power, low emissions and availability, give them a leading position in comparison with, for example, engine and turbine-based power generation systems. Analysis suggests that choosing the size for MCFC plant is more important than the target market sector/niche. Opportunities will exist in many market sectors, though the commercial market would be easier to penetrate initially. Developers are optimistic about the commercial prospects for the MCFC. Most believe that early commercial MCFC plants may start to appear in the first decade of the next century, the earliest date suggested for initial market entry being 2002.

  9. Commercialization of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCTTC performed a market assessment for PEM Fuel Cells for terrestrial applications for the Center for Space Power (CSP). The purpose of the market assessment was to gauge the market and commercial potential for PEM fuel cell technology. Further, the market assessment was divided into subsections of technical and market overview, competitive environment, political environment, barriers to market entry, and keys to market entry. The market assessment conducted by the MCTTC involved both secondary and primary research. The primary target markets for PEM fuel cells were transportation and utilities in the power range of 10 kW to 100 kW. The fuel cell vehicle market size was estimated under a pessimistic scenario and an optimistic scenario. The estimated size of the fuel cell vehicle market in dollar terms for the year 2005 is $17.3 billion for the pessimistic scenario and $34.7 billion for the optimistic scenario. The fundamental and applied research funded and conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and DOE in the area of fuel cells presents an excellent opportunity to commercialize dual-use technology and enhance U.S. business competitiveness. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  10. Fuel cell commercialization: The key to a hydrogen economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, P.

    With the current level of global oil production, oil reserves will be sufficient for 40 years. However, due to the fact that the global GDP will have increased by a factor seven in 2050, oil reserves are likely to be exhausted in a much shorter time period. The EU and car industry aim at a reduction of the consumption of oil, at energy savings (with a key role for fuel cells) and an increased use of hydrogen from natural gas and, possibly, coal, in the medium term. The discovery of huge methane resources as methane hydrates (20 times those of oil, gas and coal together) in oceans at 1000-3000 m depth could be of major importance. In the long term, the EU aims at a renewable energy-based energy supply. The European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform is expected to play a major role in bringing about a hydrogen economy. The availability of commercial fuel cells is here a prerequisite. However, after many years of research, fuel cells have not yet been commercialized. If they will not succeed to enter the market within 5 years there is a real danger that activities aiming at a hydrogen society will peter out. In a hydrogen strategy, high priority should therefore be given to actions which will bring about fuel cell commercialization within 5 years. They should include the identification of fuel cell types and (niche) markets which are most favorable for a rapid market introduction. These actions should include focused short-term RTD aiming at cost reduction and increased reliability.

  11. The 2012 Plasma Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature plasma physics and technology are diverse and interdisciplinary fields. The plasma parameters can span many orders of magnitude and applications are found in quite different areas of daily life and industrial production. As a consequence, the trends in research, science and technology are difficult to follow and it is not easy to identify the major challenges of the field and their many sub-fields. Even for experts the road to the future is sometimes lost in the mist. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is addressing this need for clarity and thus providing guidance to the field by this special Review article, The 2012 Plasma Roadmap. Although roadmaps are common in the microelectronic industry and other fields of research and development, constructing a roadmap for the field of low-temperature plasmas is perhaps a unique undertaking. Realizing the difficulty of this task for any individual, the plasma section of the Journal of Physics D Board decided to meet the challenge of developing a roadmap through an unusual and novel concept. The roadmap was divided into 16 formalized short subsections each addressing a particular key topic. For each topic a renowned expert in the sub-field was invited to express his/her individual visions on the status, current and future challenges, and to identify advances in science and technology required to meet these challenges. Together these contributions form a detailed snapshot of the current state of the art which clearly shows the lifelines of the field and the challenges ahead. Novel technologies, fresh ideas and concepts, and new applications discussed by our authors demonstrate that the road to the future is wide and far reaching. We hope that this special plasma science and technology roadmap will provide guidance for colleagues, funding agencies and government institutions. If successful in doing so, the roadmap will be periodically updated to continue to help in guiding the field. (topical review)

  12. Technology Roadmaps: Solar photovoltaic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Solar PV power is a commercially available and reliable technology with a significant potential for long-term growth in nearly all world regions. This roadmap estimates that by 2050, PV will provide around 11% of global electricity production and avoid 2.3 gigatonnes (Gt) of CO2 emissions per year. Achieving this roadmap's vision will require an effective, long-term and balanced policy effort in the next decade to allow for optimal technology progress, cost reduction and ramp-up of industrial manufacturing for mass deployment. Governments will need to provide long-term targets and supporting policies to build confidence for investments in manufacturing capacity and deployment of PV systems. PV will achieve grid parity -- i.e. competitiveness with electricity grid retail prices -- by 2020 in many regions. As grid parity is achieved, the policy framework should evolve towards fostering self-sustained markets, with the progressive phase-out of economic incentives, but maintaining grid access guarantees and sustained R&D support.

  13. Technology roadmap for lithium ion batteries 2030; Technologie-Roadmap Lithium-Ionen-Batterien 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielmann, Axel; Isenmann, Ralf; Wietschel, Martin [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The technology roadmap for lithium ion batteries 2030 presents a graphical representation of the cell components, cell types and cell characteristics of lithium ion batteries and their connection with the surrounding technology field from today through 2030. This is a farsighted orientation on the way into the future and an implementation of the ''Roadmap: Batterieforschung Deutschland'' of the BMBF (Federal Ministry of Education and Science). The developments in lithium ion batteries are identified through 2030 form today's expert view in battery development and neighbouring areas. (orig.)

  14. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Compromises of Bali Roadmap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jingmin; Wei Dong

    2008-01-01

    The Bali Roadmap, as the breakthrough on intergovernmental negotiation of climate change mitigation, having brought United States on track, is still a result of compromises. The major compromises of the Bali Roadmap are centered around three issues of quantifying emission reduction targets, developing countries' obligations as well as quantifying developed countries' financial assistance in developing countries' capacity building on climate change. It is found that the rationalities behind these compromises are the national interests. Due to the fact, achieving cohesion among all nations in climate change actions is very difficult. Therefore, the Bali Roadmap may lead to a tough way with distant hope. However, technology innovation and well-designed economic instruments would be helpful and supportive for further international negotiation and cooperation.

  16. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  17. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  18. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  19. OHVT technology roadmap [2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    The OHVT Technology Roadmap for 2000 presents the multiyear program plan of the U.S. DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). It is an update of the 1997 plan, reflecting changes in regulations and ongoing discussions with DOE's heavy vehicle customers. The technical plan covers three classes of trucks: (1) class 7-8 (large, on-highway trucks); (2) class 3-6 (medium duty trucks); (3) class 1-2 (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles) as well as enabling and supporting technologies. The Roadmap documents program goals, schedules, and milestones.

  20. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  1. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-08-01

    Roadmap identifying the efforts of the Materials Technical Team (MTT) to focus primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks) which enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed.

  2. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  3. Roadmap of Infinite Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive summary of equivalence checking results for infinite-state systems. References to the relevant papers will be updated continuously according to the development in the area. The most recent version of this document is available from the web-page http://www.brics.dk/~srba/roadmap....

  4. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad;

    2014-01-01

    Six different strategies have recently been proposed for the European Union (EU) energy system in the European Commission's report, Energy Roadmap 2050. The objective for these strategies is to identify how the EU can reach its target of an 80% reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions in 2050...

  5. Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    Roadmap 2030: The U.S. Concrete Industry Technology Roadmap tracks the eight goals published in the American Concrete Institute Strategic Development Council's Vision 2030: A Vision for the U.S. Concrete Industry. Roadmap 2030 highlights existing state-of-the-art technologies and emerging scientific advances that promise high potential for innovation, and predicts future technological needs. It defines enabling research opportunities and proposes areas where governmental-industrial-academic partnerships can accelerate the pace of development. Roadmap 2030 is a living document designed to continually address technical, institutional, and market changes.

  6. Fuel cell commercialization — beyond the 'Notice of Market Opportunity for Fuel Cells' (NOMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfass, J. A.; Glenn, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Notice of Market Opportunity for Fuel Cells (NOMO) was released in Oct. 1988 by the American Public Power Association. Its goal was to identify a manufacturer for commercializing a multi-megawatt fuel cell power plant with attractive cost and performance characteristics, supported by a realistic, yet aggressive commercialization plan, leading to mid-1990s application. Energy Research Corporation's program to commercialize its 2-MW internal-reforming carbonate fuel cell was selected. The program was refined in the development of the Principles and Framework for Commercializing Direct Fuel Cell Power Plants, which defines buyer responsibilities for promotion and coordination of information development, supplier responsibilities for meeting certain milestones and for sharing the results of success in a royalty agreement, and risk management features. Twenty-three electric and gas utilities in the US and Canada have joined the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group to support the buyers' obligations in this program. The City of Santa Clara, CA; Electric Power Research Institute; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Southern California Gas Company; Southern California Edison; National Rural Electric Cooperative Association; and Pacific Gas & Electric, have formed the Santa Clara Demonstration Group to build the first 2-MW power plant. The preliminary design for this demonstration is nearly complete. Integrated testing of a 20-kW stack with the complete balance-of-plant, has been successfully accomplished by Pacific Gas & Electric at its test facility in San Ramon, CA.

  7. Commercial Development Of Ovonic Thin Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.

    1983-09-01

    One square foot Ovonic amorphous photovoltaic devices are already in commercial production and are manufactured through a continuous web process. The next levels of commercialization required to achieve a large-volume power market will be discussed, and the device specifications correlated with the chemical and electronic properties of the materials that we are developing to achieve even higher efficiencies. It has been long considered a utopian dream to harness the energy of the sun to create electricity that would be competitive in cost to that produced from the conventional sources of energy such as oil, gas, and uranium. The impact on our society of stand-alone power generators without moving parts using the continually available, ubiquitous energy of the sun could certainly lead to a new age with consequences comparable to the first introduction of electricity which greatly accelerated the Industrial Revolution. Low cost, nonpolluting energy not dependent upon or limited by transmission costs could again make DC electricity a realistic option. The relatively young field of photovoltaics suffers from certain dogmas that are just now being questioned. For example, it is thought by many that solar cells utilizing crys-talline materials have inherently higher efficiencies than those using amorphous materials, and that somehow crystalline solar cells, whether fabricated from single crystals or polycrystalline material, in round or rectangular geometries, grown from the melt or by a rib-bon process, can be reduced in cost sufficiently that the economics become attractive enough for large-scale terrestrial generation of power. In this paper, we shall show that amorphous materials can have much higher efficiencies than do crystalline and that the answer to our power generation needs lies not in crystalline but in amorphous technology. At Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD), we have designed and built a production machine (described by my colleague, Dr. Izu, in a

  8. National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-04-01

    This document summarizes the presentations and suggestions put forth by officials, industry experts and policymakers in their efforts to come together to develop a roadmap for America''s clean energy future and outline the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision. The National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop was held April 2-3, 2002. These proceedings were compiled into a formal report, The National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, which is also available online.

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The development of Technology Roadmaps: Smart Grids -- which the IEA defines as an electricity network that uses digital and other advanced technologies to monitor and manage the transport of electricity from all generation sources to meet the varying electricity demands of end users -- is essential if the global community is to achieve shared goals for energy security, economic development and climate change mitigation. Unfortunately, existing misunderstandings of exactly what smart grids are and the physical and institutional complexity of electricity systems make it difficult to implement smart grids on the scale that is needed. This roadmap sets out specific steps needed over the coming years to achieve milestones that will allow smart grids to deliver a clean energy future.

  10. The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, David J.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Benner, Steven A.; Boss, Alan P.; Deamer, David; Falkowski, Paul G.; Farmer, Jack D.; Hedges, S. Blair; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Liskowsky, David R.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Meyer, Michael A.; Pilcher, Carl B.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Trent, Jonathan D.; Turner, William W.; Woolf, Neville J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across the NASA enterprises that encompass the space, Earth, and biological sciences. The ongoing development of astrobiology roadmaps embodies the contributions of diverse scientists and technologists from government, universities, and private institutions. The Roadmap addresses three basic questions: How does life begin and evolve, does life exist elsewhere in the universe, and what is the future of life on Earth and beyond? Seven Science Goals outline the following key domains of investigation: understanding the nature and distribution of habitable environments in the universe, exploring for habitable environments and life in our own solar system, understanding the emergence of life, determining how early life on Earth interacted and evolved with its changing environment, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms and environmental limits of life, determining the principles that will shape life in the future, and recognizing signatures of life on other worlds and on early Earth. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high-priority efforts for the next 3-5 years. These 18 objectives are being integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  11. Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    This U.S. DRIVE electrochemical energy storage roadmap describes ongoing and planned efforts to develop electrochemical energy storage technologies for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). The Energy Storage activity comprises a number of research areas (including advanced materials research, cell level research, battery development, and enabling R&D which includes analysis, testing and other activities) for advanced energy storage technologies (batteries and ultra-capacitors).

  12. Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    This document represents the roadmap for education in the U.S. mining industry. It was developed based on the results of an Education Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held February 23, 2002 in Phoenix, Arizona.

  13. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  14. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  15. Technology Roadmaps: Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Wind energy is perhaps the most advanced of the 'new' renewable energy technologies, but there is still much work to be done. This roadmap identifies the key tasks that must be undertaken in order to achieve a vision of over 2 000 GW of wind energy capacity by 2050. Governments, industry, research institutions and the wider energy sector will need to work together to achieve this goal. Best technology and policy practice must be identified and exchanged with emerging economy partners, to enable the most cost-effective and beneficial development.

  16. Technology Roadmaps: How2Guide for Wind Energy Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    Whether in OECD, emerging or developing country economies, governments are increasingly looking to diversify their energy mix beyond simply fossil fuels. While wind energy is developing towards a mainstream, competitive and reliable technology, a range of barriers can delay progress, such as financing, grid integration, social acceptance and aspects of planning processes. National and regional technology roadmaps can play a key role in supporting wind energy development and implementation, helping countries to identify priorities and pathways tailored to local resources and markets. Recognising this, the IEA has started the How2Guides - a new series co-ordinated by the International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform to address the need for more focused guidance in the development of national roadmaps, or strategies, for specific low-carbon technologies. This builds on the success of the IEA global technology roadmap series and responds to a growing number of requests for IEA guidance to adapt the findings of the IEA global technology roadmaps to national circumstances. A successful roadmap contains a clear statement of the desired outcome, followed by a specific pathway for reaching it. The How2Guide for Wind Energy builds on the IEA well established methodology for roadmap development and shares wind specific recommendations on how to address the four phases to developing and implementing a wind energy roadmap: Planning; Visioning; Development; and Implementation. The manual also offers menus of recommendations on policy and technical options for deployment of utility-scale wind energy installations. A matrix of barriers-versus-realistic solutions options is cross-listed with considerations such as planning, development, electricity market and system, infrastructure, and finance and economics. Drawing on several case studies from around the globe, as well as on the IEA Technology Roadmap for Wind Energy, the How2Guide for Wind Energy it is intended as a

  17. Technology Roadmaps: China Wind Energy Development Roadmap 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The report shows how China, already the world's largest wind market, could reach 1 000 GW of wind power by the middle of the century, an achievement that would reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 1.5 gigatonnes per year, or roughly equivalent to the combined CO2 emissions of Germany, France and Italy in 2009. The China Wind Energy Roadmap is the first national roadmap that has been developed by a country with IEA support, drawing from its global roadmap series.

  18. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-08

    This FY 2015 report updates the results of an effort to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 to 5 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from U.S. Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  19. Autonomous Mission Operations Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    As light time delays increase, the number of such situations in which crew autonomy is the best way to conduct the mission is expected to increase. However, there are significant open questions regarding which functions to allocate to ground and crew as the time delays increase. In situations where the ideal solution is to allocate responsibility to the crew and the vehicle, a second question arises: should the activity be the responsibility of the crew or an automated vehicle function? More specifically, we must answer the following questions: What aspects of mission operation responsibilities (Plan, Train, Fly) should be allocated to ground based or vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control in the presence of significant light-time delay between the vehicle and the Earth?How should the allocated ground based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed across the flight control team and ground system automation? How should the allocated vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed between the flight crew and onboard system automation?When during the mission should responsibility shift from flight control team to crew or from crew to vehicle, and what should the process of shifting responsibility be as the mission progresses? NASA is developing a roadmap of capabilities for Autonomous Mission Operations for human spaceflight. This presentation will describe the current state of development of this roadmap, with specific attention to in-space inspection tasks that crews might perform with minimum assistance from the ground.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action 1993 Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1993 Roadmap for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project office is a tool to assess and resolve issues. The US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office uses the nine-step roadmapping process as a basis for Surface and Groundwater Project planning. This is the second year the Roadmap document has been used to identify key issues and assumptions, develop logic diagrams, and outline milestones. This document is a key element of the DOE planning process. A multi-interest group used the nine-step process to focus on issues, root cause analysis and resolutions. This core group updated and incorporated comments on the basic assumptions, then used these assumptions to identify issues. The list of assumptions was categorized into the following areas: institutional, regulatory compliance, project management, human resource requirements, and other site-specific assumptions. The group identified 10 issues in the analysis phase. All of the issues are ranked according to importance. The number one issue from the 1992 Roadmap, ''Lack of sufficient human resources,'' remained the number one issue in 1993. The issues and their ranking are as follows: Lack of sufficient human resources; increasing regulatory requirements; unresolved groundwater issues; extension of UMTRCA through September 30, 1998; lack of post-UMTRA and post-cell closure policies; unpredictable amounts and timing of Federal funding; lack of regulatory compliance agreements; problem with states providing their share of remedial action costs; different interests and priorities among participants; and technology development/transfer. The issues are outlined and analyzed in detail in Section 8.0, with a schedule for resolution of these issues in Section 9.0

  1. Fuel cell commercialization - beyond the 'Notice of Market Opportunity for Fuel Cells' (NOMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Notice of Market Opportunity for Fuel Cells (NOMO) was released in Oct. 1988 by the American Public Power Association. Its goal was to identify a manufacturer for commercializing a multi-megawatt fuel cell power plant with attractive cost and performance characteristics, supported by a realistic, yet aggressive commercialization plan, leading to mid-1990s application. Energy Research Corporation's program to commercialize its 2-MW internal-reforming carbonate fuel cell was selected. The City of Santa Clara, CA; Electric Power Research Institute; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Southern California Gas Company; Southern California Edison; National Rural Electric Cooperative Association; and Pacific Gas and Electric, have formed the Santa Clara Demonstration Group to build the first 2-MW power plant. The preliminary design for this demonstration is nearly complete. Integrated testing of a 20-kW stack with the complete balance-of-plant, has been successfully accomplished by Pacific Gas and Electric at its test facility in San Ramon, CA. (orig./MM)

  2. OHVT Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, R.A.

    2001-10-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) was created in March 1996 to address the public-interest transportation-energy aspects of a set of customers who at that time had been largely unrecognized, namely, the manufacturers, suppliers, and users of heavy transport vehicles (trucks, buses, rail, and inland marine). Previously, the DOE had focused its attention on meeting the needs of the personal-transport-vehicle customer (automobile manufacturers, suppliers, and users). Those of us who were of driving age at the time of the 1973 oil embargo and the 1979 oil price escalation vividly recall the inconvenience and irritation of having to wait in long lines for gasoline to fuel our cars. However, most of us, other than professional truck owners or drivers, were unaware of the impacts that these disruptions in the fuel supply had on those whose livelihoods depend upon the transport of goods. Recognizing the importance of heavy vehicles to the national economic health, the DOE created OHVT with a mission to conduct, in collaboration with its industry partners and their suppliers, a customer-focused national program to research and develop technologies that will enable trucks and other heavy vehicles to be more energy-efficient and able to use alternative fuels while reducing emissions. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies convened a workshop in April 1996 to elicit input from DOE's heavy vehicle industry customers, including truck and bus manufacturers, diesel-engine manufacturers, fuel producers, suppliers to these industries, and the trucking industry. The preparation of a ''technology roadmap'' was one of the key recommendations by this customer group. Therefore, the OHVT Technology Roadmap* was developed in 1996 as a first step in crafting a common vision for a government research and development (R and D) partnership in this increasingly important transportation sector. The approach used in

  3. Solar-electric power: The U.S. photovoltaic industry roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-01-01

    To meet this challenge, we — the U.S.-based PV industry — have developed this roadmap as a guide for building our domestic industry, ensuring U.S. technology ownership, and implementing a sound commercialization strategy that will yield significant benefits at minimal cost. Putting the roadmap into action will call for reasonable and consistent co-investment by our industry and government in research and technology development.

  4. Cell Phone Carriers, TV-Commercials & Branding : A study of cell phone carriers TV- commercials, branding and its affect on young people

    OpenAIRE

    Sköld, Robin; Nilsson, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Problem: As almost everyone has a cell phone today, keeping your customers is very important. An important group for cell phone carriers is young people. This is a group that uses cell phones more and more. However, attracting these people could be hard. One of the most common strategies to attract customers today is promotion through TV-commercials. Another strategy that has gained popularity is branding. We therefore asked ourselves how these strategies could affect each other and eventuall...

  5. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  6. Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap identifies research pathways leading to hydrogen production technologies that produce near-zero net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from highly efficient and diverse renewable energy sources. This roadmap focuses on initial development of the technologies, identifies their gaps and barriers, and describes activities by various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offices to address the key issues and challenges.

  7. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  8. Technology Roadmap: Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Hydropower could double its contribution by 2050, reaching 2,000 GW of global capacity and over 7,000 TWh. This achievement, driven primarily by the quest of clean electricity, could prevent annual emissions of up to 3 billion tonnes of CO2 from fossil-fuel plants. The bulk of this growth would come from large plants in emerging economies and developing countries. Hydroelectricity’s many advantages include reliability, proven technology, large storage capacity, and very low operating and maintenance costs. Hydropower is highly flexible, a precious asset for electricity network operators, especially given rapid expansion of variable generation from other renewable energy technologies such as wind power and photovoltaics. Many hydropower plants also provide flood control, irrigation, navigation and freshwater supply. The technology roadmap for Hydropower details action needed from policy makers to allow hydroelectric production to double, and addresses necessary conditions, including resolving environmental issues and gaining public acceptance.

  9. Roadmap on ultrafast optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Derryck T.; Heyl, Christoph M.; Thomson, Robert R.; Trebino, Rick; Steinmeyer, Günter; Fielding, Helen H.; Holzwarth, Ronald; Zhang, Zhigang; Del’Haye, Pascal; Südmeyer, Thomas; Mourou, Gérard; Tajima, Toshiki; Faccio, Daniele; Harren, Frans J. M.; Cerullo, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The year 2015 marked the 25th anniversary of modern ultrafast optics, since the demonstration of the first Kerr lens modelocked Ti:sapphire laser in 1990 (Spence et al 1990 Conf. on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO, pp 619–20) heralded an explosion of scientific and engineering innovation. The impact of this disruptive technology extended well beyond the previous discipline boundaries of lasers, reaching into biology labs, manufacturing facilities, and even consumer healthcare and electronics. In recognition of such a milestone, this roadmap on Ultrafast Optics draws together articles from some of the key opinion leaders in the field to provide a freeze-frame of the state-of-the-art, while also attempting to forecast the technical and scientific paradigms which will define the field over the next 25 years. While no roadmap can be fully comprehensive, the thirteen articles here reflect the most exciting technical opportunities presented at the current time in Ultrafast Optics. Several articles examine the future landscape for ultrafast light sources, from practical solid-state/fiber lasers and Raman microresonators to exotic attosecond extreme ultraviolet and possibly even zeptosecond x-ray pulses. Others address the control and measurement challenges, requiring radical approaches to harness nonlinear effects such as filamentation and parametric generation, coupled with the question of how to most accurately characterise the field of ultrafast pulses simultaneously in space and time. Applications of ultrafast sources in materials processing, spectroscopy and time-resolved chemistry are also discussed, highlighting the improvements in performance possible by using lasers of higher peak power and repetition rate, or by exploiting the phase stability of emerging new frequency comb sources.

  10. Technology Roadmapping for Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, O.

    2003-02-26

    Technology roadmapping can be an effective strategic technology planning tool. This paper describes a process for customizing a generic technology roadmapping process. Starting with a generic process reduces the learning curve and speeds up the roadmap development. Similarly, starting with a generic domain model provides leverage across multiple applications or situations within the domain. A process that combines these two approaches facilitates identifying technology gaps and determining common core technologies that can be reused for multiple applications or situations within the domain. This paper describes both of these processes and how they can be integrated. A core team and a number of technology working groups develop the technology roadmap, which includes critical system requirements and targets, technology areas and metrics for each area, and identifies and evaluates possible technology alternatives to recommend the most appropriate ones to pursue. A generalized waste management model, generated by considering multiple situations or applications in terms of a generic waste management model, provides the domain requirements for the technology roadmapping process. Finally, the paper discusses lessons learns from a number of roadmapping projects.

  11. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  12. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-01

    This FY 2014 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office - 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-04-30

    This FY 2013 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  14. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Japanese strategy of fusion roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology bases required for realization of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO) have been discussed in the Japanese fusion community. The Join-Core Team, which was launched by ministerial council, has considered the following issues to develop strategy for the establishment of technology bases for a DEMO: (1) Concept of DEMO premised for investigation, (2) Activities requiring commitment and their goals, and (3) Scientific and technological review works for the above mentioned activities. The team summarized the issues as Joint-Core Team Report (Basic Concept of DEMO and Structure of Technological Issues). This report describes the basic concept of DEMO premised for investigation and the structure of technological issues to ensure the feasibility of the DEMO concept. Also the team clarified tasks regarding the development of the design of DEMO, and the research and development programs to resolve the issues and to provide the required evidence to support the design into the consistent timeline, which is summarized in the second Joint-Core Team Report (Chart of Establishment of Technology Bases for DEMO). The reports show that DEMO is steady power generator with several hundred thousand kilowatts being able to extend to commercialization. Also function of tritium bleeding to fulfil self-sufficiency of fuels should be equipped. Required technological activities (superconducting coils, blanket, divertor, heating and current drive systems etc.) are arranged in the chart. JAEA has established the Joint Special Design Team for Fusion DEMO in cooperation with NIFS, industry, and universities and reinforces design activity of a tokamak DEMO. Two important tasks still remain to define the roadmap of development of DEMO in future, that is, socio-economic examination of fusion energy and review of alternative approaches of helical magnetic fusion system and laser fusion system. In particular, solution of the latter task should be found under the deep discussion with

  16. Overcoming the Efficiency-Limiting Mechanisms in Commercial Si Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of performance-limiting processes in a commercial solar cell fabricated on low-cost substrate is given. Higher efficiencies require effective gettering of precipitated impurities present at the defect clusters, and improved cell and process designs. Overcoming these limitations is expected to lead to 18%-20 % cell efficiencies

  17. A Technology Roadmap for Strategic Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziagos, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Phillips, Benjamin R. [SRA International, Inc. and Geothermal Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Boyd, Lauren [Geothermal Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Jelacic, Allan [SRA International, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, Greg [Geothermal Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Hass, Eric [U.S. DOE, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-02-13

    Realization of EGS development would make geothermal a significant contender in the renewable energy portfolio, on the order of 100+ GWe in the United States alone. While up to 90% of the geothermal power resource in the United States is thought to reside in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), hurdles to commercial development still remain. The Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), began in 2011 to outline opportunities for advancing EGS technologies on five- to 20-year timescales, with community input on the underlying technology needs that will guide research and ultimately determine commercial success for EGS. This report traces DOE's research investments, past and present, and ties them to these technology needs, forming the basis for an EGS Technology Roadmap to help guide future DOE research. This roadmap is currently open for public comment. Send your comments to geothermal@ee.doe.gov.

  18. High-Efficiency, Commercial Ready CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sites, James R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-11-19

    Colorado State’s F-PACE project explored several ways to increase the efficiency of CdTe solar cells and to better understand the device physics of those cells under study. Increases in voltage, current, and fill factor resulted in efficiencies above 17%. The three project tasks and additional studies are described in detail in the final report. Most cells studied were fabricated at Colorado State using an industry-compatible single-vacuum closed-space-sublimation (CSS) chamber for deposition of the key semiconductor layers. Additionally, some cells were supplied by First Solar for comparison purposes, and a small number of modules were supplied by Abound Solar.

  19. Towards a commercial process for the manufacture of genetically modified T cells for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, A. D.; Assenmacher, M; Schröder, B.; Meyer, M.; Orentas, R; Bethke, U; Dropulic, B

    2015-01-01

    The recent successes of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have highlighted the need for manufacturing processes that are robust and scalable for product commercialization. Here we review some of the more outstanding issues surrounding commercial scale manufacturing of personalized-adoptive T-cell medicinal products. These include closed system operations, improving process robustness and simplifying work flows, reducing labor intensity by implementing...

  20. Concentrating Solar Power. Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Concentrating solar power can contribute significantly to the world's energy supply. As shown in this roadmap, this decade is a critical window of opportunity during which CSP could become a competitive source of electrical power to meet peak and intermediate loads in the sunniest parts of the world. This roadmap identifies technology, economy and policy goals and milestones needed to support the development and deployment of CSP, as well as ongoing advanced research in CSF. It also sets out the need for governments to implement strong, balanced policies that favour rapid technological progress, cost reductions and expanded industrial manufacturing of CSP equipment to enable mass deployment. Importantly, this roadmap also establishes a foundation for greater international collaboration. The overall aim of this roadmap is to identify actions required - on the part of all stakeholders - to accelerate CSP deployment globally. Many countries, particularly in emerging regions, are only just beginning to develop CSP. Accordingly, milestone dates should be considered as indicative of urgency, rather than as absolutes. This roadmap is a work in progress. As global CSP efforts advance and an increasing number of CSP applications are developed, new data will provide the basis for updated analysis. The IEA will continue to track the evolution of CSP technology and its impacts on markets, the power sector and regulatory environments, and will update its analysis and set additional tasks and milestones as new learning comes to light.

  1. Technology Roadmap: Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    Energy storage technologies are valuable components in most energy systems and could be an important tool in achieving a low-carbon future. These technologies allow for the decoupling of energy supply and demand, in essence providing a valuable resource to system operators. There are many cases where energy storage deployment is competitive or near-competitive in today's energy system. However, regulatory and market conditions are frequently ill-equipped to compensate storage for the suite of services that it can provide. Furthermore, some technologies are still too expensive relative to other competing technologies (e.g. flexible generation and new transmission lines in electricity systems). One of the key goals of this new roadmap is to understand and communicate the value of energy storage to energy system stakeholders. This will include concepts that address the current status of deployment and predicted evolution in the context of current and future energy system needs by using a ''systems perspective'' rather than looking at storage technologies in isolation.

  2. Roadmap to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qattan, Malak; Demonacos, Constantinos; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija

    2012-08-01

    Standard clinical protocols and the concept "one drug fits all" that are currently used to treat illness in many cases are not effective, and strikingly so in the treatment of cancer, where 75% of therapeutic schemes are ineffective. The concept of personalized medicine is that the treatment of the disease is designed on the basis of the individual needs of each patient and the factors that influence their response to different drugs. Individualization of patient care has the potential to generate novel effective therapies, limit the adverse drug effects, create optimal treatments for individual patients, and decrease the cost associated with chronic illness and complications of drug usage. However, to achieve the goals of personalized medicine many challenges must be addressed. Here we discuss possible ways to increase the consistency of data generated by basic research and their suitability for application in medicine. New technologies employing systems biology and computer based approaches will facilitate overcoming many of the scientific challenges in the field. Changes in the education of researchers, health professionals, and the public are also required to successfully implement personalized medicine as a routine in the clinic. Finally, shift of the focus away from the development of blockbuster drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry, and modifications in the legal system to accommodate novel advancements need to be considered. The joint effort of all interested parties is needed to generate an efficient roadmap that will take us rapidly and safely to effective individual treatment, which will eliminate diseases and create better health care for all. PMID:22911518

  3. Comparison of the rat and mouse cell lines commercially available for CALUX bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeyens, L.; Windal, I.; Wouwe, N. van [Institute of Public Health, Brussels (Belgium); Scippo, M.L.; Eppe, G.; Pauw, E. de; Maghin-Rogister, G. [Liege Univ. (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    CALUX (Chemical-activated luciferase gene expression) is nowadays more and more widely used, both for the control of the norms applied to the food chain and to environmental contamination evaluation. In that purpose, two cell lines are commercially available: one rat cell line, commercialized by Bio Detection System (BDS, The Netherlands) and one mouse cell line, commercialized by Xenobiotic Detection System (XDS, USA). Both suppliers propose different clean-up methods and a slightly different method in the preparation, dosage and reading of the plates. Until now, almost no comparison of the cell lines has been performed, or the comparison includes many variables (extraction, purification, method of preparation, dosage and reading of the plate) so that it is difficult to evaluate which variables are mainly responsible of the observed differences. The objective of the research presented here is to perform a direct comparison of the 2 cell lines, and evaluate which variables can be responsible of the discrepancy observed between the results.

  4. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-01-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but hi...

  5. Partnership for Wave Power - Roadmaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Krogh, Jan; Brodersen, Hans Jørgen;

    This Wave Energy Technology Roadmap is developed by the Partnership for Wave Power including nine Danish wave energy developers. It builds on to the strategy [1] published by the Partnership in 2012, a document that describes the long term vision of the Danish Wave Energy sector: “By 2030 at the...... latest, wave energy technologies must provide a cost-effective and sustainable electricity supply from offshore energy farms in Denmark”. Technology roadmaps are tools that provide a framework for stimulating innovation in specific technology areas to achieve a long term vision, target or goal. The aim...... of these roadmaps is to help the emerging wave energy sector in Denmark to develop cost-effective solutions to convert Wave Energy....

  6. Commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wismer, L.

    1996-04-01

    Environmental concerns with air quality and global warming have triggered strict federal ambient ozone air quality standards. Areas on non-attainment of these standards exist across the United States. Because it contains several of the most difficult attainment areas, the State of California has adopted low emission standards including a zero emission vehicle mandate that has given rise to development of hybrid electric vehicles, both battery-powered and fuel-cell powered. Fuel cell powered vehicles, using on-board hydrogen as a fuel, share the non-polluting advantage of the battery electric vehicle while offering at least three times the range today`s battery technology.

  7. Commercialization of a thick-film solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, G. D.

    1980-12-01

    The use of screen printing as a technique for producing large area solar cells was evaluated with emphasis on the preparation and improvement in performance of screen printed CdS cells. Thermal gravimetric analysis of the CdS inks used to print CdS films confirm that all the fugitive binders and flux are removed under firing conditions used to prepare the CdS films. Warpage of the Nesatron glass substrates makes their use questionable. Multiple layers of CdS appear to resolve a pin hole problem previously encountered.

  8. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-12-01

    In support of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Agriculture jointly released the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report, updating the federal government's progress to reduce methane emissions through biogas systems since the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap was completed by the three agencies in July 2014. The report highlights actions taken, outlines challenges and opportunities, and identifies next steps to the growth of a robust biogas industry.

  9. Technology Roadmaps: Biofuels for Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Biofuels could provide up to 27% of total transport fuel worldwide by 2050. The use of transport fuels from biomass, when produced sustainably, can help cut petroleum use and reduce CO2 emissions in the transport sector, especially in heavy transport. Sustainable biofuel technologies, in particular advanced biofuels, will play an important role in achieving this roadmap vision. The roadmap describes the steps necessary to realise this ambitious biofuels target; identifies key actions by different stakeholders, and the role for government policy to adopt measures needed to ensure the sustainable expansion of both conventional and advanced biofuel production.

  10. OHVT technology roadmap[2000]; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OHVT Technology Roadmap for 2000 presents the multiyear program plan of the U.S. DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). It is an update of the 1997 plan, reflecting changes in regulations and ongoing discussions with DOE's heavy vehicle customers. The technical plan covers three classes of trucks: (1) class 7-8 (large, on-highway trucks); (2) class 3-6 (medium duty trucks); (3) class 1-2 (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles) as well as enabling and supporting technologies. The Roadmap documents program goals, schedules, and milestones

  11. An assessment of the energetic flows in a commercial PEM fuel-cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some primary issues have not yet been fully investigated on the way towards the commercialization of fuel-cell-based systems (FCS), e.g., their actual efficiency, reliability, safety, degradation, maintainability, etc. This article deals with an estimation of the real energetic flows and the corresponding electrical efficiency of a commercial proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell hydrogen-fed generator set (PEMFCS). The fuel-cell power system considered here is planned to be the source of both electrical and thermal energy in a mobile dwelling container unit with in-built fuel-cell-based cogeneration system, and for the design of a cogeneration unit the actual amount of disposable energy from the PEMFC unit should be estimated. The assessment of the actual energetic flows, the disposable energy and the consequent electrical efficiency of the case-study PEMFCS is carried out using commercial technical data for the PEMFCS.

  12. Fast and Accurate Measurement of Entropy Profiles of Commercial Lithium-Ion Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an effective approach to speed up the measurement of thermodynamic characterization curves (entropy of reaction ΔrS(x)) of rechargeable batteries, in particular commercial 18650 lithium ion cells. We propose and demonstrate a measurement and data processing protocol that reduces the time required to record entropy profiles from time scales of weeks to time scales of hours – without loss in accuracy. For time consuming studies such as investigations on ageing of battery cells, entropy profile measurements thus become as feasible as conventional electrochemical characterisation techniques like dV/dQ or cyclic voltammetry. We demonstrate this at the examples of two ageing protocols applied to a commercial high power and a commercial high energy cell, respectively: (i) accelerated calendric aging by storing cells at 100% state of charge at 60 °C and (ii) continuous cycling with a 1C current at 25 °C

  13. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O’Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  14. Roadmap for H{sub 2} in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannemand Andersen, P.; Greve, O.K.; Kruger Nielsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    This report reports on a roadmap workshop held in Roskilde in 2004 as part of the Nordic H{sub 2} Energy Foresight project. The workshop outlined a sequence of implementation and mutual interdependence of the hydrogen technology visions from today (2004) and until 2030. Furthermore, barriers, needs and drivers for realising the visions were discussed at the workshop in relation to science an education (needs for scientific research, needs for competences) and government (energy and industry policy, public R and D, early market stimulation, standardisation, safety). The roadmaps outlined key issues and challenges in hydrogen and fuel cell energy development and suggested paths that Nordic industry, energy companies, academia and governments may take to expand the use of hydrogen and fuel cell-based energy. Roadmap exercises offer a collective and consultative process, with the processes itself being equally important as the outcome. Hence, the aim is not to predict or suggest exact targets for hydrogen in the Nordic countries by 2030 nor putting up exact ways to achieve these targets. Bur by setting up ambitious and realistic targets and putting up roadmaps we can challenge our understanding of a future hydrogen society and be better able to suggest policies and decisions today. (au)

  15. Next-generation batteries and fuel cells for commercial, military, and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, A R

    2012-01-01

    Distilling complex theoretical physical concepts into an understandable technical framework, Next-Generation Batteries and Fuel Cells for Commercial, Military, and Space Applications describes primary and secondary (rechargeable) batteries for various commercial, military, spacecraft, and satellite applications for covert communications, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. It emphasizes the cost, reliability, longevity, and safety of the next generation of high-capacity batteries for applications where high energy density, minimum weight and size, and reliability in harsh conditions are

  16. Recent advances towards development and commercialization of plant cell culture processes for synthesis of biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Sarah A.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell culture systems were initially explored for use in commercial synthesis of several high value secondary metabolites, allowing for sustainable production that was not limited by the low yields associated with natural harvest or the high cost associated with complex chemical synthesis. Although there have been some commercial successes, most notably paclitaxel production from Taxus sp., process limitations exist with regards to low product yields and inherent production variability. ...

  17. BARRIERS TO COMMERCIALIZATION OF PASSIVE DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS: A REVEIW

    OpenAIRE

    N. K. Shrivastava; S. B. THOMBRE

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are electro-chemical reactors which realize the direct conversion of the chemical energy of reactants to electrical energy, with high efficiency and high environmental compatibility. This article is concerned with one of the most advance fuel cells- direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We present a comprehensive review on the commercialization barriers of passive DMFCs. The paper also summarizes past research efforts and possible future directions towards these problems.

  18. COPRA Aviation Security Research Roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasberg, M.P.; Leisman, L.; Voorde, I. van de; Weissbrodt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The EU funded project COPRA (Comprehensive European Approach to the Protection of Civil Aviation) developed a roadmap for future research activities, which could lead to a more resilient, flexible and comprehensive approach. Tackling 70 existing and potential threats to aviation (security) identifie

  19. Heat Roadmap Europe 3 (STRATEGO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Hansen, Kenneth; Drysdale, David;

    Heat Roadmap Europe 3 is from work package 2 of the STRATEGO project (http://stratego-project.eu/). It quantifies the impact of implementing various energy efficiency measures in the heating and cooling sectors of five EU Member States: Czech Republic, Croatia, Italy, Romania, and the United...

  20. Fusion roadmap in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    program, ITER program and the conceptual design study of K-DEMO and the implementation plan for core technology R and D based on a gap study are presented including the Korean Fusion Energy Roadmap. (author)

  1. Comparison of designed and commercial magnetic cell labels: relaxivity, cell uptake, cell viability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynek, V.; Glogarová, Kateřina; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Hájek, M.

    Warsawa : ESMRMB, 2006. s. 283-284. [Congress of European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology /23./. 21.09.2006-23.09.2006, Warsawa] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Cell * MR Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. A commercial lithium battery LiMn-oxide for fuel cell applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; He, Y.; Y. Zhao; Wang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Hereby we report first a commercial lithium battery LiMn-oxide (LMO) positive electrode material for fuel cell applications. The obtained LMO can be used for both anode and cathode in a three-layer fuel cell, but displays low electro-catalytic activity and power output. Using a nanocomposite approach we have significantly improved the cell performance from tens mW cm-2 up to 210 mW cm-2, which is technically useful for low temperature (bellow 600 °C) ceramic fuel cells. We also constructed si...

  3. Applying Technology Roadmapping to Exploratory Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry Belousov; Alexander Frolov; Irina Sukhareva

    2012-01-01

    Technology roadmaps are typically used in terms of normative approach to long-term S&T forecasting thus serving as a visual tool to identify optimal ways to reach defined future goals. Nonetheless roadmaps can be applied to exploratory studies as well. The latter are aimed at identifying key potentially transformative events, whose dynamics could be influenced by a wide range of externalities. Trends in some fields appear to dominate and shape movement in other areas. Roadmapping allows visua...

  4. AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Horneck, Gerda; Walter, Nicolas; Westall, Frances; Grenfell, John Lee; Martin, William F.; Gomez, Felipe; Leuko, Stefan; Lee, Natuschka; Onofri, Silvano; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Saladino, Raffaele; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Palomba, Ernesto; Harrison, Jesse; Rull, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research to...

  5. High Efficiency Spectrum Splitting Prototype Submodule Using Commercial CPV Cells (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevers, M.; Lau, J.; Green, M.; Thomas, I.; Lasich, J.; King, R.; Emery, K.

    2014-11-01

    This presentation summarizes progress on the design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept, prototype spectrum splitting CPV submodule using commercial CPV cells, aimed at demonstrating an independently confirmed efficiency above 40% at STC (1000 W/m2, AM1.5D ASTM G173-03, 25 degrees C).

  6. Bioculture System: Expanding ISS Space Bioscience Capabilities for Fundamental Stem Cell Research and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Fitzpatrick, Garret; Ellingson, Lance; Mitchell, Sarah; Yang, Anthony; Kosnik, Cristine; Rayl, Nicole; Cannon, Tom; Austin, Edward; Sato, Kevin

    With the recent call by the 2011 Decadal Report and the 2010 Space Biosciences Roadmap for the International Space Station (ISS) to be used as a National Laboratory for scientific research, there is now a need for new laboratory instruments on ISS to enable such research to occur. The Bioculture System supports the extended culturing of multiple cell types and microbiological specimens. It consists of a docking station that carries ten independent incubation units or ‘Cassettes’. Each Cassette contains a cooling chamber (5(°) C) for temperature sensitive solutions and samples, or long duration fluids and sample storage, as well as an incubation chamber (ambient up to 42(°) C). Each Cassette houses an independent fluidics system comprised of a biochamber, medical-grade fluid tubing, medium warming module, oxygenation module, fluid pump, and sixteen solenoid valves for automated biochamber injections of sampling. The Bioculture System provides the user with the ability to select the incubation temperature, fluid flow rate and automated biochamber sampling or injection events for each separate Cassette. Furthermore, the ISS crew can access the biochamber, media bag, and accessory bags on-orbit using the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The Bioculture System also permits initiation of cultures, subculturing, injection of compounds, and removal of samples for on-orbit processing using ISS facilities. The Bioculture System therefore provides a unique opportunity for the study of stem cells and other cell types in space. The first validation flight of the Bioculture System will be conducted on SpaceX5, consisting of 8 Cassettes and lasting for 30-37 days. During this flight we plan to culture two different mammalian cell types in bioreactors: a mouse osteocytic-like cell line, and human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived cardiomyocytes. Specifically, the osteocytic line will enable the study of a type of cell that has been flown on the Bioculture System

  7. The GRIP method for collaborative roadmapping workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    Technology roadmapping is a well-known tool for technology management, but practical advice for facilitating collaborative roadmapping workshops is relatively scarce. To cater for this need, we have designed a method for collaborative roadmapping, dubbed the GRIP method, for facilitating group work...... in TRM workshops. The design is based on establish best practices in facilitation and our experiences with the method suggest it is a feasible tool for technology managers. The benefits of the method are that it enables engaging a diverse group of individuals to the roadmapping process effectively...

  8. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and

  9. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  10. Technology Roadmaps: Tools for Development

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Clayton

    2008-01-01

    The paper opens a series of two publications devoted to technological roadmapping. This technique allows revealing and relating threats, risks, priorities and opportunities of development for different technologies and thus making better decisions. Different factors influencing on road mapping are considered such as base technologies and possible alternatives, potential gaps and risks, competitiveness etc. Special attention is paid to emerging technologies having great potential, when expecte...

  11. Commercialization basics for the photonics industry

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, David A

    2013-01-01

    Most entrepreneurs have expertise in one or more of the critical areas of commercialization, but may lack key elements necessary for success. Commercialization Basics for the Photonics Industry serves as a roadmap for the commercialization process, helping identify and address roadblocks on the path to commercialization. Evaluation techniques will help determine the strength of a business opportunity and guide its development toward the best chance of success.

  12. Technology Roadmaps: Energy-efficient Buildings: Heating and Cooling Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Buildings account for almost a third of final energy consumption globally and are an equally important source of CO2 emissions. Currently, both space heating and cooling as well as hot water are estimated to account for roughly half of global energy consumption in buildings. Energy-efficient and low/zero-carbon heating and cooling technologies for buildings have the potential to reduce CO2 emissions by up to 2 gigatonnes (Gt) and save 710 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe) of energy by 2050. Most of these technologies -- which include solar thermal, combined heat and power (CHP), heat pumps and thermal energy storage -- are commercially available today. The Energy-Efficient Buildings: Heating and Cooling Equipment Roadmap sets out a detailed pathway for the evolution and deployment of the key underlying technologies. It finds that urgent action is required if the building stock of the future is to consume less energy and result in lower CO2 emissions. The roadmap concludes with a set of near-term actions that stakeholders will need to take to achieve the roadmap's vision.

  13. Fuel cells are a commercially viable alternative for the production of "clean" energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakolas, Dimitris K; Daletou, Maria; Neophytides, Stylianos G; Vayenas, Constantinos G

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells present a highly efficient and environmentally friendly alternative technology for decentralized energy production. The scope of the present study is to provide an overview of the technological and commercialization readiness level of fuel cells. Specifically, there is a brief description of their general advantages and weaknesses in correlation with various technological actions and political strategies, which are adopted towards their proper positioning in the global market. Some of the most important key performance indicators are also discussed, alongside with a few examples of broad commercialization. It is concluded that the increasing number of companies which utilize and invest on this technology, in combination with the supply chain improvements and the concomitant technological maturity and recognition, reinforce the fuel cell industry so as to become well-aligned for global success. PMID:26667058

  14. Managing probe applications effectively? The process of pre-commercial fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, H.L. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    There has been a high degree of uncertainty regarding market adoption of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technologies, making it challenging for fuel cell firms to determine which markets to pursue at which point in time. Probes, such as prototypes, demonstrations and field trials, are market experiments conducted by fuel cell firms and industry that are central to the commercialization of fuel cell technology. However, demonstration projects are extremely resource and time intensive, and outcomes are uncertain. This paper reviewed innovation management literature on the characteristics of the technology application process. Case study research of four fuel cell firms were discussed in terms of probe objectives and outcomes. An analysis of probe application patterns over time was also presented. Several fuel cell projects were also analyzed in terms of motivations and lessons learned. The paper focused on young independent fuel cell developers that had limited resources to allocate and waste resources on ineffective probe applications. The findings complement prior research that have found probe applications a valuable tool for learning, stimulating market demand and network formation. The paper made several recommendations regarding the main objectives of the fuel cell project, to set realistic goals and align expectations between consortia members. In addition, it was found that a short term demonstration project may appear to be an attractive application, but a project with a longer term vision and a commercial value proposition was more likely to attract stakeholders. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We examine proton exchange membrane fuel cells on-board commercial airplanes. ► We model the added fuel cell system’s effect on overall airplane performance. ► It is feasible to implement an on-board fuel cell system with current technology. ► Systems that maximize waste heat recovery are the best performing. ► Current PEM and H2 storage technology results in an airplane performance penalty. -- Abstract: Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they could offer a performance advantage for the airplane when using today’s off-the-shelf technology. We also examine the effects of the fuel cell system on airplane performance with (1) different electrical loads, (2) different locations on the airplane, and (3) expected advances in fuel cell and hydrogen storage technologies. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic simulation, we found that an additional fuel cell system on a commercial airplane is technically feasible using current technology. Although applied to a Boeing 787-type airplane, the method presented is applicable to other airframes as well. Recovery and on-board use of the heat and water that is generated by the fuel cell is an important method to increase the benefit of such a system. The best performance is achieved when the fuel cell is coupled to a load that utilizes the full output of the fuel cell for the entire flight. The effects of location are small and location may be better determined by other considerations such as safety and modularity. Although the PEM fuel cell generates power more efficiently than the gas turbine generators currently used, when considering the effect of the fuel cell system on the airplane’s overall performance we found that an overall

  16. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  17. Gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumai, Kazuma; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yo; Takei, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Rikio

    To elucidate the gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cells after long cycling, we developed a device which can accurately determine the volume of generated gas in the cell. Experiments on Li xC 6/Li 1- xCoO 2 cells using electrolytes such as 1 M LiPF 6 in propylene carbonate (PC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) are presented and discussed. In the nominal voltage range (4.2-2.5 V), compositional change due mainly to ester exchange reaction occurs, and gaseous products in the cell are little. Generated gas volume and compositional change in the electrolyte are detected largely in overcharged cells, and we discussed that gas generation due to electrolyte decomposition involves different decomposition reactions in overcharged and overdischarged cells.

  18. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joesph W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klebanoff, Leonard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Akhil, Abbas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curgus, Dita B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schenkman, Benjamin L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  19. IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} fuel cells progress toward commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scroppo, J.A.; Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. More specifically, MCFC`s Manifolded Heat Exchange (IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}}) plate design created by the Institute of Technology. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, M-C Power assembled a formidable team of industry leaders. This group, refered to as the (IHMEX{sup {reg_sign}}) Team, has developed a strategy to move decisively through the stages of Technology Development and Product Design and Improvement through commercialization. This paper is to review the status of the overall commercialization program and activities. It will also provide an overview of the market entry product. Furthermore, we will evaluate the opportunities and benefits this product brings to a competitive power industry.

  20. Commercial, environmental and legislative factors that influence the implementation of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfass, Jeffrey A.; Bergman, Michael K.; Rodenhiser, Wendy

    1994-04-01

    Fuel cells and other advanced electric-generation technologies have not experienced a record of successful commercialization efforts. To lower costs for these technologies, it requires substantial production volumes with a significant investment in manufacturing facilities, all dependent on developer confidence in the ultimate market. Yet, market acceptance by buyers requires an adequate demonstration of technical performance and an assurance that these lower costs can be reached. In addition to this fundamental commercialization challenge, there are significant external factors that are greatly influencing the market's (utility's) future implementation of new alternative energy-generating technologies. The factor that has possibly the greatest impact today is the public demand for environmentally benign and renewable resource technologies. There is a growing trend of involvement by consumers, regulators and intervenors in the business and utility industry that is shifting the economic playing field by which industries make resource decisions. Concerns over air pollution, global warming, acid precipitation, depletion of the ozone layer and the hazards of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from power lines, have all led to more stringent regulations and environmental mandates. The utility business environment itself is rapidly changing. Higher public expectations from energy providers and increasing competition are leading to major changes in the American utility sector. Competitive requirements to reduce the cost of utility service is leading to business decisions that provide both opportunities and problems for increased use of alternative energy-generating technologies, like fuel cells, and/or renewables, such as wind and solar photovoltaics. Bringing new energy technologies to market is very expensive and this financial burden cannot be shouldered by the market, manufacturers or federal government alone. Further, for the market to assume a key position in early

  1. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  2. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  3. 2050 Energy Roadmap. Energy Policy and Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Commission will adopt an Energy Roadmap 2050 by the end of this year. This presentation, several months before adoption, is about the concept of the Roadmap, the role which it is intended to play in EU energy policy development and progress so far.

  4. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  5. Industry-driven sector roadmaps 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission.......Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission....

  6. Energy analysis of fuel cell system for commercial greenhouse application – A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Feasibility study of integrating a PEMFC with a commercial greenhouse. • An energy analysis has been performed in order to evaluate the energetic performance of the system. • A sensitivity analysis on the main influencing operating parameters for optimization. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of integrating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system with a commercial greenhouse and assess the mutual benefits of such integration. The main objective is to recover the low quality waste heat of the PEMFC system in order to meet the thermal energy demand of a commercial greenhouse. In addition the PEMFC covers the some part of the greenhouse electrical demand. In this study an energy analysis has been performed in order to evaluate the energetic performance of the system. To achieve these aims, first, a system model has been developed using TRNSYS. Afterwards, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out varying the main influencing operating parameters in order to evaluate an optimal configuration of the system. In particular the influences of temperature and air stoichiometry have been investigated. The results show that a 3 kW fuel cell system is capable to cover approximately the 25% and 10% of the usual electricity and heat demands of a 1000 m2 commercial greenhouse during a year, respectively

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy's office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included

  8. Modulation of endothelial cell integrity and inflammatory activation by commercial lipid emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Kevin A.; Xu, Zhidong; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombosis and immune dysfunction are two important complications that result from the administration of parenteral nutrition. Endothelial cells within the vasculature are crucial components necessary for maintenance of normal coagulation and immune function. Methods We compared the effects of three commercial lipid emulsions (LEs; Intralipid®, ClinOleic® [or Clinolipid®], and Omegaven®) differing in the levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty a...

  9. Stem Cell Research Funding Policies and Dynamic Innovation: A Survey of Open Access and Commercialization Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Lévesque, Maroussia; Kim, Jihyun Rosel; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Plomer, Aurora; Joly, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the pressures of both open access data sharing and commercialization policies in the context of publicly funded embryonic stem cell research (SCR). First, normative guidelines of international SCR organizations were examined. We then examined SCR funding guidelines and the project evaluation criteria of major funding organizations in the EU, the United Kingdom (UK), Spain, Canada and the United States. Our survey of policies revealed subtle pressures to com...

  10. On the performance limiting behavior of defect clusters in commercial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Chen, W.; Jones, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors report the observation of defect clusters in high-quality, commercial silicon solar cell substrates. The nature of the defect clusters, their mechanism of formation, and precipitation of metallic impurities at the defect clusters are discussed. This defect configuration influences the device performance in a unique way--by primarily degrading the voltage-related parameters. Network modeling is used to show that, in an N/P junction device, these regions act as shunts that dissipate power generated within the cell.

  11. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  12. China's bioenergy industry development roadmap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuanchun; Li Shizhong; Liu Xuejun

    2009-01-01

    Positive development of renewable energy, saving and substitution of fossil energy, promotion of the energy structure adjustment are the inevitable strategy choices of China's sustainable development. This paper discussed the China's bioenergy resources status, development targets and technology development roadmaps. China has 136. 140 million hm2 of marginal land, which distribute mainly in western and northern regions. There are 1 billion t of crop resi-dues and forestry waste annually, and 300 million t can be used to produce different kinds of bioenergies. And organic waste and manure can generate 50 billion m3 of biogas. The discussed development target indicated that it can construct a biomass oilfield with the capacity of 100 million t/year and reduce 200 million t of CO2 emission by 2020. The bioen-ergy technology development roadmap indicated that the bioethanol mainly uses non grain starch and hemicellulose prod-ucts as raw materials in the near-term (2006- 2010). The biodiesel technology will focus on the advanced production technology, FT diesel, liquefaction of biomass and raw material production technology.

  13. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Efficiency of commercial Cz-Si solar cell with a shallow emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, C.; Alonso, J.; Vazquez, M.A.; Caballero, L.J. [Isofoton S.A., c/Severo Ochoa 50, PTA, 29590 Malaga (Spain); Romero, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad asociada al CSIC), Dpto. Fisica Aplicada Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E29071 Malaga (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R., E-mail: barrado@uma.es [Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficie (Unidad asociada al CSIC), Dpto. Fisica Aplicada Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, E29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    The increase of a commercial solar cell performance implies an improvement in the different processes in the industrial production. In order to know the main limitations in the efficiency of Czocharalski-Si (Cz-Si) photovoltaic cells, the loss distribution was studied by means of external quantum efficiency, I-V measurements and PC-1D simulation in the current device. One of the most relevant losses is due to recombination in the emitter. The emitters with a low resistance (40 {Omega}/{open_square}) and a deep pn-junction, display a considerable loss ratio. Shallower emitters (80 {Omega}/{open_square}) with low doping density and a new paste for the front side result in a relative improvement in cell efficiency of 3.5%.

  16. Experimental study of commercial size proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial sized (16 x 16 cm2 active surface area) proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with serpentine flow chambers are fabricated. The GORE-TEX (registered) PRIMEA 5621 was used with a 35-μm-thick PEM with an anode catalyst layer with 0.45 mg cm-2 Pt and cathode catalyst layer with 0.6 mg cm-2 Pt and Ru or GORE-TEX (registered) PRIMEA 57 was used with an 18-μm-thick PEM with an anode catalyst layer at 0.2 mg cm-2 Pt and cathode catalyst layer at 0.4 mg cm-2 of Pt and Ru. At the specified cell and humidification temperatures, the thin PRIMEA 57 membrane yields better cell performance than the thick PRIMEA 5621 membrane, since hydration of the former is more easily maintained with the limited amount of produced water. Sufficient humidification at both the cathode and anode sides is essential to achieve high cell performance with a thick membrane, like the PRIMEA 5621. The optimal cell temperature to produce the best cell performance with PRIMEA 5621 is close to the humidification temperature. For PRIMEA 57, however, optimal cell temperature exceeds the humidification temperature.

  17. A roadmap to the realization of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the reduction of CO2 emissions driving future energy policy, fusion can start market penetration beyond 2050 with up to 30% of electricity production by 2100. This requires an ambitious, yet realistic roadmap towards the demonstration of electricity production by 2050. This talk describes the main technical challenges on the path to fusion energy. For all of the challenges candidate solutions have been developed and the goal of the programme is now to demonstrate that they will also work at the scale of reactor. The roadmap has been developed within a goal-oriented approach articulated in eight different Missions. For each Mission the critical aspects for reactor application, the risks and risk mitigation strategies, the level of readiness now and after ITER and the gaps in the programme have been examined with involvement of experts from the ITER International Organization, Fusion for Energy, EFDA Close Support Unites and EFDA Associates. High-level work packages for the roadmap implementation have been prepared and the resources evaluated. ITER is the key facility in the roadmap and its success represents the most important overarching objectives of the EU programme. A demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO), producing net electricity for the grid at the level of a few hundreds MW is foreseen to start operation in the early 2040s. Following ITER, it will be the single step to a commercial fusion power plant. Industry must be involved early in the DEMO definition and design. The evolution of the programme requires that industry progressively shifts its role from that of provider of high-tech components to that of driver of the fusion development. Industry must be able to take full responsibility for the commercial fusion power plant after successful DEMO operation. For this reason, DEMO cannot be defined and designed by research laboratories alone, but requires the full involvement of industry in all technological and systems aspects of the design. Europe

  18. Extensive EIS characterization of commercially available lithium polymer battery cell for performance modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciu, Tiberiu; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Teodorescu, Remus;

    2015-01-01

    degradation of an electrochemical system. Used for Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries, this method allows for a fast and accurate assessment of the battery's impedance at any working point, without modifying the state of the battery. The influence of the operating conditions, state of charge (SOC) and temperature...... on the performance of a commercially available 53 Ah Lithium polymer battery cell, manufactured by Kokam Co. Ltd., is investigated in laboratory experiments, at its beginning of life, by means of EIS. A data fitting algorithm was used to obtain the parameter values for the proposed equivalent...

  19. VistA 4 Product Roadmap

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VistA 4 Product Roadmap outlines how the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), under the direction of the VistA Evolution Program, will build upon the previous...

  20. Roadmap-Based Level Clearing of Buildings

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a roadmap-based approach for a multi-agent search strategy to clear a building or multi-story environment. This approach utilizes an encoding of the environment in the form of a graph (roadmap) that is used to encode feasible paths through the environment. The roadmap is partitioned into regions, e.g., one per level, and we design region-based search strategies to cover and clear the environment. We can provide certain guarantees within this roadmap-based framework on coverage and the number of agents needed. Our approach can handle complex and realistic environments where many approaches are restricted to simple 2D environments. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Cycle aging of commercial NMC/graphite pouch cells at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cycle aging of commercial 40 A h pouch cells was studied at different temperatures. • Cycle testing, impedance spectroscopy, and post-mortem analyses were carried out. • Post-mortem study enabled attributing the observed aging to different mechanisms. • Capacity fade was related to SEI-layer and at high temperature also to Li plating. • Significant increase in the electrolyte and separator resistances was observed. - Abstract: Cycle aging of commercial 40 A h pouch-type lithium-ion cells with NMC/graphite chemistry was studied at different cycling temperatures (room temperature, +45 °C, and +45 °C charge/+65 °C discharge). Aging was observed as capacity fade and resistance increase, and the aging mechanisms were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and post-mortem analysis, where visual inspection and thickness measurements were employed together with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analyses. It was observed that elevated temperatures resulted in accelerated capacity fade, especially for the +45 °C/+65 °C condition. SEI-layer growth and lithium plating, discovered in cell disassembly, were attributed to be the main mechanisms responsible for capacity loss. In addition to the capacity fade, resistance increase was observed both in ohmic and polarization resistances. The ohmic resistance growth was attributed to lack of electrolyte and increased separator resistance. Polarization resistance evolution during cycling was similar at room temperature and at +45 °C, but different at the +45 °C/+65 °C condition. It was concluded that post-mortem analysis is essential for attributing the cycle testing and impedance spectroscopy results to different components and processes inside the cell. For example, the lithium plating phenomenon could not have been predicted or discovered

  2. The road to commercialization in Africa: lessons from developing the sickle-cell drug Niprisan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing novel drugs from traditional medicinal knowledge can serve as a means to improve public health. Yet countries in sub-Saharan Africa face barriers in translating traditional medicinal knowledge into commercially viable health products. Barriers in moving along the road towards making a new drug available include insufficient manufacturing capacity; knowledge sharing between scientists and medical healers; regulatory hurdles; quality control issues; pricing and distribution; and lack of financing. The case study method was used to illustrate efforts to overcome these barriers during the development in Nigeria of Niprisan – a novel drug for the treatment of sickle cell anemia, a chronic blood disorder with few effective therapies. Discussion Building on the knowledge of a traditional medicine practitioner, Nigeria’s National Institute for Pharmaceutical Research and Development (NIPRD developed the traditional herbal medicine Niprisan. The commercialization of Niprisan reached a number of commercial milestones, including regulatory approval in Nigeria; securing US-based commercial partner XeChem; demonstrating clinical efficacy and safety; being awarded orphan drug status by the US Food and Drug Administration; and striking important relationships with domestic and international groups. Despite these successes, however, XeChem did not achieve mainstream success for Niprisan in Nigeria or in the United States. A number of reasons, including inconsistent funding and manufacturing and management challenges, have been put forth to explain Niprisan’s commercial demise. As of this writing, NIPRD is considering options for another commercial partner to take the drug forward. Summary Evidence from the Niprisan experience suggests that establishing benefit-sharing agreements, fostering partnerships with established research institutions, improving standardization and quality control, ensuring financial and managerial due

  3. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  4. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors' load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The presentation will include a

  5. Planetary Data System (PDS) Strategic Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Emily; McNutt, Ralph; Crichton, Daniel J.; Morgan, Tom

    2016-07-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) archives and distributes scientific data from NASA planetary missions, astronomical observations, and laboratory measurements. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) sponsors the PDS. Its purpose is to ensure the long-term usability of NASA data and to stimulate advanced research. The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the SMD at NASA Headquarters has directed the PDS to set up a Roadmap team to formulate a PDS Roadmap for the period 2017-2026. The purpose of this activity is to provide a forecast of both the rapidly changing Information Technology (IT) environment and the changing expectations of the planetary science communities with respect to Planetary Data archives including, specifically, increasing assessability to all planetary data. The Roadmap team will also identify potential actions that could increase interoperability with other archive and curation elements within NASA and with the archives of other National Space Agencies. The Roadmap team will assess the current state of the PDS and report their findings to the PSD Director by April 15, 2017. This presentation will give an update of this roadmap activity and serve as an opportunity to engage the planetary community at large to provide input to the Roadmap.

  6. Use of a commercial enzyme immunoassay to monitor dengue virus replication in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Angel Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current methods for dengue virus quantitation are either time consuming, technically demanding or costly. As an alternative, the commercial enzyme immunoassay Platelia™ Dengue NS1 AG (Bio-Rad Laboratories was used to monitor semiquantitatively dengue virus replication in cultured cells. The presence of NS1 protein was evaluated in supernatants from Vero and C6/36 HT cells infected with dengue virus. The amount of NS1 detected in the supernatants of infected cells was proportional to the initial MOI used and to the time of post infection harvest. This immunoassay was also able to detect the presence of NS1 in the supernatants of infected human macrophages. Inhibition of dengue virus replication in C6/36 HT cells treated with lysosomotropic drugs was readily monitored with the use of this assay. These results suggest that the Platelia™ Dengue NS1 AG kit can be used as a fast and reliable surrogate method for the relative quantitation of dengue virus replication in cultured cells.

  7. Cross-functional shifts in roadmapping: Sequence analysis of roadmapping practices at a large corporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonse, W.L.; Perks, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study unravels the nature of inter-functional integration in roadmapping. Roadmapping is indicated as an important innovation phenomenon and is practiced by multiple large organizations. Functional integration is widely acknowledged to play a significant role in enhancing new product success. R

  8. Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

  9. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-06-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but high amino acid concentrations alone were not sufficient to ensure superior cell growth and high antibody production. However, some key amino acids that were limiting in most media could be identified. Unbalanced glucose and amino acids led to high cell-specific lactate and ammonium production rates. In some media, persistently high glucose concentrations probably induced the suppression of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, known as Crabtree effect, which resulted in high cell-specific glycolysis rates along with a continuous and high lactate production. In additional experiments, two of the eight basal media were supplemented with feeds from two different manufacturers in six combinations, in order to understand the combined impact of media and feeds on cell metabolism in a CHO fed-batch process. Cell growth, nutrient consumption and metabolite production rates, antibody production, and IgG quality were evaluated in detail. Concentrated feed supplements boosted cell concentrations almost threefold and antibody titers up to sevenfold. Depending on the fed-batch strategy, fourfold higher peak cell concentrations and eightfold increased IgG titers (up to 5.8 g/L) were achieved. The glycolytic flux was remarkably similar among the fed-batches; however, substantially different specific lactate production rates were observed in the different media and feed combinations. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the feed additives, the basal medium can make a considerable

  10. Delivery of episomal vectors into primary cells by means of commercial transfection reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na Rae; Lee, Hyun; Baek, Song; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-05-29

    Although episomal vectors are commonly transported into cells by electroporation, a number of electroporation-derived problems have led to the search for alternative transfection protocols, such as the use of transfection reagents, which are inexpensive and easy to handle. Polyplex-mediated transport of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm has been conducted successfully in immortalized cell lines, but no report exists of successful transfection of primary cells using this method. Accordingly, we sought to optimize the conditions for polyplex-mediated transfection for effective delivery of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Episomal vectors were complexed with the commercially available transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000, FuGEND HD and jetPEI. The ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vectors was varied, and the subsequent transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of the complexes were analyzed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. No cytotoxicity and the highest transfection yield were observed when the ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vector was 4 (v/wt) in the cases of Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGENE HD, and 2 in the case of jetPEI. Of the three transfection reagents tested, jetPEI showed the highest transfection efficiency without any cytotoxicity. Thus, we confirmed that the transfection reagent jetPEI could be used to effectively deliver episomal vectors into primary cells without electroporation. PMID:25887802

  11. NASA Technology Area 07: Human Exploration Destination Systems Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Alexander, Leslie; Landis, Rob; Linne, Diane; Mclemore, Carole; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Brown, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) led Space Technology Roadmap definition efforts. This paper will given an executive summary of the technology area 07 (TA07) Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS). These are draft roadmaps being reviewed and updated by the National Research Council. Deep-space human exploration missions will require many game changing technologies to enable safe missions, become more independent, and enable intelligent autonomous operations and take advantage of the local resources to become self-sufficient thereby meeting the goal of sustained human presence in space. Taking advantage of in-situ resources enhances and enables revolutionary robotic and human missions beyond the traditional mission architectures and launch vehicle capabilities. Mobility systems will include in-space flying, surface roving, and Extra-vehicular Activity/Extravehicular Robotics (EVA/EVR) mobility. These push missions will take advantage of sustainability and supportability technologies that will allow mission independence to conduct human mission operations either on or near the Earth, in deep space, in the vicinity of Mars, or on the Martian surface while opening up commercialization opportunities in low Earth orbit (LEO) for research, industrial development, academia, and entertainment space industries. The Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS) Technology Area (TA) 7 Team has been chartered by the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to strategically roadmap technology investments that will enable sustained human exploration and support NASA s missions and goals for at least the next 25 years. HEDS technologies will enable a sustained human presence for exploring destinations such as remote sites on Earth and beyond including, but not limited to, LaGrange points, low Earth orbit (LEO), high Earth orbit (HEO), geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the Moon, near

  12. Astaxanthin-Producing Green Microalga Haematococcus pluvialis: From Single Cell to High Value Commercial Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Md. Mahfuzur R.; Liang, Yuanmei; Cheng, Jay J.; Daroch, Maurycy

    2016-01-01

    Many species of microalgae have been used as source of nutrient rich food, feed, and health promoting compounds. Among the commercially important microalgae, Haematococcus pluvialis is the richest source of natural astaxanthin which is considered as “super anti-oxidant.” Natural astaxanthin produced by H. pluvialis has significantly greater antioxidant capacity than the synthetic one. Astaxanthin has important applications in the nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and aquaculture industries. It is now evident that, astaxanthin can significantly reduce free radicals and oxidative stress and help human body maintain a healthy state. With extraordinary potency and increase in demand, astaxanthin is one of the high-value microalgal products of the future.This comprehensive review summarizes the most important aspects of the biology, biochemical composition, biosynthesis, and astaxanthin accumulation in the cells of H. pluvialis and its wide range of applications for humans and animals. In this paper, important and recent developments ranging from cultivation, harvest and postharvest bio-processing technologies to metabolic control and genetic engineering are reviewed in detail, focusing on biomass and astaxanthin production from this biotechnologically important microalga. Simultaneously, critical bottlenecks and major challenges in commercial scale production; current and prospective global market of H. pluvialis derived astaxanthin are also presented in a critical manner. A new biorefinery concept for H. pluvialis has been also suggested to guide toward economically sustainable approach for microalgae cultivation and processing. This report could serve as a useful guide to present current status of knowledge in the field and highlight key areas for future development of H. pluvialis astaxanthin technology and its large scale commercial implementation. PMID:27200009

  13. Astaxanthin-Producing Green Microalga Haematococcus pluvialis: From Single Cell to High Value Commercial Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Md Mahfuzur R; Liang, Yuanmei; Cheng, Jay J; Daroch, Maurycy

    2016-01-01

    Many species of microalgae have been used as source of nutrient rich food, feed, and health promoting compounds. Among the commercially important microalgae, Haematococcus pluvialis is the richest source of natural astaxanthin which is considered as "super anti-oxidant." Natural astaxanthin produced by H. pluvialis has significantly greater antioxidant capacity than the synthetic one. Astaxanthin has important applications in the nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and aquaculture industries. It is now evident that, astaxanthin can significantly reduce free radicals and oxidative stress and help human body maintain a healthy state. With extraordinary potency and increase in demand, astaxanthin is one of the high-value microalgal products of the future.This comprehensive review summarizes the most important aspects of the biology, biochemical composition, biosynthesis, and astaxanthin accumulation in the cells of H. pluvialis and its wide range of applications for humans and animals. In this paper, important and recent developments ranging from cultivation, harvest and postharvest bio-processing technologies to metabolic control and genetic engineering are reviewed in detail, focusing on biomass and astaxanthin production from this biotechnologically important microalga. Simultaneously, critical bottlenecks and major challenges in commercial scale production; current and prospective global market of H. pluvialis derived astaxanthin are also presented in a critical manner. A new biorefinery concept for H. pluvialis has been also suggested to guide toward economically sustainable approach for microalgae cultivation and processing. This report could serve as a useful guide to present current status of knowledge in the field and highlight key areas for future development of H. pluvialis astaxanthin technology and its large scale commercial implementation. PMID:27200009

  14. Determination of the behavior and performance of commercial Li-Ion pouch cells by means of isothermal calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Mohammad Rezwan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment-based research, there is an attempt to determine the evolution of surface temperature distribution, thermal behaviour and performance of a battery cell at the same time. The pouch type commercial test cell has a 13Ah capacity and Lithium Titanate Oxide (LTO) based anode...

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cells: A high temperature fuel cell on the edge to commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Manfred

    The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) technology has been developed in USA, Japan, Korea and Europe for many years. What has started about 30 years ago as an interesting laboratory object has now matured to a potential alternative to conventional power generation systems. Especially the combined heat and power (CHP) generation is an area, where MCFC power plants can be applied with great advantage, due to the high efficiencies which can be achieved. It was demonstrated by several manufacturers that in the sub-MW region MCFC power plants can reach electrical efficiencies of 47%. By making use of the heat generated by the system, total efficiencies of more than 80% can be achieved. The present paper will discuss some aspects of the development work going on with a focus on the role of the molten carbonate contained in the cells. An outlook will be given for the future prospects of this young technology in a changing energy market.

  16. A Roadmap to Interstellar Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Lubin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In the nearly 60 years of spaceflight we have accomplished wonderful feats of exploration that have shown the incredible spirit of the human drive to explore and understand our universe. Yet in those 60 years we have barely left our solar system with the Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 finally leaving the solar system after 37 years of flight at a speed of 17 km/s or less than 0.006% the speed of light. As remarkable as this is we will never reach even the nearest stars with our current propulsion technology in even 10 millennium. We have to radically rethink our strategy or give up our dreams of reaching the stars, or wait for technology that does not currently exist. While we all dream of human spaceflight to the stars in a way romanticized in books and movies, it is not within our power to do so, nor it is clear that this is the path we should choose. We posit a technological path forward, that while not simple, it is within our technological reach. We propose a roadmap to a program that will lead to...

  17. Technology Roadmaps: Concentrating Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The emerging technology known as concentrating solar power, or CSP, holds much promise for countries with plenty of sunshine and clear skies. Its electrical output matches well the shifting daily demand for electricity in places where airconditioning systems are spreading. When backed up by thermal storage facilities and combustible fuel, it offers utilities electricity that can be dispatched when required, enabling it to be used for base, shoulder and peak loads. Within about one to two decades, it will be able to compete with coal plants that emit high levels of CO2. The sunniest regions, such as North Africa, may be able to export surplus solar electricity to neighbouring regions, such as Europe, where demand for electricity from renewable sources is strong. In the medium-to-longer term, concentrating solar facilities can also produce hydrogen, which can be blended with natural gas, and provide low-carbon liquid fuels for transport and other end-use sectors. For CSP to claim its share of the coming energy revolution, concerted action is required over the next ten years by scientists, industry, governments, financing institutions and the public. This roadmap is intended to help drive these indispensable developments.

  18. A consortium approach to commercialized Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Allan

    Westinghouse is developing its tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) for a variety of applications in stationary power generation markets. By pressurizing a SOFC and integrating it with a gas turbine (GT), power systems with efficiencies as high as 70-75% can be obtained. The first such system will be tested in 1998. Because of their extraordinarily high efficiency (60-70%) even in small sizes the first SOFC products to be offered are expected to be integrated SOFC/GT power systems in the 1-7 MW range, for use in the emerging distributed generation (DG) market segment. Expansion into larger sizes will follow later. Because of their modularity, environmental friendliness and expected cost effectiveness, and because of a worldwide thrust towards utility deregulation, a ready market is forecasted for baseload distributed generation. Assuming Westinghouse can complete its technology development and reach its cost targets, the integrated SOFC/GT power system is seen as a product with tremendous potential in the emerging distributed generation market. While Westinghouse has been a leader in the development of power generation technology for over a century, it does not plan to manufacture small gas turbines. However, GTs small enough to integrate with SOFCs and address the 1-7 MW market are generally available from various manufacturers. Westinghouse will need access to a new set of customers as it brings baseload plants to the present small market mix of emergency and peaking power applications. Small cogeneration applications, already strong in some parts of the world, are also gaining ground everywhere. Small GT manufacturers already serve this market, and alliances and partnerships can enhance SOFC commercialization. Utilities also serve the DG market, especially those that have set up energy service companies and seek to grow beyond the legal and geographical confines of their current regulated business. Because fuel cells in general are a new product, because small

  19. NASA's Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Paul K.; Femminineo, Mark G.; Koelfgen, Syri J.; Lepsch, Roger A; Ryan, Richard M.; Taylor, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Safe, reliable, and affordable access to low-Earth (LEO) orbit is necessary for all of the United States (US) space endeavors. In 2010, NASA s Office of the Chief Technologist commissioned 14 teams to develop technology roadmaps that could be used to guide the Agency s and US technology investment decisions for the next few decades. The Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Area (LPSTA) team was tasked to address the propulsion technology challenges for access to LEO. The developed LPSTA roadmap addresses technologies that enhance existing solid or liquid propulsion technologies and their related ancillary systems or significantly advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of less mature systems like airbreathing, unconventional, and other launch technologies. In developing this roadmap, the LPSTA team consulted previous NASA, military, and industry studies as well as subject matter experts to develop their assessment of this field, which has fundamental technological and strategic impacts for US space capabilities.

  20. Technology Roadmaps: Bioenergy for Heat and Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Technology Roadmap Bioenergy for Heat and Power highlights the importance of bioenergy in providing heat in the buildings sector and in industry, and shows what contribution it could make to meeting steadlily growing world electricity demand. The critical role of sustainability as well as the importance of international trade in meeting the projected demand for bioenergy, are highlighted in the roadmap, as well as the need for large-scale biomass plants in providing The roadmap identifies key actions by different stakeholders in the bioenergy sector, and sets out milestones for technology development in order to achieve a doubling of global bioenergy supply by 2050. It addresses the need for further R&D efforts, highlights measures to ensure sustainability of biomass production, and underlines the need for international collaboration to enhance the production and use of sustainable, modern bioenergy in different world regions.

  1. Technology Roadmaps: Bioenergy for Heat and Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap Bioenergy for Heat and Power highlights the importance of bioenergy in providing heat in the buildings sector and in industry, and shows what contribution it could make to meeting steadlily growing world electricity demand. The critical role of sustainability as well as the importance of international trade in meeting the projected demand for bioenergy, are highlighted in the roadmap, as well as the need for large-scale biomass plants in providing The roadmap identifies key actions by different stakeholders in the bioenergy sector, and sets out milestones for technology development in order to achieve a doubling of global bioenergy supply by 2050. It addresses the need for further R&D efforts, highlights measures to ensure sustainability of biomass production, and underlines the need for international collaboration to enhance the production and use of sustainable, modern bioenergy in different world regions.

  2. SCENET roadmap for superconductor digital electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roadmap gives an overview on status and future developments in Superconducting Digital Electronics (SDE). Key areas in SDE under focus are applications, circuit simulation and design, circuit fabrication, interfacing and testing, cooling and system aspects, and new devices and materials. Care was taken to establish the vital link between research and development on the one hand and the industrial view on the other hand. The present roadmap is based on extensive input from the roadmap working group on SDE established by SCENET - the European Network for Superconductivity, intensified by the activities of the FLUXONICS Network - the European Foundry for Superconducting Electronics. It is the result of many years of discussion in the group and of consultations with experts in the field, on the way to bring together industrial expectations and visionary extrapolation and current status of technology

  3. Roadmap for implementation of light water reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While decommissioning of Tokai-mura reactor and JATR reactor has already started in Japan, Tsuruga reactor is announced shutdown in 2010 as the first decommissioning of commercial light water reactor (LWR). In 2030s or may be more earlier due to economic reasons, decommissioning of LWRs will take place in succession. Since rational decommissioning needs operating data of individual plants, ample time should be allowed for planning the reactor decommissioning. Committee of Nuclear Power Engineering Cooperation (NUPEC) had identified relevant issues to implement LWR decommissioning and established roadmaps showing fundamental approaches to solve seventeen items categorized in seven areas as action items. Harmonization of policy, regulations and technology development as a whole and reflection of accumulated lessons learned from overseas decommissioning experiences needed further study. (T. Tanaka)

  4. A comparison of solar photovoltaics and molten carbonate fuel cells as commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In line with the worldwide trend, Korea has recognized the importance of renewable energy and extensively supported its exploitation. As of August 2009, the largest incentives for renewable energy are offered to solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, which have vastly increased the installations of this system. On the basis of total paid incentives, the second largest beneficiary is the fuel cell (FC) system. This support has contributed to the successful commercialization of the molten carbonate FC (MCFC) as a distributed generation system (DG). Considering the status of energy systems in Korea, solar PV and MCFC systems are likely to be further developed in the country. The present paper analyzes the exploitation of these two energy systems by conducting a feasibility study and a technology assessment in the Korea environment based on many assumptions, conditions and data involved. The feasibility study demonstrates the positive economic gains of the solar PV and MCFC power plants. The unit electricity generation cost of solar PV is twice that of an MCFC system. In addition, the study reveals the slightly greater profitability of the MCFC. Exact estimation of their future economies is impossible because of uncertainties in many future conditions and environments. Nevertheless, the development of solar cells with higher efficiency is undoubtedly the most critical factor in increasing future profits. On the other hand, reductions in the operation and maintenance (O and M) costs and the natural gas (NG) price are the most important issues in raising the viability of the MCFC system. (author)

  5. Breaking down the barriers to commercialization of fuel cells in transportation through Government - industry R&D programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S.G. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Venkateswaran, S.R. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cell technology is rapidly emerging as a viable propulsion alternative to the internal combustion engine. Fuel cells offer the advantages of low emissions, high efficiency, fuel flexibility, quiet and continuous operation, and modularity. Over the last decade, dramatic advances have been achieved in the performance and cost of PEM fuel cell technologies for automotive applications. However, significant technical barriers remain to making fuel cell propulsion systems viable alternatives to the internal combustion engine. This paper focuses on the progress achieved and remaining technical barriers while highlighting Government-industry R&D efforts that are accelerating fuel cell technology toward commercialization.

  6. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group is...... currently developing a novel technique to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. In this work, the hot wire sensor is placed in the anode outlet of a commercial air-cooled fuel cell stack by Ballard Power Systems, and the voltage......Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...

  7. Streamlining of commercial Berl saddles: A new material to improve the performance of microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an upcoming technology that allows oxidizing organic matter to generate current by microorganism's activity. To render MFCs a cost-effective and energy sustainable technology, low-cost materials can be employed as support for bacteria growth and proliferation. With this purpose in mind, ceramic Berl saddles were opportunely covered by a thin and conductive carbon layer, thus obtaining an innovative low-cost anode material able to efficiently recover the electrons released by bacteria metabolisms. The conductive layer was obtained by using α-D-glucose deposition process within the following steps: impregnation, caramelization, and pyrolysis. In this way, a homogenous coating of polycrystalline graphitic carbon was successfully obtained and characterized by several methods. The carbon-coated Berl saddles were then tested as anode material in a two-compartment MFC prototype, in batch mode and using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as active microorganisms. The MFC performances were evaluated using electrochemical techniques. The carbon-coated Berl saddles showed a maximum power density of 130 mW m−2 (29.6 mA L−1) which is about 2–3 times higher than the values reported in literature by using commercial anode materials. In particular, we have carefully estimated the production and process costs of these carbon-coated Berl saddles used in our MFC prototype, obtaining a value comparable to the commercial carbon felt employed in the same MFC apparatus. All these results confirm that our innovative carbon-coated Berl saddles not only satisfy the electrical requirements, but also favor an optimal bacteria adhesion and can be produced as a low-cost anode for scaling-up MFC. - Highlights: • Berl saddles were opportunely covered by a conductive carbon layer. • New and easy electrode preparation methods offer a low-cost solution for MFC anode. • Power density using coated Berl saddles is comparable to commercial materials. • Coated

  8. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  9. The 2015 super-resolution microscopy roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Heintzmann, Rainer; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Shtengel, Gleb; Hess, Harald; Tinnefeld, Philip; Honigmann, Alf; Jakobs, Stefan; Testa, Ilaria; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ewers, Helge; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian; Klenerman, David; Willig, Katrin I.; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cordes, Thorben

    2015-11-01

    Far-field optical microscopy using focused light is an important tool in a number of scientific disciplines including chemical, (bio)physical and biomedical research, particularly with respect to the study of living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the applicability of the optical microscope is limited, since the diffraction of light imposes limitations on the spatial resolution of the image. Consequently the details of, for example, cellular protein distributions, can be visualized only to a certain extent. Fortunately, recent years have witnessed the development of ‘super-resolution’ far-field optical microscopy (nanoscopy) techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED), ground state depletion (GSD), reversible saturated optical (fluorescence) transitions (RESOLFT), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) or saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM), all in one way or another addressing the problem of the limited spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy. While SIM achieves a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional optical microscopy, STED, RESOLFT, PALM/STORM, or SSIM have all gone beyond, pushing the limits of optical image resolution to the nanometer scale. Consequently, all super-resolution techniques open new avenues of biomedical research. Because the field is so young, the potential capabilities of different super-resolution microscopy approaches have yet to be fully explored, and uncertainties remain when considering the best choice of methodology. Thus, even for experts, the road to the future is sometimes shrouded in mist. The super-resolution optical microscopy roadmap of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics addresses this need for clarity. It provides guidance to the outstanding questions through a collection of short review articles from experts in the field, giving a thorough

  10. Xenomicrobiology: a roadmap for genetic code engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Budisa, Nediljko

    2016-09-01

    Biology is an analytical and informational science that is becoming increasingly dependent on chemical synthesis. One example is the high-throughput and low-cost synthesis of DNA, which is a foundation for the research field of synthetic biology (SB). The aim of SB is to provide biotechnological solutions to health, energy and environmental issues as well as unsustainable manufacturing processes in the frame of naturally existing chemical building blocks. Xenobiology (XB) goes a step further by implementing non-natural building blocks in living cells. In this context, genetic code engineering respectively enables the re-design of genes/genomes and proteins/proteomes with non-canonical nucleic (XNAs) and amino (ncAAs) acids. Besides studying information flow and evolutionary innovation in living systems, XB allows the development of new-to-nature therapeutic proteins/peptides, new biocatalysts for potential applications in synthetic organic chemistry and biocontainment strategies for enhanced biosafety. In this perspective, we provide a brief history and evolution of the genetic code in the context of XB. We then discuss the latest efforts and challenges ahead for engineering the genetic code with focus on substitutions and additions of ncAAs as well as standard amino acid reductions. Finally, we present a roadmap for the directed evolution of artificial microbes for emancipating rare sense codons that could be used to introduce novel building blocks. The development of such xenomicroorganisms endowed with a 'genetic firewall' will also allow to study and understand the relation between code evolution and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27489097

  11. Next generation ocean dynamical core roadmap project: final report. Report for the NERC Ocean Roadmap exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, Jason; New, Adrian; Liu, Hedong; Coward, Andrew; Pickles, Stephen; Ashworth, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This document should be read in conjunction with the “Next Generation Ocean Dynamical Core Roadmap Project: Summary and Recommendations” document, which provides a summary of the present “Final Report”, and a Roadmap for ways forward for UK ocean modelling over the next 5-15 years. It describes two complementary ways forward: first is the incremental evolution of the NEMO model, and second a new modelling initiative drawing on the GungHo project.

  12. Program of scientific investigations and development of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in VIITF proposals on scientific and technical collaboration and SOFC commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleschev, Yu.N.; Chulharev, V.F.

    1996-04-01

    Investigations being performed at VNIITF covers the whole cycle of solid oxide fuel cell manufacturing. This report describes the main directions of investigations in materials, technologies, and commercialization.

  13. Roadmap for In-Space Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael; Johnson, Les; Palaszewski, Bryan; Coote, David; Goebel, Dan; White, Harold

    2012-01-01

    NASA has created a roadmap for the development of advanced in-space propulsion technologies for the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). This roadmap was drafted by a team of subject matter experts from within the Agency and then independently evaluated, integrated and prioritized by a National Research Council (NRC) panel. The roadmap describes a portfolio of in-space propulsion technologies that could meet future space science and exploration needs, and shows their traceability to potential future missions. Mission applications range from small satellites and robotic deep space exploration to space stations and human missions to Mars. Development of technologies within the area of in-space propulsion will result in technical solutions with improvements in thrust, specific impulse (Isp), power, specific mass (or specific power), volume, system mass, system complexity, operational complexity, commonality with other spacecraft systems, manufacturability, durability, and of course, cost. These types of improvements will yield decreased transit times, increased payload mass, safer spacecraft, and decreased costs. In some instances, development of technologies within this area will result in mission-enabling breakthroughs that will revolutionize space exploration. There is no single propulsion technology that will benefit all missions or mission types. The requirements for in-space propulsion vary widely according to their intended application. This paper provides an updated summary of the In-Space Propulsion Systems technology area roadmap incorporating the recommendations of the NRC.

  14. Developing a Roadmap for Excellence in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kristine S.; Reese, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Trying to figure out the promotion and tenure system is one of the major stressors for new Extension faculty. To help new county-based Extension faculty, their supervisors, committee chairs, and other mentors evaluate progress in the probationary years, a Roadmap with specific guideposts delineating expectations for pre-tenure years was developed.…

  15. Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Green, Jennifer L.; Chau, Savio N.; Curell, Philip C.; Dempsey, Cathy A.; Patterson, Linda P.; Robbins, William; Steele, Michael A.; DAnnunzio, Anthony; Meseroll, Robert; Quiter, John; Shannon, Russell; Easton, John W.; Madaras, Eric I.; BrownTaminger, Karen M.; Tabera, John T.; Tellado, Joseph; Williams, Marth K.; Zeitlin, Nancy P.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap is a guide for developing the technologies needed to enable the supportable, sustainable, and affordable exploration of the Moon and other destinations beyond Earth. Supportability is defined in terms of space maintenance, repair, and related logistics. This report considers the supportability lessons learned from NASA and the Department of Defense. Lunar Outpost supportability needs are summarized, and a supportability technology strategy is established to make the transition from high logistics dependence to logistics independence. This strategy will enable flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. The supportability roadmap defines the general technology selection criteria. Technologies are organized into three categories: diagnostics, test, and verification; maintenance and repair; and scavenge and recycle. Furthermore, "embedded technologies" and "process technologies" are used to designate distinct technology types with different development cycles. The roadmap examines the current technology readiness level and lays out a four-phase incremental development schedule with selection decision gates. The supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop technologies with the widest possible capability and utility while minimizing the impact on crew time and training and remaining within the time and cost constraints of the program.

  16. A Comparative Study of Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraerts, R.J.; Overmars, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    The probabilistic roadmap approach is one of the leading motion planning techniques. Over the past eight years the technique has been studied by many different researchers. This has led to a large number of variants of the approach, each with its own merits. It is difficult to compare the different

  17. The European Lead Fast Reactor Strategy and the Roadmap for the Demonstrator ALFRED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the technology for a new reactor must follow a chain of gradual and progressive steps to reach maturity. This paper presents the strategy for the development of a nuclear fast reactor with closed fuel cycle and based on lead coolant technology for economical electricity production: the European Lead Fast Reactor (ELFR). This reactor has the potential to multiply by two orders of magnitude the energy output from a given amount of uranium while improving the safety of the plant and the management of high level radioactive waste (HLRW) through the transmutation of minor actinides. The roadmap of ELFR is based on the progressive up-scaling from a zero power facility to the commercial deployment of the first-of-a kind plant. The intermediate steps are a Technological Pilot Plant (MYRRHA), a Demonstrator (ALFRED) and a Prototype (PROLFR). The roadmap of the demonstrator ALFRED is also presented. (author)

  18. Solar Thermal energy strategic road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) manages a fund dedicated to new energy technologies. Since 2008 this fund has funded 'research demonstrators' to implement testing of technologies that are in an experimental stage, between research and industrial deployment. ADEME coordinates a group of experts who are charged with drawing up a strategic road-map prior to each Call for Expressions of Interest. The aims of the solar thermal road-map are: - to highlight the industrial, technological, environmental and societal issues at stake; - to elaborate coherent, consistent and shared visions of the technologies and/or socio-technical systems outlined in the road-map; - to underscore the technological, organisational and socioeconomic barriers and bottlenecks to be overcome in order to achieve these visions; - to link priority research topics to a timetable of goals for technology availability and deployment that is consistent with the stated objectives; - to give priority to research needs and research demonstrators that will serve as the basis for: 1 - calls for expression of interest issued by the Research Demonstrators Fund, 2 - the research programming process at ADEME and more broadly at the Agence nationale de la recherche (ANR) and the Comite strategique national sur la recherche sur l'energie. Research priorities and needs for demonstrators are determined by the intersection of visions and bottlenecks. They also take into account industrial and research capacity in France. The road-maps may also refer to exemplary research demonstrators abroad that are in the forefront of technological progress, and make recommendations regarding industrial policy. These road-maps are the result of collective work by a group of experts appointed by the Steering Committee (Comite de pilotage, COPIL) of the Research Demonstrators Fund for new energy technologies. The members of this group are actors in research, drawn from industry, research bodies and research

  19. Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

    2013-10-30

    Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative

  20. Codes and Standards Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Hydrogen Codes and Standards Tech Team (CSTT) mission is to enable and facilitate the appropriate research, development, & demonstration (RD&D) for the development of safe, performance-based defensible technical codes and standards that support the technology readiness and are appropriate for widespread consumer use of fuel cells and hydrogen-based technologies with commercialization by 2020. Therefore, it is important that the necessary codes and standards be in place no later than 2015.

  1. Built Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Forsyth, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sinclair, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Oteri, F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The market currently encourages BWT deployment before the technology is ready for full-scale commercialization. To address this issue, industry stakeholders convened a Rooftop and Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the National Wind Technology Center, located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. This report summarizes the workshop.

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap assumptions document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel as a key element in the implementation of the Roadmap Methodology for the INEL Site. The development and identification of these assumptions in an important factor in planning basis development and establishes the planning baseline for all subsequent roadmap analysis at the INEL

  3. BBPRM: a behavior-based probabilistic roadmap method

    OpenAIRE

    Simonin, Eva; Diard, Julien

    2008-01-01

    International audience This paper focuses on the path planning problem. We offer an alternative to the probabilistic roadmap methods, from the perspective of modeling human or animal planning. In this context, hierarchies of representations are used to break down high-dimensional configuration spaces. We propose an approach for roadmap generation where low-level behaviors are used as articulations between level of the hierarchy. We also show how the obtained roadmap better represents low-le...

  4. Organics in optoelectronics: advances and roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldada, Louay

    2006-02-01

    Over a four-year period from 2001 to 2005, the Microphotonics Center Industry Consortium at MIT evaluated the vast array of new technologies that have disrupted the telecommunications industry. As part of its mission, the consortium researched a variety of communications-related technical and business topics, presented recommendations for the rational restructuring of the industry, and developed a 30-year communications technology roadmap (CTR). The CTR program was guided by industry-led Technology Working Groups (TWGs), with the support of MIT faculty and students. We present the findings of the Organics in Optoelectronics TWG in terms of advances in organic-material based optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs), and we propose a roadmap for optoelectronic integration enabled by hybrid organic-inorganic OEICs.

  5. Technology Roadmaps: Solar Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The solar heating and cooling (SHC) roadmap outlines a pathway for solar energy to supply almost one sixth (18 EJ) of the world’s total energy use for both heating and cooling by 2050. This would save some 800 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year; more than the total CO2 emissions in Germany in 2009. While solar heating and cooling today makes a modest contribution to world energy demand, the roadmap envisages that if concerted action is taken by governments and industry, solar energy could annually produce more than 16% of total final energy use for low temperature heat and nearly 17% for cooling. Given that global energy demand for heat represents almost half of the world’s final energy use – more than the combined global demand for electricity and transport – solar heat can make a significant contribution in both tackling climate change and strengthening energy security.

  6. Technology Roadmaps: Solar Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The solar heating and cooling (SHC) roadmap outlines a pathway for solar energy to supply almost one sixth (18 EJ) of the world's total energy use for both heating and cooling by 2050. This would save some 800 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per year; more than the total CO2 emissions in Germany in 2009. While solar heating and cooling today makes a modest contribution to world energy demand, the roadmap envisages that if concerted action is taken by governments and industry, solar energy could annually produce more than 16% of total final energy use for low temperature heat and nearly 17% for cooling. Given that global energy demand for heat represents almost half of the world's final energy use -- more than the combined global demand for electricity and transport -- solar heat can make a significant contribution in both tackling climate change and strengthening energy security.

  7. Electrical and Electronics Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Electrical and Electronics Technical Team’s (EETT's) mission is to enable cost-effective, smaller, lighter, and efficient power electronics and electric motors for electric traction drive systems (ETDSs) while maintaining performance of internal combustion engine (ICE)-based vehicles. The EETT also identifies technology gaps, establishes R&D targets, develops a roadmap to achieve technical targets and goals, and evaluates the R&D progress toward meeting the established R&D targets and goals.

  8. A Roadmap for Educational Research in Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Dean, Meredith J.; Mumper, Russell J.; Blouin, Robert A.; Roth, Mary T.

    2013-01-01

    Educational research must play a critical role in informing practice and policy within pharmacy education. Understanding the educational environment and its impact on students, faculty members, and other stakeholders is imperative for improving outcomes and preparing pharmacy students to meet the needs of 21st century health care. To aid in the design and implementation of meaningful educational research within colleges and schools of pharmacy, this roadmap addresses philosophy and educationa...

  9. Fusion Roadmap - Cesta k fúzi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 8 (2014), s. 24 Grant ostatní: OP Výzkum a vývoj pro konkurenceschopnost(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/35.0009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Source of funding: O - operačné programy Keywords : nuclear fusion * fusion roadmap * Eurofusion Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics http://knp.kosmo.cz/2014/082014casopisMAT21.pdf

  10. Strategic Roadmap 2024: Powering the Energy Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-05-01

    Strategic Roadmap 2024 applies our historic mission to the dynamic and evolving industry environment that includes myriad new regulations, the growing presence of interruptible and intermittent generation resources and constraints on our hydro resources. It also ties together Western’s strategy, initiatives, capital budgets and annual targets to move the agency in one direction, continue to meet customer needs and provide the best value as an organization.

  11. Design Through Analysis (DTA) roadmap vision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, Teddy Dean; Adams, Charles R.; Hoffman, Edward L.; White, David Roger; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2004-10-01

    The Design through Analysis Realization Team (DART) will provide analysts with a complete toolset that reduces the time to create, generate, analyze, and manage the data generated in a computational analysis. The toolset will be both easy to learn and easy to use. The DART Roadmap Vision provides for progressive improvements that will reduce the Design through Analysis (DTA) cycle time by 90-percent over a three-year period while improving both the quality and accountability of the analyses.

  12. MEGAHIT Roadmap: Applications for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Frank; Semenkin, Alexander; Bauer, Waldemar; Worms, Jean-Claude; Detsis, Emmanouil; CLIQUET-MORENO, Elisa; Masson, Frederic; RUAULT, Jean-Marc; Gaia, Enrico; Cristina, T.M.; Tinsley, Tim; Hodgson, Zara

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces the three EC funded nuclear electric propulsion funded projects DiPoP, MEGAHIT and DEMOCRITOS. It describes in detail the European-Russian MEGAHIT project - the study outputs, the proposal for a key technology plan, a plan for a political and public supportable reference space mission. Moreover the content of the MEGAHIT global roadmap for international realization of the INPPS (International Nuclear Power and Propulsion System) is sketched.

  13. Roadmapping for improving cocoa postharvest management

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana del Pilar Sánchez Vargas; Óscar Fernando Castellanos Domínguez; Karen Patricia Domínguez Martínez

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the methodology and results which led to preparing post-harvesting technological development strategies for cocoa management which emerged from identifying problems such as deficient cocoa quality and insufficient fermentation of the beans according to international market requirements as shown in the poor technological development in Colombia’s main co-coa producing areas. This situation led to using a technological management tool such as roadmapping orientated towards...

  14. A Roadmap for the Future of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal aim of this roadmap is to place the US and Fermilab in the best position to host the International Linear Collider (ILC). The strategy must be resilient against the many vicissitudes that will attend the development of such a large project. Pier Oddone will explore the tension between the needed concentration of effort to move a project as large as the ILC forward and the need to maintain the breadth of our field.

  15. Design of Mechanical Properties of Open-Cell Porous Materials Based on μCT Study of Commercial Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Skibinski Jakub; Cwieka Karol; Wejrzanowski Tomasz; Kurzydlowski Krzysztof J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper numerical design of mechanical properties of open-cell porous materials is addressed. A detailed knowledge of mechanisms and parameters determining mechanical properties (i.e. Young’s Modulus, Poisson’s Ratio) of foams is essential for applications such as energy absorbers or lightweight construction materials. The foam structures were designed using procedure based on Laguerre-Voronoi tessellations (LVT) with micro-computed tomography of commercial foams used as referenc...

  16. Hanford Site single-shell tank roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Roadmap covers the near-term waste management activities to ensure safe interim storage of 140 million liters of waste. It also addresses the environmental restoration activities to close the 6 single-shell tank operable units, which include 149 single-shell tanks. These tanks were constructed starting in the 1940's. Sixty-six tanks have leaked or are assumed to be leaking. This Roadmap has highlighted the need for integrated planning and resource allocation. The June 1990 Five-Year Plan did not address the tank safety concerns that evolved since its publication. Potential impacts to Tri-Party Agreement milestones for characterization, stabilization and isolation, technology development/demonstration, and closure will be examined in greater detail to strengthen the technical decision basis and to minimize consequences. The Roadmap indicates the advantage of accelerating characterization programs, technology evaluations, and supplemental environmental impact statement preparation. Working with regulators and expanded public outreach programs are essential to successful completion of this activity

  17. Technology Roadmap: Wind Energy. 2013 edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The IEA Wind Power Technology Roadmap 2013 Edition recognises the very significant progress made since the first edition was published in 2009. The technology continues to improve rapidly, and costs of generation from land-based wind installations continue to fall. Wind power is now being deployed in countries with good resources without any dedicated financial incentives. The 2013 Edition targets an increased share (15% to 18%) of global electricity to be provided by wind power in 2050, compared to 12% in the original roadmap of 2009. However, increasing levels of low-cost wind still require predictable, supportive regulatory environments and appropriate market designs. The challenges of integrating higher levels of variable wind power into the grid need to be addressed. For offshore wind, much remains to be done to develop appropriate large-scale systems and to reduce costs. The 2013 Wind Power Roadmap also provides updated analysis on the barriers that exist for the technology and suggests ways to address them, including legal and regulatory recommendations.

  18. AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, Gerda; Westall, Frances; Grenfell, John Lee; Martin, William F.; Gomez, Felipe; Leuko, Stefan; Lee, Natuschka; Onofri, Silvano; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Saladino, Raffaele; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Palomba, Ernesto; Harrison, Jesse; Rull, Fernando; Muller, Christian; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Brucato, John R.; Rettberg, Petra; Capria, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems• Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space• Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life• Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability• Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system. Key Words: Astrobiology roadmap—Europe—Origin and evolution of life—Habitability—Life detection—Life in extreme environments. Astrobiology 16, 201–243. PMID:27003862

  19. The EU fusion programme and roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pero, H., E-mail: Herve.Pero@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, DG-RTD, CDMA 05/146, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Paidassi, S. [European Commission, DG-RTD, CDMA 05/146, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► The EU fusion programme has to evolve from today's research to a strong goal-oriented programme driven by an ambitious roadmap. ► The programme shall focus on ITER and reactor-relevant technologies development. ► A new structure based on joint programming will be developed to implement the programme during Horizon 2020. -- Abstract: To meet ITER and fusion energy challenges, a gradual transition of the EU fusion programme priorities from today's fusion research to a strongly goal-oriented programme with clear milestones is required. This transition and the programme priorities should be driven by an ambitious, yet realistic roadmap to be agreed by EU fusion stakeholders. The programme must primarily focus on: ensuring the success of ITER; and research and development of reactor-relevant technologies. Industry must be involved early in the implementation and international collaboration should be conducted as part of a strategic approach. Joint programming should be a cornerstone of the EU fusion programme in Horizon 2020. Options for the new structure and current actions required to implement the roadmap during Horizon 2020 will be presented.

  20. The EU fusion programme and roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The EU fusion programme has to evolve from today's research to a strong goal-oriented programme driven by an ambitious roadmap. ► The programme shall focus on ITER and reactor-relevant technologies development. ► A new structure based on joint programming will be developed to implement the programme during Horizon 2020. -- Abstract: To meet ITER and fusion energy challenges, a gradual transition of the EU fusion programme priorities from today's fusion research to a strongly goal-oriented programme with clear milestones is required. This transition and the programme priorities should be driven by an ambitious, yet realistic roadmap to be agreed by EU fusion stakeholders. The programme must primarily focus on: ensuring the success of ITER; and research and development of reactor-relevant technologies. Industry must be involved early in the implementation and international collaboration should be conducted as part of a strategic approach. Joint programming should be a cornerstone of the EU fusion programme in Horizon 2020. Options for the new structure and current actions required to implement the roadmap during Horizon 2020 will be presented

  1. AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, Gerda; Walter, Nicolas; Westall, Frances; Grenfell, John Lee; Martin, William F; Gomez, Felipe; Leuko, Stefan; Lee, Natuschka; Onofri, Silvano; Tsiganis, Kleomenis; Saladino, Raffaele; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Palomba, Ernesto; Harrison, Jesse; Rull, Fernando; Muller, Christian; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Brucato, John R; Rettberg, Petra; Capria, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system. PMID:27003862

  2. Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

  3. Engineering and Technology Road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout its existence, the Environmental Management (EM) program has required a strong technology component to accomplish its mission, one that is focused on developing technologies to enhance safety, effectiveness, and efficiency. Although the Department of Energy (DOE) has made great progress toward safely disposing of the legacies of the Cold War, much remains to be done. These past accomplishments provide a guide for future success; however, the unique nature of many of the remaining challenges will require a strong and responsive applied research and engineering program. The Engineering and Technology Road-map was developed to address this need and guide the EM Engineering and Technology Program. The Road-map identifies the technical risks and uncertainties that the EM program faces over the next ten years; the strategies EM will use to reduce those risks; and the planned outcomes of implementing those strategies. Input for this Road-map was provided by EM Federal Project Directors, Stakeholders, Site Contractors, National Laboratories and the National Academy of Science. To accomplish this work, EM has designated federal Strategic Initiative Managers who will work with Federal Project Directors to develop, refine and implement a detailed scope and schedule for each initiative, as well as identify the point at which the technologies developed will be inserted into EM cleanup projects. The starting point for the Road-map was technical project risk and uncertainty. Risks are defined as known technical issues that could prevent project success. Uncertainties are indefinite or unpredictable technical aspects of a project. Risks included in the Road-map were identified in three ways: 1) By the Projects - EM's operations are performed within a culture of disciplined project management, based on DOE Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. As such, technical risks and uncertainties affecting each cleanup project are

  4. Teknologisk roadmap viser vej til vækstteknologier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2013-01-01

    Hvilke teknologier er fremtidens vækstteknologier, som skal begunstiges med offentlige investeringer? Det har de nye EU-roadmap 2020-processer vist sig overlegne til at udpege – ikke mindst i forhold til den tidligere udskældte picking the winners-strategi. I roadmap-processerne kortlægges...

  5. Appraisal of the European Commission’s Energy Roadmap 2050

    OpenAIRE

    Meeus, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    What is the European energy strategy for 2050? How different is it from the 2020 energy strategy? What are the technology options? What are the policy options? The European Commission provided a first answer to these questions in its Energy Roadmap 2050. This article gives an appraisal of that answer based on the recommendations we made during the preparation of the roadmap.

  6. 76 FR 11308 - Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... interested persons that the First Annual Meeting of the Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap will be held on April... solutions. DATES: The First Annual Meeting of the Aviation Noise Impacts Roadmap will be held on April 19-20... aviation noise impacts research. The first annual meeting will focus on the following topics: noise...

  7. Changes of the balancing between anode and cathode due to fatigue in commercial lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Karin; Jakes, Peter; Scharner, Sebastian; Liebau, Verena; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    The electrode balancing defines the state of charge (SoC) of a lithium-ion cell and is a crucial point considering lifetime and safe operation. The electrode balancing varies during fatigue which results in changes of the individual electrode potentials for fixed (dis-)charge voltages of the full-cell. Therefore the materials are cycled closer or beyond their electrochemical (meta-)stability window. This leads to accelerated degradation reactions or even to safety problems. The origin of the changes in the cell balancing is the limited amount of mobile lithium, which decreases during cycling due to the loss of lithiated active material a), the reduction of accessible lattice sites in the active materials b) and the loss of active lithium outside the electrodes c). In most of the commercial cells a) and b) can be attributed to the cathode, c) occurs due to reactions on the anode surface. Changes in the electrode balancing of three differently fatigued 7 Ah lithium-ion cells are investigated by electrochemical cycling of full- and half-cells, assembled from cell components of the fatigued 7 Ah cells. Based on these results the observed performance drop is assigned to a), b) or c) mentioned above and the capacity losses are quantified.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-30

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy`s office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included.

  9. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  10. Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program, a government-industry research partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The 21st Century Truck Program has been established as a government-industry research partnership to support the development and implementation of commercially viable technologies that will dramatically cut fuel use and emissions of commercial trucks and buses while enhancing their safety and affordability as well as maintaining or enhancing performance. The innovations resulting from this program will reduce dependence on foreign oil, improve our nation's air quality, provide advanced technology for military vehicles, and enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. truck and bus industry while ensuring safe and affordable freight and bus transportation for the nation's economy. This Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program has been prepared to guide the development of the technical advancements that will enable the needed improvements in commercial truck fuel economy, emissions, and safety.

  11. Space Heaters, Computers, Cell Phone Chargers: How Plugged In AreCommercial Buildings?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie; Brown, Richard; Busch, John; Pinckard, Margaret; Roberson, Judy

    2007-02-28

    Evidenceof electric plug loads in commercial buildings isvisible everyday: space heaters, portable fans, and the IT technician'stwo monitors connected to one PC. The Energy Information Administrationestimates that office and miscellaneous equipment together will consume2.18 quads in 2006, nearly 50 percent of U.S. commercial electricity use.Although the importance of commercial plug loads is documented, its verynature (diverse product types, products not installed when buildinginitially constructed, and products often hidden in closets) makes itdifficult to accurately count and categorize the end use.We auditedsixteen buildings in three cities (San Francisco, Atlanta, Pittsburgh)including office, medical and education building types. We inventoriedthe number and types of office and miscellaneous electric equipment aswell as estimated total energy consumption due to these product types. Intotal, we audited approximately 4,000 units of office equipment and 6,000units of miscellaneous equipment and covered a diverse range of productsranging from electric pencil sharpeners with a unit energy consumption(UEC) of 1 kWh/yr to a kiln with a UEC of 7,000 kWh/yr. Our paperpresents a summary of the density and type of plug load equipment foundas well as the estimated total energy consumption of the equipment.Additionally, we present equipment trends observed and provide insightsto how policy makers can target energy efficiency for this growing enduse.

  12. Short Term Culture of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Commercial Osteoconductive Carriers Provides Unique Insights into Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B. Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available For spinal fusions and the treatment of non-union fractures, biological substrates, scaffolds, or carriers often are applied as a graft to support regeneration of bone. The selection of an appropriate material critically influences cellular function and, ultimately, patient outcomes. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are regarded as a critical component of bone healing. However, the interactions of BMSCs and commercial bone matrices are poorly reported. BMSCs were cultured with several commercially available bone substrates (allograft, demineralized bone matrix (DBM, collagen, and various forms of calcium phosphates for 48 h to understand their response to graft materials during surgical preparation and the first days following implantation (cell retention, gene expression, pH. At 30 and 60 min, bone chips and inorganic substrates supported significantly more cell retention than other materials, while collagen-containing materials became soluble and lost their structure. At 48 h, cells bound to β-tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (βTCP-HA and porous hydroxyapatite (HA granules exhibited osteogenic gene expression statistically similar to bone chips. Through 24 h, the DBM strip and βTCP-collagen became mildly acidic (pH 7.1–7.3, while the DBM poloxamer-putties demonstrated acidity (pH 10. The dissolution of DBM and collagen led to a loss of cells, while excessive pH changes potentially diminish cell viability and metabolism. Extracts from DBM-poloxamers induced osteogenic gene expression at 48 h. This study highlights the role that biochemical and structural properties of biomaterials play in cellular function, potentially enhancing or diminishing the efficacy of the overall therapy.

  13. Technology roadmapping for strategy and innovation charting the route to success

    CERN Document Server

    Isenmann, Ralf; Phaal, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technology roadmapping is a core method to help companies and other organisations gain orientation for future opportunities and changes. This book is a key resource for technology roadmapping – it provides expert knowledge in four areas: To frame/embed technology roadmapping To structure the process and tasks of technology roadmapping To implement technology roadmapping into corporate strategies To link technology roadmapping to further instruments of strategic planning and corporate foresight This comprehensive survey of technology roadmapping includes papers from leading European, American and Asian experts: It provides an overview of different methods of technology roadmapping and the interactions between them It familiarises readers with the most important sub-methods It embeds/links technology roadmapping to the overall framework of management research and business studies This book, the first of a series, is unique: it aims to become the leading compendium for technology roadmapping knowledge and prac...

  14. Chemicals Industry New Process Chemistry Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-08-01

    The Materials Technology I workshop was held in November 1998 to address future research needs for materials technology that will support the chemical industry. Areas covered included disassembly, recovery, reuse and renewable technology; new materials; and materials measurement and characterization. The Materials Technology II workshop was held in September 1999 and covered additives, modeling and prediction and an additional segment on new materials. Materials Technology Institute (MTI) for the Chemical Process Industries, Inc. and Air Products & Chemicals lead the workshops. The Materials Technology Roadmap presents the results from both workshops.

  15. Successful user experience strategy and roadmaps

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenzweig, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Successful User Experience: Strategy and Roadmaps provides you with a hands-on guide for pulling all of the User Experience (UX) pieces together to create a strategy that includes tactics, tools, and methodologies. Leveraging material honed in user experience courses and over 25 years in the field, the author explains the value of strategic models to refine goals against available data and resources. You will learn how to think about UX from a high level, design the UX while setting goals for a product or project, and how to turn that into concrete actionable steps. After reading this book, y

  16. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  17. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  18. Program of scientific investigations and development of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in VNIITF. Proposals on scientific and technical collaboration and SOFC commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleschev, Yu.N.; Chukharev, V.F.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes proposals on scientific and technical collaborations pertaining to solid oxide fuel cell commercialization. Topics included for discussion are: materials research and manufacture; market estimation and cost; directions of collaboration; and project of proposals on joint enterprise creation.

  19. Technology Roadmap Research Program for the Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph R. Vehec

    2010-12-30

    The steel industry's Technology Roadmap Program (TRP) is a collaborative R&D effort jointly sponsored by the steel industry and the United States Department of Energy. The TRP program was designed to develop new technologies to save energy , increase competitiveness, and improve the environment. TRP ran from July, 1997 to December, 2008, with a total program budget of $38 million dollars. During that period 47 R&D projects were performed by 28 unique research organizations; co-funding was provided by DOE and 60 industry partners. The projects benefited all areas of steelmaking and much know-how was developed and transferred to industry. The American Iron and Steel Institute is the owner of all intellectual property developed under TRP and licenses it at commercial rates to all steelmakers. TRP technologies are in widespread use in the steel industry as participants received royalty-free use of intellectual property in return for taking the risk of funding this research.

  20. Energy Analysis of a Fuel Cell System for Commercial Greenhouse Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sardella, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable energy management becomes more important due to the ever more actual problems of environmental pollution and limited natural resources. The fuel cell technology is one of the most attractive solutions in this sense. During the past decades fuel cells have been investigated and demonstrated for several applications. One of the most attractive applications is using fuel cell system for stationary energy cogeneration (CHP), since they are capable of producing thermal energy and power...

  1. Plasma α-tocopherol content and its relationship with milk somatic cells count in Italian commercial herds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Pilotto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed to investigate relationship between plasma vitamin E concentration and milk somatic cell count in healthy cows in commercial herds. 49 multiparous cows from two commercial dairy herds were monitored from the day of dry off until 90 DIM. BCS was assessed and blood samples were collected at dry off, day 0, 30, 60 and 90 postpartum. Plasma was analyzed for α-tocopherol content. Quantification of NEFA, BOHB, Zn and Se was performed in serum samples. Milk production and composition was obtained from routinely test-day of Italian milk producers association. Somatic Cell Score (SCS was calculated and included in the dataset. Analysis of data was performed using MIXED repeated and CORR procedures of SAS.We did not observe a correlation between plasmatic vitamin E and somatic cell score, and this can be explained by the low level of somatic cell score (averages 1.64 and 1.26. The lowest value of vitamin E was observed at parturition (1.64 µg/ml and 1.95 µg/ml. A significant (P<0.01 negative (-20% correlation was observed between NEFA serum content and α-tocopherol plasma concentration. Serum selenium content was positively correlated (+42%, P<0.0001 to zinc concentration. Grouping cows on the basis of their plasma α-tocopherol content higher or lower than 3 μg/mL at dry off, SCS at 30 and 60 DIM tended to be higher in lactating animals with lower content of α-tocopherol (1.12 vs. 1.72, P=0.18 at 30d; 0.92 vs. 1.72, P=0.07 at 60d. However, plasma α-tocopherol content at dry off could be usefully correlated with somatic cell count in fresh cows.

  2. Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

  3. 'Mini'-Roadmapping - Ensuring Timely Sites' Cleanup/Closure by Resolving Science and Technology Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roadmapping is a powerful tool to manage technical risks and opportunities associated with complex problems. Roadmapping identifies technical capabilities required for both project- and program-level efforts and provides the basis for plans that ensure the necessary enabling activities will be done when needed. Roadmapping reveals where to focus further development of the path forward by evaluating uncertainties for levels of complexity, impacts, and/or the potential for large payback. Roadmaps can be customized to the application, a ''graded approach'' if you will. Some roadmaps are less detailed. We have called these less detailed, top-level roadmaps ''mini-roadmaps''. These mini roadmaps are created to tie the needed enablers (e.g., technologies, decisions, etc.) to the functions. If it is found during the mini-roadmapping that areas of significant risk exist, then those can be roadmapped further to a lower level of detail. Otherwise, the mini-roadmap may be sufficient to manage the project/program risk. Applying a graded approach to the roadmapping can help keep the costs down. Experience has indicated that it is best to do mini-roadmapping first and then evaluate the risky areas to determine whether to further evaluate those areas. Roadmapping can be especially useful for programs/projects that have participants from multiple sites, programs, or other entities which are involved. Increased synergy, better communications, and increased cooperation are the results from roadmapping a program/project with these conditions

  4. NASA Net Zero Energy Buildings Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Scheib, J.; Torcellini, P.; Hendron, B.; Slovensky, M.

    2014-10-01

    In preparation for the time-phased net zero energy requirement for new federal buildings starting in 2020, set forth in Executive Order 13514, NASA requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a roadmap for NASA's compliance. NASA detailed a Statement of Work that requested information on strategic, organizational, and tactical aspects of net zero energy buildings. In response, this document presents a high-level approach to net zero energy planning, design, construction, and operations, based on NREL's first-hand experience procuring net zero energy construction, and based on NREL and other industry research on net zero energy feasibility. The strategic approach to net zero energy starts with an interpretation of the executive order language relating to net zero energy. Specifically, this roadmap defines a net zero energy acquisition process as one that sets an aggressive energy use intensity goal for the building in project planning, meets the reduced demand goal through energy efficiency strategies and technologies, then adds renewable energy in a prioritized manner, using building-associated, emission- free sources first, to offset the annual energy use required at the building; the net zero energy process extends through the life of the building, requiring a balance of energy use and production in each calendar year.

  5. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  6. Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an important part of the lowest-cost greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation portfolio. IEA analysis suggests that without CCS, overall costs to reduce emissions to 2005 levels by 2050 increase by 70%. This roadmap includes an ambitious CCS growth path in order to achieve this GHG mitigation potential, envisioning 100 projects globally by 2020 and over 3000 projects by 2050. This roadmap's level of project development requires an additional investment of over USD 2.5-3 trillion from 2010 to 2050, which is about 6% of the overall investment needed to achieve a 50% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050. OECD governments will need to increase funding for CCS demonstration projects to an average annual level of USD 3.5 to 4 billion (bn) from 2010 to 2020. In addition, mechanisms need to be established to incentivise commercialisation beyond 2020 in the form of mandates, GHG reduction incentives, tax rebates or other financing mechanisms.

  7. Technology Roadmap: Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    As long as fossil fuels and carbon-intensive industries play dominant roles in our economies, carbon capture and storage (CCS) will remain a critical greenhouse gas reduction solution. This CCS roadmap aims at assisting governments and industry in integrating CCS in their emissions reduction strategies and in creating the conditions for scaled-up deployment of all three components of the CCS chain: CO2 capture, transport and storage. To get us onto the right pathway, this roadmap highlights seven key actions needed in the next seven years to create a solid foundation for deployment of CCS starting by 2020. IEA analysis shows that CCS is an integral part of any lowest-cost mitigation scenario where long-term global average temperature increases are limited to significantly less than 4 °C, particularly for 2 °C scenarios (2DS). In the 2DS, CCS is widely deployed in both power generation and industrial applications. The total CO2 capture and storage rate must grow from the tens of megatonnes of CO2 captured in 2013 to thousands of megatonnes of CO2 in 2050 in order to address the emissions reduction challenge. A total cumulative mass of approximately 120 GtCO2 would need to be captured and stored between 2015 and 2050, across all regions of the globe.

  8. International Smart Grid Roadmaps and their Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Specht

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In US and Europe many approaches and efforts exist with different viewpoints and focuses on what is understood as smart grids. One agreement of almost all approaches is the need for standardization to operate smart grids. Thus, several roadmaps and studies, mainly dealing with smart grid standardization, were developed. However, these documents are also focusing different parts of smart grid realizations and were mainly devised independently from each other. In this contribution, an overview on the most important approaches is given and furthermore, a set of identified core standards is introduced. Though, to make reliable statements about the approaches it is necessary to have a methodology enabling comparability and measurability. Hence, the Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM is presented as a starting point for the assessment of projects and roadmaps. Since it does not meet all requirements for such assessments, because it was developed to assess utilities and follows a one-size-fits-all approach, a configuration approach based on several parameters, representing significant characteristics, is suggested.

  9. Physicochemical characteristics and bronchial epithelial cell cytotoxicity of Folpan 80 WG® and Myco 500®, two commercial forms of folpet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi Isabelle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticides, in particular folpet, have been found in rural and urban air in France in the past few years. Folpet is a contact fungicide and has been widely used for the past 50 years in vineyards in France. Slightly water-soluble and mostly present as particles in the environment, it has been measured at average concentration of 40.1 μg/m3 during its spraying, 0.16–1.2 μg/m3 in rural air and around 0.01 μg/m3 in urban air, potentially exposing both the workers and the general population. However, no study on its penetration by inhalation and on its respiratory toxicity has been published. The objective of this study was to determine the physicochemical characteristics of folpet particles (morphology, granulometry, stability in its commercial forms under their typical application conditions. Moreover, the cytotoxic effect of these particles and the generation of reactive oxygen species were assessed in vitro on respiratory cells. Results Granulometry of two commercial forms of folpet (Folpan 80WG® and Myco 500® under their typical application conditions showed that the majority of the particles (>75% had a size under 5 μm, and therefore could be inhaled by humans. These particles were relatively stable over time: more than 75% of folpet remained in the particle suspension after 30 days under the typical application conditions. The inhibitory concentration (IC50 on human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o- was found to be between 2.89 and 5.11 μg/cm2 for folpet commercial products after 24 h of exposure. Folpet degradation products and vehicles of Folpan 80 WG® did not show any cytotoxicity at tested concentrations. At non-cytotoxic and subtoxic concentrations, Folpan 80 WG® was found to increase DCFH-DA fluorescence. Conclusion These results show that the particles of commercial forms of folpet are relatively stable over time. Particles could be easily inhaled by humans, could reach the conducting airways and are

  10. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullock, M.

    1992-04-01

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

  11. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL's roadmapping efforts

  12. Performance and degradation evaluation of five different commercial lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Shim, Joongpyo

    2004-04-20

    The initial performance of five different types of Li-ion rechargeable batteries, from Quallion Corp, UltraLife Battery and Toshiba, was measured and compared. Cell characterization included variable-rate constant-current cycling, various USDOE pulse-test protocols and full-spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Changes in impedance and capacity were monitored during electrochemical cycling under various conditions, including constant-current cycling over 100 percent DOD at a range of temperature and pulse profile cycling over a very narrow range of DOD at room temperature. All cells were found to maintain more than 80 percent of their rated capacity for more than 400 constant current 100 percent DOD cycles. The power fade (or impedance rise) of the cells varied considerably. New methods for interpreting the pulse resistance data were evaluated for their usefulness in interpreting performance mechanism as a function of test protocol and cell design.

  13. Opportunities for single event modeling in emerging commercial technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single event effects - once the domain of high-reliability circuits destined for space applications and highly susceptible DRAMs with alpha-emitting packaging - are now envisioned to be a critical and wide-spread reliability issue for most future-generation commercial integrated circuits. Soft error rate specifications are now commonly found in commercial technology development road-maps. Commercial integrated circuit manufacturing companies, with no interest in space systems, are undertaking single event modeling efforts. This presentation will discuss modeling issues that are emerging as SEE analysis expands from a mission-critical to a commercial reliability-driven environment. (author)

  14. Human Periodontal Ligament Cells Response to Commercially Available Calcium Hydroxide Pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Fahd Alsalleeh; Lane. Stephenson; Nickolas. Lyons; Ashley. Young; Stetson. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that calcium hydroxidebased medicaments have a cytotoxic effect on human cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytoxicity of several calcium hydroxideproducts on periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Calcium hydroxide powder (Avantor Performance Materials Inc.), Calasept® (Nordiska Dental AB), Metapaste® (Meta Biomed Co., Ltd.), Vitapex® (Neo Dental International Inc.), Ultracal® (Ultradent Products, Inc.), and Pulpdent® (Pulp...

  15. Prototype commercial electrooxidation cell for the recovery of molybdenum and rhenium from molybdenite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the goal to maximize minerals and metals recovery from primary domestic resources, design factors associated with minimizing current leakage in bipolar cell configurations were studied as a means of improving the efficiency of bipolar electrooxidation cells. Initial studies that were conducted in a small bipolar cell operating at 140 to 145 volts and 15.4 A indicated how design factors could be employed to minimize current leakage around adjacent electrodes during cell operation. Based on these results, a 40-electrode, 108-kVA prototype of an industrial-sized cell was constructed and tested for extracting metal values from offgrade molybdenite concentrates. The feasibility of recovering molybdenum and rhenium from the oxidized pulp also was determined. Feed to the process sequence consisted of flotation concentrates containing 16 to 35% Mo as molybdenite and 6 to 15% Cu. Electrooxidation in the prototype cell results in 84 to 97% Mo and Re extraction with a corresponding energy consumption of 9 to 13 kWh/lb Mo extracted

  16. Prototype commercial electrooxidation cell for the recovery of molybdenum and rhenium from molybdenite concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheiner, B.J.; Pool, D.L.; Lindstrom, R.E.; McCleland, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    As part of the goal to maximize minerals and metals recovery from primary domestic resources, design factors associated with minimizing current leakage in bipolar cell configurations were studied as a means of improving the efficiency of bipolar electrooxidation cells. Initial studies that were conducted in a small bipolar cell operating at 140 to 145 volts and 15.4 A indicated how design factors could be employed to minimize current leakage around adjacent electrodes during cell operation. Based on these results, a 40-electrode, 108-kVA prototype of an industrial-sized cell was constructed and tested for extracting metal values from offgrade molybdenite concentrates. The feasibility of recovering molybdenum and rhenium from the oxidized pulp also was determined. Feed to the process sequence consisted of flotation concentrates containing 16 to 35% Mo as molybdenite and 6 to 15% Cu. Electrooxidation in the prototype cell results in 84 to 97% Mo and Re extraction with a corresponding energy consumption of 9 to 13 kWh/lb Mo extracted.

  17. From technology platforms to roadmaps - Getting there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The process of developing a technology roadmap for hydrogen is by no means fixed - various approaches, methodologies and tools are available to achieve the same end: a clear strategy with concrete, implementable steps to be taken by specific actor groups on a defined timescale. This paper uses the development of a hydrogen roadmap in Portugal as a case study to illustrate a possible approach. The methodology and tools used are described and appraised, highlighting key advantages and challenges. The methodology adopted in Portugal began with a purely qualitative vision building and analysis component (the Hi-Po project), prior to the development of the actual roadmap under the EDEN project. The latter uses a variety of quantitative computer models, as well as more qualitative stakeholder consultation to assess the potential impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy (under four possible scenarios of market penetration of hydrogen technologies). The steps of the EDEN methodology can be summarised as follows: - Review of key hydrogen futures literature; - Choice of tools to analyse impacts; - Definition of scope of analysis: the impact of introducing hydrogen in passenger road transport, and domestic combined heat and power, is assessed; - Set-up of a group of key stakeholders, with representation from all the sectors which would be most affected by and have most effect on, the transition to a hydrogen economy; - Creation of a baseline scenario - business as usual situation in the country without a policy specifically aiming to introduce hydrogen; - Development, in consultation with the stakeholder group, of a shared vision for hydrogen in Portugal, including the technologies to be used for production, distribution and use of hydrogen, and the degree of penetration of these technologies into the economy under various scenarios; - Analysis of these scenarios using the chosen tools; - Presentation of preliminary results to the stakeholder group, and

  18. Hazards, Safety and Design Considerations for Commercial Lithium-ion Cells and Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the features of the Lithium-ion batteries, particularly in reference to the hazards and safety of the battery. Some of the characteristics of the Lithium-ion cell are: Highest Energy Density of Rechargeable Battery Chemistries, No metallic lithium, Leading edge technology, Contains flammable electrolyte, Charge cut-off voltage is critical (overcharge can result in fire), Open circuit voltage higher than metallic lithium anode types with similar organic electrolytes. Intercalation is a process that places small ions in crystal lattice. Small ions (such as lithium, sodium, and the other alkali metals) can fit in the interstitial spaces in a graphite lattice. These metallic ions can go farther and force the graphitic planes apart to fit two, three, or more layers of metallic ions between the carbon sheets. Other features of the battery/cell are: The graphite is conductive, Very high energy density compared to NiMH or NiCd, Corrosion of aluminum occurs very quickly in the presence of air and electrolyte due to the formation of HF from LiPF6 and HF is highly corrosive. Slides showing the Intercalation/Deintercalation and the chemical reactions are shown along with the typical charge/discharge for a cylindrical cell. There are several graphs that review the hazards of the cells.

  19. Modeling and Optimization of Commercial Buildings and Stationary Fuel Cell Systems (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainscough, C.; McLarty, D.; Sullivan, R.; Brouwer, J.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation describes the Distributed Generation Building Energy Assessment Tool (DG-BEAT) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of California Irvine. DG-BEAT is designed to allow stakeholders to assess the economics of installing stationary fuel cell systems in a variety of building types in the United States.

  20. The Roadmap to Finnish Open Science and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Olsbo, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Finland published its open science roadmap at the end of November 2014. This roadmap is based on the work of the Open Science and Research Initiative (ATT), a cross-administrative initiative established by the Ministry of Education and Culture. The goal of this initiative is to promote open science and availability of information. Exploration of recent developments of open access in the EU shows that Finland is not among the leading countries in the EU. This paper focuses on the practical act...

  1. Promising Roadmap Alternatives for the SpaceLiner

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the vision and potential roadmap alternatives of an ultrafast intercontinental passenger transport based on a rocket powered two-stage reusable vehicle. An operational scenario and the latest technical lay-out of the configuration�s preliminary design including flight performance are described. The question of how the revolutionary ultrafast transport can be realized is addressed by an assessment of the different technological and programmatic roadmap a...

  2. China-EU Energy Cooperation Roadmap 2020 _ Concept Note

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The process for the definition of an Energy Cooperation Roadmap between the EU and China was officially initiated at the first meeting of the Energy Security Working Group held in Beijing in February 2013, following the China-EU Joint Declaration on Energy Security of May 2012 that stated the formal establishment of the relationships between China and the EU as energy consumers and strategic partners. This Concept Note on China-EU Energy Cooperation Roadmap 2020 has been elaborated by the Eur...

  3. RAILWAY INDUSTRY ROADMAP IN THE STATE OF SANTA CATARINA, BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Acires; Jonny C. DA SILVA; Heitor H. KAGUEIAMA; Carolina R. HADDAD; Mauricio URIONA M.; Álvaro G.R. LEZANA; Dante L. JULIATTO

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to identify the main requirements to strengthen the railroad industry in Santa Catarina by using technology roadmapping. The railway industry is composed of carriers, manufacturers, suppliers, operators, logistics, services and education. The survey aimed to provide guidelines for the Federation of the State of Santa Catarina Industry (FIESC) to develop its strategic plan for the next eight years. Based on the survey, the roadmap defined vision, mission, a list of key concep...

  4. Canada's CO2 capture and storage technology roadmap : a preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation consists of a PowerPoint slide presentation on the development, conclusions, recommendations and path forward for Canada's CO2 Capture and Storage Technology Roadmap. The Roadmap was developed over three years with input from industry, academia, research organizations and international experts as well as provincial and federal governments. The document identifies both the challenges and opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS), the technology pathways and identifies concrete requirements and critical objectives for the path forward

  5. Background paper on Technology Roadmaps (TRMs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, E.; Phaal, R. [Institute for Manufacturing IfM, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Londo, H.M.; Wurtenberger, L.; Cameron, L.R. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    This background paper reports on the use of technology roadmaps (TRMs) related to climate change mitigation and adaptation technologies. The study is motivated by the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (CoP) request to the Technology Executive Committee (TEC) to catalyse the development and use of TRMs as facilitative tools for action on mitigation and adaptation. Having originated in industry, TRMs are now used extensively in policy settings too, however their widespread use across sectors and by different stakeholders has resulted in a lack of understanding of their real value to help catalyse cooperation towards technological solutions to the problems presented by climate change. Consequently this background paper presents (1) an overview of different TRM methods, (2) an initial analysis of gaps and barriers in existing TRMs, and (3) a review of current TRM good practices.

  6. Roadmapping Future E-Government Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicking, Melanie

    Global electronic markets, virtual organisations, virtual identities, virtual products and services, and Internet-related crime are growing in prominence and importance. In a world that is increasingly non-physical and borderless, what are government's roles, responsibilities and limitations? The Internet plays a central role within the transformation process from traditional governments towards modern and innovative government that the requirements of an Information Society. Based on the findings of the eGovRTD2020 project, that aims at identifying key research challenges and at implementing a model for a holistic government with horizon 2020, this paper explains the necessity to investigate and understand the Internet and in particular government's role and responsibilities in it. Furthermore, the paper provides a research roadmap that details how to address certain issue related research questions.

  7. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  8. Computing Correlated Electrons: Roadmap and Roadblocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Gonzalo

    2014-03-01

    Starting with a reminder of the motivations and key concepts, I will present an overview of computational strongly correlated electron research, its challenges and its current applications and directions. I will explain methods to obtain information from the theory, given the roadblocks one encounters due to strong quantum correlation. The focus will be on the density matrix renormalization group, one of the preferred methods to extract information from the low dimensional theories. A roadmap to study time evolution, temperature dependence, and spectral functions will be discussed. These three topics are of interest for experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's CNMS nanocenter and elsewhere. The talk will conclude with a summary of our efforts to program and make available free and open source codes to compute correlated electrons in models for functional materials. Sponsors: CNMS ORNL, Scientific User Facilities Division, BES, U.S. DOE, and DOE early career research program.

  9. A Tool Design of Cobit Roadmap Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Youssfi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the role of information technology in organizations has changed from primarily a supportive and transactional function to being an essential prerequisite for strategic value generation. The organizations based their operational services through its Information Systems (IS that need to be managed, controlled and monitored constantly. IT governance (ITG, i.e. the way organizations manage IT resources, has became a key factor for enterprise success due to the increasing enterprise dependency on IT solutions. There are several approaches available to deal with ITG. These methods are diverse, and in some cases, long and complicated to implement. One well-accepted ITG framework is COBIT, designed for a global approach. This paper describes a design of a tool for COBIT roadmap implementation. The model is being developed in the course of ongoing PhD research.

  10. Roadmap ICT 2030; Routekaart ICT 2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    Extra attention for 'ICT and energy' can lead to significant energy savings, both in the ICT sector (Greening of ICT), as in other sectors (Greening by ICT). That has been elaborated as a vision of ICT Office in this roadmap. Actions are formulated to get started. Innovations and measures are connected to energy saving targets [Dutch] Extra aandacht voor 'ICT en energie' kan leiden tot grote energiebesparingen, zowel in de ICT sector zelf (Greening of ICT), als in andere sectoren (Greening by ICT). Dat is in deze Routekaart als visie van ICT-Office uitgewerkt. Acties zijn geformuleerd om daadwerkelijk aan de slag te kunnen gaan. Aan de innovaties en maatregelen zijn doelstellingen ten aanzien van energiebesparing gekoppeld, die zijn vertaald naar concrete bedragen.

  11. Survey on commercial use of fuel cells; Nenryo denchi ni kansuru jitsuyoka no tame no chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The basic survey was carried out for the future approach to R & D of fuel cells. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) is in the stage of demonstration research and field test supported by subsidy after the end of Sunshine project. Its reliability and durability problems are being solved, and its cost reduction is only one problem for practical use. Distributed systems or on-site systems will be used utilizing its excellent environmental characteristics. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), solid oxide one (SOFC) and polymer electrolyte one (PEFC) under development were thus surveyed. The following are surveyed: (1) Contribution to a human society such as improvement of energy demand/supply structure and environmental protection, (2) Technological items such as outlook for R & D, validity of developmental issues, comparison between various R & D and significance in industrial promotion, (3) Economic items such as profitability and feasible period, and (4) Social items such as sociability, compatibility to needs, possibility of locations, international meaning, market scale and promotion scenario. 90 refs., 67 figs., 96 tabs.

  12. Analog front-end cell designed in a commercial 025 mu m process for the ATLAS pixel detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Blanquart, L; Comes, G; Denes, P; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Fischer, P; Mandelli, E; Meddeler, G; Peric, I; Richardson, J

    2002-01-01

    A new analog pixel front-end cell has been developed for the ATLAS detector at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This analog cell has been submitted in two commercial 0.25 mu m CMOS processes (in an analog test chip format), using special layout techniques for radiation hardness purposes. It is composed of two cascaded amplifiers followed by a fast discriminator featuring a detection threshold within the range of 1000 to 10000 electrons. The first preamplifier has the principal role of providing a large bandwidth, low input impedance, and fast rise time in order to enhance the time-walk and crosstalk performance, whereas the second fully differential amplifier is aimed at delivering a sufficiently high-voltage gain for optimum comparison. A new do feedback concept renders the cell tolerant of sensor leakage current up to 300 nA and provides monitoring of this current. Two 5-bit digital-to-analog converters tolerant to single- event upset have been i...

  13. Cell-based therapeutics from an economic perspective: primed for a commercial success or a research sinkhole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Todd N; Dusserre, Nathalie; Maruszewski, Marcin; L'heureux, Nicolas

    2008-11-01

    Despite widespread hype and significant investment through the late 1980s and 1990s, cell-based therapeutics have largely failed from both a clinical and financial perspective. While the early pioneers were able to create clinically efficacious products, small margins coupled with small initial indications made it impossible to produce a reasonable return on the huge initial investments that had been made to support widespread research activities. Even as US FDA clearance opened up larger markets, investor interest waned, and the crown jewels of cell-based therapeutics went bankrupt or were rescued by corporate bailout. Despite the hard lessons learned from these pioneering companies, many of today's regenerative medicine companies are supporting nearly identical strategies. It remains to be seen whether or not our proposed tenets for investment and commercialization strategy yield an economic success or whether the original model can produce a return on investment sufficient to justify the large up-front investments. Irrespective of which approach yields a success, it is critically important that more of the second-generation products establish profitability if the field is to enjoy continued investment from both public and private sectors. PMID:18947313

  14. From fast fluorescence imaging to molecular diffusion law on live cell membranes in a commercial microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Carmine; Gratton, Enrico; Beltram, Fabio; Cardarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the spatial distribution and the motion of membrane components like lipids and proteins are key factors in the regulation of many cellular functions. However, due to the fast dynamics and the tiny structures involved, a very high spatio-temporal resolution is required to catch the real behavior of molecules. Here we present the experimental protocol for studying the dynamics of fluorescently-labeled plasma-membrane proteins and lipids in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Notably, this approach doesn't need to track each molecule, but it calculates population behavior using all molecules in a given region of the membrane. The starting point is a fast imaging of a given region on the membrane. Afterwards, a complete spatio-temporal autocorrelation function is calculated correlating acquired images at increasing time delays, for example each 2, 3, n repetitions. It is possible to demonstrate that the width of the peak of the spatial autocorrelation function increases at increasing time delay as a function of particle movement due to diffusion. Therefore, fitting of the series of autocorrelation functions enables to extract the actual protein mean square displacement from imaging (iMSD), here presented in the form of apparent diffusivity vs average displacement. This yields a quantitative view of the average dynamics of single molecules with nanometer accuracy. By using a GFP-tagged variant of the Transferrin Receptor (TfR) and an ATTO488 labeled 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (PPE) it is possible to observe the spatiotemporal regulation of protein and lipid diffusion on µm-sized membrane regions in the micro-to-milli-second time range. PMID:25350683

  15. PVT roadmap. A European guide for the development and market introduction of PVT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In PVT technology, heat is extracted from PV cells. In this way, a device is made that produces both electricity and heat. In the EU-funded co-ordination action PV-Catapult, workshops on PVT were organised at the PVSEC 2004 Conference in Paris and the Eurosun 2004 conference in Freiburg, to obtain active participation of the PV and solar thermal communities. Currently, the results of the workshops are used in the drafting of a roadmap for the large-scale introduction of PVT technology on the market. First results will be presented here

  16. A roadmap for the development and market introduction of PVT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In PVT technology, heat is extracted from PV cells. In this way, a device is made that produces both electricity and heat. In the EU funded coordination action PV-Catapult, workshops on PVT were organised at the PVSEC 2004 Conference in Paris and the Eurosun 2004 conference in Freiburg, to obtain active participation of the PV and solar thermal communities. Currently, the results of the workshops are used in the drafting of a roadmap for the large scale introduction of PVT technology on the market. First results will be presented here

  17. A PROCESS FOR THE UPDATE AND REVIEW OF OPERATION AND TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS

    OpenAIRE

    CHRISTOPHER HOLMES; MICHAEL FERRILL

    2008-01-01

    In order to aid Singaporean small and medium sized companies identify and select emerging technologies for business benefit, the Operation and Technology Roadmapping (OTR) process has been introduced and applied to over seventy companies. To help these companies continue the adoption of roadmapping, an update process has been developed and applied to ten organizations. This paper introduces the operation and technology roadmap methodology for roadmap creation, and then explores the process us...

  18. ESTABLISH A CREATIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR ROADMAPPING IN ACADEMY- FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF I-SYSTEM METHODOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tieju MA; Andrzej P. WIERZBICKI; Yoshiteru NAKAMORI

    2007-01-01

    Roadmapping, originated from industry as a strategic planning tool, is attracting increasing applications in academy. Based on the recognition that roadmapping is a knowledge creation process,this paper analyzes what kind of support is needed or helpful for establishing a creative environment for roadmapping in academy and reviews various types of such support from the perspective of i-system methodology. As case studies of such support, this paper further introduces roadmapping pratices in Janpan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.

  19. 3D roadmap in neuroangiography: technique and clinical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first clinical results obtained with a novel technique: the three-dimensional [3D] roadmap. The major difference from the standard 2D digital roadmap technique is that the newly developed 3D roadmap is based on a rotational angiography acquisition technique with the two-dimensional [2D] fluoroscopic image as an overlay. Data required for an accurate superimposition of the previously acquired 3D reconstructed image on the interactively made 2D fluoroscopy image, in real time, are stored in the 3D workstation and constitute the calibration dataset. Both datasets are spatially aligned in real time; thus, the 3D image is accurately superimposed on the 2D fluoroscopic image regardless of any change in C-arm position or magnification. The principal advantage of the described roadmap method is that one contrast injection allows the C-arm to be positioned anywhere in the space and allows alterations in the distance between the x-ray tube and the image intensifier as well as changes in image magnification. In the clinical setting, the 3D roadmap facilitated intravascular neuronavigation with concurrent reduction of procedure time and use of contrast medium. (orig.)

  20. Energy Union: a global road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents and comments the strategy defined by the European Commission in its document entitled 'Energy Union: secure, sustainable, competitive, affordable energy for every European' which defines a framework and a road-map for the emergence and progress of a Europe of energy. Such an Energy Union means solidarity between members, a free circulation of energy across borders, a priority for energy efficiency, a transition towards a low carbon society, and competitive and affordable prices for the European citizen. The author outlines the present weaknesses of the Europe of energy: first world energy importer, twelve countries being under the required interconnection level (10 per cent of the installed production should be able to cross the borders), some countries depending on a unique provider for their energy imports, low energy performance for buildings and high oil-dependence for transports. On the other hand, good results have already been reached regarding the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. To be successful, this new strategy thus requires high investments and the development of new standards

  1. Road-map for 2. generation biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents road-map issues concerning the requirements for biofuels of second generation, and defines the priorities addressed by a demonstrator program. It recalls the context created by the challenges of climate change and the excessive dependence on fossil fuels, and the objectives defined by the European Union in terms of biofuel share in the global consumption. Then, it describes the candidate technologies for the production of this second generation of biofuels, those based on thermo-chemical processes (mainly the pyrolysis-gasification of biomass), and those based on biochemical processes (enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of biomass). It highlights the technological challenges for these processes, and describes the various objectives of research projects supported by a 'demonstrator fund'. It discusses the necessity to develop demonstrators, and mentions some current projects of private companies, competitiveness clusters, and public research institutions. An agenda is defined from 2009 to 2020 which encompasses the research, demonstration and operation phases. An appendix provides brief presentations of thermo-chemical or biological demonstrators currently under operation or under construction in foreign countries (Germany, Finland, United States of America, Sweden, Spain, Canada, Japan, and Denmark)

  2. Rationale and Roadmap for Moon Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.; ILEWG Team

    We discuss the different rationale for Moon exploration. This starts with areas of scientific investigations: clues on the formation and evolution of rocky planets, accretion and bombardment in the inner solar system, comparative planetology processes (tectonic, volcanic, impact cratering, volatile delivery), records astrobiology, survival of organics; past, present and future life. The rationale includes also the advancement of instrumentation: Remote sensing miniaturised instruments; Surface geophysical and geochemistry package; Instrument deployment and robotic arm, nano-rover, sampling, drilling; Sample finder and collector. There are technologies in robotic and human exploration that are a drive for the creativity and economical competitivity of our industries: Mecha-electronics-sensors; Tele control, telepresence, virtual reality; Regional mobility rover; Autonomy and Navigation; Artificially intelligent robots, Complex systems, Man-Machine interface and performances. Moon-Mars Exploration can inspire solutions to global Earth sustained development: In-Situ Utilisation of resources; Establishment of permanent robotic infrastructures, Environmental protection aspects; Life sciences laboratories; Support to human exploration. We also report on the IAA Cosmic Study on Next Steps In Exploring Deep Space, and ongoing IAA Cosmic Studies, ILEWG/IMEWG ongoing activities, and we finally discuss possible roadmaps for robotic and human exploration, starting with the Moon-Mars missions for the coming decade, and building effectively on joint technology developments.

  3. AFCI Safeguards Enhancement Study: Technology Development Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leon E.; Dougan, A.; Tobin, Stephen; Cipiti, B.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Bakel, A. J.; Bean, Robert; Grate, Jay W.; Santi, P.; Bryan, Steven; Kinlaw, M. T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Burr, Tom; Lehn, Scott A.; Tolk, K.; Chichester, David; Menlove, H.; Vo, D.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Merkle, P.; Wang, T. F.; Duran, F.; Nakae, L.; Warren, Glen A.; Friedrich, S.; Rabin, M.

    2008-12-31

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Safeguards Campaign aims to develop safeguards technologies and processes that will significantly reduce the risk of proliferation in the U.S. nuclear fuel cycle of tomorrow. The Safeguards Enhancement Study was chartered with identifying promising research and development (R&D) directions over timescales both near-term and long-term, and under safeguards oversight both domestic and international. This technology development roadmap documents recognized gaps and needs in the safeguarding of nuclear fuel cycles, and outlines corresponding performance targets for each of those needs. Drawing on the collective expertise of technologists and user-representatives, a list of over 30 technologies that have the potential to meet those needs was developed, along with brief summaries of each candidate technology. Each summary describes the potential impact of that technology, key research questions to be addressed, and prospective development milestones that could lead to a definitive viability or performance assessment. Important programmatic linkages between U.S. agencies and offices are also described, reflecting the emergence of several safeguards R&D programs in the U.S. and the reinvigoration of nuclear fuel cycles across the globe.

  4. Technology Roadmap: Fuel Economy of Road Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This roadmap explores the potential improvement of existing technologies to enhance the average fuel economy of motorised vehicles; the roadmap’s vision is to achieve a 30% to 50% reduction in fuel use per kilometre from new road vehicles including 2-wheelers, LDV s and HDV s) around the world in 2030, and from the stock of all vehicles on the road by 2050. This achievement would contribute to significant reductions in GHG emissions and oil use, compared to a baseline projection. Different motorised modes are treated separately, with a focus on LDV s, HDV s and powered two-wheelers. A section on in-use fuel economy also addresses technical and nontechnical parameters that could allow fuel economy to drastically improve over the next decades. Technology cost analysis and payback time show that significant progress can be made with low or negative cost for fuel-efficient vehicles over their lifetime use. Even though the latest data analysed by the IEA for fuel economy between 2005 and 2008 showed that a gap exists in achieving the roadmap’s vision, cutting the average fuel economy of road motorised vehicles by 30% to 50% by 2030 is achievable, and the policies and technologies that could help meet this challenge are already deployed in many places around the world.

  5. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Schlücker, Sebastian; Wenger, Jérôme; Regmi, Raju; Rigneault, Hervé; Calafiore, Giuseppe; West, Melanie; Cabrini, Stefano; Fleischer, Monika; van Hulst, Niek F.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Pucci, Annemarie; Cojoc, Dan; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.; Ni, Ming

    2016-06-01

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field.

  6. Continuing the International Roadmapping Effort - An Introduction to the Evolution of the ISECG Global Exploration Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlutz, Juergen; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Laurini, Kathy; Spiero, Francois

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration goals call for sending humans and robots beyond low Earth orbit and establishing sustained access to destinations such as the Moon, asteroids and Mars. Space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are discussing an international approach for achieving these goals, documented in ISECG's Global Exploration Roadmap (GER). The GER reference scenario reflects a step-wise evolution of critical capabilities from ISS to missions in the lunar vicinity in preparation for the journey of humans to Mars. As ISECG agencies advance their individual planning, they also advance the mission themes and reference architecture of the GER to consolidate common goals, near-term mission scenarios and initial opportunities for collaboration. In this context, particular focus has been given to the Better understanding and further refinement of cislunar infrastructure and potential lunar transportation architecture Interaction with international science communities to identify and articulate the scientific opportunities of the near-term exploration mission themes Coordination and consolidation of interest in lunar polar volatiles prospecting and potential for in-situ resource utilisation Identification and articulation of the benefits from exploration and the technology transfer activities The paper discusses the ongoing roadmapping activity of the ISECG agencies. It provides an insight into the status of the above activities and an outlook towards the evolution of the GER that is currently foreseen in the 2017 timeframe.

  7. Oceans of Energy. European Ocean Energy Roadmap 2010-2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    support industry development. It will also be necessary to integrate previously mapped ocean resources and transmission capacity potentials in Europe. Risk reduction will be required to leverage private investment into the ocean energy industry; this can be achieved by appropriate fiscal policies (grant support and market pull). Revenue incentives are important, however, they are currently insufficient and will not work in isolation from capital support measures in the early stages of industry growth. It is anticipated that costs will reach mature levels after a number of commercial scale developments utilising technologies of similar generic design have been installed. It is the opinion of the European Ocean Energy Association (EU-OEA) that a joint private/public effort, such as the establishment of a European Industrial Initiative, is critical for the development of the European ocean energy industry. A European Industrial Initiative would bring together the necessary critical mass of private/public resources to advance the industry to full commercialisation. The inclusion of ocean energy within the upcoming framework programme will enable it to leverage private investment, accelerating development and achieving the associated benefits of a thriving ocean energy industry. The EU-OEA has committed itself to supporting and facilitating the development of such a European Industrial Initiative. An initial step should be the establishment of the Strategic Ocean Energy Platform that will gather key industrial players and achieve the critical mass required to set out the industrial and technological objectives for a joint European Industrial Initiative. The establishment of a Strategic Ocean Energy Platform and a European Industrial Initiative are therefore the key recommendations of this Roadmap.

  8. Sequence Homologies between Mycoplasma and Chlamydia spp. Lead to False-Positive Results in Chlamydial Cell Cultures Tested for Mycoplasma Contamination with a Commercial PCR Assay▿

    OpenAIRE

    Maass, Viola; Kern, Jan Marco; Poeckl, Matthias; Maass, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a frequent problem in chlamydial cell culture. After obtaining contradictory contamination results, we compared three commercial PCR kits for mycoplasma detection. One kit signaled contamination in mycoplasma-free Chlamydia pneumoniae cultures. Sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed primer homology with the chlamydial genome as the basis of this false-positive result.

  9. A temperature-controlled cell for X-ray study of liquid systems using a commercial DRON-UM1 diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A container (cell) and a temperature-control system have been designed enabling one to carry out x-ray diffraction study of liquid samples both at a fixed temperature and within a certain temperature range using a commercial DRON-UMl x-ray diffractometer. Special features of the cell and the materials used for it allow one to study both chemically inert and corrosive liquids

  10. Development of an Online Toolkit for Measuring Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Performance -- Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na

    2013-03-13

    This study analyzes the market needs for building performance evaluation tools. It identifies the existing gaps and provides a roadmap for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a toolkit with which to optimize energy performance of a commercial building over its life cycle.

  11. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Title of CRM Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooke, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps "Title." Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  12. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Human Health & Support Systems Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps. Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  13. Technology Roadmaps: A guide to development and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    New low-carbon technologies show clear potential for transforming the global energy system, but a key challenge remains: what steps do governments and industry need to take to ensure their development and deployment? Roadmapping, used for decades in technology-intensive industries, is a useful tool to help address complicated issues strategically at the national, regional and global levels. To help turn political statements and analytical work into concrete action, the International Energy Agency (IEA) is developing a series of global roadmaps devoted to low-carbon energy technologies. This guide is aimed at providing countries and companies with the context, information and tools they need to design, manage and implement an effective energy roadmap process.

  14. An Interim Report on NASA's Draft Space Technology Roadmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA has developed a set of 14 draft roadmaps to guide the development of space technologies under the leadership of the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). Each of these roadmaps focuses on a particular technology area (TA). The roadmaps are intended to foster the development of advanced technologies and concepts that address NASA's needs and contribute to other aerospace and national needs. OCT requested that the National Research Council conduct a study to review the draft roadmaps, gather and assess relevant community input, and make recommendations and suggest priorities to inform NASA's decisions as it finalizes its roadmaps. The statement of task states that "based on the results of the community input and its own deliberations, the steering committee will prepare a brief interim report that addresses high-level issues associated with the roadmaps, such as the advisability of modifying the number or technical focus of the draft NASA roadmaps." This interim report, which does not include formal recommendations, addresses that one element of the study charge. NASA requested this interim report so that it would have the opportunity to make an early start in modifying the draft roadmaps based on feedback from the panels and steering committee. The final report will address all other tasks in the statement of task. In particular, the final report will include a prioritization of technologies, will describe in detail the prioritization process and criteria, and will include specific recommendations on a variety of topics, including many of the topics mentioned in this interim report. In developing both this interim report and the final report to come, the steering committee draws on the work of six study panels organized by technical area, loosely following the organization of the 14 roadmaps, as follows: A Panel 1: Propulsion and Power TA01 Launch Propulsion Systems TA02 In-Space Propulsion Technologies TA03 Space Power and Energy Storage Systems TA13

  15. Structured Crowdsourcing: A B2B Innovation Roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Engell, Toke; Jensen, Nik Grewy;

    Crowdsourcing is an increasingly popular source of both ideas and funding. Crowdsourcing in a B2B context is less well understood and, as such, much of our discussion will highlight business-to-business crowdsourcing. More generally discussion will address crowdsourcing relative to innovation and...... technology development and customer relationship management. Examples will be used to derive a general roadmap, and to identify specific areas worthy of increased attention. The roadmap is developed as a six-stage approach that begins with task specification and concludes with management of inputs generated...... from crowd-sourcing efforts. The roadmap emphasizes on early stages in the overall innovation management activity that is related to development and specification of the task to be crowdsourced, the identification of the crowd, the creation of the environment to connect the crowdsourcer, the task and...

  16. The European Lead Fast Reactor Strategy and the Roadmap for the Demonstrator ALFRED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expected impacts: → To ensure that nuclear energy remains a long-term contributor to a low carbon economy it is necessary to increase its sustainability through demonstrating the technical, industrial and economic viability of Gen IV fast nuclear reactors; → With the construction and operation of MYRRHA and ALFRED, Europe will be in an excellent position to secure the development of a safe, sustainable and competitive fast nuclear technology; → ALFRED Demonstrator Roadmap will: • play a key role by involving European industry and maintaining and developing European leadership in nuclear technologies worldwide; • allow to investigate and address the main technological issues that can be implemented in the LFR prototype (2035); • make possible commercial deployment, by the European industry, of these technologies by 2050 and beyond; • contribute significantly to the development of a sustainable and secure energy supply for Europe from the second half of this century onwards

  17. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Shigehiro; Eckroad, Steven; Marian, Adela; Choi, Kyeongdal; Kim, Woo Seok; Terai, Motoaki; Deng, Zigang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Jiasu; Umemoto, Katsuya; Du, Jia; Febvre, Pascal; Keenan, Shane; Mukhanov, Oleg; Cooley, Lance D.; Foley, Cathy P.; Hassenzahl, William V.; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-11-01

    There is universal agreement between the United Nations and governments from the richest to the poorest nations that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges relating to sustainable energy, clean water, low-emission transportation, coping with climate change and natural disasters, and reclaiming use of land. We have invited researchers from a range of eclectic research areas to provide a Roadmap of how superconducting technologies could address these major challenges confronting humanity. Superconductivity has, over the century since its discovery by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, promised to provide solutions to many challenges. So far, most superconducting technologies are esoteric systems that are used in laboratories and hospitals. Large science projects have long appreciated the ability of superconductivity to efficiently create high magnetic fields that are otherwise very costly to achieve with ordinary materials. The most successful applications outside of large science are high-field magnets for magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory magnetometers for mineral and materials characterization, filters for mobile communications, and magnetoencephalography for understanding the human brain. The stage is now set for superconductivity to make more general contributions. Humanity uses practically unthinkable amounts of energy to drive our modern way of life. Overall, global power usage has been predicted to almost double from 16.5 to 30 TW in the next four decades (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). The economy with which electrons carry energy compels the continued quest for efficient superconducting power generation, energy storage, and power transmission. The growing global population requires new arable land and treatment of water, especially in remote areas, and superconductivity offers unique solutions to these problems. Exquisite detectors give warning of changes that are otherwise invisible. Prediction of climate and

  18. A Suggested Approach for Producing VAMS Air Transportation System Technology Roadmaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Del

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview on the use of technology 'roadmaps' in order to facilitate the research development of VAMS (Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation). These roadmaps are to be produced by each concept team, updated annually, discussed at the technical interchange meetings (TIMs), shared among all VAMS participants, and made available electronically. These concept-specific technology roadmaps will be subsequently blended into an integrated catalog of roadmaps, technical discussions, and research recommendations. A historical example of ATM (Air Traffic Management) research and technology from 1940 to 1999 as shown in a series of 'roadmaps' is also included.

  19. French Roadmap for complex Systems 2008-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Chavalarias, David; Bourgine, Paul; Perrier, Edith; Amblard, Fréderic; Arlabosse, François; Auger, Pierre; Baillon, Jean-Bernard; Barreteau, Olivier; Baudot, Pierre; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Ben Amor, Soufian; Berry, Hugues; Bertelle, Cyrille; Berthod, Marc; Beslon, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    This second issue of the French Complex Systems Roadmap by the French National Network for Complex SYstems (http://RNSC.fr) and the Paris Ile-de-France Complex Systems Institute (http://iscpif.fr) is the outcome of the “Entretiens de Cargèse 2008”, an interdisciplinary brainstorming session organized over one week in 2008, jointly by RNSC, ISC-PIF and IXXI. It capitalizes on the first roadmap and gathers contributions of more than 70 scientists from major French institutions. A “complex sy...

  20. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  1. The Roadmap to achieve EU goals on urban mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Hedegaard; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Schippl, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    Is it possible to change urban mobility in Europe to achieve ambitious sustainability goals? If so, who should dowhat by when? These questions are answered in a new Roadmap on urban mobility prepared as part of the European FP7 research project TRANSFORuM.......Is it possible to change urban mobility in Europe to achieve ambitious sustainability goals? If so, who should dowhat by when? These questions are answered in a new Roadmap on urban mobility prepared as part of the European FP7 research project TRANSFORuM....

  2. The anatomy of a distributed motion planning roadmap

    KAUST Repository

    Jacobs, Sam Ade

    2014-09-01

    © 2014 IEEE. In this paper, we evaluate and compare the quality and structure of roadmaps constructed from parallelizing sampling-based motion planning algorithms against that of roadmaps constructed using sequential planner. Also, we make an argument and provide experimental results that show that motion planning problems involving heterogenous environments (common in most realistic and large-scale motion planning) is a natural fit for spatial subdivision-based parallel processing. Spatial subdivision-based parallel processing approach is suited for heterogeneous environments because it allows for local adaption in solving a global problem while taking advantage of scalability that is possible with parallel processing.

  3. Superconductivity and the environment: a Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is universal agreement between the United Nations and governments from the richest to the poorest nations that humanity faces unprecedented global challenges relating to sustainable energy, clean water, low-emission transportation, coping with climate change and natural disasters, and reclaiming use of land. We have invited researchers from a range of eclectic research areas to provide a Roadmap of how superconducting technologies could address these major challenges confronting humanity. Superconductivity has, over the century since its discovery by Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, promised to provide solutions to many challenges. So far, most superconducting technologies are esoteric systems that are used in laboratories and hospitals. Large science projects have long appreciated the ability of superconductivity to efficiently create high magnetic fields that are otherwise very costly to achieve with ordinary materials. The most successful applications outside of large science are high-field magnets for magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory magnetometers for mineral and materials characterization, filters for mobile communications, and magnetoencephalography for understanding the human brain. The stage is now set for superconductivity to make more general contributions. Humanity uses practically unthinkable amounts of energy to drive our modern way of life. Overall, global power usage has been predicted to almost double from 16.5 to 30 TW in the next four decades (2011 Equinox Summit: Energy 2030 http://wgsi.org/publications-resources). The economy with which electrons carry energy compels the continued quest for efficient superconducting power generation, energy storage, and power transmission. The growing global population requires new arable land and treatment of water, especially in remote areas, and superconductivity offers unique solutions to these problems. Exquisite detectors give warning of changes that are otherwise invisible. Prediction of climate and

  4. Scenario-based roadmapping assessing nuclear technology development paths for future nuclear energy system scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy may play a significant role in a future sustainable energy mix. The transition from today's nuclear energy system towards a future more sustainable nuclear energy system will be dictated by technology availability, energy market competitiveness and capability to achieve sustainability through the nuclear fuel cycle. Various scenarios have been investigated worldwide each with a diverse set of assumptions on the timing and characteristics of new nuclear energy systems. Scenario-based roadmapping combines the dynamic scenario-analysis of nuclear energy systems' futures with the technology roadmap information published and analysed in various technology assessment reports though integrated within the nuclear technology roadmap Nuclear-Roadmap.net. The advantages of this combination is to allow mutual improvement of scenario analysis and nuclear technology roadmapping providing a higher degree of confidence in the assessment of nuclear energy system futures. This paper provides a description of scenario-based roadmapping based on DANESS and Nuclear-Roadmap.net. (author)

  5. Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R and D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R and D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been

  6. Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-10-01

    Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in

  7. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  8. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progesss on NASA's Human Exploration Systems and Mobility Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps: Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Technology and Capability Readiness Levels. Relationships Between Roadmaps. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Team Progress to Date).

  9. Local randomization in neighbor selection improves PRM roadmap quality

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2012-10-01

    Probabilistic Roadmap Methods (PRMs) are one of the most used classes of motion planning methods. These sampling-based methods generate robot configurations (nodes) and then connect them to form a graph (roadmap) containing representative feasible pathways. A key step in PRM roadmap construction involves identifying a set of candidate neighbors for each node. Traditionally, these candidates are chosen to be the k-closest nodes based on a given distance metric. In this paper, we propose a new neighbor selection policy called LocalRand(k,K\\'), that first computes the K\\' closest nodes to a specified node and then selects k of those nodes at random. Intuitively, LocalRand attempts to benefit from random sampling while maintaining the higher levels of local planner success inherent to selecting more local neighbors. We provide a methodology for selecting the parameters k and K\\'. We perform an experimental comparison which shows that for both rigid and articulated robots, LocalRand results in roadmaps that are better connected than the traditional k-closest policy or a purely random neighbor selection policy. The cost required to achieve these results is shown to be comparable to k-closest. © 2012 IEEE.

  10. Human Health and Support Systems Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Dennis; Boehm, Al

    2005-01-01

    The Human Health and Support Systems Capability Roadmap focuses on research and technology development and demonstration required to ensure the health, habitation, safety, and effectiveness of crews in and beyond low Earth orbit. It contains three distinct sub-capabilities: Human Health and Performance. Life Support and Habitats. Extra-Vehicular Activity.

  11. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-04-01

    Through the California State IOF initiative, the California Energy Commission PIER Program developed a petroleum refining roadmap to identify energy issues and priorities unique to the refining industry in California and create a plan for future R&D that could help California refineries implement energy efficient technologies.

  12. The Education Roadmap in South Africa. Policy Brief Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    A response to the precarious state of the public education system in South Africa, the Education Roadmap and its 10 Point Programme is a multi-layered policy intervention intended to galvanise educational policymakers and practitioners into action, get schools the support they need, get teachers teaching and learners learning, and ultimately…

  13. Roadmap for Next-Generation State Accountability Systems. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Chief State School Officers, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Roadmap, developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) Next-Generation State Accountability Taskforce, presents a vision for next-generation accountability systems to support college and career readiness for all students. It is written by and for states, building on the leadership toward college and career readiness. This…

  14. NIH Roadmap & the Common Fund - Cancer Imaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Roadmap for Medical Research is a series of high impact, trans-NIH programs supported by the NIH Common Fund. These programs address challenges that are priorities for the NIH and medical research but are issues that require the cooperation of more than one NIH institute to address.

  15. Science and Technology Roadmapping to Support Project Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mc Carthy, Jeremiah Justin; Haley, Daniel Joseph; Dixon, Brent Wayne

    2001-07-01

    Disciplined science and technology roadmapping provides a framework to coordinate research and development activities with project objectives. This case-history paper describes initial project technology needs identification, assessment and R&D ranking activities supporting characterization of 781 waste tanks requiring a 'hazardous waste determination' or 'verification of empty' decision to meet an Idaho state Voluntary Consent Order.

  16. Synthesis-Spectroscopy Roadmap Problems: Discovering Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Laurie L.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry problems that interrelate and integrate synthesis with spectroscopy are presented. These synthesis-spectroscopy roadmap (SSR) problems uniquely engage second-year undergraduate organic chemistry students in the personal discovery of organic chemistry. SSR problems counter the memorize-or-bust strategy that many students tend to…

  17. A National Roadmap for Vadose Zone Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowall, Stephen Jacob

    2001-08-01

    This roadmap is a means of achieving, to the best of our current knowledge, a reasonable scientific understanding of how contaminants of all forms move in the vadose geological environments. This understanding is needed to reduce the present uncertainties in predicting contaminant movement, which in turn will reduce the uncertainties in remediation decisions.

  18. Science Instruments and Sensors Capability Roadmap: NRC Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Rich; Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The Science Instruments and Sensors roadmaps include capabilities associated with the collection, detection, conversion, and processing of scientific data required to answer compelling science questions driven by the Vision for Space Exploration and The New Age of Exploration (NASA's Direction for 2005 & Beyond). Viewgraphs on these instruments and sensors are presented.

  19. Endotoxin Contamination in Commercially Available Pokeweed Mitogen Contributes to the Activation of Murine Macrophages and Human Dendritic Cell Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jae Seung; Kim, Hye Jin; Ryu, Young Hee; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Dae Kyun; Han, Seung Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Commercially available pokeweed mitogen (PWM) has been reported to activate macrophages, leading to production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO). However, we found that polymyxin B (PMB), a specific inhibitor of endotoxin activity, inhibited the PWM-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and NO and the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). A kinetic-turbidimetric Limulus amebocyte lysate assay demonstrated that commercial PWM contained substantial endotoxin, ove...

  20. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  1. Off-highway vehicle technology roadmap.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The off-highway sector is under increasing pressure to reduce operating costs (including fuel costs) and to reduce emissions. Recognizing this, the Society of Automotive Engineers and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) convened a workshop in April 2001 (ANL 2001) to (1) determine the interest of the off-highway sector (consisting of agriculture, construction, surface mining, inland marine) in crafting a shared vision of off-highway, heavy machines of the future and (2) identify critical research and development (R and D) needs for minimizing off-highway vehicle emissions while cost-effectively maintaining or enhancing system performance. The workshop also enabled government and industry participants to exchange information. During the workshop, it became clear that the challenges facing the heavy, surface-based off-highway sector can be addressed in three major machine categories: (1) engine/aftertreatment and fuels/lubes, (2) machine systems, and (3) thermal management. Working groups convened to address these topical areas. The status of off-highway technologies was determined, critical technical barriers to achieving future emission standards were identified, and strategies and technologies for reducing fuel consumption were discussed. Priority areas for R and D were identified. Given the apparent success of the discussions at the workshop, several participants from industry agreed to help in the formation of a joint industry/government ''roadmap'' team. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has an extensive role in researching ways to make heavy-duty trucks and trains more efficient, with respect to both fuel usage and air emissions. The workshop participants felt that a joint industry/government research program that addresses the unique needs of the off-highway sector would complement the current research program for highway vehicles. With industry expertise, in-kind contributions, and federal government funding (coupled with

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, K.L.; Ramuhali, P.; Brenchley, D.L.; Coble, J.B.; Hashemian, H.M.; Konnick, R.; Ray, S.

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary [partial] The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. A workshop was held to gather subject matter experts to develop the NDE R&D Roadmap for Cables. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, and NDE instrumentation development from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), universities, commercial NDE service vendors and cable manufacturers, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

    2012-09-14

    The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

  4. A Lunar Surface System Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Taleghani, barmac K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a Supportability Technology Development Roadmap as a guide for developing capabilities intended to allow NASA s Constellation program to enable a supportable, sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon and Mars. Presented is a discussion of supportability, in terms of space facility maintenance, repair and related logistics and a comparison of how lunar outpost supportability differs from the International Space Station. Supportability lessons learned from NASA and Department of Defense experience and their impact on a future lunar outpost is discussed. A supportability concept for future missions to the Moon and Mars that involves a transition from a highly logistics dependent to a logistically independent operation is discussed. Lunar outpost supportability capability needs are summarized and a supportability technology development strategy is established. The resulting Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Strategy defines general criteria that will be used to select technologies that will enable future flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. This strategy also introduces the concept of exploiting flight hardware as a supportability resource. The technology roadmap involves development of three mutually supporting technology categories, Diagnostics Test and Verification, Maintenance and Repair, and Scavenging and Recycling. The technology roadmap establishes two distinct technology types, "Embedded" and "Process" technologies, with different implementation and thus different criteria and development approaches. The supportability technology roadmap addresses the technology readiness level, and estimated development schedule for technology groups that includes down-selection decision gates that correlate with the lunar program milestones. The resulting supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop a set

  5. Investigation of the Stability and 1.0 MeV Proton Radiation Resistance of Commercially Produced Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Alloy Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys is reported. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below 1E14 sq cm fluences above 1E14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed In dark I-V measurements. The current mechanism were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  6. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Brett D.

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called “Mobile Electricity” is characterized. Mobile Electricity (Me-) redefines H2FCVs as innovative products able to import and export electricity across the traditional vehicle boundary. Such vehicles could provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services. T...

  7. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenie, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: General Background and Introduction of Capability. Roadmaps for Systems Engineering Cost/Risk Analysis. Agency Objectives. Strategic Planning Transformation. Review Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Review Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Progress to Date).

  8. CYTOTOXICITY EVALUATION OF TWO ROOT CANAL SEALERS AND A COMMERCIAL CALCIUM HYDROXIDE PASTE ON THP1 CELL LINE BY TRYPAN BLUE ASSAY

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Tavares Bekner Correa; Gabriel Alves Costa Veranio; Licínio Esmaeraldo Silva; Raphael Hirata Junior; Jeffry M. Coil; Miriam F. Zaccaro Scelza

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of two brands of root canal sealers, epoxy-resin based and zinc oxide-eugenol based, and one commercial calcium hydroxide paste on a monocyte cell line THP-1. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Undiluted (crude extract) and diluted extracts to 10%, 1%, 0.1%, 0.01%, 0.001% and 0.0001% of the sealers were tested for cytotoxicity to THP-1 cells using the trypan blue assay. Extracts were obtained according to ISO standard. Data were ana...

  9. ERC commercialization activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MW power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full-sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MW Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

  10. Evaluation of commercial lithium-ion cells based on composite positive electrode for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle applications. Part I: Initial characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating commercial Li-ion batteries presents some unique benefits. One of them is to use cells made from established fabrication process and form factor, such as those offered by the 18650 cylindrical configuration, to provide a common platform to investigate and understand performance deficiency and aging mechanism of target chemistry. Such an approach shall afford us to derive relevant information without influence from processing or form factor variability that may skew our understanding on cell-level issues. A series of 1.9 Ah 18650 lithium ion cells developed by a commercial source using a composite positive electrode comprising (LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 + LiMn2O4) is being used as a platform for the investigation of certain key issues, particularly path-dependent aging and degradation in future plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) applications, under the US Department of Energy's Applied Battery Research (ABR) program. Here we report in Part I the initial characterizations of the cell performance and Part II some aspects of cell degradation in 2C cycle aging. The initial characterizations, including cell-to-cell variability, are essential for life cycle performance characterization in the second part of the report when cell-aging phenomena are discussed. Due to the composite nature of the positive electrode, the features (or signature) derived from the incremental capacity (IC) of the cell appear rather complex. In this work, the method to index the observed IC peaks is discussed. Being able to index the IC signature in details is critical for analyzing and identifying degradation mechanism later in the cycle aging study.

  11. 'Mini'-Roadmapping - Ensuring Timely Sites' Cleanup/Closure by Resolving Science and Technology Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roadmapping is a powerful tool to manage technical risks and opportunities associated with complex problems. Roadmapping identifies technical capabilities required for both project- and program-level efforts and provides the basis for plans that ensure the necessary enabling activities will be done when needed. Roadmapping reveals where to focus further development of the path forward by evaluating uncertainties for levels of complexity, impacts, and/or the potential for large payback. Roadmaps can be customized to the application, a ''graded approach'' if you will. Some roadmaps are less detailed. We have called these less detailed, top-level roadmaps ''mini-roadmaps''. These miniroadmaps are created to tie the needed enablers (e.g., technologies, decisions, etc.) to the functions. If it is found during the mini-roadmapping that areas of significant risk exist, then those can be road mapped further to a lower level of detail. Otherwise, the mini-roadmap may be sufficient to manage the project/program risk. Applying a graded approach to the roadmapping can help keep the costs down. Experience has indicated that it is best to do mini-roadmapping first and then evaluate the risky areas to determine whether to further evaluate those areas. Roadmapping can be especially useful for programs/projects that have participants from multiple sites, programs, or other entities which are involved. Increased synergy, better communications, and increased cooperation are the results from roadmapping a program/project with these conditions. And, as with any trip, the earlier you use a roadmap, the more confidence you will have that you will arrive at your destination with few, if any, problems. The longer the trip or complicated the route, the sooner the map is needed. This analogy holds true for using roadmapping for laying out program/project baselines and any alternative (contingency) plans. The mini-roadmapping process has been applied to past projects like the hydrogen gas

  12. NASA Space Technology Draft Roadmap Area 13: Ground and Launch Systems Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology development roadmap for the area of ground and launch systems processing. The scope of this technology area includes: (1) Assembly, integration, and processing of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and payload hardware (2) Supply chain management (3) Transportation of hardware to the launch site (4) Transportation to and operations at the launch pad (5) Launch processing infrastructure and its ability to support future operations (6) Range, personnel, and facility safety capabilities (7) Launch and landing weather (8) Environmental impact mitigations for ground and launch operations (9) Launch control center operations and infrastructure (10) Mission integration and planning (11) Mission training for both ground and flight crew personnel (12) Mission control center operations and infrastructure (13) Telemetry and command processing and archiving (14) Recovery operations for flight crews, flight hardware, and returned samples. This technology roadmap also identifies ground, launch and mission technologies that will: (1) Dramatically transform future space operations, with significant improvement in life-cycle costs (2) Improve the quality of life on earth, while exploring in co-existence with the environment (3) Increase reliability and mission availability using low/zero maintenance materials and systems, comprehensive capabilities to ascertain and forecast system health/configuration, data integration, and the use of advanced/expert software systems (4) Enhance methods to assess safety and mission risk posture, which would allow for timely and better decision making. Several key technologies are identified, with a couple of slides devoted to one of these technologies (i.e., corrosion detection and prevention). Development of these technologies can enhance life on earth and have a major impact on how we can access space, eventually making routine commercial space access and improve building and manufacturing, and weather

  13. Higher Americium Oxidation State Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shehee, Thomas C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-18

    -solvent-extraction separations are also under investigation. The first would separate Am(VI) by co-crystallization with uranium and the other oxidizable actinides as their nitrate salts. This novel idea has been successful in lab scale testing, and merits further investigation. Similarly, success has been achieved in separations using inorganic or hybrid ion exchange materials to sorb the lanthanides and actinides, while allowing pentavalent americium to elute. This is the only technique currently investigating Am(V), despite the advantages of this oxidation state with regard to its higher stability. The ultimate destination for this roadmap is to develop an americium separation that can be applied under process conditions, preferably affording a co-separation of the actinyl (VI) ions. Toward that end, emphasis is given here to selection of a solvent extraction flowsheet for testing in the INL centrifugal contactor hot test bed during FY16. A solvent extraction process will be tested mainly because solvent extraction separations of Am(VI) are relatively mature and the test bed currently exists in a configuration to support them. Thus, a major goal of FY16 is to select the oxidant/ligand combination to run such a test using the contactors. The only ligands under consideration are DAAP and DEHBA. This is not to say that ion exchange and co-crystallization techniques are unimportant. They merit continued investigation, but are not mature enough for hot test bed testing at this time.

  14. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3

  15. Draft revised roadmap for improvement of pipe-wall thinning management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main committee of Power Generation Facility Code (MC-PGFC) of Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) made a roadmap in 2007 to enhance pipe wall thinning management rules after establishing management rules. JSME Research Committee for improving Pipe-Wall-Thinning Management drafted a revised version of the roadmap based on the questionnaire on March 2014. This paper shows summary of the questionnaire and the roadmap. (author)

  16. 3D Road-Mapping in the Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Rossitti, S.; Pfister, M

    2009-01-01

    3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at ...

  17. Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design. From Fundamentals to Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-01

    Vision2020 agreed to join NNI and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EERE) in sponsoring the "Nanomaterials and the Chemical Industry Roadmap Workshop" on September 30-October 2, 2002. This roadmap, Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function, is based on the scientific priorities expressed by workshop participants from the chemical industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  18. A roadmap for the EU White Paper goal on Urben Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Schippl, Jens; Leiren, Merethe Dotterud;

    2015-01-01

    result is a roadmap that proposes a broad strategy to answer the question “Who has to do what, by when” to achieve the urban transport goal. The roadmap includes detailed proposals for action and milestones at different levels of decision making. This paper will describe the process of consultations and...... the outcomes of the roadmap process and will also discuss the perspectives for implementation....

  19. A European Roadmap for Research in Astrobiology - The AstRoMap Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, F.; Walter, N.; Horneck, G.; Muller, C.; Rettberg, P.; Capria, M.; Palomba, E.

    2015-10-01

    AstRoMap (Astrobiology Road Mapping activity-www.astromap-eu.org) is a collaborative project which will provide the European Planetary Science Community with a road map in astrobiology. The goals of the project have been: (i) to pose big questions related to astrobiology; and (ii) the identification of experiments, new technology and/or those space missions to be developed in future programs and which could answer those big questions. This collaborative infrastructure includes the organization of expert panels and international workshops in order to discuss about those big questions and the science objectives by the community to be addressed. The main deliverable will be a Roadmap document. The project is steered by a consortium of six European and national research institutes and associations: -­- Centro de Astrobiologica (INTACSIC), Spain -­- European Science Foundation, France -­- Association pour un Réseau Européen d'Exo/Astrobiology (EANA), France -­- B-USOC, Belgium -­- Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Germany -­- National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), ItalyOrigin and evolution of planetary systems -­- Origin of organic compounds in space -­- Rock-water-carbon interactions, organic synthesis, and steps to life -­- Life and habitability on Earth and in Space -­- -­- Biosignatures as facilitating life detection The key topics will focus on a limited number of strategic scientific objectives to be addressed in the next 20 years by European astrobiologists, and suggest research activities for future development.

  20. Construction of a dead-end type micro- to R.O. membrane test cell and performance test with the laboratory- made and commercial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darunee Bhongsuwan

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A dead-end type membrane stirred cell for an RO filtration test has been designed and constructed. Magnetic stirring system is applied to overcome a pressure-induced concentration polarization occurred over a membrane surface in the test cell. A high pressure N2 tank is used as a pressure source.Feed container is designed for 2.5 l feed solution and a stirred cell volume is 0.5 l . The test cell holds a magnetic stirrer freely moved over the membrane surface. All units are made of stainless steel. A porous SS316L disc is used as a membrane support. The dead-end stirred cell is tested to work properly in an operating pressure ranged 0 - 400 psi. It means that the dead-end cell can be used to test a membrane of different filtration modes, from micro- to Reverse Osmosis filtration. Tests performed at 400 psi for 3 hours are safe but tests at a 500 psi increase leakage possibility. The cell is used to test the performance of both commercial and laboratory-made membranes. It shows that the salt rejection efficiency of the nano- and RO membranes, NTR759HR and LES90, determined by using the new test cell, is closely similar to those reported from the manufacture. Result of the tests for our own laboratory-made membrane shows a similar performance to the nanofiltration membrane LES90.

  1. Roadmap grounded as 'visual portray': reflecting on an artifact and metaphor

    OpenAIRE

    Simonse, W.L.; Buijs, J.A.; Hultink, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Artifacts Design representations and presentations of work, strategic thinking, and business processes. Main theme Design!? - related by research program on Design Roadmapping, at the Industrial Design Engineering Faculty.

  2. Interactive navigation of heterogeneous agents using adaptive roadmaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Russell; Sud, Avneesh; Andersen, Erik; Guy, Stephen J; Lin, Ming C; Manocha, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for collision-free navigation of a large number of independent agents in complex and dynamic environments. We introduce adaptive roadmaps to perform global path planning for each agent simultaneously. Our algorithm takes into account dynamic obstacles and interagents interaction forces to continuously update the roadmap based on a physically-based dynamics simulator. In order to efficiently update the links, we perform adaptive particle-based sampling along the links. We also introduce the notion of 'link bands' to resolve collisions among multiple agents. In practice, our algorithm can perform real-time navigation of hundreds and thousands of human agents in indoor and outdoor scenes. PMID:19008554

  3. Technology Development Roadmaps - a Systematic Approach to Maturing Needed Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John W. Colllins; Layne Pincock

    2010-07-01

    Abstract. Planning and decision making represent important challenges for all projects. This paper presents the steps needed to assess technical readiness and determine the path forward to mature the technologies required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. A Technology Readiness Assessment is used to evaluate the required systems, subsystems, and components (SSC) comprising the desired plant architecture and assess the SSCs against established Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). A validated TRL baseline is then established for the proposed physical design. Technology Development Roadmaps are generated to define the path forward and focus project research and development and engineering tasks on advancing the technologies to increasing levels of maturity. Tasks include modeling, testing, bench-scale demonstrations, pilot-scale demonstrations, and fully integrated prototype demonstrations. The roadmaps identify precise project objectives and requirements; create a consensus vision of project needs; provide a structured, defensible, decision-based project plan; and, minimize project costs and schedules.

  4. Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage in Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    A new technology roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industrial Applications, released today in Beijing, shows that carbon capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial applications by 4 gigatonnes in 2050. Such an amount is equal to roughly one-tenth of the total emission cuts needed from the energy sector by the middle of the century. This requires a rapid deployment of CCS technologies in various industrial sectors, and across both OECD and non-OECD countries. The roadmap, a joint report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), says that over 1800 industrial-scale projects are required over the next 40 years.

  5. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Benjamin R. [SRA International Inc. and Geothermal Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Ziagos, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur [Geothermal Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Hass, Eric [Geothermal Technologies Office, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-02-13

    Characterizing productive geothermal systems is challenging yet critical to identify and develop an estimated 30 gigawatts electric (GWe) of undiscovered hydrothermal resources in the western U.S. This paper, undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), summarizes needs and technical pathways that target the key geothermal signatures of temperature, permeability, and fluid content, and develops the time evolution of these pathways, tying in past and current GTO exploration Research and Development (R&D) projects. Beginning on a five-year timescale and projecting out to 2030, the paper assesses technologies that could accelerate the confirmation of 30 GWe. The resulting structure forms the basis for a Geothermal Exploration Technologies Roadmap, a strategic development plan to help guide GTO R&D investments that will lower the risk and cost of geothermal prospect identification. This roadmap is currently open for public comment. Send your comments to geothermal@ee.doe.gov.

  6. Status report on roadmap headquarters issue resolution activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Roadmap Project Office (RPO), under the Office of Planning (EM-14), continues to review headquarters (HQ) issues raised by the field in their roadmap documents. Currently, twenty-nine HQ issues are in the ''resolution'' process or are being defined for resolution. The resolution process involves an Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program (EM) HQ person, the Action Officer (AO), as the leader in the resolution process. The RPO is responsible to EM-14 for reporting on the progress of issue resolution activities and also to provide contractor support to each Action Officer: the contractor support person is identifies as the Issue Resolution Facilitator (IF). Field contacts also are identified for each issue. This document provides current information on HQ issues actively in the ''resolution'' process or being defined for resolution. The issues are primarily institutional rather than technical and mainly involve regulatory, coordination, prioritization, policy and management concerns

  7. Mission Assurance Modeling and Simulation: A Cyber Security Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Gerald; Roberts, David; Poole, Donold; Aquino, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a cyber security modeling and simulation roadmap to enhance mission assurance governance and establish risk reduction processes within constrained budgets. The term mission assurance stems from risk management work by Carnegie Mellon's Software Engineering Institute in the late 19905. By 2010, the Defense Information Systems Agency revised its cyber strategy and established the Program Executive Officer-Mission Assurance. This highlights a shift from simply protecting data to balancing risk and begins a necessary dialogue to establish a cyber security roadmap. The Military Operations Research Society has recommended a cyber community of practice, recognizing there are too few professionals having both cyber and analytic experience. The authors characterize the limited body of knowledge in this symbiotic relationship. This paper identifies operational and research requirements for mission assurance M&S supporting defense and homeland security. M&S techniques are needed for enterprise oversight of cyber investments, test and evaluation, policy, training, and analysis.

  8. Roadmap for ILC Detector R&D Test Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Community, Worldwide ILC Detector

    2007-01-01

    This document provides a roadmap for ILC detector test beam needs in the next 3 - 5 years. In this period, detector Letters of Intent are expected by fall 2008, the ILC Engineering Design Report to be submitted in ILC and its detectors in 2012. ILC detectors are required to have unprecedented precision to be able to elucidate new physics discoveries at TeV energies from the LHC and ILC machines, and to fully exploit experimental investifation at the electrweak unification energy scale. Ahieving this requires significant investment for detector test beam activities to complete the R&D needed, to test prototypes and (later) to qualify final detector system desgns, including integated system tess. This roadmap document describes the need for significant increases in resources for ILC test beam activities. It should be used by test beam facility managers and the worldwide ILC leadership to assure that the necessary resources and facilities are made available to meet the needs in time.

  9. Astroparticle physics in Europe gets a new roadmap

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Capello

    2011-01-01

    After publishing its first strategy plan in 2008, the AStroParticle European Research Area (ASPERA) – a network of European national funding agencies responsible for astroparticle physics – has just published an update. The new document provides an overview of the activities of the astroparticle physics community, makes recommendations for future projects and emphasizes the role of networking and sharing among the funding agencies.   The new strategies for Astroparticle Physics (ApP) – the research field at the intersection of astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology – were discussed at a meeting held in Paris on 21 and 22 November, when a new roadmap was presented to the community. “An update of the strategic plan published in 2008 was needed because of the significant progress made in recent years,” explains Arnaud Marsollier, ASPERA press officer. “In this new roadmap, ASPERA gives an updated overview of ApP Projects ...

  10. RAILWAY INDUSTRY ROADMAP IN THE STATE OF SANTA CATARINA, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acires DIAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify the main requirements to strengthen the railroad industry in Santa Catarina by using technology roadmapping. The railway industry is composed of carriers, manufacturers, suppliers, operators, logistics, services and education. The survey aimed to provide guidelines for the Federation of the State of Santa Catarina Industry (FIESC to develop its strategic plan for the next eight years. Based on the survey, the roadmap defined vision, mission, a list of key concepts, drivers and actions for the Federation to support the railway industry development, since this industrial sector is still economically unrepresented when compared to other sectors in Santa Catarina. The survey also pointed out there is a strong expansion program of the railway freight and railway transport for people in Brazil, both in government and private sectors.

  11. Nanotechnology for the Forest Products Industry Vision and Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atalla, Rajai [USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States); Beecher, James [USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States); Caron, Robert [Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, Peachtree Corners, GA (United States); Catchmark, Jeffrey [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Deng, Yulin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Glasser, Wolfgang [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Gray, Derek [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Haigler, Candace [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Jones, Philip [Imerys, Paris (France); Joyce, Margaret [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Kohlman, Jane [USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States); Koukoulas, Alexander [Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, Peachtree Corners, GA (United States); Lancaster, Peter [Weyerhaeuser Company, Longview, WA (United States); Perine, Lori [American Forest and Paper Association, Washington, DC (United States); Rodriguez, Augusto [Georgia-Pacific Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Wegner, Theodore [USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States); Zhu, Junyong [USDA Forest Service, Washington, DC (United States)

    2005-03-01

    A roadmap for Nanotechnology in the Forest Products Industries has been developed under the umbrella of the Agenda 2020 program overseen by the CTO committee. It is expected that the use of new analytical techniques and methodologies will allow us to understand the complex nature of wood based materials and allow the dramatically enhanced use of the major strategic asset the US has in renewable, recyclable resources based on its well managed Forests.

  12. Technology Roadmap for Energy Reduction in Automotive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2008-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), in collaboration with the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR), hosted a technology roadmap workshop in Troy, Michigan in May 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to explore opportunities for energy reduction, discuss the challenges and barriers that might need to be overcome, and identify priorities for future R&D. The results of the workshop are presented in this report.

  13. Adaptive probabilistic roadmap construction with multi-heuristic local planning

    OpenAIRE

    Isto, Pekka

    2003-01-01

    The motion planning problem means the computation of a collision-free motion for a movable object among obstacles from the given initial placement to the given end placement. Efficient motion planning methods have many applications in many fields, such as robotics, computer aided design, and pharmacology. The problem is known to be PSPACE-hard. Because of the computational complexity, practical applications often use heuristic or incomplete algorithms. Probabilistic roadmap is a probabilistic...

  14. Experience-Based Planning with Sparse Roadmap Spanners

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, David; Sucan, Ioan A.; Moll, Mark; Okada, Kei; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    We present an experienced-based planning framework called Thunder that learns to reduce computation time required to solve high-dimensional planning problems in varying environments. The approach is especially suited for large configuration spaces that include many invariant constraints, such as those found with whole body humanoid motion planning. Experiences are generated using probabilistic sampling and stored in a sparse roadmap spanner (SPARS), which provides asymptotically near-optimal ...

  15. Roadmap to risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) success

    OpenAIRE

    Balian, John D.; Wherry, Janice C.; Malhotra, Rachpal; Perentesis, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Medical safety-related risk management is a rapidly evolving and increasingly important aspect of drug approval and market longevity. To effectively meet the challenges of this new era, we describe a risk management roadmap that proactively yet practically anticipates risk-management requirements, provides the foundation for enduring yet appropriately flexible risk-management practices, and leverages these techniques to efficiently and effectively utilize risk evaluation and mitigation strate...

  16. Codecharts roadmaps and blueprints for object-oriented programs

    CERN Document Server

    Eden, Amnon H

    2011-01-01

    NEW LANGUAGE VISUALIZES PROGRAM ABSTRACTIONS CLEARLY AND PRECISELY Popular software modelling notations visualize implementation minutiae but fail to scale, to capture design abstractions, and to deliver effective tool support. Tailored to overcome these limitations, Codecharts can elegantly model roadmaps and blueprints for Java, C++, and C# programs of any size clearly, precisely, and at any level of abstraction. More practically, significant productivity gains for programmers using tools supporting Codecharts have been demonstrated in controlled experiments. Hundreds of figures a

  17. The EU decarbonisation roadmap 2050: What way to walk?

    OpenAIRE

    Hübler, Michael; Löschel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We carry out a detailed CGE (Computable General Equilibrium) analysis of the EU Decarbonisation Roadmap 2050 on a macroeconomic and on a sectoral level. Herein, we study a Reference scenario that implements existing EU policies as well as 3 unilateral and 3 global climate action scenarios. We identify global climate action with international emissions trading and the ful l equalization of CO2 prices across all (EU) sectors as a reasonable policy option to avoid additional costs of the Decarbo...

  18. Bhutan - Electronic Government Procurement Readiness Assessment and Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    The readiness assessment and roadmap for implementation are the first two components of the Electronic Government Procurement (E-GP) assessment and implementation effort to assist the Royal Government of Bhutan (RGoB) develop an e-GP implementation plan. This work is part of a wider ongoing initiative for public procurement reform, which the RGoB is undertaking with World Bank and other do...

  19. The future of technology enhanced active learning – a roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Pahl, Claus; Kenny, Claire

    2008-01-01

    The notion of active learning refers to the active involvement of learner in the learning process, capturing ideas of learning-by-doing and the fact that active participation and knowledge construction leads to deeper and more sustained learning. Interactivity, in particular learnercontent interaction, is a central aspect of technology-enhanced active learning. In this roadmap, the pedagogical background is discussed, the essential dimensions of technology-enhanced active learning syste...

  20. Tuneable dual-comb spectrometer based on commercial femtosecond lasers and reference cell for optical frequency calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo-Campa, E.; Bennès, J.; Balet, L.; Kundermann, S.; Merenda, F.; Boer, G.; Lecomte, S.

    2016-07-01

    Two commercial femtosecond laser sources have been used to implement a dual-comb spectrometer tuneable across a spectral range from 1.5 to 2.2 μm. The optical linewidth of the comb modes was characterized for different time scales in order to estimate the achievable spectral resolution for an optimal acquisition time. The transmission spectra of three different gas samples were recorded, demonstrating good agreement with reference data. Frequency axis calibration was provided via the parallel monitoring of a reference sample. This technique allows an accurate calibration of the frequency axis of the spectrometer, with no need for stabilization or optical referencing of the frequency combs. Our set-up represents a good compromise for a compact and versatile dual-comb spectrometer based on commercially available parts with possible applications in trace-gas monitoring, remote sensing and spectroscopy of short-lived processes.

  1. Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.'' In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks

  2. Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team (FPITT) supports the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (the Partnership) in the identification and evaluation of implementation scenarios for fuel cell technology pathways, including hydrogen and fuel cell electric vehicles in the transportation sector, both during a transition period and in the long term.

  3. EU Energy Roadmap 2050. Surrogate for an ambitious decarbonisation policy?; EU-Energy Roadmap 2050. Surrogat fuer eine ehrgeizige Dekarbonisierungspolitik?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geden, Oliver; Fischer, Severin [Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    When the 'Energy Roadmap 2050' of the European Commission was first published, it was presented as a blueprint of the future development of the European power supply system. Now, just a few months later, it becomes clear that the impending decisions on the energy and climate policy goals of the EU beyond 2020 will be influenced only marginally by the roadmap of the EU Commission: There is too much opposition in the 27 EU member states. On the one hand, the consensus reached in 2007, i.e. that energy policy should be oriented along climate policy goals, has been broken. On the other hand, the EU member states are not prepared to accept restrictions of national sovereignty in the energy policy sector.

  4. Designing Program Roadmaps to Catalyze Community Formation: A Case Study of the Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmapword

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Brent; Hanson, Duane; Matthern, Gretchen

    2003-02-27

    A number of broad perspective technology roadmaps have been developed in the last few years as tools for coordinating nation-wide research in targeted areas. These roadmaps share a common characteristic of coalescing the associated stakeholder groups into a special-interest community that is willing to work cooperatively in achieving the roadmap goals. These communities are key to roadmap implementation as they provide the collaborative energy necessary to obtain the political support and funding required for identified science and technology development efforts. This paper discusses the relationship between roadmaps and special-interest communities, using the recently drafted Department of Energy's Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap as a case study. Specific aspects this roadmap's design facilitated the development of a long-term stewardship community while specific realities during roadmap development impacted the realization of the design.

  5. Technology Development Roadmap: A Technology Development Roadmap for a Future Gravitational Wave Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Conklin, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; McKenzie, Kirk; Mueller, Guido; Mueller, Juergen; Thorpe, James Ira; Arsenovic, Peter; Baker, John; Bender, Peter; Brinker, Edward; Crow, John; Spero, Robert; deVine Glenn; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Humankind will detect the first gravitational wave (GW) signals from the Universe in the current decade using ground-based detectors. But the richest trove of astrophysical information lies at lower frequencies in the spectrum only accessible from space. Signals are expected from merging massive black holes throughout cosmic history, from compact stellar remnants orbiting central galactic engines from thousands of close contact binary systems in the Milky Way, and possibly from exotic sources, some not yet imagined. These signals carry essential information not available from electromagnetic observations, and which can be extracted with extraordinary accuracy. For 20 years, NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and an international research community have put considerable effort into developing concepts and technologies for a GW mission. Both the 2000 and 2010 decadal surveys endorsed the science and mission concept of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). A partnership of the two agencies defined and analyzed the concept for a decade. The agencies partnered on LISA Pathfinder (LPF), and ESA-led technology demonstration mission, now preparing for a 2015 launch. Extensive technology development has been carried out on the ground. Currently, the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) concept, a LISA-like concept with only two measurement arms, is competing for ESA's L2 opportunity. NASA's Astrophysics Division seeks to be a junior partner if eLISA is selected. If eLISA is not selected, then a LISA-like mission will be a strong contender in the 2020 decadal survey. This Technology Development Roadmap (TDR) builds on the LISA concept development, the LPF technology development, and the U.S. and European ground-based technology development. The eLISA architecture and the architecture of the Mid-sized Space-based Gravitational-wave Observatory (SGO Mid)-a competitive design with three measurement arms from the recent design study for a NASA

  6. Research Development and Commercialization Advances of Hydrogen Energy and Fuel Cell%氢能与燃料电池的研发及商业化进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘相敏; 林瑞; 李昕; 马建新

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen energy is considered as the most promising clean energy resource for 21 st century. In recent years, hydrogen ener and fuel cell technologies have made great progresses around the world, and start commercial deployments. Based on extensi' investigation, the global Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) and commercialization involving hydrogen energy and fu cell in past two years are reviewed, and suggestions for hydrogen energy and fuel cell technologies Research, Development (R&D) China are put forward.%氢能被视为21世纪最具发展潜力的清洁能源,近年来以燃料电池技术为代表的氢能开发和利用已在全球各国取得巨大进展,并开始部分实现商业化.本文在广泛调研的基础上,综述了近两年来全球范围内氢能和燃料电池研发、示范和商业化发展的现状与趋势,并提出关于中国氢能与燃料电池技术研究发展的建议.

  7. Electricity Technology Roadmap. Technology for the Sustainable Society. 2025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dutch Electricity Technology Roadmap Initiative is being developed by KEMA as a joint effort of Dutch and European experts of universities, industry and (non)governmental organisations. It aims to assess how to structure the ongoing collaborative research and technological advancement, the exploration of the opportunities and the threats for the electricity-based innovations over the next twenty-five years. In addition it analyses how to manage the transition towards a knowledge based economy and a more sustainable society. To date, about 100 organisations have participated with KEMA and its sponsors in shaping a comprehensive vision of the opportunities to structure the knowledge based economy in the Digital Society with as basis the increase of electricity's value to society. This vision is being translated into a set of technology development destinations and a total of six distinct initiatives for targeted projects. KEMA is leading this ongoing road-mapping effort, with the support of TENNET and EPRI (USA). The Dutch power generation utilities and the Ministry of Economics (EZ) financially support the work. It is an investment in the future of the Dutch knowledge based economy and a guidance to structure and strengthen the value of public and private RandD investments. The Electricity Technology Roadmap Initiative explores a period of fast regulatory, political, technological and institutional change in the electricity enterprise and in the society. The strategic choices made in this period of change can have profound consequences on whether future opportunities are opened or closed, and whether threats increase or are eliminated The reluctance to proceed with important changes is understandable, given the extreme uncertainty under which decisions must be made. No regrets solutions may be appropriate in some circumstances. These situations highlight the need for foresight and the importance of strategic roadmapping. The first year of the Roadmap

  8. Summary of the International Workshop on Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Roadmapping in the ITER Era; 7–10 September 2011, Princeton, NJ, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the ITER project now well under way, the countries engaged in fusion research are planning, with renewed intensity, the research and major facilities needed to develop the science and technology for harnessing fusion energy. The Workshop on MFE Roadmapping in the ITER Era was organized to provide a timely forum for an international exchange of technical information and strategic perspectives on how best to tackle the remaining challenges leading to a magnetic fusion DEMO, a nuclear fusion device or devices with a level of physics and technology integration necessary to cover the essential elements of a commercial fusion power plant. Presentations addressed issues under four topics: (1) Perspectives on DEMO and the roadmap to DEMO; (2) Technology; (3) Physics-Technology integration and optimization; and (4) Major facilities on the path to DEMO. Participants identified a set of technical issues of high strategic importance, where the development strategy strongly influences the overall roadmap, and where there are divergent understandings in the world community, namely (1) the assumptions used in fusion design codes, (2) the strategy for fusion materials development, (3) the strategy for blanket development, (4) the strategy for plasma exhaust solution development and (5) the requirements and state of readiness for next-step facility options. It was concluded that there is a need to continue and to focus the international discussion concerning the scientific and technical issues that determine the fusion roadmap, and it was suggested that an international activity be organized under appropriate auspices to foster international cooperation on these issues. (conference report)

  9. Results from the NASA Capability Roadmap Team for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Romig, Kris A.; Larson, William E.; Johnson, Robert; Rapp, Don; Johnson, Ken R.; Sacksteder, Kurt; Linne, Diane; Curreri, Peter; Duke, Michael; Blair, Brad; Gertsch, Leslie; Boucher, Dale; Rice, Eric; Clark, Larry; McCullough, Ed; Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, the President of the United States unveiled a new vision for robotic and human exploration of space entitled, "A Renewed Spirit of Discovery". As stated by the President in the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE), NASA must "... implement a sustained and affordable human and robotic program to explore the solar system and beyond " and ".. .develop new technologies and harness the moon's abundant resources to allow manned exploration of more challenging environments." A key to fulfilling the goal of sustained and affordable human and robotic exploration will be the ability to use resources that are available at the site of exploration to "live off the land" instead of bringing everything from Earth, known as In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). ISRU can significantly reduce the mass, cost, and risk of exploration through capabilities such as: mission consumable production (propellants, fuel cell reagents, life support consumables, and feedstock for manufacturing & construction); surface construction (radiation shields, landing pads, walls, habitats, etc.); manufacturing and repair with in-situ resources (spare parts, wires, trusses, integrated systems etc.); and space utilities and power from space resources. On January 27th, 2004 the President's Commission on Implementation of U.S. Space Exploration Policy (Aldridge Committee) was created and its final report was released in June 2004. One of the report's recommendations was to establish special project teams to evaluate enabling technologies, of which "Planetary in situ resource utilization" was one of them. Based on the VSE and the commission's final report, NASA established fifteen Capability Roadmap teams, of which ISRU was one of the teams established. From Oct. 2004 to May 2005 the ISRU Capability Roadmap team examined the capabilities, benefits, architecture and mission implementation strategy, critical decisions, current state-of-the-art (SOA), challenges, technology gaps, and risks of

  10. Comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma and normal lung fibroblast cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rashmezad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has attracted the attention of the scientific community in nanotechnology and biotechnology due to their extensive application in the area of material sciences and medicine. Nowadays, despite a various application of nanomaterial’s, there is a little information about their impact on human health. In this study, we investigated the comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma (AGS and normal lung fibroblast (MRC-5 cell lines. Methods: The current experimental study was carried out in Islamic Azad University, East Tehran Branch, from April to November 2014. The biological synthesis of nanosilver was obtained from Eucalyptus plant extract as a reducing agent. Further to more analysis, morphological study on size and shape of developed biological nanosilver was characterized by performing scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. AGS and MCR-5 cell lines were treated with various concentration of nanosilver for 24, 48 and 72 hours. Finally, the cell viability was evaluated by using MTT assay. Results: The results show that the nanosilver exerts a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on viability of cells. At 100µg/mL of commercial and biological synthesized nanosilver, the viability of AGS was reduced to 7.47±0.002% (P=0.002 and 3.65±0.01% (P=0.003 after 72 hours, respectively. In addition, the viability of MRC-5 at the same condition was reduced to 10.27±0.19% (P=0.001 and 9.16±1.53% (P=0.002, respectively. Conclusion: Based on a thorough literature surveys, the present study is the first research about biosynthesis of nanosilver using Eucalyptus plant extract. This eco-friendly and cost effective method can be used for large scale production of silver nanoparticle. In addition, based on the current obtained data, commercial and biological synthesized nanosilver can more inhibitory effect on cancer cells compared

  11. 76 FR 66040 - NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards, Release 2.0 (Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability... and Technology (NIST) seeks comments on the draft NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid..., 2011. The entire draft version of the NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid...

  12. Commercial irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial irradiation, the treatment of products with gamma radiation principally using a Cobalt-60 source, had its beginnings in Europe and Australia 25 years ago. To date the most successful application of the process is the sterilization of medical products and, for a variety of reasons, gamma sterilization is now becoming dominant in this important field. Many other applications have been evaluated over the years and the most exciting is undoubtedly food irradiation for which there is a vast potential. The commercial feasibility of setting up and irradiation facility is a complex subject and the selection of Cobalt-60 gamma plant depends on a number of technical and economic considerations. The parameters which determine the design and capacity of the optimum plant include throughput, product size and dose requirements; a balance has to be struck between plant flexibility and overall economy. The Ansell irradiators are designed primarily for the sterilization of medical products although some experimental food irradiation has been done, particularly in Australia. (author)

  13. NASA's New Thermal Management Systems Roadmap; Whats in it, What it Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ted

    2016-01-01

    In July of 2015 NASA publically released a new set of Technology Area Roadmaps that will be used to help guide future NASA-funded technology development efforts. One of these was the Thermal Management Systems Roadmap, often identified as TA14. This Roadmap identifies the time sequencing and interdependencies of high priority, advanced thermal control technology for the next 5 to 20 years. Available funding limits the development of new technology. The Roadmaps are the first step in the process of prioritizing HQ-supported technology funding. The 2015 Roadmaps are focused on planned mission architectures and needs, as identified in the NRC-led science Decadals and HEOMD's Design Reference Missions. Additionally, the 2015 Roadmaps focus on "applied " R&D as opposed to more basic research. The NASA Mission Directorates were all closely involved in development of 2015 Roadmaps, and an extensive external review was also conducted. This talk will discuss the Technology Roadmaps in general, and then focus on the specific technologies identified for TA 14, Thermal Management Systems.

  14. Towards nZEB - Some Examples of National Requirements and Roadmaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagemar, Lennart; Schmidt, Michael; Allard, Francis;

    2011-01-01

    definition of energy performance in [kWh/m2,a]. Many countries have prepared long term roadmaps with detailed targets, Figure 1. Such roadmaps help the industry to be prepared and committed to the targets. For example, in Norway, zero energy buildings are expected in 2027, but in UK carbon neutral buildings...

  15. Science and technology roadmap for graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, A.C.; Dekker, C.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.; Van Der Zant, H.S.J.; et. al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the science and technology roadmap for graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems, targeting an evolution in technology, that might lead to impacts and benefits reaching into most areas of society. This roadmap was developed within the framework of the European Graphen

  16. Drawing a Roadmap: Barriers and Challenges to Designing the Ideal Virtual World for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this article is to draw a roadmap for designing an "ideal" virtual world for higher education, pointing decision-makers in a general direction for implementing virtual worlds and noting various barriers along the way. When using a roadmap, one can take many different paths to reach a desired destination. Similarly, institutions can…

  17. Science and technology roadmap for graphene, related two-dimensional crystals, and hybrid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Andrea C.; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Falko, Vladimir;

    2015-01-01

    We present the science and technology roadmap (STR) for graphene, related twodimensional (2d) crystals, and hybrid systems, targeting an evolution in technology, that might lead to impacts and benefits reaching into most areas of society. The roadmap was developed within the framework of the...

  18. Chemical and electronic interface structure of spray pyrolysis deposited undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films on a commercial Cz-Si solar cell substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabas, M.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Lab. de Materiales y Superficies, Universidad de Malaga 29071 Malaga (Spain); Barrett, N.T. [CEA DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gota, S. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, UMR 012 CEA-CNRS CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Lopez-Escalante, M.C. [Isofoton S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Andalucia, Severo Ochoa, 50, 29590 Malaga (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    We have studied differences in the interface between undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited on commercial Si solar cell substrates. The undoped ZnO film is significantly thicker than the Al-doped film for the same deposition time. An extended silicate-like interface is present in both samples. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) probe the presence of a zinc silicate and several Si oxides in both cases. Although Al doping improves the conductivity of ZnO, we present evidence for Al segregation at the interface during deposition on the Si substrate and suggest the presence of considerable fixed charge near the oxidized Si interface layer. The induced distortion in the valence band, compared to that of undoped ZnO, could be responsible for considerable reduction in the solar cell performance. (author)

  19. Towards 15% energy conversion efficiency: a systematic study of the solution-processed organic tandem solar cells based on commercially available materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ning; Baran, Derya; Forberich, Karen;

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the lack of scalable high performance donor materials, studies on mass-produced organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices lag far behind that on lab-scale devices. In this work, we choose 6 already commercially available conjugated polymers and systematically investigate their potential in...... organic tandem solar cells. All the devices are processed under environmental conditions using doctor-blading, which is highly compatible with mass-production coating technologies. Power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of 6–7% are obtained for OPV devices based on different active layers. Optical...... simulations based on experimental data are performed for all realized tandem solar cells. An efficiency potential of ∼10% is estimated for these compounds in combination with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as an acceptor. In addition, we assume a hypothetical, optimized acceptor to understand the...

  20. Roadmaps for the Development of Technologies Related to Danish Wave Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Krogh, Jan; Brodersen, H. J.;

    2015-01-01

    seconded by offshore industry, and research institutions. The Danish Partnership for Wave Power has further been consolidated through the follow-on Roadmap project described in this paper. The roadmap project has in detail investigated how the four most common technology areas for wave power developers can...... be realized through series of research and test activities. The four common technology areas are: • Anchor systems • PTO systems • Electrical transmission to the seabed • Materials and components The purpose of drafting the roadmaps is to engage the developers as well as the funding authorities in...... the roadmaps outline what activities (research, development and test) are necessary to achieve the desired level of technology i.e. in 2020. The Roadmaps can thus be used to prioritize and coordinate technology development projects....

  1. Cytotoxicity evaluation of two root canal sealers and a commercial calcium hydroxide paste on THP1 cell line by Trypan Blue assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Tavares Bekner Correa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of two brands of root canal sealers, epoxy-resin based and zinc oxide-eugenol based, and one commercial calcium hydroxide paste on a monocyte cell line THP-1. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Undiluted (crude extract and diluted extracts to 10%, 1%, 0.1%, 0.01%, 0.001% and 0.0001% of the sealers were tested for cytotoxicity to THP-1 cells using the trypan blue assay. Extracts were obtained according to ISO standard. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Crude extract of AH Plus and Fill Canal killed approximately 90% of THP-1 cells versus 36% of THP-1 cells killed by L&C crude extract (p0.05, except for L&C 1% extract. CONCLUSIONS: The results revealed that the L&C paste crude extract was less cytotoxic to THP-1 cells than AH Plus or Fill Canal crude extracts.

  2. Toward systems-level analysis of agricultural production from crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM): scaling from cell to commercial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sarah C; Ming, Ray; LeBauer, David S; Long, Stephen P

    2015-10-01

    Systems-level analyses have become prominent tools for assessing the yield, viability, economic consequences and environmental impacts of agricultural production. Such analyses are well-developed for many commodity crops that are used for food and biofuel, but have not been developed for agricultural production systems based on drought-tolerant plants that use crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). We review the components of systems-level evaluations, and identify the information available for completing such analyses for CAM cropping systems. Specific needs for developing systems-level evaluations of CAM agricultural production include: improvement of physiological models; assessment of product processing after leaving the farm gate; and application of newly available genetic tools to the optimization of CAM species for commercial production. PMID:26094655

  3. Roadmap 2050: McKinsey and company lay down the low-carbon gauntlet to the EU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probert, T.

    2010-05-15

    A report issued by the European Climate Foundation, 'Roadmap 2050: A practical guide to a prosperous low-carbon Europe' appears to have dispelled concerns that the decarbonization of the European Union's power sector is profligate fantasy. The overall conclusion of the report is that by 2050, Europe could achieve an economy-wide, affordable reduction of GHG emission of at least 80% compared to 1990 levels. Realizing this radical transformation, however, requires fundamental changes to the European energy system. This would only be possible with a nearly zero-carbon power supply that emits 5% or less of baseline GHG emissions. Such a supply could be realised by further developing and deploying low carbon technologies that are already commercially available or in later-stage development like CCS, and by expanding the trans-European transmission grid. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  4. Hydrogen delivery technology rRoadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen holds the long-term potential to solve two critical problems related to the energy infrastructure: U.S. dependence on foreign oil and U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants. The U.S. transportation sector is almost completely reliant on petroleum, over half of which is currently imported, and tailpipe emissions remain one of the country’s key air quality concerns. Fuel cell vehicles operating on hydrogen produced from domestically available resources – including renewable resources, coal with carbon sequestration, or nuclear energy – would dramatically decrease greenhouse gases and other emissions, and would reduce dependence on oil from politically volatile regions of the world. Clean, domestically-produced hydrogen could also be used to generate electricity in stationary fuel cells at power plants, further extending national energy and environmental benefits.

  5. Practical Roadmap and Limits to Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Lunt, Richard R.; Rowehl, Jill A.; Osedach, Timothy Paul; Brown, Patrick Richard; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The significant research interest in the engineering of photovoltaic (PV) structures at the nanoscale is directed toward enabling reductions in PV module fabrication and installation costs as well as improving cell power conversion efficiency (PCE). With the emergence of a multitude of nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) device architectures, the question has arisen of where both the practical and the fundamental limits of performance reside in these new systems. Here, the former is address...

  6. Augmenting CT cardiac roadmaps with segmented streaming ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qi; Shechter, Guy; Gutiérrez, Luis F.; Stanton, Douglas; Zagorchev, Lyubomir; Laine, Andrew F.; Elgort, Daniel R.

    2007-03-01

    Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter-based cardiac interventions performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. These CT volumes provide a high-resolution depiction of soft-tissue structures, but at only a single point within the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US) provides intra-operative access to real-time dynamic information about the cardiac anatomy. In this work, using a customized segmentation method based on a 3D active mesh, endocardial borders of the left ventricle were extracted from US image streams (4D data sets) at a frame rate of approximately 5 frames per second. The coordinate systems for CT and US modalities were registered using rigid body registration based on manually selected landmarks, and the segmented endocardial surfaces were overlaid onto the CT volume. The root-mean squared fiducial registration error was 3.80 mm. The accuracy of the segmentation was quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human volunteer studies via comparison with manual tracings on 9 randomly selected frames using a finite-element model (the US image resolutions of the phantom and volunteer data were 1.3 x 1.1 x 1.3 mm and 0.70 x 0.82 x 0.77 mm, respectively). This comparison yielded 3.70+/-2.5 mm (approximately 3 pixels) root-mean squared error (RMSE) in a phantom study and 2.58+/-1.58 mm (approximately 3 pixels) RMSE in a clinical study. The combination of static anatomical roadmap volumes and dynamic intra-operative anatomic information will enable better guidance and feedback for image-guided minimally invasive cardiac interventions.

  7. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ''where we are now'' to ''where we want and need to be.'' The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues

  8. Developing the "Lunar Vicinity" Scenario of the Global Exploration Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G.; Neal, C. R.; Crawford, I. A.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Global Exploration Roadmap (GER, [1]) has been developed by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG - comprised of 14 space agencies) to define various pathways to getting humans beyond low Earth orbit and eventually to Mars. Such pathways include visiting asteroids or the Moon before going on to Mars. This document has been written at a very high level and many details are still to be determined. However, a number of important papers regarding international space exploration can form a basis for this document (e.g. [2,3]). In this presentation, we focus on developing the "Lunar Vicinity" scenario by adding detail via mapping a number of recent reports/documents into the GER. Precedence for this scenario is given by Szajnfarber et al. [4] who stated "We find that when international partners are considered endogenously, the argument for a "flexible path" approach is weakened substantially. This is because international contributions can make "Moon first" economically feasible". The documents highlighted here are in no way meant to be all encompassing and other documents can and should be added, (e.g., the JAXA Space Exploration Roadmap). This exercise is intended to demonstrate that existing documents can be mapped into the GER despite the major differences in granularity, and that this mapping is a way to promote broader national and international buy-in to the Lunar Vicinity scenario. The documents used here are: the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Panel on Exploration report on developing a global space exploration program [5], the Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs) report from the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group (LEAG) [6], the Lunar Exploration Roadmap developed by LEAG [7], the National Research Council report Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon (SCEM) [8], the scientific rationale for resuming lunar surface exploration [9], the astrobiological benefits of human space exploration [9,10].

  9. Roadmap to a Sustainable Structured Trusted Employee Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Cameron W [ORNL; Eisele, Gerhard R [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    Organizations (facility, regulatory agency, or country) have a compelling interest in ensuring that individuals who occupy sensitive positions affording access to chemical biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) materials facilities and programs are functioning at their highest level of reliability. Human reliability and human performance relate not only to security but also focus on safety. Reliability has a logical and direct relationship to trustworthiness for the organization is placing trust in their employees to conduct themselves in a secure, safe, and dependable manner. This document focuses on providing an organization with a roadmap to implementing a successful and sustainable Structured Trusted Employee Program (STEP).

  10. National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01

    There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  11. Commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  12. Commercially Available Gas-Permeable Cell Culture Bags May Not Prevent Anoxia in Cultured or Shipped Islets

    OpenAIRE

    Avgoustiniatos, E.S.; Hering, B.J.; Rozak, P.R.; Wilson, J.R.; Tempelman, L.A.; Balamurugan, A.N.; Welch, D.P.; Weegman, B. P.; Suszynski, T.M.; Papas, K.K.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged anoxia has deleterious effects on islets. Gas-permeable cell culture devices can be used to minimize anoxia during islet culture and especially during shipment when elimination of gas-liquid interfaces is required to prevent the formation of damaging gas bubbles. Gas-permeable bags may have several drawbacks, such as propensity for puncture and contamination, difficult islet retrieval, and significantly lower oxygen permeability than silicone rubber membranes (SRM). We hypothesized ...

  13. PVT roadmap. A European guide for the development and market introduction of PVT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the roadmap is to identify promising markets for PVT (PhotoVoltaic Thermal) technology , and to identify the economical, policy, legislative and technical bottlenecks. In addition, the roadmap wants to inform the parties in the market on PVT. It thereby targets a broad range of professionals, including policy makers, solar manufacturers, installers and researchers. This work has been carried out within the PVT forum project, which is part of the EU-supported project PV-Catapult. The aim of PVT Forum is to lay the foundations for a large-scale introduction of PVT technology in Europe by means of this roadmap. In order to construct the roadmap, a two-step approach was taken. As a first step, PVT experts, PV and solar thermal industries and other stakeholders were brought together in two workshops, connected to the PVSEC 2004 in Paris and the Eurosun conference 2004 in Freiburg, to identify drivers and barriers for PVT. The results of these two workshops, that were presented in two workshop reports, were used as input for the roadmap presented here. As a second step, the PVT roadmap was written, formulating the necessary actions that should be taken on short, medium and long term in order to enlarge the market for PVT products. The chapters of the roadmap are written and reviewed by the various participants in PVT Forum. These participants have been selected for this project on the basis of their contribution to PVT development over the last years

  14. Astrobiology: A Roadmap for Charting Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincezi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. It provides a biological perspective to many areas of NASA research. It links such endeavors as the search for habitable planets, exploration missions to Mars and the outer Solar System, efforts to understand the origins and early evolution of life, and charting the potential of life to adapt to future challenges, both on Earth and in space. Astrobiology addresses the following three basic questions, which have been asked in some form for generations. How does life begin and evolve? Does life exist elsewhere in the universe? What is future of life on Earth and beyond? The NASA Astrobiology Roadmap provides guidance for research and technology development across several NASA Enterprises: Space Science, Earth Science, and the Human Exploration and Development of Space. The Roadmap is formulated in terms of eight Science Goals that outline key domains of investigation that might require perhaps decades of effort to consolidate. For each of these goals, Science Objectives outline more specific high priority near-term efforts for the next three to five years. These twenty objectives will be integrated with NASA strategic planning.

  15. HTA Implementation Roadmap in Central and Eastern European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaló, Zoltán; Gheorghe, Adrian; Huic, Mirjana; Csanádi, Marcell; Kristensen, Finn Boerlum

    2016-02-01

    The opportunity cost of inappropriate health policy decisions is greater in Central and Eastern European (CEE) compared with Western European (WE) countries because of poorer population health and more limited healthcare resources. Application of health technology assessment (HTA) prior to healthcare financing decisions can improve the allocative efficiency of scarce resources. However, few CEE countries have a clear roadmap for HTA implementation. Examples from high-income countries may not be directly relevant, as CEE countries cannot allocate so much financial and human resources for substantiating policy decisions with evidence. Our objective was to describe the main HTA implementation scenarios in CEE countries and summarize the most important questions related to capacity building, financing HTA research, process and organizational structure for HTA, standardization of HTA methodology, use of local data, scope of mandatory HTA, decision criteria, and international collaboration in HTA. Although HTA implementation strategies from the region can be relevant examples for other CEE countries with similar cultural environment and economic status, HTA roadmaps are not still fully transferable without taking into account country-specific aspects, such as country size, gross domestic product per capita, major social values, public health priorities, and fragmentation of healthcare financing. PMID:26763688

  16. A Region-Based Strategy for Collaborative Roadmap Construction

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2015-01-01

    © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. Motion planning has seen much attention over the past two decades. A great deal of progress has been made in sampling-based planning, whereby a planner builds an approximate representation of the planning space. While these planners have demonstrated success inmany scenarios, there are still difficult problems where they lack robustness or efficiency, e.g., certain types of narrow spaces. Conversely, human intuition can often determine an approximate solution to these problems quite effectively, but humans lack the speed and precision necessary to perform the corresponding low-level tasks (such as collision checking) in a timely manner. In this work, we introduce a novel strategy called Region Steering in which the user and a PRM planner work cooperatively to map the space while maintaining the probabilistic completeness property of the PRMplanner. Region Steering utilizes two-way communication to integrate the strengths of both the user and the planner, thereby overcoming the weaknesses inherent to relying on either one alone. In one communication direction, a user can input regions, or bounding volumes in the workspace, to bias sampling towards or away from these areas. In the other direction, the planner displays its progress to the user and colors the regions based on their perceived usefulness.We demonstrate that Region Steering provides roadmap customizability, reduced mapping time, and smaller roadmap sizes compared with fully automated PRMs, e.g., Gaussian PRM.

  17. Fabrication of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for high performance solid oxide fuel cells using a low price commercial inkjet printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gwon Deok; Neoh, Ke Chean; Bae, Kiho; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Son, Ji-Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigate a method to fabricate high quality lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) using a commercial low price inkjet printer. The ink source is synthesized by dissolving the LSCF nanopowder in a water-based solvent with a proper amount of surfactants. Microstructures of the LSCF layer, including porosity and thickness per printing scan cycle, are adjusted by grayscale in the printing image. It is successfully demonstrated that anode-supported SOFCs with optimally printed LSCF cathodes can produce decent power output, i.e., a maximum peak power density of 377 mW cm-2 at 600 °C, in our experiment. We expect that this approach can support the quick and easy prototyping and evaluating of a variety of cathode materials in SOFC research.

  18. Voltage relaxation and impedance spectroscopy as in-operando methods for the detection of lithium plating on graphitic anodes in commercial lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Stefan; Bauer, Marius; Petzl, Mathias; Danzer, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, voltage relaxation and impedance spectroscopy are introduced as in-operando methods for detecting lithium plating in commercial lithium-ion cells with graphitic anodes. Voltage relaxation is monitored subsequent to defined charge steps of variable amplitudes, charge throughputs, termination criteria and at different ambient temperatures yielding dependencies over a wide experimental parameter range. An adapted differential voltage analysis is presented to resolve the characteristic mixed potential evolving in case of plating. Impedance spectroscopy is applied in parallel to the relaxation phase to trace a possible alteration of the cell's impedance due to the concurrent depletion of reversibly deposited lithium. The introduced voltage differentials are shown to resolve the mixed potential with restrictions only for little charge throughputs. The comparison of voltage relaxation and already established stripping discharge reveals similarities of the underlying physicochemical processes and allows an estimate of the amount of deposited lithium in case of relaxation. In the evolution of the cell's impedance, a reversible shrinkage of the high frequency intersection resistance and the arc representing the anodic charge transfer process are identified as indicators towards plating. The presented methods solely rely on non-destructive measurement quantities and thus are fully suitable for the application in battery management systems.

  19. Effects of the nanotopographic surface structure of commercially pure titanium following anodization–hydrothermal treatment on gene expression and adhesion in gingival epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term stability and maintenance of endosseous implants with anodized–hydrothermally treated commercially pure titanium surfaces and a nanotopographic structure (SA-treated c.p.Ti) depend on the barrier function provided by the interface between the transmucosal portion of the implant surface and the peri-implant epithelium. This study investigated the effects of extracellular and intracellular gene expression in adherent gingival epithelial cells cultured for 1–7 days on SA-treated c.p.Ti implant surfaces compared to anodic oxide (AO) c.p.Ti and c.p.Ti disks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed filopodium-like extensions bound closely to the nanotopographic structure of SA-treated c.p.Ti at day 7 of culture. Gene expressions of focal adhesion kinase, integrin-α6β4, and laminin-5 (α3, β3, γ2) were significantly higher on SA-treated c.p.Ti than on c.p.Ti or AO c.p.Ti after 7 days (P < 0.05). Our results confirmed that gingival epithelial cells adhere to SA-treated c.p.Ti as the transmucosal portion of an implant, and that this interaction markedly improves expression of focal adhesion molecules and enhances the epithelial cell phenotype. The cellular gene expression responses driving extracellular and intracellular molecular interactions thus play an important role in maintenance at the interface between SA-treated c.p.Ti implant surfaces and the gingival epithelial cells. - Highlights: • SA-treated Ti provides a nanotopographic structure for clinical oral implants. • This could regulate integrin-mediated epithelial cell adhesion and gene expression. • FAK mRNA was significantly higher on SA-treated Ti. • Integrin-α6β4 and laminin-5 mRNA were significantly higher on SA-treated Ti. • Extracellular/intracellular molecular interactions play a key role on SA-treated Ti

  20. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: "Mobile electricity" technologies, early California household markets, and innovation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett David

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called "Mobile Electricity" (Me-) is characterized. Me- redefines H2 FCVs as innovative products able to provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services. To characterize such opportunities, this study first integrates and extends previous analyses of H2FCVs, plug-in hybrids, and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power. It uses a new model to estimate zero-emission-power vs. zero-emission-driving tradeoffs, costs, and grid-support revenues for various electric-drive vehicle types and levels of infrastructure service. Next, the initial market potential for Me- enabled vehicles, such as H2FCVs and plug-in hybrids, is estimated by eliminating unlikely households from consideration for early adoption. 5.2 million of 33.9 million Californians in the 2000 Census live in households pre-adapted to Me-, 3.9 million if natural gas is required for home refueling. The possible sales base represented by this population is discussed. Several differences in demographic and other characteristics between the target market and the population as a whole are highlighted, and two issues related to the design of H2FCVs and their supporting infrastructure are discussed: vehicle range and home hydrogen refueling. These findings argue for continued investigation of this and similar target segments-which represent more efficient research populations for subsequent study by product designers and other decision-makers wishing to understand the early market dynamics facing Me- innovations. Next, Me-H2FCV commercialization issues are raised from the perspectives of innovation, product development, and strategic marketing. Starting with today's internalcombustion hybrids, this discussion suggests a way to move beyond the battery vs. fuel-cell zero-sum game and towards the

  1. A Governance Roadmap and Framework for EarthCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governance Steering Committee, EarthCube

    2013-04-01

    EarthCube is a process and an outcome, established to transform the conduct of research through the development of community-guided cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences as the prototype for potential deployment across all domain sciences. EarthCube aims to create a knowledge management system and infrastructure that integrates all Earth system and human dimensions data in an open transparent, and inclusive manner. EarthCube requires broad community participation in concept, framework, and implementation and must not be hindered by rigid preconceptions. We discovered widely varying interpretations, expectations, and assumptions about governance among EarthCube participants. Our definition of governance refers to the processes, structure and organizational elements that determine, within an organization or system of organizations, how power is exercised, how stakeholders have their say, how decisions are made, and how decision makers are held accountable. We have learned, from historic infrastructure case studies, background research on governance and from community feedback during this roadmap process, that other types of large-scale, complex infrastructures, including the Internet, have no central control, administration, or management. No national infrastructure that we examined is governed by a single entity, let alone a single governance archetype. Thus we feel the roadmap process must accommodate a governance system or system of systems that may have a single governing entity, particularly at the start, but can evolve into a collective of governing bodies as warranted, in order to be successful. A fast-track process during Spring, 2012 culminated in a Governance Roadmap delivered to an NSF-sponsored charrette in June with an aggressive timetable to define and implement a governance structure to enable the elements of EarthCube to become operational expeditiously. Our goal is to help ensure the realization of this infrastructure sooner, more efficiently, and

  2. A Governance Roadmap and Framework for EarthCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    EarthCube is a process and an outcome, established to transform the conduct of research through the development of community-guided cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences as the prototype for potential deployment across all domain sciences. EarthCube aims to create a knowledge management system and infrastructure that integrates all Earth system and human dimensions data in an open transparent, and inclusive manner. EarthCube requires broad community participation in concept, framework, and implementation and must not be hindered by rigid preconceptions. We discovered widely varying interpretations, expectations, and assumptions about governance among EarthCube participants. Our definition of governance refers to the processes, structure and organizational elements that determine, within an organization or system of organizations, how power is exercised, how stakeholders have their say, how decisions are made, and how decision makers are held accountable. We have learned, from historic infrastructure case studies, background research on governance and from community feedback during this roadmap process, that other types of large-scale, complex infrastructures, including the Internet, have no central control, administration, or management. No national infrastructure that we examined is governed by a single entity, let alone a single governance archetype. Thus we feel the roadmap process must accommodate a governance system or system of systems that may have a single governing entity, particularly at the start, but can evolve into a collective of governing bodies as warranted, in order to be successful. A fast-track process during Spring, 2012 culminated in a Governance Roadmap delivered to an NSF-sponsored charrette in June with an aggressive timetable to define and implement a governance structure to enable the elements of EarthCube to become operational expeditiously. Our goal is to help ensure the realization of this infrastructure sooner, more efficiently, and

  3. Biological Response of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Commercial Tantalum Coatings with Microscale and Nanoscale Surface Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Kumar, Girish; Goering, Peter L.; Williams, Brian; Stiglich, Jack; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-06-01

    Tantalum is a promising orthopaedic implant coating material due to its robust mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Previous studies have demonstrated improved biocompatibility and tissue integration of surface-treated tantalum coatings compared to untreated tantalum. Surface modification of tantalum coatings with biologically inspired microscale and nanoscale features may be used to evoke optimal tissue responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate commercial tantalum coatings with nanoscale, sub-microscale, and microscale surface topographies for orthopaedic and dental applications using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Tantalum coatings with different microscale and nanoscale surface topographies were fabricated using a diffusion process or chemical vapor deposition. Biological evaluation of the tantalum coatings using hBMSCs showed that tantalum coatings promote cellular adhesion and growth. Furthermore, hBMSC adhesion to the tantalum coatings was dependent on surface feature characteristics, with enhanced cell adhesion on sub-micrometer- and micrometer-sized surface topographies compared to hybrid nano-/microstructures. Nanostructured and microstructured tantalum coatings should be further evaluated to optimize the surface coating features to promote osteogenesis and enhance osseointegration of tantalum-based orthopaedic implants.

  4. The global roadmap for advancing development of vaccines against sexually transmitted infections: Update and next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Deal, Carolyn D; Giersing, Birgitte; Rees, Helen; Bolan, Gail; Johnston, Christine; Timms, Peter; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Jerse, Ann E; Cameron, Caroline E; Moorthy, Vasee S; Kiarie, James; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the World Health Organization, the US National Institutes of Health, and global technical partners published a comprehensive roadmap for development of new vaccines against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Since its publication, progress has been made in several roadmap activities: obtaining better epidemiologic data to establish the public health rationale for STI vaccines, modeling the theoretical impact of future vaccines, advancing basic science research, defining preferred product characteristics for first-generation vaccines, and encouraging investment in STI vaccine development. This article reviews these overarching roadmap activities, provides updates on research and development of individual vaccines against herpes simplex virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Treponema pallidum, and discusses important next steps to advance the global roadmap for STI vaccine development. PMID:27105564

  5. Implementation Plan for Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop an implementation plan to realize the vision and goals identified in the Chemical Industry R&D Roadmap for Nanomaterials By Design: From Fundamentals to Function.

  6. Long-term developments in the transport sector -- comparing biofuel and hydrogen roadmaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyterlinde, M.A.; Londo, M.; Godfroij, P.; Jeeninga, H.

    2007-07-01

    In view of climate change and declining oil reserves, alternative fuels for transport receive increasing attention. Two promising options are biofuels, of which the market penetration has already started, and hydrogen, which, when used in fuel cell cars, could lead to zero-emission vehicles. This paper draws on the results of two ongoing EU projects in which roadmaps are being developed for respectively biofuels and hydrogen . The most important potential conflict lies in competition for biomass as a feedstock. In this context, the hydrogen-fuel cell route has the advantage of a higher efficiency (in terms of km driven per ha or tonne biomass) than biofuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is more flexible in feedstock, since it can also be produced in a climate-friendly way from fossil resources such as coal. Synergy between biofuels and hydrogen is in gasification technology. This technology is required both for biomass-to-liquids, one of the more promising biofuels, and for hydrogen production from biomass and/or coal. Our analysis indicates that the transportation sector will need both options in the long term: while hydrogen may become dominant for passenger cars, greening of long-distance heavy duty transport will become dependent on a bio-based diesel substitute. (auth)

  7. Formation of PAH-DNA adducts after in vivo and vitro exposure of rats and lung cells to different commercial carbon blacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The current study was designed to test the possible release and bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a set of commercial carbon blacks (CBs) as well as the ability of these PAHs to form bulky DNA adducts. Methods: In four commercial CBs (Printex 90, Sterling V, N330, Lampblack 101), leaching of PAH was examined through (1) release of parent PAHs in saline with or without surfactant, and (2) PAH adducts in lung epithelial cells (A549) or in rat lungs after exposure to two CBs (Printex 90, Sterling V) for 13 weeks (50 mg/m3). In vitro experiments were done with original and extracted particles, as well as organic extracts of CB in DMSO. As positive controls, B[a]P (0.03 μM) and a mixture of 16 PAHs (0.1 μM) were used. Results: No leaching of PAHs was measured in saline or surfactant-containing saline. In vitro incubations with CB particles (30-300 μg/cm2) revealed no adduct spots except for Sterling V. However, the spot was not concentration dependent and remains unidentified. Lung DNA from rats after inhalation of Printex 90 or Sterling V showed no spots related to PAH-DNA adduct formation compared to sham-exposed rats. Conclusion: The results suggest that PAHs are very tightly bound to these CBs. Only using organic extracts or particles of low-surface Sterling V, with high PAH content, PAHs may become available to form PAH-DNA adducts. However, the in vitro conditions showing this effect will not be encountered in vivo and renders this mechanism in particle-induced lung cancer at in vivo exposures highly unlikely

  8. Experimental infection of commercial layers with wild or attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strains: anatomic pathology, total blood cell count and serum protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KO Garcia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to comparatively evaluate hemogram, blood serum components and anatomopathologic alterations in commercial layers experimentally challenged with an attenuated vaccine candidate strain (SG∆cobS∆cbiA and other two pathogenic strains (SGDcobS and SGNalr of Gallinarum (SG. In total, 280 commercial layers were randomly divided into 4 groups (G1, G2, G3 and G4. At five days of age, birds from groups G1 received approximately 107 colony forming units (CFU of SGDcobS; meanwhile birds from group G2 and G3 received the same dose of SGNalr and SG∆cobS∆cbiA, respectively. Birds from G4 were not infected. At 24 hours before (DBI and 24 hours after (1 DAI, and three (3 DAI, five (5 DAI, seven (7 DAI ten (10 DAI, and fifteen (15 DAI days after the infection, 10 birds of each group were humanely killed and blood samples collected to hematological and serum tests. Samples of liver, spleen, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, kidney and heart were also collected for the histological examination. Birds inoculated with SGDcobS and SGNalr showed similar alterations in hemogram, blood serum components and anatomopathologic exams. On the other hand, the exams of birds inoculated with SG∆cobS∆cbiA strain were similar to those of the uninfected birds. However, changes could be noticed in levels of uric acid and cholesterol during the course of the infection of birds from G3. Decrease in levels of light IgG 3 DAI was also observed in birds from this group. Pyknosis in kidney cells was a microscopic alteration found in birds from G3. Further studies must be done to verify if these alterations will not interfere in the performance of the vaccinate birds with SG∆cobS∆cbiA strain.

  9. Towards a nuclear energy technology roadmap. A new service to the nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear energy in a future sustainable energy mix has been the subject of debates over the past few years. The future for nuclear energy will not only depend on this energy market development and the socio-political environment, but also on the innovation potential of the nuclear community to cope with the ever shorter business cycles in the energy market and the inherently longer term horizon needed in developing nuclear energy at its potential. Today's nuclear R and D community is in a transition phase, i.e. from former 'national' R and D-organisational structure to a truly international research area based on partnerships between organisations and companies creating networks-of-excellence. Several studies in the recent past have indicated the need for a shared vision in guiding this process. Identification of shared R and D-programmes, mergers and acquisitions of organizations and companies, knowledge gap analysis and the strategic mapping for each organization or company active in this nuclear R and D community. Technology Roadmapping is the appropriate tool to respond to these needs. Several stand-alone nuclear roadmap activities have been undertaken but lacked the possibility to analyse and make use of the synergies and interactions inherent to this technology development. The development has started of a master nuclear roadmap portal covering all the roadmap and technology foresight information in one so-called master nuclear roadmap. This master nuclear roadmap is implemented in an electronic online format allowing easy access, easy updating and lots of functionalities which may not be offered by traditional snap-shot roadmap reports. The paper will bring an overview on the role that technology roadmapping is playing in various industry sectors and the added value it may bring in the nuclear technology sector on a organizational as well as technology sector level. The paper will highlight the current status of this new initiative. (author)

  10. Network Based Technology Roadmapping for Future Markets: Case of 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Tucker; David Tucker; James Eastham; Elizabeth Gibson; Sumir Varma; Tugrul Daim

    2014-01-01

    A clear and understandable Technology Roadmap (TRM) is necessary to planning and navigating change in the product development process. The fabric of the 3D printing landscape is complex and difficult to understand from single snapshot approach and a TRM is only as useful as it is understandable and easily communicable. Successful Technology Roadmapping involves expert industry analysis, technology expertise, and visual story telling. This research builds upon the ...

  11. The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 S&T Roadmap Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-11

    The Soils and Groundwater – EM-20 Science and Technology Roadmap Project is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management-funded initiative designed to develop new methods, strategies and technology for characterizing, modeling, remediating, and monitoring soils and groundwater contaminated with metals, radionuclides, and chlorinated organics. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by EM-20 Roadmap Project staff.

  12. The very large research infrastructures: the French road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled that the notion of TGIR (Tres Grande Infrastructure de Recherche, Very large research infrastructure) has evolved in time and now encompasses many different realities in terms of domain or size, this document briefly presents the main challenging fields of research: the planet, the universe seen from the Earth, particles and nuclei, matter, information, communication, computing and data services, human and social sciences, life sciences and health. It indicates TGIRs which have been selected for the French road-map: some already exist and operational (46), some are not yet operational but have been decided in terms of financing (19) and some are still projected but with different levels of priority. Appendices give selection criteria, working group compositions for different domains, and description sheets for these TGIRs (nature, localisation, scientific tools, spin-offs and impacts, international value, concerned scientific community, budget)

  13. Roadmap towards justice in urban climate adaptation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linda; Chu, Eric; Anguelovski, Isabelle; Aylett, Alexander; Debats, Jessica; Goh, Kian; Schenk, Todd; Seto, Karen C.; Dodman, David; Roberts, Debra; Roberts, J. Timmons; Vandeveer, Stacy D.

    2016-02-01

    The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris (COP21) highlighted the importance of cities to climate action, as well as the unjust burdens borne by the world's most disadvantaged peoples in addressing climate impacts. Few studies have documented the barriers to redressing the drivers of social vulnerability as part of urban local climate change adaptation efforts, or evaluated how emerging adaptation plans impact marginalized groups. Here, we present a roadmap to reorient research on the social dimensions of urban climate adaptation around four issues of equity and justice: (1) broadening participation in adaptation planning; (2) expanding adaptation to rapidly growing cities and those with low financial or institutional capacity; (3) adopting a multilevel and multi-scalar approach to adaptation planning; and (4) integrating justice into infrastructure and urban design processes. Responding to these empirical and theoretical research needs is the first step towards identifying pathways to more transformative adaptation policies.

  14. A Research Roadmap for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, F.; Lewith, G.; Witt, C. M.;

    2014-01-01

    likely that they are significant. Research into different models of CAM health care integration: There are different models of CAM being integrated into conventional medicine throughout Europe, each with their respective strengths and limitations. These models should be described and concurrently...... evaluated; innovative models of CAM provision in health care systems should be one focus for CAM research. We also propose a methodological framework for CAM research. We consider that a framework of mixed methodological approaches is likely to yield the most useful information. In this model, all available......Background: The CAMbrella coordination action was funded within the Framework Programme 7. Its aim is to provide a research roadmap for clinical and epidemiological research for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that is appropriate for the health needs of European citizens and acceptable...

  15. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  16. Facilitating hospice discussions: a six-step roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer; Casarett, David

    2011-01-01

    Hospice programs provide comprehensive, compassionate care to dying patients and their families. However, many patients do not enroll in hospice, and those who do generally receive hospice care only in the last weeks of life. Although patients and families rely on their physicians to discuss hospice, there is often inadequate communication between patients and physicians about end-of-life issues. We describe a Six-Step Roadmap for navigating discussions about hospice adapted from the SPIKES protocol for delivering bad news: setting up the discussion, assessing the patient's perception, inviting a patient to discuss individual goals and needs, sharing knowledge, empathizing with the patient's emotions, and summarizing and strategizing the next steps. PMID:21702400

  17. Open innovation in early drug discovery: roadmaps and roadblocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Melvin; Simpson, Peter B

    2016-05-01

    Open innovation in pharmaceutical R&D evolved from a triple helix of convergent paradigm shifts in academic, industrial and government research sectors. The birth of the biotechnology sector catalyzed shifts in location dynamics that led to the first wave of open innovation in pharmaceutical R&D between big pharma and startup companies. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap was a crucial inflection point that set the stage for a new wave of open innovation models between pharmaceutical companies and universities that have the potential to transform the pharmaceutical R&D landscape. We highlight the attributes of leading protected open innovation models that foster the sharing of proprietary small molecule collections by lowering the risk of premature escape of intellectual property, particularly structure-activity data. PMID:26743597

  18. Analysis on Technology Roadmap of Agricultural Equipment Industry in Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chongjing; TAN; Jin; YE; Shi; YANG

    2014-01-01

    Since the subsidizing agricultural machine purchase was launched in 2004,the agriculture equipment industry in Chongqing has progressed by leaps and bounds,but it is still faced with a few urgent problems,which requires the coordination of stakeholders,with an aim to establish a clear direction of the development of industry and a technology route. With planting industry as an example,this paper applies the principle and method of industry technology roadmap to analyse the market demand,industry target,technology barrier and R & D demand of agricultural equipment industry in Chongqing. Based on the results,the top technology R & D items of agricultural equipment industry in Chongqing are obtained. Finally,the following suggestions are put forward: integrating resources,constructing platform and improving innovation ability; constructing agricultural industry park and promoting clustered development of agricultural equipment industry; strengthening finance and taxation support; strengthening construction of agricultural mechanization infrastructure; substantially developing socialized service of agricultural machinery.

  19. Roadmap NRK 2012-2030; Routekaart NRK 2012-2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebbekx, J.; Duivenvoorde, G.; De Wolf, W. [Berenschot Groep, Utrecht (Netherlands); Lenselink, J. [Energy Experts International, Huissen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    This roadmap identifies how RKI companies (rubber and synthetic materials) can create new revenue opportunities: development of sustainable products, switching from petroleum to carbon chains from biobased materials, closing the material chain (reuse/recycling). Also within their own organizations more efficiency can be achieved by continuing to invest in innovation in processes and innovation in the organization itself. A selective overview is given of innovation projects [Dutch] In deze routekaart wordt aangegeven op welke wijze RKI-bedrijven (rubber en kunststoffen) nieuwe omzetkansen kunnen creeren: ontwikkelen van duurzame producten; overschakelen van aardolie naar koolstofketens uit biobased materialen; sluiten van de materiaalketen (hergebruik/recycling). Ook binnen de eigen organisatie kan er meer rendement worden behaald door te blijven investeren in innovatie in de eigen processen en innovatie in de eigen organisatie. Er is een overzicht gegeven van alle mogelijke verzamelde en geselecteerde innovatieprojecten.

  20. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  1. Roadmap for Agriculture Biomass Feedstock Supply in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Richard Hess; Thomas D. Foust; Reed Hoskinson; David Thompson

    2003-11-01

    The Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee established a goal that biomass will supply 5% of the nation’s power, 20% of its transportation fuels, and 25% of its chemicals by 2030. These combined goals are approximately equivalent to 30% of the country’s current petroleum consumption. The benefits of a robust biorefinery industry supplying this amount of domestically produced power, fuels, and products are considerable, including decreased demand for imported oil, revenue to the depressed agricultural industry, and revitalized rural economies. A consistent supply of highquality, low-cost feedstock is vital to achieving this goal. This biomass roadmap defines the research and development (R&D) path to supplying the feedstock needs of the biorefinery and to achieving the important national goals set for biomass. To meet these goals, the biorefinery industry must be more sustainable than the systems it will replace. Sustainability hinges on the economic profitability of all participants, on environmental impact of every step in the process, and on social impact of the product and its production. In early 2003, a series of colloquies were held to define and prioritize the R&D needs for supplying feedstock to the biorefinery in a sustainable manner. These colloquies involved participants and stakeholders in the feedstock supply chain, including growers, transporters, equipment manufacturers, and processors as well as environmental groups and others with a vested interest in ensuring the sustainability of the biorefinery. From this series of colloquies, four high-level strategic goals were set for the feedstock area: • Biomass Availability – By 2030, 1 billion dry tons of lignocellulosic feedstock is needed annually to achieve the power, fuel, and chemical production goals set by the Biomass Research and Development Technology Advisory Production Committee • Sustainability – Production and use of the 1 billion dry tons annually must be

  2. An ESA roadmap for geobiology in space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Claire R.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Geobiology, and in particular mineral-microbe interactions, has a significant role to play in current and future space exploration. This includes the search for biosignatures in extraterrestrial environments, and the human exploration of space. Microorganisms can be exploited to advance such exploration, such as through biomining, maintenance of life-support systems, and testing of life-detection instrumentation. In view of these potential applications, a European Space Agency (ESA) Topical Team "Geobiology in Space Exploration" was developed to explore these applications, and identify research avenues to be investigated to support this endeavour. Through community workshops, a roadmap was produced, with which to define future research directions via a set of 15 recommendations spanning three key areas: Science, Technology, and Community. These roadmap recommendations identify the need for research into: (1) new terrestrial space-analogue environments; (2) community level microbial-mineral interactions; (3) response of biofilms to the space environment; (4) enzymatic and biochemical mineral interaction; (5) technical refinement of instrumentation for space-based microbiology experiments, including precursor flight tests; (6) integration of existing ground-based planetary simulation facilities; (7) integration of fieldsite biogeography with laboratory- and field-based research; (8) modification of existing planetary instruments for new geobiological investigations; (9) development of in situ sample preparation techniques; (10) miniaturisation of existing analytical methods, such as DNA sequencing technology; (11) new sensor technology to analyse chemical interaction in small volume samples; (12) development of reusable Lunar and Near Earth Object experimental platforms; (13) utility of Earth-based research to enable the realistic pursuit of extraterrestrial biosignatures; (14) terrestrial benefits and technological spin-off from existing and future space

  3. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progress on NASA's Transformational Spaceport and Range Technologies Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, Darin M.

    2005-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Research Council's diaglog to assess progress on NASA's transformational spaceport and range technologies capability roadmap development is presented. The topics include: 1) Agency Goals and Objectives; 2) Strategic Planning Transformation; 3) Advanced Planning Organizational Roles; 4) Public Involvement in Strategic Planning; 5) Strategic Roadmaps; 6) Strategic Roadmaps Schedule; 7) Capability Roadmaps; 8) Capability Charter; 9) Process for Team Selection; 10) Capability Roadmap Development Schedule Overview; 11) Purpose of NRC Review; 12) Technology Readiness Levels; 13) Capability Readiness Levels; 14) Crosswalk Matrix Trans Spaceport & Range; 15) Example linkage to other roadmaps; 16) Capability Readiness Levels Defined; and 17) Crosswalk Matrix Ratings Work In-progress.

  4. Technology Road-map - Nuclear Energy. 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the release in 2010 of Technology Road-map: Nuclear Energy (IEA/NEA, 2010), a number of events have had a significant impact on the global energy sector and on the outlook for nuclear energy. They include the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in March 2011, the global financial and economic crises that hit many industrialised countries during the period 2008-10 and failings in both electricity and CO2 markets. Despite these additional challenges, nuclear energy still remains a proven low-carbon source of base-load electricity, and many countries have reaffirmed the importance of nuclear energy within their countries' energy strategies. To achieve the goal of limiting global temperature increases to just 2 deg. C by the end of the century, a halving of global energy-related emissions by 2050 will be needed. A wide range of low-carbon energy technologies will be needed to support this transition, including nuclear energy. This edition of the nuclear road-map prepared jointly by the IEA and NEA take into account recent challenges facing the development of this technology. The 2015 edition of the Nuclear Energy Technology Road-map aims to: Outline the current status of nuclear technology development and the need for additional R and D to address increased safety requirements and improved economics. Provide an updated vision of the role that nuclear energy could play in a low-carbon energy system, taking into account changes in nuclear policy in various countries, as well as the current economics of nuclear and other low-carbon electricity technologies. Identify barriers and actions needed to accelerate the development of nuclear technologies to meet the Road-map vision. Share lessons learnt and good practices in nuclear safety and regulation, front- and back-end fuel cycle practices, construction, decommissioning, financing, training, capacity building and communication. Key findings: Nuclear power is the largest source of low

  5. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  6. Roadmap Towards Registration and Technology Transfer of Radiation Processed Plant Growth Promoters/Elicitors: The Philippine Experience. Chapter 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pot experiments to test the effectivity of radiation-processed oligocarrageenans as a plant growth promoter/elicitor have been done on rice, soybean, tomatoes, and corn. Though many data from IAEA RCA and CRP participating countries have proven the efficacy of radiation modified oligomers as bio-stimulants and elicitor, certain R & D gaps need to be addressed in order that these products can reach the commercialization stage. A more integrated and systematic study of each crop with the following components need to be conducted: a) timing of application (plant growth stages such as seedling, active, vegetative, and reproductive stages); b) dosage (concentration of oligomers and volume of spray); c) effect in different seasons of the year (dry or wet); d) efficacy in photosynthetic activities (greening of leaves); and e) induction of resistance to pests and diseases (sturdiness, color of leaves, plant height, enzyme systems etc.). Some R & D work on the effect of radiation processed oligocarrageenans as plant growth promoter/elicitor are discussed. It also discusses R & D gaps that need to be addressed to make these oligomers reach the market. The Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority of the Philippines categorizes plant growth promoters and elicitors as fertilizers, requiring very stringent regulations for its registration. The paper proposes a roadmap towards the commercialization of plant growth promoter/elicitors. (author)

  7. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell APU Feasibility Study for a Long Range Commercial Aircraft Using UTC ITAPS Approach. Volume 1; Aircraft Propulsion and Subsystems Integration Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Hari; Yamanis, Jean; Welch, Rick; Tulyani, Sonia; Hardin, Larry

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this contract effort was to define the functionality and evaluate the propulsion and power system benefits derived from a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) based Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for a future long range commercial aircraft, and to define the technology gaps to enable such a system. The study employed technologies commensurate with Entry into Service (EIS) in 2015. United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Integrated Total Aircraft Power System (ITAPS) methodologies were used to evaluate system concepts to a conceptual level of fidelity. The technology benefits were captured as reductions of the mission fuel burn and emissions. The baseline aircraft considered was the Boeing 777-200ER airframe with more electric subsystems, Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) engines, and an advanced APU with ceramics for increased efficiency. In addition to the baseline architecture, four architectures using an SOFC system to replace the conventional APU were investigated. The mission fuel burn savings for Architecture-A, which has minimal system integration, is 0.16 percent. Architecture-B and Architecture-C employ greater system integration and obtain fuel burn benefits of 0.44 and 0.70 percent, respectively. Architecture-D represents the highest level of integration and obtains a benefit of 0.77 percent.

  8. 3D Hierarchical Pt-Nitrogen-Doped-Graphene-Carbonized Commercially Available Sponge as a Superior Electrocatalyst for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Sui, Xu-Lei; Li, Jia-Long; Zhang, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Li-Mei; Wang, Zhen-Bo

    2016-06-29

    Three-dimensional hierarchical nitrogen-doped graphene (3D-NG) frameworks were successfully fabricated through a feasible solution dip-coating method with commercially available sponges as the initial backbone. A spongy template can help hinder the graphene plates restacking in the period of the annealing process. The Pt/3D-NG catalyst was synthesized employing a polyol reduction process. The resultant Pt/3D-NG exhibits 2.3 times higher activity for methanol electro-oxidation along with the improvement in stability as compared with Pt/G owing to their favorable features including large specific surface area, high pore volume, high N doping level, and the homogeneous dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. Besides, Pt/3D-NG also presents high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance in acid media when compared with Pt/3D-G and Pt/G. This work raises a valid solution for the fabrication of 3D functional freestanding graphene-based composites for a variety of applications in fuel cell catalysis, energy storage, and conversion. PMID:27266527

  9. Enteroscopy and radiology for the management of celiac disease complications: Time for a pragmatic roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchi, Federica; Locatelli, Martina; Tomba, Carolina; Conte, Dario; Ferretti, Francesca; Elli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease is the most common autoimmune enteropathy in Western countries, and is usually associated with a good response to the gluten free diet and an excellent prognosis. However, a minority of patients develop complications of the disease, such as refractory celiac disease, ulcerative jejunoileitis and neoplastic complications such as adenocarcinoma of the small bowel and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. Neoplastic complications described in association with celiac disease have a high mortality rate, due to their aggressive behavior and to the usual advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, the detection of small bowel lesions has dramatically improved thank to the availability of highly performing radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The diagnostic delay of malignant complications in patients with celiac disease may be improved by establishing a pragmatic flowchart for the identification and follow up of "at risk" patients. We performed a comprehensive review of the articles published on this issue in order to promote a roadmap to be applied when facing with celiac patients with suspected small bowel complications. PMID:27012449

  10. Trends in robotics: A summary of the Department of Energy`s critical technology roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eicker, P.J.

    1998-08-10

    Technology roadmaps serve as pathways to the future. They call attention to future needs for research and development; provide a structure for organizing technology forecasts and programs; and help communicate technological needs and expectations among end users and the research and development (R and D) community. Critical Technology roadmaps, of which the Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM) Roadmap is one example, focus on enabling or cross-cutting technologies that address the needs of multiple US Department of Energy (DOE) offices. Critical Technology roadmaps must be responsive to mission needs of the offices; must clearly indicate how the science and technology can improve DOE capabilities; and must describe an aggressive vision for the future of the technology itself. The RIM Roadmap defines a DOE research and development path for the period beginning today, and continuing through the year 2020. Its purpose is to identify, select and develop objectives that will satisfy near- and long-term challenges posed by DOE`s mission objectives. If implemented, this roadmap will support DOE`s mission needs while simultaneously advancing the state-of-the-art of RIM. For the purposes of this document, RIM refers to systems composed of machines, sensors, computers and software that deliver processes to DOE operations. The RIM Roadmap describes how such systems will revolutionize DOE processes, most notably manufacturing, hazardous and remote operations, and monitoring and surveillance. The advances in DOE operations and RIM discussed in this document will be possible due to the developments in many other areas of science and technology, including computing, communication, electronics and micro-engineering. Modern software engineering techniques will permit the implementation of inherently safe RIM systems that will depend heavily on software.

  11. ANCRE alliance: Road-map for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Created in 2009 by the Higher Education and Research ministry and by the Ecology ministry, ANCRE, the National Alliance for Energy Research Coordination aims at enhancing the efficiency of French research in the field of energy by promoting partnerships and synergies between public and private sectors (research organizations, universities and companies). ANCRE aims to propose a coordinated strategy for research and innovation projects. Beyond its four founding members, CEA, CNRS, IFPEN and CPU, ANCRE brings together all the French public research organizations concerned with energy issues, and has strong links with the industrial sector. Among the 10 programmatic groups of ANCRE, one is specifically dedicated to Nuclear Energies (fission and fusion). This group has proposed road-maps in five scientific fields, considered as strategic for R and D, in relation to industrial objectives and scientific bottlenecks: nuclear materials, nuclear chemistry, reactor physics, instrumentation and fusion. For twenty to thirty years, R and D on nuclear materials has evolved from the heavy metallurgy of the first generation of power reactors to the nano-materials science under extreme conditions for present and future needs. Nuclear systems are characterized by extreme operating conditions: high temperatures, mechanical stresses, radiations, corrosive environment, and long durations. In order to deal with these extreme conditions, it is necessary to have a sound knowledge of the materials, to the finest scale. R and D development was made possible by advances in materials science, in relation to more efficient observation means (now reaching the atom scale) and deeper control of the microstructure. Development of simulation methods at the atomic level (ab initio, classical molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo, etc.) have also allowed a better understanding of phenomena at their most fundamental level. Material performance issues, however, remain significant, as the performance

  12. IRIS Responsiveness to Generation IV Road-map Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Generation IV road-map process is in its second and final year. Almost one hundred concepts submitted from all over the world have been reviewed against the Generation IV goals of resources sustainability; safety and reliability; and, economics. Advanced LWRs are taken as the reference point. IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure), a 100-335 MWe integral light water reactor being developed by a vast international consortium led by Westinghouse, is one on the concepts being considered in the road-map and is perhaps the most visible representative of the concept set known as Integral Primary System Reactors (IPSR). This paper presents how IRIS satisfies the prescribed goals. The first goal of resource sustainability includes criteria like utilization of fuel resources, amount and toxicity of waste produced, environmental impact, proliferation and sabotage resistance. As a thermal reactor IRIS does not have the same fuel utilization as fast reactors. However, it has a significant flexibility in fuel cycles as it is designed to utilize either UO2 or MOX with straight burn cycles of 4 to 10 years, depending on the fissile content. High discharge burnup and Pu recycling result in good fuel utilization and lower waste; IRIS has also attractive proliferation resistance characteristics, due to the reduced accessibility of the fuel. The safety and reliability goal include reliability, workers' exposure, robust safety features, models with well characterized uncertainty, source term and mechanisms of energy release, robust mitigation of accidents. IRIS is significantly better than advanced LWRs because of its safety by design which eliminates a variety of accidents such as LOCAs, its containment vessel coupled design which maintains the core safely covered during the accident sequences, its design simplification features such as no (or reduced) soluble boron, internal shielding and four-year refueling/maintenance interval which significantly reduce workers

  13. Tripple Junction Solar Cells With 30.0% Efficiency And Next Generation Cell Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostler, W.; Meusel, M.; Kubera, T.; Torunski, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the data of the AZUR SPACE 3G30 cell. With its 30% BOL efficiency for AM0, it marks the final stage of lattice-matched space triple-junction cells. Furthermore, a summary is given on the roadmap for the development of future cell concept in terms of higher efficiency and increase of cell size.

  14. Transition Management: Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şiir Kilkiş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates several streams of literature in transition management and proposes a holistic framework for its application in policy-making. Separate fields of study, such as motors of change and strategic intelligence tools, are unified in a single analytical process. The process involves five steps that may be repeated until a desired policy objective is achieved. The pilot, integrated technology roadmap process that has been launched in Turkey is analyzed as a case study. The Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap has been completed with the participation of over 160 experts in 5 different stages. It involved the collection of over 349 Delfi statements, their consolidation for a Delfi survey with 16 statements, the analysis of the results, a focal group meeting to develop roadmaps for the 7 selected goals, and the consultation of the roadmaps to the sector. The paper concludes that an integrated technology roadmap process, as described in the pilot case study, provides an advanced version of transition management, which is needed to mobilize research, development, and innovation for sustainable development.

  15. Photonics in Environment and Energy. A technology roadmap for SMEs on new photonic devices and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Jonathan; Salingre, Anthony; Vitale, David; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Lojkowski, Witold

    2012-11-01

    Scientific and technological developments in photonics will have a major influence on lots of industries over the next ten to fifteen years. In this highly evolving field, the long-term competitiveness of companies, and especially of Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs), mainly depends on their ability to offer a good product and to establish a successful market position, which is well connected to the management of the hidden potential in existing technological capabilities. Technology roadmaps are interesting tools used to portray the structural and temporal relationships among science, technology and applications and thus help in the decision-making process to remain successful on the market. The present roadmap aims at identifying technological trends for new photonic devices and nanophotonic materials, mainly in terms of market development. It has the main objective to inform SMEs about new scientific discoveries and developments in photonics and their related problem-solving potential for future products and applications in the Environment and Energy sector. This roadmap is part of a set of four roadmaps about the use of photonic technologies in the industrial sectors of ICT, Heath and Well-being, Environment and Energy and Safety and Security. They were developed in the course of the European project PhotonicRoadSME. Altogether, these roadmaps will contribute to support SMEs in their strategic planning for future applications and products.

  16. Energy Technology Roadmaps: A Guide to Development and Implementation. 2014 edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    New low-carbon technologies show clear potential for transforming the global energy system, but a key challenge remains: what steps do governments and industry need to take to ensure their development and deployment? Roadmapping, used for decades in technology-intensive industries, is a useful tool to help address complicated issues strategically at the national, regional and global levels. To help turn political statements and analytical work into concrete action, the International Energy Agency (IEA) is developing a series of global roadmaps devoted to low-carbon energy technologies. Drawing upon the extensive IEA experience, this guide is aimed at providing countries and companies with the context, information and tools needed to design, manage and implement an effective energy technology roadmap process relevant to their own local circumstances and objectives. This edition of the Energy Technology Roadmaps: a guide to development and implementation includes more detailed guidance on how to identify key stakeholders, develop a technology baseline and development of indicators to help track progress against roadmap milestones. The IEA hopes that this guide and the examples and references it offers, together with the new IEA How2Guides, which provide technology-specific guidance, will help national and local policy makers and industry to develop strategies that accelerate the deployment of low-carbon energy technologies worldwide.

  17. Strategic Program Planning Lessons Learned in Developing the LTS S&T Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane Hanson; Brent Dixon; Gretchen Matthern

    2003-07-01

    Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning method used by companies to identify and plan the development of technologies necessary for new products. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management has used this same method to refine requirements and identify knowledge and tools needed for completion of defined missions. This paper describes the process of applying roadmapping to clarify mission requirements and identify enhancing technologies for the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of polluted sites after site cleanup has been completed. The nature of some contamination problems is such that full cleanup is not achievable with current technologies and some residual hazards remain. LTS maintains engineered contaminant barriers and land use restriction controls, and monitors residual contaminants until they no longer pose a risk to the public or the environment. Roadmapping was used to clarify the breadth of the LTS mission, to identify capability enhancements needed to improve mission effectiveness and efficiency, and to chart out the research and development efforts to provide those enhancements. This paper is a case study of the application of roadmapping for program planning and technical risk management. Differences between the planned and actual application of the roadmapping process are presented along with lessons learned. Both the process used and lessons learned should be of interest for anyone contemplating a similar technology based planning effort.

  18. Strategic Program Planning Lessons Learned In Developing The Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, B.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Matthern, G.E.

    2003-04-24

    Technology roadmapping is a strategic planning method used by companies to identify and plan the development of technologies necessary for new products. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management has used this same method to refine requirements and identify knowledge and tools needed for completion of defined missions. This paper describes the process of applying roadmapping to clarify mission requirements and identify enhancing technologies for the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of polluted sites after site cleanup has been completed. The nature of some contamination problems is such that full cleanup is not achievable with current technologies and some residual hazards remain. LTS maintains engineered contaminant barriers and land use restriction controls, and monitors residual contaminants until they no longer pose a risk to the public or the environment. Roadmapping was used to clarify the breadth of the LTS mission, to identify capability enhancements needed to improve mission effectiveness and efficiency, and to chart out the research and development efforts to provide those enhancements. This paper is a case study of the application of roadmapping for program planning and technical risk management. Differences between the planned and actual application of the roadmapping process are presented along with lessons learned. Both the process used and lessons learned should be of interest for anyone contemplating a similar technology based planning effort.

  19. Microbial Populations in Naked Neck Chicken Ceca Raised on Pasture Flock Fed with Commercial Yeast Cell Wall Prebiotics via an Illumina MiSeq Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si Hong; Lee, Sang In; Ricke, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrate dietary supplements that selectively stimulate the growth of one or more beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of the host. These bacteria can inhibit colonization of pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and competing for niches with pathogens within the gut. Pasture flock chickens are generally raised outdoors with fresh grass, sunlight and air, which represents different environmental growth conditions compared to conventionally raised chickens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in microbial populations from naked neck chicken ceca fed with commercial prebiotics derived from brewer’s yeast cell wall via an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 147 day-of-hatch naked neck chickens were distributed into 3 groups consisted of 1) C: control (no prebiotic), 2) T1: Biolex® MB40 with 0.2%, and 3) T2: Leiber® ExCel with 0.2%, consistently supplemented prebiotics during the experimental period. At 8 weeks, a total of 15 birds from each group were randomly selected and ceca removed for DNA extraction. The Illumina Miseq platform based on V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was applied for microbiome analysis. Both treatments exhibited limited impact on the microbial populations at the phylum level, with no significant differences in the OTU number of Bacteroidetes among groups and an increase of Proteobacteria OTUs for the T1 (Biolex® MB40) group. In addition there was a significant increase of genus Faecalibacterium OTU, phylum Firmicutes. According to the development of next generation sequencing (NGS), microbiome analysis based on 16S rRNA gene proved to be informative on the prebiotic impact on poultry gut microbiota in pasture-raised naked neck birds. PMID:26992104

  20. Microbial Populations in Naked Neck Chicken Ceca Raised on Pasture Flock Fed with Commercial Yeast Cell Wall Prebiotics via an Illumina MiSeq Platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Hong Park

    Full Text Available Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrate dietary supplements that selectively stimulate the growth of one or more beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of the host. These bacteria can inhibit colonization of pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs and competing for niches with pathogens within the gut. Pasture flock chickens are generally raised outdoors with fresh grass, sunlight and air, which represents different environmental growth conditions compared to conventionally raised chickens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in microbial populations from naked neck chicken ceca fed with commercial prebiotics derived from brewer's yeast cell wall via an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 147 day-of-hatch naked neck chickens were distributed into 3 groups consisted of 1 C: control (no prebiotic, 2 T1: Biolex® MB40 with 0.2%, and 3 T2: Leiber® ExCel with 0.2%, consistently supplemented prebiotics during the experimental period. At 8 weeks, a total of 15 birds from each group were randomly selected and ceca removed for DNA extraction. The Illumina Miseq platform based on V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was applied for microbiome analysis. Both treatments exhibited limited impact on the microbial populations at the phylum level, with no significant differences in the OTU number of Bacteroidetes among groups and an increase of Proteobacteria OTUs for the T1 (Biolex® MB40 group. In addition there was a significant increase of genus Faecalibacterium OTU, phylum Firmicutes. According to the development of next generation sequencing (NGS, microbiome analysis based on 16S rRNA gene proved to be informative on the prebiotic impact on poultry gut microbiota in pasture-raised naked neck birds.

  1. It's Time for An Epigenomics Roadmap of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papait, Roberto; Corrado, Nadia; Rusconi, Francesca; Serio, Simone; V G Latronico, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The post-genomic era has completed its first decade. During this time, we have seen an attempt to understand life not just through the study of individual isolated processes, but through the appreciation of the amalgam of complex networks, within which each process can influence others. Greatly benefiting this view has been the study of the epigenome, the set of DNA and histone protein modifications that regulate gene expression and the function of regulatory non-coding RNAs without altering the DNA sequence itself. Indeed, the availability of reference genome assemblies of many species has led to the development of methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq that have allowed us to define with high resolution the genomic distribution of several epigenetic elements and to better comprehend how they are interconnected for the regulation of gene expression. In the last few years, the use of these methodologies in the cardiovascular field has contributed to our understanding of the importance of epigenetics in heart diseases, giving new input to this area of research. Here, we review recently acquired knowledge on the role of the epigenome in heart failure, and discuss the need of an epigenomics roadmap for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27006627

  2. Roadmap for sustainable water resources in southwestern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, Peter H

    2010-12-14

    The management of water resources in arid and semiarid areas has long been a challenge, from ancient Mesopotamia to the modern southwestern United States. As our understanding of the hydrological and climatological cycles has improved, and our ability to manipulate the hydrologic cycle has increased, so too have the challenges associated with managing a limited natural resource for a growing population. Modern civilization has made remarkable progress in water management in the past few centuries. Burgeoning cities now survive in desert regions, relying on a mix of simple and complex technologies and management systems to bring adequate water and remove wastewater. These systems have permitted agricultural production and urban concentrations to expand in regions previously thought to have inadequate moisture. However, evidence is also mounting that our current management and use of water is unsustainable. Physical, economic, and ecological limits constrain the development of new supplies and additional water withdrawals, even in regions not previously thought vulnerable to water constraints. New kinds of limits are forcing water managers and policy makers to rethink previous assumptions about population, technology, regional planning, and forms of development. In addition, new threats, especially the challenges posed by climatic changes, are now apparent. Sustainably managing and using water in arid and semiarid regions such as the southwestern United States will require new thinking about water in an interdisciplinary and integrated way. The good news is that a wide range of options suggest a roadmap for sustainable water management and use in the coming decades. PMID:21149725

  3. Environmental sensitivity studies for Gen-IV roadmap DUPIC scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental effect of the DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel cycle, which is considered as one of the partial recycle scenario in Gen-IV roadmap, has been analyzed by using the dynamic analysis method. Through the parametric calculations for the DUPIC fuel cycle deployment time and the fraction of the DUPIC reactors, the environmental effects of the fuel cycle for important parameters such as the amount of spent fuel and the combined amounts of plutonium and minor actinides were estimated and compared to those of the once-through LWR fuel cycle. The results of the sensitivity calculations showed that an early deployment of the DUPIC fuel cycle with a high DUPIC reactor fraction can reduce the accumulation of spent fuel by up to 40%. More important is the associated reduction in the combined amount of plutonium and minor actinides, which may reduce the key repository parameter (long term decay heat). Therefore it is expected that favorable environmental effects will be the outcome of the implementation of the DUPIC fuel cycle

  4. NIH医学研究路线图(NIH roadmap)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐高连; 赵冰海; 吕学诜

    2005-01-01

    多年来,国防和医疗领域一直是美国科技政策的重点。美国国立卫生研究院(national institutes of health,NIH)不仅是美国,也是世界上从事生命科学研究最重要的研究机构,它的一举一动无不对世界的科学研究,尤其是生命科学的发展有着巨大的影响。为提高医学研究能力,加速基础医学研究成果向临床应用的转化,NIH院长瑞尔霍尼(Elias A.Zerhouni)博士于2003年10月1日公布了NIH医学研究路线图(the NIH roadmap for medical research,NIH roadmap),这是一个通向生命科学未来的“中长期发展规划”,它将对21世纪全世界医学的发展产生重大影响。

  5. Supersonics/Airport Noise Plan: An Evolutionary Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the Plan for the Airport Noise Tech Challenge Area of the Supersonics Project. It is given in the context of strategic planning exercises being done in other Projects to show the strategic aspects of the Airport Noise plan rather than detailed task lists. The essence of this strategic view is the decomposition of the research plan by Concept and by Tools. Tools (computational, experimental) is the description of the plan that resources (such as researchers) most readily identify with, while Concepts (here noise reduction technologies or aircraft configurations) is the aspects that project management and outside reviewers most appreciate as deliverables and milestones. By carefully cross-linking these so that Concepts are addressed sequentially (roughly one after another) by researchers developing/applying their Tools simultaneously (in parallel with one another), the researchers can deliver milestones at a reasonable pace while doing the longer-term development that most Tools in the aeroacoustics science require. An example of this simultaneous application of tools was given for the Concept of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles. The presentation concluded with a few ideas on how this strategic view could be applied to the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Quiet Aircraft Tech Challenge Area as it works through its current roadmapping exercise.

  6. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  7. Research and Development Roadmap for Water Heating Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzler, William [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Gagne, Claire [Navigant Consulting Inc.; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Lutz, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Merrigan, Tim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2011-10-01

    Although water heating is an important energy end-use in residential and commercial buildings, efficiency improvements in recent years have been relatively modest. However, significant advancements related to higher efficiency equipment, as well as improved distribution systems, are now viable. DOE support for water heating research, development and demonstration (RD&D) could provide the impetus for commercialization of these advancements.

  8. Space agencies' scientific roadmaps need harmonisation and reegular re-assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worms, Jean-Claude; Culhane, J. Leonard; Walter, Nicolas; Swings, Jean-Pierre; Detsis, Emmanouil

    The need to consider international collaboration in the exploration of space has been recognised since the dawn of the space age in 1957. Since then, international collaboration has been the main operational working mode amongst space scientists the world over, setting aside national pre-eminence and other political arguments. COSPAR itself was created as a tool for scientists to maintain the dialogue at the time of the cold war. Similarly the inherent constraints of the field (cost, complexity, time span) have led space agencies to try and coordinate their efforts. As a result many - if not all - of the key space science missions since the 60’s have been collaborative by nature. Different collaboration models have existed with varying success, and the corresponding lessons learned have been assessed through various fora and reports. For various reasons whose scope has broadened since that time (use of space in other domains such as Earth observation, telecommunication and navigation; emergence of commercial space activities; increased public appeal and capacity to motivate the young generation to engage into related careers), the importance of international collaboration in space has never faltered and coordination among spacefaring nations has become the norm. However programme harmonisation is often found to be lacking, and duplication of efforts sometimes happens due to different planning and decision procedures, programmatic timelines or budgetary constraints. Previous studies, in particular by the European ESSC-ESF, with input from the US NAS-SSB, advocated the need to establish a coordinating body involving major space agencies to address these coordination issues in a systematic and harmonious way. Since then and in line with this recommendation, the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) of 14 space agencies was created in 2007 and published a first roadmap to advance a “Global Exploration Strategy”. ISECG is non-binding though

  9. Draft of the revised roadmap for pipe wall thinning management improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main committee of Power Generation Facility Code (MC-PGFC) of Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) established rules to manage pipe wall thinning on 2005-2006, and they also made a roadmap in 2007 to enhance pipe wall thinning management rules. Research Committee on Improvement and Practical Use of Pipe-Wall-Thinning Management (P-SCCII-4) of JSME drafted a revised version of the roadmap based on the questionnaire on March 2014. This paper shows summary of the questionnaire and the roadmap. The priority of establishment of verification methods for application to the domestic power plant was suggested to be high, in which the relation among the purpose of wall-thinning-prediction methods, how to use them, and accuracy of them should be clarified. (author)

  10. Technology Road-map Update for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technology Road-map Update provides an assessment of progress made by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) in the development of the six systems selected when the original Technology Road-map was published in 2002. More importantly, it provides an overview of the major R and D objectives and milestones for the coming decade, aiming to achieve the Generation IV goals of sustainability, safety and reliability, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident are taken into account to ensure that Generation IV systems attain the highest levels of safety, with the development of specific safety design criteria that are applicable across the six systems. Accomplishing the ten-year R and D objectives set out in this new Road-map should allow the more advanced Generation IV systems to move towards the demonstration phase. (authors)

  11. Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development: A Roadmap for Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This Building Technologies Office (BTO) Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap identifies priority windows and building envelope R&D areas of interest. Cost and performance targets are identified for each key R&D area. The roadmap describes the technical and market challenges to be overcome, R&D activities and milestones, key stakeholders, and potential energy savings that could result if cost and performance targets are met. Methods for improving technology performance and specific strategies for reducing installed costs and mitigating any other market barriers, which would increase the likelihood of mass-market technology adoption, are identified. This roadmap is a useful resource for public and private decision makers evaluating and pursuing high-impact R&D focused on advancing next-generation energy efficient windows and building envelope technologies.

  12. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  13. The Forest Fibre Industry. 2050 Roadmap to a low-carbon bio-economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presas, T.; Mensink, M.

    2011-11-15

    In March 2011, the European Commission published a 'Roadmap for moving to a competitive low-carbon economy in 2050', a discussion document to explore the future of climate change policy. The document models pathways towards 2050 and the possible contribution of different sectors. It will be followed by an 'energy roadmap' towards the end of 2011 and will be combined with other roadmaps on, for example, the future of transport. In time, it will lead to a new 'climate change and energy package'. The outcome will be crucial for Europe's pulp, paper and wood products industries, which operate at the crossroads of renewable energy policy, emission trading, industrial and raw material policies. Climate change policy, too, has a major influence on the future of these sectors. After all, climate change policy is, essentially, industrial policy. This roadmap attempts to lay out the future of the forest fibre industry - the pulp, paper and board and wood products sectors combined - and its potential to meet future consumer demands, stay competitive and deliver a CO2 emission reduction in line with the modelled overall industrial reduction of 80% by 2050, compared to 1990 levels. The roadmap explores the technical, financial and resource constraints that lie ahead, and the policy framework that will be needed to tackle them. Our roadmap is an exploration into the future. The CO2 reduction envisaged can only be achieved when the right policy framework is in place. The sector can play its part as long as it remains profitable and attractive to investments, keeps access to fibre and other raw materials and receives enough support to bring breakthrough technologies within reach.

  14. Thermochromism in Commercial Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary Anne; Leblanc, Monique

    1999-09-01

    Many commercial products change color with a change of temperature. How do they do it? The processes responsible for the two major categories of commercial thermochromic coloring agents are presented, along with a description of applications of thermochromic materials.

  15. Commercial formalin substitutes for histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, P; Lyon, H

    1997-01-01

    We compared the performance of six commercial fixatives proposed to be formalin substitutes with the performance of buffered formalin, Clarke's ethanol-acetic acid, and ethanol, using rat liver, small intestine, and kidney. We investigated the rate of penetration, mode of fixation, extent of...... performed equally well on all tissues tested. While several of the commercial fixatives appeared to preserve liver tissue at 200x, the preservation of kidney, intestinal villi, and smooth muscle was unacceptable. Histological distortion, cell shrinkage and vacuolization were prominent when the substitutes...... was obtained by combining formalin fixation with antigen retrieval. We conclude that none of the proposed commercial substitutes for buffered formalin are adequate for critical histology or histopathology....

  16. Research and Development Roadmap For Next-Generation Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-07-01

    The Department of Energy commissioned this roadmap to establish a set of high-priority research and development (R&D) activities that will accelerate the transition to low-GWP refrigerants across the entire heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry. The schedule of R&D activities occurs within an accelerated five-year timeframe, and covers several prominent equipment types. The roadmap is organized around four primary objectives to: assess and mitigate safety risks, characterize refrigerant properties, understand efficiency and environmental tradeoffs, and support new refrigerant and equipment development.

  17. Synthesizing R&D Data: Experiences from the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Roadmap (IMTR) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    merrell, m.a.

    1999-05-05

    IMTR is a tremendous undertaking to assess the current state and future needs of Manufacturing Technology R&D. A follow-on project to the roadmaps is the development and populating of a Gap Analysis database containing current R&D abstracts related to the roadmaps' technical elements. Efficiently identifying the R&D projects within scope presents many travails of synthesizing data from across a wide spectrum. Challenges to this project were directly proportional to the lack of single-source data collections.

  18. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strong...

  19. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity†Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Brett D.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the premise that new consumer value must drive hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle (H2FCV) commercialization, a group of opportunities collectively called “Mobile Electricity†is characterized. Mobile Electricity (Me-) redefines H2FCVs as innovative products able to import and export electricity across the traditional vehicle boundary. Such vehicles could provide home recharging and mobile power, for example for tools, mobile activities, emergencies, and electric-grid-support services...

  20. Commercial Banking Industry Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Cambridge, MA.

    Work and family programs are becoming increasingly important in the commercial banking industry. The objective of this survey was to collect information and prepare a commercial banking industry profile on work and family programs. Fifty-nine top American commercial banks from the Fortune 500 list were invited to participate. Twenty-two…

  1. COMMERCIAL FOODS, MATHEMATICS - I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DORNFIELD, BLANCHE E.

    THE UNDERSTANDING AND MASTERY OF FUNDAMENTAL MATHEMATICS IS A NECESSARY PART OF COMMERCIAL FOODS WORK. THIS STUDENT HANDBOOK WAS DESIGNED TO ACCOMPANY A COMMERCIAL FOODS COURSE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL FOR STUDENTS WITH APPROPRIATE APTITUDES AND COMMERCIAL FOOD SERVICE GOALS. THE MATERIAL, TESTED IN VARIOUS INTERESTED CLASSROOMS, WAS PREPARED BY…

  2. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  3. A Community Roadmap for Discovery of Geosciences Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baru, C.

    2012-12-01

    This talk will summarize on-going discussions and deliberations related to data discovery undertaken as part of the EarthCube initiative and in the context of current trends and technologies in search and discovery of scientific data and information. The goal of the EarthCube initiative is to transform the conduct of research by supporting the development of community-guided cyberinfrastructure to integrate data and information for knowledge management across the Geosciences. The vision of EarthCube is to provide a coherent framework for finding and using information about the Earth system across the entire research enterprise that will allow for substantial improved collaboration between specialties using each other's data (e.g. subdomains of geo- and biological sciences). Indeed, data discovery is an essential prerequisite to any action that an EarthCube user would undertake. The community roadmap activity addresses challenges in data discovery, beginning with an assessment of the state-of-the-art, and then identifying issues, challenges, and risks in reaching the data discovery vision. Many of the lessons learned are general and applicable not only to the geosciences but also to a variety of other science communities. The roadmap considers data discovery issues in Geoscience that include but are not limited to metadata-based discovery and the use of semantic information and ontologies; content-based discovery and integration with data mining activities; integration with data access services; and policy and governance issues. Furthermore, many geoscience use cases require access to heterogeneous data from multiple disciplinary sources in order to analyze and make intelligent connections between data to advance research frontiers. Examples include, say, assessing the rise of sea surface temperatures; modeling geodynamical earth systems from deep time to present; or, examining in detail the causes and consequences of global climate change. It has taken the past one

  4. Energy System and Thermoeconomic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Light Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Whitney G.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2015-06-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE)’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is spearheading a program with industry to deploy and independently monitor five kilowatt-electric (kWe) combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) in light commercial buildings. This publication discusses results from PNNL’s research efforts to independently evaluate manufacturer-stated engineering, economic, and environmental performance of these CHP FCSs at installation sites. The analysis was done by developing parameters for economic comparison of CHP installations. Key thermodynamic terms are first defined, followed by an economic analysis using both a standard accounting approach and a management accounting approach. Key economic and environmental performance parameters are evaluated, including (1) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of power, (2) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of energy, (3) the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollution emissions with a switch from conventional power plants and furnaces to CHP FCSs; (4) the change in GHG mitigation costs from the switch; and (5) the change in human health costs related to air pollution. From the power perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical power is estimated to span a range from $15–19,000/ kilowatt-electric (kWe) (depending on site-specific changes in installation, fuel, and other costs), while the average per unit cost of electrical and heat recovery power varies between $7,000 and $9,000/kW. From the energy perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical energy ranges from $0.38 to $0.46/kilowatt-hour-electric (kWhe), while the average per unit cost per unit of electrical and heat recovery energy varies from $0.18 to $0.23/kWh. These values are calculated from engineering and economic performance data provided by the manufacturer (not independently measured data). The GHG emissions were estimated to decrease by

  5. A physiome interoperability roadmap for personalized drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simon; Wolstencroft, Katherine; de Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    The goal of developing therapies and dosage regimes for characterized subgroups of the general population can be facilitated by the use of simulation models able to incorporate information about inter-individual variability in drug disposition (pharmacokinetics), toxicity and response effect (pharmacodynamics). Such observed variability can have multiple causes at various scales, ranging from gross anatomical differences to differences in genome sequence. Relevant data for many of these aspects, particularly related to molecular assays (known as '-omics'), are available in online resources, but identification and assignment to appropriate model variables and parameters is a significant bottleneck in the model development process. Through its efforts to standardize annotation with consequent increase in data usability, the human physiome project has a vital role in improving productivity in model development and, thus, the development of personalized therapy regimes. Here, we review the current status of personalized medicine in clinical practice, outline some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to expand its applicability, and discuss the relevance of personalized medicine to the more widespread challenges being faced in drug discovery and development. We then review some of (i) the key data resources available for use in model development and (ii) the potential areas where advances made within the physiome modelling community could contribute to physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in support of personalized drug development. We conclude by proposing a roadmap to further guide the physiome community in its on-going efforts to improve data usability, and integration with modelling efforts in the support of personalized medicine development. PMID:27051513

  6. Status and Roadmap of the Global Air Quality Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M. G.; Husar, R. B.

    2012-04-01

    With the recognition of air quality as a transboundary problem the need for harmonizing, harvesting and synthesizing air quality data on the continental and global scale has grown. Observational data from urban, rural and remote surface sites, from regular aircraft flights and from satellites are made available together with numerical analyses and forecasts of the atmospheric chemical composition through various databases, which are for historic reasons only loosely connected and rarely allow for a seamless, interoperable and easy access across different networks and data centers. A number of pilot services have been established under the auspices of the GEO Air Quality Community of Practice, and a meeting of this community in 2011 discussed the technical and semantic challenges for linking these services together and expanding the existing air quality data network. Key issues that were identified are the capability of existing server software to translate data formats and metadata requirements, the lack of a community-wide coherent set of metadata tags to identify data sets in catalogue applications, the need for clear rules to define the granularity of data sets in catalogues, the requirement of data traceability and information needs on calibration and modification records, and the ambiguities in the interpretation of current information exchange standards such as WCS and netcdf-CF. Particular challenges for exchanging air quality data result from the need for near-realtime information and from the necessity to obtain concurrent meteorological data in order to assess and interpret the air quality information. This presentation will summarize the present status of the air quality data network and provide a draft roadmap for the future development.

  7. ROADIDEA- Roadmap for radical innovations in European transport services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikivi, P.

    2009-09-01

    Weather plays a key role in most traffic accidents, in which over 40.000 European citizens are killed and more than 1,2 million injured every year. It is thus clear that innovations are needed to develop better road weather services to make traffic safer. As transport is responsible of 20% of green house gas emissions in Europe, such services are also needed that make traffic more efficient and reduce congestion. ROADIDEA "Roadmap for radical innovations in European transport services” is a FP7/INFSO Collaboration project that started in 2007 and continues until mid-2010, see www.roadidea.eu. The main objective is to study the potential of the European transport service sector for innovations, analysing available data sources, revealing existing problems and bottlenecks, and developing better methods and models to be utilised in service platforms. These will be capable of providing new, innovative services for various transport user groups. The fourteen partners of ROADIDEA come from Finland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Hungary, Croatia and Slovenia. The differences of the existing transport systems and available data sources in these countries are analysed as well as the problems caused by local climate and geography. The innovation process is key activity of the project and will be described in detail in the presentation. It has produced more than 100 ideas during two consecutive brainstorming seminars. Ideas have been analysed and the most potential ones shortlisted for further development. These include e.g. advanced friction models, road condition and fog warning systems, which receive input from hybrid (mobile and fixed combined) observing systems and automated messages from private cars. The Hamburg Port with increasing congestion needs multi-modal traffic model that takes weather into account. New semi-public high-quality ways to travel need to be innovated to reduce the use of private cars in the battle against climate change.

  8. Validation of 3D multimodality roadmapping in interventional neuroradiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijters, Daniel; Homan, Robert; Mielekamp, Peter; van de Haar, Peter; Babic, Drazenko

    2011-08-01

    Three-dimensional multimodality roadmapping is entering clinical routine utilization for neuro-vascular treatment. Its purpose is to navigate intra-arterial and intra-venous endovascular devices through complex vascular anatomy by fusing pre-operative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) with the live fluoroscopy image. The fused image presents the real-time position of the intra-vascular devices together with the patient's 3D vascular morphology and its soft-tissue context. This paper investigates the effectiveness, accuracy, robustness and computation times of the described methods in order to assess their suitability for the intended clinical purpose: accurate interventional navigation. The mutual information-based 3D-3D registration proved to be of sub-voxel accuracy and yielded an average registration error of 0.515 mm and the live machine-based 2D-3D registration delivered an average error of less than 0.2 mm. The capture range of the image-based 3D-3D registration was investigated to characterize its robustness, and yielded an extent of 35 mm and 25° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) with CT, and 15 mm and 20° for >80% of the datasets for registration of 3DRA with MR data. The image-based 3D-3D registration could be computed within 8 s, while applying the machine-based 2D-3D registration only took 1.5 µs, which makes them very suitable for interventional use.

  9. Consolidation and development roadmap of the EMI middleware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kónya, B.; Aiftimiei, C.; Cecchi, M.; Field, L.; Fuhrmann, P.; Nilsen, J. K.; White, J.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific research communities have benefited recently from the increasing availability of computing and data infrastructures with unprecedented capabilities for large scale distributed initiatives. These infrastructures are largely defined and enabled by the middleware they deploy. One of the major issues in the current usage of research infrastructures is the need to use similar but often incompatible middleware solutions. The European Middleware Initiative (EMI) is a collaboration of the major European middleware providers ARC, dCache, gLite and UNICORE. EMI aims to: deliver a consolidated set of middleware components for deployment in EGI, PRACE and other Distributed Computing Infrastructures; extend the interoperability between grids and other computing infrastructures; strengthen the reliability of the services; establish a sustainable model to maintain and evolve the middleware; fulfil the requirements of the user communities. This paper presents the consolidation and development objectives of the EMI software stack covering the last two years. The EMI development roadmap is introduced along the four technical areas of compute, data, security and infrastructure. The compute area plan focuses on consolidation of standards and agreements through a unified interface for job submission and management, a common format for accounting, the wide adoption of GLUE schema version 2.0 and the provision of a common framework for the execution of parallel jobs. The security area is working towards a unified security model and lowering the barriers to Grid usage by allowing users to gain access with their own credentials. The data area is focusing on implementing standards to ensure interoperability with other grids and industry components and to reuse already existing clients in operating systems and open source distributions. One of the highlights of the infrastructure area is the consolidation of the information system services via the creation of a common information

  10. Consolidation and development roadmap of the EMI middleware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific research communities have benefited recently from the increasing availability of computing and data infrastructures with unprecedented capabilities for large scale distributed initiatives. These infrastructures are largely defined and enabled by the middleware they deploy. One of the major issues in the current usage of research infrastructures is the need to use similar but often incompatible middleware solutions. The European Middleware Initiative (EMI) is a collaboration of the major European middleware providers ARC, dCache, gLite and UNICORE. EMI aims to: deliver a consolidated set of middleware components for deployment in EGI, PRACE and other Distributed Computing Infrastructures; extend the interoperability between grids and other computing infrastructures; strengthen the reliability of the services; establish a sustainable model to maintain and evolve the middleware; fulfil the requirements of the user communities. This paper presents the consolidation and development objectives of the EMI software stack covering the last two years. The EMI development roadmap is introduced along the four technical areas of compute, data, security and infrastructure. The compute area plan focuses on consolidation of standards and agreements through a unified interface for job submission and management, a common format for accounting, the wide adoption of GLUE schema version 2.0 and the provision of a common framework for the execution of parallel jobs. The security area is working towards a unified security model and lowering the barriers to Grid usage by allowing users to gain access with their own credentials. The data area is focusing on implementing standards to ensure interoperability with other grids and industry components and to reuse already existing clients in operating systems and open source distributions. One of the highlights of the infrastructure area is the consolidation of the information system services via the creation of a common information

  11. A roadmap to truly disposable unattended ground sensor (UGS) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barry M.

    2010-04-01

    In the last two decades, research by McQ Inc. and others has led to substantial advances in the performance of unattended ground sensor (UGS) systems. These advancements include: extremely long battery life; small, robust packaging; high performance detection and classification algorithms; multimodal, multispectral sensors; long range communications; air droppable delivery; fully integrated sensor management; multi-sensor situational awareness and data fusion; advanced video detection and optical sensor development; and others. This research has demonstrated that there is a great deal that existing technology can do to solve users' intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) requirements using UGS sensors. However, in spite of these advances, UGS systems have not enjoyed widespread use in either DoD, DHS or with law enforcement agencies (LEA). Although requirements differ from agency to agency and application to application, the primary factor that limits more widespread use of UGS systems is cost. Cost determines how many sensors an agency can buy and how they are used operationally. Only when sensors cost $100 or less will they be considered truly disposable. The focus of this paper is to present the technical considerations and a roadmap for producing truly low cost UGS sensors. Achieving this goal will then create within the DoD, DHS, LEA and other communities' requirements for UGS systems intended for a wide variety of uses that were never seriously considered previously because of cost. The implications are significant and will lead to an explosion in the number of UGS systems made and used on an annual basis.

  12. Short communication: Effect of commercial or depurinized milk diet on plasma advanced oxidation protein products, cardiovascular markers, and bone marrow CD34+ stem cell potential in rat experimental hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Gordana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic, Tatjana; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Aneta; Jovanovic, Jelena; Zivkovic, Petar

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular repair and myocardial contractility may be improved by migration of bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and their delivery to the site of injury, a process known as BMSC homing. The aim of our study was to examine the dietary effect of a newly patented depurinized milk (DP) that is almost free of uric acid and purine and pyrimidine compounds compared with a standard commercial 1.5% fat UHT milk diet or allopurinol therapy in rat experimental hyperuricemia. Bone marrow stem cell potential (BMCD34(+), CD34-postive bone marrow cells), plasma oxidative stress parameters [advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], myocardial damage markers [creatine phosphokinase (CPK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)], plasma cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were investigated. The DP milk diet significantly increased the number of BMCD34(+) stem cells compared with commercial UHT milk. Allopurinol given alone also increased the number of BMCD34(+). Hyperuricemia caused a significant increase in all plasma enzyme markers for myocardial damage (CPK, LDH, and AST). A cardioprotective effect was achieved with allopurinol but almost equally with DP milk and more than with commercial milk. Regarding plasma AOPP, TBARS, and cholesterol levels, the most effective treatment was DP milk. In conclusion, the protective role of a milk diet on cardiovascular function may be enhanced through the new depurinized milk diet, which may improve cardiovascular system function via increased bone marrow stem cell regenerative potential, decreased plasma oxidative stress parameters, and decreased levels of myocardial damage markers and cholesterol. New dairy technology strategies focused on eliminating harmful milk compounds should be completely nontoxic. Novel milk products should be tested for their ability to improve tissue repair and function. PMID:25218755

  13. The EU Decarbonisation Roadmap 2050—What way to walk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carry out a detailed computable general equilibrium (CGE) analysis of the EU Decarbonisation Roadmap 2050 on a macroeconomic and on a sectoral level. Herein, we study a Reference scenario that implements existing EU policies as well as 3 unilateral and 3 global climate action scenarios. We identify global climate action with international emissions trading and the full equalisation of CO2 prices across all (EU) sectors as an economically reasonable policy option to avoid additional costs of the Decarbonisation Roadmap to a large extent. This policy option may include CDM (Clean Development Mechanism in the sense of ‘where’-flexibility) in an extended form if there are countries without emissions caps. Moreover, we identify diverse sectoral effects in terms of output, investment, emissions and international competitiveness. We conclude that the successful realisation of the EU Decarbonisation Roadmap probably requires a wise and joint consideration of technology, policy design and sectoral aspects. - Highlights: ► We extend the CGE model PACE until 2050 and include energy technologies. ► We assess the newest EU Decarbonisation Roadmap in six policy scenarios. ► Global action with ETS and CDM credits from non-participants create low(est) costs. ► Mitigation costs can strongly increase at CO2 reductions around 80%. ► The policy effects vary strongly across EU sectors

  14. Roadmap for High School Feedback Reports: Key Focus Areas to Ensure Quality Implementation. Data for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    High school feedback reports let school and district leaders know where their students go after graduation and how well they are prepared for college and beyond. This roadmap discusses the seven key focus areas the Data Quality Campaign (DQC) recommends states work on to ensure quality implementation of high school feedback reports.

  15. Going Further: A Roadmap to the Works of the ACCLAIM Research Initiative. Working Paper No. 42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Zach; Howley, Craig

    2012-01-01

    "Going Further" presents a roadmap to the works of the ACCLAIM (Appalachian Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics) Research Initiative, the research effort of one the Centers for Learning and Teaching (CLTs) created with a grant (2001-2005) from the National Science Foundation. The Center began with a broad…

  16. An Imaging Roadmap for Biology Education: From Nanoparticles to Whole Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Daniel J.; Davidson, Richard J.; Nelson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging techniques provide ways of knowing structure and function in biology at different scales. The multidisciplinary nature and rapid advancement of imaging sciences requires imaging education to begin early in the biology curriculum. Guided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap initiatives, we incorporated a nanoimaging, molecular…

  17. A Roadblock to Social Justice? An Analysis and Critique of the South African Education Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikly, Leon

    2011-01-01

    The article provides an analysis and critique of contemporary debates concerning the quality of education in South Africa from a social justice perspective. In particular the article focuses on the "Education Roadmap" which has gained support from a range of stakeholders in South Africa including key members of the newly elected government. The…

  18. Regional Open Innovation Roadmapping: A New Framework for Innovation-Based Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Schwerdtner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To foster sustainable regional development, many regions rely on innovations. To safeguard the generation of innovations and their market introduction, companies have increasingly used technology roadmapping and open innovation. The project INNOrural (Innovations for sustainable rural development expanded these concepts by applying them to regions. This led to the rise of the “Regional Open Innovation Roadmapping” framework for innovation-based regional development (ROIR. This framework was tested by conducting two innovation roadmapping processes in the model region of Märkisch-Oderland (MOL, Germany: the certification of regional wood fuel and the establishment of a competence center for precision farming technology. Both innovation ideas were selected during the roadmapping process by applying a sustainability assessment. After 12 months, two complete roadmaps were ready for implementation. Key principles of ROIR were identified, including the use of a clear and replicable sustainability assessment method, the involvement of all relevant stakeholder groups in the early process and the cooperation between regional and subject experts. Generally, the broader adaptation of ROIR for additional regions will be useful. Nevertheless, the ROIR processes need to be evaluated in depth to develop a better understanding and to provide evidence of the benefits and limitations of this approach.

  19. The Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with criticism of the NIH Roadmap

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley, William; Courtney, John; Pardes, Herbert; Moskowitz, Jay; Orringer, Eugene; Rubenstein, Arthur; Wood, Alastair; Rettig, Richard; Ausiello, Dennis; Brenner, David; Collins, Francis; Elias, Jack; Greene, Warner; Horowitz, Ralph; Jameson, Larry

    2006-01-01

    As representatives of 50 leading academic medical centers focusing on clinical research and many of academic medicine’s scientific leaders, the Clinical Research Forum and Association of American Physicians disagree with the JCI’s recent editorials on the NIH Roadmap, Elias Zerhouni’s leadership, and the future directions of biomedical research.

  20. Navigating the multiple meanings of ?? diversity: A roadmap for the practicing ecologist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Marti J.; Crist, Thomas O.; Chase, Jonathan M.;

    2011-01-01

    A recent increase in studies of β diversity has yielded a confusing array of concepts, measures and methods. Here, we provide a roadmap of the most widely used and ecologically relevant approaches for analysis through a series of mission statements. We distinguish two types of β diversity: direct...

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs: Strategic Roadmap 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Strategic Roadmap 2025 outlines strategic target areas and tactical actions to ensure the Office remains aligned with its congressional mandates and DOE goals, and that it can be responsive to changing conditions in Indian Country and the nation.

  2. Assistive Robotics in Robotics for healthcare, roadmap study for the EC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, G.J.; Wilt, M. de; Cremers, G.; Rensma, A.

    2009-01-01

    To gain understanding in the current status of Robotics in healthcare the European Commission issued a roadmap study into this domain. This paper reports on the main characteristics and results of this study. The study covered the wide domain of Healthcare and in this paper the domains relevant for

  3. Roadmapping - A Tool for Resolving Science and Technology Issues Related to Processing, Packaging, and Shipping Nuclear Materials and Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roadmapping is an effective methodology to identify and link technology development and deployment efforts to a program's or project's needs and requirements. Roadmapping focuses on needed technical support to the baselines (and to alternatives to the baselines) where the probability of success is low (high uncertainty) and the consequences of failure are relatively high (high programmatic risk, higher cost, longer schedule, or higher ES and H risk). The roadmap identifies where emphasis is needed, i.e., areas where investments are large, the return on investment is high, or the timing is crucial. The development of a roadmap typically involves problem definition (current state versus the desired state) and major steps (functions) needed to reach the desired state. For Nuclear Materials (NM), the functions could include processing, packaging, storage, shipping, and/or final disposition of the material. Each function is examined to determine what technical development would be needed to make the function perform as desired. This requires a good understanding of the current state of technology and technology development and validation activities to ensure the viability of each step. In NM disposition projects, timing is crucial. Technology must be deployed within the project window to be of value. Roadmaps set the stage to keep the technology development and deployment focused on project milestones and ensure that the technologies are sufficiently mature when needed to mitigate project risk and meet project commitments. A recent roadmapping activity involved a 'cross-program' effort, which included NM programs, to address an area of significant concern to the Department of Energy (DOE) related to gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen. The roadmap that was developed defined major gas generation issues within the DOE complex and research that has been and is being conducted to address gas generation concerns. The roadmap also provided the basis for sharing

  4. Roadmap for human resources for expanded Indian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with detailed requirement of human resources for all phases of nuclear power plant, for the manufacturing sector and the probable roadmap for achieving India's target. The accident in Fukushima has brought out that only nuclear power that avoids being a threat to the health and safety of the population and the environmental will be acceptable to the society and for this to be achieved human resources could be a single major contributor. India has ambitious plan of achieving 20,000MW by 2020 and 63,000MW by 2050. It is felt out of the three resources men, material and money; the critical shortage would be human resources both in quality and quantity. As per IAEA report (Publication of 2008 edition of energy, electricity and nuclear power estimates for the period of 2030), nuclear capacity must grow to at least 1.8 times current capacity by 2030 if global temperature rises are to be kept at 2°C. Objective of recruiting and training human resources for Indian Industry can be as follows: a) For catering domestic market. b) For catering international market later on for nuclear industries outside India. As India will be an important future international player. The above would require a multiplication of human resources by nearly seven times. In addition it has to be wholesome covering all levels and all skills and all disciplines and stages covering the whole nuclear cycle including regulators. Human resources are required for design and engineering, construction, commissioning, operation, manufacturing and for support services. The manpower for these has to be trained to achieve high quality of nuclear standards. Presently Indian Department of Atomic Energy(DAE) runs several training schools giving one year Post Graduate, tailor made courses. This needs to be multiplied by Joint efforts. Training should be on 'SAT (Systematic Approach to Training)' methodology to ensure focussed, specific, needed to culminate in safe, reliable and viable operation of

  5. Earth Cube Data Community Roadmap for Mining Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Graves, S. J.; Baker, J.; Falke, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Data from Earth observation sensors have been accumulating at a very high rate for several years now. In combination with in-situ observations and physical model output, this enormous, distributed repository of geocience datasets holds the answers to important questions about our planet's past, present and future. However, the information is only usable if effective analysis capabilities can be brought to bear. For example, researchers may want to perform statistical correlations among multiple geophysical parameters, across many years of observations. Data mining/analytics has the potential to provide these capabilities, and, if employed in close coordination with domain geoscientists could increase the science return from these vast data collections. The goal of NSF's Earth Cube initiative is to transform the conduct of geosciences research by supporting the development of community-guided cyberinfrastructure to integrate data and information for knowledge management. Organizing the diverse array of geosciences datasets and software into one single "Earth Cube" will undoubtedly increase scientific productivity by making it easier for researchers to extract knowledge quickly. However, a major challenge is the reliable extraction of features of interest and knowledge from the massive archive of multi-dimensional datasets, many of which exhibit a large degree of spatiotemporal sparseness. As part of the Earth Cube Data Community activities, we held a series of virtual workshops to generate a community dialogue in the area of data mining/analytics. These discussions focused on reviewing existing data mining tools and approaches used by the geoscience community, identifying existing challenges that must be overcome and defining a roadmap for the future of data mining/analytics in Earth Cube. Several key themes emerged from these discussions. A need for workbench environments was identified that enable researchers to discover and use new analytic approaches and to

  6. Technology Roadmaps - Electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (EV/PHEV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-06-15

    The mass deployment of electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and PHEVs) that rely on low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission electricity generation has great potential to significantly reduce the consumption of petroleum and other high CO2-emitting transportation fuels. The vision of the Electric and Plug-in Hybrid (EV/PHEV) Vehicles Roadmap is to achieve by 2050 the widespread adoption and use of EVs and PHEVs, which together represent more than 50% of annual LDV (light duty vehicle) sales worldwide. In addition to establishing a vision, this roadmap sets strategic goals to achieve it, and identifies the steps that need to be taken to accomplish these goals. This roadmap also outlines the roles and collaboration opportunities for different stakeholders and shows how government policy can support the overall achievement of the vision. The strategic goals for attaining the widespread adoption and use of EVs and PHEVs worldwide by 2050 cover the development of the EV/PHEV market worldwide through 2030 and involve targets that align with global targets to stabilise GHG concentrations. These technology-specific goals include the following: Set targets for electric-drive vehicle sales; Develop coordinated strategies to support the market introduction of electric-drive vehicles; Improve industry understanding of consumer needs and behaviours; Develop performance metrics for characterising vehicles; Foster energy storage RD and D initiatives to reduce costs and address resource-related issues; and, Develop and implement recharging infrastructure. The roadmap outlines additional recommendations that must be considered in order to successfully meet the technology milestones and strategic goals. These recommendations include the following: Use a comprehensive mix of policies that provide a clear framework and balance stakeholder interests; Engage in international collaboration efforts; and, Address policy and industry needs at a national level. The IEA will work in an

  7. Aggressive commercial practicies

    OpenAIRE

    Tomanová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Diploma thesis evaluates the effectiveness of legal instruments to prevent the use of aggressive commercial practices. Thesis is divided into two main chapters, the first is the protection against aggressive commercial practices in business to consumer market and the second part is dedicated to the protection against aggressive practices in the business to business market. Each section compares the European protection of aggressive commercial practices (and also through European legislation i...

  8. Cassava Commercialization in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Cynthia; Haggblade, Steven; Salegua, Venancio Alexandre; Cuambe, Constantino; Mudema, Joao; Tomo, Alda

    2011-01-01

    Cassava supplies roughly 30% of all calories consumed in Mozambique, making it the country’s most important food security crop. Over the past several decades, growing urbanization and shifting demand patterns have led to growing opportunities for cassava processing and commercialization. This paper examines the commercial dynamics in Mozambique’s cassava value chain as well as the food security implications of growing cassava commercialization.

  9. Studying Knowledge Commercialization

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Mehrabi; Iraj Soltani; Akbar Nilipour; Pegah Kiarasi

    2013-01-01

    Research ideas and findings of learners can be led to wealth creation, entrepreneurship and finally development and economic and social welfare. In order to realize knowledge commercialization it is necessary to determine the constituent processes, methods and factors to be used in decision-making for commercialization. Knowledge commercialization in engineering and construction management of national Iranian south oil company was studied in this survey in viewpoint of some effective inter-or...

  10. Comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma and normal lung fibroblast cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ali Rashmezad; Elahe Ali Asgary; Farzaneh Tafvizi; Seyed Ataollah Sadat Shandiz; Amir Mirzaie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has attracted the attention of the scientific community in nanotechnology and biotechnology due to their extensive application in the area of material sciences and medicine. Nowadays, despite a various application of nanomaterial’s, there is a little information about their impact on human health. In this study, we investigated the comparative study on cytotoxicity effect of biological and commercial synthesized nanosilver on human gastric carcinoma (...

  11. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  12. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments - conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial.

  13. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments – conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial. PMID:26015762

  14. The Human Space Life Sciences Critical Path Roadmap Project: A Strategy for Human Space Flight through Exploration-Class Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    The product of the critical path roadmap project is an integrated strategy for mitigating the risks associated with human exploration class missions. It is an evolving process that will assure the ability to communicate the integrated critical path roadmap. Unlike previous reports, this one will not sit on a shelf - it has the full support of the JSC Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SA) and is already being used as a decision making tool (e.g., budget and investigation planning for Shuttle and Space Station mission). Utility of this product depends on many efforts, namely: providing the required information (completed risk data sheets, critical question information, technology data). It is essential to communicate the results of the critical path roadmap to the scientific community - this meeting is a good opportunity to do so. The web site envisioned for the critical path roadmap will provide the capability to communicate to a broader community and to track and update the system routinely.

  15. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation outlines a competition that has as its goal to explores the viability of using public-private partnerships to open space frontier for commercial uses. The teams have the objective of designing a business plan to open the space frontier to commercial interests.

  16. Recycling Sounds in Commercials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Charlotte Rørdam

    2012-01-01

    Commercials offer the opportunity for intergenerational memory and impinge on cultural memory. TV commercials for foodstuffs often make reference to past times as a way of authenticating products. This is frequently achieved using visual cues, but in this paper I would like to demonstrate how such...

  17. Implementing the South African additive manufacturing technology roadmap - the role of an additive manufacturing centre of competence

    OpenAIRE

    Du Preez, Willie Bouwer; De Beer, Deon J.

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa (RAPDASA) expressed the need for a national Additive Manufacturing Roadmap. Consequentially, the South African Department of Science and Technology commissioned the development of a South African Additive Manufacturing Technology Roadmap. This was intended to guide role-players in identifying business opportunities, addressing technology gaps, focusing development programmes, and informing investment decisions that would enable local c...

  18. A roadmap towards a low-carbon society in Japan using backcasting methodology: Feasible pathways for achieving an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to analyze feasibility and a roadmap of a low-carbon society in Japan by 2050, while satisfying required demands. Future technology roadmaps, CO2 emission pathways and energy mix transitions leading Japan are calculated using the AIM/Backcasting Model based on backcasting methodology with taking into consideration that one of the keys for technological market penetration is the preferences of consumers. Under the CO2 emission target of 80% reduction as compared to 1990 level by 2050, it is found from the results that the target is feasible in Japan by implementing actions toward low-carbon society as early as possible. From the perspective of minimizing the total costs, it would be best to target a reduction rate of 16–20% in 2020, 31–35% in 2030 and 53–56% in 2040 within the range of Scenarios A and B. During this process, major investment will be needed in the early stage of the analytical periods, especially in the residential, commercial and transport sectors. However, viewed in the long term, this can be recovered by reduction in energy consumption. Moreover, the analysis suggests that returns that balance the total investment may be possible. - Highlights: ► Reducing CO2 emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050 is achievable in Japan. ► Feasible pathway is examined by the AIM/Backcasting Model based on backcasting methodology. ► Taking steps sooner will increase the likelihood of achieving a low-carbon society. ► Major investment will be needed in the early stage of the analytical periods. ► Viewed in the long term, this can be recovered by reduction in energy consumption.

  19. Roadmap on optical rogue waves and extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmediev, Nail; Kibler, Bertrand; Baronio, Fabio; Belić, Milivoj; Zhong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yiqi; Chang, Wonkeun; Soto-Crespo, Jose M.; Vouzas, Peter; Grelu, Philippe; Lecaplain, Caroline; Hammani, K.; Rica, S.; Picozzi, A.; Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir; Mussot, Arnaud; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe; Amiraranashvili, Shalva; Bree, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Masoller, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Runge, Antoine F. J.; Erkintalo, Miro; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Arecchi, F. T.; Wabnitz, Stefan; Tiofack, C. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.

    2016-06-01

    this point of view, a number of the scientists who work in this area of research have come together to present their research in a single review article that will greatly benefit all interested parties of this research direction. Whether the authors of this ‘roadmap’ have similar views or different from the original concept, the potential reader of the review will enrich their knowledge by encountering most of the existing views on the subject. Previously, a special issue on optical rogue waves (2013 J. Opt. 15 060201) was successful in achieving this goal but over two years have passed and more material has been published in this quickly emerging subject. Thus, it is time for a roadmap that may stimulate and encourage further research.

  20. Strategic Roadmap for the U.S. Geoscience Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Gallagher, K. T.; Richard, S. M.; Hutchison, V. B.

    2012-04-01

    An external advisory working group has prepared a 5-year strategic roadmap for the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN). USGIN is a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who formally agreed in 2007 to develop a national geoscience information framework that is distributed, interoperable, uses open source standards and common protocols, respects and acknowledges data ownership, fosters communities of practice to grow, and develops new Web services and clients. The intention of the USGIN is to benefit the geological surveys by reducing the cost of online data publication and access provision, and to benefit society through easier (lower cost) access to public domain geoscience data. This information supports environmental planning, resource-development, hazard mitigation design, and decision-making. USGIN supposes that sharing resources for system development and maintenance, standardizing data discovery and creating better access mechanisms, causes cost of data access and maintenance to be reduced. Standardization in a wide variety of business domains provides economic benefits that range between 0.2 and 0.9% of the gross national product. We suggest that the economic benefits of standardization also apply in the informatics domain. Standardized access to rich data resources will create collaborative opportunities in science and business. Development and use of shared protocols and interchange formats for data publication will create a market for user applications, facilitating geoscience data discovery and utility for the benefit of society. The USGIN Working Group envisions further development of tools and capabilities, in addition to extending the community of practice that currently involves geoinformatics practitioners from the USGS and AASG. Promoting engagement and participation of the state geological surveys, and increasing communication between the states, USGS, and other