WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell colony-forming cells

  1. Characterization of stroma-dependent blast colony-forming cells in human marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, M.Y.; Dowding, C.R.; Riley, G.P.; Greaves, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of haemopoietic progenitor cells that can be distinguished by their ability to adhere to preformed stromal layers (cultured in the presence of methylprednisolone (MP/sup +/) and form blast cell colonies. The stromal layers function in the colony assay after they have been heavily irradiated but not after they have been passaged. The binding of the progenitor cells to the stromal cells is complete after 2 hours of coincubation, and stromal layers of 9.6 cm/sup 2/ can provide adhesion sites for at least 2000 blast colony-forming cells. The blast colony-forming cells were shown by micromanipulation to self-renew as well as the give rise to multipotential and lineage-committed colony-forming progenitor cells.

  2. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  3. The sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan rescues senescence of endothelial colony-forming cells for ischemic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Choi, Sung Hyun; Asahara, Takayuki; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-06-01

    The efficacy of cell therapy using endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in the treatment of ischemia is limited by the replicative senescence of isolated ECFCs in vitro. Such senescence must therefore be overcome in order for such cell therapies to be clinically applicable. This study aimed to investigate the potential of sulfated polysaccharide fucoidan to rescue ECFCs from cellular senescence and to improve in vivo vascular repair by ECFCs. Fucoidan-preconditioning of senescent ECFCs was shown by flow cytometry to restore the expression of functional ECFC surface markers (CD34, c-Kit, VEGFR2, and CXCR4) and stimulate the in vitro tube formation capacity of ECFCs. Fucoidan also promoted the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins (cyclin E, Cdk2, cyclin D1, and Cdk4) in senescent ECFCs, significantly reversed cellular senescence, and increased the proliferation of ECFCs via the FAK, Akt, and ERK signaling pathways. Fucoidan was found to enhance the survival, proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of senescent ECFCs transplanted in ischemic tissues in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Moreover, ECFC-induced functional recovery and limb salvage were markedly improved by fucoidan pretreatment of ECFCs. To our knowledge, the findings of our study are the first to demonstrate that fucoidan enhances the neovasculogenic potential of ECFCs by rescuing them from replicative cellular senescence. Pretreatment of ECFCs with fucoidan may thus provide a novel strategy for the application of senescent stem cells to therapeutic neovascularization.

  4. CD44 expression in endothelial colony-forming cells regulates neurovascular trophic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, Susumu; Marchetti, Valentina; Aguilar, Edith; Lee, Kelsey; Usui, Yoshihiko; Bucher, Felicitas; Trombley, Jennifer K.; Fallon, Regis; Wagey, Ravenska; Peters, Carrie; Scheppke, Elizabeth L.; Westenskow, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a common component of eye diseases that often lead to vision loss. Vaso-obliteration is associated with inherited retinal degenerations, since photoreceptor atrophy lowers local metabolic demands and vascular support to those regions is no longer required. Given the degree of neurovascular crosstalk in the retina, it may be possible to use one cell type to rescue another cell type in the face of severe stress, such as hypoxia or genetically encoded cell-specific degenerations. Here, we show that intravitreally injected human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) that can be isolated and differentiated from cord blood in xeno-free media collect in the vitreous cavity and rescue vaso-obliteration and neurodegeneration in animal models of retinal disease. Furthermore, we determined that a subset of the ECFCs was more effective at anatomically and functionally preventing retinopathy; these cells expressed high levels of CD44, the hyaluronic acid receptor, and IGFBPs (insulin-like growth factor–binding proteins). Injection of cultured media from ECFCs or only recombinant human IGFBPs also rescued the ischemia phenotype. These results help us to understand the mechanism of ECFC-based therapies for ischemic insults and retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28138561

  5. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarel K. Gandhi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC, within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  6. Matrix production and organization by endothelial colony forming cells in mechanically strained engineered tissue constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicky de Jonge

    Full Text Available AIMS: Tissue engineering is an innovative method to restore cardiovascular tissue function by implanting either an in vitro cultured tissue or a degradable, mechanically functional scaffold that gradually transforms into a living neo-tissue by recruiting tissue forming cells at the site of implantation. Circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs are capable of differentiating into endothelial cells as well as a mesenchymal ECM-producing phenotype, undergoing Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal-transition (EndoMT. We investigated the potential of ECFCs to produce and organize ECM under the influence of static and cyclic mechanical strain, as well as stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1. METHODS AND RESULTS: A fibrin-based 3D tissue model was used to simulate neo-tissue formation. Extracellular matrix organization was monitored using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. ECFCs produced collagen and also elastin, but did not form an organized matrix, except when cultured with TGFβ1 under static strain. Here, collagen was aligned more parallel to the strain direction, similar to Human Vena Saphena Cell-seeded controls. Priming ECFC with TGFβ1 before exposing them to strain led to more homogenous matrix production. CONCLUSIONS: Biochemical and mechanical cues can induce extracellular matrix formation by ECFCs in tissue models that mimic early tissue formation. Our findings suggest that priming with bioactives may be required to optimize neo-tissue development with ECFCs and has important consequences for the timing of stimuli applied to scaffold designs for both in vitro and in situ cardiovascular tissue engineering. The results obtained with ECFCs differ from those obtained with other cell sources, such as vena saphena-derived myofibroblasts, underlining the need for experimental models like ours to test novel cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  9. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke.

  10. The hematopoietic chemokine CXCL12 promotes integration of human endothelial colony forming cell-derived cells into immature vessel networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Sarah E; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Khoo, Cheen P; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Camicia, Rosalba; Zhang, Youyi; Grabowska, Rita; Harris, Adrian L; Roubelakis, Maria G; Watt, Suzanne M

    2014-11-15

    Proangiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) prime endothelial cells to respond to "hematopoietic" chemokines and cytokines by inducing/upregulating expression of the respective chemokine/cytokine receptors. Coculture of human endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC)-derived cells with human stromal cells in the presence of VEGF and FGF-2 for 14 days resulted in upregulation of the "hematopoietic" chemokine CXCL12 and its CXCR4 receptor by day 3 of coculture. Chronic exposure to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in this vasculo/angiogenesis assay significantly reduced vascular tubule formation, an observation recapitulated by delayed AMD3100 addition. While AMD3100 did not affect ECFC-derived cell proliferation, it did demonstrate a dual action. First, over the later stages of the 14-day cocultures, AMD3100 delayed tubule organization into maturing vessel networks, resulting in enhanced endothelial cell retraction and loss of complexity as defined by live cell imaging. Second, at earlier stages of cocultures, we observed that AMD3100 significantly inhibited the integration of exogenous ECFC-derived cells into established, but immature, vascular networks. Comparative proteome profiler array analyses of ECFC-derived cells treated with AMD3100 identified changes in expression of potential candidate molecules involved in adhesion and/or migration. Blocking antibodies to CD31, but not CD146 or CD166, reduced the ECFC-derived cell integration into these extant vascular networks. Thus, CXCL12 plays a key role not only in endothelial cell sensing and guidance, but also in promoting the integration of ECFC-derived cells into developing vascular networks.

  11. Development of serum-free quality and quantity control culture of colony-forming endothelial progenitor cell for vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Haruchika; Iwasaki, Hiroto; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Ii, Masaaki; Shizuno, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuko; Ito, Rie; Horii, Miki; Ishida, Hideyuki; Kato, Shunichi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative and qualitative impairment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) limits the efficacy of autologous cell therapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Here, we developed a serum-free quality and quantity control culture system for colony-forming EPCs to enhance their regenerative potential. A culture with serum-free medium containing stem cell factor, thrombopoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, and Flt-3 ligand was determined as optimal quality and quantity culture (QQc) in terms of the most vasculogenic colony-forming EPC expansion, evaluated by the newly established EPC colony formation assay. The QQc of umbilical cord blood-CD133(+) cells for 7 days produced a 52.9-fold increase in total cell number and 3.28-fold frequency in definitive EPC colony development, resulting in a 203.9-fold increase in estimated total definitive EPC colony number in vitro. Pre- or post-QQc cells were intramyocardially transplanted into nude rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Echocardiographic and micromanometer-tipped conductance catheter examinations 28 days post-MI revealed significant preservation of left ventricular (LV) function in rats receiving pre- or post-QQc cells compared with those receiving phosphate-buffered saline. Assessments of global LV contractility indicated a dose-dependent effect of pre- or post-QQc cells and the superior potency of post-QQc cells over pre-QQc cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed more abundant formation of both human and rat endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes in the infarcted myocardium following transplantation of post-QQc cells compared with pre-QQc cells. Our optimal serum-free quality and quantity culture may enhance the therapeutic potential of EPCs in both quantitative and qualitative aspects for cardiovascular regeneration.

  12. MURINE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELLS WITH LONG-TERM ENGRAFTMENT AND MARROW REPOPULATING ABILITY ARE MORE RESISTANT TO GAMMA-RADIATION THAN ARE SPLEEN COLONY-FORMING CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLOEMACHER, RE; VANOS, R; VANBEURDEN, CAJ; DOWN, JD

    1992-01-01

    The radiation sensitivity of various subsets in the haemopoietic stem cell hierarchy was defined using a limiting dilution type long-term bone marrow culture technique that was previously shown to allow quantification of cells with spleen colony-forming potential (day-12 CFU-S) and in vivo marrow re

  13. Clonogenic colony-forming ability of hepatic stem cells in the spleens of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To confirm the existence of hepatic stem cells (HSCs), fetal liver cells isolated from mice on embryonic day 13 (ED13) were long-term cultured in vitro. Growth of the cells was observed intensively and characteristics were identified by immunocytochemistry. The results showed that some of the cells grew as colonies, in which some cells expressed AFP, CD34 and Albumin. Then the cells were transplanted intravenously into irradiated syngeneic mice. At day 12 a number of small hyperplasia nodules were seen in the apparently enlarged spleens of recipient mice. Moreover, some nodules were positive for AFP and CD34 and consisted of various types of cells, suggesting the very existence of hepatic stem cells in the mouse fetal liver.

  14. Genistein promotes endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC bioactivities and cardiac regeneration in myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hun Lee

    Full Text Available Although stem cell-mediated treatment of ischemic diseases offers significant therapeutic promise, the limitation in the therapeutic efficacy of transplanted stem cells in vivo because of poor engraftment remains a challenge. Several strategies aimed at improving survival and engraftment of stem cells in the ischemic myocardium have been developed, such as cell transplantation in combination with growth factor delivery, genetic modification of stem cells, and/or cell therapy using scaffolds. To improve therapeutic efficacy, we investigated the effects of genistein on the engraftment of transplanted ECFCs in an acute myocardial ischemia model.We found that genistein treatment enhanced ECFCs' migration and proliferation, which was accompanied by increases in the expression of ILK, α-parvin, F-actin, and phospholylation of ERK 1/2 signaling. Transplantation of genistein-stimulates ECFCs (GS-ECFCs into myocardial ischemic sites in vivo induced cellular proliferation and secretion of angiogenic cytokines at the ischemic sites and thereby enhanced neovascularization and decreased myocardial fibrosis as well as improved cardiac function, as shown by echocardiography. Taken together, these data suggest that pretreatment of ECFCs with genistein prior to transplantation can improve the regenerative potential in ischemic tissues, providing a novel strategy in adult stem cell therapy for ischemic diseases.

  15. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  16. Satellite cell heterogeneity revealed by G-Tool, an open algorithm to quantify myogenesis through colony-forming assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ippolito Joseph

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle growth and repair is accomplished by the satellite cell pool, a self-renewing population of myogenic progenitors. Functional heterogeneity within the satellite cell compartment and changes in potential with experimental intervention can be revealed by in vitro colony-forming cell (CFC assays, however large numbers of colonies need to be assayed to give meaningful data, and manually quantifying nuclei and scoring markers of differentiation is experimentally limiting. Methods We present G-Tool, a multiplatform (Java open-source algorithm that analyzes an ensemble of fluorescent micrographs of satellite cell-derived colonies to provide quantitative and statistically meaningful metrics of myogenic potential, including proliferation capacity and propensity to differentiate. Results We demonstrate the utility of G-Tool in two applications: first, we quantify the response of satellite cells to oxygen concentration. Compared to 3% oxygen which approximates tissue levels, we find that 21% oxygen, the ambient level, markedly limits the proliferative potential of transit amplifying progeny but at the same time inhibits the rate of terminal myogenic differentiation. We also test whether satellite cells from different muscles have intrinsic differences that can be read out in vitro. Compared to masseter, dorsi, forelimb and hindlimb muscles, we find that the diaphragm satellite cells have significantly increased proliferative potential and a reduced propensity to spontaneously differentiate. These features may be related to the unique always-active status of the diaphragm. Conclusions G-Tool facilitates consistent and reproducible CFC analysis between experiments and individuals. It is released under an open-source license that enables further development by interested members of the community.

  17. Flow cytometric method for in situ preparation of standard materials of a small defined number of microbial cells with colony-forming potentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hideaki; Nakano, Koichiro; Takatani, Norimasa; Yoshida, Tomonori; Igimi, Shizunobu; Saito, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    Standard materials of a small defined number of cells with colony-forming potentiality are essential for the rational validation of food microbiological methods. An in situ flow cytometric method using viable staining with 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and tryptic soy agar (TSA) was previously proposed and its feasibility was demonstrated with five strains. In this study, this method was applied to 16 strains to support its broad applicability. The cell sorting gate was previously determined based on the CFDA stainability alone. Now the structural properties of cells designated by forward and side-scattering intensities have been introduced as the second gating criteria. Under the optimum gate condition, 100 cells have been selected and sorted on TSA. Consequently, a 95% or higher colony-forming rate has been attained for every strain. A successful application to microaerophilic Campylobacter spp. is especially of great importance because it suggests further broader applicability.

  18. Quantitative analysis of changes in colony forming ability and DNA double strand breaks in {gamma}-ray irradiated amoeboid cells of Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoda, Eiko [Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Colony forming ability of {gamma}-ray irradiated amoeboid cells of acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum, subsequently kept in a non-growing condition at 24degC, was larger than that just after irradiation. Though colony forming ability decreased in the cells kept at 0degC after irradiation, it increased to some extent in the cells subsequently treated in the non-growing condition at 24degC. Next, double strand breaks (dsbs) of cellular DNA were quantitatively analysed by single cell gel electrophoresis under neutral condition (pH 8.0). It was demonstrated that the amount of DNA dsbs in the cells kept at 24degC were smaller than both in those just after irradiation and in those kept at 0degC. These results suggest that so-called potentially lethal damages were recovered by growth inhibition in the cells kept at 24degC, and that the recovery accompanied repair of DNA dsbs. In addition, the fact that the amount of DNA dsbs in the cells kept at 0degC was not significantly different from that just after irradiation seems to mean that damages other than DNA dsbs were also recovered. Mechanisms underlying specifically high {gamma}-ray resistance of Physarum polycephalum were discussed. (author)

  19. X-ray-induced chromosome damage in live mammalian cells, and improved measurements of its effects on their colony-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, G P; Nelson, W J; Revell, S H; Shaw, C A

    1982-02-01

    We have improved the precision of the technique described by Grote et al. (1981 a,b) for the observation of the radiation responses of live cultured mammalian cells with an incubated phase-contrast microscope: the colony-forming abilities of single cells obtained by selective detachment of mitoses (instead of cell pairs as previously) may now be followed individually and may be directly compared with chromosome damage detected after post-radiation mitosis (M1). An X-ray dose of 1.4 Gy to diploid Syrian hamster cells (BHK 21 C13) in G1 had no effect on cell ability to reach M1. If chromosome fragment loss was then detected (as micronuclei) in the daughter-cell pair then colony-forming ability nearly always deteriorated, and either a stop-growth (79 per cent) or a slow-growth (21 per cent) colony resulted; but chromosomal bridges which persisted beyond M1 broke during interphase 1 and themselves caused no detectable cell damage additional to that attributable to the micronuclei which accompanied them.

  20. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A "cellular stove" approach to the photoablation of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2016-06-28

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities.

  1. Tumor-tropic endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) loaded with near-infrared sensitive Au nanoparticles: A “cellular stove” approach to the photoablation of melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheri, Giancarlo; Zoppi, Angela; Olmi, Roberto; Trigari, Silvana; Traversi, Rita; Severi, Mirko; Bani, Daniele; Bianchini, Francesca; Torre, Eugenio; Margheri, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Calorini, Lido; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso, Mario Del

    2016-01-01

    In the photothermal treatments (PTs) of tumor, the localization of a high number of near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles in the tumor mass is still a challenging issue. Here, we propose a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles to tumor cells as hidden cargo of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) endowed with an innate tumor-tropism. Remarkably, ECFC gold enrichement doesn't affect cell viability and preserves the endothelial lineage characteristics such as capillary morphogenesis and cell migration. We demonstrate that heavily Au-doped ECFCs are able to efficiently warm up the tumor environment, and kill the cancer cells via hyperthermic heating both in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, we show an excellent thermotransductive property of gold enriched ECFCs and their capability to kill melanoma cells at moderate NIR light intensities. PMID:27223433

  2. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Abbas; Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Donovan, Prudence; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2017-02-01

    The prospect of using endothelial progenitors is currently hampered by their low engraftment upon transplantation. We report that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), independent of source and age, improve the engraftment of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). MSC coculture altered ECFC appearance to an elongated mesenchymal morphology with reduced proliferation. ECFC primed via MSC contact had reduced self-renewal potential, but improved capacity to form tube structures in vitro and engraftment in vivo Primed ECFCs displayed major differences in transcriptome compared to ECFCs never exposed to MSCs, affecting genes involved in the cell cycle, up-regulating of genes influencing mesenchymal transition, adhesion, extracellular matrix. Inhibition of NOTCH signaling, a potential upstream regulator of mesenchymal transition, in large part modulated this gene expression pattern and functionally reversed the mesenchymal morphology of ECFCs. The collective results showed that primed ECFCs survive better and undergo a mesenchymal transition that is dependent on NOTCH signaling, resulting in significantly increased vasculogenic potential.-Shafiee, A., Patel, J., Wong, H. Y., Donovan, P., Hutmacher, D. W., Fisk, N. M., Khosrotehrani, K. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

  3. Human endothelial colony-forming cells expanded with an improved protocol are a useful endothelial cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denecke, Bernd; Horsch, Liska D; Radtke, Stefan; Fischer, Johannes C; Horn, Peter A; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is to supply larger three-dimensional (3D) bioengineered tissue transplants with sufficient amounts of nutrients and oxygen and to allow metabolite removal. Consequently, artificial vascularization strategies of such transplants are desired. One strategy focuses on endothelial cells capable of initiating new vessel formation, which are settled on scaffolds commonly used in tissue engineering. A bottleneck in this strategy is to obtain sufficient amounts of endothelial cells, as they can be harvested only in small quantities directly from human tissues. Thus, protocols are required to expand appropriate cells in sufficient amounts without interfering with their capability to settle on scaffold materials and to initiate vessel formation. Here, we analysed whether umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) fulfil these requirements. In a first set of experiments, we showed that marginally expanded ECFCs settle and survive on different scaffold biomaterials. Next, we improved ECFC culture conditions and developed a protocol for ECFC expansion compatible with 'Good Manufacturing Practice' (GMP) standards. We replaced animal sera with human platelet lysates and used a novel type of tissue-culture ware. ECFCs cultured under the new conditions revealed significantly lower apoptosis and increased proliferation rates. Simultaneously, their viability was increased. Since extensively expanded ECFCs could still settle on scaffold biomaterials and were able to form tubular structures in Matrigel assays, we conclude that these ex vivo-expanded ECFCs are a novel, very potent cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. CKbeta8-1 alters expression of cyclin E in colony forming units-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) lineage from human cord blood CD34+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Eui Kyu; Ra, Jae Sun; Lee, Seong Ae; Kwon, Byoung S; Han, In Seob

    2005-12-31

    A C6 beta-chemokine, CKbeta8-1, suppressed the colony formation of CD34+ cells of human cord blood (CB). Molecular mechanisms involved in CKbeta8-1-medicated suppression of colony formation of CD34+ cells are not known. To address this issue, the level of various G1/S cell cycle regulating proteins in CKbeta8-1-treated CD34+ cells were compared with those in untreated CD34+ cells. CKbeta8-1 did not significantly alter the expression of the G1/S cycle regulation proteins (cyclin D1, D3, and E), CDK inhibitor (p27and Rb), and other cell proliferation regulation protein (p53) in CB CD34+ cells. Here we describe an in vitro system in which CB CD34+ cells were committed to a multipotent progenitor lineage of colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) by a simple combination of recombinant human (rh) GM-CSF and rhIL-3. In this culture system, we found that cyclin E protein appeared later and disappeared faster in the CKbeta8-1-treated cells than in the control cells during CFU-GM lineage development. These findings suggested that cyclin E may play a role in suppressing the colony formation of CFU-GM by CKbeta8-1.

  5. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function.

  6. The Transcription Factor Nrf2 Protects Angiogenic Capacity of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells in High-Oxygen Radical Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Gremmels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs have shown a promise in tissue engineering of vascular constructs, where they act as endothelial progenitor cells. After implantation, ECFCs are likely to be subjected to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes in response to ROS. Methods. Stable knockdown of Nrf2 and Keap1 was achieved by transduction with lentiviral shRNAs; activation of Nrf2 was induced by incubation with sulforaphane (SFN. Expression of Nrf2 target genes was assessed by qPCR, oxidative stress was assessed using CM-DCFDA, and angiogenesis was quantified by scratch-wound and tubule-formation assays. Results. Nrf2 knockdown led to a reduction of antioxidant gene expression and increased ROS. Angiogenesis was disturbed after Nrf2 knockdown even in the absence of ROS. Conversely, angiogenesis was preserved in high ROS conditions after knockdown of Keap1. Preincubation of ECFCs with SFN reduced intracellular ROS in the presence of H2O2 and preserved scratch-wound closure and tubule-formation. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate that Nrf2 plays an important role in the angiogenic capacity of ECFCs, particularly under conditions of increased oxidative stress. Pretreatment of ECFCs with SFN prior to implantation may be a protective strategy for tissue-engineered constructs or cell therapies.

  7. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Human Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Products from Single Colony Forming Unit-Derived Colonies Based on the Subfractionation Culturing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Si-na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Junghee; Cho, Yun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Sun-Ji; Moon, Sun-Hwa; Kang, Ji-Eun; Ji, In-Mi; Lim, Huyn-Ja; Lee, Dong-Soon; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Song, Sun U

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell products derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in clinical trials, and a few products have been already commercialized. However, the therapeutic effects of clinical-grade MSCs are still controversial owing to mixed results from recent clinical trials. A potential solution to overcome this hurdle may be to use clonal stem cells as the starting cell material to increase the homogeneity of the final stem cell products. We have previously developed an alternative isolation and culture protocol for establishing a population of clonal MSCs (cMSCs) from single colony forming unit (CFU)-derived colonies. In this study, we established a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible procedure for the clinical-grade production of human bone marrow-derived cMSCs based on the subfractionation culturing method. We optimized the culture procedures to expand and obtain a clonal population of final MSC products from single CFU-derived colonies in a GMP facility. The characterization results of the final cMSC products met our preset criteria. Animal toxicity tests were performed in a good laboratory practice facility, and showed no toxicity or tumor formation in vivo. These tests include single injection toxicity, multiple injection toxicity, biodistribution analysis, and tumorigenicity tests in vivo. No chromosomal abnormalities were detected by in situ karyotyping using oligo-fluorescence in situ hydridization (oligo-FISH), providing evidence of genetic stability of the clinical-grade cMSC products. The manufacture and quality control results indicated that our GMP methodology could produce sufficient clonal population of MSC products from a small amount of bone marrow aspirate to treat a number of patients.

  8. TRPC3-mediated Ca(2+) signals as a promising strategy to boost therapeutic angiogenesis in failing hearts: the role of autologous endothelial colony forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Francesco; Lucariello, Angela; Guerra, Germano

    2017-08-17

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a sub-population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that are released in circulation to restore damaged endothelium during its physiological turnover or rescue blood perfusion after an ischemic insult. Additionally, they may be mobilized from perivascular niches located within larger arteries' wall in response to hypoxic conditions. For this reason, EPCs have been regarded as an effective tool to promote revascularization and functional recovery of ischemic hearts, but clinical application failed to exploit the full potential of patients-derived cells. Indeed, the frequency and biological activity of EPCs are compromised in aging individuals or in subjects suffering from severe cardiovascular risk factors. Rejuvenating the reparative phenotype of autologous EPCs through a gene transfer approach has, therefore, been put forward as an alternative approach to enhance their therapeutic potential in cardiovascular patients. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration constitutes a pivotal signal for the activation of the so-called endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), the only known truly endothelial EPC subset. Studies from our group showed that the Ca(2+) toolkit differs between peripheral blood- and umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived ECFCs. In the present article, we first discuss how VEGF uses repetitive Ca(2+) spikes to regulate angiogenesis in ECFCs and outline how VEGF-induced intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations differ between the two ECFC subtypes. We then hypothesize about the possibility to rejuvenate the biological activity of autologous ECFCs by transfecting the cell with the Ca(2+) -permeable channel Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 3, which selectively drives the Ca(2+) response to VEGF in UCB-derived ECFCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. High frequency of endothelial colony forming cells marks a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Rosti

    Full Text Available Increased mobilization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells may represent a new biological hallmark of myeloproliferative neoplasms. We measured circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs in 106 patients with primary myelofibrosis, fibrotic stage, 49 with prefibrotic myelofibrosis, 59 with essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera, and 43 normal controls. Levels of ECFC frequency for patient's characteristics were estimated by using logistic regression in univariate and multivariate setting. The sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and positive predictive value of increased ECFC frequency were calculated for the significantly associated characteristics. Increased frequency of ECFCs resulted independently associated with history of splanchnic vein thrombosis (adjusted odds ratio = 6.61, 95% CI = 2.54-17.16, and a summary measure of non-active disease, i.e. hemoglobin of 13.8 g/dL or lower, white blood cells count of 7.8×10(9/L or lower, and platelet count of 400×10(9/L or lower (adjusted odds ratio = 4.43, 95% CI = 1.45-13.49 Thirteen patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis non associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms were recruited as controls. We excluded a causal role of splanchnic vein thrombosis in ECFCs increase, since no control had elevated ECFCs. We concluded that increased frequency of ECFCs represents the biological hallmark of a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis. The recognition of this disease category copes with the phenotypic mimicry of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Due to inherent performance limitations of ECFCs assay, there is an urgent need to arrive to an acceptable standardization of ECFC assessment.

  10. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels facilitates the function of human endothelial colony-forming cells via Ca(2+) /Akt/eNOS pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; He, Meng-Yu; Ye, Jian-Kui; Ma, Shu-Ying; Huang, Wen; Wei, Yong-Yue; Kong, Hui; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Xie, Wei-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Accumulating data, including those from our laboratory, have shown that the opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP ) plays a protective role in pulmonary vascular diseases (PVD). As maintainers of the endothelial framework, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are considered excellent candidates for vascular regeneration in cases of PVD. Although KATP openers (KCOs) have been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on endothelial cells, the impact of KATP on ECFC function remains unclear. Herein, this study investigated whether there is a distribution of KATP in ECFCs and what role KATP play in ECFC modulation. By human ECFCs isolated from adult peripheral blood, KATP were confirmed for the first time to express in ECFCs, comprised subunits of Kir (Kir6.1, Kir6.2) and SUR2b. KCOs such as the classical agent nicorandil (Nico) and the novel agent iptakalim (Ipt) notably improved the function of ECFCs, promoting cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, which were abolished by a non-selective KATP blocker glibenclamide (Gli). To determine the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the impacts of KCOs on CaMKII, Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways. Enhanced levels were detected by western blotting, which were abrogated by Gli. This suggested an involvement of Ca(2+) signalling in the regulation of ECFCs by KATP . Our findings demonstrated for the first time that there is a distribution of KATP in ECFCs and KATP play a vital role in ECFC function. The present work highlighted a novel profile of KATP as a potential target for ECFC modulation, which may hold the key to the treatment of PVD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. WKYMVm-induced activation of formyl peptide receptor 2 stimulates ischemic neovasculogenesis by promoting homing of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Soon Chul; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Jeong, Geun Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Chi Dae; Kwon, Sang Mo; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-03-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are recruited to the sites of ischemic injury in order to contribute to neovascularization and repair of injured tissues. However, therapeutic potential of ECFCs is limited due to low homing and engraftment efficiency of transplanted ECFCs. The G-protein-coupled formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2 has been implicated in regulation of inflammation and angiogenesis, while the role of FPR2 in homing and engraftment of ECFCs and neovascularization in ischemic tissues has not been fully defined. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of WKYMVm, a selective FPR2 agonist isolated by screening synthetic peptide libraries, on homing ability of ECFCs and vascular regeneration of ischemic tissues. WKYMVm stimulated chemotactic migration, angiogenesis, and proliferation ability of human ECFCs in vitro. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of FPR2, but not FPR3, abrogated WKYMVm-induced migration and angiogenesis of ECFCs. Intramuscular injection of WKYMVm resulted in attenuation of severe hind limb ischemia and promoted neovascularization in ischemic limb. ECFCs transplanted via tail vein into nude mice were incorporated into capillary vessels in the ischemic hind limb, resulting in augmented neovascularization and improved ischemic limb salvage. Intramuscular injection of WKYMVm promoted homing of exogenously administered ECFCs to the ischemic limb and ECFC-mediated vascular regeneration. Silencing of FPR2 expression in ECFCs resulted in abrogation of WKYMVm-induced in vivo homing of exogenously transplanted ECFCs to the ischemic limb, neovascularization, and ischemic limb salvage. These results suggest that WKYMVm promotes repair of ischemic tissues by stimulating homing of ECFCs and neovascularization via a FPR2-dependent mechanism. © AlphaMed Press.

  12. Erythropoietin Pretreatment of Transplanted Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Enhances Recovery in a Cerebral Ischemia Model by Increasing Their Homing Ability: A SPECT/CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigue, Philippe; Hache, Guillaume; Bennis, Youssef; Brige, Pauline; Stalin, Jimmy; Pellegrini, Lionel; Velly, Lionel; Orlandi, Francesca; Castaldi, Elena; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence; Guillet, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy of ischemic diseases, as less than 10% of patients with an ischemic stroke are eligible for thrombolysis. We previously reported that erythropoietin priming of ECFCs increased their in vitro and in vivo angiogenic properties in mice with hindlimb ischemia. The present study used SPECT/CT to evaluate whether priming of ECFCs with erythropoietin could enhance their homing to the ischemic site after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion in rats and potentiate their protective or regenerative effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, cerebral apoptosis, and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Rats underwent a 1-h MCAO followed by reperfusion and then 1 d after MCAO received an intravenous injection of either PBS (control, n = 10), PBS-primed ECFCs (ECFCPBS, n = 13), or erythropoietin-primed ECFCs (ECFCEPO, n = 10). ECFC homing and the effect on BBB disruption, cerebral apoptosis, and CBF were evaluated by SPECT/CT up to 14 d after MCAO. The results were expressed as median ± interquartile range for ipsilateral-to-contralateral ratio of the activity in middle cerebral artery-vascularized territories in each hemisphere. Histologic evaluation of neuronal survival and astrocytic proliferation was performed on day 14. Erythropoietin priming increased homing of ECFCs to the ischemic hemisphere (ECFCPBS, 111.0% ± 16.0%; ECFCEPO, 146.5% ± 13.3%). BBB disruption was significantly reduced (control, 387% ± 153%; ECFCPBS, 151% ± 46% [P < 0.05]; ECFCEPO, 112% ± 9% [P < 0.001]) and correlated negatively with ECFC homing (Pearson r = -0.6930, P = 0.0002). Cerebral apoptosis was significantly reduced (control, 161% ± 10%; ECFCPBS, 141% ± 9% [P < 0.05]; ECFCEPO,118% ± 5% [P < 0.001]) and correlated negatively with ECFC homing (r = -0.7251, P < 0.0001). CBF was significantly restored with ECFCs and almost totally so with erythropoietin priming (control, 72% ± 2

  13. Combination of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes the highest number of primitive haemopoietic progenitors as shown by pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, M J; Hui, C H; To, L B; Begley, C G; Basser, R L; Simmons, P J

    2000-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with poor prognosis carcinoma of the breast underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization using five different regimens. The yields of primitive haemopoietic progenitors were quantified by a recently described pre-colony-forming unit (pre-CFU) assay using limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Results of days 14 and 35 pre-CFU were also correlated with conventional CD34+ cell enumeration, CFU-GM (granulocyte-macrophage) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTCIC) assays. The yield of pre-CFUs with the combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) was significantly higher than with G-CSF alone, cyclophosphamide (Cyclo) and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and GM-CSF, or Cyclo alone. No significant correlation between neutrophil engraftment and pre-CFU could be demonstrated. Furthermore, CFU-GM was shown to bear a stronger correlation with pre-CFU and LTCIC than CD34+ cell measurement; thus, CFU-GM remains a useful biological tool for haemopoietic stem cell assay. We conclude that the combination of G-CSF and SCF mobilizes the highest number of pre-CFUs as measured by functional pre-CFU assay, which provides an alternative measurement of primitive haemopoietic progenitors to the LTCIC assay.

  14. Preliminary studies On the colonial form of Cylindrotheca sp. (Bacillariophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.R.Li; B.Z.Bian

    1986-01-01

    From a stock culture of Cylindrotheca sp., non-motile colony-forming cells were observed and isolated.Colony-forming cells produced both single cells and colony-forming cells in liquid medla.the rate of single cell production varied among clones.

  15. 骨髓细胞不同组份形成成纤维细胞集落形成单位的效率及1,25(OH)2D3和PGE2在其中的调节作用%Efficiency of colony forming unit-fibroblastic formed by the different fraction of bone marrow cells and regulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 in colony formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王嵘; 苗登顺; 季吉

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are presented in the different fractions of bone marrow cells and whether the efficiency of colony forming unit-fibroblastic (CFU-f) formed by BM-MSCs is regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and prostaglandin E2(PGE2). Methods:Total bone marrow cells or non-adherent bone marrow cells derived from total bone marrow cell cultures for 1 day were separated into the mononuclear cell fraction and the granulocyte/erythrocyte fraction or the mononuclear cell fraction, the granulocyte fraction and the erythrecyte fraction by density-gradient centrifugation and were cultured in the absence or presence of 10-8mol/L 1,25 (OH)2D3 or 10-7 mol/L PGE2 for 10 days. The resulting cells were stained with methylene blue and the number of CFU-f was counted. Results: ①The CFU-f formed by mononuclear cell fraction accounted for about 10% of the total CFU-f, and CFU-f formed by granulocyte/erythrocyte fraction, granulocyte fraction and erythrocyte fraction accounted for about 90% ,47% and 35% of the total CFU-f, respectively; ②The fractions derived from the non-adherent bone marrow cells accounted for about 71% of the total CFU-f, which was more than those formed by the fractions derived from total bone marrow cells;③ Treatment of 1 ,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 enhanced the CFU-f formation of the mononuclear fraction and the granulocyte fraction derived from total bone marrow cells and the mononuclear cell fraction, the granulocyte fraction and the erythrocyte fraction derived from non-adherent bone marrow cells. Conclusion: Our results indicate that BM-MSCs are presented in the different fractions of bone marrow cells,and 1 ,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2 play a rele in stimulating proliferation of BM-MSCs.%目的:研究骨髓间充质干细胞(BM-MSCs)是否存在于骨髓不同组份中,以及其成纤维细胞集落形成单位(CFU-f)形成效率是否受1,25二羟基维生素D3[1,25(OH)2D3]和前列腺素E2(PGE2)的

  16. Use of methylene blue uptake for assessing cell viability of colony-forming microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos Bicas, J.; Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    During the past few years, interest in microalgae has grown, mainly because of their potential for biofuel production. Botryococcus braunii, a green microalga that can accumulate more than half of its dry weight as hydrocarbons, is one of the most important examples. This microorganism grows in colo

  17. Use of methylene blue uptake for assessing cell viability of colony-forming microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos Bicas, J.; Kleinegris, D.M.M.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    During the past few years, interest in microalgae has grown, mainly because of their potential for biofuel production. Botryococcus braunii, a green microalga that can accumulate more than half of its dry weight as hydrocarbons, is one of the most important examples. This microorganism grows in colo

  18. Enumeration of the colony-forming units–fibroblast from mouse and human bone marrow in normal and pathological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell populations, containing a subset of multipotential skeletal stem cells, are increasingly contemplated for use in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy, whereas their involvement in the pathogenetic mechanisms of skeletal disorders is far less recognized. We compared the concentrations of stromal clonogenic cells, colony forming units–fibroblast (CFU-Fs), in norm and pathology. Initially, culture conditions were optimized by demonstrating that fetal bovine serum hea...

  19. Factors determining cell killing by chemotherapeutic agents In Vivo-II : Melphalan, chlorambucil and nitrogen mustard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, L.M. van; Lelieveld, P.

    1971-01-01

    The sensitivity of resting spleen colony-forming cells in normal mouse bone marrow and of rapidly-proliferating spleen colony-forming cells in repopulating mouse spleen to a number of bis-chloro-aethyl-amines was determined. The rapidly-growing cells were more sensitive to each of the agents than

  20. Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Hui Jin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As cancer stem cells (CSCs are postulated to play critical roles in cancer development, including metastasis and recurrence, CSC imaging would provide valuable information for cancer treatment and lead to CSC-targeted therapy. To assess the possibility of in vivo CSC targeting, we conducted basic studies on radioimmunotargeting of cancer cells positive for CD133, a CSC marker recognized in various cancers. Antibodies against CD133 were labeled with 125I, and their in vitro cell binding properties were tested. Using the same isotype IgG as a control, in vivo biodistribution of the labeled antibody retaining immunoreactivity was examined in mice bearing an HCT116 xenograft in which a population of the cancer cells expressed CD133. Intratumoral distribution of the labeled antibody was examined and compared to the CD133 expression pattern. The 125I-labeled anti-CD133 antibody showed a modest but significantly higher accumulation in the HCT116 xenograft compared to the control IgG. The intratumoral distribution of the labeled antibody mostly overlapped with the CD133 expression, whereas the control IgG was found in the area close to the necrotic tumor center. Our results indicate that noninvasive in vivo targeting of CSCs could be possible with radiolabeled antibodies against cell membrane markers.

  1. Rat granulocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-G) assay for the assessment of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura-Takeda, K; Kotosai, K; Ozaki, A; Hara, H; Yamashita, S

    2002-06-01

    To assess the drug-induced hematotoxicity to granulocyte progenitors, we established a modified colony-forming assay using rat bone marrow cells (BMCs). In the presence of various colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), rat BMCs were disseminated on methylcellulose at a concentration of 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(4) cells/0.5 ml/well in a 12-well plate). Mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) stimulated the formation of almost all macrophage colonies. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) alone or in combination with mouse interleukin-3 (mIL-3) did not significantly effect on the number of rat colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). When BMCs were seeded at 5.2 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) (5 x 10(5) cells/1 ml/dish in a 35-mm dish), hG-CSF increased the number of the colonies in a dose-dependent manner, and resulted in about 50 colonies at 50 ng/ml. The constituent cells of the colonies were identified as neutrophils. Under these conditions, the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) were examined in rats and mice. The inhibitory effect of 5-FU on rat CFU-G was similar to the effect on mouse CFU-G. These results indicate that the rat CFU-G induced by hG-CSF is capable of being used for the evaluation of drug-induced hematotoxicity.

  2. A simple and fast method for determining colony forming units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieuwerts, S.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Mols, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To develop a flexible and fast colony forming unit quantification method that can be operated in a standard microbiology laboratory. Methods and Results: A miniaturized plating method is reported where droplets of bacterial cultures are spotted on agar plates. Subsequently, minicolony spots ar

  3. Identification of cells in primate bone marrow resembling the hemopoietic stem cell in the mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, K.A.; Noord, M.J. van; Maat, B.

    1973-01-01

    The colony forming unit culture (CFU C) in the thin layer agar colony technique is considered to be representative for hemopoietic stem cells (HSC), according to studies in mouse and monkey bone marrow. Using this in vitro assay as a guide, stem cell concentrates were prepared from monkey and human

  4. Impaired colony-forming ability following. gamma. irradiation of skin fibroblasts from tuberous scierosis patients. [/sup 60/Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, M.C.; Sell, B.M.; Smith, B.P.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.

    1982-05-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured dermal fibroblasts from human subjects afflicted with tuberous sclerosis (TS), a hereditary neurocutaneous syndrome, was assessed by assaying loss of colony-forming ability in response to acute ..gamma..-ray exposure. Related to control strains from clinically normal donors, three cell lines (GM1635, GM1643, GM2333) from two affected patients displayed enhanced sensitivity to inactivation by /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray treatment, whether administered oxically (air-saturated) or hypoxically (N/sub 2/-gassed); a fourth strain (GM1644) from a third patient exhibited normal radiosensitivity under both treatment conditions. The post-..gamma..-irradiaton colony-forming ability of the three hypersensitive TS strains was intermediate between that of normal controls and that of strains from patients inheriting the radiotherapy-sensitive neurovascular disorder ataxia telangiectasia. The variability in the radioresponse of the TS stains (three sensitive and one normal) is not surprising, considering the widely recognized clinical heterogeneity in the disease. Our findings, aside from providing a laboratory marker for early (possible presymptomatic) detection of persons at high risk for TS, may lead to a better understanding of the origin and progressive development of this multifaceted syndrome.

  5. Isolation and In Vitro Characterization of Epidermal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Kasper S; Andersen, Marianne Stemann; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2017-01-01

    Colony-forming assays represent prospective methods, where cells isolated from enzymatically dissociated tissues or from tissue cultures are assessed for their proliferative capacity in vitro. Complex tissues such as the epithelial component of the skin (the epidermis) are characterized by a subs...... skin sorted by surface antigens associated with adult stem cell characteristics.......Colony-forming assays represent prospective methods, where cells isolated from enzymatically dissociated tissues or from tissue cultures are assessed for their proliferative capacity in vitro. Complex tissues such as the epithelial component of the skin (the epidermis) are characterized...... by a substantial cellular heterogeneity. Analysis of bulk populations of cells by colony-forming assays can consequently be convoluted by a number of factors that are not controlled for in population wide studies. It is therefore advantageous to refine in vitro growth assays by sub-fractionation of cells using...

  6. Single cell time-lapse analysis reveals that podoplanin enhances cell survival and colony formation capacity of squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Youichi; Kojima, Motohiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) are characterized by high clonal expansion capacity. We previously reported that podoplanin is a TIC-specific marker for the human squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. The aim of this study is to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the high clonal expansion potential of podoplanin-positive A431cells using Fucci imaging. Single podoplanin-positive cells created large colonies at a significantly higher frequency than single podoplanin-negative cells, whereas no difference was observed between the two types of cells with respect to cell cycle status. Conversely, the cell death ratio of progenies derived from podoplanin-positive single cell was significantly lower than that of cells derived from podoplanin-negative cells. Single A431 cells, whose podoplanin expression was suppressed by RNA interference, exhibited increased cell death ratios and decreased frequency of large colony forming. Moreover, the frequency of large colony forming decreased significantly when podoplanin-positive single cells was treated with a ROCK (Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase) inhibitor, whereas no difference was observed in single podoplanin-negative cells. Our current study cleared that high clonal expansion capacity of podoplanin-positive TICs populations was the result of reduced cell death by podoplanin-mediated signaling. Therefore, podoplanin activity may be a therapeutic target in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:28059107

  7. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  8. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felthaus, O. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Brockhoff, G. [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reck, A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Zeitler, K. [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Hautmann, M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, T.E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, G. [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, C., E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  9. Prospective isolation and global gene expression analysis of the erythrocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terszowski, Grzegorz; Waskow, Claudia; Conradt, Peter; Lenze, Dido; Koenigsmann, Jessica; Carstanjen, Dirk; Horak, Ivan; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2005-03-01

    The erythrocyte colony-forming unit (CFU-E) is a rare bone marrow (BM) progenitor that generates erythrocyte colonies in 48 hours. The existence of CFU-Es is based on these colonies, but CFU-Es have not been purified prospectively by phenotype. We have separated the "nonstem," "nonlymphoid" compartment (lineage marker [lin]-c-Kit+Sca-1-IL-7Ralpha-) into interleukin 3 receptor alpha negative (IL-3Ralpha-) and IL-3Ralpha+ subsets. Within IL-3Ralpha- but not IL-3Ralpha+ cells we have identified TER119-CD41-CD71+ erythrocyte-committed progenitors (EPs). EPs generate CFU-E colonies at about 70% efficiency and generate reticulocytes in vivo. Depletion of EPs from BM strongly reduces CFU-E frequencies. EPs lack potential for erythrocyte burst-forming unit, megakaryocyte, granulocyte (G), and monocyte (M) colonies, and for spleen colony-forming units. Chronically suppressed erythropoiesis in interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP)-deficient BM is associated with reduced frequencies of both the EP population and CFU-E colonies. During phenylhydrazine-induced acute anemia, numbers of both the EP population and CFU-E colonies increase. Collectively, EPs (lin-c-Kit+Sca-1-IL-7Ralpha-IL-3Ralpha-CD41-CD71+) account for most, if not all, CFU-E activity in BM. As a first molecular characterization, we have compared global gene expression in EPs and nonerythroid GM progenitors. These analyses define an erythroid progenitor-specific gene expression pattern. The prospective isolation of EPs is an important step to analyze physiologic and pathologic erythropoiesis.

  10. Novel Biophysical Marker of Aggressive Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    incubated (1–2 weeks) until visible colonies formed. Colonies were stained overnight with PBS containing 0.01% crystal violet and 0.02% citric acid ...resistance to FSS. We considered the possibility that differences in cell viability may reflect altered cell cycle distribu- tions among the asynchronous...phases of the cell cycle (Table S1). We also investigated whether cells selected for enhanced metastatic properties by serial passage through animals

  11. Modified a colony forming unit microbial adherence to hydrocarbons assay and evaluated cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm production of Vibrio scophthalmi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrio scophthalmi has been considered as an opportunistic pathogen of the flat fish. There is little information available on V. scophthalmi adhesion to the host, an important step in the initial infection process. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a modified Microbial Adherence to H...

  12. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  13. Leukemia microvesicles affect healthy hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Ramzi, Mani; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Kakoui, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Microvesicles are released by different cell types and shuttle mRNAs and microRNAs which have the possibility to transfer genetic information to a target cell and alter its function. Acute myeloid leukemia is a malignant disorder, and leukemic cells occupy all the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemia microvesicles on healthy umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to find evidence of cell information transferring. Leukemia microvesicles were isolated from acute myeloid leukemia patients and were co-incubated with healthy hematopoietic stem cells. After 7 days, cell count, hematopoietic stem cell-specific cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, colony-forming unit assay, and some microRNA gene expressions were assessed. Data showed a higher number of hematopoietic stem cells after being treated with leukemia microvesicles compared with control (treated with no microvesicles) and normal (treated with normal microvesicles) groups. Also, increased levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a genes were observed in this group, while colony-forming ability was still maintained and high ranges of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD90(+), and CD117(+) phenotypes were observed as stemness signs. Our results suggest that leukemia microvesicles are able to induce some effects on healthy hematopoietic stem cells such as promoting cell survival and some microRNAs deregulation, while stemness is maintained.

  14. Engineering Replacement Tissues with Amniotic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    chondrogenic conditions (2D) formed tight nodes after 14 days. From left to right, nodes stained positive for alcian blue, safranin -O, and collagen II. 3...potential (alcian blue, safranin -O, collagen II staining) and colony forming ability were established (Figure 2). We were able to expand the cell...groups appear to be negative for Safranin -O stain (Figure 16) and weakly positive for alcian blue stain (Figure 17). Upon examination at a higher

  15. Comparative study of biological properties between mucosal stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells obtained from human fallopian tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-jiao WANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore whether there are stem cells in the endosalpinx, and to compare the biological properties between the mucosal stem cells (MuSCs and mesenchymal stem cells (MeSCs obtained from the fallopian tube for the purpose of providing experimental basis for clinical application. Methods In this study, we isolated, cultured and amplified human MuSCs and MeSCs in vitro, and compared the cell morphology, cell phenotype, colony forming efficiency, proliferation and differentiation capacities of MuSCs and MeSCs. Results Both MeSCs and MuSCs showed a similar elongated morphology, but the arrangement of MuSCs were more uniform than that of MeSCs. MuSCs showed a significantly higher proliferation capacity compared with MeSCs. Colony forming unit-fibroblast analysis further showed that more colonies formed with MuSCs than that of MeSCs, with a significant statistical difference. However, FTMSC and FMSC showed similar immunophenotypes. In vitro assays revealed that both types of cells showed the potential of adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. Conclusions Stem cells were found in the fallopian tube mucosa, and MuSCs have stronger proliferation capacity than MeSCs, thus they possess a higher value for clinical application. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.04.08

  16. Identification and characterization of SP cells in human lung adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang ZHU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Recently, eloquent studies from some solid tumors have provided proofs that cancers originate from cancer stem cells (CSC. The discovery of CSC has changed our view of carcinogenesis and chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis. Methods Side population (SP cell analysis combined with serum-free media (SFM were applied to established human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index, colony-forming efficiency and tumorigenic potential. Results Characteristic SP cells could be detected by FACS in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. And the proportion of SP cells is greatly increased after serum-free culture.SP cells have a greater proliferative index, a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo .Conclusion SP cells exist in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.

  17. [Effects of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Juan; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Wang, Jian; Lin, Ya-Ni; Pang, Tian-Xiang; Li, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study was purpose to investigate the effect of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat. The sequence of shRNA targeting the site 531-552 of Sam68 mRNA was designed and chemically synthesized, then a single-vector lentiviral, Tet-inducible shRNA-Sam68 system (pLKO-Tet-On) was constructed; next the Jurkat cells were infected with lentivirus to create stable cell clones with regulatable Sam68 gene expression. The inhibitory efficiency of Sam68 gene was assayed by Real-time PCR and Western blot; the cell activity of Jurkat cells was detected with MTT assay; the change of colony forming potential of Jurkat cells was analyzed by colony forming test; the cell cycle distribution was tested by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the expression of Sam68 in experimental cells was statistically decreased as compared with that of the control cells; the cells activity and colony forming capacity of the Jurkat cells with Sam68 gene silence were significantly inhibited; with Sam68 gene silencing, the percentage of S phase cells was significantly increased, while the percentage of G2 phase cells was significantly decreased. It is concluded that the silencing Sam68 gene using shRNA interference can effectively inhibit the proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat.

  18. CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells but not B cells in some multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, N; Matsuoka, Y; Kishida, S; Nakata, J; Mizutani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Mugitani, A; Ichihara, H; Aoyama, Y; Nishida, S; Tsuboi, A; Fujiki, F; Tatsumi, N; Nakajima, H; Hino, M; Kimura, T; Yata, K; Abe, M; Oka, Y; Oji, Y; Kumanogoh, A; Sugiyama, H

    2012-09-01

    Clonogenic multiple myeloma (MM) cells reportedly lacked expression of plasma cell marker CD138. It was also shown that CD19(+) clonotypic B cells can serve as MM progenitor cells in some patients. However, it is unclear whether CD138-negative clonogenic MM plasma cells are identical to clonotypic CD19(+) B cells. We found that in vitro MM colony-forming cells were enriched in CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells, while CD19(+) B cells never formed MM colonies in 16 samples examined in this study. We next used the SCID-rab model, which enables engraftment of human MM in vivo. CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells engrafted in this model rapidly propagated MM in 3 out of 9 cases, while no engraftment of CD19(+) B cells was detected. In 4 out of 9 cases, CD138(+) plasma cells propagated MM, although more slowly than CD138(-) cells. Finally, we transplanted CD19(+) B cells from 13 MM patients into NOD/SCID IL2Rγc(-/-) mice, but MM did not develop. These results suggest that at least in some MM patients CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells rather than B cells, and that MM plasma cells including CD138(-) and CD138(+) cells have the potential to propagate MM clones in vivo in the absence of CD19(+) B cells.

  19. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  20. Self-Renewal and High Proliferative Colony Forming Capacity of Late-Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitors Is Regulated by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors Driven by Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Wang, Weili; Alexis, Josue; Shafiee, Abbas; Stevenson, Alexander J; Gabrielli, Brian; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-04-01

    Since the discovery of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), there has been significant interest in their therapeutic potential to treat vascular injuries. ECFC cultures display significant heterogeneity and a hierarchy among cells able to give rise to high proliferative versus low proliferative colonies. Here we aimed to define molecularly this in vitro hierarchy. Based on flow cytometry, CD34 expression levels distinguished two populations. Only CD34 + ECFC had the capacity to reproduce high proliferative potential (HPP) colonies on replating, whereas CD34- ECFCs formed only small clusters. CD34 + ECFCs were the only ones to self-renew in stringent single-cell cultures and gave rise to both CD34 + and CD34- cells. Upon replating, CD34 + ECFCs were always found at the centre of HPP colonies and were more likely in G0/1 phase of cell cycling. Functionally, CD34 + ECFC were superior at restoring perfusion and better engrafted when injected into ischemic hind limbs. Transcriptomic analysis identified cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) cell cycle inhibiting genes (p16, p21, and p57), the Notch signaling pathway (dll1, dll4, hes1, and hey1), and the endothelial cytokine il33 as highly expressed in CD34 + ECFC. Blocking the Notch pathway using a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) led to reduced expression of cell cycle inhibitors, increased cell proliferation followed by a loss of self-renewal, and HPP colony formation capacity reflecting progenitor exhaustion. Similarly shRNA knockdown of p57 strongly affected self-renewal of ECFC colonies. ECFC hierarchy is defined by Notch signalling driving cell cycle regulators, progenitor quiescence and self-renewal potential.

  1. Isolation and characterization of cancer stem-like cells from MHCC97H Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanyong Yi; Kejun Nan; Aihua Yuan; Chuangxin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To identify and isolate CD133 positive cancer stem-like cells (CD133+ cells) from the highly invasive human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line(MHCC97H), and examine their potential for clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Methods: CD133+ and CD133- cells were isolated from MHCC97H cell line by magnetic bead cell sorting(MACS), and the potentials of CD133+ cells for colony formation and tumorigenicity were evaluated by soft agar cloning and tumor formation following nude mice inoculation. Results:CD133+ cells represent a minority(0.5-2.0%) of the tumor cell population with a greater colony-forming efficiency and greater tumor production ability. The colony-forming efficiency of CD133+ cells in soft agar was significantly higher than CD133- cells(36.8±1.4 vs 12.9±0.8, P<0.05).After 6 weeks, 3/5 mice inoculated with 1 × 103 CD133+ cells, 4/5 with 1 × 104 CD133+ cells and 5/5 with 1 × 105 CD133+ cells developed detectable tumors at the injection site, while only one tumor was found in mice treated with same numbers of CD133- cells. Conclusion: CD133 may be a hallmark of liver cancer stem cells (CSC) in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC), because the CD133+ cells identified and isolated with anti-CD133 labeled magnetic beads from MHCC97H cell line exhibit high potentials for clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. These CD133+ cells might contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis, as well as the growth and recurrence of human HCC, and therefore may be a useful target for anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Stable radioresistance in ataxia-telangiectasia cells containing DNA from normal human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapp, L.N.; Painter, R.B. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (USA). Lab. of Radiobiology)

    1989-11-01

    SV40-transformed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells were transfected with a cosmid containing a normal human DNA library and selectable marker, the neo gene, which endows successfully transformed mammalian cells with resistance to the antibiotic G418. Cells from this line were irradiated with 50 Gy of X-rays and fused with non-transfected AT cells. Among the G418-resistant colonies recovered was one stably resistant to radiation. Resistance to ionizing radiation of both primary transfectant line and its fusion derivative was intermediate between that of AT cells and normal cells, as assayed by colony-forming ability and measurement of radiation-induced G{sub 2} chromatic aberrations; both cell lines retained AT-like radioresistant DNA synthesis. Results suggest that, because radioresistance in transfected cells was not as great as in normal human cells, two hallmarks of AT, radiosensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis, may still be the result of a single defective AT gene. (author).

  3. Identification and purification of human erythroid progenitor cells by monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor (TU 67).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F; Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Oster, W; Wernet, P; Mertelsmann, R

    1988-04-01

    Anti-TU 67 is a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes the transferrin receptor. With respect to hematopoietic cells TU 67 is expressed by human multipotent colony-forming cells (CFU-Mix), erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E and CFU-E) and a fraction of granulocyte/monocyte colony forming cells, but is not expressed by mature hematopoietic cells including erythrocytes, platelets, lymphocytes, and peripheral blood myeloid cells. The TU 67-positive fraction of normal bone marrow, separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immune rosettes, contained 87% of the erythroid progenitor cells. Erythroid progenitor cells were enriched up to 50-fold by using a combination of monoclonal antibodies to deplete mature hematopoietic cells, followed by positive selection of BFU-E and CFU-E by TU 67 antibody.

  4. Cells, cells, and more cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M Tariq; Gres, Katherine E; Petitto, Virginia B; Cross, Shelley Ann

    2007-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with bilateral optic nerve swelling, vitreous cells, and cerebrospinal fluid monocytic pleocytosis. A chest radiograph and computed tomography demonstrated a lesion in the left lung, which histologically was confirmed to be a small-cell lung carcinoma. The serum was positive for the anti-CV2 (anti-CRMP-5) antibody. Following treatment with chemoradiation the optic nerve swelling and vitritis resolved. The differential diagnosis of uveal-meningeal diseases is discussed and the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of paraneoplastic syndromes reviewed.

  5. Growth inhibiting effects of terazosin on androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许克新; 王向红; 凌明达; 王云川

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, terazosin on the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.Methods Two androgen independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145, were used to determine cell viability, colony-forming ability, as well as cell cycle distribution, after exposure to terazosin. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP1.Results This study shows that terazosin inhibits not only prostate cancer cell growth but also its colony forming ability, both of which are main targets of clinical treatment. In addition, terazosin is shown to inhibit cell growth through G1 phase cell cycle arrest and the up-regulation of p27KIP1.Conclusion This study provides evidence that the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer.

  6. [Effect of aurora inhibitor VX-680 on proliferation and apoptosis of CML cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Sun, Hui-Yan; Li, Xiao-Lin; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of VX-680, an aurora inhibitor, on proliferation and apoptosis of K562, KCL22 cell lines and CD34⁺ cells from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in vitro. The proliferation of K562 and KCL22 cell was detected by CCK-8 method. Apoptosis of cells was detected by Annexin V-PI labeling and flow cytometry. The colony forming ability of bone marrow CD34⁺ cells derived from CML patients and donors was determined by the colony forming test. The results showed that the treatment of K562, KCL22 and CML CD34⁺ cells with VX-680 of 20-100 nmol/L for 3 days could obviously inhibit the cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner (P VX-680 treatment significantly induced apoptosis of K562 and KCL22 cells. Compared to bone marrow CD34⁺ cells derived from the healthy donors, the colony forming ability of CML CD34⁺ cells derived from bone marrow of CML patients was remarkably reduced (P VX-680, an aurora inhibitor, can inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of CML cells in vitro.

  7. Effect of Fluoride Mouthrinse and Toothpaste on Number of Streptococcal Colony Forming Units of Dental Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SE Jabbarifar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent topical fluoride therapy through toothpaste, mouthrinse, professional gels and solutions causes decrease in incidence, pause and repair of dental caries in the enamel. These mechanisms are done through penetration of fluoride ions (F- and their replacement with hydroxyl ions (OH- of hydroxyappatite of enamel, interfere with microbial metabolism of dental plaque and bacteriostatic effect on some cariogenic bacterial strains such as streptococci. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste on the number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Methods: 62 children with 6-7 years old were put in two groups. Samples of dental plaque from each group were collected both before and after use of the fluoride mouthrinse and or toothpaste. The samples were cultured on blood agar to find the number of streptococcal colony forming units (CFU. The mean colony forming unit was compared inter and intra groups before and after application of Fluoride products. Results: The streptococcal CFU of dental plaque before and after use of the mouthrinse and toothpaste respectively was (1240±1367, 1253±1341.5 and (551±716, 898±1151. Statistically, the streptococcal CFU in each group before and after use of the toothpaste and mouthrinse was significantly different. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the fluoride toothpaste and mouthrinse reduce number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Also this reduction was not depended on level of (F- Ions, sort of vehicle of fluoride and frequent application of the fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste. Keywords: fluoride mouthrinse, fluoride toothpaste, colony forming unit (CFU, streptococcus

  8. Expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived stromal cells on hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jin-rong; LIU Wen-li; ZHOU Yu-feng; ZHOU Jian-feng; SUN Han-ying; LUO Li; ZHANG Heng; XU Hui-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells and are used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases, but the amplification of HSCs has been difficult to achieve in vitro. In the present study, the expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region derived stromal cells on HSCs were explored, attempting to improve the efficiency of HSC transplantation in clinical practice.Methods The murine stromal cells were isolated from the AGM region of 12 days postcoitum (dpc) murine embryos and bone marrow(BM)of 6 weeks old mice, respectively. After identification with flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, the stromal cells were co-cultured with ESCs-derived, cytokines-induced HSCs. The maintenance and expansion of ESCs-derived HSCs were evaluated by detecting the population of CD34+ and CD34+Sca-1+cells with flow cytometry and the blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFCs) by using semi-solid medium colonial culture. Finally, the homing and hematopoietic reconstruction abilities of HSCs were evaluated using a murine model of HSC transplantation in vivo.Results AGM and BM-derived stromal cells were morphologically and phenotypically similar, and had the features of stromal cells. When co-cultured with AGM or BM stromal cells, more primitive progenitor cells (HPP-CFCs ) could be detected in ESCs derived hematopoietic precursor cells, but BL-CFC's expansion could be detected only when co-cultured with AGM-derived stromal cells. The population of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were expanded 3 times,but no significant expansion in the population of CD34+Sca-1+ cells was noted when co-cultured with BM stromal cells. While both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and CD34+Sca-1+ cells were expanded 4 to 5 times respectively when co-cultured with AGM stromal cells. AGM region-derived stromal cells, like BM-derived stromal

  9. Endothelial progenitor cell subsets and preeclampsia: Findings and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Attar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular remodeling is an essential component of gestation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an important role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. The results of studies measuring the number of EPCs in normal pregnancies and in preeclampsia have been highly controversial or even contradictory because of some variations in technical issues and different methodologies enumerating three distinct subsets of EPCs: circulating angiogenic cells (CAC, colony forming unit endothelial cells (CFU-ECs, and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs. In general, most studies have shown an increase in the number of CACs in the maternal circulation with a progression in the gestational age in normal pregnancies, while functional capacities measured by CFU-ECs and ECFCs remain intact. In the case of preeclampsia, mobilization of CACs and ECFCs occurs in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but the functional capacities shown by culture of the derived colony-forming assays (CFU-EC and ECFC assays are altered. Furthermore, the number of all EPC subsets will be reduced in umbilical cord blood in the case of preeclampsia. As EPCs play an important role in the homeostasis of vascular networks, the difference in their frequency and functionality in normal pregnancies and those with preeclampsia can be expected. In this review, there was an attempt to provide a justification for these controversies.

  10. Effects of high glucose on mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yu-Ming; Schilling, Tatjana; Benisch, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    High glucose (HG) concentrations impair cellular functions and induce apoptosis. Exposition of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to HG was reported to reduce colony forming activity and induce premature senescence. We characterized the effects of HG on human MSC in vitro using telomerase-immortalized...

  11. Adult Cardiac-Resident MSC-like Stem Cells with a Proepicardial Origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, James J. H.; Chandrakanthan, Vashe; Xaymardan, Munira; Asli, Naisana S.; Li, Joan; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Heffernan, Corey; Menon, Mary K.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Rashidianfar, Amirsalar; Biben, Christine; Zoellner, Hans; Colvin, Emily K.; Pimanda, John E.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T.; Prall, Owen W. J.; Harvey, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Colony-forming units fibroblast (CFU-Fs), analogous to those giving rise to bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), are present in many organs, although the relationship between BM and organ-specific CFU-Fs in homeostasis and tissue repair is unknown. Here we describe a population of adult c

  12. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cryopreservation and Thawing Decrease α4-Integrin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Irioda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The effects of cryopreservation on adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not clearly documented, as there is a growing body of evidence about the importance of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to analyze human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells phenotypic expression (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD49d, colony forming unit ability, viability, and differentiation potential before and after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods. 12 samples of the adipose tissue were collected from a healthy donor using the liposuction technique. The cell isolation was performed by enzymatic digestion and then the cells were cultured up to passage 2. Before and after cryopreservation the immunophenotype, cellular viability analysis by flow cytometer, colony forming units ability, differentiation potential into adipocytes and osteoblasts as demonstrated by Oil Red O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. Results. The immunophenotypic markers expression was largely preserved, and their multipotency was maintained. However, after cryopreservation, the cells decreased α4-integrin expression (CD49d, cell viability, and number of colony forming units. Conclusions. These findings suggest that ADMSC transplanted after cryopreservation might compromise the retention of transplanted cells in the host tissue. Therefore, further studies are warranted to standardize protocols related to cryopreservation to attain full benefits of stem cell therapy.

  13. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  14. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs) has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods: Side population(SP) cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results: Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM) as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion: SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of

  15. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2010-01-01

    Objective:There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs)has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods:Side population(SP)cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS)was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results:Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM)as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion:SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of cancer stem

  16. [The expression of antigens, detectable with ICO-series monoclonal antibodies, on the surfaces of cells forming granulocyte and macrophage colonies in semiliquid agar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel'eva, E V; Kharlamova, L A; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Agafonov, V A; Tupitsyn, N N

    1989-01-01

    The expression of antigens on granulocyte-macrophagal colony-forming cells of patients with nonhematological diseases was studied. Treatment of bone marrow cells with murine monoclonal antibodies ICO-1 and ICO-11 led to statistically significant inhibition of the number of growing colonies. Monoclonal antibodies ICO-02, ICO-10, ICO-GM-1 and ICO-G-2 had no such effect.

  17. Fluorouracil selectively enriches stem-like cells in the lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mu-mu; Xiong, Yan-lei; Jia, Xin-shan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao-lei; Wang, En-Hua

    2013-06-01

    Most adult stem cells are in the G0 or quiescent phase of the cell cycle and account for only a small percentage of the cells in the tissue. Thus, isolation of stem cells from tissues for further study represents a major challenge. This study sought to enrich cancer stem cells and explore cancer stem-like cell clones using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the lung adenocarcinoma cell line, SPC. Proliferation inhibition was analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays, according to which half maximal inhibitory concentration values were calculated. Expression levels of stem cell markers after treatment with 5-FU were examined using immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Additionally, side population (SP) cells were sorted using FACS. Properties of SP cells were evaluated by using Transwell, colony-forming assays, and tumor formation experiments. 5-FU greatly inhibits proliferation, especially of cells in S phase. SP cells possess greater invasive potential, higher clone-forming potential, and greater tumor-forming ability than non-SP cells. Treatment with 5-FU enriches the SP cells with stem cell properties in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines.

  18. Reproducible establishment of hemopoietic supportive stromal cell lines from murine bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K.; Tezuka, H.; Sakoda, H.; Konno, M.; Nagata, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Uchino, H.; Mori, K.J.

    1989-02-01

    Stromal cell lines, designated MS-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 were established by irradiating the adherent cells in long-term bone marrow cultures with 900-rad x-rays. Two of the cell lines, MS-1 and MS-5, have the capacity to support the growth of hemopoietic stem cells (spleen colony-forming cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) for greater than 2 months in vitro. These two cell lines were alkaline phosphatase-, peroxidase-, and factor VIII-negative and positive for periodic acid-Schiff and nonspecific esterase. Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type I were produced by these two cell lines. Neither MS-1 cell- nor MS-5 cell-conditioned medium supported the growth of hemopoietic stem cells, and hemopoietic stem cells were found preferentially to be under and on MS-1 and MS-5 layers rather than in suspension. Close contact with the MS-1 cell layer or the MS-5 cell layer appears to be essential in maintaining hemopoiesis in vitro. Conditioned media from MS-1 cells and MS-5 cells stimulated granulocyte colony formation from murine bone marrow cells in semisolid culture.

  19. Specific Inhibition of CD147 Gene Expression in Jurkat T Lymphocytes Decreased Colony Forming Capability%抑制CD147表达对Jurkat T淋巴细胞集落形成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏冬; 张俊峰; 王汉伟; 郭竹英; 徐芒华; 高丰厚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of inhibiting CD147 gene expression by small interfering RNA(siRNA) in Jurkat T lymphocytes on the colony forming capability. Methods Specific siRNA targeting CD147 gene was transfected into Jurkat cells by LipofectimineTM 2000. The changes of CD147 mRNA level were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR,and total proteins level and cell surface protein were respectively detected by Western blot and flow cytometry at 48 h after transfection. By fluorescence inverted microscope,the changes of colony forming in Jurkat cells between the specificly inhibit ed CD147 group and the normal group were compared. Results Compared with control group,the CD147 mRNA and protein level in siRNA interference group were reduced by( 38.57 ± 1.55 ) % and (47.4 ± 1.47 ) % respectively ,and the mean fluorescence intensity of CD147 in Jurkat cells was descended by(50.5 ±4.7) %. Along with the inhibition of CD147, the colony forming of siRNA interference group obviously reduced(P <0.05 ). Conclusion siRNA can specifically inhibit the expression of CD147 in Jurkat cells,which can decrease the colony forming of the Jurkat cells, indicating that CD147 may potentially facilitate inflammatory cell adhesion and aggregation.%目的 研究小干扰RNA抑制CD147基因对Jurkat T淋巴细胞集落形成的影响.方法 将CD147特异的siRNA,经LipofectamineTM2000转染Jurkat细胞48 h后,用半定量RT-PCR检测CD147 mRNA水平的变化,Western blot和流式细胞术(FCM)分别检测总蛋白和细胞表面蛋白水平的变化.通过荧光倒置显微镜比较特异性抑制CDl47表达后Jurkat细胞集落形成的变化.结果 与对照组相比siRNA干扰组细胞CD147 mRNA和蛋白水平的表达均降低,抑制率分别为(38.57±1.55)%和(47.4±1.47)%,细胞表面CD147的平均荧光强度(MFI)下降(50.5±4.7)%(P<0.05).随着CD147被抑制,siRNA干扰组细胞集落形成明显少于对照组(P<0.05).结论

  20. Influence of interferon preparations on the proliferative capacity of human and mouse bone marrow cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van 't Hull (Eveline); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.J. de Vries (Marco); H. Schellekens (Huub)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractThe toxicity of interferon to bone marrow was studied by the use of in vitro colony forming assays for hemopoietic cells. In the same study the relative inhibitory effects of two clinically common interferon preparations, leukocyte and fibroblast interferons, were compared with regard to

  1. Influence of interferon preparations on the proliferative capacity of human and mouse bone marrow cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van 't Hull (Eveline); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. de Vries (Marco); H. Schellekens (Huub)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractThe toxicity of interferon to bone marrow was studied by the use of in vitro colony forming assays for hemopoietic cells. In the same study the relative inhibitory effects of two clinically common interferon preparations, leukocyte and fibroblast interferons, were compared with regard to

  2. Positive and negative regulation of cell proliferation by E2F-1: influence of protein level and human papillomavirus oncoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melillo, R M; Helin, K; Lowy, D R;

    1994-01-01

    E2F-1 is a member of a family of transcription factors implicated in the activation of genes required for the progression through the S phase of the cell cycle. We have examined the biological activities of E2F-1 with short-term colony-forming assays and long-term immortalization assays. High lev...

  3. Highly active antiretroviral therapy normalizes the function of progenitor cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Nielsen, S; Kjaer Ersboll, A; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    1998-01-01

    -infected patients were determined prior to HAART and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of therapy. The mean number of colony-forming units (cells) per milliliter (cfu/mL) was 15.0 prior to HAART vs. 109.8 in healthy controls (Pcfu/mL increased to 100.3 (Pcfu...

  4. NS-018, a selective JAK2 inhibitor, preferentially inhibits CFU-GM colony formation by bone marrow mononuclear cells from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junya; Kodama, Ayumi; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakaya, Yohei; Tamura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Naito, Haruna; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    JAK2/STAT signaling promotes survival and expansion of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) clones, but little is known about the potential of JAK2/STAT as a therapeutic target in MDS. We investigated the effect of NS-018, a novel antagonist for JAK2, on the colony-forming ability of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) from high-risk MDS patients. NS-018 decreased colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colony numbers from MDS-derived BMMNCs in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was significantly more potent than against normal BMMNCs. In addition, NS-018 suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT3 in colony-forming cells from MDS patients. Collectively, NS-018 could be a new therapeutic option for high-risk MDS.

  5. HepG2 cells acquire stem cell-like characteristics after immune cell stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Yang, Miqing; Lin, Ling; Ren, Hongzhen; Lin, Chaotong; Lin, Suling; Shen, Guoying; Ji, Binfeng; Meng, Chun

    2016-02-01

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is currently regarded as one of the main culprits of tumor formation and therapy failure. It is known that chronic inflammation is associated with CSCs, but it is not clear yet how inflammation affects the development of CSCs. In the present study we aimed to examine the relationship between cancer cell stimulation mediated by immune cells and the acquisition of a CSC-like phenotype. Cancer cells derived from single hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells were treated with mouse splenic B cells (MSBCs) and mouse peritoneal macrophage cells (MPMCs), respectively. The stem cell-like characteristics of the resulting HepG2 cells (MSBC-HepG2 and MPMC-HepG2) were evaluated using different assays, including biomarker assays, in vitro tumoroid and colony forming assays, in vivo tumor forming assays and signal transduction pathway activation assays. Various stemness characteristics of HepG2 cells, including self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity were evaluated. The expression levels of stemness-related genes and its encoded proteins in the MSBC-HepG2 and MPMC-HepG2 cells were assessed using RT-PCR and FACS analyses. We found that MSBC-HepG2 and MPMC-HepG2 cells possess hepatic CSC properties, including persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, high tumorigenic capacity and over-expression of CSC-related genes and proteins (i.e., EpCAM, ALDH, CD133 and CD44), compared to the parental cells. We also found that 1x10(3) MSBC-HepG2 and MPMC-HepG2 cells were able to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice and that the Notch and SHH signaling pathways were highly activated in MSBC-HepG2 cells. We conclude that the immune system may have a double-edge effect on cancer development. On one hand, immune cells such as B lymphocytes and macrophages may recognize, attack and eliminate cancer cells, whereas on the other hand, they may promote a subset of cancer cells to acquire stem cell-like characteristics.

  6. CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio D’Agati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the relation between umbilical cord clamping time and two different enrichment system of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood with the proliferative ability and bone marrow reconstitution of the stem cells obtained. After an obstetrician performed the cord blood collection, the purification of stem cells was performed either with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (negative selections using the Stem Sep method, or with a positive cells selection based on their surface CD34 antigens using the Mini Macs system. An excellent recovery of haematopoietic progenitors [Burst Forming Unit Erythroids (BFUE; Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM; and Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes, Erythroids, Monocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GME], inversely related to the increase in clamping time, was performed with the Mini Macs system (54% of colonies, with 90% purity. With Stem Sep method, haematopoietic progenitor’s recovery was 35% (with 80% purity. By applying early clamping of umbilical cord blood we obtained a greater number of CD34+ cells and their clonogenic activity was increased with enrichment. This is a useful technique considering that the number of CD34+ stem cells usually contained from a unit of placental blood is enough for the transplant to a child, but not for an adult. Thus, using these methods, we can get a larger number of CD34+ stem cells which reduces the risk of Graft versus Host Disease also in adult patients, producing survival rates similar to those obtained with transplantation of bone marrow from unrelated donors.

  7. CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Pafumi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the relation between umbilical cord clamping time and two different enrichment system of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood with the proliferative ability and bone marrow reconstitution of the stem cells obtained. After an obstetrician performed the cord blood collection, the purification of stem cells was performed either with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (negative selections using the Stem Sep method, or with a positive cells selection based on their surface CD34 antigens using the Mini Macs system. An excellent recovery of haematopoietic progenitors [Burst Forming Unit Erythroids (BFUE; Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM; and Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes, Erythroids, Monocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GME], inversely related to the increase in clamping time, was performed with the Mini Macs system (54% of colonies, with 90% purity. With Stem Sep method, haematopoietic progenitor’s recovery was 35% (with 80% purity. By applying early clamping of umbilical cord blood we obtained a greater number of CD34+ cells and their clonogenic activity was increased with enrichment. This is a useful technique considering that the number of CD34+ stem cells usually contained from a unit of placental blood is enough for the transplant to a child, but not for an adult. Thus, using these methods, we can get a larger number of CD34+ stem cells which reduces the risk of Graft versus Host Disease also in adult patients, producing survival rates similar to those obtained with transplantation of bone marrow from unrelated donors.

  8. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-02-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells.

  9. Impaired migration and cell volume regulation in aquaporin 5-deficient SPC-A1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Ziqiang; Gu, Yutong; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-05-31

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is widely expressed in various organ and tissues. In light of the novel oncogenic properties of aquaporins (AQPs), here we investigated the effect of AQP5 knockdown by RNAi on transmembrane osmotic water permeability, cell migration potential and cell volume regulation ability. AQP5 expression was inhibited by short hairpin RNA in SPC-A1 cells, a lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Cells loaded with a fluoroprobe (calcein-AM) were immersed in either isosmotic, hyperosmotic or hyposmotic solutions, and fluorescence intensity was recorded using confocal microscopy. These measurements were used to calculate osmotic water permeability coefficients (Pf) and to monitor regulated volume decrease (RVD). Tumor cell migration and invasion assays were performed in a modified Boyden chamber. Wound healing and colony forming ability were also tested. Although self-quenching was not found in SPC-A1 cells, we observed a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and cell water volume, suggesting that this method is a sensitive and reproducible way to measure single-cell transmembrane water permeability. Cells in which the AQP5 gene was silenced showed a 49.4% decrease in osmotic water permeability, a 55.3% decrease in migration and a 28.4% decrease in invasion potential. In addition, RVD decreased remarkably with reduced osmotic water permeability. Our results suggest that AQP5, which mediates water permeability and thus regulates cell shape and volume, is a potentially important determinant in cell migration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  11. Galvanic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  12. Galvanic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. G.

    1973-01-01

    Many standard physical chemistry textbooks contain ambiguities which lead to confusion about standard electrode potentials, calculating cell voltages, and writing reactions for galvanic cells. This article shows how standard electrode potentials can be used to calculate cell voltages and deduce cell reactions. (Author/RH)

  13. The Frequency of Proliferative Stromal Cells in Adipose Tissue Varies Between Inbred Mouse Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ASCs can proliferate as undifferentiated cells with a fibroblast-like morphology in cell culture, or can be induced to differentiate into a variety of cell types including, adipipogenic, myogenic, neurogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and hepatic cells. There is increasing interest to understand the factors controlling the proliferation of ASCs since these cells might provide a readily available source of autologous stem/progenitor cells for cell therapy applications. To explore potential genetic factors that modify the properties of ASCs, we tried to identify relevant properties of ASCs that differ between inbred mouse strains. Plating cells in a modified colony forming assay indicates that the percentage of high proliferative cells among ASCs differs more than 2-fold between 129x1/svj and C57Bl/6J mice. The identification of genetic factors affecting the proliferative capacity of stem cell populations could improve the efficacy of cell therapy.

  14. Junctional adhesion molecule-A, JAM-A, is a novel cell-surface marker for long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Yasuyoshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Hirata, Ayami; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Toshio; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A/JAM-1/F11R) is a cell adhesion molecule expressed in epithelial and endothelial cells, and also hematopoietic cells, such as leukocytes, platelets, and erythrocytes. Here, we show that JAM-A is expressed at a high level in the enriched hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fraction; that is, CD34(+)c-Kit(+) cells in embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) aorta-gonod-mesonephros (AGM) and E11.5 fetal liver (FL), as well as c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lineage(-) (KSL) cells in E14.5 FL, E18.5FL, and adult bone marrow (BM). Although the percentage of JAM-A(+) cells in those tissues decreases during development, the expression in the HSC fraction is maintained throughout life. Colony-forming assays reveal that multilineage colony-forming activity in JAM-A(+) cells is higher than that in JAM-A(-) cells in the enriched HSC fraction in all of those tissues. Transplantation assays show that long-term reconstituting HSC (LTR-HSC) activity is exclusively in the JAM-A(+) population and is highly enriched in the JAM-A(+) cells sorted directly from whole BM cells by anti-JAM-A antibody alone. Together, these results indicate that JAM-A is expressed on hematopoietic precursors in various hematopoietic tissues and is an excellent marker to isolate LTR-HSCs.

  15. Cell Biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioufle, B. Le; Picollet-D'Hahan, N.

    A cell biochip is a microsystem, equipped with electronic and microfluidic functions, designed to manipulate or analyse living cells. The first publications in this emerging area of research appeared toward the end of the 1980s. In 1989 Washizu described a biochip designed to fuse two cells by electropermeabilisation of the cytoplasmic membrane [1]. Research centers have devised a whole range of cell chip structures, for simultaneous or sequential analysis of single cells, cell groups, or cell tissues reconstituted on the chip. The cells are arranged in a square array on a parallel cell chip for parallel analysis, while they are examined and processed one by one in a microchannel in the case of a series cell chip. In contrast to these biochips for high-throughput analysis of a large number of cells, single-cell chips focus on the analysis of a single isolated cell. As in DNA microarrays, where a large number of oligonucleotides are ordered in a matrix array, parallel cell chips order living cells in a similar way. At each point of the array, the cells can be isolated, provided that the cell type allows this, e.g., blood cells, or cultivated in groups (most adhesion cells can only survive in groups). The aim is to allow massively parallel analysis or processing. Le Pioufle et al. describe a microdevice for the culture of single cells or small groups of cells in a micropit array [2]. Each pit is equipped to stimulate the cell or group of cells either electrically or fluidically. Among the applications envisaged are gene transfer, cell sorting, and screening in pharmacology. A complementary approach, combining the DNA microarray and cell biochip ideas, has been put forward by Bailey et al. [3]. Genes previously arrayed on the chip transfect the cultured cells on the substrate depending on their position in the array (see Fig. 19.1). This way of achieving differential lipofection on a chip was then taken up again by Yoshikawa et al. [4] with primary cells, more

  16. In vitro and in vivo activity of 4-thio-uridylate against JY cells, a model for human acute lymphoid leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenyi, Erika [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Benko, Ilona [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Vamosi, Gyoergy [Cell Biology and Signaling Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Biophysics and Cell Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Geresi, Krisztina [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Tarkanyi, Ilona [3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Szegedi, Istvan [Department of Pediatrics, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Lukacs, Levente [Coordinating Department of Surgical Techniques, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Juhasz, Istvan [Department of Dermatology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Kiss, Csongor [Department of Pediatrics, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Fesues, Laszlo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 (Hungary); and others

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} s{sup 4}UMP a naturally occurring thiolated nucleotide, effectively inhibited the proliferation of JY cells in vitro and in vivo. {yields} s{sup 4}UMP decreased the cell number and colony forming activity of leukemia cells in SCID mice. {yields} The effect of s{sup 4}UMP was undetectable on the bone marrow of healthy mice. {yields} The biochemical changes of the treated cells suggested that s{sup 4}UMP induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: We have previously reported the in vitro anti-proliferative effect of 4-thio-uridylate (s{sup 4}UMP) on OCM-1 uveal melanoma cells. Here, we assessed the efficacy of s{sup 4}UMP on JY cells. Treatment of JY cells with s{sup 4}UMP suppressed their colony forming activity and induced apoptosis; healthy human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells were 14-fold less sensitive to the nucleotide. In vivo effectiveness of s{sup 4}UMP was determined using xenograft SCID mouse model. s{sup 4}UMP decreased the cell number and colony forming activity of the total cell content of the femur of SCID mice transplanted with JY cells without affecting the bone marrow of healthy mice. These results suggest that s{sup 4}UMP alone or in combination with other clinically approved anti-leukemic remedies should be further explored as a potential novel therapeutic agent.

  17. Characterization of subpopulation lacking both B-cell and plasma cell markers in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Zhan, Maosheng; Hori, Yumiko; Honma, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells with tumorigenic potential are limited to a small population known as cancer-initiating cells (CICs). To date, CICs have not been identified in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Here, we investigated a candidate of CICs of an indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM), using WM cell line MWCL-1. WM tumor expresses both B-cell and plasma cell markers, CD20 and CD138. When stained with anti-CD20 and anti-CD138 antibodies, MWCL-1 cells were classified into three subpopulations: CD20⁻ CD138⁻, CD20⁺ CD138⁻, and CD20⁺ CD138⁺. When cultured, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells yielded all three subpopulations, but CD20⁺ cells did not yield CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells. Higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) expelling and in vitro colony formation activities were detected in CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells than in CD20⁺ CD138⁻ and CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells. When cultured in the absence of serum or with anti-cancer drug, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells were resistant to apoptosis. In contrast, CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells were vulnerable to apoptosis in the same condition. In fact, the immunohistochemical analysis with clinical samples revealed that tumor cells in apoptosis were CD138-positive. The production of all three subpopulations, the efficient ROS expelling and in vitro colony-forming activities, and the resistance to apoptosis suggested that the CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cell might be a candidate of CICs in WM.

  18. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lincan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Shen, Hongmei [Cancer Center of Integrative Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhao, Guangqiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Yang, Runxiang [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Cai, Xinyi [Colorectal Cancer Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Jin, Congguo [Cancer Institute, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Huang, Yunchao, E-mail: daliduanlincan@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  19. Phenotypic and functional properties of feline dedifferentiated fat cells and adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Shota; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kano, Koichiro; Harada, Kayoko; Uechi, Masami; Matsumoto, Taro

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells show multilineage differentiation potential similar to that observed in mesenchymal stem cells. Since DFAT cells can be prepared from a small quantity of adipose tissue, they could facilitate cell-based therapies in small companion animals such as cats. The present study examined whether multipotent DFAT cells can be generated from feline adipose tissue, and the properties of DFAT cells were compared with those of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). DFAT cells and ASCs were prepared from the floating mature adipocyte fraction and the stromal vascular fraction, respectively, of collagenase-digested feline omental adipose tissue. Both cell types were evaluated for growth kinetics, colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) frequency, immunophenotypic properties, and multilineage differentiation potential. DFAT cells and ASCs could be generated from approximately 1g of adipose tissue and were grown and subcultured on laminin-coated dishes. The frequency of CFU-Fs in DFAT cells (35.8%) was significantly higher than that in ASCs (20.8%) at passage 1 (P1). DFAT cells and ASCs displayed similar immunophenotypes (CD44(+), CD90(+), CD105(+), CD14(-), CD34(-) and CD45(-)). Alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive cells were readily detected in ASCs (15.2±7.2%) but were rare in DFAT cells (2.2±3.2%) at P1. Both cell types exhibited adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and smooth muscle cell differentiation potential in vitro. In conclusion, feline DFAT cells exhibited similar properties to ASCs but displayed higher CFU-F frequency and greater homogeneity. DFAT cells, like ASCs, may be an attractive source for cell-based therapies in cats.

  20. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  1. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Takakura, Shunji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takashi; Umeda, Bunichi [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1{+-}2.9 x 10{sup 6}/kg (n=10) and 3.1{+-}1.5 x 10{sup 5}/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  2. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  3. Isolating subpopulations of human epidermal basal cells based on polyclonal serum against trypsin-resistant CSPG4 epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Anders Patrik; Christensen, Rikke; Praetorius, Jeppe; Jensen, Uffe Birk

    2017-01-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is highly expressed by human epidermal keratinocytes located at the tip of the dermal papilla where keratinocytes show characteristics of stem cells. However, since available antibodies to CSPG4 are directed against trypsin-sensitive epitopes we have been unable to study these keratinocytes isolated directly from skin samples by flow cytometry. By choosing epitopes of CSPG4 relatively close to the cell membrane we were able to generate a polyclonal antibody that successfully detects CSPG4 on keratinocytes after trypsinization. Although CSPG4-positive basal cells express higher levels of Itgβ1 the colony-forming efficiency is slightly lower than CSPG4-negative basal cells. Sorting the directly isolated keratinocytes based on Itgβ1 did not reveal differences in colony-forming efficiency between keratinocytes expressing high or low levels of Itgβ1. However, after the first passage Itgβ1 could be used to predict colony-forming efficiency whether the culture was established from CSPG4-positive or CSPG4-negative basal cell keratinocytes. Although we were unable to detect differences in the colony-forming assay, global gene expression profiling showed that CSPG4-positive basal cell keratinocytes are distinct from CSPG4-negative basal cell keratinocytes. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to generate antibodies against trypsin-resistant epitopes of CSPG4. Our study also documents a marked change in behaviour upon cell culturing and challenges the way we assess for stemness within the human epidermal basal layer.

  4. Engineering cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S; Milano, Daniel F; Natividad, Robert J; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-10-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling on the basis of quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilize synthetic cells, advanced 'chassis' and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues.

  5. Stem cells in cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmartin, Agneta; English, Denis; Sanberg, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    This commentary documents the increased number of stem cell-related research reports recently published in the cell transplantation field in the journal Cell Transplantation. The journal covers a wide range of issues in cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine and is attracting clinical and preclinical articles from around the world. It thereby complements and extends the basic coverage of stem cell physiology reported in Stem Cells and Development. Sections in Cell Transplantation cover neuroscience, diabetes, hepatocytes, bone, muscle, cartilage, skin, vessels, and other tissues, as well as tissue engineering that employs novel methods with stem cells. Clearly, the continued use of biomedical engineering will depend heavily on stem cells, and these two journals are well positioned to provide comprehensive coverage of these developments.

  6. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R.

    2014-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cells (cell surface engineering and synthetic gene circuits) to modulate juxtacrine cell-cell signaling. In addition, significant progress has been made in elucidating design rules and strategies to modulate juxtacrine signaling based on quantitative, engineering analysis of the mechanical and regulatory role of juxtacrine signals in the context of other cues and physical constraints in the microenvironment. These advances in engineering juxtacrine signaling lay a strong foundation for an integrative approach to utilizing synthetic cells, advanced ‘chassis’ and predictive modeling to engineer the form and function of living tissues. PMID:23856592

  7. Side population rather than CD133+ cells distinguishes enriched tumorigenicity in hTERT-immortalized primary prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Karen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subpopulations of cancer cells with the capacity of generating solid tumors have been characterized. In various cancer types, including prostate cancer cells, a side population (SP and CD133-expressing cells have been proposed as containing a population cancer cells with stem-like ability. Therefore the aim of this work was to determine, in prostate cancer cell lines, the frequency and tumorigenic potential of SP and CD133+ cells. Results In vitro 2D colony-forming assay and sphere-forming assay, Flow cytometry analysis and magnetic cell sorting were utilized to sort CD133+, CD133- and Side population (SP cells. Our findings indicate that CD44 and integrin α-6 are uniformly expressed in the hTERT cell lines; however, CD133 is expressed only in a small population (in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, for the hTERT cells, SP rather than CD133 expression showed an 8-fold enhanced tumorigenic potential. The data suggest that SP cells, rather than those with CD133 marker, contain the rare population of CSC capable of producing prostate tumors. Conclusion Collectively, our data suggest that although CD133 is expressed only in a small population of hTERT-immortalized prostate cancer cells, it is not likely to be associated with stem cells, as CD133- and CD133+ cells exhibited similar tumorigenicity. However, SP isolated cells, appear to be enriched with tumorigenic stem-like cells capable of generating palpable tumors.

  8. Significantly different proliferative potential of oral mucosal epithelial cells between six animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Namiki, Hideo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-06-01

    There has been an upsurge in regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, because oral mucosal epithelial cells can be obtained noninvasively, cultured epithelial cell sheets have been used in a number of ectopic transplantations. Additionally, the verification of the properties of experimental animals' cultured cells has accelerated the application of regenerative medicine. In the present study, the properties of oral mucosal epithelial cells were compared between six animal species. The human and pig epithelia were relatively thicker than the epithelia of the other species. The colony-forming efficiency of the rat was the highest, followed by those of the dog, human, rabbit, and pig, whereas the colonies of the mouse cells were all paraclone and uncountable in the colony-forming assay. We also found that the rabbit and pig cells proliferated poorly and were unable to form cell sheets without feeder layers. In contrast, even in the absence of feeder layers and cholera toxin, cultured dog and mouse cells formed contiguous sheets, when the cell seeding density was high. These results indicate that interspecies variation is considerable in oral mucosal epithelial cells and that specific experimental animal or human cells must be chosen according to the intended use. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  9. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  10. Comparison of methods for measuring viable E. coli cells during cultivation: great differences in the early and late exponential growth phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengwei; Cheng, Hairong; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Fengqing

    2011-01-01

    Four methods, namely enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU), aerobic respiration, MTT reduction capacity and succinate dehydrogenase activity were compared to determine the viability of E. coli cells at the early and late exponential growth phases. Our results revealed that great differences in cell viability existed between these methods and that the choice of method to determine cell viability must be made with caution.

  11. Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian

  12. The effect of cell concentrations from different cell populations on the viability of umbilical blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck-Dlimi, Barbara; Dlimi, Afif; Zimmermann, Robert; Eckstein, Reinhold; Zingsem, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    In addition to bone marrow or peripheral blood derived stem cells, cord blood (CB) is an alternative source for hematopoietic stem cells. This report shows the impact of higher concentrations of leukocytes, mononu- clear cells (MNCs), and CD34-positive cells on the viability of CB derived stem cells after cryopreservation. Statistical analysis of data from 5520 CB units, prepared and cryopreserved from 2003 through 2011, was performed with appropriate software. Cell concentrations for leukocytes, platelets, red blood cells (RBCs), CD34-positive leukocytes, viable leukocytes, and MNCs were determined. The proliferation and differentiation capacity was assessed in cell culture assays. Content of leukocytes, CD34-positive leukocytes, and MNCs decreased after thawing. The recovery rate of colony forming units (CFUs) (29.05%) correlated significantly with leukocytes, platelets, RBCs, MNCs, CD34- positive leukocytes, and viable leukocytes. The recovery rate for erythroblasts (3.33%) correlated significantly with leukocytes, CD34-positive leukocytes, MNCs, and viable leukocytes. In the different cell concentration groups only RBCs showed a negative influence on viability. The concentrations of leukocytes, platelets, and CD34-positive leukocytes before cryopreservation correlated positively with the concentrations of leukocytes, CD34-positive leukocytes, MNCs as well as with the cell viability after thawing. Increased cell concentrations in CB do not limit the recovery of CD34-positive leukocytes nor the viability of leukocytes or the number of CFUs after thawing. On the contrary, CB units with high cell concentrations show a better outcome than units with low cell concentrations. Only RBCs seem to have a negative influence on CB quality.

  13. Continuous production of erythropoietin by an established human renal carcinoma cell line: development of the cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, J.B.; Shouval, D.

    1986-01-01

    Establishment of a stable, transformed human renal carcinoma cell line that produces erythropoietin in vitro and has maintained this function continuously since 1981 and for > 150 passages in monolayer culture was accomplished by transplantation of human renal clear cell carcinoma tissue from a patient with erythrocytosis into an immunosuppressed athymic mouse. In addition to its immunocrossreactivity with native human urinary erythropoietin, the tumor erythropoietin demonstrates biological activity in the in vitro mouse erythroid colony-forming unit assay and in tumor-bearing nude mice. The cloned renal carcinoma cell line has an abnormal human karyotype and has ultrastructural features characteristic of human renal clear cell carcinoma. This cell line provides a reproducible model system for the production of an erythropoietin-like material and for the study of its synthesis and secretion.

  14. Characterization of mesenchymal progenitor cells in crown and root pulp from human mesiodentes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Toriumi, T; Watanabe, N; Watanabe, E; Akita, D; Mashimo, T; Akiyama, Y; Isokawa, K; Shirakawa, T; Honda, M J

    2015-01-01

    Mesiodentes are usually found in the central position of the upper or lower jaw as supernumerary teeth. Here, we obtained 10 mesiodentes and three permanent teeth (PT) and separated the dental pulp (DP) from these into crown and root portions. We then characterized and compared the isolated crown portion-derived cells (crown cells) with root portion-derived cells (root cells) using a range of in vitro assays. Crown cells and root cells were examined for cell surface marker expression, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F), cell proliferation, cell cycle characteristics and markers, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. The proportion of CD105-positive cells (CD105(+) cells) in the crown cells vs the root cells varied among the mesiodentes, but not among the PT. When there were more CD105(+) cells in the root cells than in the crown cells, the root cells showed higher CFU-F, proliferation capacity, and osteogenic differentiation capacity. In contrast, when the crown cells contained more CD105(+) cells than the root cells, the crown cells showed the higher CFU-F, proliferation capacity, and osteogenic differentiation capacity. In addition, the sorted CD105(+) cells showed higher CFU-F and proliferation capacity than the sorted CD105(-) cells. These results indicated that proportion of CD105(+) cells is an effective means of characterizing DP-derived cells in mesiodentes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Engineering Cell-Cell Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Blagovic, Katarina; Gong, Emily S.; Milano, Daniel F.; Natividad, Robert J.; Asthagiri, Anand R

    2013-01-01

    Juxtacrine cell-cell signaling mediated by the direct interaction of adjoining mammalian cells is arguably the mode of cell communication that is most recalcitrant to engineering. Overcoming this challenge is crucial for progress in biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, immune system engineering and therapeutic design. Here, we describe the significant advances that have been made in developing synthetic platforms (materials and devices) and synthetic cel...

  16. Glycosaminoglycan mimetic improves enrichment and cell functions of human endothelial progenitor cell colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Fabien; Lavergne, Mélanie; Negroni, Elisa; Ferratge, Ségolène; Carpentier, Gilles; Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Siñeriz, Fernando; Uzan, Georges; Albanese, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Human circulating endothelial progenitor cells isolated from peripheral blood generate in culture cells with features of endothelial cells named late-outgrowth endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC). In adult blood, ECFC display a constant quantitative and qualitative decline during life span. Even after expansion, it is difficult to reach the cell dose required for cell therapy of vascular diseases, thus limiting the clinical use of these cells. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are components from the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are able to interact and potentiate heparin binding growth factor (HBGF) activities. According to these relevant biological properties of GAG, we designed a GAG mimetic having the capacity to increase the yield of ECFC production from blood and to improve functionality of their endothelial outgrowth. We demonstrate that the addition of [OTR(4131)] mimetic during the isolation process of ECFC from Cord Blood induces a 3 fold increase in the number of colonies. Moreover, addition of [OTR(4131)] to cell culture media improves adhesion, proliferation, migration and self-renewal of ECFC. We provide evidence showing that GAG mimetics may have great interest for cell therapy applied to vascular regeneration therapy and represent an alternative to exogenous growth factor treatments to optimize potential therapeutic properties of ECFC.

  17. Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on cryopreservation of porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ock, Sun-A; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a commonly used cryoprotectant in cryopreservation procedures, is detrimental to viability of cells. In this view point, a comparative study was carried out to evaluate the effect of DMSO on porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs). We compared the viability, colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay, expression of Bak and Bcl2 genes, Bcl2 protein antigen, and CD90 in pMSCs cryopreserved with 5%, 10%, and 20% DMSO. pMSCs isolated from bone marrow were characterized by alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of transcription factors, such as Oct 3/4, Nanog, and Sox2. The cells were then cryopreserved by cooling at a rate of -1°C/min in a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. The results of survival of pMSCs cryopreserved at 5% DMSO were comparable to control group (fresh pMSCs). The survival and the number of colonies formed in cryopreserved pMSCs were inversely proportional to the concentration of DMSO. The number of colonies formed in pMSCs cryopreserved with all concentrations of DMSO was significantly (p DMSO, this study strongly suggests the use of 5% DMSO in cryopreservation of pMSCs as an alternative to conventional 10% DMSO.

  18. A new experimental protocol as an alternative to the colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) clonogenic assay to assess the haematotoxic potential of new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Gianni; Vandin, Luca; Bonato, Monica; Repeto, Paolo; Sciuscio, Davide

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a first attempt to set-up a new in vitro experimental protocol with culture in liquid medium and flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow progenitors is described. This protocol is proposed as an alternative to the colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) clonogenic in vitro assay currently used to assess the toxic potential of new drugs in the bone marrow. This new experimental approach should enable to speed up the procedure of the in vitro haematotoxic potential assessment, to reduce inter-experimental variability and to enhance result accuracy. Preliminary results obtained demonstrated that the progenitor cell count by flow cytometry replacing the light microscopy granulocyte/macrophage colony count represents a tremendous improvement in terms of accuracy and standardisation. Moreover, differential counts of cell sub-populations can be performed by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, this method demonstrated to be time-saving, since 4 day cell incubation period is required instead of 7-14 day incubation in the CFU-GM clonogenic assay. On the basis of results obtained so far, the new experimental protocol proposed looks a promising alternative to the CFU-GM clonogenic assay currently used.

  19. Baseline correlation and comparative kinetics of cerebrospinal fluid colony-forming unit counts and antigen titers in cryptococcal meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.E.; Teparrukkul, P.; Pinpraphaporn, S.; Larsen, R.A.; Chierakul, W.; Peacock, S.; Day, N.; White, N.J.; Harrison, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal colony-forming unit counts and CSF cryptococcal antigen titers serve as alternative measures of organism load in cryptococcal meningitis. For these measures, we correlated baseline values and rates of decline during the first 2 weeks of therapy in 68 human immu

  20. Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  1. Activity of MKT 077, a rhodacyanine dye, against human tumor colony-forming units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, T; Izbicka, E; Lawrence, R A; Nalin, C; Weitman, S D; Von Hoff, D D

    1999-03-01

    MKT 077 is related to rhodamine 123 dye and demonstrates preferential accumulation in the mitochondria of cancer cells compared to normal cells. This difference in retention between cancer and normal cells led to the finding that MKT 077 selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells in vitro. To define the preclinical activity profile of MKT 077, the compound was tested in vivo against a large variety of human tumors utilizing the human tumor-cloning assay. MKT 077 was studied using a sequential 2 h exposure separated by 24 h (2-24-2 h) and a 24 h exposure at final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 1.0, 2.0, 10.0 and 20.0 microg/ml. MKT 077 was also studied using continuous exposure at final concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 microg/ml. A decrease in tumor colony formation was considered significant if survival of colonies treated with MKT 077 was 50% or less compared to untreated controls. A total of 149 specimens was treated with MKT 077 with 51, 58 and 34 evaluable specimens with the 2-24-2 h, the 24 h and the continuous exposure, respectively. The results of the present study suggest a positive relationship between concentration and response. No relationship between exposure schedule and activity was observed. Inhibitory effects were obtained against multiple tumor types. High cytotoxic activity was obtained against breast, ovary, endometrial, colon and non-small cell lung cancer with concentrations of 2 microg/ml or above. In conclusion, the broad spectrum of cytotoxicity of MKT 077 in the human tumor-cloning assay and the unique mechanism of action of MKT 077 encourage additional preclinical and clinical studies with this compound and other rhodacyanine dyes.

  2. Response of colony-forming units-spleen to heavy charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, E J; Kelly, L S; Mahlmann, L J; Schooley, J C; Thomas, R H; Howard, J; Alpen, E L

    1983-10-01

    Survival of colony-forming units-spleen (CFU-S) was measured after single doses of photons or heavy charged particles from the BEVALAC. The purposes were to define the radiosensitivity to heavy ions used medically and to evaluate relationships between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET infinity). In in vitro irradiation experiments. CFU-S suspensions were exposed to 220 kVp X rays or to 20Ne (372 MeV/micron) or 40Ar (447 MeV/micron) particles in the plateau portion of the Bragg curve. In in vivo irradiation experiments, donor mice from which CFU-S were harvested were exposed to 12C (400 MeV/micron). 20Ne (400 or 670 MeV/micron), or 40Ar (570 MeV/micron) particles in Bragg peaks spread to 4 or 10 cm by spiral ridge filters. Based on RBE at 10 survival, the maximum RBE of 2.1 was observed for 40Ar particles characterized by an LET infinity of approximately 100 keV/micron. Lower RBEs were determined at lower or higher estimated values of LET infinity and ranged from 1.1 for low energy 40Ar particles to 1.5-1.6 for low energy 12C and 20Ne. The responses of CFU-S are compared with responses of other model systems to heavy charged particles and with the reported sensitivity of CFU-S to neutrons of various energies. The maximum RBE reported here, 2.1 for high energy 40Ar particles, is somewhat lower than values reported for fission-spectrum neutrons, and is appreciably lower than values for monoenergetic 0.43-1.8 MeV neutrons. Low energy 12C and 20Ne particles have RBEs in the range of values reported for 14.7 MeV neutrons.

  3. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  4. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  5. The Suppression Effect of Light Rare Earth Elements on Proliferation of Two Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIYUN-JING; XIAOBAI; 等

    2000-01-01

    To study the suppression effect of light rare earth elements(RE) on proliferation of two cancer cell lines.Two cancer cell lines PAMC82 and K562 were used to examine their colony-forming ability in soft agar,microtubule structure,calmodulin levels and regulation of smoe gene expressions y Northern blot analysis with and without treatment by RE.The results showed that on soft agar culture the colony-forming ability of human gastric cancer cell line PAMC82 treated by RE chloride decreased and the PAMC82 cell microtubule abnormal structure became normal.The calmodulin (CaM) levels decreased in human leukemia cells(k562) treated with cerium chloride and neodymium chloride.The Northern blot analysis revealed marked up-regulation of p53,p16(MTS1),p21(WAF1) gene expressions in PAMC82 cells treated with lanthanum chloride and cerium chloride,as compared to control PAMC82 cells,The light rare earth elements studied have certain suppression effects on proliferation of cancer cells,This effect might be realted to the decrease of calmodulin and up-regulationg of smoe gene expressions in cancer cells.

  6. The Suppression Effect of Light Rare Earth Elements on Proliferation of Two Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To study the suppression effect of light rare earth elements (RE) on proliferation of two cancer cell lines. Two cancer cell lines PAMC82 and K562 were used to examine their colony-forming ability in soft agar, microtubule structure, calmodulin levels and regulation of some gene expressions by Northern blot analysis with and without treatment by RE. The results showed that on soft agar culture the colony-forming ability of human gastric cancer cell line PAMC82 treated by RE chloride decreased and the PAMC82 cell microtubule abnormal structure became normal. The calmodulin (CaM) levels decreased in human leukemia cells (K562) treated with cerium chloride and neodymium chloride. The Northern blot analysis revealed marked up-regulation of p53, p16(MTS1), p21(WAF1) gene expressions in PAMC82 cells treated with lanthanum chloride and cerium chloride, as compared to control PAMC82 cells. The light rare earth elements studied have certain suppression effects on proliferation of cancer cells. This effect might be related to the decrease of calmodulin and up-regulation of some gene expressions in cancer cells.

  7. Types of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Types of Stem Cells Stem cells are the foundation from which all ... Learn About Stem Cells > Types of Stem Cells Stem cells Stem cells are the foundation for every organ ...

  8. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  9. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Stem Cell-Like Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed I; Czarnecka, Anna M; Lewicki, Sławomir; Helbrecht, Igor; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Koch, Irena; Zdanowski, Robert; Król, Magdalena; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancement in cancer research has shown that tumors are highly heterogeneous, and multiple phenotypically different cell populations are found in a single tumor. Cancer development and tumor growth are driven by specific types of cells-stem cell-like cancer cells (SCLCCs)-which are also responsible for metastatic spread and drug resistance. This research was designed to verify the presence of SCLCCs in renal cell cancer cell lines. Subsequently, we aimed to characterize phenotype and cell biology of CD105+ cells, defined previously as renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells. The main goal of the project was to describe the gene-expression profile of stem cell-like cancer cells of primary tumor and metastatic origin. Real-time PCR analysis of stemness genes (Oct-4, Nanog and Ncam) and soft agar colony formation assay were conducted to check the stemness properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. FACS analysis of CD105+ and CD133+ cells was performed on RCC cells. Isolated CD105+ cells were verified for expression of mesenchymal markers-CD24, CD146, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD11b, CD19, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR and alkaline phosphatase. Hanging drop assay was used to investigate CD105+ cell-cell cohesion. Analysis of free-floating 3D spheres formed by isolated CD105+ was verified, as spheres have been hypothesized to contain undifferentiated multipotent progenitor cells. Finally, CD105+ cells were sorted from primary (Caki-2) and metastatic (ACHN) renal cell cancer cell lines. Gene-expression profiling of sorted CD105+ cells was performed with Agilent's human GE 4x44K v2 microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were further categorized into canonical pathways. Network analysis and downstream analysis were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Metastatic RCC cell lines (ACHN and Caki-1) demonstrated higher colony-forming ability in comparison to primary RCC cell lines. Metastatic RCC cell lines harbor numerous CD105+ cell subpopulations and have

  10. EFFECTS OF ANTI- PML/RARα OR ANTI- PML ANTISENCE ON THE GROWTH, DIFFERENTIATION AND APOPTOSIS OF NB4 CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈烨; 缪金明; 朱学宏; 邵念贤; 方智雯; 欧阳仁荣

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of anti- PML/RARα or anti- PML antisence on the growth,differentiation and apoptosis of NB4 cell lines. Methods Wright's stain for cell morphology, flow cytometry and DNA gel electronphoresis for cell apoptosis, methylcellulose assays for leukemic colony forming unit and trypan - blue exclusion for cell counts. Results Both the start cordon region of the PML or PML- RARα mRNA(STAS) and the fusion point region of the long type PML - RARα mRNA (FUAS) could inhibit cell growth. Cells became partially differentiated at 5d of treatment, and FUAS- treated cells showed more significant differentiation than STAS-treated cells. Morphology of typical apoptosis could be seen at 7, 9d incubation with antisence oligodeoxynucleotides (AS). In contrast, no cell growth inhibition, no morphology changes were seen in Sen or Ran treated cells compared with untreated cells. The number of acute myelocytic leukemia colony forming unit(AML - CFU) markedly decreased in STAS and FUAS treated cells. Cell DNA content analyzed by flow cytometry showed the typical profile of apoptotic cells, in which pre- G1 peak appear before G1 peak at 7,9d of treatment with STAS or FUAS. Conclusion Anti-PML/RARα or anti-PML antisence inhibit the cell growth, induce differentiation and differentiated cell apoptosis of NB4 cells.

  11. First report on the colony-forming freshwater ciliate Ophrydium versatile in an African river

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available if this is evaluated on chlorophyll content alone (Hecky and Kling, 1981; Amblard et al., 1993). However, freshwater ciliated protozoa that form sessile colonies are relatively rare, especially species that possess photosynthetic cells. The species O. versatile (O... not previously been reported from Africa and little is known of its distribution in rivers or its relationship with the limnological features of rivers. Both phytoplankton and protozoa include acellular organ- isms that live close to minimal conditions...

  12. Downregulated Chibby in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with increased expression in laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jue; Ren, Gang; Zhao, De-An; Li, Bo-An; Cai, Cheng-Fu; Zhou, Yi; Luo, Xian-Yang

    2014-11-01

    Chibby (Cby) inhibits Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation by competing with Lef-1 (the transcription factor and target of β-catenin) to bind to β-catenin. This suggests that Cby could be a tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we examined Cby expression in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and its function and mechanism in laryngeal carcinoma cell lines. Cby expression levels were investigated by immunohistochemistry in a panel of 36 LSCC patient cases. The expression of β-catenin, c-myc and cyclin D1 in Hep-2 were determined through RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Activity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway after overexpression of Cby was measured by TCF/LEF luciferase reporter gene assay. Proliferation, clone forming ability, cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis of Hep-2 cells were detected by MTT assay, plate colony forming assay, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay, respectively. This study showed that expression of Cby protein was strongly downregulated in LSCC tumor tissues in comparison to normal laryngeal mucosa samples. No significant correlation was found between the expression of Cby in tumor tissue and gender, age, clinical stage and tumor differentiation of laryngeal cancer patients. When Cby was overexpressed in Hep-2 cells, the expression of cyclin D1 was reduced and β-catenin activity was inhibited. Proliferation and plate colony forming assays revealed a significant inhibitory effect of Cby on growth and colony formation ability of Hep-2 cells after Cby overexpression in comparison to control and mock-infected cells. In addition, we also found that upregulated expression of Cby resulted in accumulation of numbers of cells in G0/G1 phase with concomitant decrease in S phase by cell cycle assay. TUNEL staining demonstrated that, compared with the control group, the rate of apoptosis in the plv-cs2.0-Cby group was significantly increased. Taken together, downregulation of Cby was observed in LSCC, but with no

  13. Short-term uvb-irradiation leads to putative limbal stem cell damage and niche cell-mediated upregulation of macrophage recruiting cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Notara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet light B (UVB-irradiation is linked to various ocular pathologies such as limbal stem cell defects in pterygium. Despite the large circumstantial evidence linking UVB irradiation and limbal epithelial stem cell damage, the precise molecular responses of limbal stem cells to UVB irradiation are unclear. Here the effect of UVB irradiation on the putative stem cell phenotype, limbal niche cells and the subsequent effects on corneal (lymphangiogenic privilege were investigated. Primary human limbal epithelial stem cells and fibroblasts were irradiated with 0.02 J/cm2 of UVB, a low dose corresponding to 3 min of solar irradiation. UVB irradiation caused significant reduction of limbal epithelial and limbal fibroblast proliferation for 24 h, but apoptosis of limbal epithelial stem cells only. Moreover, UVB induced stem-like character loss of limbal epithelial cells, as their colony forming efficiency and putative stem cell marker expression significantly decreased. Interestingly, limbal epithelial cells co-cultured with UVB-irradiated limbal fibroblasts also exhibited loss of stem cell character and decrease of colony forming efficiency. Conditioned media from limbal epithelial cells inhibited lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and tube network complexity; however this effect diminished following UVB irradiation. In contrast, pro-inflammatory and macrophage-recruiting cytokines such as TNFα, IFNγ and MCP1 were significantly upregulated following cell irradiation of limbal fibroblasts. These data demonstrate the key role of the limbal stem cell niche in response to UVB and subsequent (lymphangiogenic and inflammatory events. These data suggest that the known pro(lymphangiogenic effect of UVB irradiation in pterygium is not linked to a direct up-regulation of pro-angiogenic cytokines, but rather to indirect macrophage-recruiting cytokines being upregulated after UVB irradiation.

  14. Computerized video time-lapse (CVTL) analysis of cell death kinetics in human bladder carcinoma cells (EJ30) X-irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kenneth; Leonhardt, Edith A; Trinh, Maxine; Prieur-Carrillo, Geraldine; Lindqvist, Johan; Albright, Norman; Ling, C Clifton; Dewey, William C

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the modes and kinetics of cell death for EJ30 human bladder carcinoma cells irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle. Asynchronous human bladder carcinoma cells were observed in multiple fields by computerized video time-lapse (CVTL) microscopy for one to two cell divisions before irradiation (6 Gy) and for 6-11 days afterward. By analyzing time-lapse movies collected from these fields, pedigrees were constructed showing the behaviors of 231 cells irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle (i.e. at different times after mitosis). A total of 219 irradiated cells were determined to be non-colony-forming over the time spans of the experiments. In these nonclonogenic pedigrees, cells died primarily by necrosis either without entering mitosis or over 1 to 10 postirradiation generations. A total of 105 giant cells developed from the irradiated cells or their progeny, and 30% (31/105) divided successfully. Most nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase (9-12 h after mitosis) died by the second generation, while those irradiated either before or after this short period in mid-S phase had cell deaths occurring over one to nine postirradiation generations. The nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase also experienced the longest average delay before their first division. Clonogenic cells (11/12 cells) divided sooner after irradiation than the average nonclonogenic cells derived from the same phase of the cell cycle. The early death and long division delay observed for nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase could possibly result from an increase in damage induced during the transition from the replication of euchromatin to the replication of heterochromatin.

  15. Effect of Human WEE1 and Stem Cell Factor on Human CD34+ Umbilical Cord Blood Cell Damage Induced by Chemotherapeutic Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LEI; Yong HE; Wenfang SHI; Jilin PENG; Sha WU; Huifen ZHU; Jianguo CHEN; Guanxin SHEN

    2007-01-01

    Myelosuppression is one of the major side-effects of most anticancer drugs. To achieve myeloprotection, one bicistronic vector encoding anti-apoptotic protein human WEE1 (WEE1Hu) and proliferation-stimulating stem cell factor (SCF) was generated. In this study, we selected human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells as the in vitro model in an attempt to investigate whether WEE1Hu, rather than conventional drug-resistant genes, can be introduced to rescue cells from the damage by chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, adriamycin, mitomycin-c and 5-fluorouracil. Cell viability and cytotoxicity assay,colony-forming units in culture assay and externalization of phospholipid phosphatidylserine analysis showed that the expression of WEE1Hu and SCF in CD34+ cells provided the cells with some protection. These findings suggest that the expression of WEE1Hu and SCF might rescue CD34+ cells from chemotherapyinduced myelosuppression.

  16. Cancer stem cells may be the cause of poor radiotherapy results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadayuki, Ban [International and Research Cooperation Section, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently applied to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), because about 90 percent of the cases is diagnosed in its late stages , although the 5-year survival rate after radiotherapy alone ranges from only 6 to 11.6 percent. Stage I ESCC has been considered a good target for radiation therapy, but the 5-year overall survival ratio is only 62 percent. It is well known that the cells in cancer tissue are heterogeneous in morphology and differentiation, even if the tissue consists of progenies developed from a single neoplastic cell. Cultured cancer cells have often been characterized by their morphological heterogeneity. When we assessed the dose-survival responses of 31 culture d human ESCC cell lines in a colony-formation assay, we found that one cell line (KYSE70) formed morphologically variable colonies in one dish. These were a densely mounding type (M-type), a flat, diffusive type (F-type), and a type with mixed mounding and flat cells (M/F-type). The M- and F-type colonies were isolated from a clone of the KYSE70 cells, and both types of cells produced tumors in nude mice. Interestingly, metastatic tumors were observed in mice transplanted with the F-type-colony forming cells. X-ray irradiation stimulated the cells to transform from M-type to F-type. A direct comparison of gene expression levels between both types of cells was conducted using an oligonucleotide micro-array. Genes involved in tumor invasion, cell motility, and cell-shape change were up-regulated in F-type colony-forming cells. Our data suggest that the cancer stem-like cells exist in the M-type colony-forming cells, and that X-ray irradiation stimulated them to de-differentiate into more malignant progenies than the parental cells. Our study suggests that it is urgent to establish methods to ascertain whether or not tumor tissues contain cancer stem cells. If tissues do contain cancer stem cells, excluding or killing them before radiotherapy or chemotherapy may greatly

  17. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  18. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Cramer

    Full Text Available The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  19. Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  20. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    '. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products....

  1. Stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Monti, Manuela; Merico, Valeria; Neri, Tui; Zanoni, Mario; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The application of stem cells to regenerative medicine is one of the actual hot topics in biomedicine. This research could help the cure of a number of diseases that are affecting a large share of the population. Some good results in cell replacement have already been obtained (infarcted heart, diabetes, Parkinson disease), apart from those of more traditional applications like severe burns and blood tumors. We are now facing crucial questions in stem cell biology. One of the key questions is how a cell begins to proliferate or differentiate. Genome reprogramming, both following nuclear transfer and cytoplast action, will likely highlight some of the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. In turn, these clues should be useful to the production of populations of reprogrammed cells that could develop into tissues or, in the future, into proper organs. We will overview what stem cells are, what roles they play in normal developmental processes and how stem cells could have the potential to treat diseases.

  2. Host cells and cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Glyn N; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy based on the use of viral vectors is entirely dependent on the use of animal cell lines, mainly of mammalian origin, but also of insect origin. As for any biotechnology product for clinical use, viral -vectors have to be produced with cells derived from an extensively characterized cell bank to maintain the appropriate standard for assuring the lowest risk for the patients to be treated. Although many different cell types and lines have been used for the production of viral vectors, HEK293 cells or their derivatives have been extensively used for production of different vector types: adenovirus, oncorectrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors, because of their easy handling and the possibility to grow them adherently in serum-containing medium as well as in suspension in serum-free culture medium. Despite this, these cells are not necessarily the best for the production of a given viral vector, and there are many other cell lines with significant advantages including superior growth and/or production characteristics, which have been tested and also used for the production of clinical vector batches. This chapter presents basic -considerations concerning the characterization of cell banks, in the first part, and, in the second part, practically all cell lines (at least when public information was available) established and developed for the production of the most important viral vectors (adenoviral, oncoretroviral, lentiviral, AAV, baculovirus).

  3. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  4. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease Images Red blood cells, sickle cell Red blood cells, normal Red blood ... multiple sickle cells Red blood cells, sickle cells Red blood cells, sickle and ... Heeney MM, Ware RE. Sickle cell disease. In: Orkin SH, Fisher DE, Ginsburg D, Look ...

  5. Transfection of gene Livin α/β into A549 cells and separate effect on the cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian-guo; LIAO Rong-xia; CHEN Zheng-tang; WANG Zhi-xin; ZHANG Qing; HU Yi-de; WANG Dong-lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To express two Livin isoforms (Livin α & β genes) with transfection techniques in A549 cell line respectively in order to observe their effect on growth of cell line. Methods:Two eukaryotic expression vectors of Livin, pcDNA3.1-Livin α & β, were transfected into A549 cell line by electroporation. Then G418-resistant clones were screened. RT-PCR, Northern blot and immunofluorescence cytochemistry were used to detect Livin α & β expression level in the transfected cells. Finally, observation of cell morphology, growth curve assay and colony formation analysis were performed to explore the effect of Livin on growth of the cells. Results:Livin α & β were expressed in transfected A549 cells, and induced a faster cell growth, shorter doubling time and stronger cell colony forming ability, yet had no morphology change.Conclusion:Both isoforms can accelerate the growth of A549 cells, indicating a close relationship between Livin expression and the genesis and development of lung cancer. The expression of Livin α & β in A549 cells provides basis for further study of their different biological functions of anti-apoptosis and of their role in lung cancer cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  6. [Expression of CD48 as a live marker to distinguish division of hematopoietic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Lu-Yun; Pang, Ya-Kun; Dong, Fang; Ji, Qing; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation when they divide. Three types of cell divisions exist. A dividing stem cell may generate 2 new stem cells (symmetrical renewal division), or 2 differentiating cells (symmetrical differentiation division), or 1 cell of each type (asymmetrical division). This study was aimed to explore an efficient and stable method to distinguish the way of cell division in hematopoietic stem cells. Previous studies showed that the distribution of Numb in a cell could be used to distinguish the type of cell division in various kinds of cells. Therefore, the distribution of Numb protein was detected by immunofluorescence in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells of mice exploring the relationship between Numb protein and centrosomes. Since CD48 positive marks the HSC that have lost the ability to reconstitute the blood system in mice, CD48 marker could be used to distinguish cell fate decision between self-renewal and differentiation as a living marker. In this study, the CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells were sorted from bone marrow cells of mice and the cells were directly labeled with Alexa Fluor (AF) 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody in living cultures. After 3 days, the percentage of AF488(+) cells was evaluated under microscope and by FACS. Then colony forming cell assay (CFC) was performed and the ability of cell proliferation were compared between AF488(+) and AF488(-) cells. The results showed that Numb could be used to distinguish different cell division types of hematopoietic stem cells, which was symmetrically or asymmetrically segregated in mitotic CD48(-)CD150(+)LSK cells. The self-labeled fluorochrome could be detected both by FACS as well as microscope. There were about 40% AF488(+) cells after 3 day-cultures in medium titrated with self-labeled AF 488-conjugated anti-CD48 antibody, and the results were consistent between confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. The colony forming ability of

  7. Uncaria tomentosa stimulates the proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Iria; do Carmo Araújo, Maria; Zimmermann, Estevan Sonego; Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Benedetti, Aloisio Luiz; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Asbahr, Ana Carolina Cavazzin; Bertol, Gustavo; Farias, Júlia; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2011-09-01

    The Asháninkas, indigenous people of Peru, use cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) to restore health. Uncaria tomentosa has antioxidant activity and works as an agent to repair DNA damage. It causes different effects on cell proliferation depending on the cell type involved; specifically, it can stimulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors and cause apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Neutropenia is the most common collateral effect of chemotherapy. For patients undergoing cancer treatment, the administration of a drug that stimulates the proliferation of healthy hematopoietic tissue cells is very desirable. It is important to assess the acute effects of Uncaria tomentosa on granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) and in the recovery of neutrophils after chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, by establishing the correlation with filgrastim (rhG-CSF) treatment to evaluate its possible use in clinical oncology. The in vivo assay was performed in ifosfamide-treated mice receiving oral doses of 5 and 15 mg of Uncaria tomentosa and intraperitoneal doses of 3 and 9 μg of filgrastim, respectively, for four days. Colony-forming cell (CFC) assays were performed with human hematopoietic stem/precursor cells (hHSPCs) obtained from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Bioassays showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa significantly increased the neutrophil count, and a potency of 85.2% was calculated in relation to filgrastim at the corresponding doses tested. An in vitro CFC assay showed an increase in CFU-GM size and mixed colonies (CFU-GEMM) size at the final concentrations of 100 and 200 μg extract/mL. At the tested doses, Uncaria tomentosa had a positive effect on myeloid progenitor number and is promising for use with chemotherapy to minimize the adverse effects of this treatment. These results support the belief of the Asháninkas, who have classified Uncaria tomentosa as a 'powerful plant'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cholesteatoma fibroblasts promote epithelial cell proliferation through overexpression of epiregulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available To investigate whether keratinocytes proliferate in response to epiregulin produced by subepithelial fibroblasts derived from middle ear cholesteatoma. Tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing tympanoplasty. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were performed to examine epiregulin expression and localization in cholesteatoma tissues and retroauricular skin tissues. Fibroblasts were cultured from cholesteatoma tissues and from normal retroauricular skin. These fibroblasts were used as feeder cells for culture with a human keratinocyte cell line (PHK16-0b. To investigate the role of epiregulin in colony formation by PHK16-0b cells, epiregulin mRNA expression was knocked down in fibroblasts by using short interfering RNA and epiregulin protein was blocked with a neutralizing antibody. Epiregulin mRNA expression was significantly elevated in cholesteatoma tissues compared with that in normal retroauricular skin. Staining for epiregulin was more intense in the epithelial cells and subepithelial fibroblasts of cholesteatoma tissues than in retroauricular skin. When PHK16-0b cells were cultured with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, their colony-forming efficiency was 50% higher than when these cells were cultured with normal skin fibroblasts. Also, knockdown of epiregulin mRNA in cholesteatoma fibroblasts led to greater suppression of colony formation than knockdown in skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the colony-forming efficiency of PHK16-0b cells was significantly reduced after treatment with an epiregulin neutralizing antibody in co-culture with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, but not in co-culture with skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that keratinocyte hyperproliferation in cholesteatoma is promoted through overexpression of epiregulin by subepithelial fibroblasts via epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, which may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of middle ear cholesteatoma.

  9. Isolation and Enrichment of Mouse Female Germ Line Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Khosravi-Farsani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The existence of female germ-line stem cells (FGSCs has been the subject of a wide range of recent studies. Successful isolation and culture of FGSCs could facilitate studies on regenerative medicine and infertility treatments in the near future. Our aim in the present study was evaluation of the most commonly used techniques in enrichment of FGSCs and in establishment of the best procedure. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, after digesting neonate ovary from C57Bl/6 mice, we performed 2 different isolation experiments: magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS and pre-plating. MACS was applied using two different antibodies against mouse vasa homolog (MVH and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA1 markers. After the cells were passaged and proliferated in vitro, colony-forming cells were characterized using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR (for analysis of expression of Oct4, Nanog, C-kit, Fragilis, Mvh, Dazl, Scp3 and Zp3, alkaline phosphatase (AP activity test and immunocytochemistry. Results: Data showed that colonies can be seen more frequently in pre-plating technique than that in MACS. Using the SSEA1 antibody with MACS, 1.98 ± 0.49% (Mean ± SDV positive cells were yield as compared to the total cells sorted. The colonies formed after pre-plating expressed pluripotency and germ stem cell markers (Oct4, Nanog, C-kit, Fragilis, Mvh and Dazl whereas did not express Zp3 and Scp3 at the mRNA level. Immunocytochemistry in these colonies further confirmed the presence of OCT4 and MVH proteins, and AP activity measured by AP-kit showed positive reaction. Conclusion: We established a simple and an efficient pre-plating technique to culture and to enrich FGSCs from neonatal mouse ovaries.

  10. Effect of c- erbB2 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides on Radiosensitivity of Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RENQing-Lan

    2003-01-01

    Object To explore tile effect of lipofectin - c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides on radiosensitivity of human ovarian cancer cell llne. Methods The expression of c - erbB2 was detected by means of RT - PCR, cellular response to irradiation was evaluated by tile colony forming assay. Results Lipofectin- c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(AS- ODN) could suppress the expression of c - erbB2 , and significantly decreased the colony forming rate of human ovarian cancer cells after ionizing irradiation (P 0.05 ). Condusion c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides sensitized the SKOV3 to ionizing irradiation through decreasing the expression of e - erbB2 , which might be the result of the fact that c - erbB2 antisense oligodeoxynueleotides inhibit the eelluar signal transductionpathway relating to the radiation- resistant phenotype.

  11. Cell, cell, cell: fuel cell applications moving ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, E.

    2001-11-01

    Developments in fuel cell technology within the last decade, such as the targeting by major automakers of non-polluting fuel cells as an alternative to the internal combustion engine, are reviewed. For example, Ballard Power Systems of Vancouver is the exclusive supplier to both DaimlerCrysler and the Ford Motor Company of the fuel cell stacks that produce the power in fuel cell systems. Ballard plans the commercial launch of transit bus engines in 2002 and automotive products between 2003 and 2005. The company also sees huge opportunities for fuel cells in stationary and portable power applications. At the same time, the Calgary-based fuel cell division of Energy Ventures Inc. is developing a direct methanol fuel cell that eliminates the intermediate step of 'reforming' methanol into hydrogen that is required in the Ballard process. Energy Ventures targets small niche markets such as small utility vehicles for its direct methanol fuel cell. A completely self-contained fuel cell of this type is expected to be ready in 2002. Solid oxide fuel cells for off-grid remote power units as well as for home heat and power is yet another field of development that will be particularly attractive to operations in remote areas where reliable grid electricity is expensive and hard to obtain. A prototype 2.3 kW residential power system using natural gas was made available by Global Thermoelectric Inc in June 2001; field testing is planned for 2002, with commercial production in late 2003 or 2004. The Calgary-based Snow Leopard Resources Inc plans to use pure hydrogen sulphide obtained from sour natural gas as a hydrogen source. The prime focus of Snow Leopard is on gas plants looking for ways to increase their efficiency, obtain carbon dioxide credits and generate electricity on site. This type of fuel cell also could be of interest to companies with shut-in sour gas since these companies could use the stationary fuel cell system to generate electricity.

  12. Bi-Cell Unit for Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent concerns a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell . The bi-cell unit is comprised of two electrode packs. Each of the electrode packs includes an...invention relates in general to a bi-cell unit for a fuel cell and in particular, to a bi-cell unit for a hydrazine-air fuel cell .

  13. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  14. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  15. Cucurbitacin B Causes Increased Radiation Sensitivity of Human Breast Cancer Cells via G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwit Duangmano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To explore the effects of cucurbitacin B on the radiation survival of human breast cancer cells and to elucidate the cellular mechanism of radiosensitization if any. Materials and Methods. Human breast carcinoma cell lines were treated with cucurbitacin B before irradiation with 0–10 Gy of C137s gamma rays. The effect of cucurbitacin B on cell-survival following irradiation was evaluated by colony-forming assay. Cell cycle distributions were investigated using flow cytometry. Real-time PCR and western blots were performed to investigate the expression of cell cycle checkpoints. Results. Cucurbitacin B inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Only MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C cells but not SKBR-3 cells were radiosensitized by cucurbitacin B. Flow cytometric analysis for DNA content indicated that cucurbitacin B resulted in G2/M arrest in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7:5C but not SKBR-3 cells. Moreover, Real-time PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated upregulated p21 expression before irradiation, a likely cause of the cell cycle arrest. Conclusion. Taken together, these findings suggest that cucurbitacin B causes radiosensitization of some breast cancer cells, and that cucurbitacin B induced G2/M arrest is an important mechanism. Therefore, combinations of cucurbitacin B with radiotherapy may be appropriate for experimental breast cancer treatment.

  16. Fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Srivastava

    1962-05-01

    Full Text Available The current state of development of fuel cells as potential power sources is reviewed. Applications in special fields with particular reference to military requirements are pointed out.

  17. T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Informed d Corporate Support Corporate Partners National Teams Partnership Opportunities d Personal Stories Ambassadors & Familiar Faces Life ... d Our Healthcare Voice Home What Is MS? Definition of MS T Cells Share this page Facebook ...

  18. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Support CD34pos Hematopoietic Stem Cell Propagation and Suppress Inflammatory Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Moslem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs represent a promising cell source for research and therapeutic applications, but their restricted ex vivo propagation capabilities limit putative applications. Substantial self-renewing of stem cells can be achieved by reprogramming cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs that can be easily expanded as undifferentiated cells even in mass culture. Here, we investigated a differentiation protocol enabling the generation and selection of human iPSC-derived MSCs exhibiting relevant surface marker expression profiles (CD105 and CD73 and functional characteristics. We generated such iPSC-MSCs from fibroblasts and bone marrow MSCs utilizing two different reprogramming constructs. All such iPSC-MSCs exhibited the characteristics of normal bone marrow-derived (BM MSCs. In direct comparison to BM-MSCs our iPSC-MSCs exhibited a similar surface marker expression profile but shorter doubling times without reaching senescence within 20 passages. Considering functional capabilities, iPSC-MSCs provided supportive feeder layer for CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells’ self-renewal and colony forming capacities. Furthermore, iPSC-MSCs gained immunomodulatory function to suppress CD4+ cell proliferation, reduce proinflammatory cytokines in mixed lymphocyte reaction, and increase regulatory CD4+/CD69+/CD25+ T-lymphocyte population. In conclusion, we generated fully functional MSCs from various iPSC lines irrespective of their starting cell source or reprogramming factor composition and we suggest that such iPSC-MSCs allow repetitive cell applications for advanced therapeutic approaches.

  19. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  20. Adhesion of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells on peptide-linked polymers in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Cooper, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    The initial adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cord blood endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (HBOECs) was studied under radial flow conditions. The surface of a variable shear-rate device was either coated with polymer films or covered by synthetic fibers. Spin-coating was applied to produce smooth polymer films, while fibrous scaffolds were generated by electrospinning. The polymer was composed of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA), and CGRGDS peptide. The peptide was incorporated into the polymer system by coupling to an acrylate-PEG-N-hydroxysuccinimide comonomer. A shear-rate-dependent increase of the attached cells with time was observed with all cell types. The adhesion of ECs increased on RGD-linked polymer surfaces compared to polymers without adhesive peptides. The number of attached ECFCs and HBOECs are significantly higher than that of HUVECs within the entire shear-rate range and surfaces examined, especially on RGD-linked polymers at low shear rates. Their superior adhesion ability of endothelial progenitor cells under flow conditions suggests they are a promising source for in vivo seeding of vascular grafts and shows the potential to be used for self-endothelialized implants.

  1. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  2. [Production of mature red blood cell by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan-Jun; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Cui, Shuang; Ni, Lei; Zhao, Bo-Tao; Wang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Song-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Most protocols for in vitro producing red blood cells (RBC) use the CD34(+) cells or embryonic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow or peripheral blood as the start materials. This study was purposed to produce the mature RBC in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells as start material. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from buffy coat after blood leukapheresis, the mature red blood cells (RBC) were prepared by a 4-step culture protocol. The results showed that after culture by inducing with the different sets of cytokines and supporting by mouse MS-5 cell line, the expansion of PBMNC reached about 1000 folds at the end of the culture. About 90% of cultured RBC were enucleated mature cells which had the comparable morphological characteristics with normal RBC. Colony-forming assays showed that this culture system could stimulate the proliferation of progenitors in PBMNC and differentiate into erythroid cells. The structure and function analysis indicated that the mean cell volume of in vitro cultured RBC was 118 ± 4 fl, which was slight larger than that of normal RBC (80-100 fl); the mean cell hemoglobin was 36 ± 1.2 pg, which was slight higher than that of normal RBC (27-31 pg); the maximal deformation index was 0.46, which approachs level of normal RBC; the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyrurvate kinase levels was consistant with young RBC. It is concluded that PBMNC are feasble, convenient and low-cost source for producing cultured RBC and this culture system is suitable to generate the RBC from PBMNC.

  3. Effects of lovastatin alone or combined with irradiation on tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrys, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Doerfler, A.; Yaromina, A.; Hessel, F.; Krause, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Oertel, R. [Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Baumann, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Experimental Center, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the effect of lovastatin alone or combined with radiation on U87MG and FaDu cells in vitro and U87MG tumors in vivo. Material and methods: cell number, p21{sup WAF1} expression, apoptosis, reproductive cell death, and cell-cycle distribution were investigated after incubation of U87MG and FaDu cells in vitro. The effect of lovastatin (50 mg/kg/day) on tumor growth and on tumor growth delay after single-dose irradiation with 20 Gy was investigated using U87MG tumors in nude mice. Results: lovastatin dose dependently decreased cell number and proliferation of U87MG and FaDu cells. The proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase, apoptosis and p21 protein expression increased after lovastatin alone or combined with 4-Gy irradiation in both cell lines. Effects of lovastatin on cell cycle and cell number were more pronounced in U87MG compared to FaDu. No radiosensitization of clonogenic cells by lovastatin could be demonstrated in both cells lines, but the colony-forming ability after lovastatin alone was decreased in FaDu cells. In vivo, lovastatin decreased tumor volume over time but did not increase growth delay after irradiation of U87MG tumors with 20 Gy. Conclusion: the data support effects of lovastatin on proliferation, apoptosis and colony-forming ability in vitro and tumor volume in vivo. At the drug concentration achievable, lovastatin did not improve the effects of radiation on U87MG tumors in vivo. (orig.)

  4. Radiosensitisation by pharmacological ascorbate in glioblastoma multiforme cells, human glial cells, and HUVECs depends on their antioxidant and DNA repair capabilities and is not cancer specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M Leticia; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-09-01

    We previously showed that 5 mM ascorbate radiosensitized early passage radioresistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells derived from one patient tumor. Here we investigate the sensitivity of a panel of cell lines to 5 mM ascorbate and 6 Gy ionizing radiation, made up of three primary human GBM cells, three GBM cell lines, a human glial cell line, and primary human vascular endothelial cells. The response of different cells lines to ascorbate and/or radiation was determined by measuring viability, colony-forming ability, generation and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), cell cycle progression, antioxidant capacity and generation of reactive oxygen species. Individually, radiation and ascorbate both decreased viability and clonogenicity by inducing DNA damage, but had differential effects on cell cycle progression. Radiation led to G2/M arrest in most cells whereas ascorbate caused accumulation in S phase, which was moderately associated with poor DSB repair. While high dose ascorbate radiosensitized all cell lines in clonogenic assays, the sensitivity to radiation, high dose ascorbate, and combined treatment varied between cell lines. Normal glial cells were similar to GBM cells with respect to free radical scavenging potential and effect of treatment on DNA damage and repair, viability, and clonogenicity. Both GBM cells and normal cells coped equally poorly with oxidative stress caused by radiation and/or high dose ascorbate, dependent primarily on their antioxidant and DSB repair capacity.

  5. DIFFERENTIATION AND MALIGNANT SUPPRESSION INDUCED BY MOUSE ERYTHROID DIFFERENTIATION AND DENUCLEATION FACTOR ON MOUSE ERYTHROLEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩代书; 赵青; 葛晔华; 周建平; 马静; 陈克铨; 薛社普

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the roles of mouse erythroid differentiation and denueleation factor (MEDDF), a novel factor cloned in our laboratory recently, in erythroid terminal differentiation.Methods. Mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were transfected with eukaryotic expression plasmid pcD-NA-MEDDF. Then we investigated the changes on characteristics of cell growth by analyzing cells growth rate,mitotic index and colony-forming rate in semi-solid medium. The expressions of c-myc and β-globin genes were analysed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.Results. MEL ceils transfected with pcDNA-MEDDF showed significant lower growth rate, mitotic index,and colony-forming rate in semi-solid medium ( P<0.01 ). The percentage of benzidine-positive cells was 32.8% after transfection. The expression of β-globin in cells transfected with pcDNA-MEDDF was 3.43 times higher than that of control (MEL transfected with blank vector, pcDNA3. 1 ), and the expression of c-myc decreased by 66.3%.Conclusions. MEDDF can induce differentiation of MEL cell and suppress its malignancy.

  6. Electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan; Yonco, Robert M.; You, Hoydoo; Melendres, Carlos A.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell has a layer-type or sandwich configuration with a Teflon center section that houses working, reference and counter electrodes and defines a relatively narrow electrolyte cavity. The center section is surrounded on both sides with thin Teflon membranes. The membranes are pressed in place by a pair of Teflon inner frames which are in turn supported by a pair of outer metal frames. The pair of inner and outer frames are provided with corresponding, appropriately shaped slits that are in plane generally transverse to the plane of the working electrode and permit X-ray beams to enter and exit the cell through the Teflon membranes that cover the slits so that the interface between the working electrode and the electrolyte within the cell may be analyzed by transmission geometry. In one embodiment, the center section consists of two parts, one on top of the other. Alternatively, the center section of the electrochemical cell may consist of two intersliding pieces or may be made of a single piece of Teflon sheet material. The electrolyte cavity is shaped so that the electrochemical cell can be rotated 90.degree. in either direction while maintaining the working and counter electrodes submerged in the electrolyte.

  7. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Escobedo-Cousin

    Full Text Available Cord blood (CB is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT. However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT.

  8. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  9. Autologous stem cell-based therapy for sickle cell leg ulcer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, José Válber L; Fortuna, Vitor; de Souza, Eliane Silva; Daltro, Gildasio Cerqueira; Meyer, Roberto; Minniti, Caterina P; Borojevic, Radovan

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent chronic leg ulcers are among the most severe vasculopathic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). Their treatment remains a challenge. Stem cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) is a promising new therapeutic option for other forms of chronic ulcers. This prospective pilot study was performed to evaluate safety and feasibility of BMMC implantation in patients with SCD and chronic leg ulcers (SCLU). Ulcer closure, recurrence and local pain were evaluated. BMMC were successfully administered to 23 SCLU patients and no serious adverse events occurred. During the 6-month follow-up period, 91·3% of patients had improved ulcer pain compared with baseline and 29·2% of the treated ulcers achieved total healing. The frequency of progenitor stem cells (CD34CD45(low) and fibroblast colony-forming units) in BMMC was found to be significantly reduced in SCLU patients and compared to SCD patients without ulcers (P < 0·004 and P < 0·01, respectively). No relationship was observed between treatment outcome and the number of implanted BM progenitor stem cells. In conclusion, BMMC implantation is a feasible and safe procedure, showing favourable outcomes for the treatment of SCLU, and encouraging further controlled clinical trials.

  10. Expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Expressing Cells Generates Myeloid Progenitor Cells that Stimulate Limb Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, David M; Cooper, Tyler T; Sherman, Stephen E; Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Hewitt, Mark; Bell, Gillian I; Hess, David A

    2017-07-01

    Uncompromised by chronic disease-related comorbidities, human umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitor cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi) cells) stimulate blood vessel regeneration after intra-muscular transplantation. However, implementation of cellular therapies using UCB ALDH(hi) cells for critical limb ischemia, the most severe form of severe peripheral artery disease, is limited by the rarity (18-fold over 6-days under serum-free conditions. Consistent with the concept that ALDH-activity is decreased as progenitor cells differentiate, only 15.1% ± 1.3% of progeny maintained high ALDH-activity after culture. However, compared to fresh UCB cells, expansion increased the total number of ALDH(hi) cells (2.7-fold), CD34(+) /CD133(+) cells (2.8-fold), and hematopoietic colony forming cells (7.7-fold). Remarkably, injection of expanded progeny accelerated recovery of perfusion and improved limb usage in immunodeficient mice with femoral artery ligation-induced limb ischemia. At 7 or 28 days post-transplantation, mice transplanted with expanded ALDH(hi) cells showed augmented endothelial cell proliferation and increased capillary density compared to controls. Expanded cells maintained pro-angiogenic mRNA expression and secreted angiogenesis-associated growth factors, chemokines, and matrix modifying proteins. Coculture with expanded cells augmented human microvascular endothelial cell survival and tubule formation under serum-starved, growth factor-reduced conditions. Expanded UCB-derived ALDH(hi) cells represent an alternative to autologous bone marrow as an accessible source of pro-angiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cells for the refinement of vascular regeneration-inductive therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1607-1619. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. Multiple lineages of human breast cancer stem/progenitor cells identified by profiling with stem cell markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy W Hwang-Verslues

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity of cancer stem/progenitor cells that give rise to different forms of cancer has been well demonstrated for leukemia. However, this fundamental concept has yet to be established for solid tumors including breast cancer. In this communication, we analyzed solid tumor cancer stem cell markers in human breast cancer cell lines and primary specimens using flow cytometry. The stem/progenitor cell properties of different marker expressing-cell populations were further assessed by in vitro soft agar colony formation assay and the ability to form tumors in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the expression of stem cell markers varied greatly among breast cancer cell lines. In MDA-MB-231 cells, PROCR and ESA, instead of the widely used breast cancer stem cell markers CD44(+/CD24(-/low and ALDH, could be used to highly enrich cancer stem/progenitor cell populations which exhibited the ability to self renew and divide asymmetrically. Furthermore, the PROCR(+/ESA(+ cells expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers. PROCR could also be used to enrich cells with colony forming ability from MB-361 cells. Moreover, consistent with the marker profiling using cell lines, the expression of stem cell markers differed greatly among primary tumors. There was an association between metastasis status and a high prevalence of certain markers including CD44(+/CD24(-/low, ESA(+, CD133(+, CXCR4(+ and PROCR(+ in primary tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggest that similar to leukemia, several stem/progenitor cell-like subpopulations can exist in breast cancer.

  12. Effects of benzene inhalation on murine pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkite, E P; Inoue, T; Carsten, A L; Miller, M E; Bullis, J E; Drew, R T

    1982-03-01

    Effects of benzene inhalation on mouse pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells have been evaluated. Male mice 8--12 wk old were exposed to 400 ppm benzene for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, for up to 9 1/2 wk. At various time intervals exposed and control animals were killed, and cardiac blood was evaluated for changes in white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) content. In addition, femora and tibiae were evaluated for total marrow cellularity, stem cell content (as measured by the spleen colony technique), and the percent of stem cells in DNA synthesis (as determined by the tritiated thymidine cytocide technique). Exogenous spleen colonies grown from marrow of exposed animals were counted, identified, and scored by histological type. Exposure to benzene caused significant depressions of RBCs and WBCs throughout the exposure period, which continued for at least 14 d after exposure. Bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content were also depressed in exposed animals throughout the study. Tritiated thymidine cytocide of spleen colony-forming cells was generally increased in exposed animals, perhaps indicating a compensatory response to the reduction of circulating cells. Spleen colonies of all types were depressed after exposure to benzene. The significance of the reduction in cellularity, stem cell content, and changes in morphology of spleen colonies is discussed in relation to cellular toxicity and residual injury.

  13. Changes in growth, rRNA content, and cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes induced by CO2 up- and downshift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jydegaard-Axelsen, A.M.; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Koch, A.G.;

    2005-01-01

    Cell morphology, rRNA content, and growth were examined for Listeria monocytogenes LO28 and EGD, respectively, grown in brain-heart infusion (BHI) and on slices of sausage at 10degreesC in 100% CO2, 100% N-2, and air. In CO2, filamentous cells were formed by both strains on sausage slices and by L...... unchanged. On sausage slices, the number of colony forming units also increased rapidly for both strains in response to CO2 downshift. Large variations in rRNA content of individual cells were observed in the tested scenarios. The results demonstrate the risk of underestimating the number of infectious...

  14. Changes in growth, rRNA content, and cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes induced by CO2 up- and downshift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jydegaard-Axelsen, A.M.; Aaes-Jorgensen, A.; Koch, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Cell morphology, rRNA content, and growth were examined for Listeria monocytogenes LO28 and EGD, respectively, grown in brain-heart infusion (BHI) and on slices of sausage at 10degreesC in 100% CO2, 100% N-2, and air. In CO2, filamentous cells were formed by both strains on sausage slices and by L...... unchanged. On sausage slices, the number of colony forming units also increased rapidly for both strains in response to CO2 downshift. Large variations in rRNA content of individual cells were observed in the tested scenarios. The results demonstrate the risk of underestimating the number of infectious...

  15. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and nucl......A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  16. Integrin α6β4 identifies human distal lung epithelial progenitor cells with potential as a cell-based therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Li

    Full Text Available To develop stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease, it is first necessary to identify markers of human lung epithelial progenitor/stem cells and to better understand the potential for differentiation into distinct lineages. Here we investigated integrin α6β4 as an epithelial progenitor cell marker in the human distal lung. We identified a subpopulation of α6β4(+ cells that localized in distal small airways and alveolar walls and were devoid of pro-surfactant protein C expression. The α6β4(+ epithelial cells demonstrated key properties of stem cells ex vivo as compared to α6β4(- epithelial cells, including higher colony forming efficiency, expression of stem cell-specific transcription factor Nanog, and the potential to differentiate into multiple distinct lineages including basal and Clara cells. Co-culture of α6β4(+ epithelial cells with endothelial cells enhanced proliferation. We identified a subset of adeno-associated virus (AAVs serotypes, AAV2 and AAV8, capable of transducing α6β4(+ cells. In addition, reconstitution of bronchi epithelial cells from CF patients with only 5% normal α6β4(+ epithelial cells significantly rescued defects in Cl(- transport. Therefore, targeting the α6β4(+ epithelial population via either gene delivery or progenitor cell-based reconstitution represents a potential new strategy to treat CF lung disease.

  17. Synthesis and cyto-genotoxicity evaluation of graphene on mice spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Ehsan; Akhavan, Omid; Shamsara, Mehdi; Daliri, Morteza; Dashtizad, Mojtaba; Farmany, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    The present study analyzed the dose-dependent cyto- and genotoxicity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide on spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) for the first time. The results showed that graphene oxide significantly increased oxidative stress at concentrations of 100 and 400μg/ml, while low concentrations did not have a significant effect. In addition, according to the MTT assay, the cell number decreased in high-concentration (100 and 400μg/ml) graphene oxide-treated samples compared to untreated cells. However, a reduced graphene-treated sample demonstrated a significant increase in cell number. Moreover, microscopic analysis found high concentrations of graphene nanosheets in cell culture medium that reduced the number of colonies and colony forming cells. We conclude that a high concentration of graphene can be toxic to SSCs. However, such toxicity can be reduced by the surface modification of graphene nanomaterials.

  18. Femtosecond optical transfection as a tool for genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mapa, M. L.; Gardner, J.; Bradburn, H.; King, J.; Dholakia, K.; Gunn-Moore, F.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond optical transfection for the genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells. Using a system with an SLM combined with a scanning mirror allows poration of both single-cell and colony-formed human embryonic stem cells in a rapid and targeted manner. In this work, we show successful transfection of plasmid DNA tagged with fluorescent reporters into human embryonic stem cells using three doses of focused femtosecond laser. A significant number of transfected cells retained their undifferentiated morphological feature of large nucleus with high nucleus to cytoplasmic ratio, 48h after photoporation. Furthermore, DNA constructs driven by different types of promoters were also successfully transfected into human embryonic stem cells using this technique.

  19. CellTracks cell analysis system for rare cell detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagan, Michael T.; Trainer, Michael N.; Bendele, Teresa; Rao, Chandra; Horton, Allen; Tibbe, Arjan G.; Greve, Jan; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The CellTracks system is a Compact Disk-based cell analyzer that, similar to flow cytometry, differentiates cells that are aligned while passing through focused laser beams. In CellTracks, only immuno-magnetically labeled cells are aligned and remain in position for further analysis. This feature is

  20. Tuning Collective Cell Migration by Cell-Cell Junction Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.; Mayor, R.

    2017-01-01

    Collective cell migration critically depends on cell-cell interactions coupled to a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Important cell-cell adhesion receptor systems implicated in controlling collective movements include cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily members (L1CAM, NCAM, ALCAM), Ephrin/Eph receptor

  1. Tuning Collective Cell Migration by Cell-Cell Junction Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.; Mayor, R.

    2017-01-01

    Collective cell migration critically depends on cell-cell interactions coupled to a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Important cell-cell adhesion receptor systems implicated in controlling collective movements include cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily members (L1CAM, NCAM, ALCAM), Ephrin/Eph

  2. Combination of low O(2) concentration and mesenchymal stromal cells during culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells improves the maintenance and proliferative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Mohammad; Vlaski, Marija; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Lafarge, Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Praloran, Vincent; Brunet De La Grange, Philippe; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2012-06-01

    The physiological approach suggests that an environment associating the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and low O(2) concentration would be most favorable for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in course of ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic grafts. To test this hypothesis, we performed a co-culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells with or without MSC in presence of cytokines for 10 days at 20%, 5%, and 1.5% O(2) and assessed the impact on total cells, CD34(+) cells, committed progenitors (colony-forming cells-CFC) and stem cells activity (pre-CFC and Scid repopulating cells-SRC). Not surprisingly, the expansion of total cells, CD34(+) cells, and CFC was higher in co-culture and at 20% O(2) compared to simple culture and low O(2) concentrations, respectively. However, co-culture at low O(2) concentrations provided CD34(+) cell and CFC amplification similar to classical culture at 20% O(2) . Interestingly, low O(2) concentrations ensured a better pre-CFC and SRC preservation/expansion in co-culture. Indeed, SRC activity in co-culture at 1.5% O(2) was higher than in freshly isolated CD34(+) cells. Interleukin-6 production by MSC at physiologically low O(2) concentrations might be one of the factors mediating this effect. Our data demonstrate that association of co-culture and low O(2) concentration not only induces sufficient expansion of committed progenitors (with respect to the classical culture), but also ensures a better maintenance/expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), pointing to the oxygenation as a physiological regulatory factor but also as a cell engineering tool.

  3. Bispecific antibody fragments with CD20 X CD28 specificity allow effective autologous and allogeneic T-cell activation against malignant cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow cultures from patients with B-cell lineage leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M; Grosse-Hovest, L; Holler, E; Kolb, H J; Jung, G

    1999-08-01

    Bispecific antibodies directed against tumor-associated target antigens and to surface receptors mediating T-cell activation, such as the TCR/CD3 complex and the costimulatory receptor CD28, are capable of mediating T-cell activation resulting in tumor cell killing. In this study, we used the B-cell-associated antigens CD19 and CD20 as target structures on human leukemic cells. We found that a combination of bispecific antibody fragments (bsFab2) with target x CD3 and target x CD28 specificity induces vigorous autologous T-cell activation and killing of malignant cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow cultures from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and follicular lymphoma. The bsFab2 targeting CD20 were considerably more effective than those binding to CD19. The colony-forming capacity of treated bone marrow was impaired due to large amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha produced during bsFab2-induced T-cell activation. Neutralizing tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies were found to reverse this negative effect without affecting T-cell activation and tumor cell killing. CD20 x CD28 bsFab2, when used alone rather than in combination, markedly improved the recognition of leukemic cells by allogeneic T cells. Therefore, these reagents may be capable of enhancing the immunogenicity of leukemic cells in general and, in particular, of increasing the antileukemic activity of allogeneic donor buffy coat cells in relapsed bone marrow transplanted patients.

  4. Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  5. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease?Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... disease, hemoglobin SS disease, hemoglobin synthesis, hemoglobinopathies, ... cell anemia, sickle cell crisis, vaso-occlusive crisis Family Health, ...

  6. Potent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  7. Potent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    It seems hard to believe that Dolly the cloned sheep was born 10 years ago, kindling furious arguments over the prospects and ethics of cloning a human. Today, the controversy over cloning is entwined, often confused, with concerns over the use of human embryonic stem cells. Most people are unclear what cloning is, and they know even less when it…

  8. Electrochemical Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising a negative electrode, an electrolyte and a positive electrode in which the positive electrode structure comprises a lithium cobalt manganese oxide of the composition Li¿2?Co¿y?Mn¿2-y?O¿4? where 0

  9. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  10. Reconstitution of the myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous and genetically modified CD34(+) bone marrow cells, following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derdouch, S.; Gay, W.; Prost, S.; Le Dantec, M.; Delache, B.; Auregan, G.; Andrieu, T.; Le Grand, R. [CEA, DSV, Serv Immunovirol, Inst Maladies Emergentes et Therapies Innovantes, Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Derdouch, S.; Gay, W.; Prost, S.; Le Dantec, M.; Delache, B.; Auregan, G.; Andrieu, T.; Le Grand, R. [Univ Paris 11, UMR E01, Orsay (France); Negre, D.; Cosset, F. [Univ Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, IFR 128, F-69007 Lyon (France); Negre, D.; Cosset, F. [INSERM, U758, F-69007 Lyon (France); Negre, D.; Cosset, F.L. [Ecole NormaleSuper Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Leplat, J.J. [CEA, DSV, IRCM, SREIT, Lab Radiobiol, F-78352 Jouy En Josas (France); Leplat, J.J. [CEA, DSV, IRCM, SREIT, Etude Genome, F-78352 Jouy En Josas (France); Leplat, J.J. [INRA, DGA, Radiobiol Lab, F-78352 Jouy En Josas (France); Leplat, J.J. [INRA, DGA, Etude Genome, F-78352 Jouy En Josas (France)

    2008-07-01

    Prolonged, altered hematopoietic reconstitution is commonly observed in patients undergoing myelo-ablative conditioning and bone marrow and/or mobilized peripheral blood-derived stem cell transplantation. We studied the reconstitution of myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous CD34{sup +} bone marrow cells following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques. The bone marrow cells were first transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector encoding eGFP, with a mean efficiency of 72% {+-} 4%. The vector used was derived from the simian immunodeficiency lentivirus SIVmac251, VSV-g pseudo-typed and encoded eGFP under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. After myeloid differentiation, GFP was detected in colony-forming cells (37% {+-} 10%). A previous study showed that transduction rates did not differ significantly between colony-forming cells and immature cells capable of initiating long-term cultures, indicating that progenitor cells and highly immature hematopoietic cells were transduced with similar efficiency. Blood cells producing eGFP were detected as early as three days after transplantation,and eGFP-producing granulocyte and mononuclear cells persisted for more than one year in the periphery. Conclusion: The transplantation of CD34{sup +} bone marrow cells had beneficial effects for the ex vivo proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors, favoring reconstitution of the T-and B-lymphocyte, thrombocyte and red blood cell compartments. (authors)

  11. EFFECTS OF PML AND PML/RMRa ANTISENCE OLIGO- NUCLEOTIDE ON PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA CELL NB4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈烨; 缪金明; 方智雯; 朱学宏; 邵念贤; 欧阳仁荣

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of anti-PML (promyelocytic leukemia) or anti-PML/RARa (promyelocytic leukemia/retionic acid receptora) antisense oligonucleotides on cell growth, expression of PML-RARa mRNA and PML-RARa/PML protein location of NB4 cell lines. Methods: RT-PCR was used for detecting PML-RARa mRNA expression, trypan blue exclusion for cell count, methylcellose assay for leukemic colony forming unit detection, immuno- fluorescence for PML-RARa/PML protein location. Results: Both anti-PML start codon region antisence (STAS) and anti-PML-RARa fusion region antisence (FUAS) could inhibit cell growth and the formation of acute myelocytic colony forming unit of cells(AML-CFU). Cells become partial differentiated at days 5, being more obvious in FUAS-treated cells than in STAS ones. Down regulation of PML-RARa mRNA expression occurred at 24 hours in STAS and FUAS-treated cells and maintained for up to 72 hours. Immuno-fluorescence analysis with anti-PML monoclonal antibody showed a remarkable decrease even complete disappearance of microgranules. The residual granules became enlarged as discrete dots (<10 per cell), similar to normal POD structure in some STAS-treated cells at 24 hours. At 72 hours, nearly all the granules disappeared. Similar changes were observed in FUAS-treated cells. Conclusion: Both PML and PML-RARa antisence oligonucleotides can specially block the expression of PML-RARa at mRNA and protein levels. PML protein is implicated in the regulations of cell differentiation.

  12. Suppression of tumorigenesis by human mesenchymal stem cells in a hepatoma model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Qiao; Zhili Xu; Tiejun Zhao; Zhigang Zhao; Mingxia Shi; Robert C Zhao; Lihong Ye; Xiaodong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can home to tumor sites and inhibit the growth of tumor cells. Little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms that link hMSCs to the targeted inhibition of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of hMSCs on two human hepatoma cell lines (H7402 and HepG2) using an animal transplantation model, a co-culture system and conditioned media from hMSCs. Animal transplantation studies showed that the latent time for tumor formation was prolonged and that the tumor size was smaller when SCID mice were injected with H7402 cells and an equal number of Z3 hMSCs. When co-cultured with Z3 cells, H7402 cell proliferation decreased, apoptosis increased, and the expression of Bcl-2, c-Myc, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and survivin was downregulated. After treatment with conditioned media derived from Z3 hMSC cultures, H4702 cells showed decreased colony-forming ability and decreased proliferation. 1m-munoblot analysis showed that β-catenin, Bcl-2, c-Myc, PCNA and survivin expression was downregulated in H7402 and HepG2 cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that hMSCs inhibit the malignant phenotypes of the H7402 and HepG2 human liver cancer cell lines, which include proliferation, colony-forming ability and oncogene expression both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our studies provide evidence that the Wnt signaling pathway may have a role in hMSC-mediated targeting and tumor cell inhibition.

  13. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    -99% pure population of leukocytes. Viability was assessed using Trypan blue histological analysis. We successfully isolated and labeled ~25-30 x 10{sup 7} CD34+ lymphocytes in cytokine mobilized progenitor cell apharesis harvests. Cells were also subjected to a stat gram stain to look for bacterial contamination, stat endotoxin LAL to look for endotoxin contamination, flow cytometry for evaluation of the purity of the cells and 14-day sterility culture. Colony forming assays confirm the capacity of these cells to proliferate and function ex-vivo with CFU-GM values of 26 colonies/ 1 x 10{sup 4} cells plated and 97% viability in cytokine augmented methylcellulose at 10-14 days in CO{sub 2} incubation. We developed a closed-processing system for the product labeling prior to infusion to maintain autologous cell integrity and sterility. Release criteria for the labeled product were documented for viability, cell count and differential, and measured radiolabel. We were successful in labeling the cells with up to 500 uCi/10{sup 8} cells, with viability of >98%. However, due to delays in getting the protocol approved by the FDA, the cells were not infused in humans in this location (although we did successfully use CD34+ cells in humans in a study in Australia). The approach developed should permit labeling of progenitor cells that can be administered to human subjects for tracking. The labeling approach should be useful for all progenitor cell types, although this would need to be verified since different cell lines may have differential radiosensitivity.

  14. Effects of Spinach Powder Fat-Soluble Extract on Proliferation of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE TAo; HUANG CHENG-YU; CHEN HAl; HOU YUN-HUA

    1999-01-01

    Four kinds of assays were used to study the effect of a fat-soluble extract of spinach powder(SPFE) on the proliferation of human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (SGC-7901) in vitro.These studies included: ( i ) cell growth assay, ( ii ) colony forming assay, ( iii ) MTT colorimetric assay, and ( iv ) 3H-TdR incorporation assay. The concentrations of SPFE expressed as the level of β-carotene in the medium were 2 × 10-s, 2 × 10-7 and 2 × 10-6 mol/L β-carotene in assays ( i ) ~ ( iii ), but 4 × 10-8, 4 × 10-7 and 4 × 10-6 mol/L β-carotene in assay ( iV ) respectively. The results indicated that SPFE inhibited the proliferation and colony forming ability of SGC-7901 cells. And in MTT assay, SPFE inhibited the viability of SGC-7901 cells, but no inhibitory effect of SPFE was observed on the viability of lymphocytes in peripheral blood of healthy people. Finally, in the 3H-TdR incorporation test, both SPFE and β-carotene showed significant inhibitory effects on DNA synthesis in SGC-7901 cells, but SPFE was more effective than 3-carotene.

  15. Effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Iwasaki, M; Koshiura, R

    1982-12-01

    Effects of several autonomic agents on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in HeLa cells were studied. When beta-adrenergic stimulants such as isoproterenol, epinephrine, terbutaline and turobuterol were added at concentrations over 10(-14) M 15 to 60 min before mitomycin C, the colony-forming ability of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited more than by mitomycin C alone. The action of isoproterenol and epinephrine on the colony-forming ability of the cells was abolished by propranolol. The intracellular cyclic AMP level of HeLa cells reached the peak of about two-fold the basal level at 30 min after the addition of 10(-8) M isoproterenol. In combination with mitomycin C, the high level of intracellular cyclic AMP induced by isoproterenol was maintained for a significantly longer period in comparison with that by isoproterenol alone, while mitomycin C alone caused essentially no change in the cyclic AMP level. The pretreatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP also enhanced the effect of mitomycin C. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that the synergistic effect of beta-adrenergic stimulants on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is mediated via stimulation of the beta-adrenoceptors of HeLa cells which elevates the intracellular cyclic AMP for a long time in combination with mitomycin C.

  16. Effect of ultrasound sonication on clonogenic survival and mitochondria of ovarian cancer cells in the presence of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junyan; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Xu, Chuanshan

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of ultrasound sonication in the presence of methylene blue on clonogenic survival and mitochondria of ovarian cancer cells. Human ovarian cancer HO-8910 cells, which were incubated with different concentrations of methylene blue for 1 hour, were exposed to an ultrasonic wave for 5 seconds with intensity of 0.46 W/cm(2). Clonogenic survival of HO-8910 cells after ultrasound sonication was measured by a colony-forming unit assay. Mitochondrial structural changes were observed on transmission electron microscopy, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy with rhodamine 123 staining. The colony-forming units of HO-8910 cells decreased considerably after ultrasound sonication in the presence of methylene blue. Transmission electron microscopy showed slightly enlarged mitochondria in the ultrasound-treated cells in the absence of methylene blue; however, seriously damaged mitochondria, even with almost complete disappearance of cristae, were found in the cells treated by ultrasound sonication in the presence of methylene blue. The mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed significantly when HO-8910 cells were treated by ultrasound sonication in the presence of methylene blue (P cells. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Overexpression of the promyelocytic leukemia gene suppresses growth of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Dalin 贺大林; NAN Xunyi 南勋义; Chang Kun-Song; WANG Yafeng 王亚峰; Chung Leland W.K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To examine the anti-oncogenic effects of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) on bladder cancer and to explore its molecular mechanisms of growth suppression.Methods Wild-type PML was transfected into bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) and expressed in a replication-deficient adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system and introduced into human bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) in vitro and in vivo. The effect and mechanisms of the PML gene in cell growth, clonogenicity, and tumorigenicity of bladder cancer cells were studied using in vitro and in vivo growth assays, soft agar colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis assay and in vivo tumorigenicity assay.Results Overexpression of PML in 5637 cells significantly reduced their growth rate and clonogenicity on soft agar. PML suppressed bladder cancer cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) significantly suppressed the tumorigenicity and growth of bladder cancer cells. Intratumoral injection of Ad-PML into tumors induced by 5637 cells dramatically suppressed their growth. Conclusions The results indicated that overexpression of PML protein may promote efficient growth inhibition of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) expression efficiently suppresses human bladder cancer growth.

  18. Proteomic identification of VEGF-dependent protein enrichment to membrane caveolar-raft microdomains in endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillà, Anastasia; Magherini, Francesca; Margheri, Francesca; Laurenzana, Anna; Gamberi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Bianchi, Laura; Danza, Giovanna; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Serratì, Simona; Modesti, Alessandra; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2013-07-01

    Endothelial cell caveolar-rafts are considered functional platforms that recruit several pro-angiogenic molecules to realize an efficient angiogenic program. Here we studied the differential caveolar-raft protein composition of endothelial colony-forming cells following stimulation with VEGF, which localizes in caveolae on interaction with its type-2 receptor. Endothelial colony-forming cells are a cell population identified in human umbilical blood that show all the properties of an endothelial progenitor cell and a high proliferative rate. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis was coupled with mass spectrometry to identify candidate proteins. The twenty-eight differentially expressed protein spots were grouped according to their function using Gene Ontology classification. In particular, functional categories relative to cell death inhibition and hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes resulted enriched. In these categories, Peroxiredoxin-2 and 6, that control hydrogen peroxide metabolic processes, are the main enriched molecules together with the anti-apoptotic 78 kDa glucose regulated protein. Some of the proteins we identified had never before identified as caveolar-raft components. Other identified proteins include calpain small subunit-1, known to mediates angiogenic response to VEGF, gelsolin, which regulates stress fiber assembly, and annexin A3, an angiogenic mediator that induces VEGF production. We validated the functional activity of the above proteins, showing that the siRNA silencing of these resulted in the inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Overall, our data show that VEGF stimulation triggers the caveolar-raft recruitment of proteins that warrant a physiological amount of reactive oxygen species to maintain a proper angiogenic function of endothelial colony-forming cells and preserve the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from postnatal blood mononuclear cells by plasmid vector expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Sarah N; Huang, Xiaosong; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2012-11-01

    Several human postnatal somatic cell types have been successfully reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) offer several advantages compared with other cell types. They are easily isolated from umbilical cord blood (CB) or adult peripheral blood (PB), and can be used fresh or after freezing. A short culture allows for more efficient reprogramming, with iPSC colonies forming from blood MNCs in 14 d, compared with 28 d for age-matched fibroblastic cells. The advantages of briefly cultured blood MNCs may be due to favorable epigenetic profiles and gene expression patterns. Blood cells from adults, especially nonlymphoid cells that are replenished frequently from intermittently activated blood stem cells, are short-lived in vivo and may contain less somatic mutations than skin fibroblasts, which are more exposed to environmental mutagens over time. We describe here a detailed, validated protocol for effective generation of integration-free human iPSCs from blood MNCs by plasmid vectors.

  20. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment).

  1. [CFU-HPP colony formation of bone marrow hematopoietic proginitor cells in psoriatic patients and methylation of p16 gene promotor in CFU-HPP colony cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Niu, Xu-Ping; Li, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Ming; Yin, Guo-Hua

    2007-08-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the colony formation of high-proliferative potential colony-forming units (CFU-HPP) from bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells of psoriatic patients and p16 gene promotor methylation in CFU-HPP cells, and to explore the relationship between the colony formation and the methylation status of p16 gene promoter. Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells from psoriatic patients and normal controls were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and were cultured in methycellulose semi-solid culture medium with SCF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-6 for 14 days to measure the colonies of CFU-HPP. The CFU-HPP colony cells were collected and methylation status of p16 gene promoter of CFU-HPP cell DNA modified with sodium bisulfite was detected by the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The results showed that in methycellulose semi-solid culture system, the number and the size of CFU-HPP colonies of bone marrow of psoriatic patients were all significantly less than that of normal controls, the positive frequency of p16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells was lower than that in CFU-HPP colony cells of normal controls. It is concluded that the colony formation capability of CFU-HPP from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells in psoriatic patients is lower than that in normal controls, and the lower positive frequency of P16 gene promoter methylation in CFU-HPP cells perhaps closely correlated with lower CFU-HPP colony-forming capability.

  2. Increased survival of normal cells during laser photodynamic therapy: implications for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliya, K.S.; Matthews, J.L.; Fay, J.W.; Dowben, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Laser light-induced, dye-mediated photolysis of leukemic cells was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating occult tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Merocyanine 540 (MC540) was mixed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells in the presence of human albumin. This cell-dye mixture was irradiated with 514 nm argon laser light. Results show that in the presence of 0.1%, 0.25% and 0.5% albumin, laser light doses of 62.4 J/cm/sup 2/, 93.6 J/cm/sup 2/ and 109.2 J/cm/sup 2/, respectively, were required for a 5 log reduction in the survival of leukemic cells. Under identical conditions, 80% to 84% of the normal bone marrow cells and 41% of the granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells survived. The number of surviving stromal cells was reduced (1+) compared to the untreated control (4+). Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with equal number of HL-60 cells did not interfere with the killing of HL-60 cells treated with MC540 and laser light. The non-specific cytotoxicity of laser light alone was less than 6% for normal bone marrow cells. These results suggest that the concentration of human albumin plays an important role in laser light-induced phototoxicity. This laser light-induced selective photolysis of leukemic cells can be used in ex vivo purging of tumor cell-contaminated bone marrow grafts to achieve very high survival rates of normal bone marrow cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells.

  3. Fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi.

    1989-05-22

    This invention aims to maintain a long-term operation with stable cell output characteristics by uniformly supplying an electrolyte from the reserver to the matrix layer over the entire matrix layer, and further to prevent the excessive wetting of the catalyst layer by smoothly absorbing the volume change of the electrolyte, caused by the repeated stop/start-up of the fuel cell, within the reserver system. For this purpose, in this invention, an electrolyte transport layer, which connects with an electrolyte reservor formed at the electrode end, is partly formed between the electrode material and the catalyst layer; a catalyst layer, which faces the electrolyte transport layer, has through-holes, which connect to the matrix, dispersely distributed. The electrolyte-transport layer is a thin sheet of a hydrophilic fibers which are non-wovens of such fibers as carbon, silicon carbide, silicon nitride or inorganic oxides. 11 figs.

  4. Ghost cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms.

  5. Comparative study of myocytes from normal and mdx mice iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Cao, Jiqing; Liu, Qiang; Qin, Jie; Kong, Jie; Wang, Yanyun; Li, Yaqin; Geng, Jia; Li, Qiuling; Yang, Liqing; Xiang, Andy Peng; Zhang, Cheng

    2012-02-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) have been derived from various techniques and show great potential for therapy of human diseases. Furthermore, the iPS technique can be used to provide cell models to explore pathological mechanisms of many human diseases in vitro, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is a severe recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy without effective treatment. In this study, we try to determine whether there are different characteristics of myocytes from mdx iPS cells and C57BL/10 iPS cells. Our results showed that both of mdx and C57BL/10 cells could be induced into iPS cells in vitro, whereas colony-forming ability of mdx iPS cells was much weaker than that of C57BL/10 iPS cells. Meanwhile, mdx iPS cells could be induced to differentiate into myocytes, whereas their differentiation efficiency was much lower than that of C57BL/10 iPS cells. And, the number of apoptotic cells in differentiated myocytes from mdx iPS cells was significantly higher than that from C57BL/10 iPS cells. More importantly, treatment of a pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD) produced a significant decrease in apoptotic cells. This study might add some insight to the biology study of dystrophin gene.

  6. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  7. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  8. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  9. Diffusive boundary layers of the colony-forming plankton alga Phaeocystis sp - implications for nutrient uptake and cellular growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Stolte, W.; Jørgensen, BB

    1999-01-01

    . At diffusion limitation, this concentration gradient was reflected by an apparently higher half-saturation constants for nutrient uptake, K-M, for colonial cells compared with that for single cells. The diffusion limited supply of inorganic nitrogen and orthophosphate from the bulk water phase......The impact of colony formation on cellular nutrient supply was calculated for Phaeocystis in a turbulent environment using a diffusion-reaction model. The model included diffusive boundary layer as predicted by Sherwood numbers in mass transfer to a sphere. Literature values for nutrient uptake (V......-max, K-m) of single cells and colonies and the size dependence of cell numbers in colonies were used in the model. Colony formation was shown to decrease nutrient uptake by Phaeocystis cells because of the presence of diffusive boundary layers with concentration gradients surrounding the colonies...

  10. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  11. Quantification of erythroid and granulocytic precursor cells in plateletpheresis residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, C.N.; Brennan, J.K.; Lichtman, M.A.; Nusbacher, J.

    1978-01-01

    Mononuclear cell fractions of human blood and plateletpheresis residues were compared for their content of hemopoietic precursor cells. Erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) averaged 560 +- 130 per ml of blood and granulocyte--monocyte colony forming units (CFU-C) averaged 240 +- 90 per ml blood. Estimates based on a blood volume of 7% of body weight indicate that the total blood pools of BFU-E and CFU-C are about 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ and 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ cells respectively. Sequential studies were performed over 3 days following one plateletpheresis in 4 donors. CFU-C and BFU-E approximately doubled between 48 and 72 hours after a plateletpheresis. During this time there was no significant alteration in the percent of null, T or B lymphocytes in blood. Thus, plateletpheresis appears to lead to a mobilization of precursor cells, which results in a transient increase in their concentration in blood. Therefore, pheresis 48 to 72 hours after an initial short-term procedure could harvest much larger numbers of precursor cells. Moreover, such techniques would put blood precursor cell content of plateletpheresis residues within reach of the precursor cell content in the volume of human marrow used for transplantation.

  12. CellFinder: a cell data repository

    OpenAIRE

    Stachelscheid, H.; Seltmann, S.; Lekschas, F.; Fontaine, J.F.; Mah, N.; Neves, M.; Andrade-Navarro, M.A.; Leser, U; Kurtz, A.

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue t...

  13. The High Yield Expansion and Megakaryocytic Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood CD133+ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Nikougoftar Zarif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite of many benefits, umbilical cord blood (UCB hematopoietic stem cell(HSC transplantation is associated with low number of stem cells and slow engraftment;in particular of platelets. So, expanded HSCs and co-transfusion of megakaryocyte (MKprogenitor cells can shorten this period. In this study, we evaluated the cytokine conditionsfor maximum expansion and MK differentiation of CD133+ HSCs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, The CD133+ cells were separatedfrom three cord blood samples by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS method, expandedin different cytokine combinations for a week and differentiated in thrombopoietin(TPO for the second week. Differentiation was followed by the flow cytometry detectionof CD41 and CD61 surface markers. Colony forming unit (CFU assay and DNA analysiswere done for colonogenic capacity and ploidy assay.Results: CD133+ cells showed maximum expansion in the stem span medium with stemcell factor (SCF + FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-ligand (Flt3-L + TPO but the maximum differentiationwas seen when CD133+ cells were expanded in stem span medium with SCF+ Interleukin 3 (IL-3 + TPO for the first and in TPO for the second week. Colony FormingUnit-MK (CFU-MK was formed in three sizes of colonies in the mega-cult medium. In theDNA analysis; 25.2 ± 6.7% of the cells had more than 2n DNA mass.Conclusion: Distinct differences in the MK progenitor cell count were observed when thecells were cultured in stem span medium with TPO, SCF, IL-3 and then the TPO in thesecond week. Such strategy could be applied for optimization of CD133+ cells expansionfollowed by MK differentiation.

  14. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as bi...

  15. De novo epidermal regeneration using human eccrine sweat gland cells: higher competence of secretory over absorptive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiggia, Luca; Biedermann, Thomas; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Oliveira, Carol; Braziulis, Erik; Klar, Agnieszka S; Meuli-Simmen, Claudia; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2014-06-01

    In our previous work, we showed that human sweat gland-derived epithelial cells represent an alternative source of keratinocytes to grow a near normal autologous epidermis. The role of subtypes of sweat gland cells in epidermal regeneration and maintenance remained unclear. In this study, we compare the regenerative potential of both secretory and absorptive sweat gland cell subpopulations. We demonstrate the superiority of secretory over absorptive cells in forming a new epidermis on two levels: first, the proliferative and colony-forming efficiencies in vitro are significantly higher for secretory cells (SCs), and second, SCs show a higher frequency of successful epidermis formation as well as an increase in the thickness of the formed epidermis in the in vitro and in vivo functional analyses using a 3D dermo-epidermal skin model. However, the ability of forming functional skin substitutes is not limited to SCs, which supports the hypothesis that multiple subtypes of sweat gland epithelial cells hold regenerative properties, while the existence and exact localization of a keratinocyte stem cell population in the human eccrine sweat gland remain elusive.

  16. Up-regulation of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex expression in side-population cells derived from a human trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Tabu, Kouichi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Taga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Akemi; Makino, Shintaro; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    The continual proliferation and differentiation of trophoblasts are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy. It is well known that the tissue stem cells are associated with the development of tissues and pathologies. It has been demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells identified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) are enriched with stem cells. The SP cells in HTR-8/SVneo cells derived from human primary trophoblast cells were isolated by FACS. HTR-8/SVneo-SP cell cultures generated both SP and non-SP (NSP) subpopulations. In contrast, NSP cell cultures produced NSP cells and failed to produce SP cells. These SP cells showed self-renewal capability by serial colony-forming assay. Microarray expression analysis using a set of HTR-8/SVneo-SP and -NSP cells revealed that SP cells overexpressed several stemness genes including caudal type homeobox2 (CDX2) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus D (LY6D) gene was the most highly up-regulated in HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. LY6D gene reduced its expression in the course of a 7-day cultivation in differentiation medium. SP cells tended to reduce its fraction by treatment of LY6D siRNA indicating that LY6D had potential to maintain cell proliferation of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. On ontology analysis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was involved in the up-regulated genes on microarray analysis. HTR-SVneo-SP cells showed enhanced migration. This is the first report that LY6D was important for the maintenance of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. EMT was associated with the phenotype of these SP cells.

  17. In vitro evaluation of isolation possibility of stem cells from intra oral soft tissue and comparison of them with bone mar-row stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Torkzaban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stem cells are of great interest for regenerating disturbed tissues and organs. These cells are commonly isolated from the bone marrow, but there has been interest in other tissues in the recent years. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of isolation of stem cells from oral connective tissue and investigated their characteristics.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, sampling from the bone marrow and oral connective tissue of a beagle dog was performed under general anesthesia. Bone marrow stem cell isolation was performed according to the established protocols. The samples obtained from oral soft tissue were broken to small pieces and after adding collagenase I, the samples were incubated for 45 minutes in 37°C. Other processes were similar to the processes which were carried out on bone marrow cells. Then cell properties were compared to evaluate if the cells from the connective tissue were stem cells.Results: The cells from the bone marrow and connective tissue had the same morphology. The result of colony forming unit assay was relatively similar. Population doubling time was similar too. In addition, both cell groups differentiated to osteoblasts in osteogenic media.Conclusion: The cells isolated from the oral connective tissue had the characteristics of stem cells, including fibroblastoid morphology, self renewal properties, high proliferation rate and differentiation potential.

  18. Lhx2 expression promotes self-renewal of a distinct multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cell in embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Dahl

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms regulating the expansion of the hematopoietic system including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver during embryonic development are largely unknown. The LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 is a candidate regulator of fetal hematopoiesis since it is expressed in the fetal liver and Lhx2(-/- mice die in utero due to severe anemia. Moreover, expression of Lhx2 in embryonic stem (ES cell-derived embryoid bodies (EBs can lead to the generation of HSC-like cell lines. To further define the role of this transcription factor in hematopoietic regulation, we generated ES cell lines that enabled tet-inducible expression of Lhx2. Using this approach we observed that Lhx2 expression synergises with specific signalling pathways, resulting in increased frequency of colony forming cells in developing EB cells. The increase in growth factor-responsive progenitor cells directly correlates to the efficiency in generating HSC-like cell lines, suggesting that Lhx2 expression induce self-renewal of a distinct multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cell in EBs. Signalling via the c-kit tyrosine kinase receptor and the gp130 signal transducer by IL-6 is necessary and sufficient for the Lhx2 induced self-renewal. While inducing self-renewal of multipotential progenitor cells, expression of Lhx2 inhibited proliferation of primitive erythroid precursor cells and interfered with early ES cell commitment, indicating striking lineage specificity of this effect.

  19. Electrorefining cell evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, M.C.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

    1989-04-14

    Operational characteristics of the LANL electrorefining cell, a modified LANL electrorefining cell, and an advanced electrorefining cell (known as the CRAC cell) were determined. Average process yields achieved were: 75% for the LANL cell, 82% for the modified LANL cell, and 86% for the CRAC cell. All product metal from the LANL and modified LANL cells was within foundry specifications. Metal from one run in the CRAC cell exceeded foundry specifications for tantalum. The LANL and modified LANL cells were simple in design and operation, but product separation was more labor intensive than with the CRAC cell. The CRAC cell was more complicated in design but remained relatively simple in operation. A decision analysis concluded that the modified LANL cell was the preferred cell. It was recommended that the modified LANL cell be implemented by the Plutonium Recovery Project at Rocky Flats and that development of the CRAC cell continue. 8 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  1. Sickle cell test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal hemoglobin that causes sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells ... has two abnormal hemoglobin S genes. A person with sickle cell trait has only one of these abnormal genes and ...

  2. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, T P; Bickham, U; Bayne, C J

    2013-06-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome.

  3. Thymoquinone synergistically potentiates temozolomide cytotoxicity through the inhibition of autophagy in U87MG cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhouhi, Mona; Sariri, Reyhaneh; Rabzia, Arezou; Khazaei, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal forms of human cancer and temozolomide (TMZ) is currently part of the standard treatment for this disease. Combination therapy using natural substances can enhance the anti-cancer activity of TMZ. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of TMZ in combination with thymoquinone (TQ) on human GBM cell line (U87MG). Materials and Methods: The cell line was treated with TMZ and/or TQ. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue and MTT assay. The effect of TMZ and/or TQ on colony-forming ability of the cells was investigated. Apoptosis and autophagy were quantified by fluorescent dye staining. The expression level of two autophagy related genes (ATG) were assessed using RT-PCR. Furthermore, nitric oxide (NO) production was detected by Griess reaction. Results: After treatment with TMZ and/or TQ, the cell viability was reduced in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the cell survival fraction (SF) was significantly decreased (P=0.000). Apoptosis index of U87MG cells was also significantly increased (P=0.000). Autophagy was significantly increased by TMZ (P=0.000) and decreased by TQ (P=0.018). Also TMZ and/or TQ significantly decreased NO production by U87MG cell (P=0.000). Conclusion: TQ enhanced the anti-cancer activity of TMZ by inhibition of autophagy at the transcriptional level and decreased the colony-forming ability and NO production of U87MG cell line. PMID:27746872

  4. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  5. Optimizing cell viability in dropletbased cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jan; Visser, C.W.; Henke, S.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Biofabrication commonly involves the use of liquid droplets to transport cells to the printed structure. However, the viability of the cells after impact is poorly controlled and understood, hampering applications including cell spraying, inkjet bioprinting, and laser-assisted cell transfer. Here,

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Blashki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashki, Daniel; Murphy, Matthew B; Ferrari, Mauro; Simmons, Paul J; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies. PMID:27579159

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adhering to Adipocytes in Canine Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Yi; Fujita, Naoki; Endo, Kentaro; Morita, Maresuke; Takeda, Tae; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2017-03-15

    The ceiling culture method has been used to isolate mature adipocytes from adipose tissue that can be dedifferentiated into fibroblastic cells, also known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that self-renew and are multipotent, with much higher homogeneity and colony-forming efficiency than those of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We cultured adipocytes from canine bone marrow using this technique, with the expectation of obtaining DFAT cells. However, contrary to our expectations, continuous monitoring of ceiling cultures by time-lapse microscopy revealed many small cells adhering to adipocytes that proliferated rapidly into cells with a fibroblastic morphology and without any dedifferentiation from adipocytes. We named these cells bone marrow peri-adipocyte cells (BM-PACs) and demonstrated the multipotent properties of BM-PACs compared to that of conventionally cultured canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). BM-PACs showed significantly greater clonogenicity and proliferation ability than BMMSCs. An in vitro trilineage differentiation assay revealed that BM-PACs possess adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic capacities superior to those of BMMSCs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD73, which plays an important role in cell growth and differentiation, was significantly higher in BM-PACs than in BMMSCs. These results indicate that canine BM-PACs have stem cell characteristics that are superior to those of BMMSCs, and that these mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to be a feasible source for cell-based therapies in dogs.

  9. Y-27632, a ROCK Inhibitor, Promoted Limbal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Corneal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chin Sun

    Full Text Available Transplantation of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial cells is proven effective in restoring limbal stem cell deficiency. The present study aimed to investigate the promoting effect of Y-27632 on limbal epithelial cell proliferation. Limbal explants isolated from human donor eyes were expanded three weeks on culture dishes and outgrowth of epithelial cells was subsequently subcultured for in vitro experiments. In the presence of Y-27632, the ex vivo limbal outgrowth was accelerated, particularly the cells with epithelial cell-like morphology. Y-27632 dose-dependently promoted the proliferation of in vitro cultured human limbal epithelial cells as examined by phase contrast microscopy and luminescent cell-viability assay 30 hours after the treatment. The colony forming efficacy determined 7 days after the treatment was enhanced by Y-27632 also in a dose-dependent manner. The number of p63- or Ki67-positive cells was dose-dependently increased in Y-27632-treated cultures as detected by immunofluorescent staining and western blotanalysis. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometric method revealed an increase in S-phase proliferating cells. The epithelial woundclosure rate was shown to be faster in experimental group received topical treatment withY-27632 than the sham control using a rat corneal wounding model. These resultsdemonstrate that Y-27632 can promote both the ex vivo and in vitro proliferation oflimbal epithelial cell proliferation. The in vivo enhanced epithelial wound healingfurther implies that the Y-27632 may act as a new strategy for treating limbal stem cell deficiency.

  10. α-Solanine Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Esophageal Cancer Cells by Inducing MicroRNA 138 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Esophageal cancer (EC is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. Due to difficulties with performing the operation, most patients choose to have palliative treatment instead. Radiotherapy is one of the main palliative treatments of EC. However, the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy is not satisfactory α-Solanine is a bioactive component of steroidal glycoalkaloids which has been demonstrated to exhibit anti-metastasis activity in different cancers. In the present study, we determined the effect of α-solanine on the radiosensitivity of EC cells and priliminarily explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods: Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay was conducted to found the cytotoxic effect of α-solanine on EC cells. CCK-8 assay and colony-forming survival assays were performed to explore the effect of α-solanine on cell viability and proliferation of EC cells after irradiation. Immunofluorescence and comet assays were used to detect the effect of α-solanine on DNA repair capacity of EC cells after irradiation. The flow cytometry (FCM and Hoechst/PI staining were conductd to study the effect of α-solanine on apoptosis of EC cells after irradiation. Results: The cytotoxic effect of α-solanine to EC cells was dose-dependent. The results of CCK-8, colony-forming survival assay, immunofluorescence, comet assay, FCM and Hoechst/PI staining showed that α-solanine could enhance the radiosensitivity of EC cells. α-Solanine could downregulate Survivin expression level by upregulating miR-138 expression in EC cells. Upregulation of miR-138 and knock down Survivin both enhanced the radiosensitivity of EC cells. Moreover, Survivin could restore the effect of α-solanine and miR-138 on radiosensitivity of EC cells. Conclusions: α-solanine could enhance the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cells by inducing microRNA-138 expression, and probably be an effective radiosensitizer in treating EC.

  11. Skin Stem Cells in Skin Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollapour Sisakht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Preclinical and clinical research has shown that stem cell therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many diseases. This article describes skin stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications. Evidence Acquisition Compared with conventional methods, cell therapy reduces the surgical burden for patients because it is simple and less time-consuming. Skin cell therapy has been developed for variety of diseases. By isolation of the skin stem cell from the niche, in vitro expansion and transplantation of cells offers a surprising healing capacity profile. Results Stem cells located in skin cells have shown interesting properties such as plasticity, transdifferentiation, and specificity. Mesenchymal cells of the dermis, hypodermis, and other sources are currently being investigated to promote regeneration. Conclusions Because skin stem cells are highly accessible from autologous sources and their immunological profile is unique, they are ideal for therapeutic approaches. Optimization of administrative routes requires more investigation own to the lack of a standard protocol.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Cell-cell Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Huai

    2004-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is the key for multicellular organisms to survive. This recognition critically depends on protein-protein interactions from opposing cell surfaces. Recent structural investigations reveal unique features of these cell surface receptors and how they interact. These interactions are specific, but usually relatively weak, with more hydrophilic forces involved in binding. The receptors appear to have specialized ways to present their key interacting elements for ligand-binding from the cell surface. Cell-cell contacts are multivalent. A large group of cell surface molecules are engaged in interactions. Characteristic weak interactions make possible for each individual molecule pair within the group to constantly associate-dissociate-reassociate, such that the cell-cell recognition becomes a dynamic process. The immunological synapse is a good example for immune receptors to be orchestrated in performing immunological function in a collective fashion.

  13. Photoelectrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Boudreau, Robert A. (Norton, MA)

    1983-06-14

    A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a sealed container having a light-transmitting window for admitting light into the container across a light-admitting plane, an electrolyte in the container, a photoelectrode in the container having a light-absorbing surface arranged to receive light from the window and in contact with the electrolyte, the surface having a plurality of spaced portions oblique to the plane, each portion having dimensions at least an order of magnitude larger than the maximum wavelength of incident sunlight, the total surface area of the surface being larger than the area of the plane bounded by the container, and a counter electrode in the container in contact with the electrolyte.

  14. Development of isolated sheep inner cell masses/embryonic discs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasiewicz, J; Szablisty, E; Guszkiewicz, A; Kossakowski, M; Stefanski, G; Modlinski, J; Reed, M

    1996-05-01

    Ovine inner cell masses (ICMs)/embryonic discs cultured in vitro, in conditions copying those in which mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) arise from mouse blastocysts, give rise to ectodermal colonies. Day 10-11 ICMs/epiblasts produce ectodermal colonies sufficiently often (55-60%) for it to be considered worthwhile trying to generate presumed ESCs from them. Younger ICMs can only be taken into account if culture conditions can be improved so that ICM/ectodermal cells are more numerous. Older embryonic discs (12-13 day) are inconvenient because of the problem of endoderm overgrowing ectoderm. Secondary cultures of ectodermal colonies form epithelial or mesenchymal cells, which can be passaged at least seven times (50 days).

  15. Endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation to PEGylated polymers with covalently linked RGD peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Heath, Daniel E; Cooper, Stuart L

    2012-03-01

    A nonfouling peptide grafted polymer was synthesized that can promote endothelial cell (EC) binding. The polymer was composed of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate, and CGRGDS peptide. The peptide was incorporated into the polymer system either by a chain transfer reaction or by coupling to an acrylate-PEG-N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) comonomer. The introduction of PEG chains minimizes protein adsorption. Human umbilical vein ECs and endothelial colony forming cells were cultured on these surfaces in short term and long-term studies. A difference in number and morphology of ECs was observed depending on the method of peptide incorporation. Both cell types adhered better to polymer films containing NHS coupled RGD peptide after 2 h even in the presence of albumin but significant cell detachment occurred after 4 days. Polymer solutions were electrospun into fibrous scaffolds. Both nonfouling and peptide binding characteristics were retained after processing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxin Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  17. nduced pluripotent stem cells and cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst-stage embryo. They hold a huge promise for cell therapy with their self-renewing ability and pluripotency, which is known as the potential to differentiate into all cell types originating from three embryonic germ layers. However, their unique pluripotent feature could not be utilised for therapeutic purposes due to the ethical and legal problems during derivation. Recently, it was shown that the cells from adult tissues could be reverted into embryonic state, thereby restoring their pluripotent feature. This has strenghtened the possiblity of directed differentition of the reprogrammed somatic cells into the desired cell types in vitro and their use in regenerative medicine. Although these cells were termed as induced pluripotent cells, the mechanism of pluripotency has yet to be understood. Still, induced pluripotent stem cell technology is considered to be significant by proposing novel approaches in disease modelling, drug screening and cell therapy. Besides their self-renewing ability and their potential to differentiate into all cell types in a human body, they arouse a great interest in scientific world by being far from the ethical concerns regarding their embryonic counterparts and their unique feature of being patient-specific in prospective cell therapies. In this review, induced pluripotent stem cell technology and its role in cell-based therapies from past to present will be discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 550-561

  18. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S.; Wang, Y; Wang, X-N.

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ‘entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  19. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  20. The effect of resveratrol in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy. Study using Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Lill, C.; Brunner, M.; Thurnher, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Radiotherapy and -biology, Vienna (Austria); Houben, R. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Dermatology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Bigenzahn, J. [CeMM-Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-01-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin. In case of systemic disease, possible therapeutic options include irradiation or chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the flavonoid resveratrol enhances the effect of radiotherapy or chemotherapy in MCC cell lines. The two MCC cell lines MCC13 and MCC26 were treated with increasing doses of resveratrol. Combination experiments were conducted with cisplatin and etoposide. Colony forming assays were performed after sequential irradiation with 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 Gy and apoptosis was assessed with flow cytometry. Expression of cancer drug targets was analyzed by real-time PCR array. Resveratrol is cytotoxic in MCC cell lines. Cell growth is inhibited by induction of apoptosis. The combination with cisplatin and etoposide resulted in a partially synergistic inhibition of cell proliferation. Resveratrol and irradiation led to a synergistic reduction in colony formation compared to irradiation alone. Evaluation of gene expression did not show significant difference between the cell lines. Due to its radiosensitizing effect, resveratrol seems to be a promising agent in combination with radiation therapy. The amount of chemosensitizing depends on the cell lines tested. (orig.) [German] Das Merkelzellkarzinom (MCC) ist ein seltener, jedoch hochmaligner Tumor der Haut. Sowohl Strahlentherapie oder Chemotherapie sind moegliche therapeutische Optionen. In dieser Studie wurde untersucht, ob das Flavonoid Resveratrol die Wirkung der Strahlen- oder Chemotherapie in MCC-Zelllinien verbessert. Die beiden MCC-Zelllinien MCC13 und MCC26 wurden mit ansteigenden Dosen von Resveratrol behandelt. Kombinationsexperimente wurden mit Cisplatin und Etoposid durchgefuehrt und die Koloniebildung in ''Colony-Forming''-Assays nach erfolgter sequentieller Bestrahlung mit 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 und 8 Gy gemessen. Desweiteren wurde die Apoptose mittels Durchflusszytometrie bestimmt. Die

  1. Collecting duct-derived cells display mesenchymal stem cell properties and retain selective in vitro and in vivo epithelial capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Joan; Ariunbold, Usukhbayar; Suhaimi, Norseha; Sunn, Nana; Guo, Jinjin; McMahon, Jill A; McMahon, Andrew P; Little, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    We previously described a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like population within the adult mouse kidney that displays long-term colony-forming efficiency, clonogenicity, immunosuppression, and panmesodermal potential. Although phenotypically similar to bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, kidney MSC-like cells display a distinct expression profile. FACS sorting from Hoxb7/enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice identified the collecting duct as a source of kidney MSC-like cells, with these cells undergoing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition to form clonogenic, long-term, self-renewing MSC-like cells. Notably, after extensive passage, kidney MSC-like cells selectively integrated into the aquaporin 2-positive medullary collecting duct when microinjected into the kidneys of neonatal mice. No epithelial integration was observed after injection of BM-MSCs. Indeed, kidney MSC-like cells retained a capacity to form epithelial structures in vitro and in vivo, and conditioned media from these cells supported epithelial repair in vitro. To investigate the origin of kidney MSC-like cells, we further examined Hoxb7(+) fractions within the kidney across postnatal development, identifying a neonatal interstitial GFP(lo) (Hoxb7(lo)) population displaying an expression profile intermediate between epithelium and interstitium. Temporal analyses with Wnt4(GCE/+):R26(tdTomato/+) mice revealed evidence for the intercalation of a Wnt4-expressing interstitial population into the neonatal collecting duct, suggesting that such intercalation may represent a normal developmental mechanism giving rise to a distinct collecting duct subpopulation. These results extend previous observations of papillary stem cell activity and collecting duct plasticity and imply a role for such cells in collecting duct formation and, possibly, repair.

  2. Physical impaction injury effects on bacterial cells during spread plating influenced by cell characteristics of the organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Mujawar, M M; Sekhar, A C; Upreti, R

    2014-04-01

    To understand the factors that contribute to the variations in colony-forming units (CFU) in different bacteria during spread plating. Employing a mix culture of vegetative cells of ten organisms varying in cell characteristics (Gram reaction, cell shape and cell size), spread plating to the extent of just drying the agar surface (50-60 s) was tested in comparison with the alternate spotting-and-tilt-spreading (SATS) approach where 100 μl inoculum was distributed by mere tilting of plate after spotting as 20-25 microdrops. The former imparted a significant reduction in CFU by 20% over the spreader-independent SATS approach. Extending the testing to single organisms, Gram-negative proteobacteria with relatively larger cells (Escherichia, Enterobacter, Agrobacterium, Ralstonia, Pantoea, Pseudomonas and Sphingomonas spp.) showed significant CFU reduction with spread plating except for slow-growing Methylobacterium sp., while those with small rods (Xenophilus sp.) and cocci (Acinetobacter sp.) were less affected. Among Gram-positive nonspore formers, Staphylococcus epidermidis showed significant CFU reduction while Staphylococcus haemolyticus and actinobacteria (Microbacterium, Cellulosimicrobium and Brachybacterium spp.) with small rods/cocci were unaffected. Vegetative cells of Bacillus pumilus and B. subtilis were generally unaffected while others with larger rods (B. thuringiensis, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus spp.) were significantly affected. A simulated plating study coupled with live-dead bacterial staining endorsed the chances of cell disruption with spreader impaction in afflicted organisms. Significant reduction in CFU could occur during spread plating due to physical impaction injury to bacterial cells depending on the spreader usage and the variable effects on different organisms are determined by Gram reaction, cell size and cell shape. The inoculum spreader could impart physical disruption of vegetative cells against a hard surface

  3. Elimination of clonogenic tumor cells from HL-60, Daudi, and U-937 cell lines by laser photoradiation therapy: implications for autologous bone marrow purging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliya, K.S.; Pervaiz, S.

    1989-03-01

    Laser photoradiation therapy was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in the elimination of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 of laser light in the presence of 20 micrograms/mL of merocyanine 540 (MC540) there was greater than 5 log reduction in Burkitt's lymphoma (Daudi) cells. Similar tumor cell kill was obtained for leukemia (HL-60) cells at a laser light dose of 93.6 J/cm2. However, to obtain the same efficiency of killing for histiocytic lymphoma (U-937) cells, a higher dose of MC540 (25 micrograms/mL) was required. Clonogenic tumor stem cell colony formation was reduced by greater than 5 logs after laser photoradiation therapy. Under identical conditions for each cell line the percent survival for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM, 45.9%, 40%, 17.5%), granulocyte/erythroid/macrophage/megakaryocyte (GEMM, 40.1%, 20.1%, 11.5%), colony-forming units (CFU-C, 16.2%, 9.1%, 1.8%), and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E, 33.4%, 17.8%, 3.9%) was significantly higher than the tumor cells. Mixing of gamma ray-irradiated normal marrow cells with tumor cells (1:1 and 10:1 ratio) did not interfere with the elimination of tumor cells. The effect of highly purified recombinant interferon alpha (rIFN) on laser photoradiation therapy of tumor cells was also investigated. In the presence of rIFN (30 to 3,000 U/mL), the viability of leukemic cells was observed to increase from 0% to 1.5% with a concurrent decrease in membrane polarization, suggesting an increase in fluidity of cell membrane in response to rIFN. However, at higher doses of rIFN (6,000 to 12,000 U/mL) this phenomenon was not observed. The viability of lymphoma cells remained unaffected at all doses of rIFN tested.

  4. Number and proliferative capacity of osteogenic stem cells are maintained during aging and in patients with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, J; Eriksen, E F

    2001-01-01

    Decreased bone formation is an important pathophysiological mechanism responsible for bone loss associated with aging and osteoporosis. Osteoblasts (OBs), originate from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and form colonies (termed colony-forming units-fibroblastic [......Decreased bone formation is an important pathophysiological mechanism responsible for bone loss associated with aging and osteoporosis. Osteoblasts (OBs), originate from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and form colonies (termed colony-forming units......-fibroblastic [CFU-Fs]) when cultured in vitro. To examine the effect of aging and osteoporosis on the MSC population, we quantified the number of MSCs and their proliferative capacity in vitro. Fifty-one individuals were studied: 38 normal volunteers (23 young individuals [age, 22-44 years] and 15 old individuals...... [age, 66-74 years]) and 13 patients with osteoporosis (age, 58-83 years). Bone marrow was aspirated from iliac crest; mononuclear cells were enriched in MSCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) using STRO-1 antibody. Total CFU-F number, size distribution, cell density per CFU-F, number...

  5. Transcriptional signature of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) preconditioned for chondrogenesis in hypoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgaard, L.; Lund, P.; Duroux, M. [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 3B, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Lockstone, H.; Taylor, J. [Bioinformatics and Statistical Genetics, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Emmersen, J.; Fink, T. [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 3B, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Ragoussis, J. [Genomics, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Zachar, V., E-mail: vlaz@hst.aau.dk [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 3B, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor involved in the control of stem cells. To obtain a better insight into the phenotypical changes brought about by hypoxic preconditioning prior to chondrogenic differentiation; we have investigated growth, colony-forming and chondrogenic capacity, and global transcriptional responses of six adipose tissue-derived stem cell lines expanded at oxygen concentrations ranging from ambient to 1%. The assessment of cell proliferation and colony-forming potential revealed that the hypoxic conditions corresponding to 1% oxygen played a major role. The chondrogenic inducibility, examined by high-density pellet model, however, did not improve on hypoxic preconditioning. While the microarray analysis revealed a distinctive inter-donor variability, the exposure to 1% hypoxia superseded the biological variability and produced a specific expression profile with 2581 significantly regulated genes and substantial functional enrichment in the pathways of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, exposure to 1% oxygen resulted in upregulation of factors related to angiogenesis and cell growth. In particular, leptin (LEP), the key regulator of body weight and food intake was found to be highly upregulated. In conclusion, the results of this investigation demonstrate the significance of donor demographics and the importance of further studies into the use of regulated oxygen tension as a tool for preparation of ASCs in order to exploit their full potential.

  6. Modeling the relationship between most probable number (MPN) and colony-forming unit (CFU) estimates of fecal coliform concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, Andrew D; Wolpert, Robert L

    2008-07-01

    Most probable number (MPN) and colony-forming-unit (CFU) estimates of fecal coliform bacteria concentration are common measures of water quality in coastal shellfish harvesting and recreational waters. Estimating procedures for MPN and CFU have intrinsic variability and are subject to additional uncertainty arising from minor variations in experimental protocol. It has been observed empirically that the standard multiple-tube fermentation (MTF) decimal dilution analysis MPN procedure is more variable than the membrane filtration CFU procedure, and that MTF-derived MPN estimates are somewhat higher on average than CFU estimates, on split samples from the same water bodies. We construct a probabilistic model that provides a clear theoretical explanation for the variability in, and discrepancy between, MPN and CFU measurements. We then compare our model to water quality samples analyzed using both MPN and CFU procedures, and find that the (often large) observed differences between MPN and CFU values for the same water body are well within the ranges predicted by our probabilistic model. Our results indicate that MPN and CFU intra-sample variability does not stem from human error or laboratory procedure variability, but is instead a simple consequence of the probabilistic basis for calculating the MPN. These results demonstrate how probabilistic models can be used to compare samples from different analytical procedures, and to determine whether transitions from one procedure to another are likely to cause a change in quality-based management decisions.

  7. Suiciding of lymphocytic precursor cells by tritiated nucleosides, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeki, E M; Nishimura, T; Bisel, T U

    1978-02-01

    Differences in suiciding by various tritiated nucleosides were observed between two functional assays for in vitro lymphocytic precursor cell development, the hemolysin plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay and the B lymphocytic colony-forming cell (CFC-L) assay, using BDF1 mouse spleen cells. PFC growth was markedly reduced by an early (days 0-1) pulse of tritiated deoxyadenosine ([3H]dAdo), but relatively unaffected by a pulse of tritiated thymidine ([3H]dThd) during the same interval. In contrast, CFC-L formation significantly dropped after an early (day 0) [3H]dThd pulse, as well as after pulses of [3H]dAdo and the corresponding tritiated ribosides, uridine and adenosine. This implied a cycling state in an early lymphocytic precursor cell, as opposed to the PFC insensitivity to an early [3H]dThd pulse. The response pattern of colonies and clusters to [3H]dThd supported our notion of a delayed suiciding of CFC contributing to the increase in cluster numbers.

  8. Radiosensitivity of Human Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, R. M.; Medina, V.; Cricco, G.; Mohamed, N.; Martin, G.; Nunez, M.; Croci, M.; Crescenti, E. J.; Rivera, E. S.

    2004-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a skin cancer resulting from the malign transformation of skin-pigment cells, the melanocytes. The radiotherapy, alone or in combination with other treatment, is an important therapy for this disease. the objective of this paper was to determine in vitro the radiosensitivity of two human melanoma cell lines with different metastatic capability: WM35 and MI/15, and to study the effect of drugs on radiobiological parameters. The Survival Curves were adjusted to the mathematical Linear-quadratic model using GrapsPad Prism software. Cells were seeded in RPMI medium (3000-3500 cells/flask), in triplicate and irradiated 24 h later. The irradiation was performed using an IBL 437C H Type equipment (189 TBq, 7.7 Gy/min) calibrated with a TLD 700 dosimeter. The range of Doses covered from 0 to 10 Gy and the colonies formed were counted at day 7th post-irradiation. Results obtained were: for WM35, {alpha}=0.37{+-}0.07 Gy''-1 and {beta}=0.06{+-}0.02 Gy''-2, for M1/15m {alpha}=0.47{+-}0.03 Gy''-1 and {beta}=0.06{+-}0.01 Gy''-2. The {alpha}/{beta} values WM35: {alpha}/{beta} values WM35: {alpha}/{beta}=6.07 Gy and M1/15: {alpha}/{beta}{sub 7}.33 Gy were similar, independently of their metastatic capabillity and indicate that both lines exhibit high radioresistance. Microscopic observation of irradiated cells showed multinuclear cells with few morphologic changes non-compatible with apoptosis. By means of specific fluorescent dyes and flow cytometry analysis we determined the intracellular levels of the radicals superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and their modulation in response to ionizing radiation. The results showed a marked decreased in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} intracellular levels with a simultaneous increase in superoxide that will be part of a mechanism responsible for induction of cell radioresistance. This response triggered by irradiated cells could not be abrogated by different treatments like histamine or the

  9. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  10. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  11. Microvesicles Derived from Indoxyl Sulfate Treated Endothelial Cells Induce Endothelial Progenitor Cells Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Andres; Guerrero, Fatima; Buendia, Paula; Obrero, Teresa; Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a typical protein-bound uremic toxin that cannot be effectively cleared by conventional dialysis. Increased IS is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease and development of cardiovascular disease. After endothelial activation by IS, cells release endothelial microvesicles (EMV) that can induce endothelial dysfunction. We developed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by IS to evaluate the functional effect of EMV on the endothelial repair process developed by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). EMV derived from IS-treated endothelial cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized for miRNAs content. The effects of EMV on healthy EPCs in culture were studied. We observed that IS activates endothelial cells and the generated microvesicles (IsEMV) can modulate the classic endothelial roles of progenitor cells as colony forming units and form new vessels in vitro. Moreover, 23 miRNAs were contained in IsEMV including four (miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, miR-150-5p, and hsa-let-7i-5p) that were upregulated in IsEMV compared with control endothelial microvesicles. Other authors have found that miR-181a-5p, miR-4454, and miR-150-5p are involved in promoting inflammation, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Interestingly, we observed an increase in NFκB and p53, and a decrease in IκBα in EPCs treated with IsEMV. Our data suggest that IS is capable of inducing endothelial vesiculation with different membrane characteristics, miRNAs and other molecules, which makes maintaining of vascular homeostasis of EPCs not fully functional. These specific characteristics of EMV could be used as novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of vascular disease.

  12. Sorting and biological characteristics analysis for side population cells in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yegui; Gao, Hucheng; Liu, Mingdong; Mao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of the tumor worldwide, its incidence is increasing year by year. This study aims to investigate the sorting and biological characteristics of side population (SP) cells. Human HCC tissues used were obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection. SP cells were sorted using flow cytometry. Cell cycle assay, apoptosis assay and colony formation assay were performed to detect cell proliferation and apoptosis. Invasion assay was employed to examine SP cell invasion. Tumorigenicity assay was used to evaluate tumorigenicity. HCC related microRNAs (miRNA) were analyzed using Micro-array analysis. Target genes were predicted using miRNA database. GO analsis was employed to predict target gene function. Apoptosis percentage was lower and cell viability was higher in SP cells than non-SP (NSP) cells. Colony forming ability of SP cells was significantly higher than NSP cells. Transwell assay positive cells in SP cells were higher significantly than NSP cells. Tumorigenicity of SP cells was higher significantly than NSP cells. 107 differentially expression miRNA were discovered, including 45 up-expressed miRNAs and 62 down-expressed miRNAs in SP cells. Up-regulated hsa-miR-193b-3p and hsa-miR-505-3p predict 25 and 35 target genes, and correlated with 4 and 42 GO terms, respectively. Down-regulated hsa-miR-200a-3p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-130b-3p predict 133, 48 and 127 target genes, and correlate with 10, 7 and 109 GO terms, respectively. In conclusion, proliferation, colony formation, anti-apoptosis, self-renewal capavility, invasive characteristic and tumorigenicity in SP cells isolated from HCC tissues was higher compared to NSP cells. Therefore, sorted SP cells could characterize with biological functions of cancer stem cells.

  13. Cell death pathways in directly irradiated cells and cells exposed to medium from irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Garcia, Amaya; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare levels of apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death and senescence after treatment with both direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line) were irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) using a cobalt 60 teletherapy unit. For bystander experiments, the medium was harvested from donor HaCaT cells 1 hour after irradiation and transferred to recipient HaCaT cells. Clonogenic assay, apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death, senescence and cell cycle analysis were measured in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells A reduction in cell survival was observed for both directly irradiated cells and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM)-treated cells. Early apoptosis and necrosis was observed predominantly after direct irradiation. An increase in the number of cells in G2/M phase was observed at 6 and 12 h which led to mitotic cell death after 72 h following direct irradiation and ICCM treatment. No senescence was observed in the HaCaT cell line following either direct irradiation or treatment with ICCM. This study has shown that directly irradiated cells undergo apoptosis, necrosis and mitotic cell death whereas ICCM-treated cells predominantly undergo mitotic cell death.

  14. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shengjuan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bergen, Werner G. [Program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences/Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Hausman, Gary J. [Animal Science Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2771 (United States); Zan, Linsen, E-mail: zanls@yahoo.com.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Dodson, Michael V., E-mail: dodson@wsu.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  15. Cell death by the quinoxaline dioxide DCQ in human colon cancer cells is enhanced under hypoxia and is independent of p53 and p21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddadin Makhluf J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We have shown that the radio sensitizer DCQ enhances sensitivity of HCT116 human colon cancer cells to hypoxia. However, it is not known whether the p53 or p21 genes influence cellular response to DCQ. In this study, we used HCT116 that are either wildtype for p53 and p21, null for p53 or null for p21 to understand the role of these genes in DCQ toxicity. Methods HCT116 cells were exposed to DCQ and incubated under normoxia or hypoxia and the viability, colony forming ability, DNA damage and apoptotic responses of these cells was determined, in addition to the modulation of HIF-1α and of p53, p21, caspase-2, and of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM target PIDD-C. Results DCQ decreased colony forming ability and viability of all HCT116 cells to a greater extent under hypoxia than normoxia and the p21-/-cell line was most sensitive. Cells had different HIF-1α responses to hypoxia and/or drug treatment. In p53+/+, DCQ significantly inhibited the hypoxia-induced increases in HIF-1α protein, in contrast to the absence of a significant HIF-1α increase or modulation by DCQ in p21-/- cells. In p53-/- cells, 10 μM DCQ significantly reduced HIF-1α expression, especially under hypoxia, despite the constitutive expression of this protein in control cells. Higher DCQ doses induced PreG1-phase increase and apoptosis, however, lower doses caused mitotic catastrophe. In p53+/+ cells, apoptosis correlated with the increased expression of the pro-apoptotic caspase-2 and inhibition of the pro-survival protein PIDD-C. Exposure of p53+/+ cells to DCQ induced single strand breaks and triggered the activation of the nuclear kinase ATM by phosphorylation at Ser-1981 in all cell cycle phases. On the other hand, no drug toxicity to normal FHs74 Int human intestinal cell line was observed. Conclusions Collectively, our findings indicate that DCQ reduces the colony survival of HCT116 and induces apoptosis even in cells that are null for p53

  16. Effects of LncRNA-HOST2 on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Run-Tian; Cao, Jing-Lin; Yan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Yang; An, Cong-Jing; Lv, Hai-Tao

    2017-01-31

    This study explored the effect of LncRNA-HOST2 on cell proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC-7721. HCC tissues and adjacent normal tissues from 162 HCC patients were collected. The HCC cell lines were assigned into the control group (regular culture), negative control group (NC, transfected with siRNA) and experimental group (transfected with Lnc-HOST2 siRNA). qRT-PCR was used to detect the expression of LncRNA-HOST2. Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 and colony-forming assays, cell apoptosis by flow cytometry and cell migration by scratch test. Transwell assay was used to evaluate cell migration and invasion abilities. LncRNA-HOST2 expression in the HCC tissues increased 2 to 10 times than that in the adjacent normal tissues. Compared with the HL-7702 cell line, LncRNA-HOST2 expression in HepG2, SMMC7721 and Huh7 cell lines was all up-regulated, but the SMMC-7721 cell had the highest Lnc-HOST2 expression. The LncRNA-HOST2 expression in the experimental group was down-regulated as compared to the control and NC groups. In comparison with the control and NC groups, cloned cells reduced, cell apoptosis increased, clone-forming ability weakened and inhibitory rate of colony formation increased in the experimental group. The cells migrating and penetrating into transwell chamber were fewer in the experimental group than those in the control and NC groups. The experimental group exhibited slow wound-healing and decreased cell migration area after 48 h. These findings indicate that LncRNA-HOST2 can promote cell proliferation, migration and invasion and inhibit cell apoptosis in human HCC cell line SMMC-7721.

  17. Curcumin decreases malignant characteristics of glioblastoma stem cells via induction of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersey, Zachary C; Rodriguez, Gregor A; Barbarite, Eric; Sanchez, Anthony; Walters, Winston M; Ohaeto, Kelechi C; Komotar, Ricardo J; Graham, Regina M

    2017-02-04

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of primary brain tumor in adults. Following standard treatment of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, patients are expected to survive 12-14 months. Theorized cause of disease recurrence in these patients is tumor cell repopulation through the proliferation of treatment-resistant cancer stem cells. Current research has revealed curcumin, the principal ingredient in turmeric, can modulate multiple signaling pathways important for cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival. Following resection, tumor specimens were dissociated and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) were propagated in neurosphere media and characterized via immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was determined with MTS assay. GSC proliferation, sphere forming and colony forming assays were conducted through standard counting methods. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was examined using the fluorescent molecular probe CM-H2DCFA. Effects on cell signaling pathways were elucidated by western blot. We evaluate the effects of curcumin on patient-derived GSC lines. We demonstrate a curcumin-induced dose-dependent decrease in GSC viability with an approximate IC50 of 25 μM. Treatment with sub-toxic levels (2.5 μM) of curcumin significantly decreased GSC proliferation, sphere forming ability and colony forming potential. Curcumin induced ROS, promoted MAPK pathway activation, downregulated STAT3 activity and IAP family members. Inhibition of ROS with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed these effects indicating a ROS dependent mechanism. Discoveries made in this investigation may lead to a non-toxic intervention designed to prevent recurrence in glioblastoma by targeting glioblastoma stem cells.

  18. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 inhibition suppresses cell growth and enhances radiation sensitivity in medulloblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Peter S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and remains a therapeutic challenge due to its significant therapy-related morbidity. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 is highly expressed in many cancers and regulates critical steps in mitotic progression. Recent studies suggest that targeting PLK1 with small molecule inhibitors is a promising approach to tumor therapy. Methods We examined the expression of PLK1 mRNA in medulloblastoma tumor samples using microarray analysis. The impact of PLK1 on cell proliferation was evaluated by depleting expression with RNA interference (RNAi or by inhibiting function with the small molecule inhibitor BI 2536. Colony formation studies were performed to examine the impact of BI 2536 on medulloblastoma cell radiosensitivity. In addition, the impact of depleting PLK1 mRNA on tumor-initiating cells was evaluated using tumor sphere assays. Results Analysis of gene expression in two independent cohorts revealed that PLK1 mRNA is overexpressed in some, but not all, medulloblastoma patient samples when compared to normal cerebellum. Inhibition of PLK1 by RNAi significantly decreased medulloblastoma cell proliferation and clonogenic potential and increased cell apoptosis. Similarly, a low nanomolar concentration of BI 2536, a small molecule inhibitor of PLK1, potently inhibited cell growth, strongly suppressed the colony-forming ability, and increased cellular apoptosis of medulloblastoma cells. Furthermore, BI 2536 pretreatment sensitized medulloblastoma cells to ionizing radiation. Inhibition of PLK1 impaired tumor sphere formation of medulloblastoma cells and decreased the expression of SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2 mRNA in tumor spheres indicating a possible role in targeting tumor inititiating cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that targeting PLK1 with small molecule inhibitors, in combination with radiation therapy, is a novel strategy in the treatment of

  19. Efficient removal of platelets from peripheral blood progenitor cell products using a novel micro-chip based acoustophoretic platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Dykes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive collection of platelets is an unwanted side effect in current centrifugation-based peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC apheresis. We investigated a novel microchip-based acoustophoresis technique, utilizing ultrasonic standing wave forces for the removal of platelets from PBPC products. By applying an acoustic standing wave field onto a continuously flowing cell suspension in a micro channel, cells can be separated from the surrounding media depending on their physical properties. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: PBPC samples were obtained from patients (n = 15 and healthy donors (n = 6 and sorted on an acoustophoresis-chip. The acoustic force was set to separate leukocytes from platelets into a target fraction and a waste fraction, respectively. The PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions were analysed for cell recovery, purity and functionality. RESULTS: The median separation efficiency of leukocytes to the target fraction was 98% whereas platelets were effectively depleted by 89%. PBPC samples and corresponding target fractions were similar in the percentage of CD34+ hematopoetic progenitor/stem cells as well as leukocyte/lymphocyte subset distributions. Median viability was 98%, 98% and 97% in the PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions, respectively. Results from hematopoietic progenitor cell assays indicated a preserved colony-forming ability post-sorting. Evaluation of platelet activation by P-selectin (CD62P expression revealed a significant increase of CD62P+ platelets in the target (19% and waste fractions (20%, respectively, compared to the PBPC input samples (9%. However, activation was lower when compared to stored blood bank platelet concentrates (48%. CONCLUSION: Acoustophoresis can be utilized to efficiently deplete PBPC samples of platelets, whilst preserving the target stem/progenitor cell and leukocyte cell populations, cell viability and progenitor cell colony-forming ability

  20. Electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuts, J.J.F.G.; Willems, J.J.G.S.A.

    1987-10-13

    An electrochemical cell is described comprising a negative electrode. The electrochemically active material of which consists of an intermetallic compound forming a hydride with hydrogen, which compound has the CaCu/sub 5/-structure and the compositional formula AB/sub m/C/sub n/, where m+n is between 4.8 and 5.4, where n is between 0.05 and 0.6, in which A consists of Misch-metal or of one or more elements selected from the group consisting of Y, Ti, Hf, Zr, Ca, Th, La and the remaining rare earth metals, in which the total atomic quantities of the elements Y, Ti, Hf and Zr may not be more than 40% of A. B consists of two or more elements selected from the group formed by Ni, Co, Cu, Fe and Mn, where the maximum atomic quantity per gram atom of A is for Ni: 3.5, for Co:3.5, for Cu:3.5, for Fe:2.0 and for Mn:1.0, and C consists of one or more elements selected from the group formed by Al, Cr and Si in the indicated atomic quantities: Al:0.05-0.6, Cr:0.05-0.5 and Si:0.05-0.5, characterized in that the electrochemically active material additionally comprises one or more metals selected from the group formed by Pd, Pt, Ir and Rh, the atomic quantity per gram atom of A being from 0.001 to 0.5.

  1. CELL RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    REVIEWSInducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells…………………………………ROTHSTEIN Thomas L (245)Executionary pathway for apoptosis: lessons from mutant mice………………………………………WOO Minna, Razqallah Hakem, Tak W Mak (267)The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase: Signaling mechanisms and biological functions…………………………………QU Cheng Kui (279)REGULAR ARTICLESTemperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis…………………………KONG Wei Hua, Zheng GU, Jining LU, Jiake TSO (289)Transgenic mice overexpressing γ-aminobutyric acid transporter subtype I develop obesity…………………………………MA Ying Hua, Jia Hua HU, Xiao Gang ZHOU, Ruo Wang ZENG, Zhen Tong MEI, Jian FEI, Li He GUO (303)Genetic aberration in primary hepatocellular carcinoma: correlation between p53 gene mutation and loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 16q21-q23 and 9p21-p23………………………………………WANG Gang, Chang Hui HUANG, Yan ZHAO, Ling CAI, Ying WANG, Shi Jin XIU, Zheng Wen JIANG, Shuang YANG, Xin Tai ZHAO, Wei HUANG, Jian Ren GU (311)Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf deve- lopment in Arabidopsis………………………………………………SUN Yue, Wei ZHANG, Feng Ling LI, Ying Li GUO, Tian Lei LIU, Hai HUANG (325)NOTICE FOR CONTRIBUTORS…………………………………(337)CONTENTS of Vol. 10, 2000…………………………………………………(338)

  2. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  3. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy.

  4. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shengjuan; Bergen, Werner G; Hausman, Gary J; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V

    2013-04-12

    Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  5. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  6. Impact of short-term liquid storage on human CD133(+) stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Cornelia A; Mark, Peter; Klopsch, Christian; Laupheimer, Michael; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Li, Wenzhong; Ma, Nan; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a viable strategy for regenerative medicine. However, it is inevitable to have cells undergo storage for several hours or days due to processing and transportation. Therefore, it is crucial to have rigidly controlled conditions ensuring the therapeutic benefit of isolated stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the impact of short-term storage on human CD133(+) cells. CD133(+) cells were isolated from human bone marrow and kept at standardized nonfreezing storage conditions for up to 72 h. Cell viability (apoptosis/necrosis) and expression of CD133 and CXCR4 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Metabolic activity was determined using an MTT assay; colony-forming ability, as well as endothelial-like differentiation, was further evaluated. A qRT-PCR array was employed to investigate the expression of stemness genes. CD133 and CXCR4 expressions were preserved at all time points. After 30 h, cell number and metabolic activity decreased, although no significant changes were detected in cell viability and proliferation as well as endothelial-like differentiation. Cell viability and proliferation decreased significantly only after 72 h of storage. Our results indicate that storage of isolated human CD133(+) bone marrow stem cells in liquid allows for high viability and functionality. However, storage time should be limited in order to avoid cell loss.

  7. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Melatonin on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Sheep Granulosa Cells under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Fu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cross-talk between oocyte and somatic cells plays a crucial role in the regulation of follicular development and oocyte maturation. As a result, granulosa cell apoptosis causes follicular atresia. In this study, sheep granulosa cells were cultured under thermal stress to induce apoptosis, and melatonin (MT was examined to evaluate its potential effects on heat-induced granulosa cell injury. The results demonstrated that the Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE of granulosa cells was significantly decreased (heat 19.70% ± 1.29% vs. control 26.96% ± 1.81%, p < 0.05 and the apoptosis rate was significantly increased (heat 56.16% ± 13.95% vs. control 22.80% ± 12.16%, p < 0.05 in granulosa cells with thermal stress compared with the control group. Melatonin (10−7 M remarkably reduced the negative effects caused by thermal stress in the granulosa cells. This reduction was indicated by the improved CFE and decreased apoptotic rate of these cells. The beneficial effects of melatonin on thermal stressed granulosa cells were not inhibited by its membrane receptor antagonist luzindole. A mechanistic exploration indicated that melatonin (10−7 M down-regulated p53 and up-regulated Bcl-2 and LHR gene expression of granulosa cells under thermal stress. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of the protective effects of melatonin on granulosa cells during thermal stress.

  9. Substitution of Soybean Meal and Cornmeal to Moisture, pH, Bacterial Colony Forming and Shelf Life of Rejected Duck Meatballs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novia Deni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of substitution of soybean meal with cornmeal to moisture, pH, bacterial colony forming and the shelf life of rejected duck meatballs. This research material using duck meat Coast (Indian Runner salvage as much as 4000 grams were obtained from the Livestock Anduring Padang and soybean meal with Mungbean trademarks and cornmeal with cornstarch trademarks respectively of 600 grams were obtained at Raya Padang market. The research method used was experimental method with the random design, which consists of 5 treatments and 4 groups as replication. The treatment given in this study is the substitution of soybean meal and maize by A (100%: 0%, B (75%: 25%, C (50%: 50%, D (25%: 75% and E (0%: 100%. Variables measured were moisture, pH, bacterial colony forming and the shelf life of rejected duck meatballs. The results of this study indicate that substitution of soybean meal and cornmeal significant effect on moisture, pH, bacterial colony forming and shelf life. Substitution of soybean meal and cornmeal by 100%: 0% is the best to produce the rejected duck meatballs with 69.20% moisture, pH 6.44, bacterial colony forming 7.85 x 105 CFU / g, and the shelf life of 22.12 hours.

  10. Preparation of immunomagnetic nanoparticles and their application in the separation of mouse CD34 + hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin; Xu, Ke; Xu, Jianhe; Chen, Wei; Shen, Hebai; Liu, Jianwen

    2009-06-01

    The magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of about 60 nm were synthesized by coprecipitation from ferrous and ferric iron solutions and coated with silica. Then the nanoparticles were modified with N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AEAPS) in order to immobilize anti-CD34 + monoclonal antibodies to the surface of modified magnetic particles. The results of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) indicated that the nanoparticles were successfully prepared. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photo confirmed that the mouse CD34 + cells (cells expressing CD34) were separated by the immunomagnetic nanoparticles. The viability of the separated cells was studied by hematopoietic colony-forming assay, the result of which showed that the target cells still had an ability of proliferation and differentiation. The application of the separated CD34 + cells was in testing the pharmacological effect of three samples isolated from enzyme-digested traditional Chinese medicine Colla corii asini.

  11. Some observations on the three-dimensional growth of L5178Y cell colonies in soft agar culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, H.; Burki, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of spherical colonies formed by L5178Y cells grown in soft agar cultures was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Visible colonies were formed after 7 days of incubation and increased in size for more than 2 weeks. At this time the colonies contained a central core of necrotic cells surrounded by an outer shell of normal-looking cells in loose contact with each other. Cross sectional radioautographs revealed that tritiated precursors were incorporated only into those cells in the ?viable cell' shell and not in the necrotic center of the colony. It is pointed out that increased knowledge of the factors leading to this type of three-dimensional organization is of particular interest, since it is similar to the conditions found in certain types of solid tumors (Thomlinson and Gray, 1955).

  12. Optimization of culture conditions for the expansion of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem or stromal cell-like cells using xeno-free culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlapatka, Tim; Moretti, Pierre; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Hass, Ralf; Marquardt, Nicole; Jacobs, Roland; Kasper, Cornelia

    2011-04-01

    First isolated from bone marrow, mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) were shown to be present in several postnatal and extraembryonic tissues as well as in a large variety of fetal tissues (e.g., fatty tissue, dental pulp, placenta, umbilical cord blood, and tissue). In this study, an optimized protocol for the expansion of MSC-like cells from whole umbilical cord tissue under xeno-free culture conditions is proposed. Different fetal calf sera and human serum (HS) were compared with regard to cell proliferation and MSC marker stability in long-term expansion experiments, and HS was shown to support optimal growth conditions. Additionally, the optimal concentration of HS during the cultivation was determined. With regard to cell proliferative potential, apoptosis, colony-forming unit fibroblast frequency, and cell senescence, our findings suggest that an efficient expansion of the cells is carried out best in media supplemented with 10% HS. Under our given xeno-free culture conditions, MSC-like cells were found to display in vitro immunoprivileged and immunomodulatory properties, which were assessed by co-culture and transwell culture experiments with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings may be of great value for the establishment of biotechnological protocols for the delivery of sufficient cell numbers of high quality for regenerative medicine purposes.

  13. Bone regeneration at dental implant sites with suspended stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, R C; Park, Y K; Cho, J J; Kim, S K; Heo, S J; Koak, J Y; Lee, J H

    2014-10-01

    During the maintenance of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), suspended cells are discarded normally. We noted the osteogenic potential of these cells to be like that of anchorage-dependent BMMSCs. Therefore, we characterized suspended BMMSCs from rabbit bone marrow by bioengineering and applied the suspended BMMSCs to double-canaled dental implants inserted into rabbits. After primary isolation of BMMSCs, we collected the suspended cells during primary culture on the third day. The cells were transferred and maintained on an extracellular-matrix-coated culture plate. The cells were characterized and compared with BMMSCs by colony-forming-unit fibroblast (CFU-f) and cell proliferation assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), in vitro multipotency, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also analyzed the osteogenic potential of cells mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) and transplanted into immunocompromised mice. We compared the viability and proliferation of the suspended BMMSCs and BMMSCs on the titanium implant surface and observed cell morphology. Then, the cells mixed with HA/TCP were applied to the double-canaled implants during installation into rabbit tibia. Four weeks later, we analyzed bone formation inside the canal by histomorphometry. The suspended cells showed higher CFU-f on the extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated culture plate and similar results of proliferation capacity compared with BMMSCs. The cells also showed osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic ability. The suspended cells showed levels of attachment survival and proliferation on the surfaces of titanium implant discs to be higher than or similar to those of BMMSCs. The suspended cells as well as BMMSCs showed stronger bone formation ability in both upper and lower canals of the implants compared with controls on double-canaled implants inserted into rabbit tibia. In this study, we showed that suspended cells after

  14. Cell sheet engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yamato

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed ‘cell sheet engineering’ in order to avoid the limitations of tissue reconstruction using biodegradable scaffolds or single cell suspension injection. Our concept is tissue reconstruction, not from single cells, but from cell sheets. Cell sheets are prepared using temperature-responsive culture dishes. Temperature-responsive polymers are covalently grafted onto the dishes, allowing various types of cells to adhere and proliferate at 37°C. The cells spontaneously detach when the temperature is reduced below 32°C without the need for proteolytic enzymes. The confluent cells are noninvasively harvested as single, contiguous cell sheets with intact cell-cell junctions and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM. We have used these harvested cell sheets for various tissue reconstructions, including ocular surfaces, periodontal ligaments, cardiac patches, and bladder augmentation.

  15. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  16. Stem Cell Information: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... here Home » Glossary Back to top Glossary Adult stem cell Astrocyte Blastocoel Blastocyst Bone marrow stromal cells Bone ...

  17. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Provides testing for technology readiness of fuel cell systems The FCL investigates, tests and verifies the performance of fuel-cell systems...

  18. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL) Provides testing for technology readiness of fuel cell systems The FCL investigates, tests and verifies the performance of fuel-cell systems...

  19. Natural Killer Cell Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death...

  20. Fuel cells: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  1. CellFinder: a cell data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelscheid, Harald; Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Mah, Nancy; Neves, Mariana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Leser, Ulf; Kurtz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue types from RNA-seq and microarrays and 553 905 protein expressions for 535 cells/tissues. Text mining of a corpus of >2000 publications followed by manual curation confirmed expression information on ∼900 proteins and genes. CellFinder's data model is capable to seamlessly represent entities from single cells to the organ level, to incorporate mappings between homologous entities in different species and to describe processes of cell development and differentiation. Its ontological backbone currently consists of 204 741 ontology terms incorporated from 10 different ontologies unified under the novel CELDA ontology. CellFinder's web portal allows searching, browsing and comparing the stored data, interactive construction of developmental trees and navigating the partonomic hierarchy of cells and tissues through a unique body browser designed for life scientists and clinicians.

  2. Expanded Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reselected for High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Demonstrate Islet Regenerative Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Hess, David A

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) purified for high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi) ) stimulate islet regeneration after transplantation into mice with streptozotocin-induced β cell deletion. However, ALDH(hi) cells represent a rare progenitor subset and widespread use of UCB ALDH(hi) cells to stimulate islet regeneration will require progenitor cell expansion without loss of islet regenerative functions. Here we demonstrate that prospectively purified UCB ALDH(hi) cells expand efficiently under serum-free, xeno-free conditions with minimal growth factor supplementation. Consistent with the concept that ALDH-activity is decreased as progenitor cells differentiate, kinetic analyses over 9 days revealed the frequency of ALDH(hi) cells diminished as culture time progressed such that total ALDH(hi) cell number was maximal (increased 3-fold) at day 6. Subsequently, day 6 expanded cells (bulk cells) were sorted after culture to reselect differentiated progeny with low ALDH-activity (ALDH(lo) subset) from less differentiated progeny with high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) subset). The ALDH(hi) subset retained primitive cell surface marker coexpression (32.0% ± 7.0% CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, 37.0% ± 6.9% CD34(+) /CD133(+) cells), and demonstrated increased hematopoietic colony forming cell function compared with the ALDH(lo) subset. Notably, bulk cells or ALDH(lo) cells did not possess the functional capacity to lower hyperglycemia after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. However, transplantation of the repurified ALDH(hi) subset significantly reduced hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance, and increased islet-associated cell proliferation and capillary formation. Thus, expansion and delivery of reselected UCB cells that retain high ALDH-activity after short-term culture represents an improved strategy for the development of cellular therapies to enhance islet regeneration in situ.

  3. The cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide, a nonsteroidal analgesic, decreases the effect of radiation therapy in head-and-neck cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czembirek, Cornelia; Eder-Czembirek, Christina; Turhani, Dritan [Dept. of Cranio-, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Erovic, Boban M.; Thurnher, Dietmar [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Spittler, Andreas [Dept. of Surgery, Research Labs., Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Selzer, Edgar; Poetter, Richard [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology and CLEXO (Center of Excellence for Clinical and Experimental Oncology), Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2009-05-15

    Background: no data are available on the effects of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor nimesulide in combination with irradiation on the survival of head-and-neck carcinoma cells. Material and methods: two head-and-neck carcinoma cell lines (SCC9 and SCC25) were treated with nimesulide (50-600 {mu}M) and irradiated concomitantly or sequentially. Early effects on cell survival were investigated by counting cell numbers, long-term effects by colony-forming assays. Cell-cycle effects were analyzed 24-72 h after treatment with nimesulide by flow cytometry. Results: unexpectedly, nimesulide solely inhibited cell proliferation without affecting colony-forming ability. In addition, no evidence for a radiosensitizing effect of nimesulide in short-term assays was seen. Nimesulide alone had no effect on clonogenic survival alone or in combination with radiation. Conclusion: nimesulide differentially affects cell proliferation and clonogenic survival and may decrease the efficacy of radiotherapy. Short-term assays to assess tumor growth may not correctly predict the clinically relevant long-term effect of COX-2 inhibitors. (orig.)

  4. Infection by Cx43 adenovirus increased chemotherapy sensitivity in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells: not involving in induction of cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Hongfeng; Wu, Jin; Liu, Wentao; Li, Yongqing; Shi, Guangyue; Yue, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiwen; Zhao, Yanbin; Hu, Xiaowei; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Xufeng

    2015-12-15

    There is a lower basal expression of Connexin43 (Cx43) in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. In the present study, BGC-823 cells were transfected with recombinant Cx43 adenovirus plasmid vector, and we explored the influences of Cx43 expression on cell proliferation, chemo-sensitivity, colony forming ability, invasion ability and apoptosis. Moreover, we also determined the expression of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9). MTT assay was performed to determine the proliferation of BGC-823 cells before and after Cx43 transfection. The influences of Cx43 infection on sensitivity of chemotherapy (including Doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) were detected by MTT assay. Expression levels of Pgp, Cx43, as well as apoptosis-related proteins (bcl-2, bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) in BGC-823 cells were determined by Western blotting analysis before and after the infection with Cx43 adenovirus. MDR expression was determined by RT-PCR before and after Cx43 infection. Invasive ability was detected by invasion chamber. Influence of Cx43 adenovirus infection on apoptosis of BGC-823 cells was determined by flow cytometry. After infection by Cx43 adenovirus, colony forming rate and invasive ability of BGC-823 cells were decreased. Flow cytometry results revealed that cell apoptosis were insignificantly increased. The data of MTT assay revealed that infection with Cx43 adenovirus, cell proliferation ability decreased and sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs (including doxorubicin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) increased. Results of Western blotting analysis revealed that increasing expression levels of Cx43, decreasing expression levels of Pgp, and insignificant changes of bcl-2, bax, caspase3 and caspase 9 were detected. RT-PCR revealed the expression of MDR1 gene, the gene encoding Pgp, decreased significantly (pinfected with Cx43-IRES2-EGFP recombinant adenovirus vector. Colony formation, invasive ability and cell proliferation all

  5. BP8, a novel peptide from avian immune system, modulates B cell developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Bin; Feng, Xiu-Li; Cao, Rui-Bing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is the key humoral immune organ unique to birds, and is critical for early B-lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms through which the BF regulates B cell development are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated and identified a new bursal peptide (BP8, AGHTKKAP) by RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. BP8 promoted colony-forming pre-B formation, bound B cell precursor, regulated B cell development in vitro as well as in vivo, upstream of the EBF-E2A-Pax5 regulatory complex and increased immunoglobulin secretion. These data revealed a bursal-derived multifunctional factor BP8 as a novel biomaterial which is essential for the development of the immune system. This study elucidates further the mechanisms involved in humoral immune system and has implications in treating human diseases.

  6. Chitosan hydrogels enriched with polyphenols: Antibacterial activity, cell adhesion and growth and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lišková, Jana; Douglas, Timothy E L; Beranová, Jana; Skwarczyńska, Agata; Božič, Mojca; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja; Bačáková, Lucie

    2015-09-20

    Injectable hydrogels for bone regeneration consisting of chitosan, sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were enriched with the polyphenols phloroglucinol (PG) and gallic acid (GA) and characterized physicochemically and biologically with respect to properties relevant for applications in bone regeneration, namely gelation kinetics, mineralizability, antioxidant properties, antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and ability to support adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Enrichment with PG and GA had no negative effect on gelation kinetics and mineralizability. PG and GA both enhanced antioxidant activity of unmineralized hydrogels. Mineralization reduced antioxidant activity of hydrogels containing GA. Hydrogels containing GA, PG and without polyphenols reduced colony forming ability of Escherichia coli after 1h, 3h and 6h incubation and slowed E. coli growth in liquid culture for 150min. Hydrogels containing GA were cytotoxic and supported cell growth more poorly than polyphenol-free hydrogels. PG had no negative effect on cell adhesion and growth.

  7. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  8. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  9. Cell control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This extensive report provides an essential overview of cells and their use as factory automation building blocks. The following issues are discussed in depth: Cell integration Cell software and standards Future technologies applied to cells Plus Cell control applications including: - rotary parts manufacturing - diesel engine component development - general cell control development at the General Electric Corporation - a vendor list.

  10. Quantification of nucleated cells, CD34-positive cells and CFU-GM colonies in single bone marrow samples and bone marrow harvests derived from healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schündeln, Michael M; Walde, Gabriele; Basu, Oliver; Havers, Werner; Kremens, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Little is known regarding bone marrow (BM) cellularity, CD34+ fraction, and CFU-GM colony formation in relation to age and whether healthy children require a reference range distinct from healthy adults. We therefore analyzed a series of single BM aspirates from 45 healthy children who were evaluated as potential BM donors. Thirty-three of these children subsequently donated BM. We quantified the nucleated cell count, fraction of CD34+ cells, and number of CFU-GM colonies in single aspirates and BM harvests. Single aspirates displayed a mean nucleated cell count of 31.3 × 10(6) cells/mL, a mean fraction of 1.17% CD34+ cells, and a mean colony forming potential of 66.6 CFU-GM/10(5) cells. Harvests yielded the same number of nucleated cells but increased numbers of CD34+ cells and CFU-GM compared with single aspirates. The mean nucleated cell count in BM harvests was 31.1 × 10(6) /mL with a mean fraction of 1.95% CD34+ cells and a mean of 112.4 CFU-GM colonies/10(5) cells. The concentration of nucleated cells was elevated compared with reported adult counts, while CD34+ percentage and CFU-GM counts were similar. In this series of healthy children, the fraction of CD34+ cells, CFU-GM colonies, and nucleated cells decreased with age. We did not identify gender specific differences. To our knowledge, this represents the first comprehensive study of CD34+ cell fraction, CFU-GM counts, and nucleated cell numbers in the BM of healthy children. The findings provide valuable information for practical use for BM transplantation and contribute to the understanding of hematopoiesis from birth to adulthood.

  11. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  12. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that reflect light more, such as water, sand, concrete, and areas that are painted white. The higher ... - skin - squamous cell; Skin cancer - squamous cell; Nonmelanoma skin cancer - squamous ...

  13. Inducing effects of macrophage stimulating protein on the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells in liquid culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-xia; HUANG Yan-hong; CHENG La-mei; LEI Jun; WANG Qi-ru

    2007-01-01

    Background Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP) is produced by human bone marrow endothelial cells. In this study,we sought to observe its effects on inducing the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells which were cultured in a liquid culture system in the presence of the combination of stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin 3 (IL-3), interleukin 6 (IL-6), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), erythropoietin (EPO) (Cys) and MSP or of Cys and bone marrow endothelial cell conditioned medium (EC-CM).Methods Human bone marrow CD34+ cells were separated and cultured in a liquid culture system for 6 days.Granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (CFU-GM) and colony forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage,megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) were employed to assay the effects of different treatment on the proliferation of hematopoeitic stem/progenitor cells. The nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductive test and hoechest 33258 staining were employed to reflect the differentiation and apoptosis of the cells respectively.Results MSP inhibited the proliferation of CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM in semi-solid culture and the inhibitory effect on CFU-GEMM was stronger than on CFU-GM. MSP inhibited the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators. Bone marrow (BM) CFU-GEMM was 2.3-fold or 1.7-fold increase or significantly decreased in either Cys+EC-CM, Cys+MSP or Cys compared with 0 hour control in liquid culture system after 6 days.Conclusion MSP, a hematopoietic inhibitor, inhibits the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators and makes the early hematopoietic progenitor cells expand in a liquid culture system.

  14. Osteoblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells control hematopoietic stem cell migration and proliferation in 3D in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula D N de Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34(+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34(+ cells was decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation.

  15. Foetal stem cell derivation & characterization for osteogenic lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mangala Gowri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Mesencymal stem cells (MSCs derived from foetal tissues present a multipotent progenitor cell source for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study was carried out to derive foetal mesenchymal stem cells from ovine source and analyze their differentiation to osteogenic linage to serve as an animal model to predict human applications. Methods: Isolation and culture of sheep foetal bone marrow cells were done and uniform clonally derived MSC population was collected. The cells were characterized using cytochemical, immunophenotyping, biochemical and molecular analyses. The cells with defined characteristics were differentiated into osteogenic lineages and analysis for differentiated cell types was done. The cells were analyzed for cell surface marker expression and the gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated osteoblast was checked by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT PCR analysis and confirmed by sequencing using genetic analyzer. Results: Ovine foetal samples were processed to obtain mononuclear (MNC cells which on culture showed spindle morphology, a characteristic oval body with the flattened ends. MSC population CD45 - /CD14 - was cultured by limiting dilution to arrive at uniform spindle morphology cells and colony forming units. The cells were shown to be positive for surface markers such as CD44, CD54, integrinβ1, and intracellular collagen type I/III and fibronectin. The osteogenically induced MSCs were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and mineral deposition. The undifferentiated MSCs expressed RAB3B, candidate marker for stemness in MSCs. The osteogenically induced and uninduced MSCs expressed collagen type I and MMP13 gene in osteogenic induced cells. Interpretation & conclusions: The protocol for isolation of ovine foetal bone marrow derived MSCs was simple to perform, and the cultural method of obtaining pure spindle morphology cells was established

  16. Isolation and Identification of Putative Oral Cancer Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min; ZHAO Yan-Hua; TANG Xiao-Fei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and characterize putative cancer stem cells in Tea8113 oral squmous cell carcinoma cell line. Methods: Putative cancer stem cells were isolated by limited dilution assay in Tea8113 cell line. Biological features of putative cancer stem cells were detected by MTT assay, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, Colony Forming Efficiency assays, cell motility assay and in vivo tumor formation experiment. Results: Compared with untreated Tea8113 cells, the putative cancer stem cells proliferated more quickly and showed heteroploid cell cycle,higher G0/G1-arrested cells, higher CFE and higher expression levels of ABCG2 belonged to tumor stem cell phenotypes. The putative cancer stem cells had stronger capacity to generate tumors in vivo. Conclusion: The holoclone cells have higher proliferation and self-renewal abilities, which may be cancer stem cells existed in Tea8113 oral squmous cell carcinoma cell line.%目的:分离鉴定口腔鳞癌细胞系Tca8113中的肿瘤干细胞.方法:利用有限稀释的方法分离Tca8113细胞系中的肿瘤干细胞.通过MTT法、流式细胞技术、细胞免疫荧光、克隆形成率分析、细胞迁移能力检测和裸鼠皮下成瘤实验确定分离得到的肿瘤干细胞的生物学特点.结果:分离得到的紧密型克隆肿瘤细胞表现为异倍体样细胞周期,大部分细胞处于G0/G1期,增殖能力、克隆形成率和体外迁移能力都明显高于未分离的肿瘤细胞.紧密型克隆肿瘤细胞肿瘤干细胞标记物ABCG2表达也高于未分离的肿瘤细胞,并且具有更强的裸鼠皮下成瘤能力.结论:我们分离得到的紧密型克隆细胞具有较强的细胞增殖和自我更新能力,可能就是口腔鳞癌细胞系Tca8113中的肿瘤干细胞.

  17. Primary targets in photochemical inactivation of cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kristian; Jones, Stuart G.; Prydz, Kristian; Moan, Johan

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of photoinactivation of NHIK 3025 cells in culture sensitized by tetrasulfonated phenylporphines (TPPS4) are described). Ultracentrifugation studies on postnuclear supernatants indicated that the intracellular distribution of TPPS4 resembles that of (beta) -N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase ((beta) -AGA), a lysosomal marker enzyme, and that the cytosolic content of TPPS4 is below the detection limit of the ultracentrifugation method. Upon light exposure more than 90% of TPPS4 was lost from the lysosomal fractions, due to lysosomal rupture. The content of TPPS4 in the postnuclear supernatants was reduced by 30 - 40% upon exposure to light. This is most likely due to binding of TPPS4 to the nuclei, which were removed from the cell extracts before ultracentrifugation, after photochemical treatment. The unpolymerized form of tubulin seems to be an important target for the photochemical inactivation of NHIK 3025 cells. Since TPPS4 is mainly localized in lysosomes it was assumed that a dose of light disrupting a substantial number of lysosomes followed by microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole would enhance the sensitivity of the cells to photoinactivation. This was confirmed by using a colony-forming assay. The increased phototoxic effect exerted by such a treatment regime could be explained by an enhanced sensitivity of tubulin to light. Another cytosolic constituent, lactate dehydrogenase, was not photoinactivated by TPPS4 and light.

  18. Inhibition of tumor cell proliferation by Coleon C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiu; Wu, Hezhen; Wang, Xiaoming; Huang, Yongping; Li, Qing; Li, Changlong; Yang, Yanfang; Liu, Yanwen; Liu, Jianwen

    2008-04-01

    Coleon C (6,11,12,14,16-pentahydroxyabieta-5,8,11,13-tetraen-7-one), extracted from Coleus forskohlii Briq., was investigated for its anti-tumor activity on eight human tumor cell lines (95-D, A375, HeLa, A431, MKN45, BEL7402, LoVo and HL60) and two normal ones (293, L02) by MTT and colony-forming assay in vitro. The results indicated that A375 was the most sensitive of all the cell lines. Hoechst 33258 staining showed fragmentation and condensation of chromatin. DNA ladder assay indicated the fragments of DNA because of apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated hypodiploid cells existed in A375 after Coleon C treatment. In the acute toxicity studies of C57BL/6 mice, LD(50 )of Coleon C was 1496+/-150 mg/kg. In the model of Lewis lung carcinoma, the average tumor weight in groups injected with 80 mg/kg Coleon C decreased by 48.9+/-14.3% compared with that of the control. These results indicate that Coleon C could effectively inhibit tumor cell proliferation and growth by inducing apoptosis with low toxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the anti-tumor activity of Coleon C both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Impaired function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in murine liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Katsuya; Masuda, Haruchika; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Obi, Syotaro; Ito, Rie; Shizuno, Tomoko; Kurihara, Yusuke; Mine, Tetsuya; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) caused by chronic liver damage has been considered as an irreversible disease. As alternative therapy for liver transplantation, there are high expectations for regenerative medicine of the liver. Bone marrow (BM)- or peripheral blood-derived stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have recently been used to treat liver cirrhosis. We investigated the biology of BM-derived EPC in a mouse model of LF. C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) every 3 days for 90 days. Sacrificed 2 days after final injection, whole blood (WB) was collected for isolation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and biochemical examination. Assessments of EPC in the peripheral blood and BM were performed by flow cytometry and EPC colony-forming assay, respectively, using purified MNCs and BM c-KIT(+), Sca-1(+), and Lin(-) (KSL) cells. Liver tissues underwent histological analysis with hematoxylin/eosin/Azan staining, and spleens were excised and weighed. CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited histologically bridging fibrosis, pseudolobular formation, and splenomegaly, indicating successful induction of LF. The frequency of definitive EPC-colony-forming-units (CFU) as well as total EPC-CFU at the equivalent cell number of 500 BM-KSL cells decreased significantly (p changes in primitive EPC-CFU occurred in LF mice. The frequency of WB-MNCs of definitive EPC-CFU decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in LF mice compared with control mice. Together, these findings indicated the existence of impaired EPC function and differentiation in BM-derived EPCs in LF mice and might be related to clinical LF.

  20. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  1. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  2. Bone marrow concentrate for autologous transplantation in minipigs. Characterization and osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herten, M; Grassmann, J P; Sager, M; Benga, L; Fischer, J C; Jäger, M; Betsch, M; Wild, M; Hakimi, M; Jungbluth, P

    2013-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow plays an increasing role in the treatment of bone, cartilage and tendon healing disorders. Cell-based therapies display promising results in the support of local regeneration, especially therapies using intra-operative one-step treatments with autologous progenitor cells. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells were concentrated in a point-of-care device and investigated for their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics and their osteogenic potential. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of 16 minipigs. The mononucleated cells (MNC) were concentrated by gradient density centrifugation, cultivated, characterized by flow cytometry and stimulated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Cell differentiation was investigated by histological and immunohistological staining of relevant lineage markers. The proliferation capacity was determined via colony forming units of fibroblast and of osteogenic alkaline-phosphatase-positive-cells. The MNC could be enriched 3.5-fold in nucleated cell concentrate in comparison to bone marrow. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a positive signal for the MSC markers. Cells could be differentiated into the three lines confirming the MSC character. The cellular osteogenic potential correlated significantly with the percentage of newly formed bone in vivo in a porcine metaphyseal long-bone defect model. This study demonstrates that bone marrow concentrate from minipigs display cells with MSC character and their osteogenic differentiation potential can be used for osseous defect repair in autologous transplantations.

  3. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  4. Cell culturability of Pseudomonas protegens CHA0 depends on soil pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascher, Fabio; Hase, Carsten; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Défago, Geneviève; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas inoculants may lose colony-forming ability in soil, but soil properties involved are poorly documented. Here, we tested the hypothesis that soil acidity could reduce persistence and cell culturability of Pseudomonas protegens CHA0. At 1 week in vitro, strain CHA0 was found as culturable cells at pH 7, whereas most cells at pH 4 and all cells at pH 3 were noncultured. In 21 natural soils of contrasted pH, cell culturability loss of P. protegens CHA0 took place in all six very acidic soils (pH soils (5.0 pH soils at 2 weeks and 2 months. No correlation was found between total cell counts of P. protegens CHA0 and soil composition data, whereas colony counts of the strain correlated with soil pH. Maintenance of cell culturability in soils coincided with a reduction in inoculant cell size. Some of the noncultured CHA0 cells were nutrient responsive in Kogure's viability test, both in vitro and in soil. Thus, this shows for the first time that the sole intrinsic soil composition factor triggering cell culturability loss in P. protegens CHA0 is soil acidity.

  5. Cell mechanics: a dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiaxiang; Li, Yizeng; Vig, Dhruv K.; Sun, Sean X.

    2017-03-01

    Under the microscope, eukaryotic animal cells can adopt a variety of different shapes and sizes. These cells also move and deform, and the physical mechanisms driving these movements and shape changes are important in fundamental cell biology, tissue mechanics, as well as disease biology. This article reviews some of the basic mechanical concepts in cells, emphasizing continuum mechanics description of cytoskeletal networks and hydrodynamic flows across the cell membrane. We discuss how cells can generate movement and shape changes by controlling mass fluxes at the cell boundary. These mass fluxes can come from polymerization/depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton, as well as osmotic and hydraulic pressure-driven flow of water across the cell membrane. By combining hydraulic pressure control with force balance conditions at the cell surface, we discuss a quantitative mechanism of cell shape and volume control. The broad consequences of this model on cell mechanosensation and tissue mechanics are outlined.

  6. Cell surface engineering of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Zhao, Weian; Gupta, Ashish; Loh, Wei Li; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging the capacity to promote regeneration, stem cell therapies offer enormous hope for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, a significant barrier to the effective implementation of cell therapies is the inability to target a large quantity of viable cells with high efficiency to tissues of interest. Systemic infusion is desired as it minimizes the invasiveness of cell therapy, and maximizes practical aspects of repeated doses. However, cell types such as mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a poor homing capability or lose their capacity to home following culture expansion (i.e. FASEB J 21:3197-3207, 2007; Circulation 108:863-868, 2003; Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation 32:1005-1011; Blood 104:3581-3587, 2004). To address this challenge, we have developed a simple platform technology to chemically attach cell adhesion molecules to the cell surface to improve the homing efficiency to specific tissues. This chemical approach involves a stepwise process including (1) treatment of cells with sulfonated biotinyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide to introduce biotin groups on the cell surface, (2) addition of streptavidin that binds to the biotin on the cell surface and presents unoccupied binding sites, and (3) attachment of biotinylated targeting ligands that promote adhesive interactions with vascular endothelium. Specifically, in our model system, a biotinylated cell rolling ligand, sialyl Lewisx (SLeX), found on the surface of leukocytes (i.e., the active site of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1)), is conjugated on MSC surface. The SLeX engineered MSCs exhibit a rolling response on a P-selectin coated substrate under shear stress conditions. This indicates that this approach can be used to potentially target P-selectin expressing endothelium in the more marrow or at sites of inflammation. Importantly, the surface modification has no adverse impact on MSCs' native phenotype including their multilineage

  7. Acute myocardial infarction does not affect functional characteristics of adipose-derived stem cells in rats, but reduces the number of stem cells in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaijkens, B A; Krijnen, P A J; Meinster, E; ter Horst, E N; Vo, K; Musters, R J P; Kamp, O; Niessen, H W M; Juffermans, L J M; van Dijk, A

    2015-12-01

    In most pre-clinical animal studies investigating stem cell therapy in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the administered stem cells are isolated from healthy donors. In clinical practice, however, patients who suffer from AMI will receive autologous cells, for example using adipose-derived stem cells (ASC). During AMI, inflammation is induced and we hypothesized that this might affect characteristics of ASC. To investigate this, ASC were isolated from rat adipose tissue 1 day (1D group, n = 5) or 7 days (7D group, n = 6) post-AMI, and were compared with ASC from healthy control rats (Control group, n = 6) and sham-operated rats (Sham 1D group, n = 5). We found that significantly fewer ASC were present 1 day post-AMI in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF), determined by a colony-forming-unit assay (p cells in SVF of the 1D group. When cultured, no differences were found in proliferation rate and cell size between the groups in the first three passages. Also, no difference in the differentiation capacity of ASC was found. In conclusion, it was shown that significantly fewer stem cells were present in the SVF 1 day post-AMI; however, the stem cells that were present showed no functional differences.

  8. [Dose-effect relationship of DMSO and Tween 80 influencing the growth and viability of murine bone marrow-derived cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Da-Liang; Liu, Ke-Qing; Guo, Shao-San; Zhu, Hai-Lin; Huang, Chang; Wang, Bao-He

    2008-04-01

    This study was purpose to examine the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and Tween 80 on the growth and viability of stromal cells (BMSC), colony-forming units for granulocytes and macrophages (CFU-GM) and bone marrow endothelial cell line (BMEC) from murine bone marrow in vitro, and to analyze the concentration-effect relationship. The colony yields of colony-forming units fibroblastic (CFU-F) and CFU-GM were assessed in the murine bone marrow cell cultures at various concentrations of DMSO or Tween 80 and in the control groups. The MTT assay and trypan blue exclusion were used to determine the cell viability and percentage of survival in BMSC and BMEC cultures with or without either of these organic solvents. The results showed that the colony yields of both CFU-F and CFU-GM were decreased significantly (pTween 80 respectively, as compared with control. The cell viability and percentage of survival of BMSC and BMEC cultures were significantly reduced (pTween 80, as compared with control. With the increase of volume fractions of these solvents, the decreased percentages of corresponding measurements were increased by degrees. It is concluded that when the concentration of DMSO or Tween 80 goes to a certain level in cell culture medium, either of the organic solvents has an inhibitory action or/and cytotoxicity on the growth and viability of BMSCs, CFU-GM and BMECs. The growth inhibition and cytotoxic response are more significant at higher concentrations of these solvents.

  9. The effect of cilengitide in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Lill, C.; Schneider, S.; Kotowski, U.; Thurnher, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Craniomaxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Internal Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    Integrins are highly attractive targets in oncology due to their involvement in angiogenesis in a wide spectrum of cancer entities. Among several integrin inhibitors under clinical evaluation, cilengitide is the most promising compound. However, little is known about the cellular processes induced during cilengitide therapy in combination with irradiation and cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The cytostatic effect of cilengitide was assessed by proliferation assay in the three HNSCC cell lines SCC25, FaDu and CAL27. Combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were performed. Possible synergistic effects were calculated in combination index (CI) analyses. Colony forming inhibition was investigated in clonogenic assays. Real-time PCR arrays were used to evaluate target protein gene expression patterns. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. Used alone, cilengitide has only minor cytotoxic effects in HNSCC cell lines. However, combination with cisplatin resulted in synergistic growth inhibition in all three cell lines. Irradiation showed synergism in short-term experiments and in colony forming assays, an additive effect was detected. Real-time PCR assay detected downregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 after exposure of cells to cilengitide. Cilengitide in combination with cisplatin and irradiation may be a feasible option for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. However, further investigations are required to understand the exact mechanism that leads to synergistic cytotoxicity. (orig.) [German] Durch ihre Rolle bei der Angiogenese sind Integrine ein attraktives Ziel in der onkologischen Forschung. Der derzeit vielversprechendste Inhibitor dieser Molekuele ist Cilengitide, welches bereits in klinischen Studien getestet wird. Dennoch ist erst wenig ueber die zellulaeren Vorgaenge bekannt, welche durch Cilengitide in Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen (HNSCC) insbesondere in Kombination mit Strahlentherapie und

  10. PSMB4 promotes multiple myeloma cell growth by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peihao; Guo, Honggang [Department of Hematology, Navy General Hospital, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Guangchao [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Han, Siqi [Department of Medical Oncology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210002 (China); Luo, Fei [Department of Stomatology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing 210002 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: liuyi2033@163.com [Department of Hematology, Navy General Hospital, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2015-03-06

    Proteasomal subunit PSMB4, was recently identified as potential cancer driver genes in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanism of PSMB4 on carcinogenesis process remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of PSMB4 in multiple myeloma (MM). We found a significant up-regulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of PSMB4 promoted cell growth and colony forming ability of MM cells, whereas inhibition of PSMB4 led to a decrease of such events. Furthermore, our results demonstrated the up-regulation of miR-21 and a positive correlation between the levels of miR-21 and PSMB4 in MM. Re-expression of miR-21 markedly rescued PSMB4 knockdown-mediated suppression of cell proliferation and clone-formation. Additionally, while enforced expression of PSMB4 profoundly increased NF-κB activity and the level of miR-21, PSMB4 knockdown or NF-κB inhibition suppressed miR-21 expression in MM cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PSMB4 regulated MM cell growth in part by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling, which may represent promising targets for novel specific therapies. - Highlights: • First reported upregulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4 promoted MM cell growth and colony forming ability. • Further found miR-21 was up-regulated by PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4-induced miR-21 expression was modulated by NF-κB. • PSMB4-NF-κB-miR-21 axis may be potential therapeutic targets of MM.

  11. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  12. CD133+ anaplastic thyroid cancer cells initiate tumors in immunodeficient mice and are regulated by thyrotropin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Friedman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human malignancies. Its rapid onset and resistance to conventional therapeutics contribute to a mean survival of six months after diagnosis and make the identification of thyroid-cancer-initiating cells increasingly important. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In prior studies of ATC cell lines, CD133(+ cells exhibited stem-cell-like features such as high proliferation, self-renewal and colony-forming ability in vitro. Here we show that transplantation of CD133(+ cells, but not CD133(- cells, into immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice is sufficient to induce growth of tumors in vivo. We also describe how the proportion of ATC cells that are CD133(+ increases dramatically over three months of culture, from 7% to more than 80% of the total. This CD133(+ cell pool can be further separated by flow cytometry into two distinct populations: CD133(+/high and CD133(+/low. Although both subsets are capable of long-term tumorigenesis, the rapidly proliferating CD133(+/high cells are by far the most efficient. They also express high levels of the stem cell antigen Oct4 and the receptor for thyroid stimulating hormone, TSHR. Treating ATC cells with TSH causes a three-fold increase in the numbers of CD133(+ cells and elicits a dose-dependent up-regulation of the expression of TSHR and Oct4 in these cells. More importantly, immunohistochemical analysis of tissue specimens from ATC patients indicates that CD133 is highly expressed on tumor cells but not on neighboring normal thyroid cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that CD133(+ ATC cells are solely responsible for tumor growth in immunodeficient mice. Our data also give a unique insight into the regulation of CD133 by TSH. These highly tumorigenic CD133(+ cells and the activated TSH signaling pathway may be useful targets for future ATC therapies.

  13. Hypoxia regulates stemness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Xiao, Yong; Zhu, Xiao-yan; Ning, Zhou-yu; Xu, Hai-fan; Wu, Hui-min

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancers include cancer stem cell populations as well as non-tumorigenic cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells possess self-renewal capability and thus are the root cause of recurrence and metastasis of malignant tumors. Hypoxia is a fundamental pathological feature of solid tumor tissues and exerts a wide range of effects on the biological behavior of cancer cells. However, there is little information on the role of hypoxia in modulating the stemness of breast cancer cells. In the present study, we cultured MDA-MB-231 cells in a hypoxic gas mixture to simulate the hypoxic environment in tissues and to determine how hypoxia conditions could affect the cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and colony-forming ability. Expression of the stem cell phenotype CD24(-)CD44(+)ESA(+) was analyzed to assess the effects of hypoxia on stemness transformation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results found that the cell toxicity of MDA-MB-231 cells was not affected by hypoxia. Hypoxia could slightly inhibit the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells, but the inhibitory effect is not significant when compared with normoxic control. Moreover, hypoxia significantly blocked the apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells (P MB-231 cells was increased greatly after they were treated with hypoxia, and cell colony-formation rate of MDA-MB-231 cells also increased significantly in hypoxia-treated cells. These results encourage the exploration of hypoxia as a mechanism which might not be underestimated in chemo-resistant breast cancer treatment.

  14. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with the Radio-resistance of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Juan Cong; Gao, Hui; Zuo, Si Yao; Zhang, Hai Qin; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Shi Long; Han, Hai Ling; Jin, Lin Lin; Shao, Li Hong; Wei, Wei; Jin, Shun Zi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between over-expression of the neuropilin 1 (NRP1) gene and growth, survival, and radio-sensitivity of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. 3-[4,5-dimethylthylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium broide (MTT) and colony assays were then performed to determine the effect of NRP1 inhibition on the in vitro growth of NSCLC cells. The Annexin V-Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC) apoptosis detection assay was performed to analyse the effect of NRP1 enhancement on apoptosis of NSCLC cells. Transwell invasion and migration assays were employed to examine the metastatic ability of A549 cells post X-ray irradiation. In addition, Western blot assays were carried out to detect the protein level of VEGFR2, PI3K and NF-κB. Finally, to examine the effect of shNRP1 on proliferation and radio-sensitivity in vivo, a subcutaneous tumour formation assay in nude mice was performed. Microvessel density in tumour tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The stable transfected cell line (shNRP1-A549) showed a significant reduction in colony-forming ability and proliferation not only in vitro, but also in vivo. Moreover, shRNA-mediated NRP1 inhibition also significantly enhanced the radio-sensitivity of NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. The over-expression of NRP1 was correlated with growth, survival and radio-resistance of NSCLC cells via the VEGF-PI3K- NF-κB pathway, and NRP1 may be a molecular therapeutic target for gene therapy or radio-sensitization of NSCLC.

  15. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  16. Tracking adult stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context,

  17. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  18. T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting the Facts T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). T-cell lymphomas account for ...

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  20. [Effect of mouse genotype on the hematopoietic stem cell count. II. The number of hematopietic stem cells in BALB/c and CC57BR strain mice differing by the level of endogenous colony formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V A

    1979-01-01

    The number of stem hematopoietic cells in the hematopoietic organs of mice of BALB/c and CC57BR strains and (CC57BRXBALB/c)F1 hybrids was studied by the method of exogenous colony-forming units. The assay of migration of stem cells from the bone marrow to the spleen was carried out. It was found that the spleen and the bone marrow of mice of the studied genotypes contain approximately the same relative number of hematopoietic stem cells. The number of stem cells which migrate from the bone marrow to the spleen is greater in the mice of BALB/c strain than in the CC57BR mice.

  1. In vitro identification and characterization of CD133(pos cancer stem-like cells in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent publications suggest that neoplastic initiation and growth are dependent on a small subset of cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma (ATC is a very aggressive solid tumor with poor prognosis, characterized by high dedifferentiation. The existence of CSCs might account for the heterogeneity of ATC lesions. CD133 has been identified as a stem cell marker for normal and cancerous tissues, although its biological function remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ATC cell lines ARO, KAT-4, KAT-18 and FRO were analyzed for CD133 expression. Flow cytometry showed CD133(pos cells only in ARO and KAT-4 (64+/-9% and 57+/-12%, respectively. These data were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. ARO and KAT-4 were also positive for fetal marker oncofetal fibronectin and negative for thyrocyte-specific differentiating markers thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase and sodium/iodide symporter. Sorted ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibited higher proliferation, self-renewal, colony-forming ability in comparison with ARO/CD133(neg. Furthermore, ARO/CD133(pos showed levels of thyroid transcription factor TTF-1 similar to the fetal thyroid cell line TAD-2, while the expression in ARO/CD133(neg was negligible. The expression of the stem cell marker OCT-4 detected by RT-PCR and flow cytometry was markedly higher in ARO/CD133(pos in comparison to ARO/CD133(neg cells. The stem cell markers c-KIT and THY-1 were negative. Sensitivity to chemotherapy agents was investigated, showing remarkable resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in ARO/CD133(pos when compared with ARO/CD133(neg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe CD133(pos cells in ATC cell lines. ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibit stem cell-like features--such as high proliferation, self-renewal ability, expression of OCT-4--and are characterized by higher resistance to chemotherapy. The simultaneous positivity for thyroid specific factor TTF-1 and onfFN suggest

  2. Individual cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovel, R T; Sweet, R G

    1979-01-01

    Current cell sorting machines do not preserve the individual identity of processed cells; after analysis, the cells are assigned to a subpopulation where they are pooled with other similar cells. This paper reports progress on a system that sorts cells individually to precise locations on a microscope slide and preserves them for further observation with a light microscope while recording flow measurement data for each cell. Various electronic and mechanical modifications to an existing sorting machine are described that increase drop placement accuracy and permit individual cell sorting.

  3. Stem Cell Organoid Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E.; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Organoid systems leverage the self-organizing properties of stem cells to create diverse multi-cellular tissue proxies. Most organoid models only represent single or partial components of a tissue, and it is often difficult to control the cell type, organization, and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions within these systems. Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D organization within organoids to further enhance their utility in research and therapies. PMID:26748754

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  5. Innate Memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  6. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ganglion cell like cells, diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Shankar Ammanagi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cutaneous swelling found on the left anterior axillary fold of a 41-year-old man. Gross examination of specimen excised from the dermis showed a well-circumscribed nodule histologically composed of spindle cells with interspersed ganglion cell like cells. On hematoxylin and eosine (H and E staining it was diagnosed as ganglioneuroma. Ganglioneuromas are rare, benign, fully differentiated tumors that contain mature schwann cells, ganglion cells, fibrous tissue, and nerve fibers. They are commonly found along the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia and sometimes in the adrenal medulla. However primary cutaneous ganglioneuroma is an extremely rare tumor. Immunohistochemical workup revealed a fibroblastic origin and hence the case was diagnosed as fibromatosis with ganglion cell like fibroblasts. This case report suggests that the features considered diagnostic of ganglioneuromas can occur in other cutaneous lesions and, therefore, this diagnosis cannot be offered only on the basis of H and E.

  8. CD34 expression on long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells changes during developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, S; Ebihara, Y; Xu, M; Ishii, T; Sugiyama, D; Yoshino, H; Ueda, T; Manabe, A; Tanaka, R; Ikeda, Y; Nakahata, T; Tsuji, K

    2001-01-15

    The CD34 antigen serves as an important marker for primitive hematopoietic cells in therapeutic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and gene therapy, but it has remained an open question as to whether or not most HSC express CD34. Using a competitive long-term reconstitution assay, the results of this study confirm developmental changes in CD34 expression on murine HSC. In fetuses and neonates, CD34 was expressed on Lin(-)c-Kit(+) long-term repopulating HSC of bone marrow (BM), liver, and spleen. However, CD34 expression on HSC decreased with aging, and in mice older than 10 weeks, HSC were most enriched in the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) marrow cell fraction. A second transplantation was performed from primary recipients who were transplanted with neonatal Lin(-)c-Kit(+) CD34(high) HSC marrow. Although donor-type HSC resided in CD34-expressing cell fraction in BM cells of the first recipients 4 weeks after the first transplantation, the stem cell activity had shifted to Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) cells after 16 weeks, indicating that adult Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) HSC are the progeny of neonatal CD34-expresssing HSC. Assays for colony-forming cells showed that hematopoietic progenitor cells, unlike HSC, continue to express CD34 throughout murine development. The present findings are important because the clinical application of HSC can be extended, in particular as related to CD34-enriched HSC and umbilical cord blood HSC.

  9. Primary immune system responders to nucleus pulposus cells: evidence for immune response in disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Murai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although intervertebral disc herniation and associated sciatica is a common disease, its molecular pathogenesis is not well understood. Immune responses are thought to be involved. This study provides direct evidence that even non-degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP cells elicit immune responses. An in vitro colony forming inhibition assay demonstrated the suppressive effects of autologous spleen cells on NP cells and an in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed the positive cytotoxic effects of natural killer (NK cells and macrophages on NP cells. Non-degenerated rat NP tissues transplanted into wild type rats and immune-deficient mice demonstrated a significantly higher NP cell survival rate in immune-deficient mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed the presence of macrophages and NK cells in the transplanted NP tissues. These results suggest that even non-degenerated autologous NP cells are recognized by macrophages and NK cells, which may have an immunological function in the early phase of disc herniation. These findings contribute to understanding resorption and the inflammatory reaction to disc herniation.

  10. Docetaxel inhibits SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells growth and induces apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Xin Geng; Zhao-Chong Zeng; Ji-Yao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) activity of docetaxel against SMMC-7721 HCC cells and its possible mechanism.METHODS: The HCC cells were given different concentrations of docetaxel and their growth was measured by colony forming assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy (acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining, AO/EB), as well as electronic microscopy. The SMMC-7721 HCC cell reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) were measured after given docetaxel.RESULTS: Docetaxel inhibited the hepatocellular carcinoma cells growth in a concentration dependent manner with IC505×10-10 M. Marked cell apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest were observed after treatment with docetaxel ≥10-8M.Docetaxel promoted SMMC-7721 HCC cells ROS generation and GSH deletion.CONCLUSION: Docetaxel suppressed the growth of SMMC7721 HCC cells in vitro by causing apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest of the human hepatoma cells, and ROS and GSH may play a key role in the inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis.

  11. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from caprine umbilical cord tissue matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kuldeep; Agarwal, Pranjali; Das, Kinsuk; Mili, Bhabesh; Madhusoodan, A P; Kumar, Ajay; Bag, Sadhan

    2016-12-01

    Cord tissue fills the umbilical cord around the blood vessels and contains types of stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs) that are not generally found in cord blood. MSCs are the stem cells that give rise to many of the "support tissues" in the body, including bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Umbilical Cord Tissue cells (UCTs) possessing the capacity to differentiate into various cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes have been previously isolated from different species including human, canine, murine, avian species etc. The present study documents the existence of similar multipotential stem cells in caprine UCTs having similar growth and morphological characteristics. The cells were isolated from caprine umbilical cord and cultivated in DMEM (low glucose) supplemented with 15% FBS, L-glutamine and antibiotics. Primary culture achieved confluence in 5-7days having spindle shaped morphology. The cells were morphologically homogeneous, showed robust proliferation ability with a population doubled time of 92.07h as well as normal karyotype. In vitro self-renewal capacity was demonstrated by colony-forming unit assay (CFU). The cells expressed MSC specific markers and showed multi-differentiation capability into adipogenic and osteogeneic. The results indicated that caprine UCTs (cUCTs) were isolated and characterized from umbilical cord tissue which can be used for tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fibronectin and VLA-4 in haematopoietic stem cell-microenvironment interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Rios, Maribel; Stephens, Carmella; Patel, Vikram P.

    1991-08-01

    THE self-renewal and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells occurs in vivo and in vitro in direct contact with cells making up the haematopoietic microenvironment1-4. In this study we used adhesive ligands and blocking antibodies to identify stromal cell-derived extracellular matrix proteins involved in promoting attachment of murine haematopoietic stem cells. Here we report that day-12 colony-forming-unit spleen (CFU-S12)5 cells and reconstituting haematopoietic stem cells attach to the C-terminal, heparin-binding fragment of fibronectin by recognizing the CS-1 peptide of the alternatively spliced non-type III connecting segment (IIICS) of human plasma fibronectin. Furthermore, CFU-S12 stem cells express the α4 subunit of the VLA-4 integrin receptor, which is known to be a receptor for the CS-1 sequence, and monoclonal antibodies against the integrin α4 subunit of VLA-4 block adhesion of CFU-S12 stem cells to plates coated with the C-terminal fibronectin fragment. Finally, polyclonal antibodies against the integrin β1 subunit of VLA-4 inhibit the formation of CFU-S12-derived spleen colonies and medullary haematopoiesis in vivo following intravenous infusion of antibody-treated bone marrow cells.

  14. Isolation and Multiple Differentiation Potential Assessment of Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from the gingiva (GMSCs and confirm their multiple differentiation potentials, including the odontogenic lineage. GMSCs, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and dermal stem cells (DSCs cultures were analyzed for cell shape, cell cycle, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F and stem cell markers. Cells were then induced for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and analyzed for differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mineralization nodule formation and Runx2, ALP, osteocalcin (OCN and collagen I expressions for the osteogenic differentiation, and lipid vacuole formation and PPARγ-2 expression for the adipogenic differentiation. Besides, the odontogenic differentiation potential of GMSCs induced with embryonic tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (ETGC-CM was observed. GMSCs, PDLSCs and DSCs were all stromal origin. PDLSCs showed much higher osteogenic differentiation ability but lower adipogenic differentiation potential than DSCs. GMSCs showed the medial osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potentials between those of PDLSCs and DSCs. GMSCs were capable of expressing the odontogenic genes after ETGC-CM induction. This study provides evidence that GMSCs can be used in tissue engineering/regeneration protocols as an approachable stem cell source.

  15. Generation of iPS Cells from Granulosa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jian; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Somatic stem cells may generate iPS cells more efficiently than do differentiated cells. We show that granulosa cells exhibit characteristic of somatic stem cells and can be reprogrammed to iPS cells more efficiently or with few factors. Here, we describe generation of mouse and pig iPS cells from granulosa cells with high efficiency.

  16. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  17. The stem cell potential and multipotency of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells vary by cell donor and are different from those of other types of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Ki-Joo; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Su Jin; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Seo, Bommie F; Oh, Deuk-Young; Ahn, Sang-Tae; Lee, Hee Young; Rhie, Jong Won

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) from various sites are applied in tissue engineering and cell therapy. The condition of AT-MSCs depends on the donor's age, body mass index (BMI), and gender. AT-MSCs from 66 human donors were analyzed, and the cells were sorted according to donor age (10-19 years: n = 1; 20-29 years: n = 5; 30-39 years: n = 12; 40-49 years: n = 22; 50-59 years: n = 12; 60-69 years: n = 9, and 70 years or older: n = 5), BMI (under 25, 25-30, and over 30), and gender (19 males and 48 females). Additionally, AT-MSCs were compared to bone marrow MSCs and chorionic tissue-derived MSCs. We measured the MSC yield, growth rate, colony-forming units, multipotency, and surface antigens. AT-MSC proliferation was greater in cells isolated from individuals aged less than 30 years compared to the proliferation of AT-MSCs from those over 50 years old. BMI was correlated with osteogenic differentiation potency; increased BMI enhanced osteogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was more strongly induced in cells isolated from donors aged less than 30 years compared to those isolated from other age groups. Also, a BMI above 30 was associated with enhanced adipogenic differentiation compared to cells isolated from individuals with a BMI below 25. Bone marrow MSCs were strongly induced to differentiate along both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages, whereas AT-MSCs predominantly differentiated into the chondrogenic lineage. Therefore, the type of regeneration required and variations among potential donors must be carefully considered when selecting MSCs for use in applied tissue engineering or cell therapy.

  18. Peculiarity of Porcine Amniotic Membrane and Its Derived Cells: A Contribution to the Study of Cell Therapy from a Large Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Corradetti, Bruna; Bertani, Sabrina; Notarstefano, Valentina; Perrini, Claudia; Marini, Maria Giovanna; Arrighi, Silvana; Bosi, Giampaolo; Belloli, Angelo; Pravettoni, Davide; Locatelli, Valentina; Cremonesi, Fausto; Bizzaro, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to provide, for the first time, a protocol for isolation and characterization of stem cells from porcine amniotic membrane in view of their potential uses in regenerative medicine. From three samples of allanto-amnion recovered at delivery, the amniotic membrane was stripped from overlying allantois and digested with trypsin and collagenase to isolate epithelial (amniotic epithelial cells [AECs]) and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Proliferation, differentiation, and characterization studies by molecular biology and flow cytometry were performed. Histological examination revealed very few mesenchymal cells in the stromal layer, and a cellular yield of AECs of 10 × 10(6)/gram of digested tissue was achieved. AECs readily attached to plastic culture dishes displaying typical cuboidal morphology and, although their proliferative capacity decreased to the fifth passage, AECs showed a mean doubling time of 24.77 ± 6 h and a mean frequency of one fibroblast colony-forming unit (CFU-F) for every 116.75 plated cells. AECs expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mRNA markers (CD29, CD166, CD90, CD73, CD117) and pluripotent markers (Nanog and Oct 4), whereas they were negative for CD34 and MHCII. Mesodermic, ectodermic, and endodermic differentiation was confirmed by staining and expression of specific markers. We conclude that porcine amniotic membrane can provide an attractive source of stem cells that may be a useful tool for biomedical research.

  19. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  20. Differentiation of human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells into neural-like progenitor cells and maturation into an oligodendroglial-like lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Leite

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are viewed as safe, readily available and promising adult stem cells, which are currently used in several clinical trials. Additionally, their soluble-factor secretion and multi-lineage differentiation capacities place MSCs in the forefront of stem cell types with expected near-future clinical applications. In the present work MSCs were isolated from the umbilical cord matrix (Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord samples. The cells were thoroughly characterized and confirmed as bona-fide MSCs, presenting in vitro low generation time, high proliferative and colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F capacity, typical MSC immunophenotype and osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity. The cells were additionally subjected to an oligodendroglial-oriented step-wise differentiation protocol in order to test their neural- and oligodendroglial-like differentiation capacity. The results confirmed the neural-like plasticity of MSCs, and suggested that the cells presented an oligodendroglial-like phenotype throughout the differentiation protocol, in several aspects sharing characteristics common to those of bona-fide oligodendrocyte precursor cells and differentiated oligodendrocytes.

  1. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  2. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  3. Phytochemicals as Innovative Therapeutic Tools against Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele-Salvatore Scarpa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The theory that several carcinogenetic processes are initiated and sustained by cancer stem cells (CSCs has been validated, and specific methods to identify the CSCs in the entire population of cancer cells have also proven to be effective. This review aims to provide an overview of recently acquired scientific knowledge regarding phytochemicals and herbal extracts, which have been shown to be able to target and kill CSCs. Many genes and proteins that sustain the CSCs’ self-renewal capacity and drug resistance have been described and applications of phytochemicals able to interfere with these signaling systems have been shown to be operatively efficient both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of specific surface antigens, mammosphere formation assays, serial colony-forming unit assays, xenograft transplantation and label-retention assays coupled with Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 activity evaluation are the most frequently used techniques for measuring phytochemical efficiency in killing CSCs. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that EGCG, curcumin, piperine, sulforaphane, β-carotene, genistein and the whole extract of some plants are able to kill CSCs. Most of these phytochemicals act by interfering with the canonical Wnt (β-catenin/T cell factor-lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF-LEF pathway implicated in the pathogenesis of several cancers. Therefore, the use of phytochemicals may be a true therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer through the elimination of CSCs.

  4. Phytochemicals as Innovative Therapeutic Tools against Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Emanuele-Salvatore; Ninfali, Paolino

    2015-07-10

    The theory that several carcinogenetic processes are initiated and sustained by cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been validated, and specific methods to identify the CSCs in the entire population of cancer cells have also proven to be effective. This review aims to provide an overview of recently acquired scientific knowledge regarding phytochemicals and herbal extracts, which have been shown to be able to target and kill CSCs. Many genes and proteins that sustain the CSCs' self-renewal capacity and drug resistance have been described and applications of phytochemicals able to interfere with these signaling systems have been shown to be operatively efficient both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of specific surface antigens, mammosphere formation assays, serial colony-forming unit assays, xenograft transplantation and label-retention assays coupled with Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity evaluation are the most frequently used techniques for measuring phytochemical efficiency in killing CSCs. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that EGCG, curcumin, piperine, sulforaphane, β-carotene, genistein and the whole extract of some plants are able to kill CSCs. Most of these phytochemicals act by interfering with the canonical Wnt (β-catenin/T cell factor-lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF-LEF)) pathway implicated in the pathogenesis of several cancers. Therefore, the use of phytochemicals may be a true therapeutic strategy for eradicating cancer through the elimination of CSCs.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 inhibits the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Qiang; Zhen-Fang Du; Min Huang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of human renal cell carcinoma cell line OS-RC-2 in vitro. Methods: NDRG2 was harvested by RT-PCR, confirmed by DNA sequencing, and then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP, which encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP), to construct pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. OS-RC-2 cells with NDRG2 negative expression were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 plasmid. The growth of transfected OS-RC-2 cells was observed under light and fluorescence microscopes. After colony-forming cell assays, cell proliferation detection and MTT assays, the growth curves of cells in each group were plotted to investigate the inhibitory effects of adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 on the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells. Cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was specifically located on subcellular organelle. Results: A eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP-NDRG2 was successfully constructed. After NDRG2 transfection, the growth of OS-RC-2 cells was inhibited. Flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested in S phase but the peak of cell apoptosis was not present, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NDRG2 protein was located in mitochondrion. Conclusions: NDRG2 can significantly inhibit the proliferation of OS-RC-2 cells in vitro and its protein is specifically expressed in the mitochondrion.

  6. Leukemic progenitor cells are susceptible to targeting by stimulated cytotoxic T cells against immunogenic leukemia-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Vanessa; Zhang, Lu; Rojewski, Markus; Fekete, Natalie; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Erle, Alexander; Bullinger, Lars; Hofmann, Susanne; Götz, Marlies; Döhner, Konstanze; Ihme, Susann; Döhner, Hartmut; Buske, Christian; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Greiner, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSC) might be the source for leukemic disease self-renewal and account for disease relapse after treatment, which makes them a critical target for further therapeutic options. We investigated the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) counteracting and recognizing LSC. Leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) represent immunogenic structures to target LSC. We enriched the LSC-containing fraction of 20 AML patients and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of healthy volunteers. Using microarray analysis and qRT-PCR we detected high expression of several LAA in AML cells but also in LSC. PRAME (p = 0.0085), RHAMM (p = 0.03), WT1 (p = 0.04) and Proteinase 3 (p = 0.04) showed significant differential expression in LSC compared with HSC. PRAME, RHAMM and WT1 are furthermore also lower expressed on leukemic bulk. In contrast, Proteinase 3 indicates a higher expression on leukemic bulk than on LSC. In colony forming unit (CFU) immunoassays, T cells stimulated against various LAA indicated a significant inhibition of CFUs in AML patient samples. The LAA PRAME, RHAMM and WT1 showed highest immunogenic responses with a range up to 58-83%. In a proof of principle xenotransplant mouse model, PRAME-stimulated CTL targeted AML stem cells, reflected by a delayed engraftment of leukemia (p = 0.0159). Taken together, we demonstrated the expression of several LAA in LSC. LAA-specific T cells are able to hamper LSC in immunoassays and in a mouse model, which suggests that immunotherapeutic approaches have the potential to target malignant stem cells. © 2015 UICC.

  7. Clinical-scale expansion of CD34(+) cord blood cells amplifies committed progenitors and rapid scid repopulation cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayor-Genescà, Alba; Pla, Arnau; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Pujals-Fonts, Noèlia; Marín-Gallén, Sílvia; Caminal, Marta; Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Carrascal, Jorge; Vives-Pi, Marta; Garcia, Joan; Vives, Joaquim

    2017-03-25

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is associated with long periods of aplastic anaemia. This undesirable situation is due to the low cell dose available per unit of UCB and the immaturity of its progenitors. To overcome this, we present a cell culture strategy aimed at the expansion of the CD34(+) population and the generation of granulocyte lineage-committed progenitors. Two culture products were produced after either 6 or 14days of in vitro expansion, and their characteristics compared to non-expanded UCB CD34(+) controls in terms of phenotype, colony-forming activity and multilineage repopulation potential in NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice. Both expanded cell products maintained rapid SCID repopulation activity similar to the non-expanded control, but 14-day cultured cells showed impaired long term SCID repopulation activity. The process was successfully scaled up to clinically relevant doses of 89×10(6) CD34(+) cells committed to the granulocytic lineage and 3.9×10(9) neutrophil precursors in different maturation stages. Cell yields and biological properties presented by the cell product obtained after 14days in culture were superior and therefore this is proposed as the preferred production setup in a new type of dual transplant strategy to reduce aplastic periods, producing a transient repopulation before the definitive engraftment of the non-cultured UCB unit. Importantly, human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity was undetectable, c-myc expression levels were low and no genetic abnormalities were found, as determined by G-banding karyotype, further confirming the safety of the expanded product.

  8. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis.

  9. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  10. Tracking adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans

    2011-02-01

    The maintenance of stem-cell-driven tissue homeostasis requires a balance between the generation and loss of cell mass. Adult stem cells have a close relationship with the surrounding tissue--known as their niche--and thus, stem-cell studies should preferably be performed in a physiological context, rather than outside their natural environment. The mouse is an attractive model in which to study adult mammalian stem cells, as numerous experimental systems and genetic tools are available. In this review, we describe strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells in mice and discuss their potential, limitations and interpretations, as well as how they have informed our understanding of adult stem-cell biology. An accurate interpretation of physiologically relevant stem-cell assays is crucial to identify adult stem cells and elucidate how they self-renew and give rise to differentiated progeny.

  11. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  12. What are Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadshah Farhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are undifferentiated self regenerating multi potential cells. There are three types of stem cells categories by the ability to form after cells and correlated with the body’s development process. Totipotent: these stem cells can form an entire organism such as fertilized egg. Ploripotent: ploripotent cells are those that can form any cell in the body but cannot form an entire organism such as developing embryo’s totipotent cells become ploripotent  Multipotent: Multi potent stem cells are those that can only form specific cells in the body such as blood cells based. Based on the sources of stem cells we have three types of these cells: Autologous: Sources of the patient own cells are (Autologous either the cells from patient own body or his or her cord blood. For this type of transplant the physician now usually collects the periphery rather than morrow because the procedure is easier on like a bane morrow harvest it take place outside of an operating room, and the patient does not to be under general unsetting . Allogenic: Sources of stem cells from another donore are primarily relatives (familial allogenic or completely unrelated donors. Xenogenic: In these stem cells from different species are transplanted e .g striatal porcine fetal mesan cephalic (FVM xenotransplants for Parkinson’s disease. On sites of isolation such as embryo, umbilical cord and other body tissues stem cells are named embnyonic, cord blood, and adult stem cells. The scope of results and clinical application of stem cells are such as: Neurodegenerative conditions (MS,ALS, Parkinson’s, Stroke, Ocular disorders- Glaucoma, retinitis Pigmentosa (RP, Auto Immune Conditions (Lupus, MS,R. arthritis, Diabetes, etc, Viral Conditions (Hepatitis C and AIDS, Heart Disease, Adrenal Disorders, Injury(Nerve, Brain, etc, Anti aging (hair, skin, weight control, overall well being/preventive, Emotional disorders, Organ / Tissue Cancers, Blood cancers, Blood diseases

  13. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  14. Stem cells in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony

    2008-11-01

    The shortage of donors for organ transplantation has stimulated research on stem cells as a potential resource for cell-based therapy in all human tissues. Stem cells have been used for regenerative medicine applications in many organ systems, including the genitourinary system. The potential applications for stem cell therapy have, however, been restricted by the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research. Instead, scientists have explored other cell sources, including progenitor and stem cells derived from adult tissues and stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid and placenta. In addition, novel techniques for generating stem cells in the laboratory are being developed. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which the nucleus of an adult somatic cell is placed into an oocyte, and reprogramming of adult cells to induce stem-cell-like behavior. Such techniques are now being used in tissue engineering applications, and some of the most successful experiments have been in the field of urology. Techniques to regenerate bladder tissue have reached the clinic, and exciting progress is being made in other areas, such as regeneration of the kidney and urethra. Cell therapy as a treatment for incontinence and infertility might soon become a reality. Physicians should be optimistic that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will one day provide mainstream treatment options for urologic disorders.

  15. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriane Guillevic

    Full Text Available Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs, a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile.

  16. Analysis of tanshinone IIA induced cellular apoptosis in leukemia cells by genome-wide expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA is a diterpene quinone extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, a Chinese traditional herb. Although previous studies have reported the anti-tumor effects of Tan IIA on various human cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The current study was undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms of Tan IIA's apoptotic effects on leukemia cells in vitro. Methods The cytotoxicity of Tan IIA on different types of leukemia cell lines was evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5]-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay on cells treated without or with Tan IIA at different concentrations for different time periods. Cellular apoptosis progression with and without Tan IIA treatment was analyzed by Annexin V and Caspase 3 assays. Gene expression profiling was used to identify the genes regulated after Tan IIA treatment and those differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Confirmation of these expression regulations was carried out using real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA. The antagonizing effect of a PXR inhibitor L-SFN on Tan IIA treatment was tested using Colony Forming Unit Assay. Results Our results revealed that Tan IIA had different cytotoxic activities on five types of leukemia cells, with the highest toxicity on U-937 cells. Tan IIA inhibited the growth of U-937 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Annexin V and Caspase-3 assays showed that Tan IIA induced apoptosis in U-937 cells. Using gene expression profiling, 366 genes were found to be significantly regulated after Tan IIA treatment and differentially expressed among the five cell lines. Among these genes, CCL2 was highly expressed in untreated U-937 cells and down-regulated significantly after Tan IIA treatment in a dose-dependent manner. RT-qPCR analyses validated the expression regulation of 80% of genes. Addition of L- sulforaphane (L-SFN, an inhibitor of Pregnane × receptor (PXR significantly

  17. Online monitoring of cell metabolism to assess the toxicity of nanoparticles: the case of cobalt ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Valentina; Ponti, Jessica; Giudetti, Guido; Broggi, Francesca; Marmorato, Patrick; Gioria, Sabrina; Franchini, Fabio; Rauscher, Hubert; Rossi, François

    2012-05-01

    Different in vitro assays are successfully used to determine the relative cytotoxicity of a broad range of compounds. Nevertheless, different research groups have pointed out the difficulty in using the same tests to assess the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs). In this study, we evaluated the possible use of a microphysiometer, Bionas 2500 analyzing system Bionas GmbH®, to detect in real time changes in cell metabolisms linked to NPs exposure. We focused our work on response changes of fibroblast cultures linked to exposure by cobalt ferrite NPs and compared the results to conventional in vitro assays. The measurements with the microphysiometer showed a cobalt ferrite cytotoxic effect, confirmed by the Colony Forming Efficiency assay. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that the measurement of metabolic parameters with a microphysiometer is a promising method to assess the toxicity of NPs and offers the advantage to follow on-line the cell metabolic changes.

  18. Apigenin inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Shuai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xiao; Liang, Zhen; Li, Shi-Qi; Xu, Xin; Chen, Hong; Liu, Ben; Zheng, Xiang-Yi; Xie, Li-Ping

    2017-03-21

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in vegetables and fruits, has antitumor activity in several cancer types. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of action of apigenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. We found that apigenin suppressed ACHN, 786-0, and Caki-1 RCC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A comet assay suggested that apigenin caused DNA damage in ACHN cells, especially at higher doses, and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest through ATM signal modulation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated p53 knockdown showed that apigenin-induced apoptosis was likely p53 dependent. Apigenin anti-proliferative effects were confirmed in an ACHN cell xenograft mouse model. Apigenin treatment reduced tumor growth and volume in vivo, and immunohistochemical staining revealed lower Ki-67 indices in tumors derived from apigenin-treated mice. These findings suggest that apigenin exposure induces DNA damage, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, p53 accumulation and apoptosis, which collectively suppress ACHN RCC cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Given its antitumor effects and low in vivo toxicity, apigenin is a highly promising agent for treatment of RCC.

  19. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into accou

  20. Are mesenchymal stromal cells immune cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be promising agents for the treatment of immunological disease. Although originally identified as precursor cells for mesenchymal lineages, in vitro studies have demonstrated that MSCs possess diverse immune regulatory capacities. Pre-cl

  1. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Schwann Cell Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitu

  2. [Knockdown of Puma protects cord blood CD34(+) cells against γ- irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Gu, Hai-Hui; Xu, Jing; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    Puma (P53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only BCL-1 family member and a critical mediator of P53-dependent and -independent apoptosis. Puma plays an essential role in the apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells exposed to irradiation without an increased risk of malignancies. This study was purposed to develop an effective lentiviral vector to target Puma in human hematopoietic cells and to investigate the effect of Puma gene knockdown on the biological function of human cord blood CD34(+) cells. SF-LV-shPuma-EGFP and control vectors were constructed, and packaged with the pSPAX2/pMD2.G packaging plasmids via 293T cells to produce pseudo-type lentiviruses. SF-LV-shPuma-EGFP or control lentiviruses were harvested within 72 hours after transfection and then were used to transduce human cord blood CD34(+) cells. GFP(+) transduced cells were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM) for subsequent studies. Semi-quantitative real time RT PCR, Western blot, FCM with Annexin V-PE/7-AAD double staining, Ki67 staining, colony forming cell assay (CFC), CCK-8 assay and BrdU incorporation were performed to determine the expression of Puma and its effect on the cord blood CD34(+) cells. The results showed that Puma was significantly knocked down in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the low expression of Puma conferred a radio-protective effect on the cord blood CD34(+) cells. This effect was achieved through reduced apoptosis and sustained quiescence after irradiation due to Puma knockdown. It is concluded that knockdown of puma gene in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells of human cord blood possesses the radioprotective effect, maintains the cells in silence targeting Puma in human hematopoietic cells may have a similar effect with that on mouse hematopoietic cells as previously shown, and our lentiviral targeting system for Puma provides a valuable tool for future translational studies with human cells.

  3. Malignant behaviorial characteristics of CD133(+/-) glioblastoma cells from a Northern Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhi; Chen, Lei; Jiang, Zhongmin; Wang, Junfei; Su, Zhiguo; Li, Gang; Yu, Shizhu; Liu, Zhenlin

    2013-01-01

    Following emergence of the tumor stem cell theory, the increasing number of related studies demonstrates the theory's growing importance in cancer research and its potential for clinical applications. Few studies have addressed the in vitro or in vivo properties of glioma stem cells from a Han Chinese population. In the present study, surgically obtained glioblastoma tissue was classified into two subtypes, CD133(+) and CD133(-). The hierarchy, invasiveness, growth tolerance under low nutrient conditions and colony forming abilities of the tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, the characteristics of tumor cells transplanted subcutaneously or re-transplanted into nude mice were observed. The results demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells derived from Han Chinese glioma specimens were more prone to primitive cell differentiation and more invasive than CD133(-) glioblastoma cells, leading to increased tumor malignancy compared with CD133(-) cells. The tumor formation rates of CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells in mice were 26/30 and 2/30, respectively. A comparison of tumor subtypes demonstrated that CD133(+) glioblastoma cells had a lower incidence of cell apoptosis in the tumor tissue and higher protein expression levels of Oct4, Sox2, PCNA, EGFR, Ang2, MMP2 and MMP9 compared with CD133(-) cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in the CD133(+) and CD133(-) glioblastoma cell-induced tumors, the percentage of CD133(+) cells was 2.47±0.67 and 0.44±0.14%, respectively. The tumor formation rates following the re-transplantation of CD133(+) or CD133(-) tumors into nude mice were 10/10 and 4/10, respectively. These findings suggest that the CD133(+) glioblastoma cell subpopulation has a stronger malignant cell phenotype than the CD133(-) subpopulation and that its recurrence rate is increased compared with the primitive tumorigenic rate following in vivo transplantation.

  4. Real-time motion analysis reveals cell directionality as an indicator of breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Weiger

    Full Text Available Cancer cells alter their migratory properties during tumor progression to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites. However, it remains unclear how migratory behaviors differ between tumor cells of different malignancy and whether these migratory behaviors can be utilized to assess the malignant potential of tumor cells. Here, we analyzed the migratory behaviors of cell lines representing different stages of breast cancer progression using conventional migration assays or time-lapse imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV to capture migration dynamics. We find that the number of migrating cells in transwell assays, and the distance and speed of migration in unconstrained 2D assays, show no correlation with malignant potential. However, the directionality of cell motion during 2D migration nicely distinguishes benign and tumorigenic cell lines, with tumorigenic cell lines harboring less directed, more random motion. Furthermore, the migratory behaviors of epithelial sheets observed under basal conditions and in response to stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF or lysophosphatitic acid (LPA are distinct for each cell line with regard to cell speed, directionality, and spatiotemporal motion patterns. Surprisingly, treatment with LPA promotes a more cohesive, directional sheet movement in lung colony forming MCF10CA1a cells compared to basal conditions or EGF stimulation, implying that the LPA signaling pathway may alter the invasive potential of MCF10CA1a cells. Together, our findings identify cell directionality as a promising indicator for assessing the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cell lines and show that LPA induces more cohesive motility in a subset of metastatic breast cancer cells.

  5. A short-term treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances stem cell phenotype of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Mayu; Fujisawa, Takuo; Ono, Mitsuaki; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Pham, Hai Thanh; Nakajima, Ryu; Sonoyama, Wataru; Kuboki, Takuo

    2014-02-28

    During normal pulp tissue healing, inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or interleukins, act in the initial 48 hours (inflammatory phase) and play important roles not only as chemo-attractants of inflammatory cells and stem/progenitor cells but also in inducing a cascade of reactions toward tissue regeneration or reparative dentin formation or both. Previous reports have shown that inflammatory cytokines regulate the differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs), but none has interrogated the impact of these cytokines on the stem cell phenotype of stem/progenitor cells. This study investigated the effects of a short-term treatment with TNF-α on the stem cell phenotype and differentiation ability of human DPCs. An in vivo mouse model of pulp exposure was performed for analysis of expression of the mesenchymal stem cell marker CD146 in DPCs during the initial stage of inflammatory response. For in vitro studies, human DPCs were isolated and incubated with TNF-α for 2 days and passaged to eliminate TNF-α completely. Analysis of stem cell phenotype was performed by quantification of cells positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers SSEA-4 (stage-specific embryonic antigen 4) and CD146 by flow cytometry as well as by quantitative analysis of telomerase activity and mRNA levels of OCT-4 and NANOG. Cell migration, colony-forming ability, and differentiation toward odontogenesis and adipogenesis were also investigated. The pulp exposure model revealed a strong staining for CD146 during the initial inflammatory response, at 2 days after pulp exposure. In vitro experiments demonstrated that a short-term (2-day) treatment of TNF-α increased by twofold the percentage of SSEA-4+ cells. Accordingly, STRO-1, CD146, and SSEA-4 protein levels as well as OCT-4 and NANOG mRNA levels were also significantly upregulated upon TNF-α treatment. A short-term TNF-α treatment also enhanced DPC function, including the ability to

  6. Induction of Functional Hair-Cell-Like Cells from Mouse Cochlear Multipotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a two-step-induction method of generating functional hair cells from inner ear multipotent cells. Multipotent cells from the inner ear were established and induced initially into progenitor cells committed to the inner ear cell lineage on the poly-L-lysine substratum. Subsequently, the committed progenitor cells were cultured on the mitotically inactivated chicken utricle stromal cells and induced into hair-cell-like cells containing characteristic stereocilia bundles. The hair-cell-like cells exhibited rapid permeation of FM1-43FX. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to measure the membrane currents of cells differentiated for 7 days on chicken utricle stromal cells and analyze the biophysical properties of the hair-cell-like cells by recording membrane properties of cells. The results suggested that the hair-cell-like cells derived from inner ear multipotent cells were functional following differentiation in an enabling environment.

  7. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell-cell contacts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venkat Maruthamuthu; Benedikt Sabass; Ulrich S. Schwarz; Margaret L. Gardel; Shu Chien

    2011-01-01

    .... A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell-cell force exists, indicating that the cell-cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction...

  8. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantifying Epithelial Early Common Progenitors from Long-Term Primary or Cell Line Sphere Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Flora; Zhu, Helen He; Gao, Wei-Qiang; Delay, Emmanuel; Maguer-Satta, Véronique

    2015-11-04

    Here, a protocol to quantify epithelial early common progenitor/stem cells grown as spheres in non-adherent culture conditions is described. This protocol is based on the combination of two functional tests: the sphere assay to maintain and enrich early progenitor/stem cells, and the epithelial colony-forming cells (E-CFC) assay to identify and quantify further differentiated epithelial progenitors. Primary spheres mainly contain progenitors and rare stem/early common progenitor cells while secondary and tertiary spheres contain progenitor cells derived from the early common progenitor/stem cell population maintained through passages and partially differentiated. Spheres are enzymatically and mechanically dissociated; the derived cells are subsequently plated on irradiated NIH-3T3 fibroblasts for further processing, as in the E-CFC assay. The principle of this assay is to quantify the number of epithelial colonies generated by cells present in the different sequential spheres. This assay has therefore been named the early common progenitor-derived colonies assay (ECP-DC).

  10. Time related variations in stem cell harvesting of umbilical cord blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Miscio, Giuseppe; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Francavilla, Massimo; Bosi, Alberto; Perfetto, Federico; Valoriani, Alice; De Cata, Angelo; Santodirocco, Michele; Totaro, Angela; Rubino, Rosa; di Mauro, Lazzaro; Tarquini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent mesenchymal cells useful for treatment in malignant/nonmalignant hematologic-immunologic diseases and regenerative medicine. Transplantation outcome is correlated with cord blood volume (CBV), number of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ progenitor cells and colony forming units in UCB donations. Several studies have addressed the role of maternal/neonatal factors associated with the hematopoietic reconstruction potential of UCB, including: gestational age, maternal parity, newborn sex and birth weight, placental weight, labor duration and mode of delivery. Few data exist regarding as to how time influences UCB collection and banking patterns. We retrospectively analyzed 17.936 cord blood donations collected from 1999 to 2011 from Tuscany and Apulia Cord Blood Banks. Results from generalized multivariable linear mixed models showed that CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell were associated with known obstetric and neonatal parameters and showed rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges. The present findings confirm that volume, total nucleated cells and stem cells of the UCB donations are hallmarked by rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges and suggest that temporal rhythms in addition to known obstetric and neonatal parameters influence CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell content in UBC units. PMID:26906327

  11. Effects of sargentgloryvine stem extracts on HepG-2 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Hua Wang; Min Long; Bao-Yi Zhu; Shu-Hui Yang; Ji-Hong Ren; Hui-Zhong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of sargentgloryvine stem extracts (SSE) on the hepatoma cell line HepG-2 in vitro and in vivo and determine its mechanisms of action.METHODS: Cultured HepG-2 cells treated with SSE were analysed by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium bromide and clone formation assay.The cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were conducted by flow cytometric, TdT-Mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining methods,and protein expression was examined by both reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting.The pathological changes of the tumor cells were observed by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Tumor growth inhibition and side effects were determined in a xenograft mouse model.RESULTS: SSE treatment could not only inhibit HepG-2 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner but also induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the S phase. The number of colonies formed by SSEtreated tumor cells was fewer than that of the controls (P 0.05). Systemic administration of SSE could inhibit the HepG-2 xenograft tumor growth with no obvious toxic side effects on normal tissues.CONCLUSION: SSE can induce apoptosis of HepG-2 cells in vitro and in vivo through decreasing expression of Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 and increasing expression of Bax.

  12. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs.

  13. Pluripotent stem cells for Schwann cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-San; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2015-04-01

    Tissue engineering of Schwann cells (SCs) can serve a number of purposes, such as in vitro SC-related disease modeling, treatment of peripheral nerve diseases or peripheral nerve injury, and, potentially, treatment of CNS diseases. SCs can be generated from autologous stem cells in vitro by recapitulating the various stages of in vivo neural crest formation and SC differentiation. In this review, we survey the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these in vivo processes. We then focus on the current in vitro strategies for generating SCs from two sources of pluripotent stem cells, namely embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Different methods for SC engineering from ESCs and iPSCs are reviewed and suggestions are proposed for optimizing the existing protocols. Potential safety issues regarding the clinical application of iPSC-derived SCs are discussed as well. Lastly, we will address future aspects of SC engineering.

  14. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  15. Synergistic Effects between mTOR Complex 1/2 and Glycolysis Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Suhua; Zou, Zhengzhi; Nie, Peipei; Wen, Ruiling; Xiao, Yingying; Tang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has greatly interested researchers. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is dysregulated in a variety of cancers and considered to be an appealing therapeutic target. It has been proven that growth factor signal, mediated by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), drives cancer metabolism by regulating key enzymes in metabolic pathways. However, the role of mTORC2 in cancer metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, by employing automated spectrophotometry, we found the level of glucose uptake was decreased in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) A549, PC-9 and SK-MES-1 cells treated with rapamycin or siRNA against Raptor, indicating that the inhibition of mTORC1 attenuated glycolytic metabolism in NSCLC cells. Moreover, the inhibition of AKT reduced glucose uptake in the cells as well, suggesting the involvement of AKT pathway in mTORC1 mediated glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, our results showed a significant decrease in glucose uptake in rictor down-regulated NSCLC cells, implying a critical role of mTORC2 in NSCLC cell glycolysis. In addition, the experiments for MTT, ATP, and clonogenic assays demonstrated a reduction in cell proliferation, cell viability, and colony forming ability in mTOR inhibiting NSCLC cells. Interestingly, the combined application of mTORC1/2 inhibitors and glycolysis inhibitor not only suppressed the cell proliferation and colony formation, but also induced cell apoptosis, and such an effect of the combined application was stronger than that caused by mTORC1/2 inhibitors alone. In conclusion, this study reports a novel effect of mTORC2 on NSCLC cell metabolism, and reveals the synergistic effects between mTOR complex 1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors, suggesting that the combined application of mTORC1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors may be a new promising approach to treat NSCLC.

  16. Synergistic Effects between mTOR Complex 1/2 and Glycolysis Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhua Jiang

    Full Text Available Cancer metabolism has greatly interested researchers. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is dysregulated in a variety of cancers and considered to be an appealing therapeutic target. It has been proven that growth factor signal, mediated by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, drives cancer metabolism by regulating key enzymes in metabolic pathways. However, the role of mTORC2 in cancer metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, by employing automated spectrophotometry, we found the level of glucose uptake was decreased in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC A549, PC-9 and SK-MES-1 cells treated with rapamycin or siRNA against Raptor, indicating that the inhibition of mTORC1 attenuated glycolytic metabolism in NSCLC cells. Moreover, the inhibition of AKT reduced glucose uptake in the cells as well, suggesting the involvement of AKT pathway in mTORC1 mediated glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, our results showed a significant decrease in glucose uptake in rictor down-regulated NSCLC cells, implying a critical role of mTORC2 in NSCLC cell glycolysis. In addition, the experiments for MTT, ATP, and clonogenic assays demonstrated a reduction in cell proliferation, cell viability, and colony forming ability in mTOR inhibiting NSCLC cells. Interestingly, the combined application of mTORC1/2 inhibitors and glycolysis inhibitor not only suppressed the cell proliferation and colony formation, but also induced cell apoptosis, and such an effect of the combined application was stronger than that caused by mTORC1/2 inhibitors alone. In conclusion, this study reports a novel effect of mTORC2 on NSCLC cell metabolism, and reveals the synergistic effects between mTOR complex 1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors, suggesting that the combined application of mTORC1/2 and glycolysis inhibitors may be a new promising approach to treat NSCLC.

  17. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Vidyasekar

    Full Text Available Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated and 2542 (downregulated genes (>2 fold in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated and 444 (downregulated genes (>2 fold under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2.

  18. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  19. A novel and feasible way to cultivate and purify endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow of children with congenital heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yong-tao; LI Jing-xing; LIU Shuo; XIN Yi; WANG Zi-jian; GAO Jin; JI Bing-yang; FAN Xiang-ming; ZHOU Qi-wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are used in vascular tissue engineering and clinic therapy.Some investigators get EPCs from the peripheral blood for clinic treatment,but the number of EPCs is seldom enough.We have developed the cultivation and purification of EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,to provide enough seed cells for a small calibre vascular tissue engineering study.Methods The 0.5-ml of bone marrow was separated from the sternum bone,and 5-ml of peripheral blood was collected from children with congenital heart diseases who had undergone open thoracic surgery.CD34+ and CD34+/VEGFR+cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood were quantified by flow cytometry.CD34+NEGFR+ cells were defined as EPCs.Mononuclear cells in the bone marrow were isolated by Ficoll(R) density gradient centrifugation and cultured by the EndoCult Liquid Medium KitTM.Colony forming endothelial cells was detected.Immunohistochemistry staining for Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1 confirmed the endothelial lineage of these cells.Results CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in peripheral blood were (0.07±0.05)% and (0.05±0.02)%,respectively.The number of CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in bone marrow were significantly higher than in blood,(4.41±1.47)% and (0.98±0.65)%,respectively (P <0.0001).Many colony forming units formed in the culture.These cells also expressed high levels of Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1.Conclusion This is a novel and feasible approach that can cultivate and purify EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,and provide seed cells for small calibre vascular tissue engineering.

  20. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  1. Cell signaling review series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiming Lin; Zhenggang Liu

    2008-01-01

    @@ Signal transduction is pivotal for many, if not all, fundamental cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, transformation and programmed cell death. Deregulation of cell signaling may result in certain types of cancers and other human diseases.

  2. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  3. Sickle Cell Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom Search Sickle Cell Anemia News -- ScienceDaily January 18, 1970 Read articles summarizing medical research on sickle-cell anemia. NYT, Nature, Wash Post, SciAm, CNN - Google Custom ...

  4. NIA Aging Cell Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To facilitate aging research on cells in culture, the NIA provides support for the NIA Aging Cell Repository, located at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research...

  5. Stem Cell Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... why are they important? Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types ... of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2016 [cited October 9, 2017 ] Available at < //stemcells. ...

  6. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  7. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  8. Engineering Stem Cell Organoids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Xiaolei; Mead, Benjamin E; Safaee, Helia; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M; Levy, Oren

    2016-01-01

    .... Herein, we discuss basic approaches to generate stem cell-based organoids, their advantages and limitations, and how bioengineering strategies can be used to steer the cell composition and their 3D...

  9. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  10. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  11. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... 1. True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  12. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  13. Cell-SELEX Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aptamers are molecules identified from large combinatorial nucleic acid libraries by their high affinity to target molecules. Due to a variety of desired properties, aptamers are attractive alternatives to antibodies in molecular biology and medical applications. Aptamers are identified through an iterative selection–amplification process known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). Although SELEX is typically carried out using purified target molecules, whole live cells are also employable as selection targets. This technology, Cell-SELEX, has several advantages. For example, generated aptamers are functional with a native conformation of the target molecule on live cells, and thus, cell surface transmembrane proteins would be targets even when their purifications in native conformations are difficult. In addition, cell-specific aptamers can be obtained without any knowledge about cell surface molecules on the target cells. Here, I review the progress of Cell-SELEX technology and discuss advantages of the technology. PMID:23515081

  14. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  15. Mast cell activation disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    only IgE dependent allergic diseases but also play a ... Mast cells are tissue fixed effector cells of allergic ..... alleviated high intensity symptoms of MCAD.29 ... Osteoporosis, osteolysis, bone pain: biphosphonates (vitamin D plus calcium.

  16. Cell phone explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging.

  17. Red blood cell production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  18. Mast cell proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Elin; Melo, Fabio R; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells are versatile effector cells of the immune system, contributing to both innate and adaptive immunity toward pathogens but also having profound detrimental activities in the context of inflammatory disease. A hallmark morphological feature of mast cells is their large content of cytoplasmic secretory granules, filled with numerous secretory compounds, including highly negatively charged heparin or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans of serglycin type. These anionic proteoglycans provide the basis for the strong metachromatic staining properties of mast cells seen when applying various cationic dyes. Functionally, the mast cell proteoglycans have been shown to have an essential role in promoting the storage of other granule-contained compounds, including bioactive monoamines and different mast cell-specific proteases. Moreover, granule proteoglycans have been shown to regulate the enzymatic activities of mast cell proteases and to promote apoptosis. Here, the current knowledge of mast cell proteoglycans is reviewed.

  19. Human Non-Hematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg Bone Marrow Stroma Cells Fulfill Stringent Stem Cell Criteria in Serial Transplantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Li, Hongzhe; Zacharaki, Dimitra; Lim, Hooi Ching

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of non-hematopoietic stromal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs), which play a central role for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise characteristics and potential stem cell properties of defined BMSC populations have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Using standard adherent colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assays, we have previously shown that BMSCs were highly enriched in the nonhematopoietic CD271pos/CD140alow/neg fraction of normal adult human bone marrow. In this study, we demonstrate that prospectively isolated CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs expressed high levels of hematopoiesis supporting genes and signature mesenchymal and multipotency genes on a single cell basis. Furthermore, CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs gave rise to non-adherent sphere colonies (mesenspheres) with typical surface marker profile and trilineage in vitro differentiation potential. Importantly, serial transplantations of CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSC-derived mesenspheres (single cell and bulk) into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice showed increased mesensphere numbers and full differentiation potential after both primary and secondary transplantations. In contrast, BMSC self-renewal potential decreased under standard adherent culture conditions. These data therefore indicate that CD271pos/CD140alow/neg BMSCs represent a population of primary stem cells with MSC phenotype and sphere-forming capacity that fulfill stringent functional stem cell criteria in vivo in a serial transplantation setting. PMID:27527928

  20. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM, using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM, the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control. Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved.

  1. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  2. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  3. Centchroman inhibits proliferation of head and neck cancer cells through the modulation of PI3K/mTOR Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vikas Kumar [Department of Radiotherapy, C.S.M. Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226003 (India); Gara, Rishi Kumar [Department of Endocrinology, Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace,1 MG Marg, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226001 (India); Bhatt, M.L.B. [Department of Radiotherapy, C.S.M. Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226003 (India); Sahu, D.P. [Medicinal and Processing Chemistry, Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace,1 MG Marg, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226001 (India); Mishra, Durga Prasad, E-mail: dpm@cdri.res.in [Department of Endocrinology, Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil Palace,1 MG Marg, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226001 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Centchroman (CC) inhibits cellular proliferation in HNSCC cells through the dual inhibition of PI3/mTOR pathway. {yields} CC treatment also inhibits STAT3 activation and alters expression of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA repair response in HNSCC cells. {yields} CC exhibits anti-proliferative activity in a variety of non-HNSCC cancer cell lines and is devoid of cytotoxicity to normal cell types of diverse origins. -- Abstract: Centchroman (CC; 67/20; INN: Ormeloxifene) is a non-steroidal antiestrogen extensively used as a female contraceptive in India. In the present study, we report the anti-proliferative effect of CC in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. CC inhibited cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner at 24 h of treatment. Further studies showed that CC treatment induced apoptosis, inhibited Akt/mTOR and signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 3 (STAT3) signaling, altered proteins associated with cell cycle regulation and DNA damage and inhibited colony forming efficiency of HNSCC cells. In addition, CC displayed anti-proliferative activity against a variety of non-HNSCC cell lines of diverse origin. The ability of CC to serve as a dual-inhibitor of Akt/mTOR and STAT3 signaling warrants further studies into its role as a therapeutic strategy against HNSCC.

  4. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  5. Storage of cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katharine A

    2011-01-01

    The successful storage of cell lines depends upon many factors, including the condition of the cells to be frozen and the experience of the operator. Attempting to freeze down unhealthy, contaminated or poorly labelled cells can have huge implications for a research laboratory. This chapter outlines the importance of good record keeping, vigilant monitoring, aseptic technique, and high-quality reagents in the successful storage and downstream propagation of cell lines.

  6. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  7. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  8. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  9. Kidney Cell Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, P.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and procedures for microgravity electrophoresis of living human embryonic kidney cells were evaluated, ground support in the form of analytical cell electrophoresis and flow cytometry was provided and cells returned from space flight were analyzed. Preflight culture media, electrophoresis buffer, fraction collection media, temperature profiles, and urokinase assay procedures were tested prior to flight. Electrophoretic mobility distributions of aliquots of the cell population to be fractionated in flight were obtained. The protocol established and utilized is given.

  10. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Hong, Zhendong Li, Yunhan Hong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  11. Thrombopoietin mobilizes CD34+ cell subsets into peripheral blood and expands multilineage progenitors in bone marrow of cancer patients with normal hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L J; Luens, K M; Estrada, M F; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R; Cohen, R L; Ashby, M A; Vadhan-Raj, S

    1998-03-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO), the primary regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis, also mediates biologic effects in vitro on hematopoietic cells more primitive than those committed to the megakaryocyte (MK) lineage. To assess the spectrum of hematopoietic effects of recombinant human (rh)TPO in vivo, we evaluated its proliferative effect on bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells, its maturation effect on BM MKs, and its mobilizing effect on peripheral blood (PB) progenitor cells during a phase I clinical laboratory investigation in which rhTPO was administered to cancer patients with normal hematopoiesis. Twelve patients received a single dose of rhTPO (0.3, 0.6, 1.2, or 2.4 microg/kg of body weight) prior to chemotherapy. BM and PB samples from these patients were analyzed 1 to 2 days before (baseline) and 7 days after rhTPO administration. At higher doses (1.2-2.4 microg/kg), rhTPO produced increased concentrations of primitive CD34+Thy-1+Lin-cells (mean 2.1-fold), CD34+mpl+ cells (mean 5.2-fold), CD34+CD41+CD14- promegakaryoblasts (mean 2.9-fold), and myeloerythroid colony-forming cells (mean threefold) in BM. No significant increases in the frequency of BM colony-forming unit (CFU)-MK were observed. Elevated numbers of both immature (2N-8N) and more mature (64N and 128N) CD41+ MKs were detected in BM, with modal ploidy remaining at 16N. Higher doses of rhTPO (1.2-2.4 microg/kg) also induced increased concentrations of CD34+ cell subsets in PB, including both primitive CD34+Thy-1+Lin- (mean 8.8-fold) and MK lineage-committed CD34+CD41+CD14- cells (mean 14.6-fold) as well as various myeloerythroid colony-forming cells (mean 3.6- to 5.5-fold). These results demonstrate that rhTPO given as a single dose not only promotes proliferation and maturation of cells of the MK lineage, but also expands the pool of BM primitive hematopoietic cells. In addition, rhTPO induces mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors into peripheral circulation. The extent to which such multilineage effects on

  12. Stem cell heterogeneity revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marianne S; Jensen, Kim B

    2016-01-01

    The skin forms a protective, water-impermeable barrier consisting of heavily crosslinked epithelial cells. However, the specific role of stem cells in sustaining this barrier remains a contentious issue. A detailed analysis of the interfollicular epidermis now proposes a model for how a composite...... of cells with different properties are involved in its maintenance....

  13. SYNOVIAL CELL SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzan

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten cases of synovial cell sarcoma are reported. The youngest patient was a 2'A years old boy with synovial cell sarcoma of the knee and the oldest one was a man with synovial cell sarcoma of the elbow.

  14. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  15. Advanced Cell Technology, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, William M

    2007-03-01

    Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTCBB: ACTC) is a biotechnology company applying novel human embryonic stem cell technologies in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We believe that regenerative medicine has the potential to revolutionize the field by enabling scientists to produce human cells of any kind for use in a wide array of therapies.

  16. Nanostructured Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    Recent forecasts for alternative energy generation predict emerging importance of supporting state of art photovoltaic solar cells with their organic equivalents. Despite their significantly lower efficiency, number of application niches are suitable for organic solar cells. This work reveals...... the principles of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells fabrication as well as summarises major differences in physics of their operation....

  17. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  18. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells reviews topics pertaining to solar energy conversion and demonstrates the ease with which a working PEC cell can be prepared with n-type silicon as the photoanode and a platinum counter electrode (both immersed in ethanolic ferrocene/ferricenium solutions). Experiments using the cell are…

  19. Adventures with Cell Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Liz

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are finding creative ways to turn the basic cell phone from a digital distraction into a versatile learning tool. In this article, the author explains why cell phones are important in learning and suggests rather than banning them that they be integrated into learning. She presents activities that can be done on a basic cell phone with a…

  20. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  1. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  2. Dazlin' pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocyst embryos and differentiate into all three germ layers in vitro. However, despite their similar origin, mouse embryonic stem cells represent a more naïve ICM-like pluripotent state whereas human embryo

  3. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  4. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  5. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...

  6. Aneuploidy in stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Martinez, Jorge; Bakker, Bjorn; Schukken, Klaske M; Simon, Judith E; Foijer, Floris

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine as well as for engineering of model systems to study diseases and develop new drugs. The discovery of protocols that allow for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from somatic cells has brought this promise steps closer to real

  7. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...

  8. Battery cell module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shambaugh, J.S.

    1981-11-23

    A modular lithium battery having a plurality of cells, having electrical connecting means connecting the cells to output terminals, and venting means for releasing discharge byproducts to a chemical scrubber is disclosed. Stainless steel cell casings are potted in an aluminum modular case with syntactic foam and epoxy. The wall thickness resulting is about 0.5 inches.

  9. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1 polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2 cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  11. Optical cell tracking analysis using a straight-forward approach to minimize processing time for high frame rate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeto, Wen Jun; Lipke, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-03-01

    Tracking of rolling cells via in vitro experiment is now commonly performed using customized computer programs. In most cases, two critical challenges continue to limit analysis of cell rolling data: long computation times due to the complexity of tracking algorithms and difficulty in accurately correlating a given cell with itself from one frame to the next, which is typically due to errors caused by cells that either come close in proximity to each other or come in contact with each other. In this paper, we have developed a sophisticated, yet simple and highly effective, rolling cell tracking system to address these two critical problems. This optical cell tracking analysis (OCTA) system first employs ImageJ for cell identification in each frame of a cell rolling video. A custom MATLAB code was written to use the geometric and positional information of all cells as the primary parameters for matching each individual cell with itself between consecutive frames and to avoid errors when tracking cells that come within close proximity to one another. Once the cells are matched, rolling velocity can be obtained for further analysis. The use of ImageJ for cell identification eliminates the need for high level MATLAB image processing knowledge. As a result, only fundamental MATLAB syntax is necessary for cell matching. OCTA has been implemented in the tracking of endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) rolling under shear. The processing time needed to obtain tracked cell data from a 2 min ECFC rolling video recorded at 70 frames per second with a total of over 8000 frames is less than 6 min using a computer with an Intel® Core™ i7 CPU 2.80 GHz (8 CPUs). This cell tracking system benefits cell rolling analysis by substantially reducing the time required for post-acquisition data processing of high frame rate video recordings and preventing tracking errors when individual cells come in close proximity to one another.

  12. The Effect of Combining Fast Neutron and Photon Irradiation on the Human Osteosarcoma OS-732 Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linchun Feng; Lin Ma; Jingxiang Huang; Dong Yang; Yingxuan Wang; Mingxue Sun; Jinhua Tang; Weike Chang; Chengxiang Liu

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the lethal effect of combining fast neutron with photon radiation on the OS-732 cell line.METHODS We examined the effect of irradiation by fast neutrons, photons and a mixed beam (fast neutrons plus photons) on the lethality and colony forming ability of the OS-732 cell line at different times.RESULTS Following a single irradiation close, the lethality was markedly strong at 24, 48 and 72 h in the group treated with fast neutrons alone and in the mixed beam group in which there was a high proportion of fast neutrons.CONCLUSION The lethal effect of a fast neutron and mixed beam with a high proportion of fast neutrons on the OS-732 cell line is highly significant. These studies provide guidance for the clinical application of fast neutrons for osteosarcoma treatment.

  13. Study of the Effects of Ultrasonic Waves on the Reproductive Integrity of Mammalian Cells Cultured in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, B. I.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of monochromatic ultrasonic waves of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and, 3.3 MHz frequency on the colony-forming ability of mammalian cells (M3-1,V79, Chang's and T-1) cultured in vitro have been studied to determine the nature of the action of ultrasonic energy on biological systems at the cellular level. The combined effect of ultrasound and X-rays has also been studied. It is concluded: (1) Ultrasonic irradiation causes both lethal and sublethal damage. (2) There is a threshold dose rate for lethal effects. (3) The effectiveness of ultrasonic waves in causing cell death probably depends on the frequency and the amplitude of the waves for a given cell line, indicating a possible resonance phenomenon.

  14. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Characterization of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Akifumi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Nobukiyo, Asako; Yamaoka, Emi; Hiyama, Eiso

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be useful for regenerative medicine because they can beharvested easily from the bone marrow of living donors and the cells can be differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages in vitro. To apply MSCs for the medical treatment of human diseases as regenerative medicine, detailed experimental characterization of the cells is required. Recently, a New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), has been widely used as a new human disease model because of its ease of handling and breeding. Although common marmoset MSCs have been established and will be used in preclinical studies of regenerative medicine, the characteristics of these cells remain unclear. Aiming to characterize common marmoset MSCs further, we harvested common marmoset bone marrow-derived cells (cmBMDCs) from the femurs of newborn males. We revealed that the morphology of the cells was similar to common marmoset fibroblasts, and extracellular matrix components, such as gelatin and fibronectin, were effective for their proliferation and formation of colony-forming unit fibroblasts. Furthermore, we were able to differentiate cmBMDCs into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro, and they expressed the MSCmarkers CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105, but their expression decreased with increasing passage number. The data demonstrate that cmBMDCs exhibit characteristics of MSCs and thus it would be beneficial to use these cells in preclinical studies.

  16. Survivability of Salmonella cells in popcorn after microwave oven and conventional cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, I; Aguirrezabal, A; Ventura, M; Comellas, L; Agut, M

    2008-01-01

    The survivability of Salmonella cells in popcorn preparation was determined for two distinct cooking methods. The first method used a standard microwave oven. The second method used conventional cooking in a pan. Prior to thermal processing in independent experiments, 12 suspensions in a range between 1x10(3) and 8x10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of Salmonella cells were inoculated in both raw microwave popcorn and conventional corn kernels. The influence of the initial concentration of Salmonella cells in the raw products and the lethal effects on Salmonella by thermal treatments for cooking were studied. Survival of Salmonella cells was determined in the thermally processed material by pre-enrichment and enrichment in selective medium, in accordance with the legislation for expanded cereals and cereals in flakes. Viable experimental contaminants were recovered from the conventionally cooked popcorn with initial inoculation concentrations of 9x10(4)cells/g or greater. Salmonella cell viability was significantly reduced after microwave oven treatment, with recoveries only from initial concentrations of 2x10(6)cells/g or superior.

  17. Horse spermatogonial stem cell cryopreservation: feasible protocols and potential biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Guilherme M J; Avelar, Gleide F; Lacerda, Samyra M S N; Figueiredo, André F A; Tavares, Amanda O; Rezende-Neto, José V; Martins, Felipe G P; França, Luiz R

    2017-08-22

    The establishment of proper conditions for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) cryopreservation and storage represents an important biotechnological approach for the preservation of the genetic stock of valuable animals. This study demonstrates the effects of different cryopreservation protocols on the survival rates and phenotypic expression of SSCs in horses. The cells were enzymatically isolated from testes of eight adult horses. After enrichment and characterization of germ cells in the suspension, the feasibility of several cryopreservation protocols were evaluated. Three different cryomedia compositions, associated with three different methods of freezing (vitrification, slow-freezing and fast-freezing) were evaluated. Based on the rates of viable SSCs found before and after thawing, as well as the number of recovered cells after cryopreservation, the best results were obtained utilizing the DMSO-based cryomedia associated with the slow-freezing method. In addition, when isolated cells were cultured in vitro, MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cryopreserved cells were as metabolically active as the fresh cells and were also expressing typical SSCs proteins (VASA, NANOS2 and GFRA1). Therefore, our results indicate that equine SSCs can be cryopreserved without impairment of structure, function, or colony-forming abilities.

  18. Targeted Gene Correction in Osteopetrotic-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Generation of Functional Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tui Neri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a human bone disease mainly caused by TCIRG1 gene mutations that prevent osteoclasts resorbing activity, recapitulated by the oc/oc mouse model. Bone marrow transplantation is the only available treatment, limited by the need for a matched donor. The use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as an unlimited source of autologous cells to generate gene corrected osteoclasts might represent a powerful alternative. We generated iPSCs from oc/oc mice, corrected the mutation using a BAC carrying the entire Tcirg1 gene locus as a template for homologous recombination, and induced hematopoietic differentiation. Similarly to physiologic fetal hematopoiesis, iPSC-derived CD41+ cells gradually gave rise to CD45+ cells, which comprised both mature myeloid cells and high proliferative potential colony-forming cells. Finally, we differentiated the gene corrected iPSC-derived myeloid cells into osteoclasts with rescued bone resorbing activity. These results are promising for a future translation into the human clinical setting.

  19. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique J Wiener

    Full Text Available Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients.

  20. Cell-ECM traction force modulates endogenous tension at cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Gardel, Margaret L

    2011-03-22

    Cells in tissues are mechanically coupled both to the ECM and neighboring cells, but the coordination and interdependency of forces sustained at cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that the endogenous force sustained at the cell-cell contact between a pair of epithelial cells is approximately 100 nN, directed perpendicular to the cell-cell interface and concentrated at the contact edges. This force is stably maintained over time despite significant fluctuations in cell-cell contact length and cell morphology. A direct relationship between the total cellular traction force on the ECM and the endogenous cell-cell force exists, indicating that the cell-cell tension is a constant fraction of the cell-ECM traction. Thus, modulation of ECM properties that impact cell-ECM traction alters cell-cell tension. Finally, we show in a minimal model of a tissue that all cells experience similar forces from the surrounding microenvironment, despite differences in the extent of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion. This interdependence of cell-cell and cell-ECM forces has significant implications for the maintenance of the mechanical integrity of tissues, mechanotransduction, and tumor mechanobiology.

  1. Short- and long-term effects of silver nanoparticles on human microvascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara; Castiglioni; Clelia; Caspani; Alessandra; Cazzaniga; Jeanette; AM; Maier

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the response to silver nanoparticles(Ag NP) of human microvascular endothelial cells, protagonists of angiogenesis. METHODS: We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells and endothelial colony-forming cells in their corresponding growth medium. Stock solutions of Ag NP were prepared in culture medium and sonicated before use. They were added at different concentrations and for different times to culture media. The toxicity of Ag NP was investigated by measuring the reduction of yellow tetrazolium salt to dark purple formazan(MTT assay) at 575 nm. After staining with trypan blue, cell proliferation was assessed by counting viable cells. The lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay was performed on culture media by following the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ and monitoring the reaction kinetically at 340 nm. Reactive oxygen species production was quantified using 2’-7’-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. The alkaline comet assay was performed after mixing the cells with low melting-point agarose. Electrophoresis was then conducted and the samples were stained with ethidium bromide and analyzed with a fluorescence microscope.RESULTS: Ag NP are cytotoxic in a dose and time dependent fashion for HMEC. At high concentrations, Ag NP determine loss of membrane integrity as demonstrated by the increased activity of lactate dehydrogenase in the culture medium. Ag NP rapidly stimulate the formation of free radicals. However, pre-incubation with Trolox, apocynin, or N-acetyl-L-cysteine, antioxidants which have different structure and act through different mechanisms, is not sufficient to prevent cytotoxicity. Ag NP also induce DNA damage dose-dependently, as shown by comet assay. When exposed to sublethal concentrations of Ag NP for long times, the cells remain viable but are growth retarded. Interestingly, removal of Ag NP partially rescues cell growth. Also genotoxicity is reversible upon removal of Ag NP from culture medium, suggesting that no permanent

  2. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SSAT inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui SUN; Bin LIU; Ya-pei YANG; Chun-xiao XU; Yun-fei YAN; Wei WANG; Xian-xi LIU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To construct a recombinant adenovirus that can express human spermidine/ spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and detect its inhibitory effect on colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro. Methods: A 516 bp eDNA of SSAT was amplified and cloned into a pGL3-hTERT plasmid. The pGL3-hTERT-SSAT recombinant was digested, and the small fragment was cloned into the shuttle vector pAdTrack. The pAdTrack-hTERT-SSAT plasmids were recombined with pAdEasy-1 vectors in AdEasy-1 cells. Positive clones were selected and transfected into the HEK293 packaging cells (transformed human embryonic kidney cells) after they were lin-earized by PacI. The process of adenovirus packaging and amplification was monitored by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. The SSAT protein levels were determined by Western blotting, and the intracellular polyamine con-tent was detected by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The MTS (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiaol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl)-2-(-4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt) and colony-forming assays were used to analyze the gene transduction efficiency and effect on the growth of HT-29 and LoVo cells. A viable cell count was used to determine the cell growth with or without exogenous polyamines. Results: The GFP expression in 293 cells during virus packing and amplification was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Western blotting results demonstrated that Ad-hTERT-SSAT could increase the expres-sion of SSAT, and consequently, spermidine and spermine were reduced to low levels. The MTS and colony-forming assay results showed that HT-29 and LoVo cell growth were significantly inhibited, and the inhibitory effect could be partially reversed by exogenous spermidine and spermine. Conclusion: The successfully constructed recombinant adenovirus Ad-hTERT-SSAT could accelerate polyamine catabolism and inhibit the colorectal cell growth in vitro. It also has therapeutic potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  3. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walenda

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34(+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs--however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34(+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy--particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration.

  4. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Edgar; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Goecke, Tamme W.; Bosio, Andreas; Rath, Björn; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bissels, Ute; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) – however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs) or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy – particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate) increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration. PMID:26024523

  5. Mechanics rules cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang James HC

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cells in the musculoskeletal system are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo. Years of research have shown that these mechanical forces, including tension and compression, greatly influence various cellular functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation and differentiation, and secretion of matrix proteins. Cells also use mechanotransduction mechanisms to convert mechanical signals into a cascade of cellular and molecular events. This mini-review provides an overview of cell mechanobiology to highlight the notion that mechanics, mainly in the form of mechanical forces, dictates cell behaviors in terms of both cellular mechanobiological responses and mechanotransduction.

  6. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  8. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  9. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors...

  10. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  11. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  12. Islet cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Anabel; Khoo, Adrian; Tejedo, Juan R; Bedoya, Francisco J; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, there has been great success in driving stem cells toward insulin-expressing cells. However, the protocols developed to date have some limitations, such as low reliability and low insulin production. The most successful protocols used for generation of insulin-producing cells from stem cells mimic in vitro pancreatic organogenesis by directing the stem cells through stages that resemble several pancreatic developmental stages. Islet cell fate is coordinated by a complex network of inductive signals and regulatory transcription factors that, in a combinatorial way, determine pancreatic organ specification, differentiation, growth, and lineage. Together, these signals and factors direct the progression from multipotent progenitor cells to mature pancreatic cells. Later in development and adult life, several of these factors also contribute to maintain the differentiated phenotype of islet cells. A detailed understanding of the processes that operate in the pancreas during embryogenesis will help us to develop a suitable source of cells for diabetes therapy. In this chapter, we will discuss the main transcription factors involved in pancreas specification and beta-cell formation.

  13. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  14. Cell viability assays: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of cell viability plays a fundamental role in all forms of cell culture. Sometimes it is the main purpose of the experiment, such as in toxicity assays. Alternatively, cell viability can be used to -correlate cell behaviour to cell number, providing a more accurate picture of, for example, anabolic -activity. There are wide arrays of cell viability methods which range from the most routine trypan blue dye exclusion assay to highly complex analysis of individual cells, such as using RAMAN microscopy. The cost, speed, and complexity of equipment required will all play a role in determining the assay used. This chapter aims to provide an overview of many of the assays available today.

  15. Cell Factory Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Anne Mathilde; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2017-03-22

    Rational approaches to modifying cells to make molecules of interest are of substantial economic and scientific interest. Most of these efforts aim at the production of native metabolites, expression of heterologous biosynthetic pathways, or protein expression. Reviews of these topics have largely focused on individual strategies or cell types, but collectively they fall under the broad umbrella of a growing field known as cell factory engineering. Here we condense >130 reviews and key studies in the art into a meta-review of cell factory engineering. We identified 33 generic strategies in the field, all applicable to multiple types of cells and products, and proven successful in multiple major cell types. These apply to three major categories: production of native metabolites and/or bioactives, heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways, and protein expression. This meta-review provides general strategy guides for the broad range of applications of rational engineering of cell factories.

  16. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  17. Enteroendocrine cell types revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme; Lund, Mari L

    2013-01-01

    The GI-tract is profoundly involved in the control of metabolism through peptide hormones secreted from enteroendocrine cells scattered throughout the gut mucosa. A large number of recently generated transgenic reporter mice have allowed for direct characterization of biochemical and cell...... biological properties of these previously highly elusive enteroendocrine cells. In particular the surprisingly broad co-expression of six functionally related hormones in the intestinal enteroendocrine cells indicates that it should be possible to control not only the hormone secretion but also the type...... and number of enteroendocrine cells. However, this will require a more deep understanding of the factors controlling differentiation, gene expression and specification of the enteroendocrine cells during their weekly renewal from progenitor cells in the crypts of the mucosa....

  18. Peripheral giant cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padam Narayan Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral giant cell granuloma or the so-called "giant cell epulis" is the most common oral giant cell lesion. It normally presents as a soft tissue purplish-red nodule consisting of multinucleated giant cells in a background of mononuclear stromal cells and extravasated red blood cells. This lesion probably does not represent a true neoplasm, but rather may be reactive in nature, believed to be stimulated by local irritation or trauma, but the cause is not certainly known. This article reports a case of peripheral giant cell granuloma arising at the maxillary anterior region in a 22-year-old female patient. The lesion was completely excised to the periosteum level and there is no residual or recurrent swelling or bony defect apparent in the area of biopsy after a follow-up period of 6 months.

  19. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  20. The role of microRNA-21 in predicting brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Zhi; Gu, Tao; Xu, Shu-Feng; Dong, Li-Xin; Li, Xin; Fu, Bao-Hong; Fu, Zhan-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at exploring the role of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in predicting brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 132 NSCLC patients, including 68 patients with BM and 64 patients without BM, were included in the study. NSCLC cells were collected and assigned to the inhibitor (IN) group, the mock group, and the negative control (NC) group. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the miR-21 expression. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were detected by colony-forming assay, MTT assay, transwell assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Angiogenesis was measured by endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results The miR-21 expression was higher in NSCLC patients with BM than in those without BM. The miR-21 expression in the IN group was lower than that in the NC and mock groups. Compared with the NC and mock groups, the values of optical density (OD) and the colony-forming number decreased in the IN group. Compared with the NC and mock groups, cell invasion and migration abilities significantly reduced in the IN group. The IN group had higher apoptosis rate than the NC and mock groups. The tube length was shorter and the number of junction points was less in the IN group in comparison to the NC and mock groups. Conclusion miR-21 might be a potential biomarker for the development of BM in NSCLC patients and could promote the proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of NSCLC cells.

  1. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Smoking decreases the level of circulating CD34+ progenitor cells in young healthy women - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Gert

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased levels of circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells have been associated with risk factors and cardiovascular diseases. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis in young women. The aim of this pilot study was to assess in healthy premenopausal women without other risk factors for cardiovascular disease the influence of nicotine abuse on the number of circulating progenitor cells in relation to endothelial function. Methods The number of endothelial progenitor cells, measured as colony-forming units in a cell-culture assay (EPC-CFU and the number of circulating CD34 + and CD34 + /CD133 + cells, measured by flow cytometry, was estimated in 32 women at the menstrual phase of the menstrual cycle. In addition, flow-mediated dilation (FMD was assessed as a marker for vascular function. In a subgroup of these women (n = 20, progenitor cells were also investigated at the mid-follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Results Compared to non-smokers, the abundance of circulating CD34 + cells was significantly lower in smoking women in the menstrual, mid-luteal, and mid-follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. The number of CD34 + progenitor cells was revealed to have significant positive correlation with FMD in young healthy women, whereas CD34 + /CD133 + progenitor cells and EPC-CFU showed no significant correlation. Conclusion The number of CD34 + progenitor cells positively correlates with FMD in young healthy women and is decreased by smoking.

  3. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  4. Stages of Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in tubules of the kidney. Renal cell ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the kidney or to other ...

  5. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  6. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  7. High Red Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  8. Cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Dosal, F L; Estrada, J A; Piérard, G E

    1991-04-01

    We report an unusual cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells characterized by the presence of intraepidermal cells resembling Toker's cells of the nipple. These cells were EMA positive and could be related to the histogenesis of some Paget's disease.

  9. Investigation of dental pulp stem cells isolated from discarded human teeth extracted due to aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Chen, Bo; Zhu, Qing-Lin; Kong, Hui; Li, Qi-Hong; Gao, Li-Na; Xiao, Min; Chen, Fa-Ming; Yu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    Recently, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from inflamed dental pulp tissue have been demonstrated to retain some of their pluripotency and regenerative potential. However, the effects of periodontal inflammation due to periodontitis and its progression on the properties of DPSCs within periodontally compromised teeth remain unknown. In this study, DPSCs were isolated from discarded human teeth that were extracted due to aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and divided into three experimental groups (Groups A, B and C) based on the degree of inflammation-induced bone resorption approaching the apex of the tooth root before tooth extraction. DPSCs derived from impacted or non-functional third molars of matched patients were used as a control. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, including colony-forming ability, proliferation, cell cycle, cell surface antigens, multi-lineage differentiation capability and in vivo tissue regeneration potential, were all evaluated in a patient-matched comparison. It was found that STRO-1- and CD146-positive DPSCs can be isolated from human teeth, even in very severe cases of AgP. Periodontal inflammation and its progression had an obvious impact on the characteristics of DPSCs isolated from periodontally affected teeth. Although all the isolated DPSCs in Groups A, B and C showed decreased colony-forming ability and proliferation rate (P biomaterials were transplanted directly into an ectopic transplantation model. However, when cell-seeded scaffolds were placed in the root fragments of human teeth, all the cells formed significant dentin- and pulp-like tissues. The ability of DPSCs to generate dental tissues decreased when the cells were isolated from periodontally compromised teeth (P < 0.05). Again, increased periodontal destruction was not necessarily followed by a decrease in the amount of dentin- and pulp-like tissue formed. These findings provide preliminary evidence that periodontally compromised teeth might

  10. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A; Entrena, José M; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A

    2016-01-11

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies.

  11. Cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Altan; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of a diverse group of microalgae based on the Extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek (XDLVO) approach using the previously reported physico-chemical surface properties. The microalgae included 10 different species of green algae and diatoms from both freshwater and saltwater environments while the substrata included glass, indium-tin oxide (ITO), stainless steel, polycarbonate, polyethylene, and polystryrene. The results indicated that acid-base interactions were the dominating mechanism of interaction for microalgae. For green algae, if at least one of the interacting surfaces was hydrophobic, adhesion at primary minimum was predicted without any energy barrier. However, most diatom systems featured energy barriers for adhesion due to repulsive van der Waals interactions. The results reported in this study are expected to provide useful data and insight into the interaction mechanisms of microalgae cells with each other and with substrata for a number of practical applications including prevention of biofouling of photobioreactors and other man-made surfaces, promotion of biofilm formation in algal biofilm photobioreactors, and developing bioflocculation strategies for energy efficient harvesting of algal biomass. Particularly, Botryococcus braunii and Cerithiopsis fusiformis were identified as promising species for biofloccuation and biofilm formation in freshwater and saltwater aquatic systems, respectively. Finally, based on the observed trends in this study, use of hydrophilic algae and hydrophilic coatings over surfaces are recommended for minimizing biofouling in aquatic systems.

  12. PEROVSKITE SOLAR CELLS (REVIEW ARTICLE)

    OpenAIRE

    Benli, Deniz Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    A solar cell is a device that converts sunlight into electricity. There are different types of solar cells but this report mainly focuses on a type of new generation solar cell that has the name organo-metal halide perovskite, shortly perovskite solar cells. In this respect, the efficiency of power conversion is taken into account to replace the dominancy of traditional and second generation solar cell fields by perovskite solar cells. Perovskite solar cell is a type of solar cell including a...

  13. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peng; Agosto, Luis M; Ilinskaya, Anna; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Truong, Rosaline; Derse, David; Uchil, Pradeep D; Heidecker, Gisela; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  14. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhong

    Full Text Available Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  15. Nanofluidic fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-11-01

    Fuel cells are gaining momentum as a critical component in the renewable energy mix for stationary, transportation, and portable power applications. State-of-the-art fuel cell technology benefits greatly from nanotechnology applied to nanostructured membranes, catalysts, and electrodes. However, the potential of utilizing nanofluidics for fuel cells has not yet been explored, despite the significant opportunity of harnessing rapid nanoscale reactant transport in close proximity to the reactive sites. In the present article, a nanofluidic fuel cell that utilizes fluid flow through nanoporous media is conceptualized and demonstrated for the first time. This transformative concept captures the advantages of recently developed membraneless and catalyst-free fuel cell architectures paired with the enhanced interfacial contact area enabled by nanofluidics. When compared to previously reported microfluidic fuel cells, the prototype nanofluidic fuel cell demonstrates increased surface area, reduced activation overpotential, superior kinetic characteristics, and moderately enhanced fuel cell performance in the high cell voltage regime with up to 14% higher power density. However, the expected mass transport benefits in the high current density regime were constrained by high ohmic cell resistance, which could likely be resolved through future optimization studies.

  16. Biology of Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Grahame J; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Trapp, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental roles of Schwann cells during peripheral nerve formation and regeneration have been recognized for more than 100 years, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that integrate Schwann cell and axonal functions continue to be elucidated. Derived from the embryonic neural crest, Schwann cells differentiate into myelinating cells or bundle multiple unmyelinated axons into Remak fibers. Axons dictate which differentiation path Schwann cells follow, and recent studies have established that axonal neuregulin1 signaling via ErbB2/B3 receptors on Schwann cells is essential for Schwann cell myelination. Extracellular matrix production and interactions mediated by specific integrin and dystroglycan complexes are also critical requisites for Schwann cell-axon interactions. Myelination entails expansion and specialization of the Schwann cell plasma membrane over millimeter distances. Many of the myelin-specific proteins have been identified, and transgenic manipulation of myelin genes have provided novel insights into myelin protein function, including maintenance of axonal integrity and survival. Cellular events that facilitate myelination, including microtubule-based protein and mRNA targeting, and actin based locomotion, have also begun to be understood. Arguably, the most remarkable facet of Schwann cell biology, however, is their vigorous response to axonal damage. Degradation of myelin, dedifferentiation, division, production of axonotrophic factors, and remyelination all underpin the substantial regenerative capacity of the Schwann cells and peripheral nerves. Many of these properties are not shared by CNS fibers, which are myelinated by oligodendrocytes. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms responsible for the complex biology of Schwann cells continues to have practical benefits in identifying novel therapeutic targets not only for Schwann cell-specific diseases but other disorders in which axons degenerate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  17. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. It