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Sample records for cell colony formation

  1. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  2. Periodic Colony Formation of Bacteria Due to their Cell Reproduction and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, H.; Wakita, J.; Watanabe, K.; Matsuyama, T.; Matsushita, M.

    We have experimentally investigated periodic pattern formation produced by bacterial species Proteus mirabilis, which forms concentric-ring-like colonies by repeating migration and rest alternately on the surface of a solid agar medium. We distinguish three phases (initial lag phase, the following migration and consolidation phases that appear alternately) for the colony growth. Here we mainly used physical approaches in order to try to understand the formation of concentric-ring-like colonies, such as cutting the part of a colony during its growth. Global chemical signals governing the colony formation from the center were not found. We also checked phase entrainment quantitatively by letting two colonies collide with each other and confirmed that it does not take place in macroscopic scales. When we cut a colony just behind the migrating front shortly after the migration started, the migration ended earlier and the following consolidation lasted longer. However, the following cycles were not influenced by the cut, i.e., the following migration and consolidation phases were both found to return normal. The cut results in the stop of supply of cell population to the migrating front by internal waves. In fact the cell population on the new terrace during the first migration after the cut was less than that without cut. Furthermore, the cell population density was found to be recovered to the ordinary value by the end of the consolidation. All these experimental results suggest that the most important factor for the repetition of migration and consolidation phases is the cell population density.

  3. Influence of B-lymphocytes from various organs on hemopoietic colony formation in the spleen by bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of B-lymphocytes from various sources on splenic colony formation was studied in the syngeneic system. Splenic, but not bone marrow and lymph node B-cells inhibited colony formation by combination of Sc-1- and Sc-1+ cells. All effects of Ig+ cells were abolished by treatment of cells with rabbit anti-MBLA serum. Thus, B-cells of various origin can either enhance or inhibit colony formation. The enhancing of inhibitory effect after B (MBLA+)-cells elimination from suspension of bone marrow and lymph node (but not spleen) Ig+-cells resulted from the activity of B-contrasuppressors

  4. miR-93 suppresses proliferation and colony formation of human colon cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Yu; Jian Zou; Zhi-Jun Bao; Jie Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116csc) and study their function in SW1116csc proliferation.METHODS: SW1116csc were isolated from the human colon cancer cell line, SW1116 and cultured in serum free medium. A miRNA microarray was used to detect differential expression profiles of miRNAs in SW1116csc and SW1116 cells. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to verify the dif ferential expression of candidate miRNAs obtained from the microarray. Target mRNAs of differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted with target predic tion tools. miRNA expression plasmids were transfected into SW1116csc using Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Cell proliferation curves were generated with trypan blue staining, and the colony formation rate of transfected cells was measured with the soft agar colony formation assay. Expression of target mRNAs and proteins from differentially expressed miRNAs were detected using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blotting.RESULTS: Compared with expression in SW1116 cells, 35 miRNAs (including hsa-miR-192, hsa-miR-29b, hsa-miR-215, hsa-miR-194, hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-32) were upregulated more than 1.5-fold, and 11 miRNAs (including hsa-miR-93, hsa-miR-1231, hsa-miRPIus-F1080, hsa-miR-524-3p, hsa-miR-886-3p and hsa-miR-561) were downregulated in SW1116csc. The miRNA microarray results were further validated with quantitative RT-PCR. miR-93 was downregulated, and its predicted mRNA targets included BAMBI, CCND2, CDKN1A, HDAC8, KIF23, MAP3K9, MAP3K11, MYCN, PPARD, TLE4 and ZDHHC1. Overexpressed miR-93 sig nificantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony forma tion by SW1116CSC. Furthermore, miR-93 negatively regulated the mRNA and protein levels of HDAC8 and TLE4.CONCLUSION: Some miRNAs were differentially ex pressed during differentiation of SW1116csc into SW1116 cells. miR-93 may inhibit SW1116csc proliferation and colony formation.

  5. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  6. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  7. Cells capable of colony formation in the peripheral blood of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCredie, K B; Hersh, E M; Freireich, E J

    1971-01-22

    Colony-forming cells have been found in the peripheral blood of man and have been grown in vitro by use of a soft agar gel technique. It has been possible to collect these cells with a blood-cell separator in numbers similar to those found in the peripheral circulation. Repeat leukapheresis of the same donor does not reduce the number of circulating colony-forming cells. PMID:5538844

  8. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood

  9. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  10. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  11. Eutectic colony formation: A phase field study

    OpenAIRE

    Plapp, Mathis; Karma, Alain

    2001-01-01

    Eutectic two-phase cells, also known as eutectic colonies, are commonly observed during the solidification of ternary alloys when the composition is close to a binary eutectic valley. In analogy with the solidification cells formed in dilute binary alloys, colony formation is triggered by a morphological instability of a macroscopically planar eutectic solidification front due to the rejection by both solid phases of a ternary impurity that diffuses in the liquid. Here we develop a phase-fiel...

  12. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its α6 integrin and α-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells

  13. RECOMBINANT HUMAN MAST-CELL GROWTH-FACTOR SUPPORTS ERYTHROID COLONY FORMATION IN POLYCYTHEMIA-VERA IN THE PRESENCE AND ABSENCE OF ERYTHROPOIETIN AND SERUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; DEWOLF, JTM; HENDRIKS, DW; ESSELINK, MT; HALIE, MR; VELLENGA, E

    1993-01-01

    The effect of mast cell growth factor (MGF) was studied on erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent and Epo-independent (''spontaneous'') erythroid colony formation in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). MGF stimulated both Epo-dependent and Epo-independent erythroid colony formation from PV peripheral bloo

  14. Possible ways whereby IL-2 stimulates colony formation by cells of in vitro irradiated bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have made an attempt to find out the reasons of IL-2-stimulation of spleen colony growth by in vitro (1 Gy) irradiated bone marrow cells. It was shown that the effect of IL on haemopoiesis manifests itself with merely small radiation doses implying that the influence of the preparation makes the process of haemopoietic organ repopulation start at a higher level of cell survival, which is presumably related to a more active repair of radiation-induced CFUs damages: this leads, with other things being equal (e.g. proliferation rate and f factor), to a higher yield of colonies than it is observed with the recipients protected with the exposed bone marrow only

  15. Periodic Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroto; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    1999-04-01

    We have experimentally investigated pattern formation of colonies ofbacterial species Proteus mirabilis, which is famous forforming concentric-ring-like colonies.The colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance anda stop alternately on a surface of a solid agar medium.We distinguish three phases (initial lag phase, the followingmigration and consolidation phases that appear alternately) for the colony growth.When we cut a colony just behind a migrating front shortly after the migrationstarted, the migration ended earlier and the following consolidationlasted longer.However, the following cycles were not influenced by the cut, i.e., thephases of the migration and consolidation were not affected.Global chemical signals governing the colony formation from thecenter were not found to exist.We also quantitatively checked phase entrainment by letting two coloniescollide with each other and found that it does not take place in macroscopic scales.All these experimental results suggest that the most important factorfor the migration is the cell population density.

  16. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen; KONG Fanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes.The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear.Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton.Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions,including different nutrient,light,and temperature conditions,to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change.The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS production in M.aeruginosa.There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M.aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L,1.98 mg N/L,0.65 mg P/L,light intensity:100 μmol/(m2·s)).These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  17. ColonyArea: An ImageJ Plugin to Automatically Quantify Colony Formation in Clonogenic Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, Camilo; Bagga, Manish; Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The clonogenic or colony formation assay is a widely used method to study the number and size of cancer cell colonies that remain after irradiation or cytotoxic agent administration and serves as a measure for the anti-proliferative effect of these treatments. Alternatively, this assay is used to quantitate the transforming potential of cancer associated genes and chemical agents. Therefore, there is a need for a simplified and standardized analysis of colony formation assays for both routine...

  18. Effect of fluid motion on colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa, generally occurring in large colonies under natural conditions, mainly exists as single cells in laboratory cultures. The mechanisms involved in colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa and their roles in algal blooms remain unknown. In this study, based on previous research findings that fluid motion may stimulate the colony formation in green algae, culture experiments were conducted under axenic conditions in a circular water chamber where the flow rate, temperature, light, and nutrients were controlled. The number of cells of Microcystis aeruginosa, the number of cells per colony, and the colonial characteristics in various growth phases were observed and measured. The results indicated that the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa, which was not observed under stagnant conditions, was evident when there was fluid motion, with the number of cells per largest colony reaching 120 and the proportion of the number of cells in colonial form to the total number of cells and the mean number of cells per colony reaching their peak values at a flow rate of 35 cm/s. Based on the analysis of colony formation process, fluid motion stimulates the colony formation in Microcystis aeruginosa in the lag growth phase, while flushes and disaggregates the colonies in the exponential growth phase. The stimulation effect in the lag growth phase may be attributable to the involvement of fluid motion in a series of physiological processes, including the uptake of trace elements and the synthesis and secretion of polysaccharides. In addition, the experimental groups exhibiting typical colonial characteristics in the lag growth phase were found to have higher cell biomass in the later phase.

  19. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENG, GANG; HU, CHENGHUAN; ZHU, LEI; HUANG, FEIZHOU; HUANG, WEI; XU, HONGBO; NIE, WANPIN

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein. PMID:24968753

  20. ColonyArea: an ImageJ plugin to automatically quantify colony formation in clonogenic assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Guzmán

    Full Text Available The clonogenic or colony formation assay is a widely used method to study the number and size of cancer cell colonies that remain after irradiation or cytotoxic agent administration and serves as a measure for the anti-proliferative effect of these treatments. Alternatively, this assay is used to quantitate the transforming potential of cancer associated genes and chemical agents. Therefore, there is a need for a simplified and standardized analysis of colony formation assays for both routine laboratory use and for parallelized automated analysis. Here we describe the freely available ImageJ-plugin "ColonyArea", which is optimized for rapid and quantitative analysis of focus formation assays conducted in 6- to 24-well dishes. ColonyArea processes image data of multi-well dishes, by separating, concentrically cropping and background correcting well images individually, before colony formation is quantitated. Instead of counting the number of colonies, ColonyArea determines the percentage of area covered by crystal violet stained cell colonies, also taking the intensity of the staining and therefore cell density into account. We demonstrate that these parameters alone or in combination allow for robust quantification of IC50 values of the cytotoxic effect of two staurosporines, UCN-01 and staurosporine (STS on human glioblastoma cells (T98G. The relation between the potencies of the two compounds compared very well with that obtained from an absorbance based method to quantify colony growth and to published data. The ColonyArea ImageJ plugin provides a simple and efficient analysis routine to quantitate assay data of one of the most commonly used cellular assays. The bundle is freely available for download as supporting information. We expect that ColonyArea will be of broad utility for cancer biologists, as well as clinical radiation scientists.

  1. Ferulic acid decreases cell viability and colony formation while inhibiting migration of MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrioğlu, Umut; Dodurga, Yavuz; Elmas, Levent; Seçme, Mücahit

    2016-01-15

    Novel and combinatorial treatment methods are becoming sought after entities in cancer treatment and these treatments are even more valuable for pancreatic cancer. The scientists are always on the lookout for new chemicals to help them in their fight against cancer. In this study, we examine the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on gene expression, viability, colony formation and migration/invasion in the cultured MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell. Cytotoxic effects of FA were determined by using trypan blue dye exclusion test and Cell TiterGlo (CTG) assay. IC50 dose in MIA PaCa-2 cells was detected as 500μM/ml at the 72nd hour. Expression profiles of certain cell cycle and apoptosis genes such as CCND1 (cyclin D1),CDK4, CDK6, RB, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-10, Bcl-2, BCL-XL,BID, DR4,DR5,FADD,TRADD,PARP, APAF, Bax, Akt, PTEN, PUMA, NOXA, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 were determined by real-time PCR. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined by CellTiter-Glo® Luminescent Cell Viability Assay. Additionally, effects of FA on colony formation and invasion were also investigated. It was observed that FA caused a significant decrease in the expression of CCND1, CDK 4/6, Bcl2 and caspase 8 and 10 in the MIA PaCa-2 cells while causing an increase in the expression of p53, Bax, PTEN caspase 3 and 9. FA was observed to decrease colony formation while inhibiting cell invasion and migration as observed by the BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber guide and colony formation assays. In conclusion, FA is thought to behave as an anti-cancer agent by affecting cell cycle, apoptotic, invasion and colony formation behavior of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Therefore, FA is placed as a strong candidate for further studies aimed at finding a better, more effective treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26516023

  2. The mycotoxin zearalenone enhances cell proliferation, colony formation and promotes cell migration in the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Micheau, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are fungal secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium and Aspergillus genera, respectively. These mycotoxins are found world-wide as corn and wheat contaminants. AFB1 is probably the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin. It has been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic, and hepatocarcinogenic. ZEN is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin that displays hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties have so far remained controversial and questionable. Using the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, we will show here that ZEN, at low concentrations, enhances cell proliferation, increases colony formation and fastens cell migration after wound healing. The highest effect of ZEN was observed at a concentration 10 times lower as compared to AFB1. Our findings suggest thus that this mycotoxin exhibits carcinogenesis-like properties in HCT116 cells. PMID:27084041

  3. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  4. EFFECTS OF INTERLEUKIN-4 ON GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE-COLONY FORMATION FROM MURINE BONE MARROW CELLS AND HEMATOPOIETIC RECONSTITUTION FOLLOWING MURINE ALLOGENEIC BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱康儿; KerryAtkinson

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mouse recombinant IL-4 on hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo.IL-4 alone was found to be incapable of stimulating colony formation,but it inhibited both IL-3-and GM-CSF-induced colony for-mation by murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.In contrast,colony formation induced by G-CSF was enhanced in the presence of IL-4.We also studied the influence of IL-4 on hematopoietie reconstiution after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine model,and found that IL-4 and G-CSF was significantly suppressed by IL-4.The combination of IL-4 and GM-CSF caused a significant decrease in the absolute mumber of meutrophils.

  5. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface ...

  6. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predatio...

  7. Pattern Formation in a Bacterial Colony Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinze Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a bacterial colony model. Based on the stability analysis, we derive the conditions for Hopf and Turing bifurcations. Furthermore, we present novel numerical evidence of time evolution of patterns controlled by parameters in the model and find that the model dynamics exhibit a diffusion controlled formation growth to spots, holes and stripes pattern replication, which show that the bacterial colony model is useful in revealing the spatial predation dynamics in the real world.

  8. Inhibition of MEK and GSK3 supports ES cell-like domed colony formation from avian and reptile embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanoh, Shota; Okazaki, Kenji; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-07-01

    As amniotes diversified, mammals may have modified mechanisms of cellular pluripotency along with the acquisition of a placenta. What then defined pluripotent states in the ancestral amniotes? To study the evolutionary background of pluripotency in amniotes, we tested the effects of extracellular effectors on primary culture cells from avian and reptile embryos in serum-free medium. When treated with a combination of a MEK inhibitor and a GSK3 inhibitor (2i condition), chicken early embryos formed domed colonies (DCs), which were morphologically indistinguishable from the colonies formed by mouse and rat naïve embryonic stem cells. However, no DCs formed when cells from further-developed embryos were cultured in the 2i condition, indicating that there is a clear boundary of DC-forming ability at around the stage of primitive streak elongation. Quail embryos at the blastoderm and cleavage stages also formed DCs in the 2i condition, which is consistent with the notion that the appearance of DCs corresponds with the presence of pluripotent cells in embryos. Gecko blastoderms also formed DCs in the 2i condition, but gastrulas did not. ERK activation by bFGF caused an effect opposite to that of the 2i condition, namely, it dispersed colonies of cells even from early embryos in all species examined. These results suggest that the regulation of pluripotency by FGF/ERK signaling may date back at least to the common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. However, gene expression analysis indicated the possibility that mammalian pluripotency transcription factors function differently in non-mammalian amniotes. PMID:23829214

  9. Thymidine kinase deficient human cells have increased UV sensitivity in their capacity to support herpes simplex virus but normal UV sensitivity for colony formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thymidine kinase deficient (tk-) and two thymidine kinase proficient (tk+) human cell lines were compared for UV sensitivity using colony-forming ability as well as their capacity to support the plaque formation of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1).The tk- line (143 cells) was a derivative of one of the tk+ lines (R970-5), whereas the other tk+ line (AC4 cells) was a derivative of the 143 cells obtained by transfection with purified sheared HSV-2 DNA encoding the viral tk gene. 143, R970-5 and AC4 cells showed a similar UV sensitivity for colony-forming ability. In contrast, the capacity to support HSV-1 plaque formation immediately (within 1 h) afte UV-irradiation was reduced to a greater extent in the 143 cells compared to the R970-5 and AC4 cells. Capacity curves for plaque formation of the HSV-1: KOS wild-type (tk+) strain were similar to those for the HSV-1: PTK3B mutant (tk-) strain were similar to those for the HSV-1: PTK3B mutant (tk-) strain in the 3 cell strains, indicating that the viral tk gene does not influence the ability of HSV-1 to form plaques in UV-irradiated compared to unirradiated human cells. Cellular capacity for HSV-1 plaque formation was found to recover in both tk- and tk+ cells for cultures infected 24 h after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that repair of UV-damaged DNA takes place to a similar extent in both tk- and tk+ human cells, but the kinetics of repair are initially slower in tk-compared to tk+ human cells. (author). 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Eutectic Colony Formation: A Stability Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Plapp, Mathis; Karma, Alain

    1998-01-01

    Experiments have widely shown that a steady-state lamellar eutectic solidification front is destabilized on a scale much larger than the lamellar spacing by the rejection of a dilute ternary impurity and forms two-phase cells commonly referred to as `eutectic colonies'. We extend the stability analysis of Datye and Langer for a binary eutectic to include the effect of a ternary impurity. We find that the expressions for the critical onset velocity and morphological instability wavelength are ...

  11. Eutectic colony formation: A stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have widely shown that a steady-state lamellar eutectic solidification front is destabilized on a scale much larger than the lamellar spacing by the rejection of a dilute ternary impurity and forms two-phase cells commonly referred to as ''eutectic colonies.'' We extend the stability analysis of Datye and Langer [V. Datye and J. S. Langer, Phys. Rev. B 24, 4155 (1981)] for a binary eutectic to include the effect of a ternary impurity. We find that the expressions for the critical onset velocity and morphological instability wavelength are analogous to those for the classic Mullins-Sekerka instability of a monophase planar interface, albeit with an effective surface tension that depends on the geometry of the lamellar interface and, nontrivially, on interlamellar diffusion. A qualitatively new aspect of this instability is the occurrence of oscillatory modes due to the interplay between the destabilizing effect of the ternary impurity and the dynamical feedback of the local change in lamellar spacing on the front motion. In a transient regime, these modes lead to the formation of large scale oscillatory microstructures for which there is recent experimental evidence in a transparent organic system. Moreover, it is shown that the eutectic front dynamics on a scale larger than the lamellar spacing can be formulated as an effective monophase interface free boundary problem with a modified Gibbs-Thomson condition that is coupled to a slow evolution equation for the lamellar spacing. This formulation provides additional physical insights into the nature of the instability and a simple means to calculate an approximate stability spectrum. Finally, we investigate the influence of the ternary impurity on a short wavelength oscillatory instability that is already present at off-eutectic compositions in binary eutectics. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  12. Growth and form of melanoma cell colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Baraldi, Massimiliano Maria; Alemi, Alexander A.; Sethna, James P.; Caracciolo, Sergio; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of melanoma cell colonies grown in vitro by analyzing the results of crystal violet assays at different concentrations of initial plated cells and for di?erent growth times. The distribution of colony sizes is described well by a continuous time branching process. To characterize the shape fluctuations of the colonies, we compute the distribution of eccentricities. The experimental results are compared with numerical results for models of random division of...

  13. Osteopontin and the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4 compete for CD44 binding and have opposite effects on CD133+ cell colony formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobocan Monica C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C21, the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4, has growth promoting activity and was discovered as one of several erythropoietin-dependent endothelial proteins. C21 stimulates red cell formation in anemic mice and is a growth factor for CD34+ and CD36+ hematopoietic cells, skin fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. ROD1 has been identified as an intracellular mediator. Nothing is known about the existence of putative C21 receptors on plasma membranes of target cells. Findings We analyzed the nature of C21-binding proteins in cell lysates of skin fibroblasts using C21 affinity columns. The membrane receptor CD44 was identified as C21-binding protein by mass spectrometry. We were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD44 on cell growth or the effect of C21 on cell proliferation. A soluble form of CD44 was synthesized in insect cells and purified from culture supernatants with a combination of PVDF filtration in the presence of ammonium sulphate and HPLC. Both osteopontin and hyaluronic acid competitively displaced Biotin-C21 binding to CD44. In a colony-forming assay using primitive CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, osteopontin and C21 had opposite effects and C21 reduced the inhibitory action of osteopontin. Conclusion CD44 is a C21-binding membrane protein. We could not demonstrate an involvement of CD44 in the proliferative action of C21. Nevertheless, based on the antagonism of C21 and osteopontin in hematopoietic precursors, we speculate that C21 could indirectly have a major impact on hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, by hindering osteopontin membrane binding at the level of the bone marrow niche.

  14. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  15. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Yuan MENG; Toshihiro AKAIKE

    2013-01-01

    Induced embryonic stem resources for the observation of the cell (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  16. Growth and form of melanoma cell colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the statistical properties of melanoma cell colonies grown in vitro by analyzing the results of crystal violet assays at different concentrations of initial plated cells and for different growth times. The distribution of colony sizes is described well by a continuous time branching process. To characterize the shape fluctuations of the colonies, we compute the distribution of eccentricities. The experimental results are compared with numerical results for models of random division of elastic cells, showing that experimental results are best reproduced by restricting cell division to the outer rim of the colony. Our results serve to illustrate the wealth of information that can be extracted by a standard experimental method such as the crystal violet assay. (paper)

  17. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  18. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.

  19. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis

  20. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu, E-mail: yuli_scu@163.com

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  1. CFAssay: statistical analysis of the colony formation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colony formation assay is the gold standard to determine cell reproductive death after treatment with ionizing radiation, applied for different cell lines or in combination with other treatment modalities. Associated linear-quadratic cell survival curves can be calculated with different methods. For easy code exchange and methodological standardisation among collaborating laboratories a software package CFAssay for R (R Core Team, R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing, 2014) was established to perform thorough statistical analysis of linear-quadratic cell survival curves after treatment with ionizing radiation and of two-way designs of experiments with chemical treatments only. CFAssay offers maximum likelihood and related methods by default and the least squares or weighted least squares method can be optionally chosen. A test for comparision of cell survival curves and an ANOVA test for experimental two-way designs are provided. For the two presented examples estimated parameters do not differ much between maximum-likelihood and least squares. However the dispersion parameter of the quasi-likelihood method is much more sensitive for statistical variation in the data than the multiple R2 coefficient of determination from the least squares method. The dispersion parameter for goodness of fit and different plot functions in CFAssay help to evaluate experimental data quality. As open source software interlaboratory code sharing between users is facilitated

  2. Studies of sector formation in expanding bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, I.; Cohen, I.; Ben-Jacob, E.

    1999-12-01

    We study sector formation in expanding bacterial colonies grown on a substrate with low level of nutrient. Bursts of sectors are observed both during compact growth on soft agar and during branching growth on semi-solid agar. For theoretical studies of these bursts we employ two mathematical models we have used successfully in the past to study patterning of bacterial colonies: a discrete model and a continuous reaction-diffusion model. Using these models we investigate the amount of segregation achieved by a neutral mutation, as well as by mutations having some advantage over the wild type. We also study the effect of chemotaxis signaling on the sector formation.

  3. The effect of dried thyroid gland pretreatment upon survival, formation of endogenous spleen colonies and differentiation of haemopoietic cell populations in X-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on non-inbred H-strain male mice confirmed that their radioresistance could be increased by a stimulatory action of thyroid hormones applied for three weeks preceding radiation It was found that the 30-day survival after 750 R increased between the 1st and the 5th days after the end of pre-treatment. The highest degree of radioresistance was observed when the radiation exposure fell into a phase of the gradual recession of an increased metabolic rate. The relevant experimental groups showed a higher frequency of endogenous spleen colonies and an increased granulocytic differentiation of haemopoietic stem cells. A higher colony-forming activity was also found in animals irradiated immediately after the termination of pre-treatment with the thyroid, but without an increase in survival. The lack of radioprotective effect under those circumstances could be explained by a persisting hypermetabolic effect of the thyroid, and by the fact that an increased proportion of haemopoietic stem cells underwent differentiation into the erythroid line. (author)

  4. Monoclonal origin of B lymphocyte colony-forming cells in spleen colonies formed by multipotential hemopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, PK; Johnson, GR

    1978-01-01

    Spleen colonies produced by transplanting lethally irradiated mice with either 12 day fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells were found to contain B- lymphocyte colony-forming cells (BL-CFC) . The proportion of BL-CFC positive spleen colonies did not increase substantially between 8 and 14 days after transplantation, the range being 18-45 percent. However, the absolute number of BL-CFC per spleen colony varied considerably (between 1 and 10,318), although the majority of colonies contained less than 200 BL-CFC. Irrespective of the time after transplantation, smaller spleen colonies were found to have a higher frequency of BL-CFC than larger spleen colonies. To determine the possible clonal origin of BL-CFC from spleen colony- forming unit (CFU-S), CBA mice were injected with equal numbers of CBA and CBA T(6)/T(6) fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells. Analysis of 7-15-day spleen colonies demonstrated that 90 percent were either exclusively T(6) positive or T(6) negative and approximately equal numbers ofboth colony types were observed. B-lymphocyte colonies were grown and successfully karyotyped from 19 spleen colonies. When compared with the original spleen colony karyotype the B-lymphocyte colony cells karyotype was identical in all 19 cases. In 3 of the 19 colonies analyzed a mixture of T(6) positive and T(6) negative karyotypes was present and identical proportions of the karyotypes were present in the pooled B-lymphocyte colony cells and spleen colony cells. The data indicate that the B-lymphocyte colony-forming cells detected in spleen colonies are genuine members of the hemopoietic clone derived from the initiating hemopoietic stem cell (CFU-S). PMID:309918

  5. Inhibitory effect of parvovirus H—1 on the formation of colonies of human hepatoma cell line in vitro and its tumors in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANSHANGJUN; CHENGWUMA; 等

    1994-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of parvovirus H-1 on the colonyforming ability.in vitro of QGY-7703,a cultured human hepatoma cell line,and on the formation and growth of its tumors in nude mice was studied.With higher multiplicity of infection(MOI) of H-1 given,survival of the QGY-7703 cells was found to be decreased.H-1 DNA amplification level at 30h postinfection(p.i.) was detected to be 7.4 times higher than that at 2h by dispersed cells assay,while the cells were delayed to enter into S phase.Plaques were formed in the indicator cells(new-born human kidney cell line,NBK) by progeny H-1 virus particles released from the infected QGY-7703 cells by infectious cell center assay.The formation of tumors in nude mice by QGY-7703 cells which were injected s c at 2h postinfection was observed to by prevented in 2 proups with given MOI 25 and 50.The tumor growth of MOI 10 group occurred at a lower exponential rate than that of control,after a 20d latent period.It was evident that parvovirus H-1 exhibited a direct inhibitory effect on the formation and growth of human hepatoma cells in vivo as well as in vitro.

  6. The Rim101p/PacC pathway and alkaline pH regulate pattern formation in yeast colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J; Honigberg, Saul M

    2010-03-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transcribed in overlapping regions of the colony, and this overlap corresponded to the initial sporulation region. The development of colony sporulation patterns depended on cell-to-cell signals, as demonstrated by chimeric colonies, which contain a mixture of two strains. One such signal is alkaline pH, mediated through the Rim101p/PacC pathway. Meiotic-arrest mutants that increased alkali production stimulated expression of an early meiotic gene in neighboring cells, whereas a mutant that decreased alkali production (cit1Delta) decreased this expression. Addition of alkali to colonies accelerated the expansion of the interior region of sporulation, whereas inactivation of the Rim101p pathway inhibited this expansion. Thus, the Rim101 pathway mediates colony patterning by responding to cell-to-cell pH signals. Cell-to-cell signals coupled with nutrient gradients may allow efficient spore formation and spore dispersal in natural environments. PMID:20038633

  7. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  8. Phenotypic plasticity within yeast colonies: differential partitioning of cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Kapros, Tamas; Honigberg, Saul M

    2016-05-01

    Across many phyla, a common aspect of multicellularity is the organization of different cell types into spatial patterns. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after diploid colonies have completed growth, they differentiate to form alternating layers of sporulating cells and feeder cells. In the current study, we found that as yeast colonies developed, the feeder cell layer was initially separated from the sporulating cell layer. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of sporulation in colonies depended on the colony's nutrient environment; in two environments in which overall colony sporulation efficiency was very similar, the pattern of feeder and sporulating cells within the colony was very different. As noted previously, under moderately suboptimal conditions for sporulation-low acetate concentration or high temperature-the number of feeder cells increases as does the dependence of sporulation on the feeder-cell transcription factor, Rlm1. Here we report that even under a condition that is completely blocked sporulation, the number of feeder cells still increased. These results suggest broader implications to our recently proposed "Differential Partitioning provides Environmental Buffering" or DPEB hypothesis. PMID:26743103

  9. The influence of fullerenol on the cell number, cell area and colony forming unit ability in irradiated human erythroleukemic cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ičević Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available DET (dye exclusion test cell count and cell area by computer analysis of the images were determined in cell lines of human eritroleukemia (K562, which were irradiated with X-rays in one dose of 24 Gy and pretreated with 10 nmol/mL fullerenol (Cgo(OH24. Cell samples obtained using a citocentrifuge and May-Grünvald Giemsi (MGG during, were analyzed. The cell colony formation ability was monitored using quantative CFU (colony forming unit test. Irradiation decreases the number of K562 cells, but fullerenol significantly increases cell number on 24th and 48th hour of the experiment. Cell area is larger, and the number of formed cell colonies after irradiation is significantly smaller compared to pretreated groups during the whole experiment. Pretreatment with fullerenol maintains a smaller cell area, and the number of colony formed units was larger compared to the irradiated cells.

  10. Effect of serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus on the formation of hemopoietic colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice after bone marrow cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colony formation capability of serum from animals with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was studied in lethally irradiated mice. Male-rats of Wistar line and hybrid mice (CBA x C57 BL) were used in the experiments. The serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus was injected simultaneously with bone marrow transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. The number of macrocolonies in the spleen was counted on the 9th day. It was ascertained that the serum from rats with destructed nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus caused an increase of the number of macroscopically visible colonies in the spleen of lethally irradiated mice. The determination of hemopoetic types of colonies showed that the effect of the serum from those animals caused an increase of the number of granulocytic-type colonies. The initiation of colony stimulating and leukopoetic activity in the blood of animals after the destruction of mammillary body nuclei and posterior hypothalamic nucleus attested, according to the authors point of view, that humoral mediators (humoral mediator) could participated in the mechanism of hypothalamus effect on leulopoiesis

  11. A novel type of colony formation in marine planktonic diatoms revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunčica Bosak

    Full Text Available Diatoms have evolved a variety of colonial life forms in which cells are connected by organic threads, mucilage pads or silicate structures. In this study, we provide the first description of a novel strategy of colony formation among marine planktonic diatoms. Bacteriastrum jadranum forms loose but regular chains with distinct heterovalvate terminal cells. The colonial cells and their siliceous projections, the setae, are not in direct contact; instead, they are enclosed within the optically transparent organic matrix. This cell jacket structure was detected by staining procedure with Alcian Blue, which showed that the polysaccharides are predominant matrix constituents and revealed that the jacket reaches the span of the setae. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations showed distinguishable fibrillar network firmly associated with cells. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM, we were able to visualise and characterise the cell jacket structure at molecular resolution. At nanoscale resolution, the cell jacket appears as a cross-linked fibrillar network organised into a recognisable structure. The circular patches of self-repeating pattern (hexagonal pores with openings of 8-100 nm are connected through thicker surrounding fibrils and reinforced by branching fibrils. The pore-forming fibrils within the patches are only 0.6-1.6 nm high, the surrounding fibrils connecting patches are 2.0-2.8 nm high, and the branching fibrils are considerably wider but not higher than 4.0 nm. The discovered polysaccharide fibrillar network is highly organised and delicately structured with a monomolecular fibril height of 0.6 nm. We conclude that the Bacteriastrum polysaccharide jacket represents an essential part of the cell, as the conjunction of the polymer network with the frustule appears to be extremely tight and such specific and unique patterns have never been found in self-assembled polysaccharide gel networks, which are usually encountered in the

  12. Collective motion and nonequilibrium cluster formation in colonies of gliding bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bar, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.098102

    2013-01-01

    We characterize cell motion in experiments and show that the transition to collective motion in colonies of gliding bacterial cells confined to a monolayer appears through the organization of cells into larger moving clusters. Collective motion by non-equilibrium cluster formation is detected for a critical cell packing fraction around 17%. This transition is characterized by a scale-free power-law cluster size distribution, with an exponent $0.88\\pm0.07$, and the appearance of giant number fluctuations. Our findings are in quantitative agreement with simulations of self-propelled rods. This suggests that the interplay of self-propulsion of bacteria and the rod-shape of bacteria is sufficient to induce collective motion.

  13. The PIM inhibitor AZD1208 synergizes with ruxolitinib to induce apoptosis of ruxolitinib sensitive and resistant JAK2-V617F-driven cells and inhibit colony formation of primary MPN cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzacurati, Lucia; Lambert, Que T.; Pradhan, Anuradha; Griner, Lori N.; Huszar, Dennis; Reuther, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders that exhibit excess mature myeloid cells, bone marrow fibrosis, and risk of leukemic transformation. Aberrant JAK2 signaling plays an etiological role in MPN formation. Because neoplastic cells in patients are largely insensitive to current anti-JAK2 therapies, effective therapies remain needed. Members of the PIM family of serine/threonine kinases are induced by JAK/STAT signaling, regulate hematopoietic stem...

  14. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  15. Effects of androgen on transient endogenous spleen colonies and other hemopoietic stem cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the effects of androgen on hemopoiesis in mice, we investigated changes in hemopoietic stem cells at various stages of differentiation after injection of 19-nandrolone decanoate (19-ND). 19-ND induced (a) a marked increase in the population of CFUe, especially in the spleen, and (b) a less significant increase in the number of CFUs, GM-CFC, and BFUe. The number of endogenous spleen colonies developed transiently on day 4 after irradiation (TE-CFU) increased significantly, and the initiation and induction of erythropoietic maturation was enhanced. Growth of the pluripotent stem cells (CFUs) assessed by endogenous spleen colony formation was influenced more than was the population size. Production of erythropoietin (Ep) in mice was not affected by the treatment with 19-ND. These results indicate that 19-ND affects mature precursors in erythroid cell lineage rather than pluripotent stem cells and that the effect is unlikely to be induced through an increase in the production of Ep

  16. Edges of human embryonic stem cell colonies display distinct mechanical properties and differentiation potential

    OpenAIRE

    Rosowski, Kathryn A.; Mertz, Aaron F.; Samuel Norcross; Dufresne, Eric R.; Valerie Horsley

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms that guide cell fate decisions during early human development, we closely examined the differentiation process in adherent colonies of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Live imaging of the differentiation process reveals that cells on the outer edge of the undifferentiated colony begin to differentiate first and remain on the perimeter of the colony to eventually form a band of differentiation. Strikingly, this band is of constant width in all colonies,...

  17. In vitro radiosensitivity of human fresh T-lymphocytes by colony formation assay using PHA and recombinant Interleukin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro culture conditions for colony formation of human fresh peripheral T-cells using phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and recombinant Interleukin-2 are defined. Peripheral lymphocytes, from six individuals, were exposed to X or gamma rays in vitro, and dose-survival curves were obtained. The results showed typical sigmoid curves similar to those observed when other mammalian cells are exposed to radiation. The D10 (dose required to kill 90 % of the cells) was found to be 3.0 to 3.5 Gy. (author)

  18. In vitro radiosensitivity of human fresh T-lymphocytes by colony formation assay using PHA and recombinant interleukin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro culture conditions for colony formation of human fresh peripheral T-cells using PHA and recombinant Interleukin-2 are defined. Peripheral lymphocytes, from six individuals, were exposed to X or gamma rays in vitro, and dose-survival curves were obtained. The results showed typical sigmoid curves similar to those observed when other mammalian cells are exposed to radiation. The D10 (dose required to kill 90 % of the cells) was found to be 3.0 to 3.5 Gy. (author)

  19. Neotenic formation in laboratory colonies of the termite Coptotermes gestroi after orphaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Costa-Leonardo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The termite Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann, 1896 (Rhinotermitidae: Coptotermitinae is an exotic species in Brazil and information concerning its reproductive developmental biology is scarce. We induced the formation of neotenics in laboratory colonies through orphaning experiments. Orphaning experiments were conducted in three-year old colonies of C. gestroi kept under laboratory conditions. After three months, eight nymphoid neotenics were observed in one colony after queen removal. Histological analysis showed that these neotenics were non-functional. The results suggest that these individuals may have arisen from the first nymphal instar (N1 or from an early N1 instar after one or two larval moults. Neotenics also were recorded on two incipient colonies of C. gestroi that lost the queen naturally.

  20. Effects of protozoan grazing on colony formation in Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) and the potential costs and benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Tang, K.W.

    2002-01-01

    . scintillans increased the mean colony size by up to 50 % relative to the controls, whereas grazing by G. dominans enhanced the mean colony size by up to 3-fold. Microscopic observations confirmed that N. scintillans was also able to ingest small colonies. In contrast, G. dominans apparently did not ingest...... colonies, and in most cases the abundance of colonies was also increased in the grazing treatment, Up to 92 % of P. globosa cells were in colonial form when G. dominans was present, in contrast to...

  1. The Rim101p/PacC Pathway and Alkaline pH Regulate Pattern Formation in Yeast Colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G.; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J.; Honigberg, Saul M.

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transc...

  2. Antigen 43 from Escherichia coli induces inter- and intraspecies cell aggregation and changes in colony morphology of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Hasman, Henrik;

    2000-01-01

    distinct frizzy colony morphology in E. coli. Here we show that Ag43 can be expressed in a functional form on the surface of the environmentally important Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 with ensuing cell aggregation and frizzy colony types. Using green fluorescence protein-tagged cells, we...... demonstrate that Ag43 can be used as a tool to provide interspecies cell aggregation between E. coli and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Ag43 expression enhances biofilm formation in P. fluorescens to glass surfaces. The versatility of this protein was also reflected in Ag43 surface display in a variety of other...

  3. Heterogeneity in proliferative potential of ovine mesenchymal stem cell colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, N P; Srivastava, J K; Smith, R F; Longinotti, C

    2004-04-01

    Bone marrow biopsies were taken from the iliac crest of 28 individual sheep from three different breeds, ranging in age from 4 months to 8 years and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated using selection due to plastic adherence. Cells were cultured in medium that had been selected for its effect on observed MSC proliferation, until populations of greater than 50 million had been obtained from each biopsy. The identity of the isolated cell populations as progenitors of the mesenchymal lineage was verified by deriving both osteoblastic and chondrocytic phenotypes when cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic medium supplements, respectively. The rate of cell proliferation for each marrow biopsy was measured at each passage and the number of initial stem cells in each sample estimated. There was no statistically significant correlation between the age of the sheep and MSC proliferative potential, or age and estimated initial MSC number. There was no apparent significant difference between proliferation rate and sheep breed and colonies established from frozen cells grew at similar rates to pre-frozen cells. Counter intuitively, there appeared to be a negatively correlated trend between proliferation rate and MSC concentration in the samples. It is concluded that no initial descriptive statistics of the marrow biopsies can assist in estimating the proliferative potential, and therefore the timing of future surgeries, of MSCs sampled for the purposes of tissue engineering. PMID:15332606

  4. Simple method for a cell count of the colonial Cyanobacterium, Microcystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Choong-Jae; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Jang, Kam-Yong; Boo, Sung Min; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2006-10-01

    The cell counting of colonial Microcystis spp. is a rather difficult and error-prone proposition, as this genus forms irregularly-shaped and irregularly-sized colonies, which are packed with cells. Thus, in order to facilitate a cell count, four methods of dividing the colonies into single cells were compared, including vortexing, sonication, TiO2 treatment, and boiling. As a result, the boiling method was determined to generate the greatest number of single cells from a colony, and all colonies were found to have divided completely after only 6 min of treatment. Furthermore, no significant cell destruction, which might alter the actual cell density, was detected in conjunction with the boiling method (P = 0.158). In order to compute the cell number more simply, the relationship between the colony size and the cell number was determined, via the boiling method. The colony volume, rather than the area or diameter was correlated more closely with the cell number (r2 = 0.727), thereby suggesting that the cell numbers of colonial Microcystis sp. can also be estimated effectively from their volumes. PMID:17082751

  5. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full t...

  6. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities saving method, amenable to high-throughput screens, for accurately measuring yeast cell viability. PMID:24185677

  7. Chemomodulation of cellular movement, collective formation of vortices by swarming bacteria, and colonial development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Czirók, András; Vicsek, Tamás; Gutnick, David L.

    1997-02-01

    Bacterial colonies have developed sophisticated modes of cooperative behavior which enable them to respond to adverse growth conditions. It has been shown that such behavior can be manifested in formation of complex colonial patterns. Certain Bacillus species exhibit collective migration, “turbulent like” flow and emergence of whirlpools during colonial development. Here we present experimental observations of collective behavior and a generic model to explain such behavior. The model incorporates self-propelled and interacting “particles” (swarmers). We show that velocity interaction between the particles can lead to a synchronized movement. To explain vortices formation, we propose a plausible mechanism involving a special chemotactic response (rotational chemotaxis) which is based on speed modulations according to the concentration of a chemoattractant. This mechanism differs from that exhibited by swimming bacteria. We show that the chemomodulation of swarmers' speed together with the velocity interactions impose a torque on the collective motion and can lead to formation of vortices. The inclusion of both attractive and repulsive rotational chemotaxis in the model captures the salient features of the observed growth patterns.

  8. Effect of staphylococcus aureus on the formation of hemopoietic colonies in the spleen and regeneration of erythpopoiesis in mice after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus Cowan-1 and Wood-46 strains inoculated in mice in the dose 1x108 cells stimulate the formation of endogeneous colonies on the spleen surface on the ninth day following the mice exposure to a sublethal dose. Staphylococci of both strains activate postradiation regeneration of erithropoiesis in the bone marrow and the spleen in mice, which is detected by 59Fe uptake at that. Formation of transitory endocolonies does not increase

  9. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  10. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns. PMID:26058163

  11. Dynamic Aspects of the Structured Cell Population in a Swarming Colony of Proteus mirabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuyama, Tohey; Takagi, Yuko; Nakagawa, Yoji; Itoh, Hiroto; Wakita, Junichi; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2000-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms a concentric-ring colony by undergoing periodic swarming. A colony in the process of such synchronized expansion was examined for its internal population structure. In alternating phases, i.e., swarming (active migration) and consolidation (growth without colony perimeter expansion), phase-specific distribution of cells differing in length, in situ mobility, and migration ability on an agar medium were recognized. In the consolidation phase, the distribution of mobile ...

  12. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  13. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. METHODS: Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. RESULTS: The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

  14. Stability Analysis of a Hybrid Cellular Automaton Model of Cell Colony Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlee, P

    2007-01-01

    Cell colonies of bacteria, tumour cells and fungi, under nutrient limited growth conditions, exhibit complex branched growth patterns. In order to investigate this phenomenon we present a simple hybrid cellular automaton model of cell colony growth. In the model the growth of the colony is limited by a nutrient that is consumed by the cells and which inhibits cell division if it falls below a certain threshold. Using this model we have investigated how the nutrient consumption rate of the cells affects the growth dynamics of the colony. We found that for low consumption rates the colony takes on a Eden-like morphology, while for higher consumption rates the morphology of the colony is branched with a fractal geometry. These findings are in agreement with previous results, but the simplicity of the model presented here allows for a linear stability analysis of the system. By observing that the local growth of the colony is proportional to the flux of the nutrient we derive an approximate dispersion relation fo...

  15. Allelopathy is involved in the formation of pure colonies of the fern Gleichenia japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Saito, Yoshihumi; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2013-04-15

    The fern Gleichenia japonica is one of the most widely distributed fern and occurs throughout East to South Asia. The species often dominates plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination has not yet been described. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that allelochemicals are involved in the formation of G. japonica colonies. An aqueous methanol extract of G. japonica inhibited the growth of seedlings of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and timothy (Phleum pratense). Increasing extract concentration increased the inhibition. These results suggest that G. japonica contain allelopathic substances. The extract was then purified by several chromatographies with monitoring the inhibitory activity and two growth inhibitory substances causing the allelopathic effect were isolated. The chemical structures of the two substances were determined by spectral data to be a novel compound 3-O-β-allopyranosyl-13-O-β-fucopyranosyl-3β-hydroxymanool (1) and 18-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl-13-epitorreferol (2). These compounds inhibited the shoot and root growth of garden cress, lettuce, alfalfa (Medicago sativa), timothy, ryegrass and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli) at concentrations greater than 0.1-1.0mM. The concentrations required for 50% growth inhibition of root and shoot growth of these test plants ranged from 0.72 to 3.49mM and 0.79 to 3.51mM for compounds 1 and 2, respectively. Concentration of compounds 1 and 2 in soil under the pure colony of G. japonica was 4.9 and 5.7mM, respectively, indicating concentrations over those required for 50% growth inhibition are potentially available under monocultural stands of these ferns. Therefore, these compounds may contribute to the allelopathic effects caused by presence of G. japonica and may thus contribute to the establishment of monocultural stands by this

  16. Characterization of a human hematopoietic progenitor cell capable of forming blast cell containing colonies in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    J. Brandt; Baird, N; Lu, L; Srour, E; R. HOFFMAN

    1988-01-01

    A hematopoietic cell (CFU-B1) capable of producing blast cell containing colonies in vitro was detected using a semisolid culture system. The CFU-B1 has the capacity for self-renewal and commitment to a number of hematopoietic lineages. Monoclonal antibody to the human progenitor cell antigen-1 (HPCA-1) and a monoclonal antibody against the major histocompatibility class II antigen (HLA-DR) were used with fluorescence activated cell sorting to phenotype the CFU-B1. The CFU-B1 was found to exp...

  17. Peripheral blood cells from children with RASopathies show enhanced spontaneous colonies growth in vitro and hyperactive RAS signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germline mutations in genes coding for molecules involved in the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway are the hallmarks of a newly classified family of autosomal dominant syndromes termed RASopathies. Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), in particular, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, can lead to potentially severe complications in children with Noonan syndrome (NS). We studied 27 children with NS or other RASopathies and 35 age-matched children as control subjects. Peripheral blood (PB) cells from these patients were studied for in vitro colony-forming units (CFUs) activity, as well as for intracellular phosphosignaling. Higher spontaneous growth of both burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) and CFU-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies from RAS-mutated patients were observed as compared with control subjects. We also observed a significantly higher amount of GM-colony-stimulating factor-induced p-ERK in children with RASopathies. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that PB cells isolated from children suffering from NS or other RASopathies without MPD display enhanced BFU-E and CFU-GM colony formation in vitro. The biological significance of these findings clearly awaits further studies. Collectively, our data provide a basis for further investigating of only partially characterized hematological alterations present in children suffering from RASopathies, and may provide new markers for progression toward malignant MPD in these patients

  18. Spleen colonies from peritoneal cell-coated membranes seeded with bone marrow and inserted into the peritoneum of lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cellulose acetate disks are placed in the peritoneal cavity of mice they become coated with cells, primarily macrophages. Colonies of granulocytes are produced on CAM when CAM-bearing mice are injected ip with syngeneic bone marrow. The cell which forms these colonies has many features in common with cells which form colonies of neutrophils and macrophages in semisolid media. CFU-ML and CFU-NM are thought to be descendants of pluripotent stem cells such as those which are assayed by the formation of spleen colonies in lethally irradiated mice. The present studies were undertaken to determine if CFU-S were present on CAM. Disks were inserted ip and left for 7 days; the mouse was then injected with marrow, and after 1 or 2 days CAM were transferred to a lethally irradiated mouse. Alternately, CAM were removed incubated in vitro with marrow for 1 h, placed in a normal mouse, and after 1 or 2 days transferred to a lethally irradiated mouse. Spleen colonies and other measures of splenic hematopoiesis were made 8 to 15 days after CAM transfer, or recipients were observed for 30-day survival after CAM transfer. CFU-S were present after either in vivo or in vitro seeding. In vitro seeding of CAM with 1.12 x 107 cells in 0.4 ml of HBSS resulted in 7.8 +- 1.6 spleen colonies at 8 days. By 15 days, colonies were confluent and spleens enlarged. Percentage 59Fe uptake at Day 8, 10, and 15 after CAM insertion also indicated vigorous hematopoiesis. The 30-day survival of lethally irradiated mice with CAM seeded in vitro was 15/40 compared to 2/20 for recipients of unseeded CAM. These data suggest the presence of pluripotent stem cells on CAM but do not indicate whether or not CAM colonies are derived from such cells

  19. Automated identification and location analysis of marked stem cells colonies in optical microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Paduano

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs are characterized by two remarkable peculiarities: the capacity to propagate as undifferentiated cells (self-renewal and the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives (pluripotency. Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing the pluripotency, it has become evident that ESC cultures consists of multiple cell populations highlighted by the expression of early germ lineage markers during spontaneous differentiation. Hence, the identification and characterization of ESCs subpopulations represents an efficient approach to improve the comprehension of correlation between gene expression and cell specification status. To study markers of ESCs heterogeneity, we developed an analysis pipeline which can automatically process images of stem cell colonies in optical microscopy. The question we try to address is to find out the statistically significant preferred locations of the marked cells. We tested our algorithm on a set of images of stem cell colonies to analyze the expression pattern of the Zscan4 gene, which was an elite candidate gene to be studied because it is specifically expressed in subpopulation of ESCs. To validate the proposed method we analyzed the behavior of control genes whose pattern had been associated to biological status such as differentiation (EndoA, pluripotency (Pou5f1, and pluripotency fluctuation (Nanog. We found that Zscan4 is not uniformly expressed inside a stem cell colony, and that it tends to be expressed towards the center of the colony, moreover cells expressing Zscan4 cluster each other. This is of significant importance because it allows us to hypothesize a biological status where the cells expressing Zscan4 are preferably associated to the inner of colonies suggesting pluripotent cell status features, and the clustering between themselves suggests either a colony paracrine effect or an early phase of cell specification through proliferation. Also, the

  20. Periodic growth of bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Takemasa; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Hiramatsu, Fumiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Kurosu, Sayuri; Nakatsuchi, Michio; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2005-06-01

    The formation of concentric ring colonies by bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Proteus mirabilis has been investigated experimentally, focusing our attention on the dependence of local cell density upon the bacterial motility. It has been confirmed that these concentric ring colonies reflect the periodic change of the bacterial motility between motile cell state and immotile cell state. We conclude that this periodic change is macroscopically determined neither by biological factors (i.e., biological clock) nor by chemical factors (chemotaxis as inhibitor). And our experimental results strongly suggest that the essential factor for the change of the bacterial motility during concentric ring formation is the local cell density.

  1. Modeling the Role of the Cell Cycle in Regulating Proteus mirabilis Swarm-Colony Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ayati, Bruce P

    2005-01-01

    We present models and computational results which indicate that the spatial and temporal regularity seen in Proteus mirabilis swarm-colony development is largely an expression of a sharp age of dedifferentiation in the cell cycle from motile swarmer cells to immotile dividing cells (also called swimmer or vegetative cells.) This contrasts strongly with reaction-diffusion models of Proteus behavior that ignore or average out the age structure of the cell population and instead use only density...

  2. Murine eosinophil differentiation factor. An eosinophil-specific colony- stimulating factor with activity for human cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A purified murine lymphokine, eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF), was found to be a selective stimulus for the clonal proliferation and differentiation of murine eosinophil progenitor cells, establishing it as the murine eosinophil colony-stimulating factor (Eo-CSF). EDF was also active on human eosinophil progenitors and mature blood eosinophils, but had no effect on neutrophil or macrophage precursor cells, nor on blood neutrophils. In culture of human bone marrow cells, EDF stimulated...

  3. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood

  4. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  5. Colony formation of the western harvester ant in a chronic gamma radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A colony of Western harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, became established in a chronically exposed gamma radiation field located on the native short-grass plains of Colorado. The exposure level at the nest site was 18 R/hr. At the end of the colony's first and second seasons the nest mound diam were 25 and 36 cm, respectively. There were no apparent habitat modifications to suggest any avoidance response to the radiation. (U.S.)

  6. Preparation and Amplification of Colony of Goat Transgenic Fetal Fibroblast and Mammary Gland Epithelial Cell with Human Lactoferrin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-ling; LIU Feng-jun; ZHANG Yong

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to explore technical system of making single transgenic positive cells become colony cells by amplification culture. [Method] Fetal fibroblasts and mammary gland epithelial cells of single goat fetus of pBLM-C1 which specifically expressed human lactoferrin were cloned. Single cell colony of single transfection cell was prepared with 3 concentrations of 0%, 50% and 100% conditioned culture media. Transfection cell and non-transfection cell were carried out amplification culture by con-culture, neo gene was as screened gene, genome DNA of transfection cell was detected by PCR method. Chromosome karyotype analysis of single colony cell was tested. [Result] Compared with non-conditioned culture medium, 100% conditioned culture medium could greatly increase survived rate of single colony cells (FF: 53.33% vs. 10.00%; MGE: 33.33% vs. 6.67%). Compared with control, con-culture of transfection cell and non-transfection cell could greatly increase rate of transfection cell single colony after amplification culture (FF: 53.33% vs. 10.00%;MGE: 33.33% vs. 6.67%), confluence time of amplification culture was significantly decreased (20-30 d). The result of PCR showed that the colony cell obtained by above method contained hLF target gene. The result of karyotype analysis showed that most cloned cell chromosomes were normal. [Conclusion] The study provides a reliable method for separating transgenic cell, inserting and diagnosing ideal vector, and can save expense and time for transgenic animal production.

  7. Yeast Colony Survival Depends on Metabolic Adaptation and Cell Differentiation Rather Than on Stress Defense*

    OpenAIRE

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important for cell protection during stress and aging. A deficiency in these enzymes leads to ROS imbalance, causing various disorders in many organisms, including yeast. In contrast to liquid cultures, where fitness of the yeast population depends on its ROS scavenging capability, the present study suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growing in colonies capable of ammonia signaling use a broader protective strategy. Instead of mai...

  8. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  9. Release of single cells from the colonial oil-producing alga Botryococcus braunii by chemical treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Liyuan; Park, Hyunsun; Okada, Shigeru; Ohama, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    We tested for chemical reagents that would be useful in preparing a large number of vital single cells from colonial Botryococcus braunii B-race, variety Showa. Among the 18 reagents assayed, glycerol and erythritol showed the highest potency for releasing single cells. Incubation in medium containing these reagents released 40–50 % single cells in 15 min. Fluorescent staining with Nile red revealed that except for the cap-like structures the released single cells were free of hydrocarbon oil...

  10. Detection of colony-stimulating factor messenger RNA in single T cells by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, D J; Owens, T; Pearse, M

    1989-01-01

    In situ hybridization has been used to study the accumulation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) mRNA in single cells of a T lymphocyte clone (E9.D4) following antibody-mediated (F23.1) activation via the Ti-T3 complex in filler-independent bulk cultures. The specificity of hybridization for...... the accumulation of CSF mRNA within individual cells of the clone following stimulation with F23.1. This could account for the corresponding heterogeneity in CSF production by single cells. Under optimal conditions at least 25% of cells contained both transcripts. The method has been used to examine...

  11. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  12. Clonogenic colony-forming ability of hepatic stem cells in the spleens of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To confirm the existence of hepatic stem cells (HSCs), fetal liver cells isolated from mice on embryonic day 13 (ED13) were long-term cultured in vitro. Growth of the cells was observed intensively and characteristics were identified by immunocytochemistry. The results showed that some of the cells grew as colonies, in which some cells expressed AFP, CD34 and Albumin. Then the cells were transplanted intravenously into irradiated syngeneic mice. At day 12 a number of small hyperplasia nodules were seen in the apparently enlarged spleens of recipient mice. Moreover, some nodules were positive for AFP and CD34 and consisted of various types of cells, suggesting the very existence of hepatic stem cells in the mouse fetal liver.

  13. Radiosensitivity of CD4 and CD8 positive human T lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay provides a new opportunity to examine possible variations in human radiosensitivity using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in place of the hitherto used skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in PBL differs among individuals, it was suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4+ and CD8+ cells differed. In the present study, CD4+ lymphocytes (helper/inducer T cells) and CD8+ lymphocytes (suppressor/cytotoxic T cells) were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D10 (the dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10 %) was quite similar for these two types of cells (3.13 ± 0.10 Gy [mean ±SD] for CD4+, 3.34 ± 0.50 Gy for CD8+ and 3.07 ± 0.05 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of a whole PBL population for screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity. (author)

  14. Recovery of hematopoietic colony-forming cells in irradiated mice pretreated with interleukin 1 (IL-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data in this report determined the effect of a single injection of recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1) prior to irradiation of B6D2F1 mice on the recovery of colony-forming cells (CFC) at early and late times after sublethal and lethal doses of radiation. Injection of rIL-1 promoted an earlier recovery of mature cells in the blood and CFC in the bone marrow and spleen. For example, 8 days after 6.5 Gy irradiation, the number of CFU-E (colony-forming units-erythroid), BFU-E (burst-forming units-erythroid), and GM-CFC (granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells) per femur was approximately 1.5-fold higher in rIL-1-injected mice than in saline-injected mice. Also, 5, 9, and 12 days after irradiation, the number of both day 8 and day 12 CFU-S (colony-forming units-spleen) was almost twofold greater in bone marrow from rIL-1-injected mice. The earlier recovery of CFU-S in rIL-1-injected mice was not associated with an increase in the number of CFU-S that survived immediately after irradiation. Also, 7 months after irradiation, the number of CFU-S per femur of both saline- and rIL-1-injected mice was still less than 50% of normal values. Data in this report demonstrate that a single injection of rIL-1 prior to irradiation accelerates early hematopoietic recovery in irradiated mice, but does not prevent expression of radiation-induced frontend damage or long-term damage to hematopoietic tissues

  15. Genetic factors affecting radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition: application of a continuous low dose-rate irradiation colony formation assay to select radiosensitive retinoblastoma family members for correction with a cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to identify new or undescribed functions of radiosensitivity and genomic instability genes using a continuous low dose-rate colony formation assay. This assay expands on the standard colony formation assay, whereby colony formation ability (retention of proliferative capacity) is measured during continuous low dose-rate irradiation rather than 10-14 days following the completion of such exposures. This approach has previously employed by the Bedford laboratory to identify a Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) mutant of CHO cells, irs-20. In this study we examine the growth response of fibroblasts derived from recently identified radiosensitive retinoblastoma family members, both affected probands and their unaffected parents, and various apparently normal fibroblast lines obtained from the NIGMS Human Genetic Cell Repository (Coriell Medical Institute, Camden, NJ). Colony formation was assayed by plating single cells, exposing them at 37 deg C to continuous Cs-137 gamma irradiation at dose rates of 0.5-8.5 cGy/h, and scoring survivors as colonies with >100 viable cells. The retinoblastoma family members display severely limited growth (survival less than 10E-3) at dose rates greater than 2-2.5 cGy/h, while the apparently normal cell lines do not display such inhibited growth until 6-7 cGy/h. Two of the retinoblastoma family cell lines, MF-6F and MF-15F (both unaffected but radiosensitive parents), were selected as targets of transfection with a viral cDNA library (ViraPort human cDNA library, Stratagene Cloning Systems, La Jolla, CA) and subjected to a ∼3 cGy/h selection dose rate, where uncorrected survival relative to normal cells is lower by a factor of 50-150. Colonies recovered will provide valuable information regarding the genetic nature of their radiosensitivity (possibly involving chromosome stability, DNA repair, and/or cell cycle regulatory pathways), that may influence risks for cancer and heritable effects for a previously

  16. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  17. Subculture of Germ Cell-Derived Colonies with GATA4-Positive Feeder Cells from Neonatal Pig Testes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hoon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enrichment of spermatogonial stem cells is important for studying their self-renewal and differentiation. Although germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs have been successfully cultured from neonatal pig testicular cells under 31°C conditions, the short period of in vitro maintenance (<2 months limited their application to further investigations. To develop a culture method that allows for in vitro maintenance of GDCs for long periods, we subcultured the GDCs with freshly prepared somatic cells from neonatal pig testes as feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs were maintained up to passage 13 with the fresh feeder cells (FFCs and then frozen. Eight months later, the frozen GDCs could again form the colonies on FFCs as shown in passages 1 to 13. Immunocytochemistry data revealed that the FFCs expressed GATA-binding protein 4 (GATA4, which is also detected in the cells of neonatal testes and total testicular cells, and that the expression of GATA4 was decreased in used old feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs in each passage had germ and stem cell characteristics, and flow cytometric analyses revealed that ~60% of these cells were GFRα-1 positive. In conclusion, neonatal pig testes-derived GDCs can be maintained for long periods with GATA4-expressing testicular somatic cells.

  18. Tyrosine Phosphatase TpbA Controls Rugose Colony Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Dephosphorylating Diguanylate Cyclase TpbB

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, Mingming; Wood, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatase TpbA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 is a negative regulator of the diguanylate cyclase TpbB. Inactivation of TpbA caused rugose colony morphology which is related to cell persistence in clinical infections. We show here that TpbA is a dual specific tyrosine phosphatase, that TpbB is phosphorylated, and that TpbA controls phosphorylation of TpbB at both Tyr and Ser/Thr residues in vivo as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, TpbB is demonstrated to be a substrat...

  19. Implementation of the Bee Colony Optimization method for the design of fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work shows the results obtained after applying the Bee Colony Optimization algorithm in the design of fuel cells for a BWR. The algorithm that is implemented, works following the behavior that have the bees when pollinating a flowers field. The bees carry out an exhaustive analysis in the cell, so they leave generating diverse configurations where different fuel bars are placed with different uranium enrichments to reach a value mean, with a specific number of gadolinium bars. The behavior of the generated cell is evaluated by means of the use of the commercial code CASMO-4, which shows the variables that allow fixing if the cell fulfills the requirements. Such variables are the local potential peak factor and the neutrons multiplication factor in an infinite medium. (Author)

  20. Repopulation of murine alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells after whole body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the repopulation of alveolar macrophage colony-forming cells (AL-CFC) after a supra lethal irradiation and bone marrow transplantation in mice. The repopulation of both CFU-S (hemopoietic stem cells) and the committed stem cells for both granulocytes and monocytes (GM-CFC) in the femoral bone marrow occurred within 2 weeks. In sharp contrast, the repopulation of AL-CFC in the lung was a very slow process. The number of AL-CFC, which are more resistant to irradiation than both CFU-S and GM-CFC, was reduced to 1% of control values one day after the irradiation and recovered slowly with time. It took almost nine weeks for the number of AL-CFC per mouse to reach normal levels. The number of recoverable alveolar cells in these mice never dropped below 70% of control values and reached the nadir about two weeks after the irradiation. (UK)

  1. Agar Technique for the Cultivation In Vitro of Bone-Marrow Colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In solid-state agar cultures certain haemopoietic cells proliferate and form discrete colonies of 200 - 4000 cells. Colony formation is dependent on stimulation by the colony-stimulating factor, and this is achieved by (1) the use of a cell feeder layer, (2) the addition of conditioned medium, or (3) the addition of human or mouse serum or urine containing the factor. All colonies initially contain granulocytic cells which differentiate from myeloblasts to polymorphs as colony growth proceeds. Later colonies develop a second population of phagocytic mononuclear cells (macrophages). The colony-forming-system is simple, readily quantitated and highly reproducible. Linear dose responses occur between the dose of colony-stimulating factor and the number and size of colonies developing from a standard number of bone-marrow cells. In-vitro colony formation has been achieved with haemopoietic cells of the following species: mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit and human. In the adult mouse, colony-forming cells are located in the bone marrow, spleen and blood and in the embryo, in the yolk sac, liver and spleen. The colony-forming cell appears to be an early member of the granulocytic series. The colony-forming system has been used as a quantitative assay system: (1) to assay levels of colony-stimulating factor in serum and urine and in the chemical- characterization and purification of the factor; and (2) to enumerate the number of colony-forming cells in haemopoietic tissues in response to a variety of experimental procedures and disease states. Since the system is applicable to human bone-marrow cells, it should prove of value in the quantitative assay of (1) survival of human bone marrow on storage, and (2) bone-marrow content of granulocytic precursor cells in various disease states and following various types of therapy. The system is not suitable for the mass production in vitro of haemopoietic cells for therapeutic use. (author)

  2. Production of bioactive human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Jang, Yong-Suk;

    2006-01-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF), a human cytokine, was expressed in transgenic rice cell suspension culture. The hG-CSF gene was cloned into the rice expression vector containing the promoter, signal peptide, and terminator derived from a rice alpha-amylase gene Amy3D. Using...... particle bombardment-mediated transformation, hG-CSF gene was introduced into the calli of rice (Oryza sativa) cultivar Dong-jin. Expression of the hG-CSF gene was confirmed by ELISA and Northern blot analysis. The amount of recombinant hG-CSF accumulated in culture medium from transgenic rice cell...... suspension culture on the sugar starvation was determined by time series ELISA. Biological activity of the plant derived hG-CSF was confirmed by measuring the proliferation of the AML-193 cells, and was similar to that of the commercial Escherichia coli-derived hG-CSF. In this paper, we discuss the...

  3. Characteristics of the in vitro monocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells detected within mouse thymus and lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enigmatic presence of in vitro colony-forming cells (CFC) within the thymus (T) and lymph node (LN) organs prompted us to determine additional characteristics of this cell population in an effort to examine their relationship to other colony-forming cells (CFC, CFU-c) derived from several hematopoietic sites. Their cluster-to-colony ratio, survival in the absence of colony-stimulating activity (CSA), radiosensitivity, drug sensitivity, and fraction in cell cycle were compared to the same parameters for CFU-c derived from bone marrow (BM), spleen (SPL), and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and those CFC derived from thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal exudate (PE). When compared with the parameters characteristic of CFU-c derived from BM, SPL, and PBL, the T-CFC and LN-CFC differed markedly in cluster-to-colony ratio, sensitivity to absence of pregnant mouse uterus extract (PMUE) in culture, and rate of appearance of colonies in culture. Similarities were observed in sensitivity to radiation (D0 value) and cytotoxic drugs as well as the fraction in cell cycle. In comparison with the CFC derived from the peritoneal exudate, two similarities were observed; namely, the marked survival in the absence of CSA in culture and the same fraction in cell cycle. However, T-CFC and LN-CFC were significantly lower in cluster-to-colony ratio and more sensitive to 60Co γ radiation than PE-CFC. Data are provided on the nature of a subpopulation of the ubiquitous monocyte-macrophage CFC located in the thymus and lymph nodes of the mouse. The results indicated that the CFC is a heterogenous population in several respects and support the implication that the tissue microenvironment may alter the phenotypic expression of the resident CFC population

  4. Implementation of the Bee Colony Optimization method for the design of fuel cells; Implementacion del metodo Bee Colony Optimization para el diseno de celdas de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J.; Ortiz S, J. J., E-mail: jaime.esquivel@fi.uaemex.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The present work shows the results obtained after applying the Bee Colony Optimization algorithm in the design of fuel cells for a BWR. The algorithm that is implemented, works following the behavior that have the bees when pollinating a flowers field. The bees carry out an exhaustive analysis in the cell, so they leave generating diverse configurations where different fuel bars are placed with different uranium enrichments to reach a value mean, with a specific number of gadolinium bars. The behavior of the generated cell is evaluated by means of the use of the commercial code CASMO-4, which shows the variables that allow fixing if the cell fulfills the requirements. Such variables are the local potential peak factor and the neutrons multiplication factor in an infinite medium. (Author)

  5. Lamella formation and emigration from the water by a laboratory colony of Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY in flow-through system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. A. Dannemann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamella formation and emigration from the water were investigated in juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata reared at two temperatures in aquaria with a constant water flow. Most snails (97.4% reared at the lower temperature (21- C formed lamella at the shell aperture and emigrated from the water, whereas only 10.1% did so at 25- C. Eighty percent of emigrations at 21- C occurred within a period of 15 days, 70-85 days after hatching. A comparison of the studies done so far indicates that the phenomenon may be affected by the ageing of snail colonies kept in the laboratory and their geographic origin, rather than the rearing conditions. This hypothesis, however, requires experimental confirmation.

  6. All colonies of CHO-K1 cells surviving γ-irradiation contain non-viable cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses production of defective cells within clones arising from irradiated progenitor cells. It aims at answering the question whether lethal mutation result from a generalised effect which lowers the ability of all the progeny to divide successfully or whether it represents a late expressed but unique lethal defect induced by radiation which occurs in some cells only and which causes those cells only to cease dividing. Results obtained from autoradiographic analysis of cells within individual surviving colonies (i.e. containing more than 150 cells) suggests that some cells in all clones are not synthesizing DNA over a 9-h period and that the properties of non-synthesizing cells rises with increasing dose of radiation from less than 3% in controls to 80-85% after a progenitor dose of 12.5 Gy. because of the possibility that cells had longer division times post irradiation, these results were repeated using Ki67 antibody labelling, a technique that identifies cells which are in cycle. Results were similar. This suggests the non-labelled cells were not reproducing. Both techniques were also used to look at the % labelling of morphologically abnormal cells in colonies. Results suggested that up to 35% of these abnormal cells were actively cycling and about 20% were synthesizing DNA. Abnormal cells did not appear in subcultures of survivor progeny suggesting that they may have failed to replate successfully and may contribute to the lethally mutated population. The results are discussed in the context of their significance for survival curve analysis and for radiotherapy and radiation protection results. (author). 32 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M Kröpfl

    Full Text Available A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15. The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI, cortisol (Co and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6 in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality.

  8. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25103869

  9. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases circulating CD34-postive cells in patients with AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Dam-Larsen, S; Nielsen, C;

    1997-01-01

    circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34 cells) in patients with AIDS, using the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Eight patients with AIDS were treated with G-CSF for neutropenia (< 1.0 x 10(9)/l). Treatment consisted of daily subcutaneous injections with 300 micrograms...

  10. Role of distinct dimorphic transitions in territory colonizing and formation of yeast colony architecture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vopálenská, I.; Šťovíček, V.; Janderová, B.; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2010), s. 264-277. ISSN 1462-2912 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : SACCHAROMYCES - CEREVISIAE * CANDIDA-ALBICANS * PSEUDOHYPHAE FORMATION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.537, year: 2010

  11. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröpfl, Julia M; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  12. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis

  13. Changes in embryonic stem cell colony morphology and early differentiation markers driven by colloidal crystal topographical cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ji

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of materials properties to guide cell behaviour is an attractive option for regenerative medicine, where controlling stem cell behaviour is important for the establishment of a functioning cell population. A wide range of materials properties have been shown to influence many types of cells but little is known about the effects of topography on embryonic stem cells (ESCs. In order to advance this knowledge, we synthesised and characterised substrates formed of silica colloidal crystal (SCC microspheres to present highly ordered and reproducible topographical features from 120-600 nm in diameter. We found that, compared to cells cultured on flat glass, cells cultured on the SCC substrates retained transcription of stem cell (Dppa5a, Nanog, and Pou5f1 and endoderm (Afp, Gata4, Sox17, and Foxa2 markers more similar to undifferentiated ESCs, suggesting the substrates are restricting differentiation, particularly towards the endoderm lineage. Additionally, five days after seeding, we observed strikingly different colony morphology, with cells on the SCC substrates growing in spherical colonies approximately ten cells thick, while cells on glass were growing in flat monolayers. Colonies on the SCC substrates developed a central pit, which was never observed in cells cultured on glass, and expressed proteins related to epithelialisation. Together, these data demonstrate the potential of using topographical cues to control stem cell behaviour in vitro.

  14. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample. PMID:25843055

  15. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors [granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)] and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1α (IL-1α). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1α and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1α accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F1 mice. The combination of IL-1α and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression

  16. Bole of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the differentiation and expansion of monocytes and dendritic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, AWA; Smit, JW; Vellenga, E

    1999-01-01

    The present study focused on whether it is possible to expand monocytic cells from CD34(+) progenitor cells by using macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the absence and presence of mast cell growth factor (MGF) and IL-6. It was demonstrated that CD34(+) cells differentiate without expans

  17. The smell of water : grazer-induced colony formation in Scenedesmus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.

    1999-01-01

    In aquatic systems, the phytoplankton - zooplankton relation is of major importance because it is the first step in the pelagic food chain. It is well known that zooplankton feed with a highly variable success on phytoplankton, primarily owing to algal characteristics such as size, shape, cell wall

  18. Colonial today

    OpenAIRE

    Agarez, Ricardo; Beeckmans, Luce; Herbelin, Caroline; Lagae, Johan; Lee, Rachel; Matos, Madalena Cunha; Murray, Noëleen; van Roosmalen, Pauline K.M.; Volait, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Across the world, colonialism produced a substantial built legacy that in many cases continues to mark post-colonial urban landscapes. This theme issue addresses the ambivalences surrounding the position of colonial architecture as heritage in the present day, questioning the common assumption that architecture produced under colonial rule constitutes, by definition, a “dissonant heritage”. Presenting cases that highlight the myriad ways in which colonial architecture is re-used, re-appropria...

  19. The smell of water : grazer-induced colony formation in Scenedesmus

    OpenAIRE

    Lürling, M.

    1999-01-01

    In aquatic systems, the phytoplankton - zooplankton relation is of major importance because it is the first step in the pelagic food chain. It is well known that zooplankton feed with a highly variable success on phytoplankton, primarily owing to algal characteristics such as size, shape, cell wall texture, nutritional quality and toxicity. Algae are present in a broad variety of shapes and may express an enormous variability in their morphology, physiology and behavior depending on environme...

  20. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarel K. Gandhi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC, within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  1. Isolation, growth and identification of colony-forming cells with erythroid, myeloid, dendritic cell and NK-cell potential from human fetal liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muench Marcus

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and the process by which they differentiate into committed progenitors has been hampered by the lack of in vitro clonal assays that can support erythroid, myeloid and lymphoid differentiation. We describe a method for the isolation from human fetal liver of highly purified candidate HSCs and progenitors based on the phenotypes CD38-CD34++ and CD38+CD34++, respectively. We also describe a method for the growth of colony-forming cells (CFCs from these cell populations, under defined culture conditions, that supports the differentiation of erythroid, CD14/CD15+ myeloid, CD1a+ dendritic cell and CD56+ NK cell lineages. Flow cytometric analyses of individual colonies demonstrate that CFCs with erythroid, myeloid and lymphoid potential are distributed among both the CD38- and CD38+ populations of CD34++ progenitors.

  2. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Kubista, Mikael; Bonin, Michael; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Skutella, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs) and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen-/laminin+ binding-) selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human fibroblasts (hFibs) revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic germ- and pluripotency-associated gene expression profile with some similarities to hESCs and with a significant distinction from somatic hFibs. Genome-wide comparisons with microarray analysis confirmed that different haGSC colonies exhibited gene expression heterogeneity with more or less pluripotency. The results of this study confirm that haGSCs are adult stem cells with a specific molecular gene expression profile in vitro, related but not identical to true pluripotent stem cells. Under ES-cell conditions haGSC colonies could be selected and maintained in a partial pluripotent state at the molecular level, which may be related to their cell plasticity and potential to differentiate into cells of all germ layers. PMID:26649052

  3. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Conrad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen−/laminin+ binding- selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human fibroblasts (hFibs revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic germ- and pluripotency-associated gene expression profile with some similarities to hESCs and with a significant distinction from somatic hFibs. Genome-wide comparisons with microarray analysis confirmed that different haGSC colonies exhibited gene expression heterogeneity with more or less pluripotency. The results of this study confirm that haGSCs are adult stem cells with a specific molecular gene expression profile in vitro, related but not identical to true pluripotent stem cells. Under ES-cell conditions haGSC colonies could be selected and maintained in a partial pluripotent state at the molecular level, which may be related to their cell plasticity and potential to differentiate into cells of all germ layers.

  4. Conidial germination, infection structure formation, and early colony development of powdery mildew on poinsettia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celio, G J; Hausbeck, M K

    1998-02-01

    ABSTRACT Powdery mildew disease on poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) growing in commercial greenhouses was first observed in the United States in 1990 and has become an economically significant problem for poinsettia growers in the Midwest and northern United States since 1992. The temporal development of infection structures produced by conidial germ tubes of the pathogen (Oidium sp.) and the effect of high temperature on their development were investigated using poinsettia leaf disks placed in humidity chambers. Observations were made using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. At 20 degrees C (85% relative humidity), conidia germinated and formed an appressorium within 6 h of inoculation. Germination over time followed a monomolecular curve (r(2) = 0.77, P cells. When the incubation temperature was 30 degrees C, conidial germination and development of secondary germ tubes and a haustorium were reduced. PMID:18944978

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917354

  6. Effect of adrenalectomy on recipients of allogeneic lymphocytes on inactivation of endogenous colony-forming cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study of the killer functions of lymph node cells directed against endogenous colony-forming cells in adrenalectomized recipients in a genetic system with one-way incompatibility: parental line - F1 hybrid. Mice were irradiated with Co 60 gamma rays on the EGO-2 apparatus with dose rate from 200 to 250 R/min. The results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test. It can be tentatively suggested that the killer action of T lymphocytes on endogenous colonies was intensified in adrenal-ectomized recipients with endogenous hypocorticism, as a result of cooperation with the cortisol-sensitive subpopulation of T helper cells, of a change in the properties of the antigen-recognizing receptors, or an increase in the sensitivity of target cells to the killer action of T lymphocytes

  7. Changes in human bone marrow colony-forming cells following chemotherapy using an agar diffusion-chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been made of the effects of cyclophosphamide on the early granulocytic precursor cells in the marrow of patients receiving intermittent high doses (5 g) of the drug. This study was designed to investigate the effect of a single cytotoxic agent on normal granulocytic precursor cells; measurements have been made of the initial cytotoxicity, recovery, and changes in proliferation rate. The growth of granulocytic colonies was assayed in agar diffusion chambers. For this, bone marrow cells were suspended in semisolid agar medium, introduced into diffusion chambers for intraperitoneal incubation in radiated (900 rad 60Co γ) mice. The colonies present in the agar were scored 8-9 days later. In addition to measuring the effect of treatment on the colony-forming capacity of the patients' marrow, full dose-response curves were obtained by injecting graded doses of cyclophosphamide into chamber-bearing mice--the method allows some account to be taken of the continuous changes in drug activity, which occurs during its degradation in vivo. Comparison of these results with measurements of the sensitivity of mouse femoral cells under the same conditions or exposed to cyclophosphamide in situ in the donor mouse has been used to detect any effect of the culture environment or the response of the cells. Following treatment with cyclophosphamide, the incidence of colony precursor cells in the patients' marrow has been monitored. Changes in the proliferation rate of these cells during the recovery period have also been estimated by measuring their sensitivity to the S-phase specific drug, cytosine arabinoside. Information on the timing of changes in the incidence and proliferation rate of granulocytic precursor cells may provide guidelines for improving schedules of treatment in an attempt to reduce the attendant bone marrow toxicity

  8. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  9. YfiBNR mediates cyclic di-GMP dependent small colony variant formation and persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G Malone

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs, auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes Yfi

  10. Increased expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mediates mesenchymal stem cells recruitment after vascular injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong; LIU Ying-xi; XIEShuang-lun; DENG Bing-qing; WANG Jing-feng; NIE Ru-qiong

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that bone marrow-derived cells may significantly contribute to atherosclerosis,post-angioplasty restenosis and transplantation-associated vasculopathy.The responsible bone marrow (BM) cells and mechanisms regulating the mobilization of these cells are currently unclear.The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on injured arteries and its effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the process of vascular remodeling.Methods Balloon-mediated vascular injury was established in female rats (n=1O0) which received radioprotective whole female BM cells by tail vein injection and male MSCs through a tibial BM injection after lethal irradiation.The injured and contralateral carotid arteries were harvested at 3,7,14 and 28 days after treatment.Results Morphometric analysis indicated that intima to media area-ratio (I/M ratio) significantly increased at 28 days,0.899±-0.057 (P <0.01),compared with uninjured arteries.Combining fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemical analysis showed that a significant number of the neointimal cells derived from MSCs,(45.2±8.5)% at 28 days (P=0.01),compared with (23.5±6.3)% at 14 days.G-CSF was induced in carotid arteries subject to balloon angioplasty (fold mRNA change=8.67±0.63 at three days,relative G-CSF protein=0.657±-0.011 at three days,P <0.01,respectively,compared with uninjured arteries).G-CSF was chemotactic for MSCs but did not affect the differentiation of MSCs into smooth-muscle-like cells.Conclusion Increased expression of G-CSF by injured arteries plays an essential role in contribution to recruitment and homing of MSCs to the site of the arterial lesion.

  11. Role of Stem Cell Factor and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Remodeling during Liver Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanyin; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Han, Yuyan; DeMorrow, Sharon; Stokes, Allison; Staloch, Dustin; Venter, Julie; White, Melanie; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Reid, Lola M.; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Functional pluripotent characteristics have been observed in specific subpopulations of hepatic cells that express some of the known cholangiocyte markers. Although evidence indicates that specific cytokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors (GM-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) may be candidate treatments for liver injury, the role of these cytokines in intrahepatic biliary epithelium remodeling is unknown. Thus, our aim was to characterize the specific cytokines that regulate the remodeling potentials of cholangiocytes after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). The expression of the cytokines and their downstream signaling molecules was studied in rats after 70% PH by immunoblots, and in small and large murine cholangiocyte cultures (SMCCs and LMCCs) by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR. There was a significant and stable increase in SCF and GM-CSF levels until 7 days after PH. Real-time PCR analysis revealed significant increases of key remodeling molecules, such as S100A4 and miR-181b after SCF plus GM-CSF administration in SMCCs. SMCCs produced significant amounts of soluble and bound SCF and GM-CSF in response to TGF-β. When SMCCs were incubated with TGF-β plus anti–SCF and GM-CSF antibodies, there was a significant decrease in S100A4 expression. Furthermore, treatment of SMCCs with SCF + GM-CSF significantly increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) mRNA as well as miR-181b expression along with a reduction of metalloproteinase inhibitor 3 (TIMP-3). The levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and miR-181b were also up-regulated in rat liver and isolated cholangiocytes after PH. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that altered expression of SCF and GM-CSF following PH can contribute to biliary remodeling (for example post-transplantation) by functional deregulation of activity of key signaling intermediates involved in cell expansion and multipotent differentiation. PMID:21932404

  12. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  13. Colony formation of C57BL/6J mice in visible burrow system: Identification of eusocial behaviors in a background strain for genetic animal models of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Deficits in social interaction are primary characteristics of autism, which has strong genetic components. Genetically-manipulated mouse models may provide a useful research tool to advance the investigation of genes associated with autism. To identify these genes using mouse models, behavioral assays for social relationships in the background strains must be developed. The present study examined colony formation in groups of one male and three female mice (Experiment 1) and, groups of three ...

  14. Tritiated thymidine and deoxycytidine suicide of mouse hemopoietic colony forming cells (CFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant enhancement of tritiated dCyd suicide occurred when unlabelled dThd was added to cultures of mouse monocytic colony-forming cells. Incorporation experiments supported the suicide experiments in that incorporation of tritiated dCyd into DNA was significantly increased. One hundred micromolar dCyd significantly reduced the radiotoxicity of 0.3 μCi of tritiated dThd; incorporation experiments indicated a dose-related reduction in the incorporation of tritiated dThd into DNA with the addition of 1-100 μM unlabelled dCyd. The addition of 1 μM aminopterin reversed the effect of 100 μM deoxycytidine; viz., incorporation of dThd into DNA was 90% of controls. Aminopterin had a similar effect on deoxyuridine reversal of tritiated dThd incorporation into DNA. Aminopterin had no effect on the reduction of tritiated dThd incorporation into DNA due to the addition of 100 μM unlabelled thymidine. Unlabelled ribonucleosides, Urd and Cyd, did not significantly affect the suicide pattern of tritiated dThd or dCyd when they were added to CFC cultures. Unlabelled deoxyribonucleosides, dThd or dCyd, did not significantly affect the suicide pattern of either tritiated Cyd or Urd when they were added to cultures containing tritiated ribonucleosides. Unlabelled Urd or Cyd was effective in reversing the suicide due to tritiated Urd or Cyd. (author)

  15. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation

  16. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Geberth; Marc-Thorsten Hütt

    2009-01-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers). This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this conce...

  17. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  18. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Conrad; Hossein Azizi; Maryam Hatami; Mikael Kubista; Michael Bonin; Jörg Hennenlotter; Karl-Dietrich Sievert; Thomas Skutella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs) and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen−/laminin+ binding-) selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human fibroblasts (hFibs) revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic ge...

  19. The influence of interleukin-2, feeder cells, and timing of irradiation on the radiosensitivity of human T lymphocytes assessed by the colony-forming assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosensitivity of human lymphocytes was investigated by the method of colony formation in the absence of interleukin-2 (IL2) and feeder cells, both of which enhance growth of T-cell colonies. The shape of the survival curve and the radiosensitivity was shown to depend upon the ability of lymphocytes to produce IL2: the survival curve for lymphocytes that were the most competent producers of IL2 is the closest to linearity; the lymphocytes that were poor producers show biphasic survival curves. The radiosensitivity of the lymphocytes from the first group is less than that of the latter, when the comparison is based on the first part of the biphasic survival curve. This is more easily seen when cultures are irradiated 24 h after stimulation by phytohemagglutinin (the time of the peak IL2 production) than when cultures are irradiated 2 h before stimulation. This study demonstrates that growth conditions influence the response of lymphocytes to irradiation and that optimal growth conditions result in a linear survival curve

  20. Effects of obstetric factors and storage temperatures on the yield of endothelial colony forming cells from umbilical cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Coldwell, Kate E.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Kean, Jennifer; Khoo, Cheen P.; Tsaknakis, Grigorios; Smythe, Jon; Watt, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    As umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC), our aim was twofold: (1) to examine potential obstetric selection criteria for achieving the highest ECFC yields from UCB units, and (2) to determine whether transient storage temperatures of fresh UCB and cryopreservation of UCB units affected ECFC yield and function. ECFC quality was assessed before and after cryopreservation by their clonogenic proliferative potential. Of the 20 factors examined, pla...

  1. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  2. Selective assessment of in vitro radiosensitivity of tumour cells and fibroblasts from single tumour biopsies using immunocytochemical identification of colonies in the soft agar clonogenic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assumed selective growth of tumour cells has formed the basis for the use of the soft agar clonogenic assay to test in vitro radio- and chemosensitivity of tumours. However, recent studies have demonstrated that fibroblasts proliferate in soft agar in addition to tumour cells. The present study was initiated to quantify the contaminating growth of non-malignant cells in the modified form of the Courtenay-Mills soft agar assay, in order to establish a reliable assay for estimating tumour cell radiosensitivity in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. DNA flow cytometry analysis confirmed that 'tumour fibroblasts' (fibroblasts obtained from tumour biopsies) grow in soft agar. In contrast, white blood cells did not form colonies. Different media were tested with soft agar, but a selective medium for tumour cells was not found. Therefore, a colony filter-technique combined with an immunocytochemical analysis was developed to quantify the number of tumour cell and fibroblast colonies. In 12 tumour biopsies, 2-33% of the colonies were Cytokeratin AE1-3 positive, whereas 83-100% of the colonies were 5B5 fibroblast antibody positive. The parameter normally reported, the overall SF2 (surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy) based on colonies in agar, was found to be statistically significantly correlated to the fibroblast SF2, but not to the tumour cell SF2. The overall SF2 was significantly different from the tumour cell SF2 in half of the tumours. Furthermore, the tumour cell SF2 was not correlated to fibroblast SF2. In consequence of our findings, correcting for fibroblast contamination is a necessity, when studying in vitro sensitivity of tumour cells. Combining the soft agar clonogenic assay with the new colony filter-technique and the immunocytochemical analysis appear to be useful for making this routine correction and for measuring the in vitro radiosensitivity of both tumour cells and fibroblasts from single tumour biopsies, which is of interest in future

  3. Interleukin 3 perfusion in W/Wv mice allows the development of macroscopic hematopoietic spleen colonies and restores cutaneous mast cell number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetically anemic W/Wv mice are characterized by the inability of their bone marrow cells to form macroscopic pluripotent hematopoietic colonies in the spleen of irradiated recipients upon transfer (colony-forming units). Furthermore, they almost totally lack mast cells, notably in the skin. In the present study, we have tested the effect of recombinant murine interleukin 3 (rmIL-3) on W/Wv mice hematopoiesis. Transfer of W/Wv bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated recipients perfused with rmIL-3 is followed by the appearance of macroscopic spleen colonies. Moreover, perfusion of rmIL-3 in W/Wv mice: (a) restores almost normal total numbers of hematopoietic precursors (colony-forming cells), but without modification of anemia; and (b) leads to the appearance of a normal number of mastocytes in the skin

  4. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...... myocardial infarction (AMI). BACKGROUND: Experimental studies and early-phase clinical trials suggest that stem cell mobilization by G-CSF may have a positive impact on cardiac regeneration after AMI. The role of G-CSF in patients with AMI remains unclear considering the inconsistent results of several...

  5. A stimulator of proliferation of spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) in the bone marrow of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence and activity of a spleen colony - forming cell (CFU-S) proliferation stimulator was investigated in rat bone marrow after irradiation. The dose dependent increase in cytosine arabinoside induced cell dealth of normal mouse bone marrow. The results demonstrate the existence of a CFU-S proliferation stimulator in rat bone marrow similar to that originally found as a macrophage product in regenarating mouse bone marrow. The CFU-S proliferation stimulator activity was not associated with the presence of interleukin - 1,2, or 6 like activities in the material tested

  6. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  7. Information use in colonial living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living. PMID:25882618

  8. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  9. Colony specificity and chemotaxis in the compound ascidian Botryllus schlosseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Francesca; Sabbadin, Armando; Zaniolo, Giovanna; Ballarin, Loriano

    2006-11-01

    We re-investigated the behavior of hemocytes during the non-fusion (rejection) reaction between genetically incompatible colonies of the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. In the course of the reaction, hemocytes - mainly morula cells - crowd inside the blind ends of marginal vascular vessels (known as ampullae) of the colonial leading edge (LE) facing the foreign colony which suggests the occurrence of chemotactic attraction of circulating hemocytes towards the ampullar lumen. Then, cells migrate, through the ampullar tips, into the partially fused tunics and contribute to the formation of the necrotic spots along the contact borders which characterize the reaction. Studies on histological sections clearly indicate that, although morula cell concentration is always higher in ampullae of the LE than in those of the lateral (L) part of the colony, their frequency significantly increases in LE ampullae of rejecting colonies with respect to LE ampullae of both fusing and isolated colonies. In addition, in vitro chemotaxis experiments demonstrated that blood plasma from incompatible colonies can stimulate morula cell migration through polycarbonate filters and this passage is inhibited by antibodies raised against mammalian pro-inflammatory cytokines. The possible nature and role of molecules recognized by anti-cytokine antibodies in hemocyte migration are discussed. PMID:16962802

  10. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Uzumaki, H; Okabe, T.; Sasaki, N; Hagiwara, K.; Takaku, F; Tobita, M.; Yasukawa, K; Ito, S.; Umezawa, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, we synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the 125I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of 125I-labeled K...

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL). TNF-α might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-κB and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed

  12. Cell Formation Techniques – A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar Arora,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular manufacturing system has been proved a vital approach for batch and job shop production systems. Group technology has been an essential tool for developing a cellular manufacturing system. Thepaper aims to discuss various cell formation techniques and highlights the significant research work done in past over the years and attempts to points out the gap in research of past studies.

  13. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor/NAMPT/visfatin and its role in inflammation-related bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschen, Alexander R.; Geiger, Sabine; Gerner, Romana [Christian Doppler Research Laboratory for Gut Inflammation and Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Tilg, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.tilg@i-med.ac.at [Christian Doppler Research Laboratory for Gut Inflammation and Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-08-07

    Chronic inflammation affects bone metabolism and is commonly associated with the presence of osteoporosis. Bone loss is directed by various immune mediators such as the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1-beta or interferon-gamma. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF)/nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)/visfatin is a pleiotropic mediator acting as growth factor, cytokine and enzyme involved in energy and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism. PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin has been recently demonstrated to exert several pro-inflammatory functions. We studied serum levels of PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their relation with bone mineral density (BMD). Furthermore, we were interested whether PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin affects osteoclastogenesis and involved mediators. PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin serum levels were increased in patients with IBD, correlated positively with disease activity and negatively with BMD, especially in the lumbar spine. Osteoclast precursor cells were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells after stimulation with various growth factors such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and soluble ligand of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). In these in vitro studies, PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin suppressed osteoclastogenesis and inhibited the differentiation of osteoclast precursors into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleated cells. These effects were paralleled by the suppression of the osteoclast typical markers RANK, nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) and cathepsin-K. This is the first report demonstrating a potential role for this important cytokine/enzyme in inflammation-related bone disease.

  14. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago M Fortunato

    Full Text Available Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin. The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2 in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF (25-100 ng/ml rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  15. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzumaki, Hiroya; Okabe, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Norio; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takaku, Fumimaro; Tobita, Masahito; Yasukawa, Kaoru (Univ. of Tokyo, Hongo (Japan)); Ito, Seiga (Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd., Machida, Tokyo (Japan)); Umezawa, Yoshimi (Juntendo Univ. School of Medicine, Hongo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the {sup 125}I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4{degree}C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to {sup 125}I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells.

  16. Identification and characterization of receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on human placenta and trophoblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since radioiodination of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is difficult, the authors synthesized a mutein of human G-CSF that retains full biological activity and receptor-binding capacity for at least 2 weeks after radioiodination. Receptors for human G-CSF were characterized in the plasma membrane fraction from the human term placenta (human placental membranes) and trophoblastic cells by using the 125I-labeled mutein of human G-CSF (KW-2228). The specific binding of 125I-labeled KW-2228 to placental membranes was pH-dependent, with maximal specific binding at pH 7.8; it increased linearly with protein to 3.7 mg of protein per ml and was both time- and temperature-dependent, with maximal binding at 4 degree C after a 24-hr incubation. When the authors examined the ability of hematopoietic growth factors to inhibit 125I-labeled KW-2228 binding, they found that KW-2228 and intact human G-CSF ihibited 125I-labeled KW-2228 binding, whereas erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor did not. Scatchard analysis revealed a single receptor type. The human G-CSF receptors on human placental membranes were shown to consist of two molecular species that could be specifically cross-linked to 125I-labeled KW-2228. Human trophoblastic cells, T3M-3, also possessed a single receptor for G-CSF. They have identified the receptor for human G-CSF on human placental membranes and trophoblastic cells

  17. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: ► Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. ► Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. ► Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it supported buffalo EBs formation, their subsequent differentiation could prove to

  18. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taru Sharma, G., E-mail: gts553@gmail.com [Reproductive Physiology Laboratory, Division of Physiology and Climatology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243 122, Bareilly, U.P. (India); Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G. [Reproductive Physiology Laboratory, Division of Physiology and Climatology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar-243 122, Bareilly, U.P. (India)

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  19. The granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine against metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-tong Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MB49 bladder cancer cell vaccine was effective against bladder cancer in the mice model in previous studies. However, part of the tumors regrew as the vaccine could not eliminate the cancer stem cells (CSCs. MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs were isolated by a combination of the limited dilution method and the serum free culture medium method. MCSCs possessed higher expression of CD133, CD44, OCT4, NANOG, and ABCG2, the ability of differentiation, higher proliferative abilities, lower susceptibility to chemotherapy, greater migration in vitro, and stronger tumorigenic abilities in vivo. Then streptavidin–mouse granulocyte macrophage–colony stimulating factor (SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine was prepared. SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine extended the survival of the mice and inhibited the growth of tumor in protective, therapeutic, memorial and specific immune response experiments. The level of immunoglobulin G and the ratio of dendritic cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were highest in the experimental group when compared to those in other four control groups, as well as for the cytotoxicity assay. We demonstrated that SA–mGM–CSF MCSCs vaccine induces an antitumor immune response to metastatic bladder cancer.

  20. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  1. Radiosensitivity of mouse haemopoietic stem cells that form colonies 8 and 12 days after transplantation of bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of macro- and microcolonies was used to study the radiosensitivity of CFU-S that form early (8 days) and late (12 days) splenic colonies after transplantation of syngeneic bone marrow fatally exposed mice: no significant differences were found. Median lethal doses (D0) for CFU-S-8 and CFU-S-12 were 1.03 and 1.13 Gy for microtest and 0.99 and 1.116 Gy for microtest respectively

  2. ENHANCEMENT OF NIH3T3 CELL PROLIFERATION BY EXPRESSING MACROPHAGE COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR IN NUCLEI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹震宇; 吴克复; 李戈; 林永敏; 张斌; 郑国光

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of nuclear M-CSF on the process of tumorigenesis. Methods: Functional part of M-CSF cDNA was inserted into an eukaryotic expression plasmid pCMV/myc/nuc, which can add three NLS to the C-terminal of the expressed protein and direct the protein into the cell nuclei. The constructed plasmid was transferred into NIH3T3 cells and the cell clones were selected by G-418 selection. Cell clones stable expressing target protein were identified by RT-PCR, ABC immunohistochemistry assay and Western blot. Cell growth kinetics analyses through growth curves, cell doubling time, MTT test and anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) inhibiting cell growth test were performed to identify cells proliferation potential. Results: The transfected cells showed elevated proliferation potential over the control cells. Conclusion: Abnormal appearance of M-CSF in nucleus could enhance cell proliferation, which suggests that cytokine isoforms within cell nucleus might play transcription factor-like role.

  3. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    polyelectrolyte layer functioning as the surface dipole formation layer to provide better electrical contact with the photoactive layer. Due to the effectiveness of the conjugated polyelectrolyte layer, performance improvement was also observed. Furthermore, other issues regarding the semi-transparent tandem solar cells (e.g., photocurrent matching, exterior color tuning, and transparency tuning) are all explored to optimize best performance. In Chapter 5 and 6, the architectures of double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells are explored. Theoretically, triple-junction tandem solar cells with three photoactive absorbers with cascaded energy bandgaps have the potential to achieve higher performance, in comparison with double-junction tandem solar cells. Such expectations can be ascribed to the minimized carrier thermalization loss and further improved light absorption. However, the design of triple-junction solar cells often involves sophisticated multiple layer deposition as well as substantial optimization. Therefore, there is a lack of successful demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming the double-junction counterparts. To solve the incompatible issues related to the layer deposition in the fabrication, we proposed a novel architecture of inverted-structure tandem solar cells with newly designed interconnecting layers. Our design of interconnecting layers does not only focus on maintaining the orthogonal solution processing advantages, but also provides an excellent compatibility in the energy level alignment to allow different absorber materials to be used. Furthermore, we also explored the light management inside the double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells. The study of light management was carried out through optical simulation method based transfer matrix formalism. The intention is to obtain a balanced photocurrent output from each subcells inside the tandem solar cell, thus the minimal recombination loss at the contact of interconnecting

  4. Comparison of Cell formation techniques in Cellular manufacturing using three cell formation algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Kumar Giri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present era of globalization and competitive market, cellular manufacturing has become a vital tool for meeting the challenges of improving productivity, which is the way to sustain growth. Getting best results of cellular manufacturing depends on the formation of the machine cells and part families. This paper examines advantages of ART method of cell formation over array based clustering algorithms, namely ROC-2 and DCA. The comparison and evaluation of the cell formation methods has been carried out in the study. The most appropriate approach is selected and used to form the cellular manufacturing system. The comparison and evaluation is done on the basis of performance measure as grouping efficiency and improvements over the existing cellular manufacturing system is presented.

  5. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  6. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state. (paper)

  7. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  8. Genistein promotes endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC bioactivities and cardiac regeneration in myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hun Lee

    Full Text Available Although stem cell-mediated treatment of ischemic diseases offers significant therapeutic promise, the limitation in the therapeutic efficacy of transplanted stem cells in vivo because of poor engraftment remains a challenge. Several strategies aimed at improving survival and engraftment of stem cells in the ischemic myocardium have been developed, such as cell transplantation in combination with growth factor delivery, genetic modification of stem cells, and/or cell therapy using scaffolds. To improve therapeutic efficacy, we investigated the effects of genistein on the engraftment of transplanted ECFCs in an acute myocardial ischemia model.We found that genistein treatment enhanced ECFCs' migration and proliferation, which was accompanied by increases in the expression of ILK, α-parvin, F-actin, and phospholylation of ERK 1/2 signaling. Transplantation of genistein-stimulates ECFCs (GS-ECFCs into myocardial ischemic sites in vivo induced cellular proliferation and secretion of angiogenic cytokines at the ischemic sites and thereby enhanced neovascularization and decreased myocardial fibrosis as well as improved cardiac function, as shown by echocardiography. Taken together, these data suggest that pretreatment of ECFCs with genistein prior to transplantation can improve the regenerative potential in ischemic tissues, providing a novel strategy in adult stem cell therapy for ischemic diseases.

  9. Radiosensitivity of Ehrlich ascites tumor clonogenic cells forming colonies in agar cultures in diffuse chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the dependence of survival of Ehrlich ascites tumor clonogenic cells on the 3d and 7th days following inoculation upon radiation dose (60Co-γ-rays) delivered under well oxygenated in vitro conditions. No differences were detected in radiosensitivity of 3- and 7-day Ehrlich ascites tumor cells: in both cases, the ''dose - effect'' curves were S-shaped with a small shoulder and close D0 values

  10. Alterations in the formation of endogeneous spleen-colony and peripheric blood in dose-range of haematologic radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haematologic consequences of gamma-irradiation were studied in CR-pair forming mice (B10LP/Sn and C57B1/10ScSn). Great attention was paid to the determination of standard haematologic values of animals of different ages. The radiosensitivity of blood cells was found to decrease in the following order: large lymphocytes > thrombocytes > small lymphocytes > granulocytes > reticulocytes > erythrocytes. It is concluded that the capacity of extramedullar haematopoiesis is very small. (L.E.)

  11. Effect of low-output He-Ne laser rays on the colony-forming ability of the cells of mice lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of low energy He-Ne laser radiation on the survival of mouse lymphoma P388 cell cultures was studied on the basis of the colony forming ability. Irradiation with 1.3 and 9 joule of 5 and 10 mW He-Ne lasers, resp., seemed to cause a relatively low cell necrosis. The survival curve did not show the shape characteristic of ionizing radiation. (author)

  12. Radiation induced formation of giant cells (Saccharomyces uvarum). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-irradiated yeast cells (Saccharomyces uvarum) grown in liquid media stop mitosis and form giant cells. Chitin ring formation, being a prerequisite for cell separation, was studied by fluorescence microscopy using Calcofluor White, a chitin specific dye. Experiments with inhibitors of DNA synthesis (hydroxyurea) and chitin synthesis (polyoxin D) demonstrate chitin ring formation to be dependent on DNA synthesis, whereas bud formation is independent of DNA synthesis and chitin ring formation respectively. Basing on these results the formation of X-ray induced giant cells implies one DNA replication which in turn induces the formation of only one chitin ring between mother cell and giant bud. Obviously no septum can be formed. Thus cell separation does not occur, but the bud already formed, produces another bud demonstrating that bud formation itself is independent of DNA synthesis. (orig.)

  13. The hematopoietic factor GM-CSF (Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor promotes neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäbitz Wolf-Rüdiger

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in the generation of granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells from hematopoietic progenitor cells. We have recently demonstrated that GM-CSF has anti-apoptotic functions on neurons, and is neuroprotective in animal stroke models. Results The GM-CSF receptor α is expressed on adult neural stem cells in the rodent brain, and in culture. Addition of GM-CSF to NSCs in vitro increased neuronal differentiation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by quantitative PCR, reporter gene assays, and FACS analysis. Conclusion Similar to the hematopoietic factor Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, GM-CSF stimulates neuronal differentiation of adult NSCs. These data highlight the astonishingly similar functions of major hematopoietic factors in the brain, and raise the clinical attractiveness of GM-CSF as a novel drug for neurological disorders.

  14. OCT4 expression in outgrowth colonies derived from porcine inner cell masses and epiblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M A; Wolf, X A; Schauser, K;

    2011-01-01

    relationship between OCT4 expression and embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like morphology. A total of 104 zona pellucida-enclosed and 101 hatched blastocysts were subjected to four different methods of ICM and epiblast isolation, respectively: Manual isolation, immunosurgery, immunosurgery with manual cleaning, or...... whole blastocyst culture. OCs were established on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells and categorized according to morphology and OCT4 staining. Although all isolation methods resulted in ESC-like OCs, immunosurgery with manual cleaning yielded significantly higher rates of ICM/epiblast attachment...... and subsequent ESC-like morphology, whereas no significant difference was found between ICM and epiblasts with respect to these characteristics. All ESC-like OCs showed nuclear OCT4 staining and expression of OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 as evaluated by RT-PCR. Upon initial passages, the expression of...

  15. Cell signaling and transcription factor genes expressed during whole body regeneration in a colonial chordate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkevich Baruch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The restoration of adults from fragments of blood vessels in botryllid ascidians (termed whole body regeneration [WBR] represents an inimitable event in the chordates, which is poorly understood on the mechanistic level. Results To elucidate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, a subtracted EST library for early WBR stages was previously assembled, revealing 76 putative genes belonging to major signaling pathways, including Notch/Delta, JAK/STAT, protein kinases, nuclear receptors, Ras oncogene family members, G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signaling. RT-PCR on selected transcripts documented specific up-regulation in only regenerating fragments, pointing to a broad activation of these signaling pathways at onset of WBR. The followed-up expression pattern of seven representative transcripts from JAK/STAT signaling (Bl-STAT, the Ras oncogene family (Bl-Rap1A, Bl-Rab-33, the protein kinase family (Bl-Mnk, Bl-Cnot, Bl-Slit and Bl-Bax inhibitor, revealed systemic and site specific activations during WBR in a sub-population of circulatory cells. Conclusion WBR in the non-vertebrate chordate Botrylloides leachi is a multifaceted phenomenon, presided by a complex array of cell signaling and transcription factors. Above results, provide a first insight into the whole genome molecular machinery of this unique regeneration process, and reveal the broad participation of cell signaling and transcription factors in the process. While regeneration involves the participation of specific cell populations, WBR signals are systemically expressed at the organism level.

  16. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Rae Rho; Mi-young Park; Seungbum Kang

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs ...

  17. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  18. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation. PMID:26907750

  19. Deadly competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'Er, Avraham

    2011-03-01

    As a result of stress due to nutrient limitation or antibiotics, competing individual bacteria within a single colony may lyse sibling cells to release nutrients (cannibalism) or DNA (fratricide). However, we have recently shown that competition is not limited to individuals, but can occur at the colony level [A. Be'er et al., PNAS 106, 428 (2009); A. Be'er et al., PNAS 107, 6258 (2010).] In response to the presence of an encroaching sibling colony, Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria secrete a lethal protein, lysing cells at the interface between the colonies. Analysis of the proteins secreted by these competing sibling colonies, combined with a mathematical model, shows how colonies maintain their growth by self-regulating the secretion of two proteins: subtilisin (a well-known growth promoter), and Slf (a previously unknown protein, which is lethal). The results also explain why a single colony is not inhibited by its own secretions.

  20. Cell-cell interactions impacts on the rate of swarm expansion and the edge shape of a colony swarming Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Tierra, Giordano; Xu, Zhiliang; Shrout, Joshua; Alber, Mark

    Collective motion has been observed by several bacterial species including the pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa. A flagellum at the pole is known to generate a self-propulsion motion. However, the role of type IV pili (TFP), distributed on the cell membrane, during swarming needs to be investigated in more details. In this work we introduce a model that combines the hydrodynamic and biophysical interactions in order to study the impact of the TFP interactions on swarming behavior of the colony. The model describes the motion and interactions of rod-shaped self propelled bacteria inside a thin liquid film. It also includes the equations describing the production and diffusion of surfactant rhamnolipids that is responsible for extraction of water from substrate, and Marangoni driven expansion of the thin liquid film by altering the surface tension. We show that TFP interactions are responsible for slower expansion rate of colonies of TFP deficient mutants compared to wild type. Experimental observations were used to calibrate the model and verify the model assumptions and predictions.

  1. Changes in the Frequency and In Vivo Vessel Forming Ability of Rhesus Monkey Circulating Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC) Across the Lifespan (Birth to Aged)

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, W. Chris; Leapley, Alyssa C.; Huang, Lan; Critser, Paul J.; Mead, Laura E.; Zeng, Pingyu; Prater, Daniel; Ingram, David A.; Tarantal, Alice F; Yoder, Mervin C.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel hierarchy of human endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), which are functionally defined by their proliferative and clonogenic potential and in vivo vessel forming ability. Utilizing previously established clonogenic assays for defining different subpopulations of human ECFC, we now show that a hierarchy of ECFC, identical to the human system, can be isolated from the peripheral blood of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and that the frequency of the circulating ce...

  2. Production of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor by knocking into the active immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus in the hybridoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwana, Yoshihisa; Funayama, Kikuko; Miyaji, Hiromasa; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Yoshida, Hajime; Itoh, Seiga

    2001-01-01

    The hybridoma cell line KM50 originally produces a monoclonal antibody at a concentration of ∼40 mg ml-1 in ascites. To investigate the possibility to apply this expression system to the production of useful proteins, the cDNA encoding human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was inserted by homologous recombination into just downstream of the promoter of the active immunoglobulin heavy chain gene of KM50. Site directed integration of targeting DNAs resulted in the disruption of expression...

  3. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the capacity of hematopoietic progenitor cells for generation of lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Clark, D R; Hutchings, M;

    1999-01-01

    An obstacle to stem cell gene therapy for AIDS is the limited numbers of hematopoietic progenitors available. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for mobilization of progenitors, but little is known about the functional characteristics of mobilized progenitors, and immature and T...... cell progenitors may not be mobilized. This study examined the effect of G-CSF on the function of progenitors. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients received G-CSF (filgrastim, 300 microgram/day) for 5 days. Absolute numbers of immature and T cell progenitors did not increase. The ability...

  4. Colony specificity in Botrylloides leachi. I. Morphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Zaniolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied colony specificity in the colonial ascidian Botrylloides leachi which, as in other botryllid ascidians, leads to either fusion or non-fusion between contacting colonies. Fusion requires the prior disappearance of contacting tunic cuticles and contact between facing ampullar epithelia. The epithelial cells of the ampullar tip show “pad regions” rich in ribosomes, which contribute to the synthesis of new tunic and cuticle. Blood cells, mainly phagocytes and pigment cells, increase their concentrations inside the ampullar lumen and phagocytes can cross the ampullar epithelium and enter the tunic, where they can contribute to the digestion of tunic cuticles and cells of the ampullar epithelium in order to establish a common circulation. Non-fusion reaction, as studied in the colony allorecognition assay, resembles the subcuticular rejection described in Japanese Botrylloides, characterised by limited tunic fusion, hemocyte leakage, and necrotic spots. Conversely, in the cut surface assay, a more intense cytotoxic reaction is observed along the contact border. In this case, morula cells crowd massively inside the facing ampullae, enter the tunic, and release their vacuolar contents which are probably required for the formation of necrotic spots.

  5. Pro-angiogenic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells and Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Pathological Angiogenesis of Bronchial and Pulmonary Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Heng; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of angiogenesis is a common feature of many disease processes. Vascular remodeling is believed to depend on the participation of endothelial progenitor cells, but the identification of endothelial progenitors in postnatal neovascularization remains elusive. Current understanding posits a role for circulating pro-angiogenic hematopoietic cells, which interact with local endothelial cells to establish an environment that favors angiogenesis in physiologic and pathophysiologic resp...

  6. Enhancement of the grafting efficiency of transplanted marrow cells by preincubation with interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the grafting efficiency of transplanted murine hematopoietic progenitors, we briefly preincubated mouse bone marrow cells with interleukin-3 (IL-3) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) ex vivo before their transplantation into irradiated recipients. This treatment was translated into an increase in the seeding efficiency of colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) and CFU-GM after transplantation. Not only was the concentration of CFU-S in the tibia increased 2 and 24 hours after transplantation, but the total cell number and CFU-S and CFU-GM concentrations were persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups 1 to 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, the survival of animals as a function of transplanted cell number was persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups compared with controls. The data indicate that the pretreatment of marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF before transplantation increases the seeding efficiency of hematopoietic stem cells and probably other progenitor cells after transplantation. This increased efficiency may be mediated by upward modulation of homing receptors. Therefore, ex vivo preincubation of donor marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF may be a useful tactic in bone marrow transplantation

  7. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast

  8. Regulatory T cell identity: formation and maintenance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xudong; Zheng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are central to the maintenance of immune homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 is essential for specifying the Treg cell lineage during development, and continued expression of Foxp3 in mature Treg cells is necessary for suppressive function. Treg cells can lose Foxp3 expression under certain conditions, and this is associated with autoimmune pathology. Here we review recent insights into the mechanisms that maintain Treg cell stability and function, and place ...

  9. Ant colony for TSP

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yinda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate Ant Colony Algorithm for the traveling salesman problem (TSP). Ants of the artificial colony are able to generate successively shorter feasible tours by using information accumulated in the form of a pheromone trail deposited on the edges of the TSP graph. This paper is based on the ideas of ant colony algorithm and analysis the main parameters of the ant colony algorithm. Experimental results for solving TSP problems with ant colony algorithm show great...

  10. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation

  11. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju, E-mail: biohjk@knu.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Clinical Trial Center, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye-Jin [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Clinical Trial Center, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kyung-Ae [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Skeletal Diseases Genome Research Center, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Clinical Trial Center, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Kyoungho [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Shin-Yoon [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Skeletal Diseases Genome Research Center, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young-Ran, E-mail: yry@knu.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, Clinical Trial Center, BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  12. Predicting the distribution of spiral waves from cell properties in a developmental-path model of Dictyostelium pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Geberth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the model systems of biological pattern formation. One of the most successful answers to the challenge of establishing a spiral wave pattern in a colony of homogeneously distributed D. discoideum cells has been the suggestion of a developmental path the cells follow (Lauzeral and coworkers. This is a well-defined change in properties each cell undergoes on a longer time scale than the typical dynamics of the cell. Here we show that this concept leads to an inhomogeneous and systematic spatial distribution of spiral waves, which can be predicted from the distribution of cells on the developmental path. We propose specific experiments for checking whether such systematics are also found in data and thus, indirectly, provide evidence of a developmental path.

  13. Models for Natural Killer Cell Repertoire Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramit Mehr

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells lyse only cells that do not express sufficient levels of self class I MHC molecules. Inhibition of lysis is mediated by inhibitory receptors expressed by NK cells, such as the murine Ly49 receptors, that bind to MHC class I molecules. Since inhibitory receptor genes and MHC class I genes are located on different chromosomes, and are hence not automatically co-inherited, NK cells apparently adapt to the MHC environment during their development. Two models have been proposed to account for this “education” process of NK cells. The two-step selection model postulates that developing NK cells initiate the stable expression of a random set of Ly49 genes, and then undergo two selection steps, one for cells that express a sufficient number of self-MHC receptors, and one against cells that express too many inhibitory receptors. The sequential model postulates that a cell keeps initiating the stable expression of additional inhibitory receptors until a sufficient expression level of self-MHC specific receptors is reached, and the cell matures. In this study we implement both models in computer simulations, and compare simulation results to experimental data, in order to evaluate the relative plausibility of the two models.

  14. Pattern formation by vascular mesenchymal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Petrasek, Danny; Boström, Kristina; Demer, Linda L.

    2004-01-01

    In embryogenesis, immature mesenchymal cells aggregate and organize into patterned tissues. Later in life, a pathological recapitulation of this process takes place in atherosclerotic lesions, when vascular mesenchymal cells organize into trabecular bone tissue within the artery wall. Here we show that multipotential adult vascular mesenchymal cells self-organize in vitro into patterns that are predicted by a mathematical model based on molecular morphogens interacting in a reaction-diffusion...

  15. Survival of clonogenic cells of Lewis lung carcinoma forming colonies in agar cultures in diffusion chambers after γ- and γ-neutron (252Cf)-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clonogenic cells forming colonies in agar cultures in diffusion chambers and those isolated from subcutaneously transplanted Lewis lung carcinoma do not differ in their sensitivity to 60Co γ-rays with respect to tumor growth stages. The dose-survival curves for all studied cells are S-shaped with a small shoulder. A cumulative dose-survival curve for malignant clonogenic cells is characterized by the average value of mean lethal dose D0=2.24 Gy and extrapolation number n=2.0. When exposed to γ-neutron-radiation (252Cf) malignant clonogenic cells exhibit a nearly exponential dose-survival curve with D0=0.56 Gy (with respect to a neutron component). The RBE of γ-neutron radiation (252Cf) is 2.5

  16. 胶质母细胞瘤原代细胞单克隆株的建立%Establishment of single cell colony from human glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周强; 漆松涛; 向伟; 王海; 张立; 李宏; 刘亚伟; 陆云涛

    2015-01-01

    目的 建立胶质母细胞瘤原代细胞的单克隆株并观察记录不同单克隆株间细胞形态和增殖能力的差异.方法 胶质母细胞瘤组织原代培养后进行纯化、单克隆培养、鉴定;定期观察单克隆细胞株的生长状况和形态特征,并比较其增殖能力的差异.结果 成功建立了23株胶质母细胞瘤细胞单克隆株,根据单克隆株形态不同,将其分为长伪足型和短伪足型,长伪足型伪足长(142.50±33.65) μm,短伪足型伪足长(31.33 ±5.72) μm,两者伪足长短差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);同时,细胞增殖实验证明长伪足型单克隆细胞株增殖能力弱于短伪足型单克隆细胞株,细胞计数试剂盒(CCK--8)实验显示长伪足型单克隆株第10天吸光度值为0.85 ±0.13,短伪足型单克隆株吸光度值为1.31 ±0.20,两者差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 不同单克隆细胞株形态和增殖能力的差异印证了肿瘤细胞的异质性.%Objective To establish single cell colony from human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and observe corresponding morphological characteristics and proliferation capacity.Methods GBM cells were acquired by enzymatic digestion culture method and further purified for single clone culture.Subsequently,these glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive colonies were indentified for research.At last,cell growth and morphological characteristics of single cell colony were recorded.Results We successfully establish 23 single cell colonies and divide them into short pseudopod type and long pseudopod type according to their morphological diversity,the length of pseudopod is (142.50 ± 33.65) μm in long pseudopod group and (31.33 ± 5.72) μm in short pseudopod group respectively,length of these two type cell are significantly different (P < 0.01).In addition,cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay indicate short pseudopod type cell exhibit significant higher proliferation capacity than long pseudopod type cell.The OD

  17. Modes of worker reproduction, reproductive dominance and brood cell construction in queenless honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Peter; Randall Hepburn, H.; Radloff, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Modes de reproduction des ouvrières, dominance de reproduction et construction des cellules de couvain dans des colonies orphelines d'Apis mellifera L. Le long d'un transect à travers la zone d'hybridation naturelle entre A. mellifera capensis, à reproduction thélytoque, et A. mellifera scutellata, à reproduction arrhénotoque, 70 colonies indigènes ont été récoltées (voir tableau pour les lieux). Toutes les reines et tous les rayons ont été ôtés et les abeilles adultes ont été transférées dan...

  18. Effect of X-Rays on Growth Rate of Rose Shoot Cultures and the Ability of Isolated Protoplasts to Form Cell Colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The popularity of rose as a garden plant, allied with its use in the production of cut flowers and also as a source of aromatic rose oils, make it one of the most important ornamental crops. Roses, however, have suffered from a narrow genetic base to which only few species have contributed significantly. In vitro culture of plants might facilitate the improvement of rose via the exploitation of somaclonal variation to generate new genetic variability and selection within the variation for desirable traits. The application of mutagens for in vitro cultures, in addition to the induced mutations, may lead to increase the somaclonal variation, thus providing additional variation for selection. On the other hand, plant protoplasts offer exciting possibilities to establish in vitro selection programs based on single cells. Induced variation in isolated protoplasts using mutagen agents may be one mean to select useful mutants. Thus the present experiments were conducted to determine the effect of X-rays on shoot cultures and the isolated protoplasts of rose (Rosa sp.). The materials consisted of the three rose varieties Rosa wichuriana, Paricer charm and Heckenzauber.The applied doses were 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy. Obtained results indicated that the genotypes differed in their sensitivity to X-rays. Rosa wichuriana seemed to be the most sensitive variety to radiation, where a dose of 20 Gy caused approximately 50% reduction in growth rate of shoot cultures, while the same dose decreased the growth rate of Paricer charm only by 25% and did not affect the growth of Heckenzauber. Results also revealed that the ability of irradiated protoplasts to form cell colonies increased when a dose of 10 Gy was performed. Doses higher than that level caused gradual decreasing in the forming of cell colonies, but however, the protoplasts could form colonies even when a dose of 60 Gy was applied. (Author)

  19. Human myeloma in vitro colony growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human myeloma stem cells were examined by their capacity to form colonies in culture. Cells separated from bone marrow of 15 patients with multiple myeloma were cultured in semi-solid methylcellulose with conditioned medium obtained from cultured T lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin. The number of colonies consisting of more than 20 cells was counted after 10 days of culture. The colonies formed consisted mostly of lymphoplasmacytoid or plasma cells, and the immunoglobulin in the cytoplasm of cells from colonies was identical to that found in cells used for culture. The number of colonies formed was proportional to the number of cells plated. These results suggested that the cells in the colonies were derived from the myeloma cells originally used. The proportion of myeloma stem cells in the proliferative state was examined in 12 patients by the suicide method using [3H]-TdR and the results were between 21 and 75 %, the mean value being approximately 40 %. The irradiation sensitivity of myeloma stem cells was examined by the 60Co-γ-irradiation method. The mean Do value in 7 cases was 116 rads and the mean extrapolation number was 2.0. An inverse relationship was observed between the Do value and the proportion of cells in the S phase. (author)

  20. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The...... mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  1. The Role of Plant Hormones in Nematode Feeding Cell Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Bird, D.

    2011-01-01

    In this Chapter, we discuss recent advances in the role of plant hormones in the molecular mechanisms underlying feeding cell formation both by cyst (CN) and root-knot nematodes (RKN). Phytohormones are small signalling molecules that regulate plant growth and development, including the formation of

  2. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  3. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  4. Endogenous formation of morphine in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poeaknapo, Chotima; Schmidt, Jürgen; Brandsch, Matthias; Dräger, Birgit; Zenk, Meinhart H.

    2004-01-01

    Morphine is a plant (opium poppy)-derived alkaloid and one of the strongest known analgesic compounds. Studies from several laboratories have suggested that animal and human tissue or fluids contain trace amounts of morphine. Its origin in mammals has been believed to be of dietary origin. Here, we address the question of whether morphine is of endogenous origin or derived from exogenous sources. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids present in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and human pancreas ca...

  5. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte-macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teizo eYoshimura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2 to 3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, but not macrophage-colony stimulating factor, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently up-regulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly up-regulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment.

  6. Epithelioid granuloma formation requiring no T-cell function.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, A.; Emori, K; Nagao, S.; Kushima, K.; Kohashi, O; Saitoh, M.; Kataoka, T.

    1982-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a minimal structure in bacterial cell walls essential for their adjuvant activity, was incorporated in a water-in-oil emulsion and injected into the footpads of nude rats devoid of functional T cells. MDP thus injected evoked massive epithelioid granulomas in the draining lymph nodes, indicating that MDP induced epithelioid granuloma formation requires no T cells. This finding with other data available strongly suggest that epithelioid granulomas can be induced withou...

  7. Formation of photovoltaic modules based on polycrystalline solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; A. Drygała; A. Januszka

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of the paper is formation of photovoltaic modules and analysis of their main electric parameters.Design/methodology/approach: Photovoltaic modules were produced from four polycrystalline silicon solar cells, that were cut and next joined in series. Soft soldering technique and copper-tin strip were used for joining cells.Findings: In order to provide useful power for any application, the individual solar cells must be connected together to give the appropriate current an...

  8. CPAP is required for cilia formation in neuronal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kuo-Sheng; Tang, Tang K

    2012-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a microtubule-based structure protruded from the basal body analogous to the centriole. CPAP (centrosomal P4.1-associated protein) has previously been reported to be a cell cycle-regulated protein that controls centriole length. Mutations in CPAP cause primary microcephaly (MCPH) in humans. Here, using a cell-based system that we established to monitor cilia formation in neuronal CAD (Cath.a-differentiated) cells and hippocampal neurons, we found that CPAP is req...

  9. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  10. Laminin 5 regulates polycystic kidney cell proliferation and cyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Dominique; Berissi, Sophie; Bertrand, Amélie; Strehl, Laetitia; Patey, Natacha; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2006-09-29

    Renal cyst formation is the hallmark of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ADPKD cyst-lining cells have an increased proliferation rate and are surrounded by an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM). We have previously shown that Laminin 5 (Ln-5, a alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(2) trimer) is aberrantly expressed in the pericystic ECM of ADPKD kidneys. We report that ADPKD cells in primary cultures produce and secrete Ln-5 that is incorporated to the pericystic ECM in an in vitro model of cystogenesis. In monolayers, purified Ln-5 induces ERK activation and proliferation of ADPKD cells, whereas upon epidermal growth factor stimulation blocking endogenously produced Ln-5 with anti-gamma(2) chain antibody reduces the sustained ERK activation and inhibits proliferation. In three-dimensional gel culture, addition of purified Ln-5 stimulates cell proliferation and cyst formation, whereas blocking endogenous Ln-5 strongly inhibits cyst formation. Ligation of alpha(6)beta(4) integrin, a major Ln-5 receptor aberrantly expressed by ADPKD cells, induces beta(4) integrin phosphorylation, ERK activation, cell proliferation, and cyst formation. These findings indicate that Ln-5 is an important regulator of ADPKD cell proliferation and cystogenesis and suggest that Ln-5 gamma(2) chain and Ln-5-alpha(6)beta(4) integrin interaction both contribute to these phenotypic changes. PMID:16870608

  11. Suppression of cell-spreading and phagocytic activity on nano-pillared surface: in vitro experiment using hemocytes of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ballarin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale nipple array on the body surface has been described from various invertebrates including endoparasitic and mesoparasitic copepods, but the functions of the nipple array is not well understood. Using the hydrophilized nanopillar sheets made of polystyrene as a mimetic material of the nipple arrays on the parasites’ body surface, we assayed the cell spreading and phagocytosis of the hemocytes of the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. On the pillared surface, the number of spreading amebocytes and the number of phagocytizing hemocytes per unit area were always smaller than those on the flat surface (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05 - 0.001, probably because the effective area for the cell attachment on the pillared surface is much smaller than the area on the flat sheet. The present results supports the idea that the nipple array on the parasites' body surface reduces the innate immune reaction from the host hemocytes.

  12. Percutaneous implantation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in osteoarthritis of the knee. First case reported in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degenerative joint disease, also known as osteoarthrosis affects to 10% of elderlies aged 60. It is mainly characterized by pain in the involved joint, crepitation, morning stiff and a progressive limitation of movement of that joint leading to a partial or total wear of articular cartilage. The treatment of the knee osteoarthrosis is a great challenge. The recent advances in use of regenerative medicine suggest that adult stem cells could represent a promisor alternative in the treatment of this entity. In a female patient aged 61 presenting with knee osteoarthrosis authors placed a percutaneous implant of autologous mononuclear cells mobilized to peripheral blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor achieving a fast clinical and radiological improvement. This result suggests that the procedure used is a feasible, simple, safe and less expensive method for treatment of articular degenerative lesions

  13. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18–24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18–24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment. PMID:27447610

  14. Observations of radiation-induced chromosome fragment loss in live mammalian cells in culture, and its effect on colony-forming ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preceding paper (Grote, Joshi, Revell and Shaw 1981) describe a method for the direct scrutiny of live cultured mammalian cells with a microscope, and reported that all diploid Syrian hamster cells (BHK 21 C13) of a sample given 1.4 Gy of 220 kV X-rays in G1 reached post-radiation mitosis without discernible abnormality, but then diverged in observed behaviour: descendant cells from some first mitoses continued to proliferate normally while cells from other first mitoses behaved abnormally and produced either slow-growth or stop-growth colonies. This paper completes the study of the same irradiated cell sample, and shows that these post-mitotic differences in clonogenic ability were related to acentric chromosome fragment losses at post-radiation mitosis, which were detected in live daughter-cell pairs as micronuclei. The proportion of live daughter-cell pairs scored as deficient was at least 80 per cent of the proportion of comparable fixed-and-stained mitoses with detected acentric fragments. (author)

  15. Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Patients with Chronic Bone and Joint Infection due to Staphylococci Expressing or Not the Small Colony Variant Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Viel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bone and joint infections (BJI are devastating diseases. Relapses are frequently observed, as some pathogens, especially staphylococci, can persist intracellularly by expressing a particular phenotype called small colony variant (SCV. As natural killer (NK cells are lymphocytes specialized in the killing of host cells infected by intracellular pathogens, we studied NK cells of patients with chronic BJI due to staphylococci expressing or not SCVs (10 patients in both groups. Controls were patients infected with other bacteria without detectable expression of SCVs, and healthy volunteers. NK cell phenotype was evaluated from PBMCs by flow cytometry. Degranulation capacity was evaluated after stimulation with K562 cells in vitro. We found that NK cells were activated in terms of CD69 expression, loss of CD16 and perforin, in all infected patients in comparison with healthy volunteers, independently of the SCV phenotype. Peripheral NK cells in patients with chronic BJI display signs of recent activation and degranulation in vivo in response to CD16-mediated signals, regardless of the type of bacteria involved. This could involve a universal capacity of isolates responsible for chronic BJI to produce undetectable SCVs in vivo, which might be a target of future intervention.

  16. Down-regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by 3C-like proteinase in transfected A549 human lung carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Hsien-Yu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is a severe respiratory illness caused by a novel virus, the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV. 3C-like protease (3CLpro of SARS-CoV plays a role in processing viral polypeptide precursors and is responsible of viral maturation. However, the function of 3CLpro in host cells remains unknown. This study investigated how the 3CLpro affected the secretion of cytokines in the gene-transfected cells. Results From immunofluorescence microscopy, the localization of c-myc tagged 3CLpro was detected both in the cytoplasm and nucleus of transfected A549 cells. Expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF was significantly decreased in 3CLpro-transfected cells by both RT-PCR and ELISA, but without changes in other cytokines, i.e., IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL12p40, TNF-α, and TGF-β. Furthermore, the protein levels of NF-kB decreased in 3CLpro-transfected A549 cells when compared to EGFP transfected cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the 3CLpro may suppress expression of GM-CSF in transfected A549 cells through down-regulation of NF-kB production.

  17. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kyung Hoon Lee; Won Young Lee; Dong Hoon Kim; Seung Hoon Lee; Jung Tae Do; Chankyu Park; Jae Hwan Kim; Young Suk Choi; Hyuk Song

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs)...

  18. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy of......: Bone marrow stem cell mobilization with subcutaneous G-CSF is safe but did not lead to further improvement in ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction compared with the recovery observed in the placebo group....

  19. Interleukin-33 is expressed in differentiated osteoblasts and blocks osteoclast formation from bone marrow precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Jochen; Bickert, Thomas; Beil, F Timo; Zaiss, Mario M; Albers, Joachim; Wintges, Kristofer; Streichert, Thomas; Klaetschke, Kristin; Keller, Johannes; Hissnauer, Tim-Nicolas; Spiro, Alexander S; Gessner, Andre; Schett, Georg; Amling, Michael; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Horst, Andrea Kristina; Schinke, Thorsten

    2011-04-01

    Since the hematopoetic system is located within the bone marrow, it is not surprising that recent evidence has demonstrated the existence of molecular interactions between bone and immune cells. While interleukin 1 (IL-1) and IL-18, two cytokines of the IL-1 family, have been shown to regulate differentiation and activity of bone cells, the role of IL-33, another IL-1 family member, has not been addressed yet. Since we observed that the expression of IL-33 increases during osteoblast differentiation, we analyzed its possible influence on bone formation and observed that IL-33 did not affect matrix mineralization but enhanced the expression of Tnfsf11, the gene encoding RANKL. This finding led us to analyze the skeletal phenotype of Il1rl1-deficient mice, which lack the IL-33 receptor ST2. Unexpectedly, these mice displayed normal bone formation but increased bone resorption, thereby resulting in low trabecular bone mass. Since this finding suggested a negative influence of IL-33 on osteoclastogenesis, we next analyzed osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow precursor cells and observed that IL-33 completely abolished the generation of TRACP(+) multinucleated osteoclasts, even in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although our molecular studies revealed that IL-33 treatment of bone marrow cells caused a shift toward other hematopoetic lineages, we further observed a direct negative influence of IL-33 on the osteoclastogenic differentiation of RAW264.7 macrophages, where IL-33 repressed the expression of Nfatc1, which encodes one of the key transciption factors of osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these findings have uncovered a previously unknown function of IL-33 as an inhibitor of bone resorption. PMID:20939024

  20. Effect of human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on differentiation and apoptosis of the human osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Postiglione

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of human granulocyte macrophage- colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on the relation between differentiation and apoptosis in SaOS-2 cells, an osteoblast-like cell line. To determine the relationship between these cellular processes, SaOS-2 cells were treated in vitro for 1, 7 and 14 days with 200 ng/mL GM-CSF and compared with untreated cells. Five nM insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I and 30 nM okadaic acid were used as negative and positive controls of apoptosis, respectively. Effects on cell differentiation were determined by ECM (extracellular matrix mineralization, morphology of some typical mature osteoblast differentiation markers, such as osteopontin and sialoprotein II (BSP-II, and production of bone ECM components such as collagen I. The results showed that treatment with GM-CSF caused cell differentiation accompanied by increased production of osteopontin and BSP-II, together with increased ECM deposition and mineralization. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V and propidium iodide incorporation showed that GM-CSF up-regulated apoptotic cell death of SaOS-2 cells after 14 days of culture in contrast to okadaic acid, which stimulated SaOS-2 apoptosis only during the early period of culture. Endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA, detected by “laddering analysis”, confirmed these data. The results suggest that GM-CSF induces osteoblastic differentiation and long-term apoptotic cell death of the SaOS-2 human osteosarcoma cell line, which in turn suggests a possible in vivo physiological role for GM-CSF on human osteoblast cells.

  1. Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with recombinant interleukin-3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), or granulocyte-macrophage CSF in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with pure hematopoietic growth factors have been investigated using tritiated thymidine labeling and autoradiography. Mice were injected subcutaneously with 125 micrograms/kg granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (in some cases 5 micrograms/kg), or 10 micrograms/kg of granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), or interleukin-3 (IL-3) every 12 hours for 84 hours. 3HTdR labeling was performed in vivo after 3 days of treatment. G-CSF increased the peripheral neutrophil count 14-fold and increased the proportion and proliferation rate of neutrophilic cells in the marrow, suppressing erythropoiesis at the same time. Newly produced mature cells were released into the circulation within 24 hours of labeling, compared with a normal appearance time of about 96 hours. By contrast, GM-CSF and IL-3 had little effect on either marrow cell kinetics or on the rate of release of mature cells, although GM-CSF did stimulate a 50% increase in peripheral neutrophils. Monocyte production was also increased about eightfold by G-CSF and 1.5-fold by GM-CSF, but their peak release was only slightly accelerated. While the peripheral half-lives of the neutrophilic granulocytes were normal, those of the monocytes were dramatically reduced, perhaps due to sequestration in the tissues for functional purposes. The stimulated monocyte production in the case of G-CSF required an additional five cell cycles, a level that might have repercussions on the progenitor compartments

  2. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  3. Modeling cell-death patterning during biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-organization by bacterial cells often leads to the formation of a highly complex spatially-structured biofilm. In such a bacterial biofilm, cells adhere to each other and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix (ECM). Bacillus substilis bacteria utilize localized cell-death patterns which focuses mechanical forces to form wrinkled sheet-like structures in three dimensions. A most intriguing feature underlying this biofilm formation is that vertical buckling and ridge location is biased to occur in region of high cell-death. Here we present a spatially extended model to investigate the role of the bacterial secreted ECM during the biofilm formation and the self-organization of cell-death. Using this reaction-diffusion model we show that the interaction between the cell's motion and the ECM concentration gives rise to a self-trapping instability, leading to variety of cell-death patterns. The resultant spot patterns generated by our model are shown to be in semi-quantitative agreement with recent experimental observation. (paper)

  4. Ant Colony Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Zahálka, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with Ant Colony algorithms and their usage for solving Travelling Salesman Problems and Vehicle Routing Problems. These algorithms are metaheuristics offering new approach to solving NP-hard problems. Work begins with a description of the forementioned tasks including ways to tackle them. Next chapter analyses Ant Colony metaheuristic and its possible usage and variations. The most important part of the thesis is practical and is represented by application Ant Colony...

  5. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, C; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life saving in the case of wound healing but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  6. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  7. Ancestral vascular lumen formation via basal cell surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Kucera

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular system of bilaterians developed from a common ancestor. However, no endothelial cells exist in invertebrates demonstrating that primitive cardiovascular tubes do not require this vertebrate-specific cell type in order to form. This raises the question of how cardiovascular tubes form in invertebrates? Here we discovered that in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus, the basement membranes of endoderm and mesoderm line the lumen of the major vessels, namely aorta and heart. During amphioxus development a laminin-containing extracellular matrix (ECM was found to fill the space between the basal cell surfaces of endoderm and mesoderm along their anterior-posterior (A-P axes. Blood cells appear in this ECM-filled tubular space, coincident with the development of a vascular lumen. To get insight into the underlying cellular mechanism, we induced vessels in vitro with a cell polarity similar to the vessels of amphioxus. We show that basal cell surfaces can form a vascular lumen filled with ECM, and that phagocytotic blood cells can clear this luminal ECM to generate a patent vascular lumen. Therefore, our experiments suggest a mechanism of blood vessel formation via basal cell surfaces in amphioxus and possibly in other invertebrates that do not have any endothelial cells. In addition, a comparison between amphioxus and mouse shows that endothelial cells physically separate the basement membranes from the vascular lumen, suggesting that endothelial cells create cardiovascular tubes with a cell polarity of epithelial tubes in vertebrates and mammals.

  8. Influence of prodigiozan on the postirradiation recovery of haemopoietic precursor cells and colony-stimulating factor level in long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodigiozan injected to long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow 24 h before irradiation increased CFUs and CFU-GM number and colony-stimulating factor (CSF)level by the time of delivery of ionizing radiation. As early as 60 min following irradiation of bone marrow structures with a dose of 2 Gy the number of CFUs and CFU-GM decreased considerably, and from day 3 on after irradiation the indices under study were gradually restored. By day 14 the cultures preinjected with prodigiozan exhibited higher recovery levels. The decrease in the number of precursor cells 60 min after irradiation was accompanied by a drastic increase in the CSF content of cultures; the CSF release in cultures protected with prodigiozan was more moderate than in the irradiated controls

  9. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  10. Modulation of Decidual Macrophage Polarization by Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Derived from First-Trimester Decidual Cells: Implication in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Piao, Longzhu; Chen, Chie-Pein; Wu, Xianqing; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Masch, Rachel; Chang, Chi-Chang; Huang, S Joseph

    2016-05-01

    During human pregnancy, immune tolerance of the fetal semiallograft occurs in the presence of abundant maternal leukocytes. At the implantation site, macrophages comprise approximately 20% of the leukocyte population and act as primary mediators of tissue remodeling. Decidual macrophages display a balance between anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory phenotypes. However, a shift to an M1 subtype is reported in preeclampsia. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) are major differentiating factors that mediate M1 and M2 polarization, respectively. Previously, we observed the following: i) the preeclamptic decidua contains an excess of both macrophages and GM-CSF, ii) the preeclampsia-associated proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, markedly enhance GM-CSF and M-CSF expression in cultured leukocyte-free first-trimester decidual cells (FTDCs), iii) FTDC-secreted GM-CSF polarizes macrophages toward an M1 subtype. The microenvironment is a key determinant of macrophage phenotype. Thus, we examined proinflammatory stimulation of FTDC-secreted M-CSF and its role in macrophage development. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated elevated M-CSF-positive decidual cell numbers in preeclamptic decidua. In FTDCs, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α signal through the NF-κB pathway to induce M-CSF production, which does the following: i) enhances differentiation of and elevates CD163 expression in macrophages, ii) increases macrophage phagocytic capacity, and iii) inhibits signal-regulatory protein α expression by macrophages. These findings suggest that FTDC-secreted M-CSF modulates the decidual immune balance by inducing M2 macrophage polarization and phagocytic capacity in response to proinflammatory stimuli. PMID:26970370

  11. Micro-crack formation in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Spernjak, Dusan; Zelenay, Piotr; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the micro-crack formation of Nafion®-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) after extended direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operation. All electrodes, both with metal-black and carbon-supported catalysts, contain some micro-cracks initially; the area covered by these cracks increases both in the anode and cathode after 100-hours of DMFC test. X-ray tomography shows an increase in the crack area in both anode and cathode that correlates with methanol feed concentration and methanol crossover. The MEAs with carbon-supported catalysts and thicker membrane are more resistant to the formation of micro-cracks compared to those with metal-black catalysts and thinner membrane, respectively. The impact of the micro-crack formation on cell performance and durability is limited over the 100-hour DMFC operation, with the long-term impact remaining unknown.

  12. The role of Kupffer cells in glucan-induced granuloma formation in the liver of mice depleted of blood monocytes by administration of strontium-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to elucidate the role of Kupffer cells in granuloma formation in the liver of mice under a condition of severe monocytopenia induced by administration of strontium-89, granulomas were produced by particulate glucan injection and examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, by [3H]thymidine autoradiography, and in culture experiments. Hepatic granulomas were smaller, less numerous, and more irregularly shaped in the monocytopenic mice than in the control mice. The granulomas were composed of multinuclear giant cells, epithelioid cells, Kupffer cells, and T lymphocytes, but not monocytes or granulocytes. Kupffer cells were heavily labeled with [3H]thymidine in the monocytopenic mice, particularly just before the stage of granuloma formation, and then clustered in the liver sinusoids. At 8 days, they formed granulomas, transformed into epithelioid cells, and transformed further into multinuclear giant cells. Although the culture of liver cell suspensions prepared from the livers of monocytopenic mice sustained diffuse proliferation of macrophages on a monolayer of mouse stromal cell line (ST2), no monocyte/macrophage colonies were formed. From these results, it is reasonable to conclude that Kupffer cells alone are activated in a condition without a supply of monocytes from peripheral blood; proliferate and cluster in the hepatic sinusoids; transform into peroxidase-negative macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinuclear giant cells; and participate in granuloma formation in loco together with T lymphocytes

  13. Autocrine protective mechanisms of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Fang, Kan-Tang; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the role of autocrine mechanisms in the anti-apoptotic effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush. We observed that both G-CSF and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) are expressed in normal rat retina. Further dual immunofluorescence staining showed G-CSFR immunoreactive cells were colocalized with RGCs, Müller cells, horizontal and amacrine cells. These results confirm that G-CSF is an endogenous ligand in the retina. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR finding demonstrated the transcription levels of G-CSF and G-CSFR were up-regulated after ON crush injury. G-CSF treatment further increased and prolonged the expression level of G-CSFR in the retina. G-CSF has been shown to enhance transdifferentiation of the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells into tissue to repair central nervous system injury. We test the hypothesis that the hematopoietic stem cells recruited by G-CSF treatment can transdifferentiate into RGCs after ON crush by performing sublethal irradiation of the rats 5 days before ON crush. The flow cytometric analysis showed the number of CD34 positive cells in the peripheral blood is significantly lower in the irradiated, crushed and G-CSF-treated group than the sham control group or crush and G-CSF treated group. Nevertheless, the G-CSF treatment enhances the RGC survival after sublethal irradiation and ON crush injury. These data indicate that G-CSF seems unlikely to induce hematopoietic stem cell transdifferentiation into RGCs after ON crush injury. In conclusion, G-CSF may serve an endogenous protective signaling in the retina through direct activation of intrinsic G-CSF receptors and downstream signaling pathways to rescue RGCs after ON crush injury, exogenous G-CSF administration can enhance the anti-apoptotic effects on RGCs. PMID:26518178

  14. Dolomitized cells within chert of the Permian Assistência Formation, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calça, Cléber P.; Fairchild, Thomas R.; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Hachiro, Jorge; Petri, Setembrino; Huila, Manuel Fernando Gonzalez; Toma, Henrique E.; Araki, Koiti

    2016-04-01

    Dolomitic microscopic structures in the form of microspheres, "horseshoe- shaped" objects, and thin botryoidal crusts found within microfossiliferous chert within stromatolites of the Evaporite Bed (EB) of the Permian Assistência Formation, Irati Subgroup, Paraná Basin, Brazil, have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The microspheres were identified as dolomitized coccoidal cyanobacteria based on similarity in size, spheroidal and paired hemispheroidal morphologies and colonial habit to co-occurring silicified organic-walled cyanobacteria embedded within the same microfabric and rock samples. The co-occurrence of dolomite, pyrite framboids, and abundant dispersed carbonaceous material and silicified cells is consistent with a hypersaline depositional environment with abundant cyanobacterial mats and elevated Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratios and reducing conditions with active anoxic microbial processes near the water-(bio)sediment interface. The abundance of extracellular polymeric substances facilitated anoxic microbial processes (sulfate reduction), providing essential conditions for possible primary microbially induced dolomitization. In most of the dolomitized cells dolomite occurs only as an external layer; in fully dolomitized cells magnesium is richest in the outermost layer. Presumably, the dolomitization process was favored by the presence of anoxic microbial degraders and negatively charged functional groups at the surface of the cyanobacterial cells. Botryoidal dolomite rims of silica-filled fenestrae formed by a similar process and inherited the botryoidal morphology of the cell as originally lining the fenestrae. Silicification interrupted the dolomitization of the largely organic biosediment, mostly by permineralization, but locally by substitution, thereby preserving not only dolomitic microspheres, but also huge numbers of structurally

  15. Both systemic and local application of Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is neuroprotective after retinal ganglion cell axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietz Gunnar PH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF plays a crucial role in controlling the number of neutrophil progenitor cells. Its function is mediated via the G-CSF receptor, which was recently found to be expressed also in the central nervous system. In addition, G-CSF provided neuroprotection in models of neuronal cell death. Here we used the retinal ganglion cell (RGC axotomy model to compare effects of local and systemic application of neuroprotective molecules. Results We found that the G-CSF receptor is robustly expressed by RGCs in vivo and in vitro. We thus evaluated G-CSF as a neuroprotectant for RGCs and found a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of G-CSF on axotomized RGCs when given subcutaneously. As stem stell mobilization had previously been discussed as a possible contributor to the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF, we compared the local treatment of RGCs by injection of G-CSF into the vitreous body with systemic delivery by subcutaneous application. Both routes of application reduced retinal ganglion cell death to a comparable extent. Moreover, G-CSF enhanced the survival of immunopurified RGCs in vitro. Conclusion We thus show that G-CSF neuroprotection is at least partially independent of potential systemic effects and provide further evidence that the clinically applicable G-CSF could become a treatment option for both neurodegenerative diseases and glaucoma.

  16. Specters of Colonialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise; Azad, Salam

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how an organization in Sweden, a country normally not considered among the former colonial powers, is still haunted by the specters of a western colonial history. Based on in-depth interviews as well as participant observation in the headquarters of a Swedish multinational...

  17. A Review of Cell Formation from Perspective of Objective Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaoqing; TANG Jiafu

    2006-01-01

    The initial and significant step in the design of a cellular manufacturing system is cell formation (CF). CF problem is proposed in this paper as a decision problem that determines to manufacture specified types of part in a manufacturing plant which machines and their associated parts are grouped together to form cell in a way that a concerned objective is optimized. For describing CF problem clearly, this paper firstly presents a review of cell formation problem from the view points of objective function. The CF problems are classified into three categories, which are cost oriented, flexibility oriented and grouping efficiency oriented CF problems. Then, the paper presents a comprehensive conceptual mathematical formulation describing the general cost problem and a decision variable for comprehensive describing routing flexibility and two trade-off questions in grouping efficiency issues. Finally, based on the review and discussion, the paper proposes five directions for future research in the CF field.

  18. Instent neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous intervention for ST-elevation myocardial infarction and treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Results from the stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Baldazzi, Federica; Ripa, Rasmus S;

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized pluripotent cells from the bone marrow are proposed to have a regenerative potential. Though, a report of excessive instent restenosis, in patients treated with G-CSF before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) warrants caution....

  19. Effect of mobilization of bone marrow stem cells by granulocyte colony stimulating factor on clinical symptoms, left ventricular perfusion and function in patients with severe chronic ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yongzhong; Tägil, Kristina; Ripa, Rasmus S.;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A phase I safety and efficacy study with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization of bone marrow stem cells to induce vasculogenesis in patients with severe ischemic heart disease (IHD) was conducted. DESIGN, PATIENTS AND RESULTS: 29 patients with IHD participated in...

  20. Intracerebroventricular transplantation of ex vivo expanded endothelial colony-forming cells restores blood-brain barrier integrity and promotes angiogenesis of mice with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin-Tao; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Sheng-Jie; Li, Sheng-Hui; Tang, Qing; Wang, Zhi-Tao; Dong, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Ning

    2013-12-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a key role in tissue repair and regeneration. Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between the number of circulating EPCs and clinical outcomes of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A recent study has further shown that intravenous infusion of human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) improves outcomes of mice subjected to experimental TBI. This follow-up study was designed to determine whether intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of ECFCs, which may reduce systemic effects of these cells, could repair the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and promote angiogenesis of mice with TBI. Adult nude mice were exposed to fluid percussion injury and transplanted i.c.v. with ECFCs on day 1 post-TBI. These ECFCs were detected at the TBI zone 3 days after transplantation by SP-DiIC18(3) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mice with ECFCs transplant had reduced Evans blue extravasation and brain water content, increased expression of ZO-1 and claudin-5, and showed a higher expression of angiopoietin 1. Consistent with the previous report, mice with ECFCs transplant had also increased microvascular density. Modified neurological severity score and Morris water maze test indicated significant improvements in motor ability, spatial acquisition and reference memory in mice receiving ECFCs, compared to those receiving saline. These data demonstrate the beneficial effects of ECFC transplant on BBB integrity and angiogenesis in mice with TBI. PMID:23957220

  1. Post-UV colony-forming ability of normal fibroblast strains and of the xeroderma pigmentosum group G strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disorder of defective DNA repair, post-uv colony-forming ability of fibroblasts from patients in complementation groups A through F correlates with the patients' neurological status. The first xeroderma pigmentosum patient assigned to the recently discovered group G had the neurological abnormalities of XP. Researchers have determined the post-uv colony-forming ability of cultured fibroblasts from this patient and from 5 more control donors. Log-phase fibroblasts were irradiated with 254 nm uv light from a germicidal lamp, trypsinized, and replated at known densities. After 2 to 4 weeks' incubation the cells were fixed, stained and scored for colony formation. The strains' post-uv colony-forming ability curves were obtained by plotting the log of the percent remaining post-uv colony-forming ability as a function of the uv dose. The post-uv colony-forming ability of 2 of the 5 new normal strains was in the previously defined control donor zone, but that of the other 3 extended down to the level of the most resistant xeroderma pigmentosum strain. The post-uv colony-forming ability curve of the group G fibroblasts was not significantly different from the curves of the group D fibroblast strains from patients with clinical histories similar to that of the group G patient

  2. Deformed Wing Virus Implicated in Overwintering Honeybee Colony Losses ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Andrea C.; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Noël, Laure M.-L. J.; Hall, Matthew J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Schroeder, Declan C.

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses. PMID:19783750

  3. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses. PMID:19783750

  4. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Borup, Rehannah; Wewer, Ulla M; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Finn C

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading and...... invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....

  5. Unequal distribution of plastids during generative cell formation in Impatiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Went, J L

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes the unequal distribution of plastids in the developing microspores of Impatiens walleriana and Impatiens glandulifera which leads to the exclusion of plastids from the generative cell. During the development from young microspore to the onset of mitosis a change in the organization of the cytoplasm and distribution of organelles is gradually established. This includes the formation of vacuoles at the poles of the elongate-shaped microspores, the movement of the nucleus to a position near the microspore wall in the central part of the cell, and the accumulation of the plastids to a position near the wall at the opposite side of the cell. In Impatiens walleriana, the accumulated plastids are separated from each other by ER cisterns, and some mitochondria are also accumulated. In both Impatiens species, the portion of the microspore in which the generative cell will be formed is completely devoid of plastids at the time mitosis starts. PMID:24257638

  6. Germ Tube Formation Changes Surface Hydrophobicity of Candida Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Fonseca

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic interaction is generally considered to play an important role in the adherence of microorganisms to eukaryotic cells and also to certain inert surfaces. Using a microbe adhesion assay to hydrocarbons (n-hexadecane, 68 strains of Candida albicans and 30 non-albicans strains were studied. Influence of source of isolate, age of the culture, and percentage of germ tube formation on adhesion were studied. C: albicans blastoconidia were found to be hydrophilic; conversely, blastoconidia of non-albicans strains were slightly more hydrophobic. Germ tube formation was associated with a significant rise in cell surface hydrophobicity. Infect. Dis. Obstet. Gynecol. 7:222–226, 1999.

  7. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Sato, Miwa; Li, Liangzhu; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup) markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly upregulated neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2–3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage CSF, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently upregulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly upregulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment. PMID:26834744

  8. A full genomic characterization of the development of a stable Small Colony Variant cell-type by a clinical Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Long M G; Kidd, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    A key to persistent and recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections is its ability to adapt to diverse and toxic conditions. This ability includes a switch into a biofilm or to the quasi-dormant Small Colony Variant (SCV). The development and molecular attributes of SCVs have been difficult to study due to their rapid reversion to their parental cell-type. We recently described the unique induction of a matrix-embedded and stable SCV cell-type in a clinical S. aureus strain (WCH-SK2) by growing the cells with limiting conditions for a prolonged timeframe. Here we further study their characteristics. They possessed an increased viability in the presence of antibiotics compared to their non-SCV form. Their stability implied that there had been genetic changes; we therefore determined both the genome sequence of WCH-SK2 and its stable SCV form at a single base resolution, employing Single Molecular Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing that enabled the methylome to also be determined. The genetic features of WCH-SK2 have been identified; the SCCmec type, the pathogenicity and genetic islands and virulence factors. The genetic changes that had occurred in the stable SCV form were identified; most notably being in MgrA, a global regulator, and RsbU, a phosphoserine phosphatase within the regulatory pathway of the sigma factor SigB. There was a shift in the methylomes of the non-SCV and stable SCV forms. We have also shown a similar induction of this cell-type in other S. aureus strains and performed a genetic comparison to these and other S. aureus genomes. We additionally map RNAseq data to the WCH-SK2 genome in a transcriptomic analysis of the parental, SCV and stable SCV cells. The results from this study represent the unique identification of a suite of epigenetic, genetic and transcriptional factors that are implicated in the switch in S. aureus to its persistent SCV form. PMID:26458527

  9. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  10. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration. PMID:26376304

  11. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  12. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  13. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Peter Su; Wanqing Du; Qinghua Ji; Boxin Xue; Dong Jiang; Yueyao Zhu; Jizhong Lou; Li Yu; Yujie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro st...

  14. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  15. p53 dependency of radio-adaptive responses in endogenous spleen colonies and peripheral blood-cell counts in C57BL mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Kiyohito; Kubo, Kihei [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Graduate School of Agriculture and Biological Sciences; Yonezawa, Morio [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    2002-12-01

    Radio-adaptive responses at a conditioning X-ray dose of 0.45 Gy and a challenging dose of 5.0 Gy on hematopoietic indices were studied in C57BL mice with p53 (Trp53) wild, heterogenous and knockout allele. The conditioning irradiation, given 2 weeks before the challenging irradiation, induced radio-adaptive responses observed as a recovery of the peripheral blood-cell counts of leukocytes, thrombocytes and erythrocytes on day 14 after challenging irradiation in C57BL mice of the wild-type p53(+/+). The pre-irradiation also increased the endogenous spleen colonies (endo-CFU-S) on day 12 and the spleen weight on day 14. On the contrary, the knockout p53(-/-) mice gave no such radio-adaptive response. The heterogenous p53(+/-) mice gave an intermediate response. The radio-adaptive response in hematopoiesis at a challenge dose of 5.0 Gy seems to be a p53-dependent phenomenon. The possible role of induction in radioresistance through the reduction of p53-drived apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells in pre-irradiated mice is discussed. (author)

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  17. Second-line treatment of non small cell lung cancer by biweekly gemcitabine and docetaxel +/- granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and low dose aldesleukine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Pierpaolo; Tindara Miano, Salvatora; Remondo, Cinzia; Migali, Cristina; Rotundo, Maria Saveria; Macrì, Paolo; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Caraglia, Michele; Gotti, Giuseppe; Francini, Guido

    2009-03-15

    Background. The antitumor activity of a novel biweekly gemcitabine (G) + docetaxel (D) regimen +/- granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and aldesleukine (IL-2) has been evaluated in a phase II trial in advanced pretreated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results. The treatment was well tolerated. The 42.3% response rate exceeded the predefined target activity, while time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 7 and 11.2 months, respectively. A greater objective response rate (58.3% vs 28.6%) and an increased number of eosinophils, basophils and activated mononuclear blood cells were observed in those patients who also received cytokine administration. Methods. Twenty-six NSCLC patients received second line G (1000 mg/m2) and D (75 mg/m2) every 15 days. 12/26 patients also received s.c. GM-CSF (100µg, days 2-6) and s.c. IL-2 (0.5MIU/ twice daily, days 7-14 and 16-29) by random selection. Conclusion. The biweekly GD regimen is a safe and active second-line treatment in NSCLC. Addition of immune-adjuvant cytokines' may enhance the activity of this therapeutic combination. PMID:19242101

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor affects the distribution and clonality of TRGV and TRDV repertoire of T cells and graft-versus-host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune modulatory effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF on T cells resulted in an unexpected low incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT. Recent data indicated that gamma delta+ T cells might participate in mediating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, whether G-CSF could influence the T cell receptors (TCR of gamma delta+ T cells (TRGV and TRDV repertoire remains unclear. To further characterize this feature, we compared the distribution and clonality of TRGV and TRDV repertoire of T cells before and after G-CSF mobilization and investigated the association between the changes of TCR repertoire and GVHD in patients undergoing G-CSF mobilized allo-PBSCT. Methods The complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3 sizes of three TRGV and eight TRDV subfamily genes were analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 20 donors before and after G-CSF mobilization, using RT-PCR and genescan technique. To determine the expression levels of TRGV subfamily genes, we performed quantitative analysis of TRGVI~III subfamilies by real-time PCR. Results The expression levels of three TRGV subfamilies were significantly decreased after G-CSF mobilization (P = 0.015, 0.009 and 0.006, respectively. The pattern of TRGV subfamily expression levels was TRGVII >TRGV I >TRGV III before mobilization, and changed to TRGV I >TRGV II >TRGV III after G-CSF mobilization. The expression frequencies of TRGV and TRDV subfamilies changed at different levels after G-CSF mobilization. Most TRGV and TRDV subfamilies revealed polyclonality from pre-G-CSF-mobilized and G-CSF-mobilized samples. Oligoclonality was detected in TRGV and TRDV subfamilies in 3 donors before mobilization and in another 4 donors after G-CSF mobilization, distributed in TRGVII, TRDV1

  19. Colony screening by PCR

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Matt Lewis ### Notes This is the fastest way to screen bacterial colonies. Our PCR machine takes 24 tubes so I routinely screen 22 colonies + 1 negative + 1 positive control. ### Choosing the primers Ideally you want a primer pair that can only work if the correct construct is present eg. a vector flanking primer and a gene specific primer. However, this may not allow you a positive control (essential) so you might have to use both vector flanking primers instead. If y...

  20. The colonial present

    OpenAIRE

    Bunnell, Tim

    2006-01-01

    cultural geographies 2006 13: 305-312 reviews in brief The colonial present. By Derek Gregory. Malden, MA: Blackwell. 2004. 367 pp. £16.99 paper. ISBN 1577180909. The colonial present extends and deepens our understanding of contemporary geopolitics in ways that speak to the key concerns of this journal. For Derek Gregory as for Edward Said, to whom the book is dedicated, and whose intellectual legacy runs through its pages - issues of cu...

  1. ACO - Ant Colony Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Žumer, Viljem; Brest, Janez; Pešl, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ant colony optimization is a relatively new approach to solving NP-Hard problems. It is based on the behavior of real ants, which always find the shortest path between their nest and a food source. Such behavior can be transferred into the discrcte world, were real ants are replaced by simple agents. Such simple agents are placed into the environment where different combinatorial problems can be solved In this paper we describe an artificial ant colony capable of solving the travelling salesm...

  2. Alterations in T cell-derived colony-stimulating factors associated with GVH-induced immune deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injection of parental C57BL/10 spleen cells into unirradiated immune-competent (B10 x B10.BR)F1 hosts has been demonstrated to produce a graft-vs.-host-induced immune deficiency in T cell-mediated functions, including mitogen or alloantigen stimulated proliferation or cytotoxic T cell generation. The production of T cell-derived lymphokines affecting hematopoiesis was also altered during GVH. During the first two weeks of GVH, IL-3 and particularly GM-CSF were produced spontaneously; in subsequent weeks, the spontaneous production dropped to normal or subnormal levels. CSF content in concanavalin A-stimulated splenic supernatants was reduced at weeks 1-2, and declined to less than 5% of normal levels by 3-4 weeks of GVH. This decline in CSF content was correlated with a decrease in immune function as assessed by concanavalin A-stimulated IL-2 production and by generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Concurrent with the recovery of immune function during GVH weeks 8-15, mitogen-stimulated production of CSF returned to normal levels. In addition to the decrease in CSF production identified in acute suppressive GVH, CSF content in concanavalin A-stimulated splenic supernatants was also decreased in chronic stimulatory GVH, generated in the strain combination (B6 x B6bm1)F1----(B6bm1 x B6bm12)F1. This decrease in CSF production correlated with a decrease in self-restricted T helper cell function. Finally, a decrease in both immune function and CSF production capacity was observed in the acute GVH following allogeneic (minor histocompatibility loci) bone marrow transplantation into irradiated hosts

  3. CELL FORMATION IN GROUP TECHNOLOGY: A SIMILARITY ORDER CLUSTERING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouping parts into families which can be produced by a cluster of machine cells is the cornerstone of cellular manufacturing, which in turn is the building block for flexible manufacturing systems. Cellular manufacturing is a group technology (GT concept that has recently attracted the attention of manufacturing firms operating under jobshop environment to consider redesigning their manufacturing systems so as to take advantage of increased throughput, reduction in work-in-progress, set-up time, and lead times; leading to product quality and customer satisfaction. The paper presents a generalised approach for machine cell formation from a jobshop using similarity order clustering technique for preliminary cell grouping and considering machine utilisation for the design of nonintergrouping material handling using the single-pass heuristic. The work addresses the shortcomings of cellular manufacturing systems design and implementations which ignore machine utilisations, group sizes and intergroup moves.

  4. Regulation of lamellipodia formation and cell invasion by CLIP-170 in invasive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Takahashi, Kazuhide

    2008-04-01

    Lamellipodia formation necessary for cell invasion is regulated by Rac1. We report here that lamellipodia formation and three-dimensional invasion were significantly promoted by HGF and serum, respectively, in invasive human breast cancer cells. Rac1 formed a complex with CLIP-170, IQGAP1, and kinesin in serum-starved cells, and stimulation of the cells with HGF and serum caused the partial release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex. The HGF-induced release of the proteins and promotion of lamellipodia formation were inhibited by an inhibitor of PI3K. Moreover, downregulation of CLIP-170 by siRNA released IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1 and promoted lamellipodia formation and invasion, independent of HGF and serum. The results suggest that promotion of lamellipodia formation and invasion by HGF or serum requires PI3K-dependent release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex and that CLIP-170 prevents cells from the extracellular stimulus-independent lamellipodia formation and invasion by tethering IQGAP1 and kinesin to Rac1. PMID:18237546

  5. Hydroxyl radical formation in phagocytic cells of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L; Huber, G L

    1979-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages, harvested from the peritoneum and lung, release superoxide (O-.2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) during phagocytosis. These two agents are thought to react with each other to produce a highly active oxidative substance known as hydroxyl radical (OH.). We present evidence suggesting that these radicals are generated by phagocytic cells of the rat. Our findings are based upon an assay where ethylene gas is generated from methional by the action of this radical. Ethylene generation was shown to be inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, and scavengers of OH.. Of the cells examined, PMN generated the most ethylene from methional, exhibiting a fourfold increase during phagocytosis. Pulmonary and peritoneal macrophages caused smaller amounts of this gas to be formed. Regardless of cell type, an intact cell was required for ethylene generation. Zymosan appeared to be the most effective particle for all cells in ethylene formation from methional, although opsonization was critical only for PMN. Ethylene generation was dependent on cell concentration to an extent and increased with time. PMID:222719

  6. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  7. MULTIMODAL APPROACHES FOR REGENERATIVE STROKE THERAPIES: COMBINATION OF GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR WITH BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IS NOT SUPERIOR TO G-CSF ALONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AurelPopa-Wagner

    1900-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilisation and homing by the stem cell mobiliser Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF. We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM MSCs in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 µg/kg or in combination with a single dose (106 cells of rat BM MSCs were administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at six hour safter transient occlusion (90 min of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by MRI at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration”. However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies would have to be carried out for a

  8. Differentiation-independent fluctuation of pluripotency-related transcription factors and other epigenetic markers in embryonic stem cell colonies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Stixová, Lenka; Pacherník, J.; Bártová, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2012), s. 710-720. ISSN 1547-3287 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ES cells * epigenetics * Oct4 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.670, year: 2012

  9. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF/NAMPT/Visfatin) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cooperate to increase the permeability of the human placental amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astern, J.M.; Collier, A.C.; Kendal-Wright, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Fluid efflux across the region of the amnion overlying the placenta is an essential component of the intramembranous absorption pathway that maintains amniotic fluid volume homeostasis. Dysregulation of this pathway may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes, however the factors controlling amnion permeability are unknown. Here, we report a novel mechanism that increases placental amnion permeability. Pre-B Cell Colony Enhancing Factor (PBEF) is a stress-responsive cytokine expressed by the human amnion, and is known to induce Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) production by other cell types. Interestingly, VEGF is up-regulated in the ovine amnion when intramembranous absorption is augmented. In this study, we show that PBEF induced VEGF secretion by primary human amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from the placental amnion, as well as from the reflected amnion that lines the remainder of the gestational sac. Further, PBEF treatment led to the increased expression of VEGFR2 in placental AEC, but not reflected AEC. To test the hypothesis that PBEF and VEGF increase placental amnion permeability, we monitored the transfer of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) from the fetal to the maternal side of human amnion explants. A treatment regimen including both PBEF and VEGF increased the rate of DCF transfer across the placental amnion, but not the reflected amnion. In summary, our results suggest that by augmenting VEGFR2 expression in the placental amnion, PBEF primes the tissue for a VEGF-mediated increase in permeability. This mechanism may have important implications in amniotic fluid volume control throughout gestation. PMID:23151382

  10. High frequency of endothelial colony forming cells marks a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Rosti

    Full Text Available Increased mobilization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells may represent a new biological hallmark of myeloproliferative neoplasms. We measured circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs in 106 patients with primary myelofibrosis, fibrotic stage, 49 with prefibrotic myelofibrosis, 59 with essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera, and 43 normal controls. Levels of ECFC frequency for patient's characteristics were estimated by using logistic regression in univariate and multivariate setting. The sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and positive predictive value of increased ECFC frequency were calculated for the significantly associated characteristics. Increased frequency of ECFCs resulted independently associated with history of splanchnic vein thrombosis (adjusted odds ratio = 6.61, 95% CI = 2.54-17.16, and a summary measure of non-active disease, i.e. hemoglobin of 13.8 g/dL or lower, white blood cells count of 7.8×10(9/L or lower, and platelet count of 400×10(9/L or lower (adjusted odds ratio = 4.43, 95% CI = 1.45-13.49 Thirteen patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis non associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms were recruited as controls. We excluded a causal role of splanchnic vein thrombosis in ECFCs increase, since no control had elevated ECFCs. We concluded that increased frequency of ECFCs represents the biological hallmark of a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis. The recognition of this disease category copes with the phenotypic mimicry of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Due to inherent performance limitations of ECFCs assay, there is an urgent need to arrive to an acceptable standardization of ECFC assessment.

  11. Adenosine formation in contracting primary rat skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study examined the capacity for adenosine formation, uptake and metabolism in contracting primary rat muscle cells and in microvascular endothelial cells in culture. 2. Strong and moderate electrical simulation of skeletal muscle cells led to a significantly greater increase in the...... extracellular adenosine concentration (421 +/- 91 and 235 +/- 30 nmol (g protein)-1, respectively; P < 0.05) compared with non-stimulated muscle cells (161 +/- 20 nmol (g protein)-1). The ATP concentration was lower (18%; P < 0.05) in the intensely contracted, but not in the moderately contracted muscle cells....... 3. Addition of microvascular endothelial cells to the cultured skeletal muscle cells enhanced the contraction-induced accumulation of extracellular adenosine (P < 0.05), whereas endothelial cells in culture alone did not cause extracellular accumulation of adenosine. 4. Skeletal muscle cells were...

  12. Pattern formation of scale cells in Lepidoptera by differential origin-dependent cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimura, T.; Zhu, M.; Cook, J.; Maini, P. K.

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for the formation of parallel rows of scale cells in the developing adult wing of moths and butterflies. Precursors of scale cells differentiate throughout each epithelial monolayer and migrate into rows that are roughly parallel to the body axis. Grafting experiments have revealed what appears to be a gradient of adhesivity along the wing. What is more, cell adhesivity character is maintained after grafting. Thus we suggest that it is a cell’s location prior to migration t...

  13. Cell-cycle dependent micronucleus formation and mitotic disturbances induced by 5-azacytidine in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stopper, Helga; Körber, C.; Schiffmann, D; Caspary, W J

    2012-01-01

    5-Azacytidine was originally developed to treat human myelogenous leukemia. However, interest in this compound has expanded because of reports of its ability to affect cell differentiation and to alter eukaryotic gene expression. In an ongoing attempt to understand the biochemical effects of this compound, we examined the effects of 5-azacytidine on mitosis and on micronucleus formation in mammalian cells. In L5178Y mouse cells, 5-azacytidine induced micronuclei at concentrations at which we ...

  14. Effects of the protein kinase C stimulant bryostatin 1 on the proliferation and colony formation of irradiated human T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein kinase C stimulant bryostatin 1 (Bryo) was used in examining human peripheral blood T-lymphocyte radiosensitivities in proliferation assays. Bryo was similar to PMA in inducing T-cell proliferation by the CD3, CD28 and CD69 pathways. No difference in radiosensitivities was observed in T-cells stimulated by the three independent surface antigen-mediated activation pathways. CD3 was chosen as the second signal for comparing the potencies of the three different first signals Bryo, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in stimulating T-cell proliferation and in maintaining this response after radiation. Though there were radioresponse differences among various individuals, the irradiated lymphocytes consistently showed significantly greater proliferation when treated with Bryo or PMA than with IL-2. These results support the important tole of protein kinase C in T-cell radiation responses, and suggest a potential role for Bryo in enhancing T-lymphocyte survival during radiation therapy. (author)

  15. Formation of nanofilms on cell surfaces to improve the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Yosuke [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kawano, Keiko [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-26 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakamura, Noriyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-26 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Chikashi, E-mail: chikashi-nakamura@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-26 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles into fibroblast and neural cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms formed on cell surfaces improved the insertion efficiency of nanoneedles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofilms improved the insertion efficiency even in Y27632-treated cells. -- Abstract: A nanoneedle, an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip etched to 200 nm in diameter and 10 {mu}m in length, can be inserted into cells with the aid of an AFM and has been used to introduce functional molecules into cells and to analyze intracellular information with minimal cell damage. However, some cell lines have shown low insertion efficiency of the nanoneedle. Improvement in the insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into such cells is a significant issue for nanoneedle-based cell manipulation and analysis. Here, we have formed nanofilms composed of extracellular matrix molecules on cell surfaces and found that the formation of the nanofilms improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle into fibroblast and neural cells. The nanofilms were shown to improve insertion efficiency even in cells in which the formation of actin stress fibers was inhibited by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that the nanofilms with the mesh structure directly contributed to the improved insertion efficiency of a nanoneedle.

  16. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  17. Black Silicon formation using dry etching for solar cells applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the formation of Black Silicon on crystalline silicon surface using SF6/O2 and SF6/O2/CH4 based plasmas in a reactive ion etching (RIE) system is presented. The effect of the RF power, chamber pressure, process time, gas flow rates, and gas mixtures on the texture of silicon surface has been analyzed. Completely Black Silicon surfaces containing pyramid like structures have been obtained, using an optimized mask-free plasma process. Moreover, the Black Silicon surfaces have demonstrated average values of 1% and 4% for specular and diffuse reflectance respectively, feature that is suitable for the fabrication of low cost solar cells.

  18. EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHMS WITH PREFERENCE FOR MANUFACTURING CELLS FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianwei; WEI Xiaopeng; LI Rui

    2008-01-01

    Due to the combinatorial nature of cell formation problem and the characteristics of multi-objective and multi-constrain, a novel method of evolutionary algorithm with preference is proposed. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is adopted to determine scientifically the weights of the sub-objective functions. The satisfaction of constraints is considered as a new objective, the ratio of the population which doesn't satisfy all constraints is assigned as the weight of new objective. In addition, the self-adaptation of weights is applied in order to converge more easily towards the feasible domain. Therefore, both features multi-criteria and constrains are dealt with simultaneously. Finally, an example is selected from the literature to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. The results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in designing the manufacturing cells.

  19. PLACE CELL FORMATION BY GRID CELL CONVERGENCE IN THE DENDRITES OF A CA1 MODEL NEURON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Pollali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Place cells are pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus which fire selectively when the animal is located in a particular place in space. CA1 place cells receive synaptic input from CA3 via the Schaffer collateral fibers to their proximal apical and basal dendrites and from the third layer of medial entorhinal cortex to their apical tuft dendrites. Both of these input pathways encode spatial information. Grid cells, which form the entorhinal input to CA1 cells, have a spatial firing field with multiple peaks which displays a regularly spaced, triangular grid pattern that covers the entire space of a given environment. Both grid and place cells are phase-modulated by theta rhythm and this modulation may be important for their spatial properties. Studying the formation of place cells is an important step in understanding how representation of the external environment is coded in neural networks that constitute spatial maps. It is not currently known how place fields emerge in CA1 neurons. An influential model of place cell formation predicts the convergence of various grid field inputs which combine linearly to create the place field output of CA1 cells. In this study, we constructed a model of CA1 place cell formation through the convergence of grid field inputs to the distal dendrites of our model neuron. We created a model of grid cell activity which represents the firing of grid cells modulated be the theta rhythm. We varied the number of different grid fields used as synaptic inputs to stimulate the distal dendrites of a biophysically constrained, detailed compartmental CA1 pyramidal cell model. In addition, inhibition was placed in both the distal and proximal dendrites. These inhibitory pathways are known to be active in different phases of the theta rhythm. We used this model to study the properties of CA1 place cell formation and to assess the output of the CA1 model cell during place cell activity. Additionally, we

  20. Formation of photovoltaic modules based on polycrystalline solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Dobrzański

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of the paper is formation of photovoltaic modules and analysis of their main electric parameters.Design/methodology/approach: Photovoltaic modules were produced from four polycrystalline silicon solar cells, that were cut and next joined in series. Soft soldering technique and copper-tin strip were used for joining cells.Findings: In order to provide useful power for any application, the individual solar cells must be connected together to give the appropriate current and voltage levels. Taking this fact into account the analysis of photovoltaic module construction was performed.Research limitations/implications: The main goal of the research is to show the practical application of solar cells. Two photovoltaic modules were assembled and their basic electric properties were analysed. It was shown that they may be successively applied as an alternative energy source.Practical implications: Photovoltaic modules are irreplaceable in areas which are far away from power network. Simply photovoltaic module can supply small device without any problem.Originality/value: The produced photovoltaic modules and photovoltaic systems confirm the utility of solar energy in every place where the sun radiation is available. Because of exhaust conventional energy sources like coal or earth gas, new renewable sources of energy (sunlight, wind are more and more often used. It brings huge ecological benefits.

  1. Bioluminescence Reporter Gene Imaging Characterize Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Teratoma Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Weijun; Zhou, Manqian; Zheng, Yizhou; Fan, Yan; HAN, ZHONGCHAO; Kong, Deling; Wu, Joseph C.; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are capable of differentiation into virtually all cell types and hold tremendous potential as cell sources for regenerative therapies. However, teratoma formation can be the main obstacle for hES cells therapy. In order to understand the biology and physiology of hES cells teratoma formation, we investigated the angiogenic process within teratomas and characterized teratoma cells. In this study, hES cells transduced with double fusion reporter gene that consis...

  2. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) following high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical benefits at no extra cost.

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Lee; Radford, J. A.; Dobson, L.; Huq, T.; Ryder, W. D.; Pettengell, R; Morgenstern, G. R.; Scarffe, J. H.; Crowther, D.

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential clinical and economic benefits of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, filgrastim) following peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) rescue after high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT), 23 consecutive patients aged less than 60 years with poor-prognosis, high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were entered into a prospective randomized trial between May 1993 and September 1995. Patients were randomized to receive either PBPC alone (n = 12) or PBPC+G-CSF (n ...

  3. Dexamethasone prevents granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production in a skin dendritic cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Carlos B.; M. Celeste Lopes; Américo Figueiredo; M. Teresa Cruz; Margarida Gonçalo; Ana Luísa Vital

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: Nitric oxide (NO) has been increasingly implicated in inflammatory skin diseases, namely in allergic contact dermatitis. In this work, we investigated the effect of dexamethasone on NO production induced by the epidermal cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a mouse fetal skin dendritic cell line. METHODS: NO production was assessed by the method of Griess. Expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein was evaluated by wester...

  4. Mipu1 Overexpression Protects Macrophages from oxLDL-Induced Foam Cell Formation and Cell Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Shun-Lin; Fan, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Fang; Han, Dan; Pan, Wen-Jun; Li, Wei; Feng, Da-Ming; JIANG, ZHI-SHENG

    2014-01-01

    Mipu1 (myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1) is a novel N-terminal Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)/C2H2 zinc finger superfamily protein, that displays a powerful effect in protecting H9c2 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis. The present study aims to investigate the effect of Mipu1 overexpression on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced foam cell formation, cell apoptosis, and its possible mechanisms. New Zealand healthy rabbits were used to establ...

  5. Colonial American Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  6. Stem Cell-Soluble Signals Enhance Multilumen Formation in SMG Cell Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, C L M; Leigh, N J; Nelson, J W; McCall, A D; Mellas, R E; Lei, P; Andreadis, S T; Baker, O J

    2015-11-01

    Saliva plays a major role in maintaining oral health. Patients with salivary hypofunction exhibit difficulty in chewing and swallowing foods, tooth decay, periodontal disease, and microbial infections. At this time, treatments for hyposalivation are limited to medications (e.g., muscarinic receptor agonists: pilocarpine and cevimeline) that induce saliva secretion from residual acinar cells as well as artificial salivary substitutes. Therefore, advancement of restorative treatments is necessary to improve the quality of life in these patients. Our previous studies indicated that salivary cells are able to form polarized 3-dimensional structures when grown on growth factor-reduced Matrigel. This basement membrane is rich in laminin-III (L1), which plays a critical role in salivary gland formation. Mitotically inactive feeder layers have been used previously to support the growth of many different cell types, as they provide factors necessary for cell growth and organization. The goal of this study was to improve salivary gland cell differentiation in primary cultures by using a combination of L1 and a feeder layer of human hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hHF-MSCs). Our results indicated that the direct contact of mouse submandibular (mSMG) cell clusters and hHF-MSCs was not required for mSMG cells to form acinar and ductal structures. However, the hHF-MSC conditioned medium enhanced cell organization and multilumen formation, indicating that soluble signals secreted by hHF-MSCs play a role in promoting these features. PMID:26285810

  7. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, V; Virtanen, S

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37°C, 5% CO2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37°C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  8. ZAP-70 kinase regulates HIV cell-to-cell spread and virological synapse formation

    OpenAIRE

    Sol-Foulon, Nathalie; Sourisseau, Marion; Porrot, Françoise; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Trouillet, Céline; Nobile, Cinzia; Blanchet, Fabien; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Noraz, Nelly; Taylor, Naomi; Alcover, Andres; Hivroz, Claire; Schwartz, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    HIV efficiently spreads in lymphocytes, likely through virological synapses (VSs). These cell–cell junctions share some characteristics with immunological synapses, but cellular proteins required for their constitution remain poorly characterized. We have examined here the role of ZAP-70, a key kinase regulating T-cell activation and immunological synapse formation, in HIV replication. In lymphocytes deficient for ZAP-70, or expressing a kinase-dead mutant of the protein, HIV replication was ...

  9. Formation of Cell-To-Cell Connection between Bone Marrow Cells and Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes in a Cocultivation Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skopalík, J.; Pásek, Michal; Rychtárik, M.; Koristek, Z.; Gabrielová, E.; Sheer, P.; Matejovič, P.; Modrianský, M.; Klabusay, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), s. 1000185. ISSN 2157-7013 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : bone marrow * mononuclear cells * isolated cardiomyocytes * cocultivation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics http://omicsonline.org/ open - access /formation-of-celltocell-connection-between-bone-marrow-cells- and -isolated-rat-cardiomyocytes-2157-7013.1000185.php?aid=33364

  10. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  11. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

    CERN Document Server

    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  12. Black Silicon formation using dry etching for solar cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murias, D. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Reyes-Betanzo, C., E-mail: creyes@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Moreno, M.; Torres, A.; Itzmoyotl, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Ambrosio, R.; Soriano, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Lucas, J. [Instituto Tecnologico de Tehuacan, Puebla (Mexico); Cabarrocas, P. Roca i [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2012-09-20

    A study on the formation of Black Silicon on crystalline silicon surface using SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} and SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} based plasmas in a reactive ion etching (RIE) system is presented. The effect of the RF power, chamber pressure, process time, gas flow rates, and gas mixtures on the texture of silicon surface has been analyzed. Completely Black Silicon surfaces containing pyramid like structures have been obtained, using an optimized mask-free plasma process. Moreover, the Black Silicon surfaces have demonstrated average values of 1% and 4% for specular and diffuse reflectance respectively, feature that is suitable for the fabrication of low cost solar cells.

  13. Dutch colonial anthropology in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Buskens, L.P.H.M.; Kommers, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to assess the results of colonial anthropology in Indonesia faced some problems, which, until recently, have not been dealt with properly. Therefore, in a newly published comprehensive history of anthropology in the Netherlands, several studies focused on the character, rather than on the substance of colonial anthropology. In the case of Dutch colonial representations of Indonesia, 'colonial anthropology' appears to be an assemblage of various disciplines that constituted a fragment...

  14. Light induced polaron formation in perovskite solar cell devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukirch, Amanda; Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad; Sfeir, Matthew; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Crochet, Jared; Gupta, Gautum; Mohite, Aditya; Tretiak, Sergei

    The need for a low-cost, clean, and abundant source of energy has generated large amounts of research in solution processed solar cell materials. The lead halide perovskite has rapidly developed as a serious candidate for the active layer of photovoltaic devices. The efficiencies of devices made with this material have increased from 3.5% to over 20% in around 5 years. Despite the remarkable progress associated with perovskite materials, there are still fundamental questions regarding their lack of photo-stability over prolonged solar irradiation that need to be addressed. Recent experiments on photo-degradation under constant illumination have found fast self-healing by resting the device in the dark for less than 1 minute. Density functional theory and symmetry analysis show that localized charge states couple to local structural lattice distortions and methyl ammonium quasistatic configurations. Once translational symmetry is lost, additional bonding configurations become symmetry allowed, triggering localized charges in the vicinity over time under constant illumination, thus seeding the formation of macroscopic charged domains and preventing efficient charge extraction. Here we present an in-depth study of polaron formation and binding energy at the atomistic level.

  15. Cytological alteration of cultured rat liver cells by 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene with special reference to chromosome changes, changes of growth patterns at a colony level and alpha-fetoprotein production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiwa,Takayoshi

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available A near diploid clone derived from a rat liver cell line was continuously treated with various concentrations of 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3'-Me-DAB in culture. By treatment with 2.8 micrograms/ml, cells with 41 chromosomes formed a mode and which then shifted to 39. The chromosome numbers of cells treated with 5.4 micrograms/ml were widely distributed at early stages, but later the mode shifted to hypotetraploid region. Untreated control cells were confirmed as near diploid. Increased plating efficiency by 3'-Me-DAB as well as the appearance of large sized colonies was obtained. The production of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP by the cells was slightly enhanced by treatment with 3'-Me-DAB. The cells treated with and without 3'-Me-DAB did not produce any tumor in rats 6 months after their intraperitoneal injection.

  16. Membrane electrolytic cell for minimizing hypochlorite and chlorate formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrolytic cell for the electrolysis of an alkali metal chloride brine is comprised of an anode compartment and a cathode compartment separated by a cation exchange membrane. The anode is comprised of an unflattened expanded structure of a valve metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, tantalum, niobium, and alloys thereof. At least one side of the anode has as the electrochemically active surface an electrodeposited layer of a valve metal oxide. A plurality of cracks traverse the electrodeposited layer and a coating of a platinum metal group oxide covers the electrodeposited layer and substantially fills the cracks. The cationic exchange membrane is comprised of a laminated structure having a first surface adapted to contact an anolyte in which the ion exchange groups are predominately sulfonic acid groups. The first surface is also in contact with the electrochemically active surface of the anode. A second surface of the cation exchange membrane, adapted to contact a catholyte, has ion exchange groups which are predominately carboxylic acid groups. The cathode positioned in the cathode compartment is spaced apart from the cation exchange membrane. The cell operates with both a low chlorine overvoltage and a low oxygen overvoltage. During electrolysis of alkali metal chloride brines, the formation of hypochlorite and chlorate ions is minimized and the alkali metal hydroxides produced have low chlorate concentrations and are suitable for use without further treatment in chlorate-sensitive applications. Spent brine treatment is simplified and at reduced costs

  17. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S;

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4.......01/microL (P CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  18. In vitro formation of β cell pseudoislets using islet-derived endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Spelios

    Full Text Available β cell pseudoislets (PIs are used for the in vitro study of β-cells in a three-dimensional (3-D configuration. Current methods of PI induction require unique culture conditions and extensive mechanical manipulations. Here we report a novel co-culture system consisting of high passage β-cells and islet-derived endothelial cells (iECs that results in a rapid and spontaneous formation of free-floating PIs. PI structures were formed as early as 72 h following co-culture setup and were preserved for more than 14 d. These PIs, composed solely of β-cells, were similar in size to that of native islets and showed an increased percentage of proinsulin-positive cells, increased insulin gene expression in response to glucose stimulation, and restored glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when compared to β-cells cultured as monolayers. Key extracellular matrix proteins that were absent in β-cells cultured alone were deposited by iECs on PIs and were found in and around the PIs. iEC-induced PIs are a readily available tool for examining β cell function in a native 3-D configuration and can be used for examining β-cell/iEC interactions in vitro.

  19. Mind bomb 1 is required for pancreatic ß-cell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Signe; Kobberup, Sune; Jørgensen, Mette C; Kalisz, Mark; Klein, Tino; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Gegg, Moritz; Lickert, Heiko; Lindner, Jill; Magnuson, Mark A; Kong, Young-Yun; Serup, Palle; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Jensen, Jan N

    2012-01-01

    insulin producing ß-cells. However, signals that regulate proximodistal (P-D) patterning and thus formation of ß-cell progenitors are unknown. Here we show that Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) is required for correct P-D patterning of the developing pancreas and ß-cell formation. We found that endoderm...

  20. Unmasking Cryptococcal Meningitis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome due to Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use in a Patient with a Poorly Differentiated Germ Cell Neoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Nathan C.; Wallace, James; Frosch, Anne E.P.; Boulware, David R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is frequently seen in patients with HIV and less frequently in patients on immune suppressive medications for other conditions. Here, we describe the first reported case of unmasking cryptococcal IRIS due to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor used in an HIV-negative patient with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Kwang, E-mail: parksk@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won, E-mail: kwon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor.

  2. Lateral inhibition-induced pattern formation controlled by the size and geometry of the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-09-01

    Pattern formation in development biology is one of the fundamental processes by which cells change their functions. It is based on the communication of cells via intra- and intercellular dynamics of biochemicals. Thus, the cell is directly involved in biochemical interactions. However, many theoretical approaches describing biochemical pattern formation have usually neglected the cell's role or have simplified the subcellular process without considering cellular aspects despite the cell being the environment where biochemicals interact. On the other hand, recent experimental observations suggest that a change in the physical conditions of cell-to-cell contact can result in a change in cell fate and tissue patterning in a lateral inhibition system. Here we develop a mathematical model by which biochemical dynamics can be directly observed with explicitly expressed cell structure and geometry in higher dimensions, and reconsider pattern formation by lateral inhibition of the Notch-Delta signaling pathway. We explore how the physical characteristic of cell, such as cell geometry or size, influences the biochemical pattern formation in a multi-cellular system. Our results suggest that a property based on cell geometry can be a novel mechanism for symmetry breaking inducing cell asymmetry. We show that cell volume can critically influence cell fate determination and pattern formation at the tissue level, and the surface area of the cell-to-cell contact can directly affect the spatial range of patterning. PMID:27229622

  3. Human granulocytopoietic colonies in diffusion chambers in mice: Growth of colonies and the effect of host irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal human non-separated bone marrow cells were cultured in fibrin clots in diffusion chambers implanted intraperitoneally in mice, and harvested at different intervals by a previously described chamber centrifugation technique. This method demonstrates the presence of cell aggregates in the diffusion chambers. When the chambers are implanted in irradiated mice (450 R) and retransplantated into newly irradiated mice every seventh day, a continous increase in number of cells per granulocytopoietic aggregate is observed from day 8 to day 21. This is compatible with the view that the aggregates are colonies. The term 'colony forming unit diffusion chamber' (CFUD) is suggested to denote the ancestor(s) of the colonies. However, formal proof that one colony is derived from one cell is lacking. Preirradiation of mice with 450 R significantly increases the number of neutrophilic granulocytopoietic colonies at day 14, provided the chambers are retransplantated to newly irradiated mice at day 7, indicating that the neutrophilic colony forming unit or its progeny is involved as at least one of the targets of the stimulating effect of host irradiation. In contrast, no effect of host irradiation on the numbers of eosinophilic colonies was observed. Aggregates of megakaryocytic cells were present during the entire culture period. (author)

  4. Counting colonies of clonogenic assays by using densitometric software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clonogenic assays are a useful tool to test whether a given cancer therapy can reduce the clonogenic survival of tumour cells. A colony is defined as a cluster of at least 50 cells which can often only be determined microscopically. The process of counting colonies is very extensive work and so we developed software that is able to count the colonies automatically from scanned flasks. This software is made freely available by us with a detailed description how to use and install the necessary features

  5. Tudor and its domains: germ cell formation from a Tudor perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Travis THOMSON; Paul LASKO

    2005-01-01

    In many metazoan species, germ cell formation requires the germ plasm, a specialized cytoplasm which often contains electron dense structures. Genes required for germ cell formation in Drosophila have been isolated predominantly in screens for maternal-effect mutations. One such gene is tudor (tud); without proper tud function germ cell formation does not occur. Unlike other genes involved in Drosophila germ cell specification tud is dispensable for other somatic functions such as abdominal patterning. It is not known how TUD contributes at a molecular level to germ cell formation but in tud mutants, polar granule formation is severely compromised, and mitochondrially encoded ribosomal RNAs do not localize to the polar granule. TUD is composed of 11 repeats of the protein motif called the Tudor domain. There are similar proteins to TUD in the germ line of other metazoan species including mice. Probable vertebrate orthologues of Drosophila genes involved in germ cell specification will be discussed.

  6. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  7. Food and Coloniality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Albán Achinte

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The author tackles the alimentary dimension of life, as something that goes beyond the simple act of ingesting food to acquire nutrients, to concentrate on the cultural implications of eating. To eat is more than to feed oneself, for eating is never by itself a wholly innocent act; that is, eating is never completely stripped from the social relationships of those gathered around a table.From this perspective, the article examines coloniality in all its forms (of power, of knowledge and of being, and shows their function as mechanisms of both alimentary enunciation and classification, that are responsible of the gastronomic supplantation of produce and food from the New World with the goods and customs that were so dear to European settlers (not forgetting that the influx of products and seasonings went also in the other direction. The colonizing project included thus, besides its religious, political and administrative pretenses, a gastronomical element, to be found in the eagerness of the colonizers to reproduce the alimentary imprint of their homeland in the new found territories, at least as far as the circumstances and the climate allowed it. Among all the facets the production of knowledge can acquire, gastronomy has been poorly studied —not to say completely silenced— in its role as a token of cultural divides, in which a coloniality of flavors and palates has been carried out.

  8. Dutch Colonial Nostalgia Across Decolonisation

    OpenAIRE

    Bijl, P.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that nostalgia for colonialism in the Netherlands, the so called tempo doeloe culture, is not a specifically postcolonial phenomenon caused by the collapse of the Dutch empire in Asia. In fact, nostalgia for the Dutch East Indies can be traced back to the nineteenth century, when the colony was still being formed, and its current form can productively be described as a nostalgia for nostalgia. On a more general level, colonial nostalgia, which is often too easily dismissed...

  9. IL-20 activates human lymphatic endothelial cells causing cell signalling and tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Troels; Tritsaris, Katerina; Hübschmann, Martin V;

    2009-01-01

    IL-20 is an arteriogenic cytokine that remodels collateral networks in vivo, and plays a role in cellular organization. Here, we investigate its role in lymphangiogenesis using a lymphatic endothelial cell line, hTERT-HDLEC, which expresses the lymphatic markers LYVE-1 and podoplanin. Upon...... IL-20 induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and mTOR, and using the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and mTOR complex inhibitor rapamycin we demonstrated the importance of these signalling pathways in IL-20-mediated proliferation. IL-20 triggered actin polymerization and morphological changes resulting in elongated...... cell structures, and in matrigels, IL-20 caused tube formations of hTERT-HDLEC in a PI3K- and mTOR dependent way. In a sprouting assay we found that IL-20 caused cell migration within 24 h at a rate comparable to VEGF-C, and this migration could be inhibited by wortmannin and rapamycin. These data show...

  10. Cutting edge: Bcl6-interacting corepressor contributes to germinal center T follicular helper cell formation and B cell helper function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jessica A; Tubo, Noah J; Gearhart, Micah D; Bardwell, Vivian J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2015-06-15

    CD4(+) germinal center (GC)-T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells become long-lived plasma cells and memory cells. The transcriptional repressor Bcl6 plays a key role in GC-Tfh formation by inhibiting the expression of genes that promote differentiation into other lineages. We determined whether BCOR, a component of a Polycomb repressive complex that interacts with the Bcl6 BTB domain, influences GC-Tfh differentiation. T cell-targeted BCOR deficiency led to a substantial loss of peptide:MHC class II-specific GC-Tfh cells following Listeria monocytogenes infection and a 2-fold decrease following immunization with a peptide in CFA. The reduction in GC-Tfh cells was associated with diminished plasma cell and GC B cell formation. Thus, T cell-expressed BCOR is critical for optimal GC-Tfh cell differentiation and humoral immunity. PMID:25964495

  11. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear β-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear β-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3β activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death

  12. Inhibition of Blumeria graminis germination and germling development within colonies of oat mildew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carver, T.L.W.; Roberts, P.C.; Thomas, B.J.;

    2001-01-01

    Germination by Blumeria graminis. DC Speer ff. spp. avenae, hordei and tritici, was greatly suppressed when conidia fell within colonies of ff. spp. avenae or hordei established on susceptible oat or barley, respectively. On healthy oat or barley, and when distant from powdery mildew, colonies. all...... ff. spp. formed normal appressoria. This was also true When conidia germinated within established barley mildew colonies. Within barley mildew colonies, appressoria of f. sp. hordei penetrated epidermal cells formed haustoria more frequently than appressoria distant from colonies. Similarly, ff. spp....... avenae and tritici, normally unable to infect barley. frequently penetrated epidermal cells subtending established barley mildew colonies. Thus, colony, establishment induced barley epidermal cell accessibility, even to non-pathogenic ff. spp, In contrast. when all three ff. spp. germinated within...

  13. Mipu1 overexpression protects macrophages from oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shun-Lin; Fan, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Fang; Han, Dan; Pan, Wen-Jun; Li, Wei; Feng, Da-Ming; Jiang, Zhi-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Mipu1 (myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1) is a novel N-terminal Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)/C2H2 zinc finger superfamily protein, that displays a powerful effect in protecting H9c2 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis. The present study aims to investigate the effect of Mipu1 overexpression on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced foam cell formation, cell apoptosis, and its possible mechanisms. New Zealand healthy rabbits were used to establish atherosclerosis model, and serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were detected by an automatic biochemical analyzer. Sudan IV staining was used to detect atherosclerotic lesions. The RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was selected as the experimental material. Oil red O staining, high-performance liquid chromatography, and Dil-labeled lipoprotein were used to detect cholesterol accumulation qualitatively and quantitatively, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell apoptosis. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression of the main proteins that are associated with the transport of cholesterol, such as ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, and CD36. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of Mipu1. There were atherosclerotic lesions in the high-fat diet group with Sudan IV staining. High-fat diet decreased Mipu1 expression and increased CD36 expression significantly at the 10th week compared with standard-diet rabbits. Mipu1 overexpression decreased oxLDL-induced cholesterol accumulation, oxLDL uptake, cell apoptosis, and cleaved caspase-3. Mipu1 overexpression inhibited the oxLDL-induced CD36 mRNA and protein expression, but it did not significantly inhibit the mRNA expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and SR-BI. Mipu1 overexpression inhibits oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and cell apoptosis. Mipu1 overexpression reduces the

  14. Kinetics of linear rouleaux formation studied by visual monitoring of red cell dynamic organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Barshtein, G; Wajnblum, D; Yedgar, S

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules may form aggregates, normally in rouleaux formations, which are dispersed with increasing blood flow. Experimental observations have suggested that the spontaneous aggregation process involves the formation of linear rouleaux (FLR) followed by formation of branched rouleaux networks. Theoretical models for the spontaneous rouleaux formation were formulated, taking into consideration that FLR may involve both "po...

  15. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls (3)(R = O)*. The kinetics of (3)(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-weak photon emission using low-noise photomultiplier, showed immediate enhancement followed by a slow decay. In parallel to the formation of (3)(R = O)*, the formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) in U266 cells caused by the addition of H2O2 was visualized by the imaging of (1)O2 using the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the formation of (1)O2 after the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. Presented results indicate that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension results in the formation of (3)(R = O)* and (1)O2 in U266 cell suspension. The contribution of the cell-free medium to the formation of electronically excited species was discussed. PMID:25744165

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Mammosphere Formation and Decrease E-Cadherin in Normal and Malignant Breast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klopp, Ann H; Lacerda, Lara; Gupta, Anshul; Debeb, Bisrat G; Solley, Travis; Li, Li; Spaeth, Erika; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lewis, Michael T.; Reuben, James M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Ferrari, Mauro; Gaspar, Rogério; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Normal and malignant breast tissue contains a rare population of multi-potent cells with the capacity to self-renew, referred to as stem cells, or tumor initiating cells (TIC). These cells can be enriched by growth as “mammospheres” in three-dimensional cultures. Objective We tested the hypothesis that human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which are known to support tumor growth and metastasis, increase mammosphere formation. Results We found that MSC increased ...

  17. Machine-Part cell formation through visual decipherable clustering of Self Organizing Map

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Dan, Pranab K

    2011-01-01

    Machine-part cell formation is used in cellular manufacturing in order to process a large variety, quality, lower work in process levels, reducing manufacturing lead-time and customer response time while retaining flexibility for new products. This paper presents a new and novel approach for obtaining machine cells and part families. In the cellular manufacturing the fundamental problem is the formation of part families and machine cells. The present paper deals with the Self Organising Map (...

  18. Colony Variation in Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Michael J.; Nuttall, Nichalas; Pryce, Todd M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearman, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is being increasingly reported as a pathogen with an outcome resembling that of S. aureus rather than coagulase-negative staphylococci. Recent local isolates exhibited colonial variation that delayed identification and interpretation of clinical significance. Until now previous descriptions have not emphasized colonial variation as an important identifying characteristic of S. lugdunensis.

  19. Student Discipline in Colonial America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, John R.

    The basis for the severe discipline imposed on school children in colonial America, especially in the Puritan colonies, was the belief in original sin. The child was regarded as being born in sin and thus depraved and prone to sin. The purpose of education was to enable children to read the Bible and thus change the behavior which otherwise would…

  20. An Approach to Determining the Optimal Cell Number of Manufacturing Cell Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An approach to determining the optimal cell number of manufacturing cell formation is presented. Firstly, the difference of weighting exponent, cluster center and metrics how to have an impact upon the clustering results and membership function are studied. Secondly, a method to determine the optimal m value is given. Two-order partial derivative of the objective function for FCM is calculated, and the variational weighting exponent m is obtained that can prevent the parameter from being the unique value and play an important role in the process of fuzzy clustering. Moreover, in order to avoid a single validity index can not assess correctly, partition coefficient (PC, classification entropy (CE, Fukuyama and Sugeno (FS and Xie and Beni (XB are considered as multi-performance indexes to evaluate the cluster validity, and then an optimal number c is chosen based on these validity measures. Finally, test exampls are given to illustrate the validity of the proposed approach.

  1. So far away from home : engaging the silenced colonial : the Netherlands-Indies diaspora in North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu-Boon, Hendrika H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of the making of colonial identities, the bond to natal land fundamental to the formation of ‘self,’ its impact on immigration/repatriation, and the hegemonic application of the paradigm of Colonialism to highly diverse colonial encounters, this research engages

  2. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  3. Formate: an Energy Storage and Transport Bridge between Carbon Dioxide and a Formate Fuel Cell in a Single Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tracy; Purohit, Krutarth; Nguyen, Christopher; Biggs, Brenna; Mayoral, Salvador; Haan, John L

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first device to our knowledge that uses a solar panel to power the electrochemical reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide (carbonate) into formate that is then used in the same device to operate a direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). The electrochemical reduction of carbonate is carried out on a Sn electrode in a reservoir that maintains a constant carbon balance between carbonate and formate. The electron-rich formate species is converted by the DFFC into electrical energy through electron release. The product of DFFC operation is the electron-deficient carbonate species that diffuses back to the reservoir bulk. It is possible to continuously charge the device using alternative energy (e.g., solar) to convert carbonate to formate for on-demand use in the DFFC; the intermittent nature of alternative energy makes this an attractive design. In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that performs reduction of carbonate, storage of formate, and operation of a DFFC. PMID:26510492

  4. Nicotinate-Curcumin Impedes Foam Cell Formation from THP-1 Cells through Restoring Autophagy Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong-Feng; Li, Hai-Zhe; Tang, Ya-Ling; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that a novel curcumin derivate nicotinate-curcumin (NC) has beneficial effects on the prevention of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Given that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism, the present study was designed to investigate whether NC decreases foam cell formation through restoring autophagy flux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 cells. Our results showed that ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) was accumulated in THP-1 cells and impaired autophagy flux. Ox-LDL-induced impairment of autophagy was enhanced by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and rescued by the autophagy inducer rapamycin. The aggregation of ox-LDL was increased by CQ, but decreased by rapamycin. In addition, colocalization of lipid droplets with LC3-II was remarkably reduced in ox-LDL group. In contrast, NC (10 μM) rescued the impaired autophagy flux by significantly increasing level of LC3-II, the number of autophagolysosomes, and the degradation of p62 in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 cells. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling was required for NC-rescued autophagy flux. Notably, our results showed that NC remarkably promoted the colocalization of lipid droplets with autophagolysosomes, increased efflux of cholesterol, and reduced ox-LDL accumulation in THP-1 cells. However, treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or CQ reduced the protective effects of NC on lipid accumulation. Collectively, the findings suggest that NC decreases lipid accumulation in THP-1 cells through restoring autophagy flux, and further implicate that NC may be a potential therapeutic reagent to reverse atherosclerosis. PMID:27128486

  5. Nicotinate-Curcumin Impedes Foam Cell Formation from THP-1 Cells through Restoring Autophagy Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong-Feng; Li, Hai-Zhe; Tang, Ya-Ling; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that a novel curcumin derivate nicotinate-curcumin (NC) has beneficial effects on the prevention of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Given that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism, the present study was designed to investigate whether NC decreases foam cell formation through restoring autophagy flux in oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 cells. Our results showed that ox-LDL (100 μg/ml) was accumulated in THP-1 cells and impaired autophagy flux. Ox-LDL-induced impairment of autophagy was enhanced by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) and rescued by the autophagy inducer rapamycin. The aggregation of ox-LDL was increased by CQ, but decreased by rapamycin. In addition, colocalization of lipid droplets with LC3-II was remarkably reduced in ox-LDL group. In contrast, NC (10 μM) rescued the impaired autophagy flux by significantly increasing level of LC3-II, the number of autophagolysosomes, and the degradation of p62 in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 cells. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling was required for NC-rescued autophagy flux. Notably, our results showed that NC remarkably promoted the colocalization of lipid droplets with autophagolysosomes, increased efflux of cholesterol, and reduced ox-LDL accumulation in THP-1 cells. However, treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or CQ reduced the protective effects of NC on lipid accumulation. Collectively, the findings suggest that NC decreases lipid accumulation in THP-1 cells through restoring autophagy flux, and further implicate that NC may be a potential therapeutic reagent to reverse atherosclerosis. PMID:27128486

  6. Lgr5(+ve) stem/progenitor cells contribute to nephron formation during kidney development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Rookmaaker, M.B.; Kujala, P.; Ng, A.; Leushacke, M.; Snippert, H.; van de Wetering, M.; Tan, S.; van Es, J.H.; Huch, M.; Poulsom, R.; Verhaar, M.C.; Peters, P.J.; Clevers, H.

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5(+ve) cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appea

  7. Lgr5(+ve) Stem/Progenitor Cells Contribute to Nephron Formation during Kidney Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Nick; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.; Kujala, Pekka; Ng, Annie; Leushacke, Marc; Snippert, Hugo; van de Wetering, Marc; Tan, Shawna; Van Es, Johan H.; Huch, Meritxell; Poulsom, Richard; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Peters, Peter J.; Clevers, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5(+ve) cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appea

  8. Thrombospondin 1 promotes synaptic formation in bone marrow-derived neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Huang; Mingnan Lu; Weitao Guo; Rong Zeng; Bin Wang; Huaibo Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a combination of growth factors was used to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into neuron-like cells, in a broader attempt to observe the role of thrombospondin 1 in synapse formation. Results showed that there was no significant difference in the differentiation rate of neuron-like cells between bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with thrombospondin induction and those without. However, the cell shape was more complex and the neurites were dendritic, with unipolar, bipolar or multipolar morphologies, after induction with thrombospondin 1. The induced cells were similar in morphology to normal neurites. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of positive cells for postsynaptic density protein 95 and synaptophysin 1 protein was significantly increased after induction with thrombospondin 1. These findings indicate that thrombospondin 1 promotes synapse formation in neuron-like cells that are differentiated from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

  9. Formation and action of oxygen activated species in cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differences of hydrogen peroxide sensibility of mammal cell lineages (man, mouse, chinese hamster) in culture are studied. The cellular survival and the frequency of DNA induced breaks by hydrogen peroxide are analysed. The efficiency of elimination of DNA breaks by cells is determined. The possible relation between the cell capacity of repair and its survival to hydrogen peroxide action is also discussed. (M.A.)

  10. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, C.; Steffen, P.; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caus...

  11. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam

  12. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  13. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. PMID:23857825

  14. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  15. Febrile Neutropenia Risk Assessment and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Support in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Receiving R-CHOP Regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salar, Antonio; Haioun, Corinne; Rossi, Francesca Gaia;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ASCO and EORTC guidelines recommend granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis for cancer patients with a ≥20% overall risk of febrile neutropenia (FN), and to support delivery of dose-dense regimens. CHOP-like regimens (with rituximab [R]) are the current...... standard of care for the management of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but they are often associated with significant myelosuppression. Neutropenic events, particularly febrile neutropenia (FN), can be life-threatening and may lead to dose delays or reductions that compromise the efficacy of......-CSF primary prophylaxis. Across all cycles, 29% of R-CHOP-21 patients had an unplanned hospitalization, with neutropenia/FN being the main reason. Subsequently, 67% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity (RDI) of ≥90% of their planned treatment (with respect to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and...

  16. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  17. IARS2 silencing induces non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promotes cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Liu, W; Li, R; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Tang, W; Wang, K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential role of Ileucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS2) silencing in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The silencing of IARS2 in H1299 cells and A549 cells were performed by lentivirus encoding shRNAs. The efficiency of IARS2 silencing was detected by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. The effects of IARS2 silencing on cell growth, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell colony formation ability were assessed by cells counting, MTT assay, flow cytometer analysis and soft agar colony formation assay, respectively. Compared with negative control group, IARS2 was significantly knockdown by transfection with lentivirus encoding shRNA of IARS2. The IARS2 silencing significantly inhibited the cells proliferation and cells colony formation ability, induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and promoted cell apoptosis. IARS2 silencing induced NSCLC cells growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promoted cell apoptosis. These results suggest that IARS2 may be a novel target for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26639235

  18. Calcium Channels are Involved in Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Specialized Cells of Pistia stratiotes L.

    OpenAIRE

    VOLK, GAYLE M.; GOSS, LENORA J.; FRANCESCHI, VINCENT R.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pistia stratiotes produces large amounts of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals in specialized cells called crystal idioblasts. The potential involvement of Ca2+ channels in Ca oxalate crystal formation by crystal idioblasts was investigated.

  19. Melanoma Cell Expression of CD200 Inhibits Tumor Formation and Lung Metastasis via Inhibition of Myeloid Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Talebian, Fatemeh; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Khattabi, Mazin; He, Yukai; Ganju, Ramesh; Bai, Xue-feng

    2012-01-01

    CD200 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions through engaging CD200 receptor on cells of the myeloid lineage and inhibits their functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in a variety of human cancer cells including melanoma cells and has been thought to play a protumor role. To investigate the role of cancer cell expression of CD200 in tumor formation and metastasis, we generated CD200-positive and CD200-negative B16 melanoma cells. Subcutaneous injection of CD200-positive B16...

  20. Antibody to a molecular marker of cell position inhibits synapse formation in retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Trisler, D.; Bekenstein, J; Daniels, M P

    1986-01-01

    A topographic gradient of TOP molecules in retina can be used to identify neuron position. Antibody to TOP from hybridoma cells that were injected into in vivo embryo eyes diffused into the retina and bound in a topographic gradient of [antibody.TOP] ([Ab.TOP]) complexes. Synapse formation in retina was inhibited in the presence of anti-TOP antibody. This suggests that TOP is involved in synapse formation and that recognition of position by neurons is necessary for normal synapse formation.

  1. Melanoma cell expression of CD200 inhibits tumor formation and lung metastasis via inhibition of myeloid cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Talebian

    Full Text Available CD200 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions through engaging CD200 receptor on cells of the myeloid lineage and inhibits their functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in a variety of human cancer cells including melanoma cells and has been thought to play a protumor role. To investigate the role of cancer cell expression of CD200 in tumor formation and metastasis, we generated CD200-positive and CD200-negative B16 melanoma cells. Subcutaneous injection of CD200-positive B16 melanoma cells inhibited tumor formation and growth in C57BL/6 mice but not in Rag1⁻/⁻C57BL/6 mice. However, i.v. injection of CD200-positive B16 melanoma cells dramatically inhibited tumor foci formation in the lungs of both C57BL/6 and Rag1⁻/⁻C57BL6 mice. Flow cytometry analysis revealed higher expression of CD200R in Gr1⁺ myeloid cells in the lung than in peripheral myeloid cells. Depletion of Gr1⁺ cells or stimulation of CD200R with an agonistic antibody in vivo dramatically inhibited tumor foci formation in the lungs. In addition, treatment with tumor antigen specific CD4 or CD8 T cells or their combination yielded a survival advantage for CD200 positive tumor bearing mice over mice bearing CD200-negative tumors. Taken together, we have revealed a novel role for CD200-CD200R interaction in inhibiting tumor formation and metastasis. Targeting CD200R may represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Expression of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF in Hansenula polymorpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganeh Talebkhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: During past decades Hansenula polymorpha has attracted global attention for the expression of recombinant proteins due to its high growth rate, minimal nutritional porequirements and use of methanol as a low cost inducer.Materials and Methods: The corresponding nucleotide sequences for the expression of heterologous genes in Hansenula poylmorpha were extracted and assembled in an E. coli vector. The constructed expression cassette included formate dehy- drogenase promoter (pFMD, a secretory signal sequence, a multiple cloning site (MCS and methanol oxidase (MOX ter- minator. Zeocin resistance gene fragment and complete cDNA encoding granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF were cloned downstream of the expression cassette in-frame with signal sequence. Restriction mapping and sequence analysis confirmed the correct cloning procedures. Final vector was transformed into Hansenula and recombinant host was induced for the expression of GCSF protein by adding methanol. SDS-PAGE and immuno-blotting were performed to confirm the identity of r-GCSF.Results: The expression cassette containing gcsf gene (615bp and zeocin resistance marker (sh-ble, 1200bp was prepared and successfully transformed into competent Hansenula polymorpha cells via electroporation. Zeocin resistant colonies were selected and GCSF expression was induced in recombinant Hansenula transformants using 0.5% methanol and an approx- imately 19kDa protein was observed on SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis using serum isolated from GCSF-treated rabbit confirmed the identity of the protein.Conclusions: Molecular studies confirmed the designed expression cassette containing gcsf gene along with pFMD and sig- nal sequence. The expressed 19kDa protein also confirmed the ability of designed vector in expressing heterologous genes in Hansenula cells. Keywords: Hansenula polymorpha, expression cassette, GCSF

  3. Colonial Figures: Memories of Street Traders in the Colonial and Early Post-colonial Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri Lynn Gibbings

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores post-colonial memories about street traders among individuals who lived in the former colony of the Dutch East Indies. It argues that these narratives romanticize the relationship between Europeans and indigenous peoples. Street vendors are also used to differentiate between periods within colonial and post-colonial history. The nostalgic representation of interracial contact between Europeans and traders is contrasted with representations of other figures such as the Japanese and the nationalist. A recurring feature of these representations is the ability of Europeans to speak with street traders and imagine what they wanted and needed. The traders are remembered as a social type that transgressed politics and represented the neutrality of the economic sphere as a place for shared communication. The article concludes that the figure of the street vendor contributes to the nostalgic reinvention of the colony but is also used in narratives to differentiate between and mark changes across the colonial and post-colonial periods.

  4. Mirror-symmetric microtubule assembly and cell interactions drive lumen formation in the zebrafish neural rod

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Clare E.; Ren, Xiaoyun; Ward, Laura C; Girdler, Gemma C; Araya, Claudio; Green, Mary J; Clark, Brian S.; Link, Brian A.; Clarke, Jonathan D. W.

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the cellular and subcellular events that occur in the centre of the developing zebrafish neural rod, we have uncovered a novel mechanism of cell polarisation during lumen formation. Cells from each side of the neural rod interdigitate across the tissue midline. This is necessary for localisation of apical junctional proteins to the region where cells intersect the tissue midline. Cells assemble a mirror-symmetric microtubule cytoskeleton around the tissue midline, which is necess...

  5. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Chen; Megan E Schrementi; Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; Luisa A DiPietro

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally...

  6. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility gu...

  7. Midbody remnant licenses primary cilia formation in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Carolyn M

    2016-08-01

    Tethered midbody remnants dancing across apical microvilli, encountering the centrosome, and beckoning forth a cilium-who would have guessed this is how polarized epithelial cells coordinate the end of mitosis and the beginning of ciliogenesis? New evidence from Bernabé-Rubio et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601020) supports this emerging model. PMID:27482049

  8. Ancestral vascular lumen formation via basal cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Tomás Kucera; Boris Strilić; Kathrin Regener; Michael Schubert; Vincent Laudet; Eckhard Lammert

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of bilaterians developed from a common ancestor. However, no endothelial cells exist in invertebrates demonstrating that primitive cardiovascular tubes do not require this vertebrate-specific cell type in order to form. This raises the question of how cardiovascular tubes form in invertebrates? Here we discovered that in the invertebrate cephalochordate amphioxus, the basement membranes of endoderm and mesoderm line the lumen of the major vessels, namely aorta and he...

  9. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW bio...

  10. Hypertrophic scar formation is associated with an increased number of epidermal Langerhans cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, F.B.; Schalkwijk, J.; Vos, H.; Timens, W.

    2004-01-01

    The exact pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar and keloid formation is still unknown and a good therapy to prevent or treat these scars is lacking. Because immunological processes seem to be important in excessive scar formation, immunological cells and parameters were studied in a standardized breast

  11. Hypertrophic scar formation is associated with an increased number of epidermal Langerhans cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, FB; Schalkwijk, J; Vos, H; Timens, W

    2004-01-01

    The exact pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar and keloid formation is still unknown and a good therapy to prevent or treat these scars is lacking. Because immunological processes seem to be important in excessive scar formation, immunological cells and parameters were studied in a standardized breast

  12. Enhancement of plaque formation and cell fusion of an enteropathogenic coronavirus by trypsin treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Storz, J.; Rott, R; Kaluza, G.

    1981-01-01

    Plaque formation, replication, and related cytopathic functions of the enteropathogenic bovine coronavirus strain L9 in bovine fetal thyroid (BFTy) and bovine fetal brain (BFB) cells were investigated in the presence and absence of trypsin. Plaque formation was enhanced in both cell types. Plaques reached a size with an average diameter of 5 mm within 4 days with trypsin in the overlay, whereas their diameter remained less than 1 mm at this time after plating without trypsin in the overlay. F...

  13. Phenotypic Heterogeneity Affects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia K279a Colony Morphotypes and β-Lactamase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abda, Ebrahim M; Krysciak, Dagmar; Krohn-Molt, Ines; Mamat, Uwe; Schmeisser, Christel; Förstner, Konrad U; Schaible, Ulrich E; Kohl, Thomas A; Nieman, Stefan; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity at the cellular level in response to various stresses, e.g., antibiotic treatment has been reported for a number of bacteria. In a clonal population, cell-to-cell variation may result in phenotypic heterogeneity that is a mechanism to survive changing environments including antibiotic therapy. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been frequently isolated from cystic fibrosis patients, can cause numerous infections in other organs and tissues, and is difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistances. S. maltophilia K279a produces the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in response to β-lactam treatment. Here we report that the patient isolate S. maltophilia K279a diverges into cellular subpopulations with distinct but reversible morphotypes of small and big colonies when challenged with ampicillin. This observation is consistent with the formation of elongated chains of bacteria during exponential growth phase and the occurrence of mainly rod-shaped cells in liquid media. RNA-seq analysis of small versus big colonies revealed differential regulation of at least seven genes among the colony morphotypes. Among those, bla L1 and bla L2 were transcriptionally the most strongly upregulated genes. Promoter fusions of bla L1 and bla L2 genes indicated that expression of both genes is also subject to high levels of phenotypic heterogeneous expression on a single cell level. Additionally, the comE homolog was found to be differentially expressed in homogenously versus heterogeneously bla L2 expressing cells as identified by RNA-seq analysis. Overexpression of comE in S. maltophilia K279a reduced the level of cells that were in a bla L2-ON mode to 1% or lower. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that S. maltophilia K279a populations develop phenotypic heterogeneity in an ampicillin challenged model. This cellular variability is triggered by regulation networks including bla L1, bla L2, and comE. PMID:26696982

  14. Indians and Southern Colonial Statutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yasuhide

    1974-01-01

    Southern statutes, with their dual nature of uniformity and diversity, were doubtlessly an essential source of law for the examination of complex legal relations between American Indians and Anglo Americans in the colonial South. (FF)

  15. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis.

  16. Biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating Halomonas venusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, Mercedes; Domènech, Òscar; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm development is characterized by distinct stages of initial attachment, microcolony formation and maturation (sessile cells), and final detachment (dispersal of new, planktonic cells). In this work we examined the influence of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation on bacterial surface properties and biofilm formation on polystyrene in detached vs. planktonic cells of an environmental strain isolated from microbial mats, Halomonas venusta MAT28. This strain was cultured either in an artificial biofilm in which the cells were immobilized on alginate beads (sessile) or as free-swimming (planktonic) cells. For the two modes of growth, conditions allowing or preventing PHA accumulation were established. Cells detached from alginate beads and their planktonic counterparts were used to study cell surface properties and cellular adhesion on polystyrene. Detached cells showed a slightly higher affinity than planktonic cells for chloroform (Lewis-acid) and a greater hydrophobicity (affinity for hexadecane and hexane). Those surface characteristics of the detached cells may explain their better adhesion on polystyrene compared to planktonic cells. Adhesion to polystyrene was not significantly different between H. venusta cells that had accumulated PHA vs. those that did not. These observations suggest that the surface properties of detached cells clearly differ from those of planktonic cells and that for at least the first 48 h after detachment from alginate beads H. venusta retained the capacity of sessile cells to adhere to polystyrene and to form a biofilm. PMID:26421734

  17. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore;

    2005-01-01

    of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the...

  18. High-Throughput Single-Cell Derived Sphere Formation for Cancer Stem-Like Cell Identification and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Ingram, Patrick N.; Fouladdel, Shamileh; McDermott, Sean P.; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S.; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that many malignancies are driven by a cellular compartment that displays stem cell properties. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) can be identified by expression of cell surface markers or enzymatic activity, but these methods are limited by phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of CSCs. An alternative phenotypic methodology based on in-vitro sphere formation has been developed, but it is typically labor-intensive and low-throughput. In this work, we present a 1,024-microchamber microfluidic platform for single-cell derived sphere formation. Utilizing a hydrodynamic capturing scheme, more than 70% of the microchambers capture only one cell, allowing for monitoring of sphere formation from heterogeneous cancer cell populations for identification of CSCs. Single-cell derived spheres can be retrieved and dissociated for single-cell analysis using a custom 96-gene panel to probe heterogeneity within the clonal CSC spheres. This microfluidic platform provides reliable and high-throughput sphere formation for CSC identification and downstream clonal analysis.

  19. Ectopic bone formation in bone marrow stem cell seeded calcium phosphate scaffolds as compared to autograft and (cell seeded allograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J O Eniwumide

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Improvements to current therapeutic strategies are needed for the treatment of skeletal defects. Bone tissue engineering offers potential advantages to these strategies. In this study, ectopic bone formation in a range of scaffolds was assessed. Vital autograft and devitalised allograft served as controls and the experimental groups comprised autologous bone marrow derived stem cell seeded allograft, biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP and tricalcium phosphate (TCP, respectively. All implants were implanted in the back muscle of adult Dutch milk goats for 12 weeks. Micro-computed tomography (µCT analysis and histomorphometry was performed to evaluate and quantify ectopic bone formation. In good agreement, both µCT and histomorphometric analysis demonstrated a significant increase in bone formation by cell-seeded calcium phosphate scaffolds as compared to the autograft, allograft and cell-seeded allograft implants. An extensive resorption of the autograft, allograft and cell-seeded allograft implants was observed by histology and confirmed by histomorphometry. Cell-seeded TCP implants also showed distinct signs of degradation with histomorphometry and µCT, while the degradation of the cell-seeded BCP implants was negligible. These results indicate that cell-seeded calcium phosphate scaffolds are superior to autograft, allograft or cell-seeded allograft in terms of bone formation at ectopic implantation sites. In addition, the usefulness of µCT for the efficient and non-destructive analysis of mineralised bone and calcium phosphate scaffold was demonstrated.

  20. Raman scattering evidence of hydrohalite formation on frozen yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Okotrub, K A

    2012-01-01

    We studied yeast cells in physiological solution during freezing by Raman microspectroscopy technique. The purpose was to find out the origin of a sharp peak near ~3430 cm^-1 in Raman spectrum of frozen mammalian cells, observed earlier (J. Dong et al, Biophys. J., 99 (2010) 2453), which presumably could be used as an indicator of intracellar ice appearance. We have shown that this line (actually doublet of 3408 and 3425 cm^-1) corresponds to Raman spectrum of hydrohalite (NaCl-2H2O), which is formed as the result of the eutectic crystallization of the liquid solution around the cells. We also show that the spatial distribution of hydrohalite in the sample significantly depends on the cooling rate. At lower cooling rate (1{\\deg}C/min), products of eutectic crystallization form layer on the cell surface which thickness varies for different cells and can reach ~1 {\\mu}m in thickness. At higher cooling rate (20{\\deg}C/min), the hydrohalite distribution appears more homogeneous, in the sample, and the eutectic cr...

  1. Valine-Resistance, a Potential Marker in Plant Cell Genetics. II. Optimization of Uv Mutagenesis and Selection of Valine-Resistant Colonies Derived from Tobacco Mesophyll Protoplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Grandbastien, M. A.; Bourgin, J. P.; Caboche, M.

    1985-01-01

    The induction and selection of valine-resistant mutants from haploid tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) mesophyll protoplast-derived cells have been studied. Using cells from an original mutant plant obtained previously, we performed reconstruction experiments in order to determine the best conditions for the recovery of resistant cells among a population of sensitive cells. Optimal selective conditions were shown to depend on various factors including cell density, time of addition of valine and...

  2. Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Timothy C Wang

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as the unique subpopulation in the tumors that possess the ability to initiate tumor growth and sustain self-renewal as well as metastatic potential. Accumulating evidence in recent years strongly indicate the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors of a wide variety of organs. In this review, we will discuss the possible existence of a gastric cancer stem cell. Our recent data suggest that a subpopulation with a defined marker shows spheroid colony format...

  3. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  4. Rapid Formation of Cell Aggregates and Spheroids Induced by a "Smart" Boronic Acid Copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2016-09-01

    Cell surface engineering has emerged as a powerful approach to forming cell aggregates/spheroids and cell-biomaterial ensembles with significant uses in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Herein, we demonstrate that cell membrane remodeling with a thermoresponsive boronic acid copolymer induces the rapid formation of spheroids using either cancer or cardiac cell lines under conventional cell culture conditions at minute concentrations. It is shown that the formation of well-defined spheroids is accelerated by at least 24 h compared to non-polymer-treated controls, and, more importantly, the polymer allows for fine control of the aggregation kinetics owing to its stimulus response to temperature and glucose content. On the basis of its simplicity and effectiveness to promote cellular aggregation, this platform holds promise in three-dimensional tissue/tumor modeling and tissue engineering applications. PMID:27571512

  5. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls 3(R = O)*. The kinetics of 3(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-wea...

  6. Neocarzinostatin-induced Rad51 nuclear focus formation is cell cycle regulated and aberrant in AT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA double-stranded breaks are the most detrimental form of DNA damage and, if not repaired properly, may lead to an accumulation of chromosomal aberrations and eventually tumorigenesis. Proteins of the Rad51/Rad52 epitasis group are crucial for the recombinational repair of DNA double-stranded breaks, whereas the Rad50/NBS1/Mre11 nuclease complex is involved in both the recombinational and the end-joining repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. Herein, we demonstrate that the chemotherapeutic enediyne antibiotic neocarzinostatin induced Rad51, but not NBS1, nuclear focus formation in a cell- cycle-dependent manner. Furthermore, neocarzinostatin-induced Rad51 foci formation revealed a slower kinetic change in AT cells, but not in wild-type or NBS cells. In summary, our results suggest that neocarzinostatin induces Rad51 focus formation through an ATM- and cell-cycle-dependent, but NBS1-independent, pathway

  7. Mobilization of regulatory T cells in response to carotid injury does not influence subsequent neointima formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Saxena

    Full Text Available AIM: T cells have been attributed an important role in modulating repair responses following vascular injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of different T cell subsets in this context. METHODS AND RESULTS: A non-obstructive collar was introduced to inflict carotid artery injury in mice and subsequent activation of immune cells in draining lymph nodes and spleen were studied by flow cytometry. Carotid artery injury of wild type mice was associated with mobilization of both Th1 type CD4(+IFNγ(+ and regulatory CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ T cells in draining lymph nodes. Studies using FoxP3-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic C57/Bl6 mice demonstrated scattered presence of regulatory T cells in the adventitial tissue of injured arteries as well as a massive emigration of regulatory T cells from the spleen in response to carotid injury. However, deletion of antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells (H2(0 mice, as well as deletion of regulatory T cells (through treatment with blocking anti-CD25 antibodies, did not affect neointima formation. Also deletion of antigen presentation to CD8(+ T cells (Tap1(0 mice was without effect on carotid collar-induced neointima formation. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that carotid artery injury is associated with mobilization of regulatory T cells. Depletion of regulatory T cells does not, however, influence the subsequent repair processes leading to the formation of a neointima. The results also demonstrate that lack of CD8(+ T cells does not influence neointima formation in presence of functional CD4(+ T cells and B cells.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Aggregate Formation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosh, Thomas J.; Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) isolated from various adult tissues show remarkable therapeutic potential and are being employed in clinical trials for the treatment of numerous diseases (Prockop et al., 2010). While routes of cell administration vary, profound beneficial effects of MSCs in animal models have been observed following intraperitoneal injections of the cells (Roddy et al., 2011). Similar to MSC spheres formed in culture under conditions where attachment to plastic is not permitted (Bartosh et al., 2010), MSCs injected into the peritoneum of mice spontaneously aggregate into 3D sphere-like structures (Bartosh et al., 2013). During the process of sphere assembly and compaction, MSCs upregulate expression of numerous therapeutic anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory factors. Here we describe the method we previously used for the generation of human bone marrow-derived MSC aggregates/spheres in vivo (Bartosh et al., 2013). By tagging the MSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP), the aggregates formed can be easily visualized, collected and analyzed for changes in cellular properties and interactions with host immune cells.

  9. Canonical and non-canonical pathways of osteoclast formation

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, H.J.; Athanasou, N A

    2009-01-01

    Physiological and pathological bone resorption is mediated by osteoclasts, multinucleated cells which are formed by the fusion of monocyte / macrophage precursors. The canonical pathway of osteoclast formation requires the presence of the receptor activator for NFkB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Noncanonical pathways of osteoclast formation have been described in which cytokines / growth factors can substitute for RANKL or M-CSF to...

  10. BCL6 interacting corepressor contributes to germinal center T follicular helper cell formation and B cell helper function

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jessica A.; Tubo, Noah J.; Gearhart, Micah D.; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Jenkins, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (GC-Tfh) cells help B cells become long-lived plasma cells and memory cells. The transcriptional repressor BCL6 plays a key role in GC-Tfh formation by inhibiting the expression of genes that promote differentiation into other lineages. We determined whether BCOR, a component of a Polycomb repressive complex that interacts with the BCL6 BTB domain, influences GC-Tfh differentiation. T cell-targeted BCOR deficiency led to a substantial loss of pept...

  11. NRP1 Regulates CDC42 Activation to Promote Filopodia Formation in Endothelial Tip Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Fantin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sprouting blood vessels are led by filopodia-studded endothelial tip cells that respond to angiogenic signals. Mosaic lineage tracing previously revealed that NRP1 is essential for tip cell function, although its mechanistic role in tip cells remains poorly defined. Here, we show that NRP1 is dispensable for genetic tip cell identity. Instead, we find that NRP1 is essential to form the filopodial bursts that distinguish tip cells morphologically from neighboring stalk cells, because it enables the extracellular matrix (ECM-induced activation of CDC42, a key regulator of filopodia formation. Accordingly, NRP1 knockdown and pharmacological CDC42 inhibition similarly impaired filopodia formation in vitro and in developing zebrafish in vivo. During mouse retinal angiogenesis, CDC42 inhibition impaired tip cell and vascular network formation, causing defects that resembled those due to loss of ECM-induced, but not VEGF-induced, NRP1 signaling. We conclude that NRP1 enables ECM-induced filopodia formation for tip cell function during sprouting angiogenesis.

  12. Arabidopsis R-SNARE proteins VAMP721 and VAMP722 are required for cell plate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis is facilitated by SNARE complex-mediated vesicle fusion at the cell-division plane. However, our knowledge regarding R-SNARE components of membrane fusion machinery for cell plate formation remains quite limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the in vivo function of Arabidopsis VAMP721 and VAMP722, two closely sequence-related R-SNAREs, in cell plate formation. Double homozygous vamp721vamp722 mutant seedlings showed lethal dwarf phenotypes and were characterized by rudimentary roots, cotyledons and hypocotyls. Furthermore, cell wall stubs and incomplete cytokinesis were frequently observed in vamp721vamp722 seedlings. Confocal images revealed that green fluorescent protein-tagged VAMP721 and VAMP722 were preferentially localized to the expanding cell plates in dividing cells. Drug treatments and co-localization analyses demonstrated that punctuate organelles labeled with VAMP721 and VAMP722 represented early endosomes overlapped with VHA-a1-labeled TGN, which were distinct from Golgi stacks and prevacuolar compartments. In addition, protein traffic to the plasma membrane, but not to the vacuole, was severely disrupted in vamp721vamp722 seedlings by subcellular localization of marker proteins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations suggest that VAMP721 and VAMP722 are involved in secretory trafficking to the plasma membrane via TGN/early endosomal compartment, which contributes substantially to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  13. An integrated approach for the cell formation and layout design in cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javadi, Babak; Jolai, Fariborz; Slomp, Jannes; Rabbani, Masoud; Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model is presented for cell formation and layout design in cellular manufacturing systems (CMS). The proposed model incorporates an extensive coverage of important operational features and especially layout design aspects to determine optimal cell configuration and Int

  14. Mxi1 influences cyst formation in three-dimensional cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Joo Yook

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyst formation is a major characteristic of ADPKD and iscaused by the abnormal proliferation of epithelial cells. Renalcyst formation disrupts renal function and induces diversecomplications. The mechanism of cyst formation is unclear.mIMCD-3 cells were established to develop simple epithelialcell cysts in 3-D culture. We confirmed previously that Mxi1plays a role in cyst formation in Mxi1-deficient mice. Cysts inMxi1 transfectanted cells were showed by collagen or mebiolgels in 3-D cell culture system. Causative genes of ADPKDwere measured by q RT-PCR. Herein, Mxi1 transfectants rarelyformed a simple epithelial cyst and induced cell death.Overexpression of Mxi1 resulted in a decrease in the PKD1,PKD2 and c-myc mRNA relating to the pathway of cystformation. These data indicate that Mxi1 influences cystformation of mIMCD-3 cells in 3-D culture and that Mxi1 maycontrol the mechanism of renal cyst formation. [BMB reports2012; 45(3: 189-193

  15. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  16. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghoon Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria.

  17. Oxygen-consuming chlor alkali cell configured to minimize peroxide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy B.; Lipp, Ludwig; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-08-01

    Oxygen-consuming zero gap chlor-alkali cell was configured to minimize peroxide formation. The cell included an ion-exchange membrane that divided the cell into an anode chamber including an anode and a cathode chamber including an oxygen gas diffusion cathode. The cathode included a single-piece of electrically conducting graphitized carbon cloth. Catalyst and polytetrafluoroethylene were attached to only one side of the cloth. When the cathode was positioned against the cation exchange membrane with the catalyst side away from the membrane, electrolysis of sodium chloride to chlorine and caustic (sodium hydroxide) proceeded with minimal peroxide formation.

  18. Neuropeptide substance P stimulates the formation of osteoclasts via synovial fibroblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of neuropeptide substance P (Sp) on the formation of osteoclasts via synovial fibroblastic cells. Synovial fibroblastic cells derived from rat knee joint expressed the Sp receptor, neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1-R). The addition of Sp stimulated the proliferation of synovial fibroblastic cells and this effect was inhibited by Sp or NK1-R antagonists. Increased expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (Rankle) in synovial fibroblastic cells after the addition of Sp was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining. Osteoprotegerin expression in synovial fibroblastic cells was decreased after incubation with SP. In co-cultures of synovial fibroblastic cells and rat peripheral blood monocytes, SP stimulated osteoclastogenesis. These results suggest that SP in the joint cavity may cause both hypertrophy of the synovium and induction of increased osteoclast formation through the increased expression of RANKL in the synovium

  19. Influence of porous silicon formation on the performance of multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Saad; M Naddaf

    2015-06-01

    The effect of formation of porous silicon on the performance of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is presented. Surface treatment of mc-Si solar cells was performed by electrochemical etching in HF-based solution. The effect of etching is viewed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs that indicated the formation of a porous layer on the surface. Total reflection spectroscopy measurements on solar cells revealed reduced reflection after etching. In order to demonstrate the effect of this porous layer on the solar cell performance, illumination-dependent – characteristics and spectral response measurements were performed and analysed before and after etching. At all illumination intensities, short-circuit current density and open-circuit voltage values for the etched solar cell were higher than those before etching, whereas fill factor values were lower for the etched cell at high illumination intensities. An interpretation of these findings is presented.

  20. Another origin of coloniality in volvocaleans: the phylogenetic position of Pyrobotrys arnoldi (Spondylomoraceae, Volvocales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Colonial volvocaleans (Chlorophyceae) are used as a standard model of multicellular evolution. However, the phylogenetic position of the colonial volvocalean family Spondylomoraceae has yet to be resolved. To examine this, the molecular phylogenies of Pyrobotrys stellata and Pyrobotrys squarrosa were analyzed using combined 18S rRNA, RUBISCO large subunit, and P700 chl a-apoprotein A2 gene sequences. In the phylogenetic trees, Pyrobotrys belonged to the clade Caudivolvoxa and was not closely related to other colonial volvocalean flagellates. The results indicate that colony formation of Spondylomoraceae independently evolved from unicellular volvocaleans. The phylogenetic position of problematic "Pascherina tetras" SAG 159-1 was also analyzed. PMID:20553352

  1. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Jay D. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, ...

  2. Ant Colony Optimization: A Review and Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Sundus Shaukat; Riaz Ahmed Bhatti; Khalid Ibrahim Qureshi; Shafqat Ali Shad

    2014-01-01

    Many optmization algorithms are developed over period of time, among these most famous and widely used is Ant Colony systems (ACA). Ant Colony Systems (ACS) are the collection of different ant colony optimization algorithms. Different algorithms are used for solve the Travelling salesmen Problem (TCP) but ant colony algorithm is more preferred to solve the travelling salesmen problem. In ant colony best solution is found with the help of cooperating agents called ants. Ants cooperate with eac...

  3. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u......, inoculation of the flow cells, running of the system, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis, and disassembly and cleaning of the system....

  4. Pattern formation in solutal convection: vermiculated rolls and isolated cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Oreste; Villacampa, Ana I.

    2002-11-01

    Observations of the peculiar behaviour of a drink of liqueur topped with cream led us to perform experiments showing that the instability is a convection phenomenon that arises through destabilizing surface-tension forces. The convection is solutal: driven by gradients of concentration of a solute, rather than by heat gradients as in the more commonly studied thermal convection. The convective patterns, vermiculated rolls and isolated cells, are quite unlike the usual planforms. They are associated with an elastic surface film, and the Marangoni number is high, characteristic of solutal convection. We have conducted further experiments that reproduce these patterns in simpler working fluids.

  5. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Antonietta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779 encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p, a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5, and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus.

  6. Identification of separate slow and fast muscle precursor cells in vivo, prior to somite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoto, S H; Melançon, E; Eisen, J S; Westerfield, M

    1996-11-01

    We have examined the development of specific muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle by labeling myogenic precursor cells with vital fluorescent dyes and following their subsequent differentiation and fate. Two populations of muscle precursors, medial and lateral, can be distinguished in the segmental plate by position, morphology and gene expression. The medial cells, known as adaxial cells, are large, cuboidal cells adjacent to the notochord that express myoD. Surprisingly, after somite formation, they migrate radially away from the notochord, becoming a superficial layer of muscle cells. A subset of adaxial cells develop into engrailed-expressing muscle pioneers. Adaxial cells differentiate into slow muscle fibers of the adult fish. We have named the lateral population of cells in the segmental plate, lateral presomitic cells. They are smaller, more irregularly shaped and separated from the notochord by adaxial cells; they do not express myoD until after somite formation. Lateral presomitic cells remain deep in the myotome and they differentiate into fast muscle fibers. Thus, slow and fast muscle fiber types in zebrafish axial muscle arise from distinct populations of cells in the segmental plate that develop in different cellular environments and display distinct behaviors. PMID:8951054

  7. QHREDGS enhances tube formation, metabolism and survival of endothelial cells in collagen-chitosan hydrogels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W Miklas

    Full Text Available Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1 were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction.

  8. QHREDGS enhances tube formation, metabolism and survival of endothelial cells in collagen-chitosan hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklas, Jason W; Dallabrida, Susan M; Reis, Lewis A; Ismail, Nesreen; Rupnick, Maria; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Cell survival in complex, vascularized tissues, has been implicated as a major bottleneck in advancement of therapies based on cardiac tissue engineering. This limitation motivates the search for small, inexpensive molecules that would simultaneously be cardio-protective and vasculogenic. Here, we present peptide sequence QHREDGS, based upon the fibrinogen-like domain of angiopoietin-1, as a prime candidate molecule. We demonstrated previously that QHREDGS improved cardiomyocyte metabolism and mitigated serum starved apoptosis. In this paper we further demonstrate the potency of QHREDGS in its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival, metabolism and tube formation. When endothelial cells were exposed to the soluble form of QHREDGS, improvements in endothelial cell barrier functionality, nitric oxide production and cell metabolism (ATP levels) in serum starved conditions were found. The functionality of the peptide was then examined when conjugated to collagen-chitosan hydrogel, a potential carrier for in vivo application. The presence of the peptide in the hydrogel mitigated paclitaxel induced apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the peptide modified hydrogels stimulated tube-like structure formation of encapsulated endothelial cells. When integrin αvβ3 or α5β1 were antibody blocked during cell encapsulation in peptide modified hydrogels, tube formation was abolished. Therefore, the dual protective nature of the novel peptide QHREDGS may position this peptide as an appealing augmentation for collagen-chitosan hydrogels that could be used for biomaterial delivered cell therapies in the settings of myocardial infarction. PMID:24013716

  9. Collective motion of cells mediates segregation and pattern formation in co-cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elod Méhes

    Full Text Available Pattern formation by segregation of cell types is an important process during embryonic development. We show that an experimentally yet unexplored mechanism based on collective motility of segregating cells enhances the effects of known pattern formation mechanisms such as differential adhesion, mechanochemical interactions or cell migration directed by morphogens. To study in vitro cell segregation we use time-lapse videomicroscopy and quantitative analysis of the main features of the motion of individual cells or groups. Our observations have been extensive, typically involving the investigation of the development of patterns containing up to 200,000 cells. By either comparing keratocyte types with different collective motility characteristics or increasing cells' directional persistence by the inhibition of Rac1 GTP-ase we demonstrate that enhanced collective cell motility results in faster cell segregation leading to the formation of more extensive patterns. The growth of the characteristic scale of patterns generally follows an algebraic scaling law with exponent values up to 0.74 in the presence of collective motion, compared to significantly smaller exponents in case of diffusive motion.

  10. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic cell loss in an environmental toxin model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, E N; Peters, S; Litteljohn, D; So, R; Bethune, C; Bobyn, J; Clarke, M; Hayley, S

    2011-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to exposure to a variety of chemical (e.g., pesticides) and inflammatory agents, which may act cumulatively over time. Finding novel means of limiting pathology associated with toxin exposure would have tremendous clinical importance. To this end, we assessed whether the hematopoietic trophic cytokine, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), would inhibit the neurodegenerative effects of the pesticide, paraquat, administered either alone or following priming with the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As previously observed, paraquat provoked a modest but significant neurodegenerative effect that was markedly augmented with LPS priming. Central infusion of GM-CSF into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) prevented the loss of SNc dopamine neurons to a degree comparable to that of glial derived neurotrophic factor. Importantly, systemic administration of GM-CSF also had neuroprotective consequences, suggesting that the trophic cytokine can cross the blood brain barrier to promote neuronal survival. Indeed, GM-CSF acted to inhibit the LPS and paraquat induced microglial response, while augmenting astrocyte immunoreactivity within the SNc. Moreover, GM-CSF blunted the paraquat induced reduction of brain derived neurotrophic factor within the hippocampus, as well as in cultured mesencephalic neurons. Although paraquat reduced mesencephalic levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, GM-CSF had no effect in this regard. Hence, GM-CSF appears to affect inflammatory and/or neuroplastic factors within the SNc that may be linked to neurodegeneration, as well as in other brain regions (hippocampus), which could be important for co-morbid non-motor symptoms in PD. These data suggest that peripheral GM-CSF administration might hold promise as a treatment of PD. PMID:21377529

  11. Characterization of Bacillus subtilis Colony Biofilms via Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Yiran; Zhao, Huimin; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2016-06-01

    Colony biofilms of Bacillus subtilis are a widely used model for studying cellular differentiation. Here, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to examine cellular and molecular heterogeneity in B. subtilis colony biofilms. From B. subtilis cells cultivated on a biofilm-promoting medium, we detected two cannibalistic factors not found in previous MALDI MSI studies of the same strain under different culturing conditions. Given the importance of cannibalism in matrix formation of B. subtilis biofilms, we employed a transcriptional reporter to monitor matrix-producing cell subpopulations using fluorescence imaging. These two complementary imaging approaches were used to characterize three B. subtilis strains, the wild type isolate NCIB3610, and two mutants, Δspo0A and ΔabrB, with defective and enhanced biofilm phenotypes, respectively. Upon deletion of key transcriptional factors, correlated changes were observed in biofilm morphology, signaling, cannibalistic factor distribution, and matrix-related gene expression, providing new insights on cannibalism in biofilm development. This work underscores the advantages of using multimodal imaging to compare spatial patterns of selected molecules with the associated protein expression patterns, obtaining information on cellular heterogeneity and function not obtainable when using a single method to characterize biofilm formation. PMID:27136705

  12. Different Effects of BORIS/CTCFL on Stemness Gene Expression, Sphere Formation and Cell Survival in Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Alberti

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are cancer cells characterized by stem cell properties and represent a small population of tumor cells that drives tumor development, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. To date, the molecular mechanisms that generate and regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. BORIS (Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites or CTCFL (CTCF-like is a DNA-binding protein that is expressed in normal tissues only in germ cells and is re-activated in tumors. Recent evidences have highlighted the correlation of BORIS/CTCFL expression with poor overall survival of different cancer patients. We have previously shown an association of BORIS-expressing cells with stemness gene expression in embryonic cancer cells. Here, we studied the role of BORIS in epithelial tumor cells. Using BORIS-molecular beacon that was already validated, we were able to show the presence of BORIS mRNA in cancer stem cell-enriched populations (side population and spheres of cervical, colon and breast tumor cells. BORIS silencing studies showed a decrease of sphere formation capacity in breast and colon tumor cells. Importantly, BORIS-silencing led to down-regulation of hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1 and cancer stem cell markers (ABCG2, CD44 and ALDH1 genes. Conversely, BORIS-induction led to up-regulation of the same genes. These phenotypes were observed in cervical, colon and invasive breast tumor cells. However, a completely different behavior was observed in the non-invasive breast tumor cells (MCF7. Indeed, these cells acquired an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype after BORIS silencing. Our results demonstrate that BORIS is associated with cancer stem cell-enriched populations of several epithelial tumor cells and the different phenotypes depend on the origin of tumor cells.

  13. Identification of sequences within the murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA 3'-untranslated region that mediate mRNA stabilization induced by mitogen treatment of EL-4 thymoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Y; Bickel, M; Pluznik, D H; Cohen, R B

    1991-09-25

    Phorbol esters (TPA) and concanavalin A (ConA) are known to induce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production in murine thymoma EL-4 cells by mRNA stabilization. The role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in GM-CSF mRNA stabilization induced by TPA and ConA in EL-4 cells was examined by transfection studies using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructions. The GM-CSF 3'-UTR contains a 63-nucleotide region at its 3' end with repeating ATTTA motifs which is responsible for mRNA degradation in a variety of cell types (Shaw, G., and Kamen, R. (1986) Cell 46, 659-666). We produced constructs containing most of the GM-CSF 3'-UTR (303 nucleotides, pRSV-CATgm) or the 3'-terminal AT-rich region (116 nucleotides, pRSV-CATau) and measured CAT enzyme activity and CAT mRNA after transient transfection into EL-4 and NIH 3T3 cells. Low levels of CAT activity were seen in both cells with either plasmid compared with levels of CAT activity obtained with pRSV-CAT. TPA treatment caused an approximately 10-fold increase in CAT activity and mRNA in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATgm. No increases were seen in EL-4 cells transfected with pRSV-CATau or pRSV-CAT. No response to TPA was detected in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, indicating that the response to TPA is relatively cell-specific. There was no increase in CAT activity after ConA treatment in EL-4 or NIH 3T3 cells transfected with any of the constructs suggesting that the GM-CSF 3'-UTR lacks elements that can respond alone to ConA. Nuclear run-on and actinomycin D chase experiments in EL-4 cells showed that TPA induces CAT activity via mRNA stabilization. By linker-substitution mutagenesis we show that TPA inducibility depends on a 60-nucleotide region of the 3'-UTR whose 5' end is located 160 nucleotides upstream of the 5' end of the AU-rich region. PMID:1917935

  14. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  15. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  16. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lincan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Shen, Hongmei [Cancer Center of Integrative Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhao, Guangqiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Yang, Runxiang [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Cai, Xinyi [Colorectal Cancer Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Jin, Congguo [Cancer Institute, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Huang, Yunchao, E-mail: daliduanlincan@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  17. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients

  18. Contemporaneity of colonialism: Capitalist modernity, imperial racism and necropolitics

    OpenAIRE

    Šefik Tatlić

    2016-01-01

    This text articulates global capitalism as an imperial formation, it deems that modernity is a particular project and/or discursive rhetoric, as well as it articulates necropolitics as the dominant form of politics in capitalism in the post 9/11 era. Hence, global capitalism is being treated here as the imperial formation and a relation of dominance which fundamentally resides on colonial epistemologies and governing logic. Modernity is, therefore, being articulated as a particular discursive...

  19. Influence of patterned topographic features on the formation of cardiac cell clusters and their rhythmic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conventional primary cultures, cardiac cells prepared from a newborn rat undergo spontaneous formation of cell clusters after several days. These cell clusters may be non-homogeneously distributed on a flat surface and show irregular beating which can be recorded by calcium ion imaging. In order to improve the cell cluster homogeneity and the beating regularity, patterned topographic features were used to guide the cellular growth and the cell layer formation. On the substrate with an array of broadly spaced cross features made of photoresist, cells grew on the places that were not occupied by the crosses and thus formed a cell layer with interconnected cell clusters. Accordingly, spatially coordinated regular beating could be recorded over the whole patterned area. In contrast, when cultured on the substrate with broadly spaced but inter-connected cross features, the cardiac cell layer showed beatings which were neither coordinated in space nor regular in time. Finally, when cultured on the substrate with narrowly spaced features, the cell beating became spatially coordinated but still remained irregular. Our results suggest a way to improve the rhythmic property of cultured cardiac cell layers which might be useful for further investigations. (paper)

  20. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves b-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Huston (Marshall W.); A.R.A. Riegman (Adriaan R.A.); R. Yadak (Rana); Y.M. van Helsdingen (Yvette); H. De Boer (Helen); N.P. van Til (Niek); G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to impr

  1. The effects and mechanisms of cytoplasmic Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on the proliferation, migration and invasion of HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng-xia; WU Hai-yan; TU Jian; ZHANG Xiao-hong; LE Xiao-yong; TANG Sheng-song

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects and mechanisms of cytoplasmic M-CSF on the proliferation, migration and invasion of HeLa cells. Methods Both pCMV/cyto/myc vector and pCMV/cyto/myc-M-CSF vector was transfected into HeLa-cell by transfectaimine. After screening by G418, the positive clones were amplified and confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. The effect of cytoplasmic MCSF on the proliferation of HeLa cells were analyzed by cell conuting and antisense oligonucleotides. The migration and invasion of cell was measured by in vitro Transwell assay and Matrigel-coated polycarbonate filters. The expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1/2/3, CDK2/4/6, Rac1, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP2/9) were assayed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. And expression of both α-tubulin and cdc42 were displayed by immunofluorescence. The activity of MMP2 was detected by gelatin zymography. Results Results A cell line (referred as to HeLa-M cell) that highly expresses cytoplasmic M-CSF was successfully established in the test. Our result indicated that HeLa-M cell had a larger volume, faster growth rate and shorter doubling time than either pCMV/cyto/myc transfected HeLa cells (referred as to HeLa-C cell) or untransfected HeLa cells (referred as to HeLa cell). M-CSF-specific antisense oligonucleoside significantly inhibited HeLa-M cell proliferation and had little effect on either HeLa-C cell or HeLa-C cell growth. Cytoplasmic M-CSF up-regulated both the expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1 and cyclinD3, CDK2, CDK 4 and CDK6,a Rho GTPase ralative protein (Rac1), cdc42 and MMP2, but had little effect on expression of MMP9 and cyclin D2. Furthermore, cytoplasmic M-CSF induced the rearrangement of the α-tubulin in HeLa cells and significantly promoted the migration and invasion of HeLa cells in vitro. Conclusions Cytoplasmic M-CSFs up-regulate the expression of cyclinE, cyclinD1 and cyclinD3, CDK2, CDK 4 and CDK6 and induces the proliferation of HeLa cells. Cytoplasmic M

  2. An improved model for nucleation-limited ice formation in living cells during freezing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Yi

    Full Text Available Ice formation in living cells is a lethal event during freezing and its characterization is important to the development of optimal protocols for not only cryopreservation but also cryotherapy applications. Although the model for probability of ice formation (PIF in cells developed by Toner et al. has been widely used to predict nucleation-limited intracellular ice formation (IIF, our data of freezing Hela cells suggest that this model could give misleading prediction of PIF when the maximum PIF in cells during freezing is less than 1 (PIF ranges from 0 to 1. We introduce a new model to overcome this problem by incorporating a critical cell volume to modify the Toner's original model. We further reveal that this critical cell volume is dependent on the mechanisms of ice nucleation in cells during freezing, i.e., surface-catalyzed nucleation (SCN and volume-catalyzed nucleation (VCN. Taken together, the improved PIF model may be valuable for better understanding of the mechanisms of ice nucleation in cells during freezing and more accurate prediction of PIF for cryopreservation and cryotherapy applications.

  3. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer, and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions

  4. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berny-Lang, M. A.; Aslan, J. E.; Tormoen, G. W.; Patel, I. A.; Bock, P. E.; Gruber, A.; McCarty, O. J. T.

    2011-02-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer, and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions.

  5. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirica...

  6. Coilin phosphomutants disrupt Cajal body formation, reduce cell proliferation and produce a distinct coilin degradation product.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunamys I Carrero

    Full Text Available Coilin is a nuclear phosphoprotein that accumulates in Cajal bodies (CBs. CBs participate in ribonucleoprotein and telomerase biogenesis, and are often found in cells with high transcriptional demands such as neuronal and cancer cells, but can also be observed less frequently in other cell types such as fibroblasts. Many proteins enriched within the CB are phosphorylated, but it is not clear what role this modification has on the activity of these proteins in the CB. Coilin is considered to be the CB marker protein and is essential for proper CB formation and composition in mammalian cells. In order to characterize the role of coilin phosphorylation on CB formation, we evaluated various coilin phosphomutants using transient expression. Additionally, we generated inducible coilin phosphomutant cell lines that, when used in combination with endogenous coilin knockdown, allow for the expression of the phosphomutants at physiological levels. Transient expression of all coilin phosphomutants except the phosphonull mutant (OFF significantly reduces proliferation. Interestingly, a stable cell line induced to express the coilin S489D phosphomutant displays nucleolar accumulation of the mutant and generates a N-terminal degradation product; neither of which is observed upon transient expression. A N-terminal degradation product and nucleolar localization are also observed in a stable cell line induced to express a coilin phosphonull mutant (OFF. The nucleolar localization of the S489D and OFF coilin mutants observed in the stable cell lines is decreased when endogenous coilin is reduced. Furthermore, all the phosphomutant cells lines show a significant reduction in CB formation when compared to wild-type after endogenous coilin knockdown. Cell proliferation studies on these lines reveal that only wild-type coilin and the OFF mutant are sufficient to rescue the reduction in proliferation associated with endogenous coilin depletion. These results emphasize

  7. The formation mechanism for printed silver-contacts for silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Jeremy D; Ahmad, Md. Imteyaz; Pool, Vanessa L.; Yu, Jiafan; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Parilla, Philip A.; Toney, Michael F; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Screen-printing provides an economically attractive means for making Ag electrical contacts to Si solar cells, but the use of Ag substantiates a significant manufacturing cost, and the glass frit used in the paste to enable contact formation contains Pb. To achieve optimal electrical performance and to develop pastes with alternative, abundant and non-toxic materials, a better understanding the contact formation process during firing is required. Here, we use in situ X-ray diffraction during ...

  8. Inhibition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic biofilm formation and invasion to host cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qilin Yu; Jianrong Li; Yueqi Zhang; Yufan Wang; Lu Liu; Mingchun Li

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the growing infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogens, it is urgent to develop novel antimicrobial agents against clinical pathogenic infections. Biofilm formation and invasion into the host cells are vital processes during pathogenic colonization and infection. In this study, we tested the inhibitory effect of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic growth, biofilm formation and invasion. Interestingly, although the synthesized AuNPs had no significant toxici...

  9. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

    2007-02-14

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow

  10. Effects of queen ages on Varroa (Varroa destructor infestation level in honey bee (Apis mellifera caucasica colonies and colony performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duran Özkök

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effects of queen age on varroa population levels in hives and performance of honey bee (A. mellifera caucasica colonies. Levels of varroa infestation and performances of the colonies which had 0, 1- and 2-year-old queens were compared in mild climate conditions. Varroa numbers on adults and drone brood, number of frames covered with bees and brood areas were determined every month between 10 May and 10 October 2004. Overall average (± S.E. % infestation levels of varroa were found to be 5.96 ± 1.42, 11.58 ± 1.46 and 15.87 ± 1.39% on adult bees and 21.55 ± 1.43, 31.96 ± 1.44 and 37.55 ± 1.45% in drone brood cells for 0, 1- and 2-year-old queen colonies, respectively. The colonies which had 0, 1- and 2-year-old queens produced 2673.58 ± 39.69, 2711.75 ± 39.68, and 1815.08 ± 39.70 cm2 overall average (± S.E. sealed brood and 10.35 ± 0.24, 10.43 ± 0.26 and 7.51 ± 0.21 numbers of frame adult bees, respectively. Honey harvested from 0, 1- and 2-year-old queen colonies averaged 21.60 ± 5.25, 22.20 ± 6.55, and 14.70 ± 2.50 kg/colony, respectively. The colonies headed by young queens had a lower level of varroa infestation, a greater brood area, longer worker bee population and greater honey yield in comparison to colonies headed by old queens.

  11. Miniature fuel cell with monolithically fabricated Si electrodes - Alloy catalyst formation -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Daiki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Katayama, Noboru; Dowaki, Kiyoshi; Hayase, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    A novel Pd-Pt catalyst formation process was proposed for reduction of Pt usage. In our miniature fuel cells, porous Pt was used as the catalyst, and the Pt usage was quite high. To reduce the Pt usage, we have attempted to deposit Pt on porous Pd by galvanic replacement, and relatively large output was demonstrated. In this study, in order to reduce more Pt usage and explore the alloy catalyst formation process, atomic layer deposition by UPD-SLRR (Under Potential Deposition - Surface Limited Redox Replacement) was applied to the Pd-Pt catalyst formation. The new process was verified at each process steps by EDS elemental analysis, and the expected spectra were obtained. Prototype cells were constructed by the new process, and cell output was raised to 420mW/cm2 by the Pd-Pt catalyst from 125mW/cm2 with Pd catalyst.

  12. Miniature fuel cell with monolithically fabricated Si electrodes – Alloy catalyst formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Pd-Pt catalyst formation process was proposed for reduction of Pt usage. In our miniature fuel cells, porous Pt was used as the catalyst, and the Pt usage was quite high. To reduce the Pt usage, we have attempted to deposit Pt on porous Pd by galvanic replacement, and relatively large output was demonstrated. In this study, in order to reduce more Pt usage and explore the alloy catalyst formation process, atomic layer deposition by UPD-SLRR (Under Potential Deposition – Surface Limited Redox Replacement) was applied to the Pd-Pt catalyst formation. The new process was verified at each process steps by EDS elemental analysis, and the expected spectra were obtained. Prototype cells were constructed by the new process, and cell output was raised to 420mW/cm2 by the Pd-Pt catalyst from 125mW/cm2 with Pd catalyst

  13. Plant metabolism and cell wall formation in space (microgravity) and on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.

    1994-01-01

    Variations in cell wall chemistry provide vascular plants with the ability to withstand gravitational forces, as well as providing facile mechanisms for correctional responses to various gravitational stimuli, e.g., in reaction wood formation. A principal focus of our current research is to precisely and systematically dissect the essentially unknown mechanism(s) of vascular plant cell wall assembly, particularly with respect to formation of its phenolic constituents, i.e., lignins and suberins, and how gravity impacts upon these processes. Formation of these phenolic polymers is of particular interest, since it appears that elaboration of their biochemical pathways was essential for successful land adaptation. By extrapolation, we are also greatly intrigued as to how the microgravity environment impacts upon 'normal' cell wall assembly mechanisms/metabolism.

  14. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system. PMID:25555820

  15. Positioning of polarity formation by extracellular signaling during asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seirin Lee, Sungrim

    2016-07-01

    Anterior-posterior (AP) polarity formation of cell membrane proteins plays a crucial role in determining cell asymmetry, which ultimately generates cell diversity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a single fertilized egg cell (P0), its daughter cell (P1), and the germline precursors (P2 and P3 cells) form two exclusive domains of different PAR proteins on the membrane along the anterior-posterior axis. However, the phenomenon of polarity reversal has been observed in which the axis of asymmetric cell division of the P2 and P3 cells is formed in an opposite manner to that of the P0 and P1 cells. The extracellular signal MES-1/SRC-1 has been shown to induce polarity reversal, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, using a mathematical model, I explore the mechanism by which MES-1/SRC-1 signaling can induce polarity reversal and ultimately affect the process of polarity formation. I show that a positive correlation between SRC-1 and the on-rate of PAR-2 is the essential mechanism underlying polarity reversal, providing a mathematical basis for the orientation of cell polarity patterns. PMID:27086039

  16. Culture medium of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells effects lymphatic endothelial cells and tumor lymph vessel formation

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAN, JIE; Li, Yahong; Yu, Jing; ZHAO, YUANYAUN; CAO, WENMING; Ma, Jie; Sun, Xiaoxian; Sun, Li; QIAN, HUI; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) favor tumor growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Neovascularization is involved in several pathological conditions, including tumor growth and metastasis. Previous studies have demonstrated that human bone marrow MSC-derived conditioned medium (hBM-MSC-CM) can promote tumor growth by inducing the expression of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) in tumor cells. However, the effect of BM-MSCs on tumor lymph vessel formation has yet...

  17. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon stimulation with fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Voelkel; H F Krug; S Diabaté

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash was used as a model for ambient particulate matter which is under suspicion to cause adverse pulmonary health effects. The fly ash was pre-sized and contained only particles < 20 m including an ultrafine fraction (< 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the formation of ROS with regard to the mass of particles applied. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) added as a co-stimulus did not increase the formation of ROS induced by fly ash. Furthermore, in LPS (0.1 g/ml) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 1 ng/ml) pre-treated cells no increase in reactive oxygen species comparable to fly ash alone is observable. In presence of the metal chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), ROS formation can be significantly reduced. Neither fly ash nor LPS induced a significant NO release in RLE-6TN cells.

  18. [Recruitment of osteogenic cells to bone formation sites during development and fracture repair - German Version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, A-M; Dirckx, N; Maes, C

    2016-04-01

    Recruitment of osteoblast lineage cells to their bone-forming locations is essential for skeletal development and fracture healing. In developing bones, osteoprogenitor cells invade the cartilage mold to establish the primary ossification center. Similarly, osteogenic cells infiltrate and populate the callus tissue that is formed following an injury. Proper bone development and successful fracture repair must, therefore, rely on controlled temporal and spatial navigation cues guiding the cells to the sites where new bone formation is needed. Some cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways involved have been elucidated. PMID:27003859

  19. Effect of erythrocyte aggregation and flow rate on cell-free layer formation in arterioles

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Kai; Namgung, Bumseok; Johnson, Paul C.; Kim, Sangho

    2010-01-01

    Formation of a cell-free layer is an important dynamic feature of microcirculatory blood flow, which can be influenced by rheological parameters, such as red blood cell aggregation and flow rate. In this study, we investigate the effect of these two rheological parameters on cell-free layer characteristics in the arterioles (20–60 μm inner diameter). For the first time, we provide here the detailed temporal information of the arteriolar cell-free layer in various rheological conditions to bet...

  20. Enhancement of Umbilical Cord Blood Cell Hematopoiesis by Maitake Beta-Glucan Is Mediated by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Production▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hong; Cheung, Sandy W. Y.; Nesin, Mirjana; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Maitake beta-glucan (MBG) is an extract from the fruit body of the Grifola frondosa mushroom that is being widely used to treat cancer in Asia. We have previously reported that MBG enhances mouse bone marrow cell (BMC) hematopoiesis in vitro and protects BMC from doxorubicin (DOX) toxicity. In the current study, we investigated the ability of MBG to enhance hematopoiesis and to reduce the toxic effects of DOX on fresh human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells. MBG treatment significantly enhanced...

  1. Heteroresistance to colistin in Klebsiella pneumoniae is triggered by small colony variants sub-populations within biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana; Sousa, Ana Margarida; Alves, Diana; Lourenço, Anália; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of Klebsiella pneumoniae multidrug-resistant strains paves the way to the re-introduction of colistin as a salvage therapy. However, recent planktonic studies have reported several cases of heteroresistance to this antimicrobial agent. The aim of this present work was to gain better understanding about the response of K. pneumoniae biofilms to colistin antibiotherapy and inspect the occurrence of heteroresistance in biofilm-derived cells. Biofilm formation and its susceptibility to colistin were evaluated through the determination of biofilm-cells viability. The profiling of planktonic and biofilm cell populations was conducted to assess the occurrence of heteroresistance. Colony morphology was further characterized in order to inspect the potential role of colistin in K. pneumoniae phenotypic differentiation. Results show that K. pneumoniae was susceptible to colistin in its planktonic form, but biofilms presented enhanced resistance. Population analysis profiles pointed out that K. pneumoniae manifest heteroresistance to colistin only when grown in biofilm arrangements, and it was possible to identify a resistant sub-population presenting a small colony morphology (diameter around 5 mm). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report linking heteroresistance to biofilm formation and a morphological distinctive sub-population. Moreover, this is the first evidence that biofilm formation can trigger the emergence of heteroresistance in an apparently susceptible strain. PMID:27140200

  2. Interleukin 3 (IL 3) regulates the in vitro proliferation of both blood monocytes and peritoneal exudate macrophages: synergism between a macrophage lineage-specific colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) and IL 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of interleukin 3 (IL 3) on regulation of macrophage proliferation was examined. Although IL 3 alone stimulates the colony formation in bone marrow cells, it fails to stimulate the colony formation by both peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) and blood monocytes. However, IL 3 greatly enhances the proliferative capacity of both PEM and monocytes in responding to suboptimal concentrations of CSF-1. At supraoptimal concentrations of CSF-1, IL 3 did not increase the number of colonies, but greatly increased colony size. Kinetic studies showed that IL 3 enhances CSF-1-induced macrophage proliferation by shortening the cell doubling time. Monocytes were more sensitive to the action of IL 3 and possessed higher proliferative potential than PEM. Binding studies with radioactive labeled CSF-1 (125I-CSF-1) showed that IL 3 treatment induced an increased expression of CSF-1 receptor activity by PEM which appears to be a result of increased number of available receptor sites. The effect of IL 3 on the expression of receptor activity is both dose- and time-dependent. IL 3 also augments the rate of receptor-mediated CSF-1 endocytosis by PEM which appears to be a direct result of increased expression of CSF-1 binding sites. These results demonstrate that, in addition to stimulating the growth and differentiation of several blood cell lineages by hemopoietic stem cells, IL 3 also possesses the ability to modulate CSF-1 receptors, thereby affecting proliferation of more mature blood monocytes and tissue-derived macrophages

  3. Riches of phenotype computationally extracted from microbial colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Dodson, Anne E; Terhorst, Jonathan; Song, Yun S; Rine, Jasper

    2016-05-17

    The genetic, epigenetic, and physiological differences among cells in clonal microbial colonies are underexplored opportunities for discovery. A recently developed genetic assay reveals that transient losses of heterochromatic repression, a heritable form of gene silencing, occur throughout the growth of Saccharomyces colonies. This assay requires analyzing two-color fluorescence patterns in yeast colonies, which is qualitatively appealing but quantitatively challenging. In this paper, we developed a suite of automated image processing, visualization, and classification algorithms (MORPHE) that facilitated the analysis of heterochromatin dynamics in the context of colonial growth and that can be broadly adapted to many colony-based assays in Saccharomyces and other microbes. Using the features that were automatically extracted from fluorescence images, our classification method distinguished loss-of-silencing patterns between mutants and wild type with unprecedented precision. Application of MORPHE revealed subtle but significant differences in the stability of heterochromatic repression between various environmental conditions, revealed that haploid cells experienced higher rates of silencing loss than diploids, and uncovered the unexpected contribution of a sirtuin to heterochromatin dynamics. PMID:27140647

  4. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD and non-RAD (NRAD cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β1-integrin, while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin. Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in RasG12V-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  5. Redox signaling in the growth and development of colonial hydroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Neil W

    2003-02-01

    Redox signaling provides a quick and efficient mechanism for clonal or colonial organisms to adapt their growth and development to aspects of the environment, e.g. the food supply. A 'signature' of mitochondrial redox signaling, particularly as mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), can be elucidated by experimental manipulation of the electron transport chain. The major sites of ROS formation are found at NADH dehydrogenase of complex I and at the interface between coenzyme Q and complex III. Inhibitors of complex III should thus upregulate ROS from both sites; inhibitors of complex I should upregulate ROS from the first but not the second site, while uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation should downregulate ROS from both sites. To investigate the possibility of such redox signaling, perturbations of colony growth and development were carried out using the hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Oxygen uptake of colonies was measured to determine comparable physiological doses of antimycin A(1) (an inhibitor of complex III), rotenone (an inhibitor of complex I) and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP; an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation). Using these doses, clear effects on colony growth and development were obtained. Treatment with antimycin A(1) results in 'runner-like' colony growth, with widely spaced polyps and stolon branches, while treatment with CCCP results in 'sheet-like' growth, with closely spaced polyps and stolon branches. Parallel results have been obtained previously with azide, an inhibitor of complex IV, and dinitrophenol, another uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Perhaps surprisingly, rotenone produced effects on colony development similar to those of CCCP. Assays of peroxides using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate and fluorescent microscopy suggest a moderate difference in ROS formation between the antimycin and rotenone treatments. The second site of ROS formation (the interface between coenzyme Q and complex III) may thus

  6. Fractal Growth of Bacterial Colonies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Fridrich, Miroslav; Burkhard, M.

    London : Chapman&Hall, 1995 - (Novak, M.M.), s. 179-191 ISBN 0-412-71020-X. [Fractal Reviews in the Natural and Applied Sciences. Marseille (FI), 07.02.1995-10.02.1995] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : fractal * bacteria l colony * growth pattern Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  7. Ant Colony Optimization for Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ast, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The very basis of this thesis is the collective behavior of ants in colonies. Ants are an excellent example of how rather simple behavior on a local level can lead to complex behavior on a global level that is beneficial for the individuals. The key in the self-organization of ants is communication

  8. Activation of the SOS response increases the frequency of small colony variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Staphylococcus aureus sub-populations of slow-growing cells forming small colony variants (SCVs) are associated with persistent and recurrent infections that are difficult to eradicate with antibiotic therapies. In SCVs that are resistant towards aminoglycosides, mutations have been...... different mechanism of action influence the formation of SCVs that are resistant to otherwise lethal concentrations of the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. We found that exposure of S. aureus to fluoroquinolones and mitomycin C increased the frequency of gentamicin resistant SCVs, while other antibiotic classes...... that environmental stimuli, including antimicrobials that reduce replication fidelity, increase the formation of SCVs through activation of the SOS response and thereby potentially promote persistent infections that are difficult to treat....

  9. Grazing impacts of the invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) on single-celled, colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria Impactos da filtração do bivalve invasor Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) sobre cianobactérias solitárias, coloniais e filamentosas

    OpenAIRE

    V Gazulha; MCD Mansur; LF Cybis; SMFO Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behavior of the invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei in the presence of single-celled, colonial, and filamentous cyanobacteria was tested in laboratory experiments to evaluate the effects of size and shape on mussel feeding. The first hypothesis holds that golden mussel filters more efficiently smaller particles, such as single cells of Microcystis, which could be more easily assimilated by its filtering apparatus. The second hypothesis sustains that L. fortunei filters more efficient...

  10. Enhancement of human glioma cells SHG44 radiosensitivity with celecoxib in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the radiosensitizing effects on human glioma cells SHG44 using celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitor, MTT assay was used to determine the effect of celecoxib on the cell growth, and Colony Formation assay, Reverse transcription-PCR assay were used to investigate the effect of celecoxib or combined with 60Co γ-irradiation on cell colony formation rate and the levels of COX-2 mRNA expression. Experimental results suggested that the cytotoxicity of celecoxib enhanced along with the increment of drug's concentration. The celecoxib could inhibit colony formation in SHG44 cells. When combined with 60Co γ-irradiation, COX-2 mRNA expression levels was lower than that of control, drug and irradiation group respectively. The study confirmed the radiosensitizing effects of this drug to human glioma cells SHG44, and it might be closely related to the COX-2 mRNA expression levels. (authors)

  11. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  12. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Kopp

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  13. A role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8{sup +} T cell responses to rabies virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8{sup +} T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8{sup +} T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8{sup +} T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8{sup +} T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  14. A role for granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8+ T cell responses to rabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8+ T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8+ T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8+ T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8+ T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  15. Gravity-induced buds formation from protonemata apical cells in the mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyyak, Natalia; Khorkavtsiv, Yaroslava

    The acceleration of moss protonemata development after the exit it to light from darkness is important gravidependent morphogenetic manifestation of the moss protonemata. The accelerated development of mosses shows in transformation of apical protonemata cells into the gametophores buds (Ripetskyj et al., 1999). In order to establish, that such reaction on gravitation is general property of gravisensity species, or its typical only for single moss species, experiments with the following moss species - Bryum intermedium (Ludw.) Brig., Bryum caespiticium Hedw., Bryum argenteum Hedw., Dicranodontium denudatum (Brid.) Britt. were carried out. All these species in response to influence of gravitation were capable to form rich bunches of gravitropical protonemata in darkness, that testified to their gravisensity. After the transference of Petri dishes with gravitropical protonemata from darkness on light was revealed, that in 3 of the investigated species the gametophores buds were absent. Only B. argenteum has reacted to action of gravitation by buds formation from apical cells of the gravitropical protonemata. With the purpose of strengthening of buds formation process, the experiments with action of exogenous kinetin (in concentration of 10 (-6) M) were carried out. Kinetin essentially stimulated apical buds formation of B. argenteum. The quantity of apical buds has increased almost in three times in comparison with the control. Besides, on separate stolons a few (3-4) buds from one apical cell were formed. Experimentally was established, that the gametophores buds formation in mosses is controlled by phytohormones (Bopp, 1985; Demkiv et al., 1991). In conditions of gravity influence its essentially accelerated. Probably, gravity essentially strengthened acropetal transport of phytohormones and formation of attractive center in the protonemata apical cell. Our investigations have allowed to make the conclusion, that gravi-dependent formation of the apical buds is

  16. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  17. Dynamics and roles of phragmoplast microfilaments in cell plate formation during cytokinesis of tobacco BY-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan; ZHANG WenJie; BALUSKA Frantisek; MENZEL Diedrik; REN HaiYun

    2009-01-01

    The phragmoplast is a special apparatus that functions in establishing a cell plate in dividing plant cells.It is known that microfilaments (MFs) are involved in constituting phragmoplast structure, but the dynamic distribution and role of phragmoplast MFs are far from being understood. In this study, the precise structure and dynamics of MFs during the initiation and the late lateral expansion of the phragmoplast were observed by using a tobacco BY-2 cell line stably expressing the microfilament reporter construct GFP-f ABD2. Three-dimensional imaging showed that the phragmoplast MFs were initiated by two populations of MFs emerging between the reconstituting daughter nuclei at anaphase, which migrated to the mid-zone and gave rise to two layers of microfilament arrays. FM4-64 stained vesicles accumulated and fused with the cell plate between the two populations of MFs. The two layers of microfilament arrays of phragmoplast with ends overlapped always surrounded the centrifugally expanding cell plate. Partial disruption of MFs at metaphase by low concentration of latrunculin B resulted in the inhibition of the cell plate consolidation and the blockage of cell plate lateral expansion,whereas high concentration of latrunculin B restrained the progression of the cell cycle. Treating the cell after the initiation of phragmoplast led to the cease of the expansion of the cell plate. Our observations provide new insights into the precise structure and dynamics of phragmoplast MFs during cytokinesis and suggest that dynamic phragmoplast MFs are important in cell plate formation.

  18. Induction of HLA-B27 heavy chain homodimer formation after activation in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Susana G.; Lynch, Sarah; Campbell, Elaine C.; Antoniou, Antony N.; Simon J Powis

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a severe, chronic inflammatory arthritis, with a strong association to the human major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) class I allele human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27. Disulfide-linked HLA-B27 heavy-chain homodimers have been implicated as novel structures involved in the aetiology of AS. We have studied the formation of HLA-B27 heavy-chain homodimers in human dendritic cells, which are key antigen-presenting cells and regulators of mammalian immun...

  19. Insulin and glucose play a role in foam cell formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Keller Susanna R; Huo Yuqing; Rissing Benjamin A; Miller Yury I; Jain Nitin; Shashkin Pavel N; Vandenhoff George E; Nadler Jerry L; McIntyre Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Foam cell formation in diabetic patients often occurs in the presence of high insulin and glucose levels. To test whether hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemic conditions affect foam cell differentiation, we examined gene expression, cytokine production, and Akt phosphorylation in human monocyte-derived macrophages incubated with two types of oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), minimally modified LDL (mmLDL) and extensively oxidized LDL (OxLDL). Methods and results Using Affy...

  20. Convective cell formation and anomalous diffusion due to electromagnetic drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convective cell formation and spectral cascade processes due to gravitational drift Alfven waves are studied using a new type of model equation. Conservation relations are derived and explosive instability is found for systems near marginal finite β stability. This instability also remains when the effects of poor as well as favorable curvature regions are included, i.e., for ballooning modes. The anomalous diffusion due to convective cells and quasi-linear effects are compared

  1. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Guiling; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) gene on renal cell cancer (RCC) cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA)-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were significantly decreased in the siRNA-SPOP group. The protein microarray screening showed that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the siRNA group was significantly decreased and that the expression of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and E-cadherin was significantly increased (P<0.05). The relevant signaling pathways were the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions pathway and extracellular matrix organization signal pathway. SPOP gene silencing induced cell apoptosis, decreased cell viability, colony formation, and migration ability, and elevated the drug sensitivity in the RCC cells. A possible mechanism is that silencing SPOP induces the differential expression of E-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, which are related to the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions and extracellular

  2. Differential survival of solitary and aggregated bacterial cells promotes aggregate formation on leaf surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, J.-M.; Lindow, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The survival of individual Pseudomonas syringae cells was determined on bean leaf surfaces maintained under humid conditions or periodically exposed to desiccation stress. Cells of P. syringae strain B728a harboring a GFP marker gene were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy, either directly in situ or after recovery from leaves, and dead cells were identified as those that were stained with propidium iodide in such populations. Under moist, conducive conditions on plants, the proportion of total live cells was always high, irrespective of their aggregated state. In contrast, the proportion of the total cells that remained alive on leaves that were periodically exposed to desiccation stress decreased through time and was only ≈15% after 5 days. However, the fraction of cells in large aggregates that were alive on such plants in both condition was much higher than more solitary cells. Immediately after inoculation, cells were randomly distributed over the leaf surface and no aggregates were observed. However, a very aggregated pattern of colonization was apparent within 7 days, and >90% of the living cells were located in aggregates of 100 cells or more. Our results strongly suggest that, although conducive conditions favor aggregate formation, such cells are much more capable of tolerating environmental stresses, and the preferential survival of cells in aggregates promotes a highly clustered spatial distribution of bacteria on leaf surfaces. PMID:14665692

  3. Discrete model of periodic pattern formation through a combined autocrine–juxtacrine cell signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We model the formation of periodic patterns of gene expression in epithelial cell sheets driven by autocrine signaling coupled to juxtacrine lateral inhibition. The mathematical model is based on a continuous description of the extracellular matrix and a discrete cell-level description of the layer of cells, coupling the dynamics of diffusible ligands to the threshold-controlled cell-autonomous regulation with randomly fluctuating production rates. The results of numerical simulations indicate that propagating signaling waves emerge in a certain parametric domain, leading to the formation of a variety of either periodic or irregular patterns. For some selections of parameters, a propagating stripe of uniform expression leaves in its wake stationary periodic arrays. Coupling of autocrine and juxtacrine cell communication is essential for the pattern regularity and for the selection of expression patterns. Moreover, weak but non-vanishing noise levels are essential for the formation of regular patterns. Additional autocrine and cell-autonomous regulatory interactions can be introduced to increase the spacing of a periodic pattern. (paper)

  4. TCPs, WUSs, and WINDs: Families of transcription factors that regulate shoot meristem formation, stem cell maintenance, and somatic cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eIkeda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to somatic mammalian cells, which cannot alter their fate, plant cells can dedifferentiate to form totipotent callus cells and regenerate a whole plant, following treatment with specific phytohormones. However, the regulatory mechanisms and key factors that control differentiation-dedifferentiation and cell totipotency have not been completely clarified in plants. Recently, several plant transcription factors that regulate meristem formation and dedifferentiation have been identified and include members of the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR (TCP, WUSCHEL (WUS, and WOUND INDUCED DEDIFFERENTIATION (WIND1 families. WUS and WIND positively control plant cell totipotency, while TCP negatively controls it. Interestingly, TCP is a transcriptional activator that acts as a negative regulator of shoot meristem formation, and WUS is a transcriptional repressor that positively maintains totipotency of the stem cells of the shoot meristem. We describe here the functions of TCP, WUS and WIND transcription factors in the regulation of differentiation-dedifferentiation by positive and negative transcriptional regulators.

  5. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment. PMID:26472159

  6. NACA deficiency reveals the crucial role of somite-derived stromal cells in haematopoietic niche formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Emi; Sarris, Milka; Redd, Michael; Le Guyader, Dorothée; Vivier, Catherine; Horsley, Wyatt; Trede, Nikolaus; Herbomel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The ontogeny of haematopoietic niches in vertebrates is essentially unknown. Here we show that the stromal cells of the caudal haematopoietic tissue (CHT), the first niche where definitive haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) home in zebrafish development, derive from the caudal somites through an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The resulting stromal cell progenitors accompany the formation of the caudal vein sinusoids, the other main component of the CHT niche, and mature into reticular cells lining and interconnecting sinusoids. We characterize a zebrafish mutant defective in definitive haematopoiesis due to a deficiency in the nascent polypeptide-associated complex alpha subunit (NACA). We demonstrate that the defect resides not in HSPCs but in the CHT niche. NACA-deficient stromal cell progenitors initially develop normally together with the sinusoids, and HSPCs home to the resulting niche, but stromal cell maturation is compromised, leading to a niche that is unable to support HSPC maintenance, expansion and differentiation. PMID:26411530

  7. Development of Large-Format Lithium-Ion Cells with Silicon Anode and Low Flammable Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Hernandez-Lugo, D. M.; Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Miller, T. B.; Lvovich, V. F.; Lytle, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing safe, high energy and high capacity lithium-ion cell designs and batteries for future missions under NASAs Advanced Space Power System (ASPS) project. Advanced cell components, such as high specific capacity silicon anodes and low-flammable electrolytes have been developed for improving the cell specific energy and enhancing safety. To advance the technology readiness level, we have developed large-format flight-type hermetically sealed battery cells by incorporating high capacity silicon anodes, commercially available lithium nickel, cobalt, aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes, and low-flammable electrolytes. In this report, we will present the performance results of these various battery cells. In addition, we will also discuss the post-test cell analysis results as well.

  8. Tumor Cell Seeding During Surgery—Possible Contribution to Metastasis Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katharina, Pachmann [Department of Experimental Hematology and Oncology, Clinic for Internal Medicine II, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena D-07747 (Germany)

    2011-06-08

    In spite of optimal local control in breast cancer, distant metastases can develop as a systemic part of this disease. Surgery is suspected to contribute to metastasis formation activating dormant tumor cells. Here we add data that seeding of cells during surgery may add to the risk of metastasis formation. The change in circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETC) was monitored in 66 breast cancer patients operated on with breast conserving surgery or mastectomy and during the further course of the disease, analyzing CETC from unseparated white blood cells stained with FITC-anti-EpCAM. An increase in cell numbers lasting until the start of chemotherapy was observed in about one third of patients. It was more preeminent in patients with low numbers of CETC before surgery and, surprisingly, in patients without involved lymph nodes. Patients with the previously reported behavior—Reincrease in cell numbers during adjuvant chemotherapy and subsequent further increase during maintenance therapy—were at increased risk of relapse. In addition to tumor cells already released during growth of the tumor, cell seeding during surgery may contribute to the early peak of relapses observed after removal of the primary tumor and chemotherapy may only marginally postpone relapse in patients with aggressively growing tumors.

  9. Tumor Cell Seeding During Surgery—Possible Contribution to Metastasis Formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of optimal local control in breast cancer, distant metastases can develop as a systemic part of this disease. Surgery is suspected to contribute to metastasis formation activating dormant tumor cells. Here we add data that seeding of cells during surgery may add to the risk of metastasis formation. The change in circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETC) was monitored in 66 breast cancer patients operated on with breast conserving surgery or mastectomy and during the further course of the disease, analyzing CETC from unseparated white blood cells stained with FITC-anti-EpCAM. An increase in cell numbers lasting until the start of chemotherapy was observed in about one third of patients. It was more preeminent in patients with low numbers of CETC before surgery and, surprisingly, in patients without involved lymph nodes. Patients with the previously reported behavior—Reincrease in cell numbers during adjuvant chemotherapy and subsequent further increase during maintenance therapy—were at increased risk of relapse. In addition to tumor cells already released during growth of the tumor, cell seeding during surgery may contribute to the early peak of relapses observed after removal of the primary tumor and chemotherapy may only marginally postpone relapse in patients with aggressively growing tumors

  10. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  11. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.; Siddappa, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effe

  12. Paraoxonases 1, 2, and 3, oxidative stress, and macrophage foam cell formation during atherosclerosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Michael; Rosenblat, Mira

    2004-11-01

    Paraoxonases PON1 and PON3, which are both associated in serum with HDL, protect the serum lipids from oxidation, probably as a result of their ability to hydrolyze specific oxidized lipids. The activity of HDL-associated PON1 seems to involve an activity (phospholipase A2-like activity, peroxidase-like activity, lactonase activity) which produces LPC. To study the possible role of PON1 in macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis we used macrophages from control mice, from PON1 knockout mice, and from PON1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we analyzed PON1-treated macrophages and PON1-transfected cells to demonstrate the contribution of PON1 to the attenuation of macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. PON1 was shown to inhibit cholesterol influx [by reducing the formation of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), increasing the breakdown of specific oxidized lipids in Ox-LDL, and decreasing macrophage uptake of Ox-LDL]. PON1 also inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis and stimulates HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PON2 and PON3 protect against oxidative stress, with PON2 acting mainly at the cellular level. Whereas serum PON1 and PON3 were inactivated under oxidative stress, macrophage PON2 expression and activity were increased under oxidative stress, probably as a compensatory mechanism against oxidative stress. Intervention to increase the paraoxonases (cellular and humoral) by dietary or pharmacological means can reduce macrophage foam cell formation and attenuate atherosclerosis development. PMID:15454271

  13. Arginine-vasopressin stimulates the formation of phosphatidic acid in rat Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.R.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) stimulated the formation of labelled phosphatidic acid (PA) in [C]arachidonic acid-prelabelled rat Leydig cells. After addition of 10 M AVP [C]arachidonoylphosphatidic acid reached a maximum within 2 min. The increase was dose-dependent (10-10 M). No change in labelling...

  14. Inhibition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic biofilm formation and invasion to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qilin; Li, Jianrong; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Yufan; Liu, Lu; Li, Mingchun

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the growing infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogens, it is urgent to develop novel antimicrobial agents against clinical pathogenic infections. Biofilm formation and invasion into the host cells are vital processes during pathogenic colonization and infection. In this study, we tested the inhibitory effect of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic growth, biofilm formation and invasion. Interestingly, although the synthesized AuNPs had no significant toxicity to the tested pathogens, Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the nanoparticles strongly inhibited pathogenic biofilm formation and invasion to dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Further investigations revealed that AuNPs abundantly bound to the pathogen cells, which likely contributed to their inhibitory effect on biofilm formation and invasion. Moreover, treatment of AuNPs led to activation of immune response-related genes in DPSCs, which may enhance the activity of host immune system against the pathogens. Zeta potential analysis and polyethylene glycol (PEG)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) coating tests further showed that the interaction between pathogen cells and AuNPs is associated with electrostatic attractions. Our findings shed novel light on the application of nanomaterials in fighting against clinical pathogens, and imply that the traditional growth inhibition test is not the only way to evaluate the drug effect during the screening of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27220400

  15. Free Energies of Formation Measurements on Solid-State Electrochemical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollino, J. A.; Aronson, S.

    1972-01-01

    A simple experiment is proposed that can provide the student with some insight into the chemical properties of solids. It also demonstrates the relationship between the Gibbs free energy of formation of an ionic solid and the emf of an electrochemical cell. (DF)

  16. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in rat skeletal muscle cells during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pereira-Da-Silva, Lucia; Juel, Carsten;

    2003-01-01

    We examined intra- and extracellular H(2)O(2) and NO formation during contractions in primary rat skeletal muscle cell culture. The fluorescent probes DCFH-DA/DCFH (2,7-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate/2,7-dichlorofluorescein) and DAF-2-DA/DAF-2 (4,5-diaminofluorescein-diacetate/4,5-diaminofluoresce...

  17. Inhibition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic biofilm formation and invasion to host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qilin; Li, Jianrong; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Yufan; Liu, Lu; Li, Mingchun

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the growing infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogens, it is urgent to develop novel antimicrobial agents against clinical pathogenic infections. Biofilm formation and invasion into the host cells are vital processes during pathogenic colonization and infection. In this study, we tested the inhibitory effect of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on pathogenic growth, biofilm formation and invasion. Interestingly, although the synthesized AuNPs had no significant toxicity to the tested pathogens, Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the nanoparticles strongly inhibited pathogenic biofilm formation and invasion to dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Further investigations revealed that AuNPs abundantly bound to the pathogen cells, which likely contributed to their inhibitory effect on biofilm formation and invasion. Moreover, treatment of AuNPs led to activation of immune response-related genes in DPSCs, which may enhance the activity of host immune system against the pathogens. Zeta potential analysis and polyethylene glycol (PEG)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) coating tests further showed that the interaction between pathogen cells and AuNPs is associated with electrostatic attractions. Our findings shed novel light on the application of nanomaterials in fighting against clinical pathogens, and imply that the traditional growth inhibition test is not the only way to evaluate the drug effect during the screening of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27220400

  18. Hypochlorite- and hypobromite-mediated radical formation and its role in cell lysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Brown, B E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Activated leukocytes generate the potent oxidants HOCl and HOBr via the formation of H(2)O(2) and the release of peroxidase enzymes (myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase). HOCl and HOBr are potent microbiocidal agents, but excessive or misplaced production can cause tissue damage and cell lysis...

  19. Recruitment Strategies and Colony Size in Ants

    OpenAIRE

    Planqué, Robert; van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; Franks, Nigel R

    2010-01-01

    Ants use a great variety of recruitment methods to forage for food or find new nests, including tandem running, group recruitment and scent trails. It has been known for some time that there is a loose correlation across many taxa between species-specific mature colony size and recruitment method. Very small colonies tend to use solitary foraging; small to medium sized colonies use tandem running or group recruitment whereas larger colonies use pheromone recruitment trails. Until now, explana...

  20. Retinoic acid-treated pluripotent stem cells undergoing neurogenesis present increased aneuploidy and micronuclei formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C Sartore

    Full Text Available The existence of loss and gain of chromosomes, known as aneuploidy, has been previously described within the central nervous system. During development, at least one-third of neural progenitor cells (NPCs are aneuploid. Notably, aneuploid NPCs may survive and functionally integrate into the mature neural circuitry. Given the unanswered significance of this phenomenon, we tested the hypothesis that neural differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA in pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by increased levels of aneuploidy, as previously described for cortical NPCs in vivo. In this work we used embryonal carcinoma (EC cells, embryonic stem (ES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells undergoing differentiation into NPCs. Ploidy analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in the rate of aneuploidy, with the prevalence of chromosome loss in RA primed stem cells when compared to naïve cells. In an attempt to understand the basis of neurogenic aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin expression was assessed in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA. RA increased micronuclei occurrence by almost 2-fold while decreased survivin expression by 50%, indicating possible mechanisms by which stem cells lose their chromosomes during neural differentiation. DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated no increase in apoptosis on embryoid bodies treated with RA, indicating that cell death is not the mandatory fate of aneuploid NPCs derived from pluripotent cells. In order to exclude that the increase in aneuploidy was a spurious consequence of RA treatment, not related to neurogenesis, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with RA under the same conditions and no alterations in chromosome gain or loss were observed. These findings indicate a correlation amongst neural differentiation, aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin downregulation in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA, providing evidence that somatically generated chromosomal

  1. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  2. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eYoshida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications.

  3. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  4. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Emsen

    Full Text Available A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV, black queen cell virus (BQCV, Kashmir bee virus (KBV, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV and sac brood virus (SBV in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera from colonies selected for high (HMP and low (LMP Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection.

  5. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsen, Berna; Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Goodwin, Paul H; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and sac brood virus (SBV) in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) from colonies selected for high (HMP) and low (LMP) Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection. PMID:25723540

  6. The Small Colony Variant Of Listeria Monocytogenes Is More Tolerant To Antibiotics And Grows Better Within Caco-2 Epithelial Cells Than The Wild Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard

    2015-01-01

    tolerant of 20mM H2O2 as compared to the wild type, with 6.3 log10 CFU/ml and 3.7 log10 CFU/ml, respectively. The SCV E18 had lower survival rate in unactivated macrophages, however, it was able to survive and multiply to almost 100-fold higher CFU/ml than the wild type in CaCo-2 epithelial cells...

  7. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-8 (rhIL-8) on the bone marrow cells of normal BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the colony formation ability of recombinant human interleukin-8 (rhIL-8) on bone marrow cells (BMCs) of normal mice in vivo. Methods: By means of cells culture and flow cytometry (FCM), the colony-stimulating activity of rhIL-8 on BMCs of normal mice was studied. Results: The experimental studies in vivo demonstrated that rhIL-8 could not changed the counts of CFU-GM and distribution of cell cycle in BMCs. Conclusion: rhIL-8 has no colony-stimulating activity to BMCs of normal mice

  8. Liver type I regulatory T cells suppress germinal center formation in HBV-tolerant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    The liver plays a critical role in inducing systemic immune tolerance, for example, during limiting hypersensitivity to food allergy and in rendering acceptance of allotransplant or even hepatotropic pathogens. We investigated the unknown mechanisms of liver tolerance by using an established hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, and found that these mice exhibited an antigen-specific tolerance toward peripheral HBsAg vaccination, showing unenlarged draining lymph node (DLN), lower number of germinal centers (GC), and inactivation of GC B cells and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Both in vivo and in vitro immune responses toward HBsAg were suppressed by mononuclear cells from HBV-carrier mice, which were CD4(+) Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1)-like cells producing IL-10. Using recipient Rag1(-/-) mice, hepatic Tr1-like cells from day 7 of HBV-persistent mice acquired the ability to inhibit anti-HBV immunity 3 d earlier than splenic Tr1-like cells, implying that hepatic Tr1-like cells were generated before those in spleen. Kupffer cell depletion or IL-10 deficiency led to impairment of Tr1-like cell generation, along with breaking HBV persistence. The purified EGFP(+)CD4(+) T cells (containing Tr1-like cells) from HBV-carrier mice trafficked in higher numbers to DLN in recipient mice after HBsAg vaccination, and subsequently inactivated both Tfh cells and GC B cells via secreting IL-10, resulting in impaired GC formation and anti-HB antibody production. Thus, our results indicate Tr1-like cells migrate from the liver to the DLN and inhibit peripheral anti-HBV immunity by negatively regulating GC B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:24089450

  9. Ant colony optimization in continuous problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ling; LIU Kang; LI Kaishi

    2007-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the basic ant colony optimization and optimum problem in a continuous space,an ant colony optimization (ACO) for continuous problem is constructed and discussed. The algorithm is efficient and beneficial to the study of the ant colony optimization in a continuous space.

  10. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  11. Context and location dependence of adaptive Foxp3+ regulatory T cell formation during immunopathological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Heiber, Joshua F.; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) may arise in the thymus (natural Treg, nTreg) or through the adaptive upregulation of Foxp3 after T cell activation (induced Treg, iTreg). In this brief review, we explore evidence for the formation and function of iTreg during pathologic conditions. Determining the ontogeny and function of Treg populations has relied on the use of manipulated systems in which either iTreg or nTreg are absent, or lineage tracing of T cell clones through repertoire ...

  12. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Willems

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  13. Lymphotoxin-Dependent B Cell-FRC Crosstalk Promotes De Novo Follicle Formation and Antibody Production following Intestinal Helminth Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Lalit Kumar; Lebon, Luc; Mosconi, Ilaria; Yang, Chen-Ying; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Luther, Sanjiv A; Harris, Nicola L

    2016-05-17

    Secondary lymphoid tissues provide specialized niches for the initiation of adaptive immune responses and undergo a remarkable expansion in response to inflammatory stimuli. Although the formation of B cell follicles was previously thought to be restricted to the postnatal period, we observed that the draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN) of helminth-infected mice form an extensive number of new, centrally located, B cell follicles in response to IL-4Rα-dependent inflammation. IL-4Rα signaling promoted LTα1β2 (lymphotoxin) expression by B cells, which then interacted with CCL19 positive stromal cells to promote lymphoid enlargement and the formation of germinal center containing B cell follicles. Importantly, de novo follicle formation functioned to promote both total and parasite-specific antibody production. These data reveal a role for type 2 inflammation in promoting stromal cell remodeling and de novo follicle formation by promoting B cell-stromal cell crosstalk. PMID:27160906

  14. Radiolysis of chromatin extracted from cultured mammalian cells: formation of DNA-protein cross links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin extracted from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts has been examined for the formation of radiation-induced DNA-protein cross links, using a membrane filter assay. The relative efficiencies of the aqueous radical intermediates, 0H., esub(aq)- and 02-, were investigated. Cross links were found in gamma-irradiated isolated chromatin and in chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation. When isolated chromatin was irradiated under conditions in which the chromosomal proteins were dissociated from the DNA, no cross links were detectable. The most efficient radical for the production of cross links in irradiated, isolated chromatin was found to be the hydroxyl radical, whereas, the superoxide radical was essentially ineffective. For chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation, the greatest effect was seen for cells irradiated in an atmosphere of nitrous oxide, suggesting the hydroxyl radical may be involved in the formation of cross links in intact cells also. The formation of cross links in chromatin irradiated in cells before isolation was considerably less efficient than in irradiated, isolated chromatin. (author)

  15. Machine-Part cell formation through visual decipherable clustering of Self Organizing Map

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Dan, Pranab K; 10.1007/s00170-010-2802-4

    2011-01-01

    Machine-part cell formation is used in cellular manufacturing in order to process a large variety, quality, lower work in process levels, reducing manufacturing lead-time and customer response time while retaining flexibility for new products. This paper presents a new and novel approach for obtaining machine cells and part families. In the cellular manufacturing the fundamental problem is the formation of part families and machine cells. The present paper deals with the Self Organising Map (SOM) method an unsupervised learning algorithm in Artificial Intelligence, and has been used as a visually decipherable clustering tool of machine-part cell formation. The objective of the paper is to cluster the binary machine-part matrix through visually decipherable cluster of SOM color-coding and labelling via the SOM map nodes in such a way that the part families are processed in that machine cells. The Umatrix, component plane, principal component projection, scatter plot and histogram of SOM have been reported in t...

  16. Formation of Deposits on the Cathode Surface of Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, François; Soucy, Gervais; Rivoaland, Loig

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of electrolysis cells for aluminum production is reduced when deposits are formed on the cathode block surface. Overfeeding of alumina or excessive heat loss in industrial cells leads to the formation of highly resistive deposits. In this study, the chemical composition of sludge, ledge toe, and thin deposits was investigated at the bottom of both industrial and experimental electrolysis cells. The formation of deposits in laboratory experiments was demonstrated in acidic, neutral, and basic electrolytic bath. A gradient of chiolite (Na5Al3F14) and α-Al2O3 was observed in the deposits. The bath at the bottom of the experimental electrolysis cell had a higher cryolite ratio implying a higher liquidus temperature. The sludge formed at the bottom of the cell can lift the aluminum metal resulting in an important reduction of the contact surface between the aluminum and the cathode block. Moreover, the deposits disturb the current path and generate horizontal current components in the metal which enhance the motion and lower the current efficiency. A thin film of bath supersaturated in alumina was observed under the metal. This work provides clarification on the formation mechanisms of the various deposits responsible for the deterioration of the cathode surface.

  17. Ion bombardment induced formation of micro-craters in plant cell envelopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beam bombardment of biological material has been recently applied for gene transfer in both plant and bacterial cells. A consistent physical mechanism for this significant result has not yet been developed. A fundamental question about the mechanism is the possible formation of pathways due to ion bombardment that are responsible for the gene transfer. We have carried out investigations of the effects of low-energy bombardment by both gaseous and metallic ion species of onion skin cells on their surface microstructure. Our experimental results reveal evidence demonstrating that the formation of micro-crater-like structures on the plant cell envelope surface is a general phenomenon consequent to ion bombardment, no matter what ion species, under certain ion beam conditions. The micro-craters are about 0.1-1 μm in size (diameter) and a few tens of nanometers in depth. The micro-crater formation process seems to be unrelated to the chemical composition of and rapid water evaporation from the cell envelope, but is associated with the special microstructure of the cell wall

  18. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S;

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4...... and CD34 cells were measured. To examine the numbers of naive and memory type CD4 cells, CD4 cell coexpression of CD45RA and CD45RO was measured. Functionality of mobilized CD4 cells was examined by use of the proliferation assay and interleukin-2 ELISA. The number of CD34 cells increased from 1.50 to...... 20.01/microL (P < .002). The CD4 cell count increased from 236 to 452/microL (P < .002). The CD45RA/CD45RO ratio increased from 0.50 to 0.57 (P < .03). Mobilized CD4 cells were functionally intact. In conclusion, G-CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  19. Engineering Strategies for the Formation of Embryoid Bodies from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Wen, Xuejun; Zhang, Ning

    2015-07-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for regenerative therapy and studying human developmental biology, attributing to their ability to differentiate into many functional cell types in the body. The main challenge in realizing hPSC potential is to guide their differentiation in a well-controlled manner. One way to control the cell differentiation process is to recapitulate during in vitro culture the key events in embryogenesis to obtain the three developmental germ layers from which all cell types arise. To achieve this goal, many techniques have been tested to obtain a cellular cluster, an embryoid body (EB), from both mouse and hPSCs. Generation of EBs that are homogeneous in size and shape would allow directed hPSC differentiation into desired cell types in a more synchronous manner and define the roles of cell-cell interaction and spatial organization in lineage specification in a setting similar to in vivo embryonic development. However, previous success in uniform EB formation from mouse PSCs cannot be extrapolated to hPSCs possibly due to the destabilization of adherens junctions on cell surfaces during the dissociation into single cells, making hPSCs extremely vulnerable to cell death. Recently, new advances have emerged to form uniform human embryoid bodies (hEBs) from dissociated single cells of hPSCs. In this review, the existing methods for hEB production from hPSCs and the results on the downstream differentiation of the hEBs are described with emphases on the efficiency, homogeneity, scalability, and reproducibility of the hEB formation process and the yield in terminal differentiation. New trends in hEB production and directed differentiation are discussed. PMID:25900308

  20. Vicenistatin induces early endosome-derived vacuole formation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yuko; Ohmichi, Tomohiro; Kazami, Sayaka; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Mano, Kousuke; Nagumo, Yoko; Kudo, Fumitaka; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Kanoh, Naoki; Eguchi, Tadashi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Usui, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Homotypic fusion of early endosomes is important for efficient protein trafficking and sorting. The key controller of this process is Rab5 which regulates several effectors and PtdInsPs levels, but whose mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that vicenistatin, a natural product, enhanced homotypic fusion of early endosomes and induced the formation of large vacuole-like structures in mammalian cells. Unlike YM201636, another early endosome vacuolating compound, vicenistatin did not inhibit PIKfyve activity in vitro but activated Rab5-PAS pathway in cells. Furthermore, vicenistatin increased the membrane surface fluidity of cholesterol-containing liposomes in vitro, and cholesterol deprivation from the plasma membrane stimulated vicenistatin-induced vacuolation in cells. These results suggest that vicenistatin is a novel compound that induces the formation of vacuole-like structures by activating Rab5-PAS pathway and increasing membrane fluidity. PMID:27104762

  1. Telomere shortening in the colonial coral Acropora digitifera during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuta, Hiroki; Shinzato, Chuya; Satoh, Nori; Hidaka, Michio

    2014-03-01

    To test whether telomere length can be used in estimating the age of colonial corals, we used terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length analysis to compare the telomere lengths of the coral Acropora digitifera at three developmental stages: sperm, planula larvae, and polyps of adult colonies. We also compared the mean TRF lengths between branches at the center and periphery of tabular colonies of A. digitifera. A significant difference was observed in the mean TRF lengths in sperm, planulae, and polyps. The mean TRF length was longest in sperm and shortest in polyps from adult colonies. These results suggest that telomere length decreases during coral development and may be useful for estimating coral age. However, the mean TRF length of branches at the center of a table-form colony tended to be longer than that of peripheral branches, although this difference was not statistically significant. This suggests that both the chronological age of polyps and cell proliferation rate influence telomere length in polyps, and that estimating coral age based on telomere length is not a simple endeavor. PMID:24601774

  2. The diaphanous-related formins promote protrusion formation and cell-to-cell spread of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattouh, Ramzi; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Czuczman, Mark A; Copeland, John W; Pelletier, Laurence; Quinlan, Margot E; Muise, Aleixo M; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2015-04-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen whose virulence depends on its ability to spread from cell to cell within an infected host. Although the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex is necessary and sufficient for Listeria actin tail assembly, previous studies suggest that other actin polymerization factors, such as formins, may participate in protrusion formation. Here, we show that Arp2/3 localized to only a minor portion of the protrusion. Moreover, treatment of L. monocytogenes-infected HeLa cells with a formin FH2-domain inhibitor significantly reduced protrusion length. In addition, the Diaphanous-related formins 1-3 (mDia1-3) localized to protrusions, and knockdown of mDia1, mDia2, and mDia3 substantially decreased cell-to-cell spread of L. monocytogenes. Rho GTPases are known to be involved in formin activation. Our studies also show that knockdown of several Rho family members significantly influenced bacterial cell-to-cell spread. Collectively, these findings identify a Rho GTPase-formin network that is critically involved in the cell-to-cell spread of L. monocytogenes. PMID:25281757

  3. One Kilogram Interstellar Colony Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, A.

    Small interstellar colony probes based on nanotechnology will become possible long before giant multi-generation ships become affordable. A beam generator and magnetic sail can accelerate a one kg probe to .1 c, braking via the interstellar field can decelerate it, and the field in a distant solar system can allow it to maneuver to an extrasolar planet. A heat shield is used for landing and nanobots emerge to build ever-larger robots and construct colony infrastructure. Humans can then be generated from genomes stored as data in computer memory. Technology is evolving towards these capabilities and should reach the required level in fifty years. The plan appears to be affordable, with the principal cost being the beam generator, estimated at $17 billion.

  4. Recovery of viral capacity in irradiated exponentially growing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponentially growing cells of the PtK-2 line (ATCC No. CCL56, from the marsupial Potorous tridactylus) require protein and RNA synthesis in a limited period following UV-radiation damage for optimal recovery as colony formers [Overberg et al. (1988) Mutat. Res. 194, 83-92]. Overall behavior suggests the operation of damage-induced recovery processes. The capacity of confluent cell monolayers for infection with unirradiated herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is sharply reduced by UV-irradiation. Capacity changes were followed in exponentially growing cells after irradiation and varying amounts of photoreactivation by means of an infectious center assay. These changes closely parallel changes of colony formation. Spontaneous recovery of capacity in the dark occurs over approximately the same time period that UV sensitivity of colony formation depends on macromolecular synthesis. The effect of photoreactivation is complementary rather than additive to this recovery, suggesting dark recovery in this period concerns pyrimidine dimers in cell DNA. (author)

  5. Recovery of viral capacity in irradiated exponentially growing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed, N.I.; Rupert, C.S. (Texas Univ., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Exponentially growing cells of the PtK-2 line (ATCC No. CCL56, from the marsupial Potorous tridactylus) require protein and RNA synthesis in a limited period following UV-radiation damage for optimal recovery as colony formers (Overberg et al. (1988) Mutat. Res. 194, 83-92). Overall behavior suggests the operation of damage-induced recovery processes. The capacity of confluent cell monolayers for infection with unirradiated herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is sharply reduced by UV-irradiation. Capacity changes were followed in exponentially growing cells after irradiation and varying amounts of photoreactivation by means of an infectious center assay. These changes closely parallel changes of colony formation. Spontaneous recovery of capacity in the dark occurs over approximately the same time period that UV sensitivity of colony formation depends on macromolecular synthesis. The effect of photoreactivation is complementary rather than additive to this recovery, suggesting dark recovery in this period concerns pyrimidine dimers in cell DNA. (author).

  6. Nest- and colony-mate recognition in polydomous colonies of meat ants ( Iridomyrmex purpureus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilgenburg, E.; Ryan, D.; Morrison, P.; Marriott, P. J.; Elgar, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    Workers of polydomous colonies of social insects must recognize not only colony-mates residing in the same nest but also those living in other nests. We investigated the impact of a decentralized colony structure on colony- and nestmate recognition in the polydomous Australian meat ant ( Iridomyrmex purpureus). Field experiments showed that ants of colonies with many nests were less aggressive toward alien conspecifics than those of colonies with few nests. In addition, while meat ants were almost never aggressive toward nestmates, they were frequently aggressive when confronted with an individual from a different nest within the same colony. Our chemical analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons of workers using a novel comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography technique that increases the number of quantifiable compounds revealed both colony- and nest-specific patterns. Combined, these data indicate an incomplete transfer of colony odor between the nests of polydomous meat ant colonies.

  7. Colonial adventures in tropical agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Buelens, Frans; Frankema, Ewout

    2015-01-01

    How profitable were foreign investments in plantation agriculture in the Netherlands Indies during the late colonial era? We use a new dataset of monthly quoted stock prices and dividends of international companies at the Brussels stock exchange to estimate the returns to investment in tropical agriculture (1919–1938). We adopt the Dimson–March–Staunton method to compute real geometric annual average rates of return and assess our estimates in an international comparative perspective. We find...

  8. Changing Views on Colonial Heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Roosmalen, P.K.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Within the context of a rational study and in order to arrive at a balanced appreciation of nineteenth and twentieth century heritage worldwide, architecture and town planning realized under colonial rule requires special attention. This paper describes the strengths and need for a revised vision of this particular heritage and the considerations and criteria that should be taken into account for evaluation of the objects. The Dutch East Indies are used as a stepping stone.

  9. Honeybee immunity and colony losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nazzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline of honeybee colonies and their eventual collapse is a widespread phenomenon in the Northern hemisphere of the globe, which severely limits the beekeeping industry. This dramatic event is associated with an enhanced impact of parasites and pathogens on honeybees, which is indicative of reduced immunocompetence. The parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the vectored viral pathogens appear to play a key-role in the induction of this complex syndrome. In particular, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV is widespread and is now considered, along with Varroa, one of the major causes of bee colony losses. Several lines of evidence indicate that this mite/DWV association severely affects the immune system of honeybees and makes them more sensitive to the action of other stress factors. The molecular mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions are currently being investigated and the emerging information has allowed the development of a new functional model, describing how different stress factors may synergistically concur in the induction of bee immune alteration and health decline. This provides a new logical framework in which to interpret the proposed multifactorial origin of bee colony losses and sets the stage for a more comprehensive and integrated analysis of the effect that multiple stress agents may have on honeybees.

  10. Exploration adjustment by ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Carolina; Stumpe, Martin C; Sendova-Franks, Ana; Franks, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    How do animals in groups organize their work? Division of labour, i.e. the process by which individuals within a group choose which tasks to perform, has been extensively studied in social insects. Variability among individuals within a colony seems to underpin both the decision over which tasks to perform and the amount of effort to invest in a task. Studies have focused mainly on discrete tasks, i.e. tasks with a recognizable end. Here, we study the distribution of effort in nest seeking, in the absence of new nest sites. Hence, this task is open-ended and individuals have to decide when to stop searching, even though the task has not been completed. We show that collective search effort declines when colonies inhabit better homes, as a consequence of a reduction in the number of bouts (exploratory events). Furthermore, we show an increase in bout exploration time and a decrease in bout instantaneous speed for colonies inhabiting better homes. The effect of treatment on bout effort is very small; however, we suggest that the organization of work performed within nest searching is achieved both by a process of self-selection of the most hard-working ants and individual effort adjustment. PMID:26909180

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Bacterial Colony Growth in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian; Mugler, Andrew; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial cells growing in liquid culture have been well studied and modeled. However, in nature, bacteria often grow as biofilms or colonies in physically structured habitats. A comprehensive model for population growth in such conditions has not yet been developed. Based on the well-established theory for bacterial growth in liquid culture, we develop a model for colony growth in 3D in which a homogeneous colony of cells locally consume a diffusing nutrient. We predict that colony growth is initially exponential, as in liquid culture, but quickly slows to sub-exponential after nutrient is locally depleted. This prediction is consistent with our experiments performed with E. coli in soft agar. Our model provides a baseline to which studies of complex growth process, such as such as spatially and phenotypically heterogeneous colonies, must be compared.

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO2 particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles

  13. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi [Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Ichihara, Sahoko, E-mail: saho@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  14. Positively charged supported lipid bilayer formation on gold surfaces for neuronal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Eun; Greben, Kyrylo; Wördenweber, Roger; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are widely used as cell membrane models and sensor platforms, but the usage on gold surface needs additional surface modification or optimized experimental conditions. In this work, the authors show lipid bilayer formation on plasma activated gold surfaces in physiological conditions without any other modification if at least 30% positively charged lipids are present. Details of bilayer formation from small unilamellar vesicles were monitored using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation in both basic and acidic environment. The authors also confirmed that this positively charged bilayer system can sustain primary cortical neuron growth and lipid transfer. This method will provide simple means to construct biomimetic interface on gold electrodes. PMID:27052005

  15. Effects of Syngas Components on the Carbon Formation in Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    YU Jian-Guo, WANG Yu-Zhang, WENG Shi-Lie

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of syngas as the fuel of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the main ways to use the coal efficiently and cleanly. However, the possibility of carbon formation in Ni/YSZ anode may reduce the performance of SOFC. According to the fully three―dimensional models of chemical/electrochemical, heat/mass transfer and overpotential, the effects of fuel components on the performance and carbon formation of SOFC were obtained. The results shows that the increments o...

  16. Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Hanno; Barrett, Robert T; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Myksvoll, Mari S; Vikebø, Frode; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Reiertsen, Tone K; Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Systad, Geir Helge

    2016-01-01

    Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers. PMID:27173005

  17. Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Hanno; Barrett, Robert T.; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Myksvoll, Mari S.; Vikebø, Frode; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Reiertsen, Tone K.; Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Systad, Geir Helge

    2016-05-01

    Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers.

  18. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingham, C.J.; Jacob, Ben E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Grampositive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular

  19. Morphological and cell volume changes in the rat lens during the formation of radiation cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, both autoradiography and three-dimensional serial reconstruction were used to monitor fiber cell differentiation and changes in lens cell volume and morphology throughout radiation cataract formation. Lenses of 4-week-old rats developed subtle (0.5+ to 1.5+) cataractous changes at 15 weeks after X-irradiation with 400 rad. At this time, these lenses were not significantly altered in lens cell volume and did not show prominent changes in lens cell morphology. A different situation was obtained for rat lenses exposed to 1200 rad. By 3 weeks after X-irradiation, these rat lenses showed significant changes in both cortical fiber morphology and cell volume. These alterations happened prior to when cataractous changes were previously found to occur in these animals (Merriam and Szechter, 1975). At 15 weeks, when moderate cataracts (2.0+ to 3.0+) formed in these lenses, cortical fiber morphology was disrupted, while fiber cell volume was similar to unirradiated controls. Eventually rat lenses irradiated with 1200 rad developed severe (4+) cataracts 32 weeks after exposure. The authors claim this is the first report of cortical fibers increasing transiently in volume prior to cataract formation. (author)

  20. The Diaphanous-Related Formins Promote Protrusion Formation and Cell-to-Cell Spread of Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Fattouh, Ramzi; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Czuczman, Mark A.; Copeland, John W.; Pelletier, Laurence; Quinlan, Margot E.; Aleixo M Muise; Higgins, Darren E.; Brumell, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen whose virulence depends on its ability to spread from cell to cell within an infected host. Although the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex is necessary and sufficient for Listeria actin tail assembly, previous studies suggest that other actin polymerization factors, such as formins, may participate in protrusion formation. Here, we show that Arp2/3 localized to only a minor portion of the protr...